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Sample records for 85th percentile speeds

  1. Quantile regression provides a fuller analysis of speed data.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Considerable interest already exists in terms of assessing percentiles of speed distributions, for example monitoring the 85th percentile speed is a common feature of the investigation of many road safety interventions. However, unlike the mean, where t-tests and ANOVA can be used to provide evidence of a statistically significant change, inference on these percentiles is much less common. This paper examines the potential role of quantile regression for modelling the 85th percentile, or any other quantile. Given that crash risk may increase disproportionately with increasing relative speed, it may be argued these quantiles are of more interest than the conditional mean. In common with the more usual linear regression, quantile regression admits a simple test as to whether the 85th percentile speed has changed following an intervention in an analogous way to using the t-test to determine if the mean speed has changed by considering the significance of parameters fitted to a design matrix. Having briefly outlined the technique and briefly examined an application with a widely published dataset concerning speed measurements taken around the introduction of signs in Cambridgeshire, this paper will demonstrate the potential for quantile regression modelling by examining recent data from Northamptonshire collected in conjunction with a "community speed watch" programme. Freely available software is used to fit these models and it is hoped that the potential benefits of using quantile regression methods when examining and analysing speed data are demonstrated. PMID:18329400

  2. Tutorial: Calculating Percentile Rank and Percentile Norms Using SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Ted A.

    2009-01-01

    Practitioners can benefit from using norms, but they often have to develop their own percentile rank and percentile norms. This article is a tutorial on how to quickly and easily calculate percentile rank and percentile norms using SPSS, and this information is presented for a data set. Some issues in calculating percentile rank and percentile…

  3. Managing speed at school and playground zones.

    PubMed

    Kattan, Lina; Tay, Richard; Acharjee, Shanti

    2011-09-01

    Since speeding is one of the major causes of frequent and severe traffic accidents around school and playground areas, many jurisdictions have reduced the speed limits in these areas to protect children who may be at risk. This paper investigated the speed compliance, mean speed and 85th percentile speed at selected school and playground zones in the City of Calgary in Alberta. Our results showed that the mean speed was lower and the rate of compliance was higher in the school zone compared to the playground zone, 2 lane roads relative to 4 lane roads, roads with fencing, traffic control devices and the presence of speed display device or children, and zones that were longer (> 200 m). Accordingly, this study provided recommendations to improve the effectiveness of school and playground zone speed limits. PMID:21658518

  4. Pay as You Speed, ISA with incentive for not speeding: results and interpretation of speed data.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, Harry; Agerholm, Niels; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Berthelsen, Kasper K; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    To simulate a market introduction of Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) and to study the effect of a Pay as You Speed (PAYS) concept, a field trial with 153 drivers was conducted during 2007-2009. The participants drove under PAYS conditions for a shorter or a longer period. The PAYS concept consisted of informative ISA linked with economic incentive for not speeding, measured through automatic count of penalty points whenever the speed limit was exceeded. The full incentive was set to 30% of a participant's insurance premium. The participants were exposed to different treatments, with and without incentive crossed with informative ISA present or absent. The results showed that ISA is an efficient tool for reducing speeding particularly on rural roads. The analysis of speed data demonstrated that the proportion of distance driven above the speed where the ISA equipment responded (PDA) was a sensitive measure for reflecting the effect of ISA, whereas mean free flow speed and the 85th percentile speed, were less sensitive to ISA effects. The PDA increased a little over time but still remained at a low level; however, when ISA was turned off, the participants' speeding relapsed to the baseline level. Both informative ISA and incentive ISA reduced the PDA, but there was no statistically significant interaction. Informative reduced it more than the incentive. PMID:22664664

  5. Effects on speed and safety of point-to-point speed enforcement systems: evaluation on the urban motorway A56 Tangenziale di Napoli.

    PubMed

    Montella, Alfonso; Imbriani, Lella Liana; Marzano, Vittorio; Mauriello, Filomena

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the effects on speed and safety of the point-to-point (P2P) speed enforcement system activated on the urban motorway A56 in Italy. The P2P speed enforcement is a relatively new approach to traffic law enforcement that involves the calculation of the average speed over a section. To evaluate the speed effects, we performed a before-after analysis of speed data investigating also effects on non-compliance to speed limits. To evaluate the safety effects, we carried out an empirical Bayes observational before-and-after study. The P2P system led to very positive effects on both speed and safety. As far as the effects on the section average travel speeds, the system yielded to a reduction in the mean speed, the 85th percentile speed, the standard deviation of speed, and the proportion of drivers exceeding the speed limits, exceeding the speed limits more than 10km/h, and exceeding the speed limits more than 20km/h. The best results were the decrease of the speed variability and the reduction of the excessive speeding behaviour. The decrease in the standard deviation of speed was 26% while the proportion of light and heavy vehicles exceeding the speed limits more than 20km/h was reduced respectively by 84 and 77%. As far as the safety effects, the P2P system yielded to a 32% reduction in the total crashes, with a lower 95% confidence limit of the estimate equal to 22%. The greatest crash reductions were in rainy weather (57%), on wet pavement (51%), on curves (49%), for single vehicle crashes (44%), and for injury crashes (37%). It is noteworthy that the system produced a statistically significant reduction of 21% in total crashes also in the part of the motorway where it was not activated, thus generating a significant spillover effect. The investigation of the effects of the P2P system on speed and safety over time allowed to develop crash modification functions where the relationship between crash modification factors and speed parameters

  6. A Comparison of Three Conditional Growth Percentile Methods: Student Growth Percentiles, Percentile Rank Residuals, and a Matching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Seo, Dong Gi

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three conditional growth percentile methods; student growth percentiles, percentile rank residuals, and a nonparametric matching method. These approaches seek to describe student growth in terms of the relative percentile ranking of a student in relationship to students that had the same…

  7. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Campos, Rossana; Lee Andruske, Cinthya; Hespanhol, Jefferson; Sulla Torres, Jose; Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of waist circumference (WC) is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a) compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b) propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old) were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders. PMID:26184250

  8. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Campos, Rossana; Andruske, Cinthya Lee; Hespanhol, Jefferson; Torres, Jose Sulla; Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of waist circumference (WC) is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a) compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b) propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old) were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders. PMID:26184250

  9. An Activity for Learning to Find Percentiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    This classroom activity is designed to help students practice calculating percentiles. The approach of the activity involves physical sorting and full classroom participation in each calculation. The design encourages a more engaged approach than simply having students make a calculation with numbers on a paper.

  10. Evaluating the safety impact of increased speed limits on rural highways in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Tarek; Sacchi, Emanuele

    2016-10-01

    Maximum speed limits are usually set to inform drivers of the highest speed that it is safe and appropriate for ideal traffic, road and weather conditions. Many previous studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between changed speed limits and safety. The results of these studies generally show that relaxing speed limits can negatively affect safety, especially with regard to fatal and injury crashes. Despite these results, several road jurisdictions in North America continue to raise the maximum speed limits. In 2013, the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure initiated a speed limits review. The review found that the 85th percentile speed on many highway segments was 10km/h higher than corresponding posted speed limits and 1300km of rural provincial highway segments were recommended for higher speed limits. Most of the highway segments had 10km/h speed limit increase with a small section having 20km/h speed limit increase. As speed limit changes can have a substantial impact on safety, the main objective of this study is to estimate the effect of the increased speed limits on crash occurrence. A before-after evaluation was undertaken with the full Bayesian technique. Overall, the evaluation showed that changed speed limits led to a statistically significant increase in fatal-plus-injury (severe) crashes of 11.1%. A crash modification function that includes changes in the treatment effect over time showed that the initial increase of the first post-implementation period may slightly decrease over time. PMID:27447060

  11. Empirical analysis of gross vehicle weight and free flow speed and consideration on its relation with differential speed limit.

    PubMed

    Saifizul, Ahmad Abdullah; Yamanaka, Hideo; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2011-05-01

    Most highly motorized countries in the world have implemented different speed limits for light weight and heavy weight vehicles. The heavy vehicle speed limit is usually chosen to be lower than that of passenger cars due to the difficulty for the drivers to safely maneuver the heavy vehicle at high speed and greater impact during a crash. However, in many cases, the speed limit for heavy vehicle is set by only considering the vehicle size or category, mostly due to simplicity in enforcement. In this study, traffic and vehicular data for all vehicle types were collected using a weigh-in-motion system installed at Federal Route 54 in Malaysia. The first finding from the data showed that the weight variation for each vehicle category is considerable. Therefore, the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) and category of heavy vehicle on free flow speed and their interaction were analyzed using statistical techniques. Empirical analysis results showed that statistically for each type of heavy vehicle, there was a significant relationship between free flow speed of a heavy vehicle and GVW. Specifically, the results suggest that the mean and variance of free flow speed decrease with an increase GVW by the amount unrelated to size and shape for all GVW range. Then, based on the 85th percentile principle, the study proposed a new concept for setting the speed limit for heavy vehicle by incorporating GVW where a different speed limit is imposed to the heavy vehicle, not only based on vehicle classification, but also according to its GVW. PMID:21376903

  12. Evaluation of the effects of school zone signs and markings on speed reduction: a driving simulator study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohua; Li, Jiahui; Ma, Jianming; Rong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Traffic control devices are one of the most significant factors affecting driving behavior. In China, there is a lack of installation guidelines or standards for traffic control devices in school zones. In addition, little research has been done to examine the effects of traffic control devices on driving behavior. Few guidelines have been established for implementing traffic control devices in school zones in China. This research conducted a driving simulator experiment to assess the effects of school zone signs and markings for two different types of schools. The efficiency of these traffic control devices was evaluated using four variables derived from the driving simulation, including average speed, relative speed difference, standard deviation of acceleration, and 85th percentile speed. Results showed that traffic control devices such as the Flashing Beacon and School Crossing Ahead Warning Assembly, the Reduce Speed and School Crossing Warning Assembly, and the School Crossing Ahead Pavement Markings were recommended for school zones adjacent to a major multilane roadway, which is characterized by a median strip, high traffic volume, high-speed traffic and the presence of pedestrian crossing signals. The School Crossing Ahead Pavement Markings were recommended for school zones on a minor two-lane roadway, which is characterized by low traffic volume, low speed, and no pedestrian crossing signals. PMID:27390630

  13. Alternative Statistical Frameworks for Student Growth Percentile Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, J. R.; Castellano, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    This article suggests two alternative statistical approaches for estimating student growth percentiles (SGP). The first is to estimate percentile ranks of current test scores conditional on past test scores directly, by modeling the conditional cumulative distribution functions, rather than indirectly through quantile regressions. This would…

  14. Percentile curves for skinfold thickness for Canadian children and youth

    PubMed Central

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Maguire, Bryan; Hamilton, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements are a reliable and feasible method for assessing body fat in children but their use and interpretation is hindered by the scarcity of reference values in representative populations of children. The objective of the present study was to develop age- and sex-specific percentile curves for five SFT measures (biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, medial calf) in a representative population of Canadian children and youth. Methods. We analyzed data from 3,938 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). Standardized procedures were used to measure SFT. Age- and sex-specific centiles for SFT were calculated using the GAMLSS method. Results. Percentile curves were materially different in absolute value and shape for boys and girls. Percentile girls in girls steadily increased with age whereas percentile curves in boys were characterized by a pubertal centered peak. Conclusions. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for five SFT measures in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. PMID:27547554

  15. Percentile curves for skinfold thickness for Canadian children and youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhle, Stefan; Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Maguire, Bryan; Hamilton, David C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements are a reliable and feasible method for assessing body fat in children but their use and interpretation is hindered by the scarcity of reference values in representative populations of children. The objective of the present study was to develop age- and sex-specific percentile curves for five SFT measures (biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, medial calf) in a representative population of Canadian children and youth. Methods. We analyzed data from 3,938 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). Standardized procedures were used to measure SFT. Age- and sex-specific centiles for SFT were calculated using the GAMLSS method. Results. Percentile curves were materially different in absolute value and shape for boys and girls. Percentile girls in girls steadily increased with age whereas percentile curves in boys were characterized by a pubertal centered peak. Conclusions. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for five SFT measures in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. PMID:27547554

  16. Percentile Curves for Anthropometric Measures for Canadian Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kuhle, Stefan; Maguire, Bryan; Ata, Nicole; Hamilton, David

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is commonly used to assess a child's weight status but it does not provide information about the distribution of body fat. Since the disease risks associated with obesity are related to the amount and distribution of body fat, measures that assess visceral or subcutaneous fat, such as waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), or skinfolds thickness may be more suitable. The objective of this study was to develop percentile curves for BMI, WC, WHtR, and sum of 5 skinfolds (SF5) in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. The analysis used data from 4115 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age that participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey Cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). BMI, WC, WHtR, and SF5 were measured using standardized procedures. Age- and sex-specific centiles were calculated using the LMS method and the percentiles that intersect the adult cutpoints for BMI, WC, and WHtR at age 18 years were determined. Percentile curves for all measures showed an upward shift compared to curves from the pre-obesity epidemic era. The adult cutoffs for overweight and obesity corresponded to the 72nd and 91st percentile, respectively, for both sexes. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for BMI, WC, WHtR, and SF5 in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. The percentile curves presented are meant to be descriptive rather than prescriptive as associations with cardiovascular disease markers or outcomes were not assessed. PMID:26176769

  17. Examining the Reliability of Student Growth Percentiles Using Multidimensional IRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    Student growth percentiles (SGPs, Betebenner, 2009) are used to locate a student's current score in a conditional distribution based on the student's past scores. Currently, following Betebenner (2009), quantile regression (QR) is most often used operationally to estimate the SGPs. Alternatively, multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) may…

  18. Urinary iodine percentile ranges in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie Porat; Soldin, Steven J.; Pezzullo, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The status of iodine nutrition of a population can be determined by measurement of urinary iodine concentrations since it is thought to indicate dietary iodine intake. Normally, these results are compared to population-based criteria, since there are no reference ranges for urinary iodine. Objective To determine the percentile ranges for urinary iodide (UI) concentrations in normal individuals in the United States. Materials and methods The third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) (1988–1994) database of the civilian, non-institutionalized, iodine-sufficient US population was used. The 2.5th to 97.5th percentile ranges for urinary iodine and for urinary iodine per gram creatinine ratio (UI/Cr) (μg/g) were calculated for females and males, 6–89 years of age, each stratified by age groups. Results and conclusions We calculated the percentile ranges for urinary iodine. After exclusions of subjects with goiter or thyroid disease, the study sample included 21,530 subjects; 10,439 males and 11,091 females. For women of childbearing age (14–44 years), urinary iodine concentration 2.5th to 97.5th percentiles are 1.8–65 μg/dl or 36–539 μg/g creatinine. For pregnant women, the ranges are 4.2–55 μg/dl or 33–535 μg/g creatinine. PMID:12559616

  19. Punching Wholes into Parts, or Beating the Percentile Averages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carwile, Nancy R.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a facetious, ingenious resolution to the percentile dilemma concerning above- and below-average test scores. If schools enrolled the same number of pigs as students and tested both groups, the pigs would fill up the bottom half and all children would rank in the top 50 percent. However, some wrinkles need to be ironed out! (MLH)

  20. Establishing percentiles for junior tennis players based on physical fitness testing results.

    PubMed

    Roetert, E P; Piorkowski, P A; Woods, R B; Brown, S W

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of this study was the establishment of a data base. A broad data base allows for data on certain parameters to be greatly expanded and will also enhance the use and interpretation of statistical methods. A longitudinal study of these variables may also assist in monitoring the players' progress over a period of time, and can provide a useful supplement to subjective coaching appraisals. The means and standard deviation for each test were calculated according to the USTA age and gender groups, that is, 12s, 14s, and 16s for each separate gender. Additionally, the mean and standard deviations for the ages, heights, and weights of each grouping were also calculated. Once the means and standard deviations were calculated, percentile tables were developed for each of the USTA groupings (by age and gender). The percentiles for each USTA test are presented in Appendix 1. A percentile is defined as the point on the distribution below which a given percentage of the scores is found. Percentiles can provide a norm-referenced interpretation of an individual score within a distribution that often consists of scores from a comparable group of individuals. Using the USTA protocol, players and coaches now have a set of normative data by which individual player's fitness scores may be compared with participants of the USTA Area Training Centers (See appendix 1). From the test results, coaches and players can determine which fitness areas need to be improved for athletes on an individual basis. Specific training programs can then be designed based on an athlete's fitness testing results. Proper interpretation of the USTA fitness testing data base results can lead to an easy way to determine the relative position of a given fitness score in the distribution, recognizing weaker areas for the purpose of injury prevention and performance enhancement. Each player can be given a profile detailing their percentile rank relative to other area training center

  1. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions. PMID:22444086

  2. Physical Fitness Percentiles of German Children Aged 9–12 Years: Findings from a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Golle, Kathleen; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Wick, Ditmar; Granacher, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background Generating percentile values is helpful for the identification of children with specific fitness characteristics (i.e., low or high fitness level) to set appropriate fitness goals (i.e., fitness/health promotion and/or long-term youth athlete development). Thus, the aim of this longitudinal study was to assess physical fitness development in healthy children aged 9–12 years and to compute sex- and age-specific percentile values. Methods Two-hundred and forty children (88 girls, 152 boys) participated in this study and were tested for their physical fitness. Physical fitness was assessed using the 50-m sprint test (i.e., speed), the 1-kg ball push test, the triple hop test (i.e., upper- and lower- extremity muscular power), the stand-and-reach test (i.e., flexibility), the star run test (i.e., agility), and the 9-min run test (i.e., endurance). Age- and sex-specific percentile values (i.e., P10 to P90) were generated using the Lambda, Mu, and Sigma method. Adjusted (for change in body weight, height, and baseline performance) age- and sex-differences as well as the interactions thereof were expressed by calculating effect sizes (Cohen’s d). Results Significant main effects of Age were detected for all physical fitness tests (d = 0.40–1.34), whereas significant main effects of Sex were found for upper-extremity muscular power (d = 0.55), flexibility (d = 0.81), agility (d = 0.44), and endurance (d = 0.32) only. Further, significant Sex by Age interactions were observed for upper-extremity muscular power (d = 0.36), flexibility (d = 0.61), and agility (d = 0.27) in favor of girls. Both, linear and curvilinear shaped curves were found for percentile values across the fitness tests. Accelerated (curvilinear) improvements were observed for upper-extremity muscular power (boys: 10–11 yrs; girls: 9–11 yrs), agility (boys: 9–10 yrs; girls: 9–11 yrs), and endurance (boys: 9–10 yrs; girls: 9–10 yrs). Tabulated percentiles for the 9-min run test

  3. Binorm-a fortran subroutine to calculate the percentiles of a standardized binormal distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCammon, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    BINORM is a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating the percentiles of a standardized binormal distribution. By using a linear transformation, the percentiles of a binormal distribution can be obtained. The percentiles of a binormal distribution are useful for plotting purposes, for establishing confidence intervals, and for sampling from a mixed population that consists of two normal distributions. ?? 1977.

  4. Development of a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Chest Model for the 5(th) Percentile Female.

    PubMed

    Kimpara, Hideyuki; Lee, Jong B; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Iwamoto, Masami; Watanabe, Isao; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of the human body have been developed to elucidate injury mechanisms due to automotive crashes. However, these models are mainly focused on 50(th) percentile male. As a first step towards a better understanding of injury biomechanics in the small female, a 3D FE model of a 5(th) percentile female human chest (FEM-5F) has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained from two sets of frontal impact, one set of lateral impact, two sets of oblique impact and a series of ballistic impacts. Two previous FE models, a small female Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS-AF05) occupant version 1.0Beta (Kimpara et al. 2002) and the Wayne State University Human Thoracic Model (WSUHTM, Wang 1995 and Shah et al. 2001) were integrated and modified for this model development. The model incorporated not only geometrical gender differences, such as location of the internal organs and structure of the bony skeleton, but also the biomechanical differences of the ribs due to gender. It includes a detailed description of the sternum, ribs, costal cartilage, thoracic spine, skin, superficial muscles, intercostal muscles, heart, lung, diaphragm, major blood vessels and simplified abdominal internal organs and has been validated against a series of six cadaveric experiments on the small female reported by Nahum et al. (1970), Kroell et al. (1974), Viano (1989), Talantikite et al. (1998) and Wilhelm (2003). Results predicted by the model were well-matched to these experimental data for a range of impact speeds and impactor masses. More research is needed in order to increase the accuracy of predicting rib fractures so that the mechanisms responsible for small female injury can be more clearly defined. PMID:17096277

  5. Colorado Growth Model--Brief Report: Student Growth Percentiles and FRL Status. Accountability & Data Analysis Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report examines the relationship between socioeconomic status, as defined by a free-and-reduced lunch proxy variable, and student growth percentiles by elementary, middle, and high school grade levels for math, reading, and writing. Comparisons were made between median growth percentiles for each educational level by free and reduced lunch…

  6. Development of a percentile based three-dimensional model of the buttocks in computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; He, Xueli; Li, Hongpeng

    2016-04-01

    There are diverse products related to human buttocks, which need to be designed, manufactured and evaluated with 3D buttock model. The 3D buttock model used in present research field is just simple approximate model similar to human buttocks. The 3D buttock percentile model is highly desired in the ergonomics design and evaluation for these products. So far, there is no research on the percentile sizing system of human 3D buttock model. So the purpose of this paper is to develop a new method for building three-dimensional buttock percentile model in computer system. After scanning the 3D shape of buttocks, the cloud data of 3D points is imported into the reverse engineering software (Geomagic) for the reconstructing of the buttock surface model. Five characteristic dimensions of the buttock are measured through mark-points after models being imported into engineering software CATIA. A series of space points are obtained by the intersecting of the cutting slices and 3D buttock surface model, and then are ordered based on the sequence number of the horizontal and vertical slices. The 1st, 5th, 50th, 95th, 99th percentile values of the five dimensions and the spatial coordinate values of the space points are obtained, and used to reconstruct percentile buttock models. This research proposes a establishing method of percentile sizing system of buttock 3D model based on the percentile values of the ischial tuberosities diameter, the distances from margin to ischial tuberosity and the space coordinates value of coordinate points, for establishing the Nth percentile 3D buttock model and every special buttock types model. The proposed method also serves as a useful guidance for the other 3D percentile models establishment for other part in human body with characteristic points.

  7. Development of a percentile based three-dimensional model of the buttocks in computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; He, Xueli; Li, Hongpeng

    2016-05-01

    There are diverse products related to human buttocks, which need to be designed, manufactured and evaluated with 3D buttock model. The 3D buttock model used in present research field is just simple approximate model similar to human buttocks. The 3D buttock percentile model is highly desired in the ergonomics design and evaluation for these products. So far, there is no research on the percentile sizing system of human 3D buttock model. So the purpose of this paper is to develop a new method for building three-dimensional buttock percentile model in computer system. After scanning the 3D shape of buttocks, the cloud data of 3D points is imported into the reverse engineering software (Geomagic) for the reconstructing of the buttock surface model. Five characteristic dimensions of the buttock are measured through mark-points after models being imported into engineering software CATIA. A series of space points are obtained by the intersecting of the cutting slices and 3D buttock surface model, and then are ordered based on the sequence number of the horizontal and vertical slices. The 1st, 5th, 50th, 95th, 99th percentile values of the five dimensions and the spatial coordinate values of the space points are obtained, and used to reconstruct percentile buttock models. This research proposes a establishing method of percentile sizing system of buttock 3D model based on the percentile values of the ischial tuberosities diameter, the distances from margin to ischial tuberosity and the space coordinates value of coordinate points, for establishing the Nth percentile 3D buttock model and every special buttock types model. The proposed method also serves as a useful guidance for the other 3D percentile models establishment for other part in human body with characteristic points.

  8. Hypothesis Testing of Population Percentiles via the Wald Test with Bootstrap Variance Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, William D.; Romer, Jacob E.

    2016-01-01

    Testing the equality of percentiles (quantiles) between populations is an effective method for robust, nonparametric comparison, especially when the distributions are asymmetric or irregularly shaped. Unlike global nonparametric tests for homogeneity such as the Kolmogorv-Smirnov test, testing the equality of a set of percentiles (i.e., a percentile profile) yields an estimate of the location and extent of the differences between the populations along the entire domain. The Wald test using bootstrap estimates of variance of the order statistics provides a unified method for hypothesis testing of functions of the population percentiles. Simulation studies are conducted to show performance of the method under various scenarios and to give suggestions on its use. Several examples are given to illustrate some useful applications to real data. PMID:27034909

  9. Shaping in the 21st century: Moving percentile schedules into applied settings

    PubMed Central

    Galbicka, Gregory

    1994-01-01

    The present paper provides a primer on percentile reinforcement schedules, which have been used for two decades to study response differentiation and shaping in the laboratory. Arranged in applied settings, percentile procedures could be used to specify response criteria, standardizing treatment across subjects, trainers, and times to provide a more consistent training environment while maintaining the sensitivity to the individual's repertoire that is the hallmark of shaping. Percentile schedules are also valuable tools in analyzing the variables of which responding is a function, both inside and outside the laboratory. Finally, by formalizing the rules of shaping, percentile schedules provide a useful heuristic of the processes involved in shaping behavior, even for those situations that may not easily permit their implementation. As such, they may help further sensitize trainers and researchers alike to variables of critical importance in behavior change. ImagesFigure 6 PMID:16795849

  10. Comparison of daily percentiles of streamflow and rainfall to investigate stream aquifer connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, Ross S.; Hostetler, Stephen; Slatter, Emily

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA frequency analysis approach was used to investigate the hydraulic connectivity between streams and aquifers, by comparing daily percentiles of streamflow and rainfall. Three Australian streams were examined - a dominantly gaining stream (Wilsons River, NSW), a dominantly gaining stream modified by significant water extraction (Ovens River, Victoria) and a dominantly losing stream (Mooki River, NSW). For the gaining stream examples, a lag is observed between the seasonal peak in the low-flow percentile curves and the seasonal peak in the daily rainfall percentile curve. Cross-correlation was used to calculate the time-shift that provides the best fit between the streamflow and rainfall percentile curves. There is a good correlation ( r2 > 0.8) between the reference rainfall percentile curve and the shifted streamflow percentile curves for gaining streams. The lags evident between the rainfall and streamflow percentile curves represent the processes of first replenishing catchment storages (such as soil moisture and groundwater) and subsequent release to the stream. This is largely a function of catchment hydrogeology as well as climate, notably the magnitude and regularity of rainfall events. Catchment size is not a controlling factor. Analysis of these lags provides insights into the dynamics of groundwater recharge, storage and release. Changes in the lag times over the flow percentiles can reflect changes in the dominant catchment storage contributing to streamflow. For the Wilsons River, the contribution from a groundwater system with longer flow paths increases at lower flow percentiles. This can be critical when protecting minimum streamflows, as near-stream groundwater flow may not be the only determining factor. The impact of water extraction can be recognised in this analysis. For the Ovens River, streamflow deficits relative to the rainfall percentile curve correspond to the summer period of high irrigation demand. Such a deficit was also observed

  11. Analysis of extreme top event frequency percentiles based on fast probability integration

    SciTech Connect

    Staple, B.; Haskin, F.E.

    1993-10-01

    In risk assessments, a primary objective is to determine the frequency with which a collection of initiating and basic events, E{sub e} leads to some undesired top event, T. Uncertainties in the occurrence rates, x{sub t}, assigned to the initiating and basic events cause uncertainty in the top event frequency, z{sub T}. The quantification of the uncertainty in z{sub T} is an essential part of risk assessment called uncertainty analysis. In the past, it has been difficult to evaluate the extreme percentiles of output variables like z{sub T}. Analytic methods such as the method of moments do not provide estimates of output percentiles and the Monte Carlo (MC) method can be used to estimate extreme output percentiles only by resorting to large sample sizes. A promising altemative to these methods is the fast probability integration (FPI) methods. These methods approximate the integrals of multi-variate functions, representing percentiles of interest, without recourse to multi-dimensional numerical integration. FPI methods give precise results and have been demonstrated to be more efficient than MC methods for estimating extreme output percentiles. FPI allows the analyst to choose extreme percentiles of interest and perform sensitivity analyses in those regions. Such analyses can provide valuable insights as to the events driving the top event frequency response in extreme probability regions. In this paper, FPI methods are adapted a) to precisely estimate extreme top event frequency percentiles and b) to allow the quantification of sensitivity measures at these extreme percentiles. In addition, the relative precision and efficiency of alternative methods for treating lognormally distributed inputs is investigated. The methodology is applied to the top event frequency expression for the dominant accident sequence from a risk assessment of Grand Gulf nuclear power plant.

  12. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Commemoration of the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 May 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), was held on 26 May 2010 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The session was devoted to the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii. The program announced on the web page of the RAS Physical Sciences Division (www.gpad.ac.ru) contained the following reports: (1) Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Current sheets and reconnection in the geomagnetic tail"; (2) Frank A G (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Dynamics of current sheets as the cause of flare events in magnetized plasmas"; (3) Kuznetsov V D (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space research on the Sun"; (4) Somov B V (Shternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Strong shock waves and extreme plasma states"; (5) Zybin K P (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Structure functions for developed turbulence"; (6) Ptuskin V S (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The origin of cosmic rays." Papers based on reports 1-4 and 6 are published in what follows. • Metastability of current sheets, L M Zelenyi, A V Artemyev, Kh V Malova, A A Petrukovich, R Nakamura Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 933-941 • Dynamics of current sheets underlying flare-type events in magnetized plasmas, A G Frank Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 941-947 • Space research of the Sun, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 947-954 • Magnetic reconnection in solar flares, B V Somov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 954-958 • The origin of cosmic rays, V S Ptuskin Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 958-961

  13. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13323.001 PMID:26880623

  14. Estimation of a monotone percentile residual life function under random censorship.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pereira, Alba M; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new estimator of a percentile residual life function with censored data under a monotonicity constraint. Specifically, it is assumed that the percentile residual life is a decreasing function. This assumption is useful when estimating the percentile residual life of units, which degenerate with age. We establish a law of the iterated logarithm for the proposed estimator, and its n-equivalence to the unrestricted estimator. The asymptotic normal distribution of the estimator and its strong approximation to a Gaussian process are also established. We investigate the finite sample performance of the monotone estimator in an extensive simulation study. Finally, data from a clinical trial in primary biliary cirrhosis of the liver are analyzed with the proposed methods. One of the conclusions of our work is that the restricted estimator may be much more efficient than the unrestricted one. PMID:23225621

  15. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. PMID:26880623

  16. Problems with Percentiles: Student Growth Scores in New York's Teacher Evaluation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Drew

    2016-01-01

    New York State has used the Growth Model for Educator Evaluation ratings since the 2011-2012 school year. Since that time, student growth percentiles have been used as the basis for teacher and principal ratings. While a great deal has been written about the use of student test scores to measures educator effectiveness, less attention has been…

  17. Percentile Norms for the AAHPER Cooperative Physical Education Tests. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Allan G.

    Percentile scores for Vancouver students in grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 on the AAHPER Cooperative Physical Education Tests are presented. Two of the six forms of the tests were used in these administrations. Every form consists of 60 multiple-choice questions to be completed in 40 minutes. A single score, based on the number of questions answered…

  18. Can Percentiles Replace Raw Scores in the Statistical Analysis of Test Data?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2005-01-01

    Educational and psychological testing textbooks typically warn of the inappropriateness of performing arithmetic operations and statistical analysis on percentiles instead of raw scores. This seems inconsistent with the well-established finding that transforming scores to ranks and using nonparametric methods often improves the validity and power…

  19. A Comparison of Growth Percentile and Value-Added Models of Teacher Performance. Working Paper #39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Stacy, Brian W.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    School districts and state departments of education frequently must choose between a variety of methods to estimating teacher quality. This paper examines under what circumstances the decision between estimators of teacher quality is important. We examine estimates derived from student growth percentile measures and estimates derived from commonly…

  20. Birthweight percentiles for twin birth neonates by gestational age in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cao, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Yiming; Yao, Cong; Xiong, Chao; Zhang, Yaqi; Wang, Youjie; Zhou, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    Localized birthweight references for gestational ages serve as an essential tool in accurate evaluation of atypical birth outcomes. Such references for twin births are currently not available in China. The aim of this study was to construct up-to-data sex specific birth weight references by gestational ages for twin births in China. We conducted a population-based analysis on the data of 22,507 eligible living twin infants with births dated between 8/01/2006 and 8/31/2015 from all 95 hospitals within the Wuhan area. Gestational ages in complete weeks were determined using a combination of last-menstrual-period based (LMP) estimation and ultrasound examination. Smoothed percentile curves were created by the Lambda Mu Sigma (LMS) method. Reference of the 3(rd), 10(th), 25(th), 50(th), 75(th), 90(th), 97(th) percentiles birth weight by sex and gestational age were made using 11,861 male and 10,646 female twin newborns with gestational age 26-42 weeks. Separate birthweight percentiles curves for male and female twins were constructed. In summary, our study firstly presents percentile curves of birthweight by gestational age for Chinese twin neonates. Further research is required for the validation and implementation of twin birthweight curves into clinical practice. PMID:27506479

  1. Age-specific percentile-based reference curve of serum procalcitonin concentrations in Japanese preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Noriko; Osawa, Kayo; Sato, Itsuko; Iwatani, Sota; Ishino, Ruri; Hayashi, Nobuhide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saegusa, Jun; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) levels are elevated early after birth in newborn infants; however, the physiological features and reference of serum PCT concentrations have not been fully studied in preterm infants. The aims of the current study were to establish an age-specific percentile-based reference curve of serum PCT concentrations in preterm infants and determine the features. The PCT concentration peaked in infants at 1 day old and decreased thereafter. At 1 day old, serum PCT concentrations in preterm infants <34 weeks' gestational age were higher than those in late preterm infants between 34 and 36 weeks' gestational age or term infants ≥37 weeks' gestational age. Although the 50-percentile value in late preterm and term infants reached the adult normal level (0.1 ng/mL) at 5 days old, it did not in preterm infants. It took 9 weeks for preterm infants to reach it. Serum PCT concentrations at onset in late-onset infected preterm infants were over the 95-percentile value. We showed that the physiological feature in preterm infants was significantly different from that in late preterm infants, even in those <37 weeks' gestational age. To detect late-onset bacterial infection and sepsis, an age-specific percentile-based reference curve may be useful in preterm infants. PMID:27033746

  2. Age-specific percentile-based reference curve of serum procalcitonin concentrations in Japanese preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzumi, Noriko; Osawa, Kayo; Sato, Itsuko; Iwatani, Sota; Ishino, Ruri; Hayashi, Nobuhide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saegusa, Jun; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) levels are elevated early after birth in newborn infants; however, the physiological features and reference of serum PCT concentrations have not been fully studied in preterm infants. The aims of the current study were to establish an age-specific percentile-based reference curve of serum PCT concentrations in preterm infants and determine the features. The PCT concentration peaked in infants at 1 day old and decreased thereafter. At 1 day old, serum PCT concentrations in preterm infants <34 weeks’ gestational age were higher than those in late preterm infants between 34 and 36 weeks’ gestational age or term infants ≥37 weeks’ gestational age. Although the 50-percentile value in late preterm and term infants reached the adult normal level (0.1 ng/mL) at 5 days old, it did not in preterm infants. It took 9 weeks for preterm infants to reach it. Serum PCT concentrations at onset in late-onset infected preterm infants were over the 95-percentile value. We showed that the physiological feature in preterm infants was significantly different from that in late preterm infants, even in those <37 weeks’ gestational age. To detect late-onset bacterial infection and sepsis, an age-specific percentile-based reference curve may be useful in preterm infants. PMID:27033746

  3. AGE AND GENDER SPECIFIC BMI PERCENTILES ARE LIMITED FOR TRACKING THE CHILDHOOD OBESITY EPIDEMIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To evaluate pediatric nutrition and physical activity interventions a reliable and feasible way of tracking change in body status is needed. Historically, body mass index (BMI) has been used in adults. BMI percentiles or Z scores, which are theoretically age and gender adjusted, have been...

  4. Student Growth Percentiles Based on MIRT: Implications of Calibrated Projection. CRESST Report 842

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li; Choi, Kilchan

    2014-01-01

    This research concerns a new proposal for calculating student growth percentiles (SGP, Betebenner, 2009). In Betebenner (2009), quantile regression (QR) is used to estimate the SGPs. However, measurement error in the score estimates, which always exists in practice, leads to bias in the QR-­based estimates (Shang, 2012). One way to address this…

  5. Risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic Youth with BMI > or = 95th percentile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize children at risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to explore possible mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD in Hispanic youth with a body mass index > or =95th percentile. Hispanic nonoverweight (n = 475) and overweight (n = 517) children, ages 4 to 19 y, wer...

  6. User Guide for the 2014-15 Teacher Median Student Growth Percentile Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    On March 22, 2016, the New Jersey Department of Education ("the Department") published a broadcast memo sharing secure district access to 2014-15 median Student Growth Percentile (mSGP) data for all qualifying teachers. These data describe student growth from the last school year, and comprise 10% of qualifying teachers' 2014-15…

  7. Birthweight percentiles for twin birth neonates by gestational age in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Cao, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Yiming; Yao, Cong; Xiong, Chao; Zhang, Yaqi; Wang, Youjie; Zhou, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    Localized birthweight references for gestational ages serve as an essential tool in accurate evaluation of atypical birth outcomes. Such references for twin births are currently not available in China. The aim of this study was to construct up-to-data sex specific birth weight references by gestational ages for twin births in China. We conducted a population-based analysis on the data of 22,507 eligible living twin infants with births dated between 8/01/2006 and 8/31/2015 from all 95 hospitals within the Wuhan area. Gestational ages in complete weeks were determined using a combination of last-menstrual-period based (LMP) estimation and ultrasound examination. Smoothed percentile curves were created by the Lambda Mu Sigma (LMS) method. Reference of the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, 97th percentiles birth weight by sex and gestational age were made using 11,861 male and 10,646 female twin newborns with gestational age 26–42 weeks. Separate birthweight percentiles curves for male and female twins were constructed. In summary, our study firstly presents percentile curves of birthweight by gestational age for Chinese twin neonates. Further research is required for the validation and implementation of twin birthweight curves into clinical practice. PMID:27506479

  8. Using Percentile Schedules to Increase Eye Contact in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Scott S.; Maynes, Natalee P.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Aversion to eye contact is a common behavior of individuals diagnosed with Fragile X syndrome (FXS); however, no studies to date have attempted to increase eye-contact duration in these individuals. In this study, we employed a percentile reinforcement schedule with and without overcorrection to shape eye-contact duration of 6 boys with FXS.…

  9. Statewide Analysis of the Drainage-Area Ratio Method for 34 Streamflow Percentile Ranges in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The drainage-area ratio method commonly is used to estimate streamflow for sites where no streamflow data are available using data from one or more nearby streamflow-gaging stations. The method is intuitive and straightforward to implement and is in widespread use by analysts and managers of surface-water resources. The method equates the ratio of streamflow at two stream locations to the ratio of the respective drainage areas. In practice, unity often is assumed as the exponent on the drainage-area ratio, and unity also is assumed as a multiplicative bias correction. These two assumptions are evaluated in this investigation through statewide analysis of daily mean streamflow in Texas. The investigation was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. More than 7.8 million values of daily mean streamflow for 712 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Texas were analyzed. To account for the influence of streamflow probability on the drainage-area ratio method, 34 percentile ranges were considered. The 34 ranges are the 4 quartiles (0-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 percent), the 5 intervals of the lower tail of the streamflow distribution (0-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, and 4-5 percent), the 20 quintiles of the 4 quartiles (0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-25, 25-30, 30-35, 35-40, 40-45, 45-50, 50-55, 55-60, 60-65, 65-70, 70-75, 75-80, 80-85, 85-90, 90-95, and 95-100 percent), and the 5 intervals of the upper tail of the streamflow distribution (95-96, 96-97, 97-98, 98-99 and 99-100 percent). For each of the 253,116 (712X711/2) unique pairings of stations and for each of the 34 percentile ranges, the concurrent daily mean streamflow values available for the two stations provided for station-pair application of the drainage-area ratio method. For each station pair, specific statistical summarization (median, mean, and standard deviation) of both the exponent and bias-correction components of the drainage-area ratio

  10. Relationships between walking and percentiles of adiposity inolder and younger men

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.

    2005-06-01

    To assess the relationship of weekly walking distance to percentiles of adiposity in elders (age {ge} 75 years), seniors (55 {le} age <75 years), middle-age men (35 {le} age <55 years), and younger men (18 {le} age <35 years old). Cross-sectional analyses of baseline questionnaires from 7,082 male participants of the National Walkers Health Study. The walkers BMIs were inversely and significantly associated with walking distance (kg/m{sup 2} per km/wk) in elders (slope {+-} SE: -0.032 {+-} 0.008), seniors (-0.045 {+-} 0.005), and middle-aged men (-0.037 {+-} 0.007), as were their waist circumferences (-0.091 {+-} 0.025, -0.045 {+-} 0.005, and -0.091 {+-} 0.015 cm per km/wk, respectively), and these slopes remained significant when adjusted statistically for reported weekly servings of meat, fish, fruit, and alcohol. The declines in BMI associated with walking distance were greater at the higher than lower percentiles of the BMI distribution. Specifically, compared to the decline at the 10th BMI percentile, the decline in BMI at the 90th percentile was 5.1-fold greater in elders, 5.9-fold greater in seniors, and 6.7-fold greater in middle-age men. The declines in waist circumference associated with walking distance were also greater among men with broader waistlines. Exercise-induced weight loss (or self-selection) causes an inverse relationship between adiposity and walking distance in men 35 and older that is substantially greater among fatter men.

  11. Trend estimates of AERONET-observed and model-simulated AOT percentiles between 1993 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea; Chang, Dong Yeong; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Recent Aerosol Optical thickness (AOT) trend studies used monthly or annual arithmetic means that discard details of the generally right-skewed AOT distributions. Potentially, such results can be biased by extreme values (including outliers). This study additionally uses percentiles (i.e., the lowest 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95% of the monthly cumulative distributions fitted to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-observed and ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC)-model simulated AOTs) that are less affected by outliers caused by measurement error, cloud contamination and occasional extreme aerosol events. Since the limited statistical representativeness of monthly percentiles and means can lead to bias, this study adopts the number of observations as a weighting factor, which improves the statistical robustness of trend estimates. By analyzing the aerosol composition of AERONET-observed and EMAC-simulated AOTs in selected regions of interest, we distinguish the dominant aerosol types and investigate the causes of regional AOT trends. The simulated and observed trends are generally consistent with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.89) and small bias (slope±2σ = 0.75 ± 0.19). A significant decrease in EMAC-decomposed AOTs by water-soluble compounds and black carbon is found over the USA and the EU due to environmental regulation. In particular, a clear reversal in the AERONET AOT trend percentiles is found over the USA, probably related to the AOT diurnal cycle and the frequency of wildfires.

  12. Estimated monthly percentile discharges at ungaged sites in the Upper Yellowstone River Basin in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Hull, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Once-monthly streamflow measurements were used to estimate selected percentile discharges on flow-duration curves of monthly mean discharge for 40 ungaged stream sites in the upper Yellowstone River basin in Montana. The estimation technique was a modification of the concurrent-discharge method previously described and used by H.C. Riggs to estimate annual mean discharge. The modified technique is based on the relationship of various mean seasonal discharges to the required discharges on the flow-duration curves. The mean seasonal discharges are estimated from the monthly streamflow measurements, and the percentile discharges are calculated from regression equations. The regression equations, developed from streamflow record at nine gaging stations, indicated a significant log-linear relationship between mean seasonal discharge and various percentile discharges. The technique was tested at two discontinued streamflow-gaging stations; the differences between estimated monthly discharges and those determined from the discharge record ranged from -31 to +27 percent at one site and from -14 to +85 percent at the other. The estimates at one site were unbiased, and the estimates at the other site were consistently larger than the recorded values. Based on the test results, the probable average error of the technique was + or - 30 percent for the 21 sites measured during the first year of the program and + or - 50 percent for the 19 sites measured during the second year. (USGS)

  13. Percentile Distributions of Birth Weight according to Gestational Ages in Korea (2010-2012)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Pediatric Growth Chart (2007) is used as a standard reference to evaluate weight and height percentiles of Korean children and adolescents. Although several previous studies provided a useful reference range of newborn birth weight (BW) by gestational age (GA), the BW reference analyzed by sex and plurality is not currently available. Therefore, we aimed to establish a national reference range of neonatal BW percentiles considering GA, sex, and plurality of newborns in Korea. The raw data of all newborns (470,171 in 2010, 471,265 in 2011, and 484,550 in 2012) were analyzed. Using the Korean Statistical Information Service data (2010–2012), smoothed percentile curves (3rd–97th) by GA were created using the lambda-mu-sigma method after exclusion and the data were distinguished by all live births, singleton births, and multiple births. In the entire cohort, male newborns were heavier than female newborns and singletons were heavier than twins. As GA increased, the difference in BW between singleton and multiples increased. Compared to the previous data published 10 years ago in Korea, the BW of newborns 22–23 gestational weeks old was increased, whereas that of others was smaller. Other countries' data were also compared and showed differences in BW of both singleton and multiple newborns. We expect this updated data to be utilized as a reference to improve clinical assessments of newborn growth. PMID:27247504

  14. Percentile Distributions of Birth Weight according to Gestational Ages in Korea (2010-2012).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Kyoung; Jang, Hye Lim; Kang, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyung-Suk; Choi, Yong-Sung; Shim, Kye Shik; Lim, Jae Woo; Bae, Chong-Woo; Chung, Sung-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    The Pediatric Growth Chart (2007) is used as a standard reference to evaluate weight and height percentiles of Korean children and adolescents. Although several previous studies provided a useful reference range of newborn birth weight (BW) by gestational age (GA), the BW reference analyzed by sex and plurality is not currently available. Therefore, we aimed to establish a national reference range of neonatal BW percentiles considering GA, sex, and plurality of newborns in Korea. The raw data of all newborns (470,171 in 2010, 471,265 in 2011, and 484,550 in 2012) were analyzed. Using the Korean Statistical Information Service data (2010-2012), smoothed percentile curves (3(rd)-97(th)) by GA were created using the lambda-mu-sigma method after exclusion and the data were distinguished by all live births, singleton births, and multiple births. In the entire cohort, male newborns were heavier than female newborns and singletons were heavier than twins. As GA increased, the difference in BW between singleton and multiples increased. Compared to the previous data published 10 years ago in Korea, the BW of newborns 22-23 gestational weeks old was increased, whereas that of others was smaller. Other countries' data were also compared and showed differences in BW of both singleton and multiple newborns. We expect this updated data to be utilized as a reference to improve clinical assessments of newborn growth. PMID:27247504

  15. A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS SCORING ABOVE THE EIGHTIETH PERCENTILE OR BELOW THE TWENTIETH PERCENTILE ON EITHER THE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ABILITY TEST OR THE WATSON-GLASER TEST OF CRITICAL THINKING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CURRY, JOHN

    IN ORDER TO ESTABLISH THE FEASIBILITY OF A CUT-OFF SCORE FOR ENTRANCE INTO TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT NORTH TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY, SCORES OF 1,346 STUDENTS WHO EITHER PLACED ABOVE THE 80TH PERCENTILE (N-672) OR BELOW THE 20TH PERCENTILE (N-674) ON EITHER THE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ABILITY TEST OR THE WATSON-GLASER TEST OF CRITICAL THINKING WERE…

  16. Percentile-based Empirical Distribution Function Estimates for Performance Evaluation of Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Susan M.; Louis, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Hierarchical models are widely-used to characterize the performance of individual healthcare providers. However, little attention has been devoted to system-wide performance evaluations, the goals of which include identifying extreme (e.g., top 10%) provider performance and developing statistical benchmarks to define high-quality care. Obtaining optimal estimates of these quantities requires estimating the empirical distribution function (EDF) of provider-specific parameters that generate the dataset under consideration. However, the difficulty of obtaining uncertainty bounds for a square-error loss minimizing EDF estimate has hindered its use in system-wide performance evaluations. We therefore develop and study a percentile-based EDF estimate for univariate provider-specific parameters. We compute order statistics of samples drawn from the posterior distribution of provider-specific parameters to obtain relevant uncertainty assessments of an EDF estimate and its features, such as thresholds and percentiles. We apply our method to data from the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program, a health insurance program for people with irreversible kidney failure. We highlight the risk of misclassifying providers as exceptionally good or poor performers when uncertainty in statistical benchmark estimates is ignored. Given the high stakes of performance evaluations, statistical benchmarks should be accompanied by precision estimates. PMID:21918583

  17. Ensemble hydrological prediction of streamflow percentile at ungauged basins in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Ajmal, Muhammad; Kim, Tae-Woong

    2015-06-01

    Streamflow records with sufficient spatial and temporal coverage at the site of interest are usually scarce in Pakistan. As an alternative, various regional methods have been frequently adopted to derive hydrological information, which in essence attempt to transfer hydrological information from gauged to ungauged catchments. In this study, a new concept of ensemble hydrological prediction (EHP) was introduced which is an improved regional method for hydrological prediction at ungauged sites. It was mainly based on the performance weights (triple-connection weights (TCW)) derived from Nash Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) and hydrological variable (here percentiles) calculated from three traditional regional transfer methods (RTMs) with suitable modification (i.e., three-step drainage area ratio (DAR) method, inverse distance weighting (IDW) method, and three-step regional regression analysis (RRA)). The overall results indicated that the proposed EHP method was robust for estimating hydrological percentiles at ungauged sites as compared to traditional individual RTMs. The comparative study based on NSE, percent bias (PBIAS) and the relative error (RE) as performance criteria resulted that the EHP is a constructive alternative for hydrological prediction of ungauged basins.

  18. State disparities in time trends of adolescent body mass index percentile and weight-related behaviors in the United States.

    PubMed

    Taber, Daniel R; Stevens, June; Poole, Charles; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Evenson, Kelly R; Ward, Dianne S

    2012-02-01

    Evidence is conflicting as to whether youth obesity prevalence has reached a plateau in the United States overall. Trends vary by state, and experts recommend exploring whether trends in weight-related behaviors are associated with changes in weight status trends. Thus, our objective was to estimate between-state variation in time trends of adolescent body mass index (BMI) percentile and weight-related behaviors from 2001 to 2007. A time series design combined cross-sectional Youth Risk Behavior Survey data from 272,044 adolescents in 29 states from 2001 to 2007. Self-reported height, weight, sports participation, physical education, television viewing, and daily consumption of 100% fruit juice, milk, and fruits and vegetables were collected. Linear mixed models estimated state variance in time trends of behaviors and BMI percentile. Across states, BMI percentile trends were consistent despite differences in behavioral trends. Boys experienced a modest linear increase in BMI percentile (ß = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.30); girls experienced a non-linear increase, as the rate of increase declined over time from 1.02 units in 2001-2002 (95% CI: 0.68, 1.36) to 0.23 units in 2006-2007 (95% CI: -0.09, 0.56). States in which BMI percentile decreased experienced a greater decrease in TV viewing than states where BMI percentile increased. Otherwise, states with disparate BMI percentile trends did not differ with respect to behaviors. Future research should explore the role of other behaviors (e.g., soda consumption), measurement units (e.g., portion size), and societal trends (e.g., urban sprawl) on state and national adiposity trends. PMID:21773818

  19. Percentile Ranking and Citation Impact of a Large Cohort of NHLBI-funded Cardiovascular R01 Grants

    PubMed Central

    Danthi, Narasimhan; Wu, Colin O.; Shi, Peibei; Lauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Funding decisions for cardiovascular R01 grant applications at NHLBI largely hinge on percentile rankings. It is not known whether this approach enables the highest impact science. Objective To conduct an observational analysis of percentile rankings and bibliometric outcomes for a contemporary set of funded NHLBI cardiovascular R01 grants. Methods and results We identified 1492 investigator-initiated de novo R01 grant applications that were funded between 2001 and 2008, and followed their progress for linked publications and citations to those publications. Our co-primary endpoints were citations received per million dollars of funding, citations obtained within 2-years of publication, and 2-year citations for each grant’s maximally cited paper. In 7654 grant-years of funding that generated $3004 million of total NIH awards, the portfolio yielded 16,793 publications that appeared between 2001 and 2012 (median per grant 8, 25th and 75th percentiles 4 and 14, range 0 – 123), which received 2,224,255 citations (median per grant 1048, 25th and 75th percentiles 492 and 1,932, range 0 – 16,295). We found no association between percentile ranking and citation metrics; the absence of association persisted even after accounting for calendar time, grant duration, number of grants acknowledged per paper, number of authors per paper, early investigator status, human versus non-human focus, and institutional funding. An exploratory machine-learning analysis suggested that grants with the very best percentile rankings did yield more maximally cited papers. Conclusions In a large cohort of NHLBI-funded cardiovascular R01 grants, we were unable to find a monotonic association between better percentile ranking and higher scientific impact as assessed by citation metrics. PMID:24406983

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  1. Analysis of the Stability of Teacher-Level Growth Scores from the Student Growth Percentile Model. REL 2016-104

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lash, Andrea; Makkonen, Reino; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    This study, undertaken at the request of the Nevada Department of Education, examined the stability over years of teacher-level growth scores from the Student Growth Percentile (SGP) model, which many states and districts have selected as a measure of effectiveness in their teacher evaluation systems. The authors conducted a generalizability study…

  2. Standard Errors of Equating for the Percentile Rank-Based Equipercentile Equating with Log-Linear Presmoothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tianyou

    2009-01-01

    Holland and colleagues derived a formula for analytical standard error of equating using the delta-method for the kernel equating method. Extending their derivation, this article derives an analytical standard error of equating procedure for the conventional percentile rank-based equipercentile equating with log-linear smoothing. This procedure is…

  3. Validation of the 5th and 95th Percentile Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Somers, J. T.; Baldwin, M. A.; Wells, J. A.; Newby, N.; Currie, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA spacecraft design requirements for occupant protection are a combination of the Brinkley criteria and injury metrics extracted from anthropomorphic test devices (ATD's). For the ATD injury metrics, the requirements specify the use of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the 95th percentile male Hybrid III. Furthermore, each of these ATD's is required to be fitted with an articulating pelvis and a straight spine. The articulating pelvis is necessary for the ATD to fit into spacecraft seats, while the straight spine is required as injury metrics for vertical accelerations are better defined for this configuration. The requirements require that physical testing be performed with both ATD's to demonstrate compliance. Before compliance testing can be conducted, extensive modeling and simulation are required to determine appropriate test conditions, simulate conditions not feasible for testing, and assess design features to better ensure compliance testing is successful. While finite element (FE) models are currently available for many of the physical ATD's, currently there are no complete models for either the 5th percentile female or the 95th percentile male Hybrid III with a straight spine and articulating pelvis. The purpose of this work is to assess the accuracy of the existing Livermore Software Technology Corporation's FE models of the 5th and 95th percentile ATD's. To perform this assessment, a series of tests will be performed at Wright Patterson Air Force Research Lab using their horizontal impact accelerator sled test facility. The ATD's will be placed in the Orion seat with a modified-advanced-crew-escape-system (MACES) pressure suit and helmet, and driven with loadings similar to what is expected for the actual Orion vehicle during landing, launch abort, and chute deployment. Test data will be compared to analytical predictions and modelling uncertainty factors will be determined for each injury metric. Additionally, the test data will be used to

  4. The Association of Weight Percentile and Motor Vehicle Crash Injury Among 3 to 8 Year Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Nelson, Kyle A.; Durbin, Dennis R.; Kallan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of age-appropriate child restraint systems significantly reduces injury and death associated with motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). Pediatric obesity has become a global epidemic. Although recent evidence suggests a possible association between pediatric obesity and MVC-related injury, there are potential misclassifications of body mass index from under-estimated height in younger children. Given this limitation, age- and sex-specific weight percentiles can be used as a proxy of weight status. The specific aim of this study was to determine the association between weight percentile and the risk of significant injury for children 3–8 years in MVCs. This was a cross-sectional study of children aged 3–8 years in MVCs in 16 US states, with data collected via insurance claims records and a telephone survey from 12/1/98–11/30/07. Parent-reported injuries with an abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of 2+ indicated a clinically significant injury. Age- and sex-specific weight percentiles were calculated using pediatric norms. The study sample included 9,327 children aged 3–8 years (weighted to represent 157,878 children), of which 0.96% sustained clinically significant injuries. There was no association between weight percentiles and overall injury when adjusting for restraint type (p=0.71). However, increasing weight percentiles were associated with lower extremity injuries at a level that approached significance (p=0.053). Further research is necessary to describe mechanisms for weight-related differences in injury risk. Parents should continue to properly restrain their children in accordance with published guidelines. PMID:21050602

  5. Percentile Values for Running Sprint Field Tests in Children Ages 6-17 Years: Influence of Weight Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Pinero, Jose; Gonzalez-Montesinos, Jose Luis; Keating, Xiaofen D.; Mora, Jesus; Sjostrom, Michael; Ruiz, Jonatan R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide percentile values for six different sprint tests in 2,708 Spanish children (1,234 girls) ages 6-17.9 years. We also examined the influence of weight status on sprint performance across age groups, with a focus on underweight and obese groups. We used the 20-m, 30-m, and 50-m running sprint standing start and…

  6. Application of Radial Basis Function Methods in the Development of a 95th Percentile Male Seated FEA Model.

    PubMed

    Vavalle, Nicholas A; Schoell, Samantha L; Weaver, Ashley A; Stitzel, Joel D; Gayzik, F Scott

    2014-11-01

    Human body finite element models (FEMs) are a valuable tool in the study of injury biomechanics. However, the traditional model development process can be time-consuming. Scaling and morphing an existing FEM is an attractive alternative for generating morphologically distinct models for further study. The objective of this work is to use a radial basis function to morph the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) average male model (M50) to the body habitus of a 95th percentile male (M95) and to perform validation tests on the resulting model. The GHBMC M50 model (v. 4.3) was created using anthropometric and imaging data from a living subject representing a 50th percentile male. A similar dataset was collected from a 95th percentile male (22,067 total images) and was used in the morphing process. Homologous landmarks on the reference (M50) and target (M95) geometries, with the existing FE node locations (M50 model), were inputs to the morphing algorithm. The radial basis function was applied to morph the FE model. The model represented a mass of 103.3 kg and contained 2.2 million elements with 1.3 million nodes. Simulations of the M95 in seven loading scenarios were presented ranging from a chest pendulum impact to a lateral sled test. The morphed model matched anthropometric data to within a rootmean square difference of 4.4% while maintaining element quality commensurate to the M50 model and matching other anatomical ranges and targets. The simulation validation data matched experimental data well in most cases. PMID:26192960

  7. Seasonal to decadal forcing of high water level percentiles in the German Bight throughout the last century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Mudersbach, Christoph; Jensen, Jürgen; Anette, Ganske; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2013-05-01

    For the purpose of coastal planning and management, especially under changing climatic conditions, enhanced knowledge about the evolution of extreme sea levels in the past, present, and future is required. This paper presents statistical analyses of high seasonal water level percentiles of 13 tide gauges in the German Bight, spanning over a period of up to 109 years throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Seasonal and annual high percentile time series of water levels were investigated in comparison to the mean sea level (MSL) for changes on seasonal, inter-annual, and decadal timescales. While throughout the first half of the twentieth century extreme water levels generally followed changes in MSL, during the second half of the century, linear extreme sea level trends exceeded those in MSL in the order of 9-64 cm per century. The largest, although insignificant, contribution to the magnitude of these trends occurs in the winter season (January to March), while smaller but, due to the generally lower atmospheric variability, significant changes are observed during spring (April to June). The observed multi-decadal trends are generally in good agreement with multi-decadal trends in the corresponding percentiles of local zonal surface winds. Only small parts of the trends remain unexplained. It is suggested that these remaining trends result from modifications in the local tidal regime. For the aspects of coastal planning, the findings clarify that in the German Bight, in addition to changes in MSL, potential changes in storminess and in the tidal regime significantly contribute to the development of extreme water levels. Since these factors have influenced the characteristic of extremes throughout the recent past, they also have to be taken into account when estimating design water levels for, e.g., dikes (in a warming climate) under changing greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Birth Weight Ratio as an Alternative to Birth Weight Percentile to Express Infant Weight in Research and Clinical Practice: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemier, Brenda M.; Schuit, Ewoud; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Pajkrt, Eva; Ganzevoort, Wessel

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare birth weight ratio and birth weight percentile to express infant weight when assessing pregnancy outcome. Study Design. We performed a national cohort study. Birth weight ratio was calculated as the observed birth weight divided by the median birth weight for gestational age. The discriminative ability of birth weight ratio and birth weight percentile to identify infants at risk of perinatal death (fetal death and neonatal death) or adverse pregnancy outcome (perinatal death + severe neonatal morbidity) was compared using the area under the curve. Outcomes were expressed stratified by gestational age at delivery separate for birth weight ratio and birth weight percentile. Results. We studied 1,299,244 pregnant women, with an overall perinatal death rate of 0.62%. Birth weight ratio and birth weight percentile have equivalent overall discriminative performance for perinatal death and adverse perinatal outcome. In late preterm infants (33+0–36+6 weeks), birth weight ratio has better discriminative ability than birth weight percentile for perinatal death (0.68 versus 0.63, P  0.01) or adverse pregnancy outcome (0.67 versus 0.60, P < 0.001). Conclusion. Birth weight ratio is a potentially valuable instrument to identify infants at risk of perinatal death and adverse pregnancy outcome and provides several advantages for use in research and clinical practice. Moreover, it allows comparison of groups with different average birth weights. PMID:25197283

  9. Speed Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, John L.; Billions, James C.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the velocity of a vehicle traveling between first and second measured points. The apparatus includes a cylindrical housing having an open top for receiving a transparent disk. Indicia representing speed calibrations is circumferentially spaced adjacent an outer perimeter of the disk. A stopwatch is carried in the housing below said disk and has a rotatable hand which rotates at a predetermined rate under the indicia. A lamp is carried below the stopwatch for illuminating the indicia carried on the transparent disk. The stopwatch is started when the vehicle passes a first reference point and stopped when the vehicle passes the second reference point. Thus, when the hand is stopped, such points to the calibrated indicia on said disk indicating the velocity of a vehicle.

  10. A storm severity index based on return levels of wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nico; Nissen, Katrin M.; Ulbrich, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    European windstorms related to extra-tropical cyclones cause considerable damages to infrastructure during the winter season. Leckebusch et al. (2008) introduced a storm severity index (SSI) based on the exceedances of the local 98th percentile of wind speeds. The SSI is based on the assumption that (insured) damage usually occurs within the upper 2%-quantile of the local wind speed distribution (i.e. if the 98th percentile is exceeded). However, critical infrastructure, for example related to the power network or the transportation system, is usually designed to withstand wind speeds reaching the local 50-year return level, which is much higher than the 98th percentile. The aim of this work is to use the 50-year return level to develop a modified SSI, which takes into account only extreme wind speeds relevant to critical infrastructure. As a first step we use the block maxima approach to estimate the spatial distribution of return levels by fitting the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution to the wind speeds retrieved from different reanalysis products. We show that the spatial distributions of the 50-year return levels derived from different reanalyses agree well within large parts of Europe. The differences between the reanalyses are largely within the range of the uncertainty intervals of the estimated return levels. As a second step the exceedances of the 50-year return level are evaluated and compared to the exceedances of the 98th percentiles for different extreme European windstorms. The areas where the wind speeds exceed the 50-year return level in the reanalysis data do largely agree with the areas where the largest damages were reported, e.g. France in the case of "Lothar" and "Martin" and Central Europe in the case of "Kyrill". Leckebusch, G. C., Renggli, D., & Ulbrich, U. (2008). Development and application of an objective storm severity measure for the Northeast Atlantic region. Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 17(5), 575-587.

  11. Dosimetric impacts of microgravity: an analysis of 5th, 50th and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R.; Semones, Edward J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-02-01

    Computational phantoms serve an important role in organ dosimetry and risk assessment performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A previous study investigated the impact on organ dose equivalents and effective doses from the use of the University of Florida hybrid adult male (UFHADM) and adult female (UFHADF) phantoms at differing height and weight percentiles versus those given by the two existing NASA phantoms, the computerized anatomical man (CAM) and female (CAF) (Bahadori et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 1671-94). In the present study, the UFHADM and UFHADF phantoms of different body sizes were further altered to incorporate the effects of microgravity. Body self-shielding distributions are generated using the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT), and the results are combined with depth dose data from the NASA codes BRYNTRN and HZETRN to yield organ dose equivalents and their rates for a variety of space radiation environments. It is found that while organ dose equivalents are indeed altered by the physiological effects of microgravity, the magnitude of the change in overall risk (indicated by the effective dose) is minimal for the spectra and simplified shielding configurations considered. The results also indicate, however, that UFHADM and UFHADF could be useful in designing dose reduction strategies through optimized positioning of an astronaut during encounters with solar particle events.

  12. Using a Spreadsheet to Compute the Maximum Wind Sector 99.5th Percentile X/Q Value in Accordance with DOE-STD-3009-2014.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Linda

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Standard 3009-2014 requires one of two methods to determine the simple Gaussian relative concentration (X/Q) of pollutant at plume centerline downwind to a receptor for a 2-h exposure duration from a ground-level release (i.e., less than 10 m height) which are (1) the 99.5th percentile X/Q for the directionally-dependent method and (2) the 95th percentile X/Q for the directionally-independent method. This paper describes how to determine the simple Gaussian 99.5th percentile X/Q for the directionally-dependent method using an electronic spreadsheet. Refer to a previous paper to determine the simple Gaussian 95th percentile X/Q for the directionally-independent method using an electronic spreadsheet (Vickers 2015). The method described herein is simple, quick, accurate, and transparent because all of the data, calculations, and results are visible for validation and verification. PMID:27023153

  13. Percentile Distributions of Median Nitrite Plus Nitrate as Nitrogen, Total Nitrogen, and Total Phosphorus Concentrations in Oklahoma Streams, 1973-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian E.; Masoner, Jason R.; Becker, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients are one of the primary causes of water-quality impairments in streams, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed regional-based nutrient criteria using ecoregions to protect streams in the United States from impairment. However, nutrient criteria were based on nutrient concentrations measured in large aggregated nutrient ecoregions with little relevance to local environmental conditions in states. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is using a dichotomous process known as Use Support Assessment Protocols to define nutrient criteria in Oklahoma streams. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is modifying the Use Support Assessment Protocols to reflect nutrient informa-tion and environmental characteristics relevant to Oklahoma streams, while considering nutrient information grouped by geographic regions based on level III ecoregions and state boundaries. Percentile distributions of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous concentrations were calculated from 563 sites in Oklahoma and 4 sites in Arkansas near the Oklahoma and Arkansas border to facilitate development of nutrient criteria for Oklahoma streams. Sites were grouped into four geographic regions and were categorized into eight stream categories by stream slope and stream order. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations were greater in the Ozark Highland ecoregion and were less in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion when compared to other geographic areas used to group sites. The 50th percentiles of median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were least in first, second, and third order streams. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland and Ouachita Mountains ecoregions were least in

  14. An inflatable belt system in the rear seat occupant environment: investigating feasibility and benefit in frontal impact sled tests with a 50th percentile male ATD

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Jason L.; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Dennis, Nate; Kent, Richard W.; Tanji, Hiromasa; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Frontal-impact airbag systems have the potential to provide a benefit to rear seat occupants by distributing restraining forces over the body in a manner not possible using belts alone. This study sought to investigate the effects of incorporating a belt-integrated airbag (“airbelt”) into a rear seat occupant restraint system. Frontal impact sled tests were performed with a Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) seated in the right-rear passenger position of a 2004 mid-sized sedan buck. Tests were performed at 48 km/h (20 g, 100 ms acceleration pulse) and 29 km/h (11 g, 100 ms). The restraints consisted of a 3-point belt system with a cylindrical airbag integrated into the upper portion of the shoulder belt. The airbag was tapered in shape, with a maximum diameter of 16 cm (at the shoulder) that decreased to 4 cm at the mid-chest. A 2.5 kN force-limiter was integrated into the shoulder-belt retractor, and a 2.3 kN pretensioner was present in the out-board anchor of the lap belt. Six ATD tests (three 48 km/h and three 29 km/h) were performed with the airbelt system. These were compared to previous frontal-impact, rear seat ATD tests with a standard (not-force-limited, not-pretensioned) 3-point belt system and a progressive force-limiting (peak 4.4 kN), pretensioning (FL+PT) 3-point belt system. In the 48 km/h tests, the airbelt resulted in significantly less (p<0.05, two-tailed Student’s t-test) posterior displacement of the sternum towards the spine (chest deflection) than both the standard and FL+PT belt systems (airbelt: average 13±1.1 mm standard deviation; standard belt: 33±2.3 mm; FL+PT belt: 23±2.6 mm). This was consistent with a significant reduction in the peak upper shoulder belt force (airbelt: 2.7±0.1 kN; standard belt: 8.7±0.3 kN; FL+PT belt: 4.4±0.1 kN), and was accompanied by a small increase in forward motion of the head (airbelt: 54±0.4 cm; standard belt: 45±1.3 cm; FL+PT belt: 47±1.1 cm) The airbelt system

  15. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  16. Speeds of coronal mass ejections: SMM observations from 1980 and 1984-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.; Burkepile, J. T.; St. Cyr, O. C.

    1994-01-01

    The speeds of 936 features in 673 coronal mass ejections have been determined from trajectories observed with the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) coronagraph in 1980 and 1984 to 1989. The distribution of observed speeds has a range (from 5th to 95th percentile) of 35 to 911 km/s; the average and median speeds are 349 and 285 km/s. The speed distributions of some selected classes of mass ejections are significantly different. For example, the speeds of 331 'outer loops' range from 80 to 1042 km/s; the average and median speeds for this class of ejections are 445 and 372 km/s. The speed distributions from each year of SMM observations show significant changes, with the annual average speeds varying from 157 (1984) to 458 km/s (1985). These variations are not simply related to the solar activity cycle; the annual averages from years near the sunspot maxima and minimum are not significantly different. The widths, latitudes, and speeds of mass ejections determined from the SMM observations are only weakly correlated. In particular, mass ejection speeds vary only slightly with the heliographic latitudes of the ejection. High-latitude ejections, which occur well poleward of the active latitudes, have speeds similar to active latitude ejections.

  17. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  18. Small portable speed calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Billions, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Calculator is adapted stopwatch calibrated for fast accurate measurement of speeds. Single assembled unit is rugged, self-contained, and relatively inexpensive to manufacture. Potential market includes automobile-speed enforcement, railroads, and field-test facilities.

  19. Is the 90th Percentile Adequate? The Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Points for Predicting Cardiovascular Risks in 124,643 15-Year-Old Taiwanese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ChinYu; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Huang, Nicole; Yeh, Jade Chienyu; deFerranti, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity has increased to alarming proportions globally. However, few studies have investigated the optimal waist circumference (WC) of Asian adolescents. This study sought to establish the optimal WC cutoff points that identify a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) among 15-year-old ethnically Chinese adolescents. This study was a regional population-based study on the CVRFs among adolescents who enrolled in all the senior high schools in Taipei City, Taiwan, between 2011 and 2014. Four cross-sectional health examinations of first-year senior high school (grade 10) students were conducted from September to December of each year. A total of 124,643 adolescents aged 15 (boys: 63,654; girls: 60,989) were recruited. Participants who had at least three of five CVRFs were classified as the high-risk group. We used receiver-operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC) to determine the optimal WC cutoff points and the accuracy of WC in predicting high cardiovascular risk. WC was a good predictor for high cardiovascular risk for both boys (AUC: 0.845, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.833–0.857) and girls (AUC: 0.763, 95% CI: 0.731–0.795). The optimal WC cutoff points were ≥78.9 cm for boys (77th percentile) and ≥70.7 cm for girls (77th percentile). Adolescents with normal weight and an abnormal WC were more likely to be in the high cardiovascular risk group (odds ratio: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.65–5.17) compared to their peers with normal weight and normal WC. The optimal WC cutoff point of 15-year-old Taiwanese adolescents for identifying CVRFs should be the 77th percentile; the 90th percentile of the WC might be inadequate. The high WC criteria can help health professionals identify higher proportion of the adolescents with cardiovascular risks and refer them for further evaluations and interventions. Adolescents’ height, weight and WC should be measured as a standard practice in routine health checkups. PMID:27389572

  20. Is the 90th Percentile Adequate? The Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Points for Predicting Cardiovascular Risks in 124,643 15-Year-Old Taiwanese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason Jiunshiou; Ho, ChinYu; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Huang, Nicole; Yeh, Jade Chienyu; deFerranti, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity has increased to alarming proportions globally. However, few studies have investigated the optimal waist circumference (WC) of Asian adolescents. This study sought to establish the optimal WC cutoff points that identify a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) among 15-year-old ethnically Chinese adolescents. This study was a regional population-based study on the CVRFs among adolescents who enrolled in all the senior high schools in Taipei City, Taiwan, between 2011 and 2014. Four cross-sectional health examinations of first-year senior high school (grade 10) students were conducted from September to December of each year. A total of 124,643 adolescents aged 15 (boys: 63,654; girls: 60,989) were recruited. Participants who had at least three of five CVRFs were classified as the high-risk group. We used receiver-operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC) to determine the optimal WC cutoff points and the accuracy of WC in predicting high cardiovascular risk. WC was a good predictor for high cardiovascular risk for both boys (AUC: 0.845, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.833-0.857) and girls (AUC: 0.763, 95% CI: 0.731-0.795). The optimal WC cutoff points were ≥78.9 cm for boys (77th percentile) and ≥70.7 cm for girls (77th percentile). Adolescents with normal weight and an abnormal WC were more likely to be in the high cardiovascular risk group (odds ratio: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.65-5.17) compared to their peers with normal weight and normal WC. The optimal WC cutoff point of 15-year-old Taiwanese adolescents for identifying CVRFs should be the 77th percentile; the 90th percentile of the WC might be inadequate. The high WC criteria can help health professionals identify higher proportion of the adolescents with cardiovascular risks and refer them for further evaluations and interventions. Adolescents' height, weight and WC should be measured as a standard practice in routine health checkups. PMID:27389572

  1. Rain-aerosol relationships influenced by wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Russell, Lynn M.; Lou, Sijia; Liu, Ying; Singh, Balwinder; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been shown to correlate with precipitation rate (R) in recent studies. The R-AOD relationships over oceans are examined in this study using 150 year simulations with the Community Earth System Model. Through partial correlation analysis, with the influence of 10 m wind speed removed, R-AOD relationships exert a change from positive to negative over the midlatitude oceans, indicating that wind speed makes a large contribution to the relationships by changing the sea-salt emissions. A simulation with prescribed sea-salt emissions shows that wind speed leads to increasing R by +0.99 mm d-1 averaged globally, offsetting 64% of the wet scavenging-induced decrease between polluted and clean conditions, defined according to percentiles of AOD. These demonstrate that wind speed is one of the major drivers of R-AOD relationships. Relative humidity at 915 hPa can also result in the positive relationships; however, its role is smaller than that of wind speed.

  2. Vehicle speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, D.; Tanno, T.; Fukunaga, T.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a vehicle speed control system for performing vehicle speed control by controlling the displacement of at least one of a hydraulic pump and a hydraulic motor of a hydraulic transmission through an electric servo device, comprising: vehicle speed setting means for generating a voltage signal corresponding to a vehicle speed to be set; compensating means interposed between the vehicle speed setting means and the electric servo device, the compensating means comprising a first delay element; and second delay element having a response characteristic slower than that of the first delay element. A selecting means for judging as to whether a voltage signal changed by the operation of the vehicle speed setting means represents an acceleration command or a deceleration command and for selecting the first delay element when the voltage signal represents an acceleration command and for selecting the second delay element when the voltage signal represents a deceleration command.

  3. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  4. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  5. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  6. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  7. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  8. 46 CFR 154.1864 - Vessel speed within speed reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel speed within speed reduction. 154.1864 Section... Vessel speed within speed reduction. The master shall ensure that the speed of the vessel is not greater than the posted speed reduction....

  9. Computer ray tracing speeds.

    PubMed

    Robb, P; Pawlowski, B

    1990-05-01

    The results of measuring the ray trace speed and compilation speed of thirty-nine computers in fifty-seven configurations, ranging from personal computers to super computers, are described. A correlation of ray trace speed has been made with the LINPACK benchmark which allows the ray trace speed to be estimated using LINPACK performance data. The results indicate that the latest generation of workstations, using CPUs based on RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) technology, are as fast or faster than mainframe computers in compute-bound situations. PMID:20563112

  10. Nonintrusive shaft speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Wyett, L.; Maram, J.

    1985-01-01

    Reusable rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV), etc., have throttling capabilities that require real-time, closed-loop control systems of engine propellant flows, combustion temperatures and pressures, and turbopump rotary speeds. In the case of the SSME, there are four turbopumps that require real-time measurement and control of their rotary speeds. Variable-reluctance magnetic speed sensors were designed, fabricated, and tested for all four turbopumps, resulting in the successful implementation and operation of three of these speed sensors during each of the 12 Shuttle flights.

  11. Association of percentile ranking with citation impact and productivity in a large cohort of de novo NIMH-funded R01 grants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J M; Quinn, K; Bodenstein, Y A; Wu, C O; Danthi, N; Lauer, M S

    2015-09-01

    Previous reports from National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation have suggested that peer review scores of funded grants bear no association with grant citation impact and productivity. This lack of association, if true, may be particularly concerning during times of increasing competition for increasingly limited funds. We analyzed the citation impact and productivity for 1755 de novo investigator-initiated R01 grants funded for at least 2 years by National Institute of Mental Health between 2000 and 2009. Consistent with previous reports, we found no association between grant percentile ranking and subsequent productivity and citation impact, even after accounting for subject categories, years of publication, duration and amounts of funding, as well as a number of investigator-specific measures. Prior investigator funding and academic productivity were moderately strong predictors of grant citation impact. PMID:26033238

  12. Thoracic response targets for a computational model: a hierarchical approach to assess the biofidelity of a 50th-percentile occupant male finite element model.

    PubMed

    Poulard, David; Kent, Richard W; Kindig, Matthew; Li, Zuoping; Subit, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Current finite element human thoracic models are typically evaluated against a limited set of loading conditions; this is believed to limit their capability to predict accurate responses. In this study, a 50th-percentile male finite element model (GHBMC v4.1) was assessed under various loading environments (antero-posterior rib bending, point loading of the denuded ribcage, omnidirectional pendulum impact and table top) through a correlation metric tool (CORA) based on linearly independent signals. The load cases were simulated with the GHBMC model and response corridors were developed from published experimental data. The model was found to be in close agreement with the experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively (CORA ratings above 0.75) and the response of the thorax was overall deemed biofidelic. This study also provides relevant corridors and an objective rating framework that can be used for future evaluation of thoracic models. PMID:25681717

  13. Perceptual countermeasures to speeding.

    PubMed

    Fildes, Brian; Corben, Bruce; Newstead, Stuart; Macaulay, Jemima; Gunatillake, Thanuja; Tziotis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    An on-road evaluation of two perceptual countermeasure treatments (an enhanced curve post treatment and peripheral transverse edgelines on the approach to an intersection) was conducted over one year to indicate potential for reducing travel speed. Measures included speed and deceleration profiles, braking, and lateral placement observations taken from video recordings at each site. Data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 12 months after treatment. The results obtained were quite variable across sites and treatments. At curves, speed effects were mixed with both speed reductions and increases observed immediately after and 12-months later. Braking results tended to support travel speed findings and some improvement in lateral placement were also observed at these locations. At intersections, the results were more stable where speed reductions were more common both immediately after treatment as well as longer-term. There were no differences in braking and lateral placement at these straight-road locations. The findings seem to have been unduly influenced to some degree by misadventure and wear and tear at these sites. It is argued that while the effectiveness of these treatments may be site specific to some degree, they do offer a low-cost solution to reducing travel speed at hazardous locations. PMID:16179136

  14. High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This computer generated animation depicts a conceptual simulation of the flight of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights.

  15. Engine speed control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Nakamura, N.; Kakinuma, H.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes an engine speed control apparatus. The system comprises an actuator for adjusting an engine speed, a first unit for computing a desired engine speed, a second unit for detecting the actual engine speed, and a third unit for detecting the difference between the outputs of the first and second units. The system also includes a fourth unit for computing a control pulse width for the actuator in accordance with the output of the third unit, a fifth unit for generating a control signal, a sixth unit for driving the actuator in response to the output of the fifth unit, and a seventh unit for computing an optimal halt time to interrupt the driving of the actuator. The actuator is driven intermittently in conformity in the control pulse width and the halt time.

  16. High Speed data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.

    1998-02-01

    A general introduction to high Speed data acquisition system techniques in modern particle physics experiments is given. Examples are drawn from the SELEX(E781) high statistics charmed baryon production and decay experiment now taking data at Fermilab.

  17. Speeding earthquake disaster relief

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortensen, Carl; Donlin, Carolyn; Page, Robert A.; Ward, Peter

    1995-01-01

    In coping with recent multibillion-dollar earthquake disasters, scientists and emergency managers have found new ways to speed and improve relief efforts. This progress is founded on the rapid availability of earthquake information from seismograph networks.

  18. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  19. The use of the percentile method for searching empirical relationships between compression strength (UCS), Point Load (Is50) and Schmidt Hammer (RL) Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giovanni; Bobbo, Luigi; Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Is50 and RL indices are commonly used to indirectly estimate the compression strength of a rocky deposit by in situ and in laboratory devices. The widespread use of Point load and Schmidt hammer tests is due to the simplicity and the speediness of the execution of these tests. Their indices can be related to the UCS by means of the ordinary least square regression analyses. Several researchers suggest to take into account the lithology to build high correlated empirical expressions (R2 >0.8) to draw UCS from Is50 or RL values. Nevertheless, the lower and upper bounds of the UCS ranges of values that can be estimated by means of the two indirect indices are not clearly defined yet. Aydin (2009) stated that the Schmidt hammer test shall be used to assess the compression resistance of rocks characterized by UCS>12-20 MPa. On the other hand, the Point load measures can be performed on weak rocks but upper bound values for UCS are not suggested. In this paper, the empirical relationships between UCS, RL and Is50 are searched by means of the percentile method (Bruno et al. 2013). This method is based on looking for the best regression function, between measured data of UCS and one of the indirect indices, drawn from a subset sample of the couples of measures that are the percentile values. These values are taken from the original dataset of both measures by calculating the cumulative function. No hypothesis on the probability distribution of the sample is needed and the procedure shows to be robust with respect to odd values or outliers. In this study, the carbonate sedimentary rocks are investigated. According to the rock mass classification of Dobereiner and De Freitas (1986), the UCS values for the studied rocks range between 'extremely weak' to 'strong'. For the analyzed data, UCS varies between 1,18-270,70 MPa. Thus, through the percentile method the best empirical relationships UCS-Is50 and UCS-RL are plotted. Relationships between Is50 and RL are drawn, too

  20. Increased Physical Activity and Fitness above the 50(th) Percentile Avoid the Threat of Older Adults Becoming Institutionalized: A Cross-sectional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catarina; Fernandes, Jorge; Raimundo, Armando; Biehl-Printes, Clarissa; Marmeleira, José; Tomas-Carus, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of physical fitness and physical activity on the threat of older adults without cognitive impairment becoming institutionalized. This cross-sectional study involved 195 non-institutionalized (80.1 ± 4.4 years) and 186 institutionalized (83.8 ± 5.2years) participants. Cognitive impairment was assessed using Mini-Mental State Examination, measures of physical fitness were determined by the Senior Fitness Test, and physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Multivariate binary logistic analysis selected four main determinants of institutionalization in both genders: The likelihood of becoming institutionalized increased by +18.6% for each additional year of age, whereas it decreased by -24.8% by each fewer kg/m(2) in body mass index (BMI), by -0.9% for each additional meter performed in the aerobic endurance test, and by -2.0% for each additional 100 metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-min/week of physical activity expenditure (p < 0.05). Values ≤50(th) percentile (age ≥81 years, BMI ≥26.7 kg/m(2), aerobic endurance ≤367.6 meters, and physical activity ≤693 MET-min/week) were computed using receiver operating characteristics analysis as cutoffs discriminating institutionalized from non-institutionalized older adults. The performance of physical activity, allied to an improvement in physical fitness (mainly BMI and aerobic endurance), may avoid the threat of institutionalization of older adults without cognitive impairment only if they are above the 50(th) percentile. The following parameters are highly recommended: Expending ≥693 MET-min/week on physical activity, having a BMI ≤26.7 kg/m(2), and being able to walk ≥367.6 meters in the aerobic endurance test, especially above the age of 80 years. The discovery of this trigger justifies the development of physical activity programs targeting the pointed cutoffs in old and very old adults

  1. Standing adult human phantoms based on 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of male and female Caucasian populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, V. F.; Milian, F. M.; Kramer, R.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Khoury, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    Computational anthropomorphic human phantoms are useful tools developed for the calculation of absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues of the human body. The problem is, however, that, strictly speaking, the results can be applied only to a person who has the same anatomy as the phantom, while for a person with different body mass and/or standing height the data could be wrong. In order to improve this situation for many areas in radiological protection, this study developed 18 anthropometric standing adult human phantoms, nine models per gender, as a function of the 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of Caucasian populations. The anthropometric target parameters for body mass, standing height and other body measures were extracted from PeopleSize, a well-known software package used in the area of ergonomics. The phantoms were developed based on the assumption of a constant body-mass index for a given mass percentile and for different heights. For a given height, increase or decrease of body mass was considered to reflect mainly the change of subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, i.e. that organ masses were not changed. Organ mass scaling as a function of height was based on information extracted from autopsy data. The methods used here were compared with those used in other studies, anatomically as well as dosimetrically. For external exposure, the results show that equivalent dose decreases with increasing body mass for organs and tissues located below the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer, such as liver, colon, stomach, etc, while for organs located at the surface, such as breasts, testes and skin, the equivalent dose increases or remains constant with increasing body mass due to weak attenuation and more scatter radiation caused by the increasing adipose tissue mass. Changes of standing height have little influence on the equivalent dose to organs and tissues from external exposure. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have also

  2. Speed Reading: Remember the Tortoise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Richard G.

    1973-01-01

    After speed-reading partisans questioned the criticisms in a Psychology Today article, another psychologist conducted a controlled study of speed readers. As we said before, "Speed Readers Don't Read; They Skim". (Editor)

  3. Everyone Deserves a Speeding Ticket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Harold

    1993-01-01

    Presents a first day physics activity having students determine the fine for a speeding ticket if the speeds considered include the earth's rotation and revolution speed, and the movement through the galaxy. (MDH)

  4. Dosimetry of infant exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields: variation of 99th percentile induced electric field value by posture and skin-to-skin contact.

    PubMed

    Li, Congsheng; Wu, Tongning

    2015-04-01

    Infant exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields from power lines was numerically analyzed in this study. Dosimetric variability due to posture and skin-to-skin contact was evaluated using human anatomical models including a recently developed model of a 12-months-old infant. As proposed by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the induced E-field strength (99th percentile value, E99 ) for the central nerve systems (E99_CNS ) and peripheral nerve system (E99_PNS ), were used as metrics. Results showed that the single (free of contact with others) infant model has lower E99 (E99_CNS and E99_PNS inclusive) compared with single adult and child models when exposed to the same power-frequency magnetic field. Also, studied postures of sitting, standing, or arm-up, would not change E99 _PNS . However, skin-to-skin contact with other models could significantly raise induced E-field strength in the infant (e.g., contact on 0.93% of the infant's total surface increased E99_PNS by 213%). Simulations with canonical models were conducted to assess different factors contributing to the E99 enhancement. Results indicated the importance of thoroughly investigating the conservativeness of current safety guidelines in the case of skin-to-skin contact, especially with infants. PMID:25708724

  5. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  6. SPEEDE Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Barbara H.; Wei, P. Betty

    1993-01-01

    A nontechnical overview of electronic data interchange (EDI) and of the SPEEDE/ExPRESS Project, which uses EDI to transmit transcripts between schools and colleges, is presented. It explores the fundamental value of the technology, specific costs and benefits, and its potential to transform the delivery of academic support services. (Author/MSE)

  7. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  8. High Speed data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.S.

    1998-02-01

    A general introduction to high Speed data acquisition system techniques in modern particle physics experiments is given. Examples are drawn from the SELEX(E781) high statistics charmed baryon production and decay experiment now taking data at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are discussed. The following design concerns are presented: (1) environmental impact (emissions and noise); (2) critical components (the high temperature combustor and the lightweight exhaust nozzle); and (3) advanced materials (high temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC's)/intermetallic matrix composites (IMC's)/metal matrix composites (MMC's)).

  10. Cloud shadow speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, V.; Bosch, J. L.; Roberts, S. W.; Kleissl, J.

    2014-06-01

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system is presented that measures cloud shadow motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short-term solar irradiance forecasts. The cloud shadow speed sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and a high-speed data acquisition system to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud shadow motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground-measured irradiance (linear cloud edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego sky imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15° and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud shadow directions and speeds with average weighted root-mean-square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s-1 when compared to LCE results.

  11. Cloud speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, V.; Bosch, J. L.; Roberts, S. W.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-10-01

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system that measures cloud motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short term solar irradiance forecasts is presented. The Cloud Speed Sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and high-speed data acquisition to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground measured irradiance (Linear Cloud Edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego Sky Imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15 and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud directions and speeds without average bias and with average weighted root mean square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s-1 when compared to LCE results.

  12. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  13. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  14. Spindle picker harvest speed effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gear drive of a modern John Deere Pro 16 picker unit was modified so that spindle speed was reduced without changing the drum speed. Three 1-row picking units were used in the study, one with the standard drive speeds, one with 25% reduction in spindle drive speed, and one with 50% reduction in...

  15. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  16. Variable speed drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A variable speed drive wherein a first embodiment is comprised of a pivotally mounted prime mover coupled to a rotary fluid output device, such as a fan or pump, through a variable and fixed pulley drive arrangement is described. The pivotal position of the prime mover and accordingly the pitch diameter of variable pulley means is controlled in accordance with fluid motor means coupled to the prime mover. This is actuated in response to a fluid feedback control signal derived from a sensed output of the rotary fluid output device. The pivotal motion of the prime mover imparts an arcuate motion to the variable pulley means which effects a speed variation of the rotary fluid output device in accordance with the variation of the pitch diameter ratio of opposing variable and fixed pulley means.

  17. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  18. Variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Younger, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This report details a new design for a variable speed controller which can be used to operate lunar machinery without the astronaut using his or her upper body. In order to demonstrate the design, a treadle for an industrial sewing machine was redesigned to be used by a standing operator. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from sit down to stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with a sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator along with the ergonomics involved. Included with the design analysis are suggestions for possible uses for the speed controller in other applications.

  19. High speed door assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  20. Two-speed transaxle

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  1. Do speed cameras reduce speeding in urban areas?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniele Falci de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Costa, Dário Alves da Silva; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2015-11-01

    This observational study aimed to estimate the prevalence of speeding on urban roadways and to analyze associated factors. The sample consisted of 8,565 vehicles circulating in areas with and without fixed speed cameras in operation. We found that 40% of vehicles 200 meters after the fixed cameras and 33.6% of vehicles observed on roadways without speed cameras were moving over the speed limit (p < 0.001). Motorcycles showed the highest recorded speed (126km/h). Most drivers were men (87.6%), 3.3% of all drivers were using their cell phones, and 74.6% of drivers (not counting motorcyclists) were wearing their seatbelts. On roadway stretches without fixed speed cameras, more women drivers were talking on their cell phones and wearing seatbelts when compared to men (p < 0.05 for both comparisons), independently of speed limits. The results suggest that compliance with speed limits requires more than structural interventions. PMID:26648375

  2. The Relation of Speeded and Unspeeded Reasoning with Mental Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Oliver; Schulze, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Studied the contribution of mental speed to task performance on reasoning tasks under timed and untimed conditions for 227 participants and for 90 participants working under time conditions. Results suggest that the use of speeded reasoning tests is likely to lead to overestimates of the relation between mental speed and reasoning ability. (SLD)

  3. High speed flywheel

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  4. Using Microsoft Excel to compute the 5% overall site X/Q value and the 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOI).

    PubMed

    Vickers, Linda D

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the method using Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation One Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 98052-6399) to compute the 5% overall site X/Q value and the 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOI) in accordance with guidance from DOE-STD-3009-1994 and U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145-1982. The accurate determination of the 5% overall site X/Q value is the most important factor in the computation of the 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest MEOI. This method should be used to validate software codes that compute the X/Q. The 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest MEOI must be compared to the U.S. DOE Evaluation Guide of 25 rem to determine the relative severity of hazard to the public from a postulated, unmitigated design basis accident that involves an offsite release of radioactive material. PMID:20386192

  5. A Model of Cognitive Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulford, Catherine P.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a model of cognitive speed and considers its relevance to research and practice. Topics include information processing; semantic cognitive flow; compressed speech; speed-reading; cognitive speed and interaction; and implications for distance education, video multimedia, computer-assisted instruction, hypermedia, interactive multimedia,…

  6. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

  7. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-28

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

  8. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  9. BMI is not a good indicator for metabolic risk in adolescent girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BMI (kg/m2) does not provide information about body fat percentile.Adolescents with BMI <85th percentile for age are considered lean and at low risk for metabolic complications. Adolescent girls with low BMI can have high body fat percentile. We hypothesized that these girls are already insulin resi...

  10. Computer workstation speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, J.F.

    1996-06-01

    This report compares the performance of several computers. Some of the machines are discontinued, and some are anticipated, but most are currently installed at Sandia Laboratories. All the computers are personal workstations or departmental servers, except for comparison, one is a Cray C90 mainframe supercomputer (not owned by the Laboratories). A few of the computers have multiple processors, but parallelism is not tested. The time to run three programs is reported for every computer. Unlike many benchmarks, these are complete application programs. They were written and are used at Sandia Laboratories. Also SPECmarks are reported for many computers. These are industry standard performance ratings. They are in general agreement with the speeds of running the Sandia programs. This report concludes with some background material and notes about specific manufacturers.

  11. TWO-SPEED DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Brunson, G.S. Jr.

    1961-04-01

    A two-speed device is described comprising a two-part stop engageable with a follower. The two-pant stop comprises first and second members in threaded engagement with each other. The first member is restrained against rotation but is free to move longitudinally, and the second member is free to move arially and rotatively. Means are provided to impart rotation to the second member. The follower is engageable first with an end of one member and then with the corresponding end of the other member after some relative longitudinal movement of the members with respect to one another due to the rotation of the second member and the holding of the first member against rotation.

  12. High speed nozzles task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, Awatef

    1995-01-01

    Supersonic cruise exhaust nozzles for advanced applications are optimized for a high nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) at design supersonic cruise Mach number and altitude. The performance of these nozzles with large expansion ratios are severely degraded for operations at subsonic speeds near sea level for NPR significantly less than the design values. The prediction of over-expanded 2DCD nozzles performance is critical to evaluating the internal losses and to the optimization of the integrated vehicle and propulsion system performance. The reported research work was aimed at validating and assessing existing computational methods and turbulence models for predicting the flow characteristics and nozzle performance at over-expanded conditions. Flow simulations in 2DCD nozzles were performed using five different turbulence models. The results are compared with the experimental data for the wall pressure distribution and thrust and flow coefficients at over-expanded static conditions.

  13. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  14. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  15. Variable speed transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, W.S.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a variable speed transmission for transmitting rotational forces between a first shaft and a second shaft wherein a sprocket is mounted on the first shaft and a variable effective diameter pulley, having opposed inclined chain-belt engaging surfaces, is mounted on the second shaft, an endless chain-belt assembly for transmitting rotational forces. The assembly has side edges thereon, comprising: a first portion defining the edges of the chain-belt assembly and having a plurality of links defining a surface corresponding to the opposed inclined chain-belt engaging surfaces on the pulley; and a second portion intermediate of the first portion having a plurality of links for engaging the teeth on the sprocket, the links being joined by a plurality of pins extending transverse to the links; and a flexible shield mounted over the links and retained relative thereto by the pins wherein the flexible shield surrounds the links of the second portion of the chain-belt assembly and retains lubrication for the second portion and to prevent same for communicating to the first portion of the chain-belt assembly.

  16. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  17. Wind Speed Perception and Risk

    PubMed Central

    Agdas, Duzgun; Webster, Gregory D.; Masters, Forrest J.

    2012-01-01

    Background How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human–wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. Method We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s) winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. Results Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk). The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual–perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. Conclusion These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters. PMID:23226230

  18. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds. Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030973. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  19. Models of Speed Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    visual search for the detection of speed deviation. 2. Perception of moving objects. 3. Exploring the role of eye movements in various visual tasks.

  20. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  1. Propeller speed and phase sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collopy, Paul D. (Inventor); Bennett, George W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A speed and phase sensor counterrotates aircraft propellers. A toothed wheel is attached to each propeller, and the teeth trigger a sensor as they pass, producing a sequence of signals. From the sequence of signals, rotational speed of each propeller is computer based on time intervals between successive signals. The speed can be computed several times during one revolution, thus giving speed information which is highly up-to-date. Given that spacing between teeth may not be uniform, the signals produced may be nonuniform in time. Error coefficients are derived to correct for nonuniformities in the resulting signals, thus allowing accurate speed to be computed despite the spacing nonuniformities. Phase can be viewed as the relative rotational position of one propeller with respect to the other, but measured at a fixed time. Phase is computed from the signals.

  2. The need for speed: global optic flow speed influences steering.

    PubMed

    Kountouriotis, Georgios K; Mole, Callum D; Merat, Natasha; Wilkie, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    How do animals follow demarcated paths? Different species are sensitive to optic flow and one control solution is to maintain the balance of flow symmetry across visual fields; however, it is unclear whether animals are sensitive to changes in asymmetries when steering along curved paths. Flow asymmetries can alter the global properties of flow (i.e. flow speed) which may also influence steering control. We tested humans steering curved paths in a virtual environment. The scene was manipulated so that the ground plane to either side of the demarcated path produced larger or smaller asymmetries in optic flow. Independent of asymmetries and the locomotor speed, the scene properties were altered to produce either faster or slower globally averaged flow speeds. Results showed that rather than being influenced by changes in flow asymmetry, steering responded to global flow speed. We conclude that the human brain performs global averaging of flow speed from across the scene and uses this signal as an input for steering control. This finding is surprising since the demarcated path provided sufficient information to steer, whereas global flow speed (by itself) did not. To explain these findings, existing models of steering must be modified to include a new perceptual variable: namely global optic flow speed. PMID:27293789

  3. The need for speed: global optic flow speed influences steering

    PubMed Central

    Kountouriotis, Georgios K.; Mole, Callum D.; Merat, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    How do animals follow demarcated paths? Different species are sensitive to optic flow and one control solution is to maintain the balance of flow symmetry across visual fields; however, it is unclear whether animals are sensitive to changes in asymmetries when steering along curved paths. Flow asymmetries can alter the global properties of flow (i.e. flow speed) which may also influence steering control. We tested humans steering curved paths in a virtual environment. The scene was manipulated so that the ground plane to either side of the demarcated path produced larger or smaller asymmetries in optic flow. Independent of asymmetries and the locomotor speed, the scene properties were altered to produce either faster or slower globally averaged flow speeds. Results showed that rather than being influenced by changes in flow asymmetry, steering responded to global flow speed. We conclude that the human brain performs global averaging of flow speed from across the scene and uses this signal as an input for steering control. This finding is surprising since the demarcated path provided sufficient information to steer, whereas global flow speed (by itself) did not. To explain these findings, existing models of steering must be modified to include a new perceptual variable: namely global optic flow speed. PMID:27293789

  4. Dynamic modeling of speed skiing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalfamo, R. S.

    1997-12-01

    The equations of motion that describe a skier descending a speed-skiing hill are solved both analytically and numerically. The model is shown to agree well with actual official results but only when the hill profile is considered. A sensitivity analysis reveals which parameters most affect the skier's exit speed. Other factors, such as scaling effects and wind gusts, are included to determine whether these need to be considered in official results. One surprising result is that, under certain conditions and hill profiles, maximum skier speed is attained prior to entry into the timing zone—thus bringing into question the optimum placement of the timing gates.

  5. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  6. Numerical wind speed simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-09-01

    A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

  7. Development of Air Speed Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1920-01-01

    Report describes the development of a suitable speed nozzle for the first few thousand airplanes made by the United States during the recent war in Europe, and to furnish a basis for more mature instruments in the future. Requirements for the project were to provide a suitable pressure collector for aircraft speed meters and to develop a speed nozzle which would be waterproof, powerful, unaffected by slight pitch and yaw, rugged and easy to manufacture, and uniform in structure and reading, so as not to require individual calibration.

  8. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  9. Superplane! High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  10. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps.

  11. Speed, road injury, and public health.

    PubMed

    Richter, Elihu D; Berman, Tamar; Friedman, Lee; Ben-David, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    We review milestones in the history of increases in speed limits and travel speeds ("speed creep") and risks for road deaths and injury. Reduced speed limits, speed-camera networks, and speed calming substantially reduce these tolls in absolute numbers-a trend that is apparent in the United Kingdom, Australia, France, and other countries, but not in the United States, which has raised speed limits and does not have speed-camera networks. Newtonian relationships between the fourth power of small increases or reductions in speed and large increases or reductions in deaths state the case for speed control. Speed adaptation and the interaction between speed and other determinants of injury risks, including congestion and countermeasures, enter into these relationships. Speed-camera networks and speed calming lead to large, sustainable, and highly cost-effective drops in road deaths and injuries and should target entire populations, not merely high-risk subgroups or situations. Yet, there are major barriers to preventive strategies based on the discovery that speed kills. Modal shifts from speed on roads to speed on rail, lower maximum vehicle speeds, and speed-camera networks are required for progress toward Vision Zero-the goal of no road deaths-through Killing Speed. The human cost of the delay in killing speed in the United States may be as high as 20,000 lives lost per year. PMID:16533112

  12. Driving Speed vs Fuel Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Floyd

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical treatment of the relationship between driving speed and fuel efficiency is presented. The material involves applications of exponentials, logarithms, and elementary calculus, and is intended to be enrichment material for secondary and lower college mathematics classes. (MP)

  13. High-speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1936-01-01

    Wind tunnel construction and design is discussed especially in relation to subsonic and supersonic speeds. Reynolds Numbers and the theory of compressible flows are also taken into consideration in designing new tunnels.

  14. Animal evolution: trilobites on speed.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    A new study quantifies rates of morphological and molecular evolution for arthropods during the critical Cambrian explosion. Both morphological and molecular evolution are accelerated--but not so much to break any speed limits. PMID:24112983

  15. High-Speed Electrochemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Byers, Joshua C; McKelvey, Kim; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-09-22

    The design, development, and application of high-speed scanning electrochemical probe microscopy is reported. The approach allows the acquisition of a series of high-resolution images (typically 1000 pixels μm(-2)) at rates approaching 4 seconds per frame, while collecting up to 8000 image pixels per second, about 1000 times faster than typical imaging speeds used up to now. The focus is on scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), but the principles and practicalities are applicable to many electrochemical imaging methods. The versatility of the high-speed scan concept is demonstrated at a variety of substrates, including imaging the electroactivity of a patterned self-assembled monolayer on gold, visualization of chemical reactions occurring at single wall carbon nanotubes, and probing nanoscale electrocatalysts for water splitting. These studies provide movies of spatial variations of electrochemical fluxes as a function of potential and a platform for the further development of high speed scanning with other electrochemical imaging techniques. PMID:26267455

  16. Dynamic Dazzle Distorts Speed Perception

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Joanna R.; Cuthill, Innes C.; Baddeley, Roland; Attwood, Angela S.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Static high contrast (‘dazzle’) patterns, such as zigzags, have been shown to reduce the perceived speed of an object. It has not escaped our notice that this effect has possible military applications and here we report a series of experiments on humans, designed to establish whether dynamic dazzle patterns can cause distortions of perceived speed sufficient to provide effective defence in the field, and the extent to which these effects are robust to a battery of manipulations. Dynamic stripe patterns moving in the same direction as the target are found to increase the perceived speed of that target, whilst dynamic stripes moving in the opposite direction to the target reduce the perceived speed. We establish the optimum position for such dazzle patches; confirm that reduced contrast and the addition of colour do not affect the performance of the dynamic dazzle, and finally, using the CO2 challenge, show that the effect is robust to stressful conditions. PMID:27196098

  17. Gated high speed optical detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.; Carson, L. M.; Neal, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of two gated, high speed optical detectors for use in high speed digital laser communication links are discussed. The optical detectors used a dynamic crossed field photomultiplier and electronics including dc bias and RF drive circuits, automatic remote synchronization circuits, automatic gain control circuits, and threshold detection circuits. The equipment is used to detect binary encoded signals from a mode locked neodynium laser.

  18. Speed Variance and Its Influence on Accidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Nicholas J.; Gadirau, Ravi

    A study was conducted to investigate the traffic engineering factors that influence speed variance and to determine to what extent speed variance affects accident rates. Detailed analyses were carried out to relate speed variance with posted speed limit, design speeds, and other traffic variables. The major factor identified was the difference…

  19. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  20. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  1. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  2. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  3. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  4. 14 CFR 23.51 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 23.51 Section 23.51... speeds. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category airplanes, rotation speed, VR, is the speed at... seaplanes and amphibians taking off from water, VR, may be any speed that is shown to be safe under...

  5. 14 CFR 23.51 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 23.51 Section 23.51... speeds. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category airplanes, rotation speed, VR, is the speed at... seaplanes and amphibians taking off from water, VR, may be any speed that is shown to be safe under...

  6. Speed analyses of stimulus equivalence.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, T J; Chase, P N

    1996-01-01

    The functional substitutability of stimuli in equivalence classes was examined through analyses of the speed of college students' accurate responding. After training subjects to respond to 18 conditional relations, subjects' accuracy and speed of accurate responding were compared across trial types (baseline, symmetry, transitivity, and combined transitivity and symmetry) and nodal distance (one- through five-node transitive and combined transitive and symmetric relations). Differences in accuracy across nodal distance and trial type were significant only on the first tests of equivalence, whereas differences in speed were significant even after extended testing. Response speed was inversely related to the number of nodes on which the tested relations were based. Significant differences in response speed were also found across trial types, except between transitivity and combined trials. To determine the generality of these comparisons, three groups of subjects were included: An instructed group was given an instruction that specified the interchangeability of stimuli related through training; a queried group was queried about the basis for test-trial responding: and a standard group was neither instructed nor queried. There were no significant differences among groups. These results suggest the use of response speed and response accuracy to measure the strength of matching relations. PMID:8636663

  7. Combining Speed Information Across Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, Preeti; Stone, Leland S.

    1995-01-01

    We used speed discrimination tasks to measure the ability of observers to combine speed information from multiple stimuli distributed across space. We compared speed discrimination thresholds in a classical discrimination paradigm to those in an uncertainty/search paradigm. Thresholds were measured using a temporal two-interval forced-choice design. In the discrimination paradigm, the n gratings in each interval all moved at the same speed and observers were asked to choose the interval with the faster gratings. Discrimination thresholds for this paradigm decreased as the number of gratings increased. This decrease was not due to increasing the effective stimulus area as a control experiment that increased the area of a single grating did not show a similar improvement in thresholds. Adding independent speed noise to each of the n gratings caused thresholds to decrease at a rate similar to the original no-noise case, consistent with observers combining an independent sample of speed from each grating in both the added- and no-noise cases. In the search paradigm, observers were asked to choose the interval in which one of the n gratings moved faster. Thresholds in this case increased with the number of gratings, behavior traditionally attributed to an input bottleneck. However, results from the discrimination paradigm showed that the increase was not due to observers' inability to process these gratings. We have also shown that the opposite trends of the data in the two paradigms can be predicted by a decision theory model that combines independent samples of speed information across space. This demonstrates that models typically used in classical detection and discrimination paradigms are also applicable to search paradigms. As our model does not distinguish between samples in space and time, it predicts that discrimination performance should be the same regardless of whether the gratings are presented in two spatial intervals or two temporal intervals. Our last

  8. 49 CFR 230.68 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Speed Indicators § 230.68 Speed indicators. Steam locomotives that operate at speeds in excess...

  9. 49 CFR 230.68 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Speed Indicators § 230.68 Speed indicators. Steam locomotives that operate at speeds in excess...

  10. 49 CFR 230.68 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Speed Indicators § 230.68 Speed indicators. Steam locomotives that operate at speeds in excess...

  11. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... traffic control devices. (c) Operating a vehicle at a speed in excess of the speed limit is prohibited. (d... of a vehicle on a Presidio Trust road. Signs indicating that vehicle speed is determined by the...

  12. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... traffic control devices. (c) Operating a vehicle at a speed in excess of the speed limit is prohibited. (d... of a vehicle on a Presidio Trust road. Signs indicating that vehicle speed is determined by the...

  13. Low speed phaselock speed control system. [for brushless dc motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulcher, R. W.; Sudey, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A motor speed control system for an electronically commutated brushless dc motor is provided which includes a phaselock loop with bidirectional torque control for locking the frequency output of a high density encoder, responsive to actual speed conditions, to a reference frequency signal, corresponding to the desired speed. The system includes a phase comparator, which produces an output in accordance with the difference in phase between the reference and encoder frequency signals, and an integrator-digital-to-analog converter unit, which converts the comparator output into an analog error signal voltage. Compensation circuitry, including a biasing means, is provided to convert the analog error signal voltage to a bidirectional error signal voltage which is utilized by an absolute value amplifier, rotational decoder, power amplifier-commutators, and an arrangement of commutation circuitry.

  14. Clinical Diagnoses before Age 75 and Men's Survival to Their 85th Birthday: The Manitoba Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Robert B.; Michaels, Leon; Cuddy, T. Edward; Bayomi, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Of all Canadian and American men who live to age 75 years, about half can expect to live to age 85. Our objective is to examine how clinical diagnoses made before age 75 relate to a man's survival to age 85 years. Design and Methods: Since 1948, a cohort of 3,983 young men (mean age of 31 years at entry) has been followed with routine…

  15. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Diego Paiva; Cianciaruso, Marco; Céleri, Lucas C.; Adesso, Gerardo; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.

    2016-04-01

    The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the nonuniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum-state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits and provides instances of novel bounds that are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, demonstrating the importance of choosing different information metrics for open system dynamics, as well as clarifying the roles of classical populations versus quantum coherences, in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  16. Measuring Speeds with Microwave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillberry, Logan

    2014-03-01

    The speed of an approximately frictionless cart is simultaneously measured in two ways. A 10.5 GHz microwave source is used in the familiar Michelson interferometry setup with one of the arms being the mobile cart and the other being a stationary microwave receiver. As the cart travels, the changing interference pattern is captured on an oscilloscope which, when combined with the source frequency, can be used to determine the cart's speed. The second speed measurement is achieved by sending a laser beam across the cart's path into a photo detector which is connected a second channel on the oscilloscope. The cart breaks the beam and travels a distance equal to its length before allowing the beam to reach the photo detector again. Using the oscilloscope's timing measurement and the known cart length, one can readily calculate the cart's speed. Comparison of the two methods conveys agreement within error, confirming the path length difference model used to calculate the speed of the cart in the microwave interferometry method.

  17. Spatial layout affects speed discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1997-01-01

    We address a surprising result in a previous study of speed discrimination with multiple moving gratings: discrimination thresholds decreased when the number of stimuli was increased, but remained unchanged when the area of a single stimulus was increased [Verghese & Stone (1995). Vision Research, 35, 2811-2823]. In this study, we manipulated the spatial- and phase relationship between multiple grating patches to determine their effect on speed discrimination thresholds. In a fusion experiment, we merged multiple stimulus patches, in stages, into a single patch. Thresholds increased as the patches were brought closer and their phase relationship was adjusted to be consistent with a single patch. Thresholds increased further still as these patches were fused into a single patch. In a fission experiment, we divided a single large patch into multiple patches by superimposing a cross with luminance equal to that of the background. Thresholds decreased as the large patch was divided into quadrants and decreased further as the quadrants were maximally separated. However, when the cross luminance was darker than the background, it was perceived as an occluder and thresholds, on average, were unchanged from that for the single large patch. A control experiment shows that the observed trend in discrimination thresholds is not due to the differences in perceived speed of the stimuli. These results suggest that the parsing of the visual image into entities affects the combination of speed information across space, and that each discrete entity effectively provides a single independent estimate of speed.

  18. High speed laser tomography system.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, D; Elsaesser, A; Edwards, A; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2008-03-01

    A high speed laser tomography system was developed capable of acquiring three-dimensional (3D) images of optically thin clouds of moving micron-sized particles. It operates by parallel-shifting an illuminating laser sheet with a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors and synchronously recording two-dimensional (2D) images of thin slices of the imaged volume. The maximum scanning speed achieved was 120,000 slices/s, sequences of 24 volume scans (up to 256 slices each) have been obtained. The 2D slices were stacked to form 3D images of the volume, then the positions of the particles were identified and followed in the consecutive scans. The system was used to image a complex plasma with particles moving at speeds up to cm/s. PMID:18377040

  19. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  20. The speed of Galileon gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the speed of gravitational waves in coupled Galileon models with an equation of state ωphi=-1 now and a ghost-free Minkowski limit. We find that the gravitational waves propagate much faster than the speed of light unless these models are small perturbations of cubic Galileons and the Galileon energy density is sub-dominant to a dominant cosmological constant. In this case, the binary pulsar bounds on the speed of gravitational waves can be satisfied and the equation of state can be close to -1 when the coupling to matter and the coefficient of the cubic term of the Galileon Lagrangian are related. This severely restricts the allowed cosmological behaviour of Galileon models and we are forced to conclude that Galileons with a stable Minkowski limit cannot account for the observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe on their own. Moreover any sub-dominant Galileon component of our universe must be dominated by the cubic term. For such models with gravitons propagating faster than the speed of light, the gravitons become potentially unstable and could decay into photon pairs. They could also emit photons by Cerenkov radiation. We show that the decay rate of such speedy gravitons into photons and the Cerenkov radiation are in fact negligible. Moreover the time delay between the gravitational signal and light emitted by explosive astrophysical events could serve as a confirmation that a modification of gravity acts on the largest scales of the Universe.

  1. An inexpensive vehicle speed detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, P., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Low-power minicomputer can plug into automobile cigarette lighter. It measures time it takes observed car to travel premeasured distance and provides immediate readout of speed. Potentially, detector could be manufactured for less than $200 per unit and would have very low maintenance cost.

  2. The Speeding Car Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    All too often, one reads about high-speed police chases in pursuit of stolen cars that result in death and injury to people and innocent bystanders. Isn't there another way to accomplish the apprehension of the thieves that does not put people at such great risk? This article presents a classroom challenge to use technology to remotely shutdown…

  3. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  4. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  5. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  6. Cloud shadow Speed Sensor (CSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Victor

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system that measures cloud shadow motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short-term forecasting is presented. The Cloud shadow Speed Sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and a high-speed data acquisition system to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud shadow motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground-measured irradiance (linear cloud edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego sky imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15° and 6 % accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud shadow directions and speeds with average weighted root-mean-square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s -1 when compared to LCE results.

  7. Algebra 1's Speed Trap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Neil Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Students often look for real-life situations where they can apply the concepts they learn. A project of measuring the speed of moving cars demonstrates that they learn communication skills, teamwork skills, and develop patience specially when work in a group with a common purpose.

  8. The Art Speed of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jan

    2006-03-01

    The Roman poet Horace predicted correctly his phrase aere perennius, would last ``longer than bronze'' because the Ode he wrote travels to the eye at nearly the speed of light regardless of the rate of the decay of the paper it's written on. John Keats's 19th century Ode predicted correctly the youthful figures he saw on a bronze age Grecian Urn moved in ``slow time'' aging little from the time of painting to the time of his viewing in the British museum-and to ours today of the same urn. The youthful images of the Keystone Kops have aged slower than their twins-- their mortal actors. Discoveries about light's speed occurred synchronously with the engineering of telegraph and radio transmissions in the 19th century-which allowed anyone an experience of what Physics had discovered. Einstein's privotal papers appeared in the same year as the first feature film shot and transmitted at the speed of light regardless of the aging of the film stock. Experiencing the light-like speed of art in Keat's ode, Cubism, Bob and Ray's radio, the Keystone Kops provides an aesthetic, visceral understanding of Einstein's Twin's Paradox about the dilation of time.

  9. Speed Judgements of Transparent Stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    When two moving patterns are combined additively, observers often perceive two transparent surfaces, even when there are no cues supporting this segmentation in a frozen snapshot. We examined the ability of observers to make quantitative judgments about the speed of one of the patterns under these conditions. The component patterns consisted of band-pass filtered random noise presented in a spatial Gaussian contrast envelope, presented for 250 ms. On each trial a standard pattern appeared on one side of the fixation point, while a test pattern appeared on the other. The test pattern moved in the same direction as the standard, but with a speed which varied from trial to trial using a staircase procedure. The subjects' task was to report the side of the fixation point on which faster motion was seen. In some conditions the test stimulus was made to appear transparent by adding a mask pattern. When the mask was stationary, or moved slowly with respect to the test, no significant biases were introduced and discrimination performance was comparable to the no-mask condition (typically 3%). If the mask moved over the test with similar speed, however, the task became much harder, regardless of whether the mask moved opposite or orthogonal to the test. (Some subjects commented on a perceived directional repulsion between tests and orthogonally moving masks.) These results suggest the use of non-directional temporal channels in the performance of the speed discrimination task.

  10. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  11. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  13. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  14. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  17. 14 CFR 91.117 - Aircraft speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft speed. 91.117 Section 91.117... speed. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10... than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed....

  18. 14 CFR 23.49 - Stalling speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stalling speed. 23.49 Section 23.49... speed. (a) VSO (maximum landing flap configuration) and VS1 are the stalling speeds or the minimum steady flight speeds, in knots (CAS), at which the airplane is controllable with— (1) For...

  19. 14 CFR 91.117 - Aircraft speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft speed. 91.117 Section 91.117... speed. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10... than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed....

  20. 14 CFR 23.49 - Stalling speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stalling speed. 23.49 Section 23.49... speed. (a) VSO (maximum landing flap configuration) and VS1 are the stalling speeds or the minimum steady flight speeds, in knots (CAS), at which the airplane is controllable with— (1) For...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  3. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  4. 14 CFR 91.117 - Aircraft speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft speed. 91.117 Section 91.117... speed. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10... than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed....

  5. Faster Is Better: High-Speed Modems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Cliff

    1995-01-01

    Discusses using high-speed modems to access the Internet. Examines internal and external modems, data speeds, compression and error reduction, faxing and voice capabilities, and software features. Considers ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) as the future replacement of high-speed modems. Sidebars present high-speed modem product…

  6. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  7. 49 CFR 230.68 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed indicators. 230.68 Section 230.68... Tenders Speed Indicators § 230.68 Speed indicators. Steam locomotives that operate at speeds in excess of 20 miles per hour over the general system of railroad transportation shall be equipped with...

  8. 14 CFR 91.117 - Aircraft speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft speed. 91.117 Section 91.117... speed. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10... than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed....

  9. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  10. 49 CFR 229.117 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed indicators. 229.117 Section 229.117... § 229.117 Speed indicators. (a) After December 31, 1980, each locomotive used as a controlling locomotive at speeds in excess of 20 miles per hour shall be equipped with a speed indicator which is—...

  11. 14 CFR 91.117 - Aircraft speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft speed. 91.117 Section 91.117... speed. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10... than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed....

  12. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  13. 49 CFR 230.68 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed indicators. 230.68 Section 230.68... Tenders Speed Indicators § 230.68 Speed indicators. Steam locomotives that operate at speeds in excess of 20 miles per hour over the general system of railroad transportation shall be equipped with...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  16. 49 CFR 229.117 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed indicators. 229.117 Section 229.117... § 229.117 Speed indicators. (a) After December 31, 1980, each locomotive used as a controlling locomotive at speeds in excess of 20 miles per hour shall be equipped with a speed indicator which is—...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  18. Driver views on speed and enforcement.

    PubMed

    Schechtman, Edna; Bar-Gera, Hillel; Musicant, Oren

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on the results of a drivers' survey regarding the effects of speed cameras for speed enforcement in Israel. The survey was part of a larger study that accompanied the introduction of digital speed cameras. Speed camera deployment started in 2011, and till the end of 2013 twenty-one cameras were deployed in interurban road sections. Yearly surveys were taken between 2010 and 2013 in 9 gas stations near speed camera installation sites in order to capture drivers' opinions about speed and enforcement. Overall, 1993 drivers were interviewed. In terms of admitted speed behavior, 38% of the drivers in 2010, 21% in 2011, 13% in 2012 and 11% in 2013 reported that their driving speed was above the perceived posted speed limit. The proportion of drivers indicating some speed camera influence on driving decreased over the years. In addition, the majority of drivers (61%) predicted positive impact of speed cameras on safety. This result did not change significantly over the years. The main stated explanation for speed limit violations was time pressure, while the main stated explanation for respecting the posted speed was enforcement, rather than safety concerns. Linear regression and sigmoidal models were applied to describe the linkage between the reported driving speed (dependent) and the perceived posted speed (independent). The sigmoidal model fitted the data better, especially at high levels of the perceived posted speeds. That is, although the perceived posted speed increased, at some point the actual driving speed levels off (asymptote) and did not increase. Moreover, we found that the upper asymptote of the sigmoidal model decreased over the years: from 113.22 (SE=18.84)km/h in 2010 to 88.92 (SE=1.55)km/h in 2013. A wide variance in perceived speed limits suggest that drivers may not know what the speed limits really are. PMID:26773696

  19. Circuit Regulates Speed Of dc Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Charles; Padden, Robin; Brown, Floyd A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Driving circuit regulates speed of small dc permanent-magnet motor in tape recorder. Two nested feedback loops maintain speed within 1 percent of constant value. Inner loop provides coarse regulation, while outer loop removes most of variation in speed that remains in the presence of regulation by the inner loop. Compares speed of motor with commanded speed and adjusts current supplied to motor accordingly.

  20. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  1. The effects of fructose-containing sugars on weight, body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors when consumed at up to the 90th percentile population consumption level for fructose.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Yu, Zhiping; Rippe, James

    2014-08-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) and World Health Organization (WHO) have recommended restricting calories from added sugars at lower levels than the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations, which are incorporated in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (DGAs 2010). Sucrose (SUC) and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) have been singled out for particular concern, because of their fructose content, which has been specifically implicated for its atherogenic potential and possible role in elevating blood pressure through uric acid-mediated endothelial dysfunction. This study explored the effects when these sugars are consumed at typical population levels up to the 90th percentile population consumption level for fructose. Three hundred fifty five overweight or obese individuals aged 20-60 years old were placed on a eucaloric diet for 10 weeks, which incorporated SUC- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 8%, 18% or 30% of calories. There was a slight change in body weight in the entire cohort (169.1 ± 30.6 vs. 171.6 ± 31.8 lbs, p < 0.01), a decrease in HDL (52.9 ± 12.2 vs. 52.0 ± 13.9 mg/dL, p < 0.05) and an increase in triglycerides (104.1 ± 51.8 vs. 114.1 ± 64.7 mg/dL, p < 0.001). However, total cholesterol (183.5 ± 42.8 vs. 184.4 mg/dL, p > 0.05), LDL (110.3 ± 32.0 vs. 110.5 ± 38.9 mg/dL, p > 0.05), SBP (109.4 ± 10.9 vs. 108.3 ± 10.9 mmHg, p > 0.05) and DBP (72.1 ± 8.0 vs. 71.3 ± 8.0 mmHg, p > 0.05) were all unchanged. In no instance did the amount or type of sugar consumed affect the response to the intervention (interaction p > 0.05). These data suggest that: (1) when consumed as part of a normal diet, common fructose-containing sugars do not raise blood pressure, even when consumed at the 90th percentile population consumption level for fructose (five times the upper level recommended by the AHA and three times the upper level recommended by WHO); (2) changes in the lipid profile are mixed, but modest. PMID:25111121

  2. HIPPI-6400 -- Designing for speed

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.

    1998-03-01

    The emerging High Performance Parallel Interface 6400 Mbit/s interface (HIPPI-6400), is targeted as a local area network (LAN), or system area network (SAN), supporting data rates of 6400 Mbit/s (800 Mbyte/s). This is eight times the speed of Gigabit Ethernet. The features used, and the design choices made, for the data link and physical layers of HIPPI-6400, to achieve this unprecedented speed are the subject of this paper. HIPPI-6400 borrowed freely from other successful technologies such as ATM, Ethernet and the original HIPPI -- taking the best features of each and melding them with some new features. HIPPI-6400 is a cost effective reliable interconnect for distances up to 1 km; it intermixes large and small messages efficiently.

  3. Slow-Slip Propagation Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.

    2007-12-01

    Combined seismic and geodetic data from subduction zones and the Salton Trough have revealed slow slip events with reasonably well-defined propagation speeds. This in turn is suggestive of a more-or-less well- defined front separating nearly locked regions outside the slipping zone from interior regions that slide much more rapidly. Such crack-like nucleation fronts arise naturally in models of rate-and-state friction for lab-like values of a/b, where a and b are the coefficients of the velocity- and state-dependence of the frictional strength (with the surface being velocity-neutral for a/b=1). If the propagating front has a quasi-steady shape, the propagation and slip speeds are kinematically tied via the local slip gradient. Given a sufficiently sharp front, the slip gradient is given dimensionally by Δτp- r/μ', where Δτp-r is the peak-to-residual stress drop at the front and μ' the effective elastic shear modulus. Rate-and-state simulations indicate that Δτp-r is given reasonably accurately by bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc), where σ is the effective normal stress, Vmax is the maximum slip speed behind the propagating front, θi is the the value of "state" ahead of the propagating front, and Dc is the characteristic slip distance for state evolution. Except for a coefficient of order unity, Δτp-r is independent of the evolution law. This leads to Vprop/Vmax ~μ'/[bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc)]. For slip speeds a few orders of magnitude above background, \\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc) can with reasonable accuracy be assigned some representative value (~4-5, for example). Subduction zone transients propagate on the order of 10 km/day or 10-1 m/s. Geodetic data constrain the average slip speed to be a few times smaller than 1 cm/day or 10-7 m/s. However, numerical models indicate that the maximum slip speed at the front may be several times larger than the average, over a length scale that is probably too small to resolve geodetically, so a representative value of Vprop/Vmax may be ~106

  4. Experiments on high speed ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the flow and the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors for flight Mach numbers in the range of 0.5 to 0.8, primary air stagnation pressures up to 107 psig (738 kPa), and primary air stagnation temperatures up to 1250 F (677 C). The experiment verified the existence of the second solution ejector flow, where the flow after complete mixing is supersonic. Thrust augmentation in excess of 1.2 was demonstrated for both hot and cold primary jets. The experimental ejector performed better than the corresponding theoretical optimal first solution ejector, where the mixed flow is subsonic. Further studies are required to realize the full potential of the second solution ejector. The research program was started by the Flight Dynamics Research Corporation (FDRC) to investigate the characteristic of a high speed ejector which augments thrust of a jet at high flight speeds.

  5. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  6. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  7. Vortex Flows at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data are for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft with Mach numbers of 1.5 to 4.6. Data are presented to show the types of vortex structures that occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures on vehicle performance and control. The data show the presence of both small- and large-scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices. Data are shown that highlight the effect of leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. Finally, a discussion of a design approach for wings that use vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speeds is presented.

  8. High speed nano-metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Humphris, Andrew D. L.; Zhao Bin; Catto, David; Kohli, Priyanka; Howard-Knight, Jeremy P.; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2011-04-15

    For manufacturing at the nanometre scale a method for rapid and accurate measurement of the resultant functional devices is required. Although atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the requisite spatial resolution, it is severely limited in scan speed, the resolution and repeatability of vertical and lateral measurements being degraded when speed is increased. Here we present a new approach to AFM that makes a direct and feedback-independent measurement of surface height using a laser interferometer focused onto the back of the AFM tip. Combining this direct height measurement with a passive, feedback-free method for maintaining tip-sample contact removes the constraint on scan speed that comes from the bandwidth of the z-feedback loop. Conventional laser reflection detection is used for feedback control, which now plays the role of minimising tip-sample forces, rather than producing the sample topography. Using the system in conjunction with a rapid scanner, true height images are obtained with areas up to (36 x 36) {mu}m{sup 2} at 1 image/second, suitable for in-line applications.

  9. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  10. Healthy Eating in Out-of-School Time: The Promise and the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiecha, Jean L.; Hall, Georgia; Gannett, Ellen; Roth, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    More than 30 percent of American children are either overweight or obese, with a body mass index (BMI) in the 85th percentile or above. Although prevalence varies by age, sex, and ethnicity, all groups are affected. Risk of serious health problems increases with increasing BMI. Childhood obesity, characterized by BMI in the 95th percentile or…

  11. Percentage of Children with a Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... e. not age-adjusted) of civilian, non-institutionalized population are provided. Healthy BMI for children: A BMI greater than or equal to the 5th percentile and less than the 85th percentile of sex specific CDC growth charts. BMI: Body mass index, which is equal ...

  12. The President's Challenge Physical Fitness Program Packet, 1997-98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    The President's Challenge Physical Fitness Awards Program makes four awards: The Presidential Physical Fitness Award recognizes those students who score at or about the 85th percentile on all five tests; the National Physical Fitness Award for those in the 50th to 84th percentile; the Participant Award for those who fall below the 50th percentile…

  13. Dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Handman, D.

    1996-10-01

    Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  14. Systems and methods for vehicle speed management

    DOEpatents

    Sujan, Vivek Anand; Vajapeyazula, Phani; Follen, Kenneth; Wu, An; Forst, Howard Robert

    2016-03-01

    Controlling a speed of a vehicle based on at least a portion of a route grade and a route distance divided into a plurality of route sections, each including at least one of a section grade and section length. Controlling the speed of the vehicle is further based on determining a cruise control speed mode for the vehicle for each of the plurality of route sections and determining a speed reference command of the vehicle based on at least one of the cruise control speed mode, the section length, the section grade, and a current speed.

  15. Speed control with end cushion for high speed air cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Wayne W.; Solbrig, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A high speed air cylinder in which the longitudinal movement of the piston within the air cylinder tube is controlled by pressurizing the air cylinder tube on the accelerating side of the piston and releasing pressure at a controlled rate on the decelerating side of the piston. The invention also includes a method for determining the pressure required on both the accelerating and decelerating sides of the piston to move the piston with a given load through a predetermined distance at the desired velocity, bringing the piston to rest safely without piston bounce at the end of its complete stroke.

  16. Early life cognitive abilities and body weight: cross-sectional study of the association of inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, and sustained attention with BMI percentiles in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Wirt, Tamara; Schreiber, Anja; Kesztyüs, Dorothea; Steinacker, Jürgen M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association of different cognitive abilities with children's body weight adjusted for further weight influencing sociodemographic, family, and lifestyle factors. Cross-sectional data of 498 primary school children (7.0 ± 0.6 years; 49.8% boys) participating in a health promotion programme in southwest Germany were used. Children performed a computer-based test battery (KiTAP) including an inhibitory control task (Go-Nogo paradigm), a cognitive flexibility task, and a sustained attention task. Height and weight were measured in a standardized manner and converted to BMI percentiles based on national standards. Sociodemographic features (migration background and parental education), family characteristics (parental body weight), and children's lifestyle (TV consumption, physical activity, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and breakfast habits) were assessed via parental questionnaire. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility to be significant cognitive predictors for children's body weight. There was no association concerning sustained attention. The findings suggest that especially cognitive abilities known as executive functions (inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility) are associated with children's body weight. Future longitudinal and intervention studies are necessary to investigate the directionality of the association and the potential of integrating cognitive training in obesity prevention strategies. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov DRKS00000494. PMID:25874122

  17. Early Life Cognitive Abilities and Body Weight: Cross-Sectional Study of the Association of Inhibitory Control, Cognitive Flexibility, and Sustained Attention with BMI Percentiles in Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Wirt, Tamara; Schreiber, Anja; Kesztyüs, Dorothea; Steinacker, Jürgen M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association of different cognitive abilities with children's body weight adjusted for further weight influencing sociodemographic, family, and lifestyle factors. Cross-sectional data of 498 primary school children (7.0 ± 0.6 years; 49.8% boys) participating in a health promotion programme in southwest Germany were used. Children performed a computer-based test battery (KiTAP) including an inhibitory control task (Go-Nogo paradigm), a cognitive flexibility task, and a sustained attention task. Height and weight were measured in a standardized manner and converted to BMI percentiles based on national standards. Sociodemographic features (migration background and parental education), family characteristics (parental body weight), and children's lifestyle (TV consumption, physical activity, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and breakfast habits) were assessed via parental questionnaire. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility to be significant cognitive predictors for children's body weight. There was no association concerning sustained attention. The findings suggest that especially cognitive abilities known as executive functions (inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility) are associated with children's body weight. Future longitudinal and intervention studies are necessary to investigate the directionality of the association and the potential of integrating cognitive training in obesity prevention strategies. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov DRKS00000494. PMID:25874122

  18. Abdominal Organ Location, Morphology, and Rib Coverage for the 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile Males and Females in the Supine and Seated Posture using Multi-Modality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ashley R.; Gayzik, F. Scott; Moreno, Daniel P.; Martin, R. Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use data from a multi-modality image set of males and females representing the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (n=6) to examine abdominal organ location, morphology, and rib coverage variations between supine and seated postures. Medical images were acquired from volunteers in three image modalities including Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and upright MRI (uMRI). A manual and semi-automated segmentation method was used to acquire data and a registration technique was employed to conduct a comparative analysis between abdominal organs (liver, spleen, and kidneys) in both postures. Location of abdominal organs, defined by center of gravity movement, varied between postures and was found to be significant (p=0.002 to p=0.04) in multiple directions for each organ. In addition, morphology changes, including compression and expansion, were seen in each organ as a result of postural changes. Rib coverage, defined as the projected area of the ribs onto the abdominal organs, was measured in frontal, lateral, and posterior projections, and also varied between postures. A significant change in rib coverage between postures was measured for the spleen and right kidney (p=0.03 and p=0.02). The results indicate that posture affects the location, morphology and rib coverage area of abdominal organs and these implications should be noted in computational modeling efforts focused on a seated posture. PMID:24406951

  19. Speed limits, enforcement, and health consequences.

    PubMed

    Elvik, Rune

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the effects of speed limit enforcement on public health. Speed limits are commonly used around the world to regulate the maximum speed at which motor vehicles can be operated on public roads. Speed limits are statutory, and violations of them are normally sanctioned by means of fixed penalties (traffic tickets) or, in the event of serious violations, suspension of the driver's license and imposition of prison sentences. Speed limit violations are widespread in all countries for which statistics can be found. Speeding contributes more to the risk of traffic injury than do other risk factors for which estimates of population-attributable risk are available. Traffic speed strongly influences impact speed in crashes and therefore has major implications for public health. PMID:22224882

  20. Flexible high-speed CODEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segallis, Greg P.; Wernlund, Jim V.; Corry, Glen

    1993-01-01

    This report is prepared by Harris Government Communication Systems Division for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract NAS3-25087. It is written in accordance with SOW section 4.0 (d) as detailed in section 2.6. The purpose of this document is to provide a summary of the program, performance results and analysis, and a technical assessment. The purpose of this program was to develop a flexible, high-speed CODEC that provides substantial coding gain while maintaining bandwidth efficiency for use in both continuous and bursted data environments for a variety of applications.

  1. Speeding up local correlation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present two techniques that can substantially speed up the local correlation methods. The first one allows one to avoid the expensive transformation of the electron-repulsion integrals from atomic orbitals to virtual space. The second one introduces an algorithm for the residual equations in the local perturbative treatment that, in contrast to the standard scheme, does not require holding the amplitudes or residuals in memory. It is shown that even an interpreter-based implementation of the proposed algorithm in the context of local MP2 method is faster and requires less memory than the highly optimized variants of conventional algorithms.

  2. Speeding up local correlation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kats, Daniel

    2014-12-28

    We present two techniques that can substantially speed up the local correlation methods. The first one allows one to avoid the expensive transformation of the electron-repulsion integrals from atomic orbitals to virtual space. The second one introduces an algorithm for the residual equations in the local perturbative treatment that, in contrast to the standard scheme, does not require holding the amplitudes or residuals in memory. It is shown that even an interpreter-based implementation of the proposed algorithm in the context of local MP2 method is faster and requires less memory than the highly optimized variants of conventional algorithms.

  3. High speed quantitative digital microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Price, K. H.; Eskenazi, R.; Ovadya, M. M.; Navon, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital image processing hardware makes possible quantitative analysis of microscope images at high speed. This paper describes an application to automatic screening for cervical cancer. The system uses twelve MC6809 microprocessors arranged in a pipeline multiprocessor configuration. Each processor executes one part of the algorithm on each cell image as it passes through the pipeline. Each processor communicates with its upstream and downstream neighbors via shared two-port memory. Thus no time is devoted to input-output operations as such. This configuration is expected to be at least ten times faster than previous systems.

  4. High-Speed TCP Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, David E.; Gassman, Holly; Beering, Dave R.; Welch, Arun; Hoder, Douglas J.; Ivancic, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is the underlying protocol used within the Internet for reliable information transfer. As such, there is great interest to have all implementations of TCP efficiently interoperate. This is particularly important for links exhibiting long bandwidth-delay products. The tools exist to perform TCP analysis at low rates and low delays. However, for extremely high-rate and lone-delay links such as 622 Mbps over geosynchronous satellites, new tools and testing techniques are required. This paper describes the tools and techniques used to analyze and debug various TCP implementations over high-speed, long-delay links.

  5. A high speed sequential decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The performance and theory of operation for the High Speed Hard Decision Sequential Decoder are delineated. The decoder is a forward error correction system which is capable of accepting data from binary-phase-shift-keyed and quadriphase-shift-keyed modems at input data rates up to 30 megabits per second. Test results show that the decoder is capable of maintaining a composite error rate of 0.00001 at an input E sub b/N sub o of 5.6 db. This performance has been obtained with minimum circuit complexity.

  6. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  7. Factors Affecting the Speed of Free Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrier, Jonathan; Horne, Joanna; Singleton, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Factors affecting the free writing speed of 11-year-old students were investigated using the Group and Individual Assessment of Handwriting Speed. Intelligence, gender, legibility and whether the student has special educational needs or speaks English as an additional language were all found to impact on writing speed to a significant extent. In…

  8. Reading Speed of Contracted French Braille

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroche, Louise; Boule, Jacinthe; Wittich, Walter

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to address three hypotheses: (1) The reading speed of both readers of French braille and readers of French print will be faster in the silent condition; however, this gain in speed will be larger for print readers; (2) Individuals who acquired braille before age 10 will display faster reading speeds at lower error rates…

  9. Basic principles of variable speed drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.

    1973-01-01

    An understanding of the principles which govern variable speed drive operation is discussed for successful drive application. The fundamental factors of torque, speed ratio, and power as they relate to drive selection are discussed. The basic types of variable speed drives, their operating characteristics and their applications are also presented.

  10. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  11. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  12. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  13. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  14. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  15. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  16. 49 CFR 236.812 - Speed, restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed, restricted. 236.812 Section 236.812 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, restricted. A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision, but...

  17. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  18. 14 CFR 25.103 - Stall speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stall speed. 25.103 Section 25.103... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.103 Stall speed. (a) The reference stall speed, VSR, is a calibrated airspeed defined by the applicant. VSR may not be less than a 1-g...

  19. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section 1004.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.21 Speed limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles...

  20. SPINDLE SPEED EFFECTS ON COTTON QUALITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and harvested at three different spindle speeds (1500, 2000, and 2400 rpm). Stalk losses were significantly greater with a spindle speed of 1500 rpm than with the higher spindle speeds, particularly for the D...

  1. 49 CFR 236.812 - Speed, restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed, restricted. 236.812 Section 236.812 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, restricted. A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision, but...

  2. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  3. 14 CFR 25.103 - Stall speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stall speed. 25.103 Section 25.103... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.103 Stall speed. (a) The reference stall speed, VSR, is a calibrated airspeed defined by the applicant. VSR may not be less than a 1-g...

  4. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  5. 14 CFR 25.103 - Stall speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stall speed. 25.103 Section 25.103... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.103 Stall speed. (a) The reference stall speed, VSR, is a calibrated airspeed defined by the applicant. VSR may not be less than a 1-g...

  6. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  7. 49 CFR 236.812 - Speed, restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed, restricted. 236.812 Section 236.812 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, restricted. A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision, but...

  8. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  9. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  10. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 25.107 Section 25.107... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.107 Takeoff speeds. (a) V1 must be... be less than VEF plus the speed gained with critical engine inoperative during the time...

  11. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  12. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  13. Preliminary study of high-speed machining

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of a high speed machining process has been established for application to Bendix aluminum products, based upon information gained through visits to existing high speed machining facilities and by the completion of a representative Bendix part using this process. The need for an experimental high speed machining capability at Bendix for further process evaluation is established.

  14. 49 CFR 229.117 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... normal position under all light conditions. (b) Each speed indicator required shall be tested as soon as... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed indicators. 229.117 Section 229.117... § 229.117 Speed indicators. (a) After December 31, 1980, each locomotive used as a...

  15. 32 CFR 636.22 - Speed regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.145). ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed regulations. 636.22 Section 636.22... § 636.22 Speed regulations. (a) Georgia state speed limits apply unless otherwise specified by this...

  16. 49 CFR 229.117 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... normal position under all light conditions. (b) Each speed indicator required shall be tested as soon as... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed indicators. 229.117 Section 229.117... § 229.117 Speed indicators. (a) After December 31, 1980, each locomotive used as a...

  17. 49 CFR 229.117 - Speed indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... normal position under all light conditions. (b) Each speed indicator required shall be tested as soon as... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed indicators. 229.117 Section 229.117... § 229.117 Speed indicators. (a) After December 31, 1980, each locomotive used as a...

  18. Why Does Light Have a Finite Speed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusca, Stephen

    1985-01-01

    Examines the question "Why does light travel at speed c?", dispelling the widespread qualitative notion that the speed of light results from time delays in the interaction of electric and magnetic fields. Also presents information by which readers can work on their own qualitative insights concerning the speed of light. (JN)

  19. 49 CFR 236.812 - Speed, restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed, restricted. 236.812 Section 236.812 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, restricted. A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision, but...

  20. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section 1004.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.21 Speed limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles...

  1. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section 1004.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.21 Speed limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles...

  2. 32 CFR 636.22 - Speed regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.145). ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed regulations. 636.22 Section 636.22... § 636.22 Speed regulations. (a) Georgia state speed limits apply unless otherwise specified by this...

  3. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  4. 49 CFR 236.812 - Speed, restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed, restricted. 236.812 Section 236.812 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, restricted. A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision, but...

  5. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  6. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  7. 14 CFR 25.103 - Stall speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stall speed. 25.103 Section 25.103... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.103 Stall speed. (a) The reference stall speed, VSR, is a calibrated airspeed defined by the applicant. VSR may not be less than a 1-g...

  8. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  9. 49 CFR 236.811 - Speed, medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed, medium. 236.811 Section 236.811 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, medium. A speed not exceeding 40 miles per hour....

  10. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  11. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 25.107 Section 25.107... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.107 Takeoff speeds. (a) V1 must be... be less than VEF plus the speed gained with critical engine inoperative during the time...

  12. 14 CFR 25.103 - Stall speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stall speed. 25.103 Section 25.103... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.103 Stall speed. (a) The reference stall speed, VSR, is a calibrated airspeed defined by the applicant. VSR may not be less than a 1-g...

  13. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff speeds. 25.107 Section 25.107... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.107 Takeoff speeds. (a) V1 must be... be less than VEF plus the speed gained with critical engine inoperative during the time...

  14. High speed flow past wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norstrud, H.

    1973-01-01

    The analytical solution to the transonic small perturbation equation which describes steady compressible flow past finite wings at subsonic speeds can be expressed as a nonlinear integral equation with the perturbation velocity potential as the unknown function. This known formulation is substituted by a system of nonlinear algebraic equations to which various methods are applicable for its solution. Due to the presence of mathematical discontinuities in the flow solutions, however, a main computational difficulty was to ensure uniqueness of the solutions when local velocities on the wing exceeded the speed of sound. For continuous solutions this was achieved by embedding the algebraic system in an one-parameter operator homotopy in order to apply the method of parametric differentiation. The solution to the initial system of equations appears then as a solution to a Cauchy problem where the initial condition is related to the accompanying incompressible flow solution. In using this technique, however, a continuous dependence of the solution development on the initial data is lost when the solution reaches the minimum bifurcation point. A steepest descent iteration technique was therefore, added to the computational scheme for the calculation of discontinuous flow solutions. Results for purely subsonic flows and supersonic flows with and without compression shocks are given and compared with other available theoretical solutions.

  15. Remote Transmission at High Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Omni and NASA Test Operations at Stennis entered a Dual-Use Agreement to develop the FOTR-125, a 125 megabit-per-second fiber-optic transceiver that allows accurate digital recordings over a great distance. The transceiver s fiber-optic link can be as long as 25 kilometers. This makes it much longer than the standard coaxial link, which can be no longer than 50 meters.The FOTR-125 utilizes laser diode transmitter modules and integrated receivers for the optical interface. Two transmitters and two receivers are employed at each end of the link with automatic or manual switchover to maximize the reliability of the communications link. NASA uses the transceiver in Stennis High-Speed Data Acquisition System (HSDAS). The HSDAS consists of several identical systems installed on the Center s test stands to process all high-speed data related to its propulsion test programs. These transceivers allow the recorder and HSDAS controls to be located in the Test Control Center in a remote location while the digitizer is located on the test stand.

  16. A speed limit for evolution.

    PubMed

    Worden, R P

    1995-09-01

    An upper bound on the speed of evolution is derived. The bound concerns the amount of genetic information which is expressed in observable ways in various aspects of the phenotype. The genetic information expressed in some part of the phenotype of a species cannot increase faster than a given rate, determined by the selection pressure on that part. This rate is typically a small fraction of a bit per generation. Total expressed genetic information cannot increase faster than a species-specific rate--typically a few bits per generation. These bounds apply to all aspects of the phenotype, but are particularly relevant to cognition. As brains are highly complex, we expect large amounts of expressed genetic information in the brain--of the order of 100 kilobytes--yet evolutionary changes in brain genetic information are only a fraction of a bit per generation. This has important consequences for cognitive evolution. The limit implies that the human brain differs from the chimpanzee brain by at most 5 kilobytes of genetic design information. This is not enough to define a Language Acquisition Device, unless it depends heavily on pre-existing primate symbolic cognition. Subject to the evolutionary speed limit, in changing environments a simple, modular brain architecture is fitter than more complex ones. This encourages us to look for simplicity in brain design, rather than expecting the brain to be a patchwork of ad hoc adaptations. The limit implies that pure species selection is not an important mechanism of evolutionary change. PMID:7475097

  17. High speed hybrid active system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Ignacio F.; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Qing, Peter X.; Kumar, Amrita; Zhang, David

    2005-05-01

    A novel piezoelectric/fiber-optic system is developed for long-term health monitoring of aerospace vehicles and structures. The hybrid diagnostic system uses the piezoelectric actuators to input a controlled excitation to the structure and the fiber optic sensors to capture the corresponding structural response. The aim of the system is to detect changes in structures such as those found in aerospace applications (damage, cracks, aging, etc.). This system involves the use of fiber Bragg gratings, which may be either bonded to the surface of the material or embedded within it in order to detect the linear strain component produced by the excitation waves generate by an arbitrary waveform generator. Interrogation of the Bragg gratings is carried out using a high speed fiber grating demodulation unit and a high speed data acquisition card to provide actuation input. With data collection and information processing; is able to determine the condition of the structure. The demands on a system suitable for detecting ultrasonic acoustic waves are different than for the more common strain and temperature systems. On the one hand, the frequency is much higher, with typical values for ultrasonic frequencies used in non-destructive testing ranging from 100 kHz up to several MHz. On the other hand, the related strain levels are much lower, normally in the μstrain range. Fiber-optic solutions for this problem do exist and are particularly attractive for ultrasonic sensing as the sensors offer broadband detection capability.

  18. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm. PMID:22047319

  19. The Measurement of Air Speed in Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1937-01-01

    Various methods of measuring the air speed of airplanes are described. Particular emphasis is placed on the procedure required to obtain precise measurements of speed by the use of the suspended Pitot-static head or the suspended static head. Typical calibration curves for service installations of Pitot-static heads are shown and the relation between errors in air speed and corresponding errors in observed altitude for such installations is discussed. There is included a brief discussion of various speed-course methods of measuring speed.

  20. Increase in friction force with sliding speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2005-09-01

    A block sliding down an inclined plane normally accelerates. However, if the friction force increases with speed, then the block can slide at a constant terminal speed in a manner similar to the fall of an object through a fluid. Measurements of the increase in the coefficient of friction for tennis ball cloth sliding on a smooth surface are described over speeds varying by a factor of 9000. For the low speed measurements, the ball cloth was attached to the bottom of a weighted box and pulled along a horizontal surface by a constant horizontal force. Results at higher speeds were obtained by bouncing a tennis ball off the surface.

  1. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Drive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Winiarski, David W.

    2002-08-18

    Adjustable speed drive (ASD) technologies have the ability to precisely control motor sytems output and produce a numbr of benefits including energy and demand savings. This report examines the performance and cost effectiveness of a specific class of ASDs called magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drives (MC-ASD) which use the strength of a magnetic field to control the amount of torque transferred between motor and drive shaft. The MagnaDrive Adjustable Speed Coupling System uses fixed rare-earth magnets and varies the distance between rotating plates in the assembly. the PAYBACK Variable Speed Drive uses an electromagnet to control the speed of the drive

  2. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R.; Dodge, Charles; Semones, Edward J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  3. Unsafe at Any (Wind) Speed?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Thomas; Hammer, Barbara; King, Paul; Ono, Yuichi; Miller, L. Scott; Thumann, Gregory

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this research was to examine the relative safety and stability of stationary motor vehicles exposed to severe winds. The focus was on private passenger vehicles. 1) The behavior of two instrumented storm-chase vehicles that were exposed to severe winds, 2) the behavior of 291 vehicles exposed to a tornado, and 3) the wind speed required to upset a sedan and a minivan exposed to winds in a wind tunnel were studied. A wind as strong as 47 m s1 (105 mph) has been measured by a storm-chase pickup truck and 44 m s1 (98 mph) by a storm chase sedan. The vehicles were not adversely affected by the wind. Also studied were 291 vehicles parked outdoors at homes struck by tornadoes, and the behavior of the vehicles was compared to the F-scale damage to the house. At sites with F1 or F2 damage, 72% of the vehicles were not moved by the wind and 96% were not tipped over. At sites with F3 or F4 damage, 50% were not moved by the wind and 82% were not tipped over. Wind tunnel tests on a sedan and minivan showed they were most vulnerable to upset (lifting of one tire from the ground) with wind directions near 45° and 135°, as measured from the front. When modeled with 5° of suspension tilt to the side, the sedan was found to be upset at wind speeds of 51-67 m s1 (115-150 mph), and the minivan was upset at wind speeds of 58-80 m s1 (130-180 mph). Although an underground shelter or sturdy building offer the best protection from severe winds, it is found that a vehicle may be a relatively stable place and may be safer than a mobile home or the outdoors. These findings may warrant changes to public recommendations made during tornado warnings and other severe storm situations.

  4. Speed tuning of motion segmentation and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. S.; Mestre, D. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1999-01-01

    Motion transparency requires that the visual system distinguish different motion vectors and selectively integrate similar motion vectors over space into the perception of multiple surfaces moving through or over each other. Using large-field (7 degrees x 7 degrees) displays containing two populations of random-dots moving in the same (horizontal) direction but at different speeds, we examined speed-based segmentation by measuring the speed difference above which observers can perceive two moving surfaces. We systematically investigated this 'speed-segmentation' threshold as a function of speed and stimulus duration, and found that it increases sharply for speeds above approximately 8 degrees/s. In addition, speed-segmentation thresholds decrease with stimulus duration out to approximately 200 ms. In contrast, under matched conditions, speed-discrimination thresholds stay low at least out to 16 degrees/s and decrease with increasing stimulus duration at a faster rate than for speed segmentation. Thus, motion segmentation and motion discrimination exhibit different speed selectivity and different temporal integration characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of the speed preferences of different neuronal populations within the primate visual cortex.

  5. Behavioural effects of fixed speed cameras on motorways: overall improved speed compliance or kangaroo jumps?

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ellen; Daniels, Stijn; Brijs, Tom; Hermans, Elke; Wets, Geert

    2014-12-01

    The present study evaluates the speed effects of fixed speed cameras on motorways. Two locations with speed cameras were extensively examined in a quasi-experiment: (1) a two-lane motorway and (2) a three-lane motorway, each with a posted speed limit of 120 km/h and sited in Flanders, Belgium. The effect is analysed through a before-and-after comparison of travel speeds. General time trends and fluctuations were controlled through the analysis of the speeds at comparison locations. At each of the two roads, data were gathered at five measurement points from 3 km upstream to 3.8 km downstream of the camera. Three outcomes were analysed: (1) average speed, (2) the odds of drivers exceeding the speed limit and (3) the odds of drivers exceeding the speed limit by more than 10%. Speeds decreased on average by 6.4 km/h at the camera locations. Both the odds of drivers exceeding the speed limit (-80%) and the odds of drivers exceeding the speed limit by more than 10% (-86%) decreased considerably. However, before and beyond the cameras the speeds hardly, if at all, reduced. Moreover, the analyses of the speed profiles before and beyond the cameras show that drivers do slow down quite abruptly before the camera and speed up again after passing the camera. It is concluded that a V-profile is found in the spatial speed distribution for both locations. PMID:25217731

  6. 76 FR 8917 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ...; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design features include a high speed protection system. These proposed special conditions contain the... Design Features The GVI is equipped with a high speed protection system that limits nose down...

  7. Wind speeds on extrasolar worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allers, Katelyn; Biller, Beth; Vos, Johanna; Williams, Peter; Berger, Edo

    2016-08-01

    We propose for photometric monitoring observations of 2MASS J10475385+2124234 and WISE J112254.73+255021.5 using Spitzer/IRAC. 2MASS J1047+21 and WISE J1122+25 are late spectral type (T6.5 and T6) radio emitters and have measured radio periods of 1.77 hrs and 1.30 hrs, respectively. Our proposed observations will not only characterize the variability of the two coolest known radio emitters but also provide a unique opportunity to measure the first wind speeds for brown dwarfs. Spitzer is currently the only facility capable of the photometric stability, continuous observations and 4.5 micron sensitivity necessary for the success of our program.

  8. Propagation Speed in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (H.H.) equations modified by Dodge for Rana pipiens myelinated nerve have been solved to determine how well the theory predicts the effects of changes of temperature and [Na+]0 on propagation. Conduction speed θ was found to have an approximately exponential dependence on temperature as was found experimentally, but the theoretical temperature coefficient (Q10) was low; 1.5 compared with the experimental finding of 2.95. θ was found to be a linear function of log ([Na+]0) in contrast to the experimental finding of a square root dependence on [Na+]0. θ is 50% greater at one-fourth normal [Na+]0 than the theory predicts. The difference between the theoretical θ([Na+]0) and the experimental θ([Na+]0) is probably due to an imprecisely known variation of parameters and not to a fundamental inadequacy of the theory. PMID:4542941

  9. Speed of complex network synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabow, C.; Grosskinsky, S.; Timme, M.

    2011-12-01

    Synchrony is one of the most common dynamical states emerging on networks. The speed of convergence towards synchrony provides a fundamental collective time scale for synchronizing systems. Here we study the asymptotic synchronization times for directed networks with topologies ranging from completely ordered, grid-like, to completely disordered, random, including intermediate, partially disordered topologies. We extend the approach of master stability functions to quantify synchronization times. We find that the synchronization times strongly and systematically depend on the network topology. In particular, at fixed in-degree, stronger topological randomness induces faster synchronization, whereas at fixed path length, synchronization is slowest for intermediate randomness in the small-world regime. Randomly rewiring real-world neural, social and transport networks confirms this picture.

  10. High-speed data search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James N.

    1994-01-01

    The high-speed data search system developed for KSC incorporates existing and emerging information retrieval technology to help a user intelligently and rapidly locate information found in large textual databases. This technology includes: natural language input; statistical ranking of retrieved information; an artificial intelligence concept called semantics, where 'surface level' knowledge found in text is used to improve the ranking of retrieved information; and relevance feedback, where user judgements about viewed information are used to automatically modify the search for further information. Semantics and relevance feedback are features of the system which are not available commercially. The system further demonstrates focus on paragraphs of information to decide relevance; and it can be used (without modification) to intelligently search all kinds of document collections, such as collections of legal documents medical documents, news stories, patents, and so forth. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of statistical ranking, our semantic improvement, and relevance feedback.

  11. Flexible High Speed Codec (FHSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segallis, G. P.; Wernlund, J. V.

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing NASA/Harris Flexible High Speed Codec (FHSC) program is described. The program objectives are to design and build an encoder decoder that allows operation in either burst or continuous modes at data rates of up to 300 megabits per second. The decoder handles both hard and soft decision decoding and can switch between modes on a burst by burst basis. Bandspreading is low since the code rate is greater than or equal to 7/8. The encoder and a hard decision decoder fit on a single application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip. A soft decision applique is implemented using 300 K emitter coupled logic (ECL) which can be easily translated to an ECL gate array.

  12. High-Speed Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, T. R.

    The large surveys and sensitive instruments of modern astronomy are turning ever more examples of variable objects, many of which are extending the parameter space to testing theories of stellar evolution and accretion. Future projects such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will only add more challenging candidates to this list. Understanding such objects often requires fast spectroscopy, but the trend for ever larger detectors makes this difficult. In this contribution I outline the science made possible by high-speed spectroscopy, and consider how a combination of the well-known progress in computer technology combined with recent advances in CCD detectors may finally enable it to become a standard tool of astrophysics.

  13. Condeep drainage systems speed consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The foundation drainage systems underlying the 6 Condeep platforms installed in the North Sea have successfully speeded up the rate of sediment consolidation and stabilization of the platform. The systems on 2 of the first concrete gravity units have now been shut down after full consolidation. The drainage, or antiliquefaction system, is vital during the first storm periods before full consolidation has taken place. In the case of the last Condeep platforms installed on stiff clays, full consolidation has taken place within a period of 2 yr. As the base of each concrete gravity platform is divided into skirt compartments, it is possible to adjust the water pressure within each compartment separately and adjust for the tilting of the structure.

  14. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as "strobe kickout". The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition.

  15. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as ``strobe kickout``. The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition. 16 figs.

  16. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    Using a robotic telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, astronomers have for the first time measured the velocity of the explosions known as gamma-ray bursts. The material is travelling at the extraordinary speed of more than 99.999% of the velocity of light, the maximum speed limit in the Universe. ESO PR Photo 26a/07 ESO PR Photo 26a/07 The REM Telescope "With the development of fast-slewing ground-based telescopes such as the 0.6-m REM telescope at ESO La Silla, we can now study in great detail the very first moments following these cosmic catastrophes," says Emilio Molinari, leader of the team that made the discovery. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful explosions occurring in distant galaxies, that often signal the death of stars. They are so bright that, for a brief moment, they almost rival the whole Universe in luminosity. They last, however, for only a very short time, from less than a second to a few minutes. Astronomers have long known that, in order to emit such incredible power in so little time, the exploding material must be moving at a speed comparable with that of light, namely 300 000 km per second. By studying the temporal evolution of the burst luminosity, it has now been possible for the first time to precisely measure this velocity. Gamma-ray bursts, which are unseen by our eyes, are discovered by artificial satellites. The collision of the gamma-ray burst jets into the surrounding gas generates an afterglow visible in the optical and near-infrared that can radiate for several weeks. An array of robotic telescopes were built on the ground, ready to catch this vanishing emission (see e.g. ESO 17/07). On 18 April and 7 June 2006, the NASA/PPARC/ASI Swift satellite detected two bright gamma-ray bursts. In a matter of a few seconds, their position was transmitted to the ground, and the REM telescope began automatically to observe the two GRB fields, detecting the near-infrared afterglows, and monitored the evolution of their luminosity as a

  17. Snow particle speeds in drifting snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Chika; Ito, Yoichi; Nemoto, Masaki; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Bellot, Hervé; Fujita, Koji

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of snow particle speeds is necessary for deepening our understanding of the internal structures of drifting snow. In this study, we utilized a snow particle counter (SPC) developed to observe snow particle size distributions and snow mass flux. Using high-frequency signals from the SPC transducer, we obtained the sizes of individual particles and their durations in the sampling area. Measurements were first conducted in the field, with more precise measurements being obtained in a boundary layer established in a cold wind tunnel. The obtained results were compared with the results of a numerical analysis. Data on snow particle speeds, vertical velocity profiles, and their dependence on wind speed obtained in the field and in the wind tunnel experiments were in good agreement: both snow particle speed and wind speed increased with height, and the former was always 1 to 2 m s-1 less than the latter below a height of 1 m. Thus, we succeeded in obtaining snow particle speeds in drifting snow, as well as revealing the dependence of particle speed on both grain size and wind speed. The results were verified by similar trends observed using random flight simulations. However, the difference between the particle speed and the wind speed in the simulations was much greater than that observed under real conditions. Snow transport by wind is an aeolian process. Thus, the findings presented here should be also applicable to other geophysical processes relating to the aeolian transport of particles, such as blown sand and soil.

  18. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Hull, G F; Dryden, H L

    1925-01-01

    This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency.

  19. Regulation of chromosome speeds in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Betterton, M. D.; McIntosh, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    When chromosome are being separated in preparation for cell division, their motions are slow (~16 nm/s) relative to the speed at which many motor enzymes can move their cellular cargoes (160–1000 nm/s and sometimes even faster) and at which microtubules (MTs) depolymerize (~200 nm/s). Indeed, anaphase chromosome speeds are so slow that viscous drag puts little load on the mechanisms that generate the relevant forces [35]. Available evidence suggests that chromosome speed is due to some form of regulation. For example, big and little chromosomes move at about the same speed, chromosomes that have farther to go move faster than others, and chromosome speed is affected by both temperature and an experimentally applied load. In this essay we review data on these phenomena and present our ideas about likely properties of the mechanisms that regulate chromosome speed. PMID:26405462

  20. Development of variable-shaft-speed alternator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothbart, G.; Fullwood, R.

    1982-02-01

    A variable shaft speed alternator (VSSA) consists of an ordinary unmodified 1-1/2 Hp wound-rotor motor, with polyphase excitation controlled by solid state switching and a hybrid of analog and digital circuitry. This circuitry senses both shaft speed and line phase resulting in logic levels which control the current flow in each rotor coil. A first order polynomial was found using the least-squares regression method which accurately expressed the relationship among shaft speed, excitation power, and output power, VSSA torque was inferred from observations to be proportional to output power. Efficiency for converting mechanical power to electrical was inferred over a range of shaft speeds. A break-even speed below which no net power is produced was observed to be 0.375 of the synchronous speed for all output power levels. Similar behavior was observed with power fed to the power network (grid). Additional measurements involved VSSA performance at various power factors.

  1. Speed cells in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Carmichael, James E; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2015-07-23

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex have spatial firing fields that repeat periodically in a hexagonal pattern. When animals move, activity is translated between grid cells in accordance with the animal's displacement in the environment. For this translation to occur, grid cells must have continuous access to information about instantaneous running speed. However, a powerful entorhinal speed signal has not been identified. Here we show that running speed is represented in the firing rate of a ubiquitous but functionally dedicated population of entorhinal neurons distinct from other cell populations of the local circuit, such as grid, head-direction and border cells. These 'speed cells' are characterized by a context-invariant positive, linear response to running speed, and share with grid cells a prospective bias of ∼50-80 ms. Our observations point to speed cells as a key component of the dynamic representation of self-location in the medial entorhinal cortex. PMID:26176924

  2. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  3. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  4. The effect of obesity on adverse outcomes and metabolism in pediatric burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N.; Williams, Felicia N.; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis Obesity influences metabolism and increases the incidence of clinical complications and worsens outcomes in pediatric burn patients. Design Retrospective, single-center study. Subjects Five hundred ninety-two severely burned pediatric patients who had burns covering more than 30% of the total body surface area and who were treated between 2001 and 2008 were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into ≥ 85th percentile (n = 277) and normal (n = 315) weight groups based on body mass index percentiles. Results Patients stratified below (normal) and ≥ 85th percentile had similar age, gender distribution, and total burn size. No significant differences were detected in the incidence of sepsis (11% for obese vs. 10% for normal), the incidence of multiple organ failure (21% for obese and 16% for normal), or mortality (11% for obese vs. 8% for normal). Compared to the normal group, the ≥ 85th percentile group had low levels of constitutive proteins (α2macroglobulin and Apolipoprotein A-1) (p < 0.05 for both) as well as high levels of triglycerides and the acute-phase protein, C-reactive protein (p < 0.05 for both) up to 60 days after injury. Patients ≥ 85th percentile showed a significant higher loss of bone mineral density and lipolysis compared to normal individuals. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that body mass index had a positive predictive value towards the maximum DENVER2 score, an index of organ failure (p < 0.001). Conclusions BMI ≥ 85th percentile altered the post-burn acute phase and catabolic response but did not increase the incidence of sepsis, multiple organ failure, or mortality in pediatric burn patients. Our results suggest that impaired metabolism and an altered inflammatory response occurs already in patients starting at the 85th percentile BMI. PMID:22143622

  5. IM Based Speed Servodrive with Luenberger Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacho, Juraj; Žalman, Milan

    2010-05-01

    The article concerns observing states of the Induction Motor (IM) using a Luenberger observer in the speed servo drive. The movement of the motor and observer roots is analyzed for a variable speed. Following the analysis, a new method for gain evaluation of the IM magnetic flux observer is presented. This structure is extended by including an adaptive speed observer. The functionality of the presented method is proved in simulations using MATLAB Simulink.

  6. Review of high speed communications photomultiplier detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enck, R. S.; Abraham, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    Four types of newly developed high speed photomultipliers are discussed: all electrostatic; static crossed field; dynamic crossed field; and hybrid (EBS). Design, construction, and performance parameters of each class are presented along with limitations of each class of device and prognosis for its future in high speed light detection. The particular advantage of these devices lies in high speed applications using low photon flux, large cathode areas, and broadband optical detection.

  7. ADVANCED HIGH SPEED PROGRAMMABLE PREFORMING

    SciTech Connect

    Norris Jr, Robert E; Lomax, Ronny D; Xiong, Fue; Dahl, Jeffrey S; Blanchard, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-matrix composites offer greater stiffness and strength per unit weight than conventional materials resulting in new opportunities for lightweighting of automotive and heavy vehicles. Other benefits include design flexibility, less corrosion susceptibility, and the ability to tailor properties to specific load requirements. However, widespread implementation of structural composites requires lower-cost manufacturing processes than those that are currently available. Advanced, directed-fiber preforming processes have demonstrated exceptional value for rapid preforming of large, glass-reinforced, automotive composite structures. This is due to process flexibility and inherently low material scrap rate. Hence directed fiber performing processes offer a low cost manufacturing methodology for producing preforms for a variety of structural automotive components. This paper describes work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), focused on the development and demonstration of a high speed chopper gun to enhance throughput capabilities. ORNL and the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) revised the design of a standard chopper gun to expand the operational envelope, enabling delivery of up to 20kg/min. A prototype unit was fabricated and used to demonstrate continuous chopping of multiple roving at high output over extended periods. In addition fiber handling system modifications were completed to sustain the high output the modified chopper affords. These hardware upgrades are documented along with results of process characterization and capabilities assessment.

  8. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance. PMID:12397401

  9. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, George J.; Albright, Kevin L.; Turko, Bojan T.

    1995-01-01

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment.

  10. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.L.; Turko, B.T.

    1995-11-14

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment. 12 figs.

  11. High speed all optical networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chlamtac, Imrich; Ganz, Aura

    1990-01-01

    An inherent problem of conventional point-to-point wide area network (WAN) architectures is that they cannot translate optical transmission bandwidth into comparable user available throughput due to the limiting electronic processing speed of the switching nodes. The first solution to wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) based WAN networks that overcomes this limitation is presented. The proposed Lightnet architecture takes into account the idiosyncrasies of WDM switching/transmission leading to an efficient and pragmatic solution. The Lightnet architecture trades the ample WDM bandwidth for a reduction in the number of processing stages and a simplification of each switching stage, leading to drastically increased effective network throughputs. The principle of the Lightnet architecture is the construction and use of virtual topology networks, embedded in the original network in the wavelength domain. For this construction Lightnets utilize the new concept of lightpaths which constitute the links of the virtual topology. Lightpaths are all-optical, multihop, paths in the network that allow data to be switched through intermediate nodes using high throughput passive optical switches. The use of the virtual topologies and the associated switching design introduce a number of new ideas, which are discussed in detail.

  12. Movement speed is biased by prior experience

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Nada; Greenwood, Richard; Rothwell, John C.; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    How does the motor system choose the speed for any given movement? Many current models assume a process that finds the optimal balance between the costs of moving fast and the rewards of achieving the goal. Here, we show that such models also need to take into account a prior representation of preferred movement speed, which can be changed by prolonged practice. In a time-constrained reaching task, human participants made 25-cm reaching movements within 300, 500, 700, or 900 ms. They were then trained for 3 days to execute the movement at either the slowest (900-ms) or fastest (300-ms) speed. When retested on the 4th day, movements executed under all four time constraints were biased toward the speed of the trained movement. In addition, trial-to-trial variation in speed of the trained movement was significantly reduced. These findings are indicative of a use-dependent mechanism that biases the selection of speed. Reduced speed variability was also associated with reduced errors in movement amplitude for the fast training group, which generalized nearly fully to a new movement direction. In contrast, changes in perpendicular error were specific to the trained direction. In sum, our results suggest the existence of a relatively stable but modifiable prior of preferred movement speed that influences the choice of movement speed under a range of task constraints. PMID:24133220

  13. Braking formula for electrons of relativistic speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethe, H.

    2014-11-01

    From the theory of Møller [Møller, Chr. 1931. Über den Stoß zweier Teilchen unter Berücksichtigung der Retardation der Kräfte. Zeitschrift f. Phys. 70: 786-795] the energy loss of electrons with relativistic speeds passing through matter is derived. The energy loss per centimeter of distance reaches a minimum at about 96% of the speed of light and increases again at higher speeds; for electrons of several billion Volt it is about 4 million Volt per centimeter of water. A table of the theoretical energy loss for electrons and protons of various speeds is given.

  14. Voight variable speed drive. [for windpowered generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The variable speed drive transmission is mounted within the gondola and connected with the wind turbine blades and the hub. This unit is designed for the production of ac power. The turbine turns by means of the variable speed drive and a set of synchronous three phase generators. This motion is controlled automatically by two wind rosettes in such a way that the wind turbine always opposes the wind direction. The Voight variable speed drive is a mechanical variable positive drive gear transmission. It has an unlimited power and torque transmission, a constant ratio with high degree of accuracy, a speed variation over a wide range, and a nonslip drive.

  15. Apparent speed increases at low luminance

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of luminance on apparent speed, subjects adjusted the speed of a low-luminance rotating grating (0.31 cd/m2) to match that of a high-luminance one (1260 cd/m2). Above 4 Hz, subjects overestimated the speed of the low-luminance grating. This overestimation increased as a function of temporal rate and reached 30% around 10 Hz temporal rates. The speed overestimation became significant once the lower luminance was 2.4 log units lower than the high luminance comparison. Next the role of motion smear in speed overestimation was examined. First it was shown that the length of the perceived motion smear increased at low luminances. Second, the length of the visible smear was manipulated by changing the presentation time of the stimuli. Speed overestimation was reduced at shorter presentation times. Third the speed of a blurred stimulus was compared to a stimulus with sharp edges and the blurred stimulus was judged to move faster. These results indicate that the length of motion smear following a target contributes to its perceived speed and that this leads to speed overestimation at low luminance where motion traces lengthen because of increased persistence. PMID:19146275

  16. High speed imaging - An important industrial tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alton; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    High-speed photography, which is a rapid sequence of photographs that allow an event to be analyzed through the stoppage of motion or the production of slow-motion effects, is examined. In high-speed photography 16, 35, and 70 mm film and framing rates between 64-12,000 frames per second are utilized to measure such factors as angles, velocities, failure points, and deflections. The use of dual timing lamps in high-speed photography and the difficulties encountered with exposure and programming the camera and event are discussed. The application of video cameras to the recording of high-speed events is described.

  17. High speed imaging - An important industrial tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alton; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1986-05-01

    High-speed photography, which is a rapid sequence of photographs that allow an event to be analyzed through the stoppage of motion or the production of slow-motion effects, is examined. In high-speed photography 16, 35, and 70 mm film and framing rates between 64-12,000 frames per second are utilized to measure such factors as angles, velocities, failure points, and deflections. The use of dual timing lamps in high-speed photography and the difficulties encountered with exposure and programming the camera and event are discussed. The application of video cameras to the recording of high-speed events is described.

  18. Rotor Speed Detection Method for Vector Control of Induction Motor without Speed Sensor Utilizing Slot Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyotake, Hirofumi; Shinohara, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Kichiro

    Speed sensorless vector controlled induction motor drives are the standard choice in many industrial applications, but this can hardly control torque and rotor speed at low speed. Recently, a method based on the high-frequency signal injection has been studied. This paper presents a method for suppressing the effects of the saturation saliency by using high pass filter, and a new approach to estimate the rotor speed. The effectiveness of these methods are demonstrated through experimental results showing both good suppression of saturation harmonics and good sensorless speed control at low speed.

  19. Speed of evolution on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xiukai; Wu, Bin; Wang, Long

    2015-12-01

    The likelihood that a mutant fixates in the wild population, i.e., fixation probability, has been intensively studied in evolutionary game theory, where individuals' fitness is frequency dependent. However, it is of limited interest when it takes long to take over. Thus the speed of evolution becomes an important issue. In general, it is still unclear how fixation times are affected by the population structure, although the fixation times have already been addressed in the well-mixed populations. Here we theoretically address this issue by pair approximation and diffusion approximation on regular graphs. It is shown (i) that under neutral selection, both unconditional and conditional fixation time are shortened by increasing the number of neighbors; (ii) that under weak selection, for the simplified prisoner's dilemma game, if benefit-to-cost ratio exceeds the degree of the graph, then the unconditional fixation time of a single cooperator is slower than that in the neutral case; and (iii) that under weak selection, for the conditional fixation time, limited neighbor size dilutes the counterintuitive stochastic slowdown which was found in well-mixed populations. Interestingly, we find that all of our results can be interpreted as that in the well-mixed population with a transformed payoff matrix. This interpretation is also valid for both death-birth and birth-death processes on graphs. This interpretation bridges the fixation time in the structured population and that in the well-mixed population. Thus it opens the avenue to investigate the challenging fixation time in structured populations by the known results in well-mixed populations.

  20. Occupant kinematics in low-speed frontal sled tests: Human volunteers, Hybrid III ATD, and PMHS.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Franck, Christopher T; Loftus, Stephen C

    2012-07-01

    A total of 34 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed, 17 low (2.5g, Δv=4.8kph) and 17 medium (5.0g, Δv=9.7kph), with five male human volunteers of approximately 50th percentile height and weight, a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD, and three male PMHS. Each volunteer was exposed to two impulses at each severity, one relaxed and one braced prior to the impulse. A total of four tests were performed at each severity with the ATD and one trial was performed at each severity with each PMHS. A Vicon motion analysis system, 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D kinematics (±1mm) (1kHz). Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. The forward excursions of the select anatomical regions generally increased with increasing severity. The forward excursions of relaxed human volunteers were significantly larger than those of the ATD for nearly every region at both severities. The forward excursions of the upper body regions of the braced volunteers were generally significantly smaller than those of the ATD at both severities. Forward excursions of the relaxed human volunteers and PMHSs were fairly similar except the head CG response at both severities and the right knee and C7 at the medium severity. The forward excursions of the upper body of the PMHS were generally significantly larger than those of the braced volunteers at both severities. Forward excursions of the PMHSs exceeded those of the ATD for all regions at both severities with significant differences within the upper body regions. Overall human volunteers, ATD, and PMHSs do not have identical biomechanical responses in low-speed frontal sled tests but all contribute valuable data that can be used to refine and validate computational models and ATDs used to assess injury risk in automotive collisions. PMID:22342960

  1. Comparison of corneal biomechanical properties in normal tension glaucoma patients with different visual field progression speed

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ying; Shoji, Nobuyuki; Morita, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Kazunori; Matsumura, Kazuhiro; Kasahara, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the corneal biomechanical properties difference by ocular response analyzer (ORA) in normal tension glaucoma (NTG) patients with different visual field (VF) progression speed. METHODS NTG patients with well-controlled Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) who routinely consulted Kitasato University Hospital Glaucoma Department between January 2010 and February 2014 were enrolled. GAT and ORA parameters including corneal compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc), Goldmann estimated intraocular pressure (IOPg), corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF) were recorded. VF was tested by Swedish interactive threshold algorithm (SITA)-standard 30-2 fields. All patients underwent VF measurement regularly and GAT did not exceed 15 mm Hg at any time during the 3y follow up. Patients were divided into four groups according to VF change over 3y, and ORA findings were compared between the upper 25th percentile group (slow progression group) and the lower 25th percentile group (rapid progression group). RESULTS Eighty-two eyes of 56 patients were studied. There were 21 eyes (21 patients) each in rapid and slow progression groups respectively. GAT, IOPcc, IOPg, CH, CRF were 12.1±1.4 mm Hg, 15.8±1.8 mm Hg, 12.8±2.0 mm Hg, 8.4±1.1 mm Hg, 7.9±1.3 mm Hg respectively in rapid progression group and 11.5±1.3 mm Hg, 13.5±2.1 mm Hg, 11.2±1.6 mm Hg, 9.3±1.1 mm Hg, 8.2±0.9 mm Hg respectively in slow progression group (P=0.214, <0.001, 0.007, 0.017, 0.413, respectively). In bivariate correlation analysis, IOPcc, IOPcc-GAT and CH were significant correlated with mΔMD (r=-0.292, -0.312, 0.228 respectively, P=0.008, 0.004, 0.039 respectively). CONCLUSION Relatively rapid VF progression occurred in NTG patients whose IOPcc are rather high, CH are rather low and the difference between IOPcc and GAT are relatively large. Higher IOPcc and lower CH are associated with VF progression in NTG patients. This study suggests that GAT measures might underestimate the

  2. A Simplified Relativity Expression for Speeds Approaching the Speed of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Neal P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a simplified method of calculating the speeds necessary to cause large relativistic changes and to determine the magnitudes of physical quantities as an object approaches the speed of light. Provides equations and two completed example problems. (JM)

  3. Variable-speed, portable routing skate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesch, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight, portable, variable-speed routing skate is used on heavy metal subassemblies which are impractical to move to a stationary machine. The assembly, consisting of the housing with rollers, router, and driving mechanism with transmission, weighs about forty pounds. Both speed and depth of cut are adjustable.

  4. Measuring the Speed of Sound in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper begins with an early measurement of the speed of sound in water. A historical overview of the consequent development of SONAR and medical imaging is given. A method of measuring the speed suitable for demonstration to year 10 students is described in detail, and an explanation of its systematic error examined.

  5. Speed Management Strategies; A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Saadati, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically identify the various methods of speed management and their effects. Methods: A systematic search was performed in Science Direct, Ovid Medline, Scopus, PubMed and ProQuest databases from April to June 2015. Hand searching and reference of selected articles were used to improve article identification. Articles published after 1990 which had reported on efficacy/effectiveness of speed management strategies were included. Data were extracted using pre-defined extraction table. Results: Of the 803 retrieved articles, 22 articles were included in this review. Most of the included articles (63%) had before-after design and were done in European countries. Speed cameras, engineering schemes, intelligent speed adaption (ISA), speed limits and zones, vehicle activated sign and integrated strategies were the most common strategies reported in the literature. Various strategies had different effects on mean speed of the vehicles ranging from 1.6 to 10 km/h. Moreover, 8-65% and 11-71% reduction was reported in person injured accidents and fatal accidents, respectively as a result of employing various strategies. Conclusion: Literature revealed positive effects of various speed management strategies. Using various strategies was mostly dependent on road characteristics, driver’s attitude about the strategy as well as economic and technological capabilities of the country. Political support is considered as a main determinant in selecting speed management strategies. PMID:27540546

  6. Contrast affects flicker and speed perception differently

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that contrast affects speed perception, with lower-contrast, drifting gratings perceived as moving slower. In a recent study, we examined the implications of this result on models of speed perception that use the amplitude of the response of linear spatio-temporal filters to determine speed. In this study, we investigate whether the contrast dependence of speed can be understood within the context of models in which speed estimation is made using the temporal frequency of the response of linear spatio-temporal filters. We measured the effect of contrast on flicker perception and found that contrast manipulations produce opposite effects on perceived drift rate and perceived flicker rate, i.e., reducing contrast increases the apparent temporal frequency of counterphase modulated gratings. This finding argues that, if a temporal frequency-based algorithm underlies speed perception, either flicker and speed perception must not be based on the output of the same mechanism or contrast effects on perceived spatial frequency reconcile the disparate effects observed for perceived temporal frequency and speed.

  7. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  8. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  9. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  10. Does Extensive Reading Promote Reading Speed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Mu

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown a wide range of learning benefits accruing from extensive reading. Not only is there improvement in reading, but also in a wide range of language uses and areas of language knowledge. However, few research studies have examined reading speed. The existing literature on reading speed focused on students' reading speed…

  11. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  12. High Speed Video for Airborne Instrumentation Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Ting; Reaves, Matthew; Mauldin, Kendall

    2006-01-01

    A flight-worthy high speed color video system has been developed. Extensive system development and ground and environmental. testing hes yielded a flight qualified High Speed Video System (HSVS), This HSVS was initially used on the F-15B #836 for the Lifting Insulating Foam Trajectory (LIFT) project.

  13. Speed enhancement of complementary MOS devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, M.

    1972-01-01

    Speed required for Sisyphus experiment on Pioneer probe was attained at supply voltage well within component limitations by combining supply voltage higher than nominal with low reactance interconnections. Speed was found to be far in excess of typical. parameters suggested by manufacturers of MOS devices.

  14. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  15. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  16. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  17. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  18. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  19. Spindle speed optimization for cotton pickers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes to cotton pickers over the years regarding the operating speed and size of the spindles have resulted in a general decrease in cotton fiber quality, particularly regarding spindle twists, preparation, and neps. Previous research showed that spindle speeds of 3000 and 4000 rpm had more detri...

  20. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  1. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176... Operating Restrictions § 13.1176 Speed restrictions. (a) From May 15 through September 30, in designated whale waters the following are prohibited: (1) Operating a motor vessel at more than 20 knots...

  2. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176... Operating Restrictions § 13.1176 Speed restrictions. (a) From May 15 through September 30, in designated whale waters the following are prohibited: (1) Operating a motor vessel at more than 20 knots...

  3. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  4. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  5. An automated stall-speed warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilner, D. O.; Bever, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development and testing of a stall-speed warning system for the OV-1C was examined. NASA designed and built an automated stall-speed warning system which presents both airspeed and stall speed to the pilot. The airspeed and stall speed are computed in real time by monitoring the basic aerodynamic parameters (dynamic pressure, horizontal and vertical accelerations, and pressure altitude) and other parameters (elevator and flap positions, engine torques, and fuel flow). In addition, an aural warning at predetermined stall margins is presented to the pilot through a voice synthesizer. Once the system was designed and installed in the aircraft, a flight-test program of less than 20 hrs was anticipated to determine the stall-speed software coefficients. These coefficients would then be inserted in the system's software and then test flown over a period of about 10 hr for the purpose of evaluation.

  6. Perceived visual speed constrained by image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about how or where the visual system parses the visual scene into objects or surfaces. However, it is generally assumed that the segmentation and grouping of pieces of the image into discrete entities is due to 'later' processing stages, after the 'early' processing of the visual image by local mechanisms selective for attributes such as colour, orientation, depth, and motion. Speed perception is also thought to be mediated by early mechanisms tuned for speed. Here we show that manipulating the way in which an image is parsed changes the way in which local speed information is processed. Manipulations that cause multiple stimuli to appear as parts of a single patch degrade speed discrimination, whereas manipulations that perceptually divide a single large stimulus into parts improve discrimination. These results indicate that processes as early as speed perception may be constrained by the parsing of the visual image into discrete entities.

  7. Speed and delay on signalized arterials

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, D.M.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents a model to predict the influence of traffic flow on the running speed of signalized arterials in Montgomery County, Maryland, while controlling for link length, the number of lanes, and route type. The model separates the changes to link running speed due to same-direction traffic and intersection approach delay from cross-traffic. It is found that flow has a small impact on link speed, each 1,000 v/l/h reduces speed by 4--8 k/h. Longer links have higher speeds, indicating that they more closely approximate free-flow conditions. Measures of intersection and link travel times are also compared. Although link running times exceed intersection stopped delay in general, total intersection delay (stopped and approach) exceeds the delay caused by same-direction traffic. This information can inform investment decision makers about roadway and intersection improvements.

  8. Using a High-Speed Camera to Measure the Speed of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, William Nathan; Baird, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The speed of sound is a physical property that can be measured easily in the lab. However, finding an inexpensive and intuitive way for students to determine this speed has been more involved. The introduction of affordable consumer-grade high-speed cameras (such as the Exilim EX-FC100) makes conceptually simple experiments feasible. Since the…

  9. Perceptual distortions of speed at low luminance: evidence inconsistent with a Bayesian account of speed encoding.

    PubMed

    Hammett, Stephen T; Champion, Rebecca A; Thompson, Peter G; Morland, Antony B

    2007-02-01

    Our perception of speed has been shown to be distorted under a number of viewing conditions. Recently the well-known reduction of perceived speed at low contrast has led to Bayesian models of speed perception that account for these distortions with a slow speed 'prior'. To test the predictive, rather than the descriptive, power of the Bayesian approach we have investigated perceived speed at low luminance. Our results indicate that, for the mesopic and photopic range (0.13-30 cd m(-2)) the perceived speed of lower luminance patterns is virtually unaffected at low speeds (<4 deg s(-1)) but is over-estimated at higher speeds (>4 deg s(-1)). We show here that the results can be accounted for by an extension to a simple ratio model of speed encoding [Hammett, S. T., Champion, R. A., Morland, A. & Thompson, P. G. (2005). A ratio model of perceived speed in the human visual system. Proceedings of Royal Society B, 262, 2351-2356.] that takes account of known changes in neural responses as a function of luminance, contrast and temporal frequency. The results are not consistent with current Bayesian approaches to modelling speed encoding that postulate a slow speed prior. PMID:17011014

  10. The Effects of a Speed Reading Course and Speed Transfer to Other Types of Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Tran Thi Ngoc

    2012-01-01

    Reading fluency plays an important part in academic achievement at colleges and universities. Speed reading courses, along with repeated reading and extensive reading, are popularly used methods to help students increase their reading speed. Several studies have shown the positive influence of a speed reading course in L2/FL on students' reading…

  11. 76 FR 31454 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... for Gulfstream GVI airplanes was published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2011 (76 FR 8917...; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... high speed protection system. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that...

  12. Deterministic prediction of surface wind speed variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drisya, G. V.; Kiplangat, D. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of wind speed is an important aspect of various tasks related to wind energy management such as wind turbine predictive control and wind power scheduling. The most typical characteristic of wind speed data is its persistent temporal variations. Most of the techniques reported in the literature for prediction of wind speed and power are based on statistical methods or probabilistic distribution of wind speed data. In this paper we demonstrate that deterministic forecasting methods can make accurate short-term predictions of wind speed using past data, at locations where the wind dynamics exhibit chaotic behaviour. The predictions are remarkably accurate up to 1 h with a normalised RMSE (root mean square error) of less than 0.02 and reasonably accurate up to 3 h with an error of less than 0.06. Repeated application of these methods at 234 different geographical locations for predicting wind speeds at 30-day intervals for 3 years reveals that the accuracy of prediction is more or less the same across all locations and time periods. Comparison of the results with f-ARIMA model predictions shows that the deterministic models with suitable parameters are capable of returning improved prediction accuracy and capturing the dynamical variations of the actual time series more faithfully. These methods are simple and computationally efficient and require only records of past data for making short-term wind speed forecasts within practically tolerable margin of errors.

  13. Magma fragmentation speed: an experimental determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D. B.; Alidibirov, M.

    2004-01-01

    The propagation speed of a fragmentation front, combined with the ascent velocity of magma is, in all likelihood, a controlling factor in the dynamics of explosive volcanic eruptions. Direct measurement of the 'fragmentation speed' in natural systems appears to be impossible at present. Fortunately, laboratory experiments can provide information on the propagation speed of the fragmentation front. Here we present the results of fragmentation speed determinations using a so-called 'fragmentation bomb'. These are, to the best of our knowledge, the first in situ fragmentation speed determinations performed on magma. Natural magma samples (Merapi basaltic andesite, Mount St. Helens dacite and Unzen dacite) have been investigated in the temperature range of 20-950°C and at pressures up to 25 MPa. Two techniques have been employed. Firstly, in experiments at 20°C, dynamic pressure transducers were placed above and below the magma samples and the fragmentation speed of the magma sample was derived from an analysis of the decompression curves. Secondly, at elevated temperatures, an alternative technique was introduced and successfully employed. This involved the severing via fragmentation of conducting wires placed within the samples at various heights. Fragmentation speeds are very low, falling in the range of 2-70 m/s and increasing with an increase in the magnitude of the decompression step responsible for the fragmentation. The first high-temperature determination seems consistent with low-temperature results. Implications for explosive volcanism are discussed briefly.

  14. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  15. Numerical Speed of Sound and its Application to Schemes for all Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Edwards, Jack R.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of "numerical speed of sound" is proposed in the construction of numerical flux. It is shown that this variable is responsible for the accurate resolution of' discontinuities, such as contacts and shocks. Moreover, this concept can he readily extended to deal with low speed and multiphase flows. As a results, the numerical dissipation for low speed flows is scaled with the local fluid speed, rather than the sound speed. Hence, the accuracy is enhanced the correct solution recovered, and the convergence rate improved. We also emphasize the role of mass flux and analyze the behavior of this flux. Study of mass flux is important because the numerical diffusivity introduced in it can be identified. In addition, it is the term common to all conservation equations. We show calculated results for a wide variety of flows to validate the effectiveness of using the numerical speed of sound concept in constructing the numerical flux. We especially aim at achieving these two goals: (1) improving accuracy and (2) gaining convergence rates for all speed ranges. We find that while the performance at high speed range is maintained, the flux now has the capability of performing well even with the low: speed flows. Thanks to the new numerical speed of sound, the convergence is even enhanced for the flows outside of the low speed range. To realize the usefulness of the proposed method in engineering problems, we have also performed calculations for complex 3D turbulent flows and the results are in excellent agreement with data.

  16. [Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed. Speeding is a major issue of road safety].

    PubMed

    Montoro González, Luis; Roca Ruiz, Javier; Lucas-Alba, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Extending and updating our knowledge concerning drivers' motivational and cognitive processes is of essential importance if we are to apply policies with long-lasting effects. This study presents data from a representative national survey analyzing the Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed, the risks of speeding, the degree of violation of speed-limits and the reasons for speeding. Results indicate that Spanish drivers rate speeding as a serious offence, yet not among the most dangerous ones. All in all, they claim to comply mostly with the speed limits. However, some interesting violation patterns emerge: observance is lower for generic speed limits according to road type (vs. specific limits shown by certain road signs), and particularly in motorways (vs. single carriageways and urban areas). Risk perception and reasons for speeding emerge as the main factors predicting the levels of speed violations reported. Results suggest that any effective intervention strategy should consider such factors, namely the link between speed, road safety, and drivers' specific reasons for speeding. PMID:21044524

  17. Stereomotion speed perception is contrast dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, K.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of contrast on the perception of stimulus speed for stereomotion and monocular lateral motion was investigated for successive matches in random-dot stimuli. The familiar 'Thompson effect'--that a reduction in contrast leads to a reduction in perceived speed--was found in similar proportions for both binocular images moving in depth, and for monocular images translating laterally. This result is consistent with the idea that the monocular motion system has a significant input to the stereomotion system, and dominates the speed percept for approaching motion.

  18. Is Intelligent Speed Adaptation ready for deployment?

    PubMed

    Carsten, Oliver

    2012-09-01

    There have been 30 years of research on Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA), the in-vehicle system that is designed to promote compliance with speed limits. Extensive trials of ISA in real-world driving have shown that ISA can significantly reduce speeding, users have been found to have generally positive attitudes and at least some sections of the public have been shown to be willing to purchase ISA systems. Yet large-scale deployment of a system that could deliver huge accident reductions is still by no means guaranteed. PMID:22664661

  19. Aeronautic Instruments. Section III : Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Franklin L; Stearns, H O

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 contains a discussion and description of the various types of air speed measuring instruments. The authors then give general specifications and performance requirements with the results of tests on air speed indicators at the Bureau of Standards. Part 2 reports methods and laboratory apparatus used at the Bureau of Standards to make static tests. Methods are also given of combining wind tunnel tests with static tests. Consideration is also given to free flight tests. Part 3 discusses the problem of finding suitable methods for the purpose of measuring the speed of aircraft relative to the ground.

  20. An Investigation of Airplane Landing Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, Kenneth F

    1930-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation on airplane landing speeds which was made to determine the applicability of accepted aerodynamic theory to the prediction of this particular performance characteristic. The experimental work consisted in measuring the landing speed of several monoplanes by a new photographic method. The results of these tests supplemented by available information regarding biplanes were compared with predictions made with basic aerodynamic theory. The prediction makes use of the fundamental relation between wing loading, lift coefficient, and speed of level flight, and the effects of aspect ratio and proximity to the ground on lift curve slope.

  1. Superplane!High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  2. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  3. Propulsion concepts for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stull, F. D.; Jones, R. A.; Zima, W. P.

    1975-01-01

    A wide variety of potentially useful and effective airbreathing aircraft have been postulated to operate at speeds in excess of Mach 3.0 by NASA and the USAF. These systems include hydrogen-fueled transports of interest for very long ranges and airbreathing launch vehicles which are aircraft-type first stage candidates for future space shuttle systems. Other high speed airbreathing systems for possible future military applications include advanced reconnaissance and fighter/interceptor type aircraft and strategic systems. This paper presents (1) a chronology of Air Force technical activity on future propulsion concepts, (2) a status report on NASA research on scramjet technology for future systems which may require speeds above Mach 5, and (3) a description of a research vehicle by which advanced propulsion technology and other technologies related to high speed can be demonstrated.

  4. Speed control system for a windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, C.E.

    1981-06-23

    A speed control system for a windmill having blades which can be feathered for altering speed and with the blades under the control of a mechanism which includes a piston assembly and a fluid governor associated therewith. Spring means are used to feather the blades against the force of the piston assembly which is interconnected with the blades, and the speed of blade rotation actually creates the fluid pressure acting on the piston assembly and a governor is associated with the piston assembly for controlling the position of the piston and thus controlling the feathering of the blades, all according to the speed of rotation of the windmill blades. The windmill can be used for generating electric power, and fail-safe mechanisms are employed for protecting in the event of a windmill blade breakage.

  5. Study of high speed photography measuring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Jiyu; Wu, Keyong

    2007-01-01

    High speed photograph measuring instrument is mainly used to measure and track the exterior ballistics, which can measure the flying position of the missile in the initial phase and trajectory. A new high speed photograph measuring instrument is presented in this paper. High speed photography measuring system records the parameters of object real-time, and then acquires the flying position and trajectory data of the missile in the initial phase. The detection distance of high speed photography is more than 4.5km, and the least detection distance is 450m, under the condition of well-balanced angular velocity and angular acceleration, program pilot track error less than 5'. This instrument also can measure and record the flying trail and trajectory parameters of plane's aero naval missile.

  6. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... speed increment attained (in accordance with § 25.111(c)(2)) before reaching a height of 35 feet above....111(c)(2)) that allows reaching V 2 before reaching a height of 35 feet above the takeoff surface;...

  7. 14 CFR 25.107 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... speed increment attained (in accordance with § 25.111(c)(2)) before reaching a height of 35 feet above....111(c)(2)) that allows reaching V 2 before reaching a height of 35 feet above the takeoff surface;...

  8. NASA Now Minute: The Speed of Sound

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about sonic booms and the speed of sound from aerospace engineerGeorge Hatcher as he shares the excitement of physics in hisdescription of how the space shuttles reentered Earth’s atmosph...

  9. NASA Now: The Speed of Sound

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about sonic booms and the speed of sound from aerospace engineer George Hatcher. Hatcher shares the excitement of physics in his description of the space shuttle re-entering Earth’s atmosph...

  10. Point Measurement of Detonation Wave Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F. K.; Gupta, N. K. M.; Wilson, D. R.

    Accurate determination of the speed of a detonation wave is important for studies of detonation phenomena. Different types of sensors that measure pressure, ion and flame have been used for this purpose.

  11. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  12. Should We Raise the Reading Speed Limit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David; Casanova, Ursula

    1988-01-01

    A recent study of reading rates of first grade students in Israel and America indicates that increased reading speed may improve comprehension and oral reading. Based on this finding, activities to help students read faster (and better) are suggested. (JL)

  13. Speed-Selector Guard For Machine Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhshir, Roda J.; Valentine, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Simple guardplate prevents accidental reversal of direction of rotation or sudden change of speed of lathe, milling machine, or other machine tool. Custom-made for specific machine and control settings. Allows control lever to be placed at only one setting. Operator uses handle to slide guard to engage or disengage control lever. Protects personnel from injury and equipment from damage occurring if speed- or direction-control lever inadvertently placed in wrong position.

  14. Speed control system for an access gate

    SciTech Connect

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2012-03-20

    An access control apparatus for an access gate. The access gate typically has a rotator that is configured to rotate around a rotator axis at a first variable speed in a forward direction. The access control apparatus may include a transmission that typically has an input element that is operatively connected to the rotator. The input element is generally configured to rotate at an input speed that is proportional to the first variable speed. The transmission typically also has an output element that has an output speed that is higher than the input speed. The input element and the output element may rotate around a common transmission axis. A retardation mechanism may be employed. The retardation mechanism is typically configured to rotate around a retardation mechanism axis. Generally the retardation mechanism is operatively connected to the output element of the transmission and is configured to retard motion of the access gate in the forward direction when the first variable speed is above a control-limit speed. In many embodiments the transmission axis and the retardation mechanism axis are substantially co-axial. Some embodiments include a freewheel/catch mechanism that has an input connection that is operatively connected to the rotator. The input connection may be configured to engage an output connection when the rotator is rotated at the first variable speed in a forward direction and configured for substantially unrestricted rotation when the rotator is rotated in a reverse direction opposite the forward direction. The input element of the transmission is typically operatively connected to the output connection of the freewheel/catch mechanism.

  15. Helicopter low-speed yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C. (Inventor); Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor); Crowell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system for improving yaw control at low speeds consists of one strake placed on the upper portion of the fuselage facing the retreating rotor blade and another strake placed on the lower portion of the fuselage facing the advancing rotor blade. These strakes spoil the airflow on the helicopter tail boom during hover, low speed flight, and right or left sidewards flight so that less side thrust is required from the tail rotor.

  16. Influence of Speed Governors of Hydropower Stations on Frequency Stabilization of Fixed-Speed Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL Jowder, Fawzi A. Rahman

    2013-05-01

    This paper uses a small power system, consisting of two hydropower stations and a fixed-speed wind farm as sources of power, to study the influence of type of speed governor of hydropower stations on the frequency stabilization of the fixed-speed wind farm. As an example, two types of speed governors are selected which are (1) mechanical-hydraulic speed governor and (2) electrical-hydraulic speed governor. Rest of the speed governors can be also examined following the same methodology presented in the research. Two transfer functions, which correspond to the two speed governors, are developed for each hydropower station. The overall transfer function of the test power system is developed, and different study cases are presented. The frequency response analysis of the different transfer functions is used to compare the two speed governors based on their ability to stabilize the frequency deviation of the fixed-speed wind resulting from electrical or mechanical disturbances in the power systems. Time-domain simulations under a mechanical disturbance, represented by a wind gust, and an electrical disturbance, represented by three-phase to ground fault, are performed to validate the results of the frequency response analysis.

  17. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  18. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  20. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  1. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  5. Comment on Goldhammer's "Measuring Ability, Speed, or Both"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    The answer to the question, "Ability, speed, or both?" may be "both at once" if speed is simply a manifestation of ability. If differences in speed are manifestations of differences in ability, then both speed and ability may reflect a single dimension best characterized by a single score. While measurement of speed has proven…

  6. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  8. Generalized extreme gust wind speeds distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, E.; Yeung, C.

    2002-01-01

    Since summer 1996, the US wind engineers are using the extreme gust (or 3-s gust) as the basic wind speed to quantify the destruction of extreme winds. In order to better understand these destructive wind forces, it is important to know the appropriate representations of these extreme gust wind speeds. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the most suitable extreme value distributions for the annual extreme gust wind speeds recorded in large selected areas. To achieve this objective, we are using the generalized Pareto distribution as the diagnostic tool for determining the types of extreme gust wind speed distributions. The three-parameter generalized extreme value distribution function is, thus, reduced to either Type I Gumbel, Type II Frechet or Type III reverse Weibull distribution function for the annual extreme gust wind speeds recorded at a specific site.With the considerations of the quality and homogeneity of gust wind data collected at more than 750 weather stations throughout the United States, annual extreme gust wind speeds at selected 143 stations in the contiguous United States were used in the study. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acquisition speed comparison of microscope software programs.

    PubMed

    Biehlmaier, Oliver; Hehl, Joachim; Csucs, Gabor

    2011-06-01

    Reliable software is a prerequisite for successful operation of a modern wide field fluorescence microscope. When used for live cell imaging, acquisition speed is of particular interest. This is both because biological processes can be highly-dynamic, and to avoid unnecessary photobleaching and phototoxicity of living samples. This article shows that besides the hardware (microscope) components themselves, the acquisition control software is an important influencing factor of speed performance. We tested and compared the speed performance of five different generic applications (Image-Pro Plus, MetaMorph, Micro-Manager, SlideBook, and Volocity) using typical experimental setups involving a single specific state-of-the-art fluorescence microscope configuration. The test measurements included multichannel experiments, z-stacking, burst acquisition, as well as combinations of these measurements with time-lapse acquisitions. The measured data provided values for guiding the testing and analysis of other microscope systems with similar configurations. Despite the identical hardware settings, significant and surprisingly large speed differences were evident among the various software applications. Additionally, no application was identifiable as the fastest in all tests. Our work pinpoints the importance of the control software in determining a system's "real" maximal imaging speed. The study could serve as basis for further tests, eventually influencing the system selection criteria for speed-sensitive applications. PMID:21604324

  10. Economy of flight at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Prandtl's theory is used to determine the airflow over bodies and wings adapted to supersonic flight. By making use of these results, and by incorporating in them an allowance for the probable skin friction, some estimates of expected lift-drag ratios are made for various flight speeds with the best configuration. At each speed a slender body and wings having the best angle of sweepback are considered. For the range of supersonic speeds shown an airplane of normal density and loading would be required to operate at an altitude of the order of 60,000 feet. The limiting value of 1-1/2 times the speed of sound corresponds to a flight speed of 1000 miles per hour. At this speed about 1.5 miles per gallon of fuel are expected. It is interesting to note that this value corresponds to a value of more than 15 miles per gallon when the weight is reduced to correspond to that of an ordinary automobile.

  11. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing. PMID:27475167

  12. The Radial Speed - Expansion Speed Relation for Earth-Directed CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, P. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-12-01

    The propagation speed of Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is an essential parameter needed in space weather forecasting. However, the true propagation speed of Earth-directed CMEs cannot be measured accurately from coronagraph images taken from Earth's view. In order to circumvent the inaccuracies of speed measurements due to the projection effects, empirical relations expressing the radial speed (Vrad) of the CME as a function of the CME expansion speed (Vexp) have been suggested. Vexp is defined as the apparent speed the CME is spreading in the coronagraph's field of view. During 2010-2012 STEREO spacecraft provided a side view of Earth-directed CMEs, allowing measurements of true CME speeds and widths. In a case study of the 2011 February 15 CME Gopalswamy et al. (2012) compared three Vrad-Vexp relations (flat cone, full or shallow ice cream cone - Gopalswamy et al., 2009) and found the closest match with the observations for the (full ice cream cone) relation Vrad = 1/2(1 + cot w)Vexp, where w is the half width of the CME. Using the STEREO/SECCHI and SOHO/LASCO observations during this opportune period, we expand this analysis to a larger set of Earth-directed CMEs. We compare the computed CME speed estimates with the measured true speeds and estimate the accuracy of the Vrad-Vexp relations. References: Gopalswamy, N. et al. (2009), The expansion and radial speeds of coronal mass ejections, Cent. Eur. Astrophys. Bull., 33, 115. Gopalswamy, N. et al. (2012), The relationship between the expansion speed and radial speed of CMEs confirmed using quadrature observations of the 2011 February 15 CME, Sun and Geosphere, 7(1), 7.

  13. Future ultra-speed tube-flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Future long-link, ultra-speed, surface transport systems will require electromagnetically (EM) driven and restrained vehicles operating under reduced-atmosphere in very straight tubes. Such tube-flight trains will be safe, energy conservative, pollution-free, and in a protected environment. Hypersonic (and even hyperballistic) speeds are theoretically achievable. Ultimate system choices will represent tradeoffs between amoritized capital costs (ACC) and operating costs. For example, long coasting links might employ aerodynamic lift coupled with EM restraint and drag make-up. Optimized, combined EM lift, and thrust vectors could reduce energy costs but at increased ACC. (Repulsive levitation can produce lift-over-drag l/d ratios a decade greater than aerodynamic), Alternatively, vehicle-emanated, induced-mirror fields in a conducting (aluminum sheet) road bed could reduce ACC but at substantial energy costs. Ultra-speed tube flight will demand fast-acting, high-precision sensors and computerized magnetic shimming. This same control system can maintain a magnetic 'guide way' invariant in inertial space with inertial detectors imbedded in tube structures to sense and correct for earth tremors. Ultra-speed tube flight can complete with aircraft for transit time and can provide even greater passenger convenience by single-model connections with local subways and feeder lines. Although cargo transport generally will not need to be performed at ultra speeds, such speeds may well be desirable for high throughput to optimize channel costs. Thus, a large and expensive pipeline might be replaced with small EM-driven pallets at high speeds.

  14. Future ultra-speed tube-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Robert M.

    1994-05-01

    Future long-link, ultra-speed, surface transport systems will require electromagnetically (EM) driven and restrained vehicles operating under reduced-atmosphere in very straight tubes. Such tube-flight trains will be safe, energy conservative, pollution-free, and in a protected environment. Hypersonic (and even hyperballistic) speeds are theoretically achievable. Ultimate system choices will represent tradeoffs between amoritized capital costs (ACC) and operating costs. For example, long coasting links might employ aerodynamic lift coupled with EM restraint and drag make-up. Optimized, combined EM lift, and thrust vectors could reduce energy costs but at increased ACC. (Repulsive levitation can produce lift-over-drag l/d ratios a decade greater than aerodynamic), Alternatively, vehicle-emanated, induced-mirror fields in a conducting (aluminum sheet) road bed could reduce ACC but at substantial energy costs. Ultra-speed tube flight will demand fast-acting, high-precision sensors and computerized magnetic shimming. This same control system can maintain a magnetic 'guide way' invariant in inertial space with inertial detectors imbedded in tube structures to sense and correct for earth tremors. Ultra-speed tube flight can complete with aircraft for transit time and can provide even greater passenger convenience by single-model connections with local subways and feeder lines. Although cargo transport generally will not need to be performed at ultra speeds, such speeds may well be desirable for high throughput to optimize channel costs. Thus, a large and expensive pipeline might be replaced with small EM-driven pallets at high speeds.

  15. Measuring droplet fall speed with a high-speed camera: indoor accuracy and potential outdoor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cheng-Ku; Hsieh, Pei-Rong; Yuter, Sandra E.; Cheng, Lin-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Lun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Acquisition of accurate raindrop fall speed measurements outdoors in natural rain by means of moderate-cost and easy-to-use devices represents a long-standing and challenging issue in the meteorological community. Feasibility experiments were conducted to evaluate the indoor accuracy of fall speed measurements made with a high-speed camera and to evaluate its capability for outdoor applications. An indoor experiment operating in calm conditions showed that the high-speed imaging technique can provide fall speed measurements with a mean error of 4.1-9.7 % compared to Gunn and Kinzer's empirical fall-speed-size relationship for typical sizes of rain and drizzle drops. Results obtained using the same apparatus outside in summer afternoon showers indicated larger positive and negative velocity deviations compared to the indoor measurements. These observed deviations suggest that ambient flow and turbulence play a role in modifying drop fall speeds which can be quantified with future outdoor high-speed camera measurements. Because the fall speed measurements, as presented in this article, are analyzed on the basis of tracking individual, specific raindrops, sampling uncertainties commonly found in the widely adopted optical disdrometers can be significantly mitigated.

  16. Reconstructing Tsunami Flow Speed from Sedimentary Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, B. E.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Paleotsunami deposits contain information about the flow that created them that can be used to reconstruct tsunami flow speed and thereby improving assessment of tsunami hazard. We applied an inverse tsunami sediment transport model to sandy deposits near Sendai Airport, Japan, that formed during the 11 March 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami to test model performance and explore the spatial variations in tsunami flow speed. The inverse model assumes the amount of suspended sediment in the water column is in equilibrium with local flow speed and that sediment transport convergences, primarily from bedload transport, do not contribute significantly to formation of the portion of the deposit we identify as formed by sediment settling out of suspension. We interpret massive or inversely graded intervals as forming from sediment transport convergences and do not model them. Sediment falling out of suspension forms a specific type of normal grading, termed 'suspension' grading, where the entire grain size distribution shifts to finer sizes higher up in a deposit. Suspension grading is often observed in deposits of high-energy flows, including turbidity currents and tsunamis. The inverse model calculates tsunami flow speed from the thickness and bulk grain size of a suspension-graded interval. We identified 24 suspension-graded intervals from 7 trenches located near the Sendai Airport from ~250-1350 m inland from the shoreline. Flow speeds were highest ~500 m from the shoreline, landward of the forested sand dunes where the tsunami encountered lower roughness in a low-lying area as it traveled downslope. Modeled tsunami flow speeds range from 2.2 to 9.0 m/s. Tsunami flow speeds are sensitive to roughness, which is unfortunately poorly constrained. Flow speed calculated by the inverse model was similar to those calculated from video taken from a helicopter about 1-2 km inland. Deposit reconstructions of suspension-graded intervals reproduced observed upward shifts in grain size

  17. ECMWF and SSMI Global Surface Wind Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Hollingsworth, Anthony; Wentz, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Monthly mean, 2.5 deg - x 2.5 deg-resolution, 10-m height wind speeds from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) instrument and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) forecast-analysis system are compared between 60 deg S and 60 deg N during 1988-1991. The SSMI data were uniformly processed while numerous changes were made to the ECMWF forecast-analysis system. The SSMI measurements, which were compared with moored-buoy wind observations, were considered to be a reference data set to evaluate the influence of the changes made to the ECMWF system upon the ECMWF surface wind speed over the ocean. A demonstrable yearly decrease of the difference between SSMI and ECMWF wind speeds occurred in the 10 deg S - 10 deg N region, including the 5 deg S - 5 deg N zone of the Pacific Ocean, where nearly all of the variations occurred in the 160 deg E - 160 deg W region. The apparent improvement of the ECMWF wind speed occurred at the same time as the yearly decrease of the equatorial Pacific SSMI wind speed, which was associated with the natural transition from La Nina to El Nino conditions. In the 10 deg S - 10 deg N tropical Atlantic, the ECMWF wind speed had a 4-year trend, which was not expected nor was it duplicated with the SSMI data. No yearly trend was found in the difference between SSMI and ECMWF surface wind speeds in middle latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. The magnitude of the differences between SSMI and ECMWF was 0.4 m s^(-1) or 100 percent larger in the northern than in the southern hemisphere extratropics. In two areas (Arabian Sea and North Atlantic Ocean) where ECMWF and SSMI wind speeds were compared to ship measurements, the ship data had much better agreement with the ECMWF analyses compared to SSMI data. In the 10 deg S - 10 deg N area the difference between monthly standard deviations of the daily wind speeds dropped significantly from 1988 to 1989, but remained constant at about 30 percent for the remaining

  18. Future trends in adjustable speed drives

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.G.

    1995-12-31

    Adjustable speed drives are an evolving technology stimulated by the demand for improved process control and tempered by environmental conditions--an evolution controlled by the dynamics of electrical power, power devices and traditional control methods. How these factors interact controls future trends and product offerings for a variety of adjustable speed motor controllers. With the topic of adjustable speed motor controllers` a reasonable place to start would be with the motor. Although many types of motors can be used for variable speed applications, this paper will focus on the ac motor and the electronic controllers associated with ac motors. Both frequency and voltage are controllable motor parameters. Controlling either or both can improve the performance of the ac motor within a given application. Each type of controller offers a unique set of advantages and disadvantages, however, the simultaneous control of frequency and voltage provides the greatest benefits. The adjustable speed controller that provides simultaneous control of frequency and voltage for ac motors is the AFD or adjustable frequency drive.

  19. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  20. Improved Algorithms Speed It Up for Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    Huge computers, huge codes, complex problems to solve. The longer it takes to run a code, the more it costs. One way to speed things up and save time and money is through hardware improvements--faster processors, different system designs, bigger computers. But another side of supercomputing can reap savings in time and speed: software improvements to make codes--particularly the mathematical algorithms that form them--run faster and more efficiently. Speed up math? Is that really possible? According to Livermore physicist Eugene Brooks, the answer is a resounding yes. ''Sure, you get great speed-ups by improving hardware,'' says Brooks, the deputy leader for Computational Physics in N Division, which is part of Livermore's Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate. ''But the real bonus comes on the software side, where improvements in software can lead to orders of magnitude improvement in run times.'' Brooks knows whereof he speaks. Working with Laboratory physicist Abraham Szoeke and others, he has been instrumental in devising ways to shrink the running time of what has, historically, been a tough computational nut to crack: radiation transport codes based on the statistical or Monte Carlo method of calculation. And Brooks is not the only one. Others around the Laboratory, including physicists Andrew Williamson, Randolph Hood, and Jeff Grossman, have come up with innovative ways to speed up Monte Carlo calculations using pure mathematics.

  1. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to identify rotorcraft concepts best capable of combining a cruise speed of 350 to 450 knots with helicopter-like low speed attributes, and to define the technology advancements needed to make them viable by the year 2000. A systematic approach was used to compare the relative attributes and mission gross weights for a wide range of concepts, resulting in a downselect to the most promising concept/mission pairs. For transport missions, tilt-wing and variable diameter tilt-rotor (VDTR) concepts were found to be superior. For a military scout/attack role, the VDTR was best, although a shrouded rotor concept could provide a highly agile, low observable alternative if its weight empty fraction could be reduced. A design speed of 375 to 425 knots was found to be the maximum desirable for transport missions, with higher speed producing rapidly diminishing benefits in productivity. The key technologies that require advancement to make the tilt-wing and VDTR concepts viable are in the areas of wing and proprotor aerodynamics, efficient structural design, flight controls, refinement of the geared flap pitch control system, expansion of the speed/descent envelope, and the structural and aerodynamic tradeoffs of wing thickness and forward sweep. For the shrouded rotor, weight reduction is essential, particularly with respect to the mechanism for covering the rotor in cruise.

  2. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  3. Sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anne; La Celle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark; Close, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    As robotic ground systems advance in capabilities and begin to fulfill new roles in both civilian and military life, the limitation of slow operational speed has become a hindrance to the wide-spread adoption of these systems. For example, military convoys are reluctant to employ autonomous vehicles when these systems slow their movement from 60 miles per hour down to 40. However, these autonomous systems must operate at these lower speeds due to the limitations of the sensors they employ. Robotic Research, with its extensive experience in ground autonomy and associated problems therein, in conjunction with CERDEC/Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), has performed a study to specify system and detection requirements; determined how current autonomy sensors perform in various scenarios; and analyzed how sensors should be employed to increase operational speeds of ground vehicles. The sensors evaluated in this study include the state of the art in LADAR/LIDAR, Radar, Electro-Optical, and Infrared sensors, and have been analyzed at high speeds to study their effectiveness in detecting and accounting for obstacles and other perception challenges. By creating a common set of testing benchmarks, and by testing in a wide range of real-world conditions, Robotic Research has evaluated where sensors can be successfully employed today; where sensors fall short; and which technologies should be examined and developed further. This study is the first step to achieve the overarching goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds on any given terrain.

  4. Maximum wind speeds and US hurricane losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnane, R. J.; Elsner, J. B.

    2012-08-01

    There is academic, commercial, and public interest in estimating loss from hurricanes striking land and understanding how loss might change as a result of future variations in climate. Here we show that the relationship between wind speed and loss is exponential and that loss increases with wind speed at a rate of 5% per m s-1. The relationship is derived using quantile regression and a data set comprising wind speeds of hurricanes hitting the United States and normalized economic losses. We suggest that the “centercepts” for the different quantiles account for exposure-related factors such as population density, precipitation, and surface roughness, and that once these effects are accounted for, the increase in loss with wind speed is consistent across quantiles. An out-of-sample test of this relationship correctly predicts economic losses from Hurricane Irene in 2011. The exponential relationship suggests that increased wind speeds will produce significantly higher losses; however, increases in exposed property and population are expected to be a more important factor for near future losses.

  5. Adjustable Speed Drive Study, Part 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Alan K.; Oregon State University. Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    1989-08-01

    Advances in speed control for motors in recent years, notably those in power electronics, have widened the range of application for several adjustable speed drive (ASD) types to include the smaller horsepower sizes. The DC motor drive, formerly in almost universal use for speed control, is being challenged by the high efficiency induction motor/pulse width modulation (PWM) drive; and for special small horsepower size applications, by the permanent magnet motor/PWM inverter drive or by the switched reluctance motor drive. The main characteristics of the several ASD types suitable for small horsepower size applications are discussed, as well as their unwanted side effects: poor power factor, harmonic distortion of the supply, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic interference. A procedure is recommended for determining which, if any, ASD to use.

  6. On The Vertical Speeds Of Airways Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, S. A. N.

    Knowledge of the statistics of aircraft vertical speeds is important both for the construction of realistic traffic simulators and for the development of trajectory prediction tools for use in future air traffic control (ATC) systems. This paper reports on the analysis of radar data recordings for nearly 10000 civil flights on airways. Results are presented for the means and spreads of vertical speeds as functions of altitude. Evidence is presented that roughly half of the observed spreads arise from fluctuations within each aircraft's trajectory, as opposed to variation from one aircraft to another. A simple procedure is proposed for simulating vertical speed data which has statistics similar to those obtained from the radar recordings. Some consequences of the results for the development of trajectory prediction tools for use in future ATC systems are discussed. The results suggest that the provision of accurate trajectory prediction tools is not as straightforward as it might at first appear to be.

  7. Fast thought speed induces risk taking.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jesse J; Pronin, Emily

    2012-04-01

    In two experiments, we tested for a causal link between thought speed and risk taking. In Experiment 1, we manipulated thought speed by presenting neutral-content text at either a fast or a slow pace and having participants read the text aloud. In Experiment 2, we manipulated thought speed by presenting fast-, medium-, or slow-paced movie clips that contained similar content. Participants who were induced to think more quickly took more risks with actual money in Experiment 1 and reported greater intentions to engage in real-world risky behaviors, such as unprotected sex and illegal drug use, in Experiment 2. These experiments provide evidence that faster thinking induces greater risk taking. PMID:22395129

  8. Affecting speed and accuracy in perception.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Bruno R

    2014-12-01

    An account of affective modulations in perceptual speed and accuracy (ASAP: Affecting Speed and Accuracy in Perception) is proposed and tested. This account assumes an emotion-induced inhibitory interaction between parallel channels in the visual system that modulates the onset latencies and response durations of visual signals. By trading off speed and accuracy between channels, this mechanism achieves (a) fast visuo-motor responding to course-grained information, and (b) accurate visuo-attentional selection of fine-grained information. ASAP gives a functional account of previously counterintuitive findings, and may be useful for explaining affective influences in both featural-level single-stimulus tasks and object-level multistimulus tasks. PMID:24853268

  9. Dynamics of human walking at steady speeds.

    PubMed

    Kokshenev, Valery B

    2004-11-12

    Biped locomotion is discussed through a Lagrangian formulation for velocity-dependent, body driving forces. An analysis of level walking in humans is given through the known experimental data on the ground-reaction force and the external work without recourse to inverted-pendulum modeling. At a certain speed, rectilinear motion of the center of mass with its backward rotation along a shortened hypocycloid is ensured by double-frequency nonlinear oscillations, whose energy cost is 1% of the external work. With increasing speed, a peculiarity and an instability of the trajectory indicate, respectively, a slow-to-normal gait crossover and the maximal fast walking speed. Key words: integrative biology, biped locomotion, human gaits, muscles. PMID:15600973

  10. DAC 22 High Speed Civil Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Between tests, NASA research engineer Dave Hahne inspects a tenth-scale model of a supersonic transport model in the 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The model is being used in support of NASA's High-Speed Research (HSR) program. Langley researchers are applying advance aerodynamic design methods to develop a wing leading-edge flap system which significantly improves low-speed fuel efficiency and reduces noise generated during takeoff operation. Langley is NASA's lead center for the agency's HSR program, aimed at developing technology to help U.S. industry compete in the rapidly expanding trans-oceanic transport market. A U.S. high-speed civil transport is expected to fly in about the year 2010. As envisioned, it would fly 300 passengers across the Pacific in about four hours at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/1950 kph) for a modest increase over business class fares.

  11. Theory-based categorization under speeded conditions

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Christian C.; Ahn, Woo-Kyoung; Palmeri, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that similarity influences rapid categorization, whereas theories can influence only more leisurely category judgments. In contrast, we argue that it is not the type of knowledge used that determines categorization speed, but rather the complexity of the categorization processes. In two experiments, participants learned four categories of items, each consisting of three causally related features. Participants gave more weight to cause features than to effect features, even under speeded response conditions. Furthermore, the time required to make judgments was equivalent, regardless of whether participants were using causal knowledge or base-rate information. We argue that both causal knowledge and base-rate information, once precompiled during learning, can be used at roughly the same speeds during categorization, thus demonstrating an important parallel between these two types of knowledge. PMID:17128608

  12. Adjustable speed drive study, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A.

    1989-08-01

    Advances in speed control for motors in recent years, notably those in power electronics, have widened the range of application for several adjustable speed drive (ASD) types to include the smaller horsepower sizes. The dc motor drive, formerly in almost universal use for speed control, is being challenged by the high efficiency induction motor/pulse width modulation (PWM) drive; and for special small horsepower size applications, by the permanent magnet motor/PWM inverter drive or by the switched reluctance motor drive. The main characteristics of the several ASD types suitable for small horsepower size applications are discussed, as well as their unwanted side effects: poor power factor, harmonic distortion of the supply, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic interference. A procedure is recommended for determining which, if any, ASD to use.

  13. Evaluation of SEASAT SMMR wind speed measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, V.; Chester, T.; Lipes, R.

    1983-02-01

    The SEASAT scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) is able to measure the wind speed at the ocean surface through the change in ocean surface microwave emissivity caused by the wind. In this paper we compare the SMMR-derived wind speeds to the wind speeds derived from an active microwave scatterometer also aboard the SEASAT, the SEASAT A scanning scatterometer (SASS), Four orbits that passed over the severe storm that damaged the Queen Elizabeth II are examined in detail. These orbits and five others were used to investigate effects which degrade the SMMR wind retrievals. When the data are filtered for such effects, we find that the SMMR winds agree with the SASS winds with a scatter (1σ) of less than 2 m/s about a bias of 1 to 2 m/s.

  14. Evaluation of Seasat SMMR wind speed measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardone, V.; Chester, T.; Lipes, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Seasat scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) is able to measure the wind speed at the ocean surface through the change in ocean surface microwave emissivity caused by the wind. In this paper the SMMR-derived wind speeds are compared to the wind speeds derived from an active microwave scatterometer also aboard the Seasat, the Seasat A scanning scatterometer (SASS). Four orbits that passed over the severe storm that damaged the Queen Elizabeth II are examined in detail. These orbits and five others were used to investigate effects which degrade the SMMR wind retrievals. When the data are filtered for such effects, it is found that the SMMR winds agree with the SASS winds with a scatter (1 sigma) of less than 2 m/s about a bias of 1 to 2 m/s.

  15. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  16. Adjustable Speed Drive Study, Part 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Alan K.; Oregon State University. Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    1989-08-01

    Advances in speed control for motors in recent years, notably those in power electronics, have widened the range of application for several adjustable speed drive (ASD) types to include the smaller horsepower sizes. The dc motor drive, formerly in almost universal use for speed control, is being challenged by the high efficiency induction motor/pulse width modulation (PWM) drive; and for special small horsepower size applications, by the permanent magnet motor/PWM inverter drive or by the switched reluctance motor drive. The main characteristics of the several ASD types suitable for small horsepower size applications are discussed, as well as their unwanted side effects: poor power factor, harmonic distortion of the supply, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic interference. A procedure is recommended for determining which, if any, ASD to use. 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Global trends in significant wave height and marine wind speed from the ERA-20CM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnes, Ole Johan; Breivik, Øyvind

    2016-04-01

    The ERA-20CM is one of the latest additions to the ERA-series produced at the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). This 10 member ensemble is generated with a version of the Integrated Forecast System (IFS), a coupled atmosphere-wave model. The model integration is run as a AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) constrained by CMIP5 recommended radiative forcing and different realizations of sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice cover (SIC) prescribed by the HadISST2 (Met Office Hadley Center). While the ERA-20CM is unable to reproduce the actual synoptic conditions, it is designed to offer a realistic statistical representation of the past climate, spanning the period 1899-2010. In this study we investigate global trends in significant wave height and marine wind speed based on ERA-20CM, using monthly mean data, upper percentiles and monthly/annual maxima. The aim of the study is to assess the quality of the trends and how these estimates are affected by different SST and SIC. Global trends are compared against corresponding estimates obtained with ERA-Interim (1979-2009), but also crosschecked against ERA-20C - an ECMWF pilot reanalysis of the 20th-century, known to most trustworthy in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics. Over the period 1900-2009, the 10 member ensemble yields trends mainly within +/- 5% per century. However, significant trends of opposite signs are found locally. Certain areas, like the eastern equatorial Pacific, highly affected by the El Niño Southern Oscillation, show stronger trends. In general, trends based on statistical quantities further into the tail of the distribution are found less reliable.

  18. Up-down Asymmetries in Speed Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Peter; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    We compared speed matches for pairs of stimuli that moved in opposite directions (upward and downward). Stimuli were elliptical patches (2 deg horizontally by 1 deg vertically) of horizontal sinusoidal gratings of spatial. frequency 2 cycles/deg. Two sequential 380 msec reveal presentations were compared. One of each pair of gratings (the standard) moved at 4 Hz (2 deg/sec), the other (the test) moved at a rate determined by a simple up-down staircase. The point of subjectively equal speed was calculated from the average of the last eight reversals. The task was to fixate a central point and to determine which one of the pair appeared to move faster. Eight of 10 observers perceived the upward drifting grating as moving faster than a grating moving downward but otherwise identical. on average (N = 10), when the standard moved downward, it was matched by a test moving upward at 94.7+/-1.7(SE)% of the standard speed, and when the standard moved upward it was matched by a test moving downward at 105.1+/-2.3(SE)% of the standard speed. Extending this paradigm over a range of spatial (1.5 to 13.5 c/d) and temporal (1.5 to 13.5 Hz) frequencies, preliminary results (N = 4) suggest that, under the conditions of our experiment, upward matter is seen as faster than downward for speeds greater than approx.1 deg/sec, but the effect appears to reverse at speeds below approx.1 deg/sec with downward motion perceived as faster. Given that an up-down asymmetry has been observed for the optokinetic response, both perceptual and oculomotor contributions to this phenomenon deserve exploration.

  19. Effect of contrast on human speed perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Thompson, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing collaborative research effort between the Life Science and Human Factors Divisions at NASA ARC to measure the accuracy of human motion perception in order to predict potential errors in human perception/performance and to facilitate the design of display systems that minimize the effects of such deficits. The study describes how contrast manipulations can produce significant errors in human speed perception. Specifically, when two simultaneously presented parallel gratings are moving at the same speed within stationary windows, the lower-contrast grating appears to move more slowly. This contrast-induced misperception of relative speed is evident across a wide range of contrasts (2.5-50 percent) and does not appear to saturate (e.g., a 50 percent contrast grating appears slower than a 70 percent contrast grating moving at the same speed). The misperception is large: a 70 percent contrast grating must, on average, be slowed by 35 percent to match a 10 percent contrast grating moving at 2 deg/sec (N = 6). Furthermore, it is largely independent of the absolute contrast level and is a quasilinear function of log contrast ratio. A preliminary parametric study shows that, although spatial frequency has little effect, the relative orientation of the two gratings is important. Finally, the effect depends on the temporal presentation of the stimuli: the effects of contrast on perceived speed appears lessened when the stimuli to be matched are presented sequentially. These data constrain both physiological models of visual cortex and models of human performance. We conclude that viewing conditions that effect contrast, such as fog, may cause significant errors in speed judgments.

  20. Machine Vision Techniques For High Speed Videography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, David B.

    1984-11-01

    The priority associated with U.S. efforts to increase productivity has led to, among other things, the development of Machine Vision systems for use in manufacturing automation requirements. Many such systems combine solid state television cameras and data processing equipment to facilitate high speed, on-line inspection and real time dimensional measurement of parts and assemblies. These parts are often randomly oriented and spaced on a conveyor belt under continuous motion. Television imagery of high speed events has historically been achieved by use of pulsed (strobe) illumination or high speed shutter techniques synchronized with a camera's vertical blanking to separate write and read cycle operation. Lack of synchronization between part position and camera scanning in most on-line applications precludes use of this vertical interval illumination technique. Alternatively, many Machine Vision cameras incorporate special techniques for asynchronous, stop-motion imaging. Such cameras are capable of imaging parts asynchronously at rates approaching 60 hertz while remaining compatible with standard video recording units. Techniques for asynchronous, stop-motion imaging have not been incorporated in cameras used for High Speed Videography. Imaging of these events has alternatively been obtained through the utilization of special, high frame rate cameras to minimize motion during the frame interval. High frame rate cameras must undoubtedly be utilized for recording of high speed events occurring at high repetition rates. However, such cameras require very specialized, and often expensive, video recording equipment. It seems, therefore, that Machine Vision cameras with capability for asynchronous, stop-motion imaging represent a viable approach for cost effective video recording of high speed events occurring at repetition rates up to 60 hertz.

  1. Nonlinear dead water resistance at subcritical speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grue, John

    2015-08-01

    The dead water resistance F 1 = /1 2 C d w ρ S U 2 (ρ fluid density, U ship speed, S wetted body surface, Cdw resistance coefficient) on a ship moving at subcritical speed along the upper layer of a two-layer fluid is calculated by a strongly nonlinear method assuming potential flow in each layer. The ship dimensions correspond to those of the Polar ship Fram. The ship draught, b0, is varied in the range 0.25h0-0.9h0 (h0 the upper layer depth). The calculations show that Cdw/(b0/h0)2 depends on the Froude number only, in the range close to critical speed, Fr = U/c0 ˜ 0.875-1.125 (c0 the linear internal long wave speed), irrespective of the ship draught. The function Cdw/(b0/h0)2 attains a maximum at subcritical Froude number depending on the draught. Maximum Cdw/(b0/h0)2 becomes 0.15 for Fr = 0.76, b0/h0 = 0.9, and 0.16 for Fr = 0.74, b0/h0 = 1, where the latter extrapolated value of the dead water resistance coefficient is about 60 times higher than the frictional drag coefficient and relevant for the historical dead water observations. The nonlinear Cdw significantly exceeds linear theory (Fr < 0.85). The ship generated waves have a wave height comparable to the upper layer depth. Calculations of three-dimensional wave patterns at critical speed compare well to available laboratory experiments. Upstream solitary waves are generated in a wave tank of finite width, when the layer depths differ, causing an oscillation of the force. In a wide ocean, a very wide wave system develops at critical speed. The force approaches a constant value for increasing time.

  2. Miniature, Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilski, Steve; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Miniature Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope (MVS-CMG) was designed for small satellites (mass from less than 1 kg up to 500 kg). Currently available CMGs are too large and heavy, and available miniature CMGs do not provide sufficient control authority for use on practical satellites. This primarily results from the need to greatly increase the speed of rotation of the flywheel in order to reduce the flywheel size and mass. This goal was achieved by making use of a proprietary, space-qualified, high-speed (100,000 rpm) motor technology to spin the flywheel at a speed ten times faster than other known miniature CMGs under development. NASA is supporting innovations in propulsion, power, and guidance and navigation systems for low-cost small spacecraft. One of the key enabling technologies is attitude control mechanisms. CMGs are particularly attractive for spacecraft attitude control since they can achieve higher torques with lower mass and power than reaction wheels, and they provide continuous torque capability that enables precision pointing (in contrast to on-off thruster control). The aim of this work was to develop a miniature, variable-speed CMG that is sized for use on small satellites. To achieve improved agility, these spacecraft must be able to slew at high rate, which requires attitude control actuators that can apply torques on the order of 5 N-m. The MVS-CMG is specifically designed to achieve a high-torque output with a minimum flywheel and system mass. The flywheel can be run over a wide range of speeds, which is important to help reduce/eliminate potential gimbal lock, and can be used to optimize the operational envelope of the CMG.

  3. Measurements of speed of response of high-speed visible and IR optical detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, H. E.; Osmundson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A technique for measuring speed of response of high speed visible and IR optical detectors to mode-locked Nd:YAG laser pulses is described. Results of measurements of response times of four detectors are presented. Three detectors that can be used as receivers in a 500-MHz optical communication system are tested.

  4. Differential Effects of Intelligence, Perceptual Speed and Age on Growth in Attentional Speed and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhammer, Frank; Rauch, Wolfgang A.; Schweizer, Karl; Moosbrugger, Helfried

    2010-01-01

    The study investigates the effects of intelligence, perceptual speed and age on intraindividual growth in attentional speed and attentional accuracy over the course of a 6-minute testing session. A sample of 193 subjects completed the Advanced Progressive Matrices and the Vienna Matrices Test representing intelligence, the tests Alertness and…

  5. High Speed and Slow Motion: The Technology of Modern High Speed Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    The enormous progress in the fields of microsystem technology, microelectronics and computer science has led to the development of powerful high speed cameras. Recently a number of such cameras became available as low cost consumer products which can also be used for the teaching of physics. The technology of high speed cameras is discussed,…

  6. Measure Guideline: Replacing Single-Speed Pool Pumps with Variable Speed Pumps for Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Easley, S.

    2012-05-01

    The report evaluates potential energy savings by replacing traditional single-speed pool pumps with variable speed pool pumps, and provide a basic cost comparison between continued uses of traditional pumps verses new pumps. A simple step-by-step process for inspecting the pool area and installing a new pool pump follows.

  7. Measure Guideline. Replacing Single-Speed Pool Pumps with Variable Speed Pumps for Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Easley, S.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline evaluates potential energy savings by replacing traditional single-speed pool pumps with variable speed pool pumps, and provides a basic cost comparison between continued uses of traditional pumps verses new pumps. A simple step-by-step process for inspecting the pool area and installing a new pool pump follows.

  8. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control. PMID:24517806

  9. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.

  10. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

    1995-11-01

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  11. High Speed SPM of Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-08-14

    The development and optimization of applications comprising functional materials necessitates a thorough understanding of their static and dynamic properties and performance at the nanoscale. Leveraging High Speed SPM and concepts enabled by it, efficient measurements and maps with nanoscale and nanosecond temporal resolution are uniquely feasible. This includes recent enhancements for topographic, conductivity, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties as originally proposed, as well as newly developed methods or improvements to AFM-based mechanical, friction, thermal, and photoconductivity measurements. The results of this work reveal fundamental mechanisms of operation, and suggest new approaches for improving the ultimate speed and/or efficiency, of data storage systems, magnetic-electric sensors, and solar cells.

  12. The speed of topological rearrangements in foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Tan, E.

    1999-11-01

    Coarsening of dry foam is characterized by a slow diffusion of gas across the fluid films separating adjacent foam cells, punctuated by rapid topological rearrangements of the polyhedral network. In this work we measure and model the speed of a typical rearrangement event, which has been reproduced on an adjustable metal frame. The interstitial liquid viscosity is varied by adding glycerin to the water/soap solution and is found to reduce the speed only at high viscosities. Marangoni effects play on the other hand a pivotal role for the lowest soap concentrations, greatly slowing down the rearrangements.

  13. Aerodynamics of High-Speed Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.

    This review highlights the differences between the aerodynamics of high-speed trains and other types of transportation vehicles. The emphasis is on modern, high-speed trains, including magnetic levitation (Maglev) trains. Some of the key differences are derived from the fact that trains operate near the ground or a track, have much greater length-to-diameter ratios than other vehicles, pass close to each other and to trackside structures, are more subject to crosswinds, and operate in tunnels with entry and exit events. The coverage includes experimental techniques and results and analytical and numerical methods, concentrating on the most recent information available.

  14. Congestion control of high-speed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    We report on four areas of activity in the past six months. These areas include the following: (1) work on the control of integrated video and image traffic, both at the access to a network and within a high-speed network; (2) more general/game theoretic models for flow control in networks; (3) work on fault management for high-speed heterogeneous networks to improve survivability; and (4) work on all-optical (lightwave) networks of the future, designed to take advantage of the enormous bandwidth capability available at optical frequencies.

  15. Pulse speed on a plucked wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekirk, Tristan; Slaton, William V.

    2012-04-01

    This paper serves to update an elegant experiment published in The Physics Teacher to measure the speed of a pulse on a taut metal wire. Unfortunately, commercially available units2 that serve the same purpose are priced outside the range of most high school or college physics teaching laboratories. Wakeland et al. show how an affordable adaptation of the traditional standing wave apparatus using taut metal wire and horseshoe magnets can be used to measure the speed of a pulse by using an oscilloscope to measure an induced voltage in the wire as the pulse transverses the middle of the magnets, which are a known distance apart.

  16. Some problems of high speed travel

    PubMed Central

    Reader, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Some aspects of high speed flight are examined to investigate whether increase in speed implies any lowering of safety standards. The problem of circadian dysrhythmia is discussed and methods of attenuating its effects are explained and some new hypnotic drugs are mentioned. The risk of decompression has been quantified and predictions have been made for risks in commercial service. Cosmic radiation in supersonic aircraft is unlikely to limit commercial operation or significantly increase risks to passengers and crew. The supersonic boom is likely to limit the terrain over which supersonic aircraft can operate and regulations covering engine noise on the ground could restrict some flights. PMID:1208294

  17. Small, high-speed dataflow processor

    SciTech Connect

    Leler, W.

    1983-01-01

    Dataflow processors show much promise for high-speed computation at reasonable cost, but they are not without problems. The author discusses a processor design which combines ideas from dynamic dataflow architecture with those from reduced instruction set computers and proven large computers with parallel internal structures. The resulting processor includes a number of innovations, including operand destinations, killer tokens, I/O streams and closed-loop computation, which result in a small, relatively inexpensive processor capable of high-speed computation. The expected application areas of the processor include interactive computer graphics, signal processing, and artificial intelligence. 6 references.

  18. Optical Spatial Filter Sensor for Ground Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasunobu; Uno, Tetsuya; Takagi, Junichi; Yamashita, Tsukasa

    1995-01-01

    The prototype for a ground speed sensor has been designed, fabricated and evaluated. It works on the principle of optical spatial filtering and uses pulse driven light emitting diodes as a source of illumination. The sensor was tested at speeds ranging from 2 to 50 km/h, and an accuracy of 1.5 km/h was obtained with response time of 30 ms, height from ground of from 230 to 370 mm and on various road surfaces. The sensor is viewed as beneficial for use in a vehicle’s antilock braking system and will contribute to traffic safety.

  19. Geometric derivation of the quantum speed limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Philip J.; Kok, Pieter

    2010-08-15

    The Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin inequalities play an important role in the study of quantum-mechanical processes in nature since they provide general limits on the speed of dynamical evolution. However, to date there has been only one derivation of the Margolus-Levitin inequality. In this paper, alternative geometric derivations for both inequalities are obtained from the statistical distance between quantum states. The inequalities are shown to hold for unitary evolution of pure and mixed states, and a counterexample to the inequalities is given for evolution described by completely positive trace-preserving maps. The counterexample shows that there is no quantum speed limit for nonunitary evolution.

  20. The speed of an inclined ruck

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Craster, R. V.; Hewitt, I. J.

    2015-01-01

    Steady rucks in an elastic beam can roll at constant speed down an inclined plane. We examine the dynamics of these travelling-wave structures and argue that their speed can be dictated by a combination of the physical conditions arising in the vicinity of the ‘contact points’ where the beam is peeled off the underlying plane and stuck back down. We provide three detailed models for the contact dynamics: viscoelastic fracture, a thermodynamic model for bond formation and detachment and adhesion mediated by a thin liquid film. The results are compared with experiments. PMID:25568622

  1. Italian High-speed Airplane Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, C F

    1940-01-01

    This paper presents an account of Italian high-speed engine designs. The tests were performed on the Fiat AS6 engine, and all components of that engine are discussed from cylinders to superchargers as well as the test set-up. The results of the bench tests are given along with the performance of the engines in various races.

  2. 14 CFR 23.51 - Takeoff speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... turbulence and complete failure of the critical engine. (b) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category..., if applicable) under all reasonably expected conditions, including turbulence and complete failure of...— (i) A speed that is shown to be safe under all reasonably expected conditions, including...

  3. Disrupting the Grid Cells' Need for Speed.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Robin; Burgess, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Hinman et al. demonstrate the presence of two speed signals in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex that are differentially affected by muscimol inactivation of medial septum. The results reveal important constraints on several computational models of grid cell firing. PMID:27497218

  4. Aging, Cognitive Performance, and Mental Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettelbeck, Ted; Rabbitt, Patrick M. A.

    1992-01-01

    Measures of four-choice reaction time, inspection time, and scores on a speeded coding-substitution task obtained from 104 adults aged 54 to 85 years were found to account for almost all age-related changes in cognitive performance on a number of indices of general fluid ability. (SLD)

  5. Spindle speed effects on cotton fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and hand-harvested in a way that kept individual bolls intact. The cotton bolls were conditioned in a controlled atmosphere and then subjected to a single cotton picker spindle operating at a speed of 1000 to...

  6. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176 Section 13.1176 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve...

  7. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176 Section 13.1176 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve...

  8. 36 CFR 13.1176 - Speed restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed restrictions. 13.1176 Section 13.1176 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve...

  9. A High Vacuum High Speed Ion Pump

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Foster, J. S. Jr.; Lawrence, E. O.; Lofgren, E. J.

    1952-08-27

    A vacuum pump based on the properties of a magnetically collimated electric discharge is described. It has a speed in the range 3000 to 7000 liters a second and a base pressure in the order of 10{sup -6} mm. (auth)

  10. High-speed civil transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system study of the potential for a high-speed commercial transport has addressed technological, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicate a need for fleets of transports with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the year 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5,000 to 6,000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristic, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene-type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high-speed civil transport; significant advances are required to reduce takeoff gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environmental accepatability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  11. Wind Speed Measurement by Paper Anemometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Juhua; Cheng, Zhongqi; Guan, Wenchuan

    2011-01-01

    A simple wind speed measurement device, a paper anemometer, is fabricated based on the theory of standing waves. In providing the working profile of the paper anemometer, an experimental device is established, which consists of an anemometer sensor, a sound sensor, a microphone, paper strips, a paper cup, and sonic acquisition software. It shows…

  12. Power of a Finite Speed Carnot Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, D. C.; Menon, V. J.

    2009-01-01

    A model of an endoreversible Carnot engine is considered where the piston moves with a constant speed "u." Expressions for the cycle time [tau] for the four branches, as well as output power, P[subscript W], are derived and the optimized root for maximum power is obtained in closed form. Our results are discussed in terms of the isothermal…

  13. Do mental speed and musical abilities interact?

    PubMed

    Gruhn, Wilfried; Galley, Niels; Kluth, Christine

    2003-11-01

    The relation between mental speed and musical ability was investigated. Seventeen subjects aged 3-7 years were divided into two subgroups: one (G1; n = 9) consisted of children who participated in an early childhood music program and who received informal musical guidance, but no special training; the other (G2; n = 8) consisted of highly talented young violin players who received intensive parental support and special training by daily deliberate practice. Mental and musical abilities of both groups were controlled by standardized tests (Kaufman's ABC and Gordon's PMMA) and compared with data taken from recordings of saccadic eye movement using online identification from an electrooculogram (EOG). Results of EOG measurement are referred to as "mental speed," which correlates highly with general mental abilities (intelligence). These results were compared with EOG scores taken from a larger sample of children of the same age range (n = 82) who received no music instruction. The grand average of their scores served as a reference line for mental speed, which is normally expected to be performed by an equivalent age group. Data in the two experimental groups did not differ statistically; however, all musically experienced children had a highly significant advantage in mental age (P <0.01) compared to the reference line of the normal population who did not exhibit any effect of training and practice. This indicates strong interaction between mental speed and music ability, which can be interpreted in terms of the expertise model and cognitive transfer effects. PMID:14681172

  14. Instrument for two-speed optokinetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandaurov, I. F.; Shestak, L. A.; Kuvshinov, Y. A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for providing optokinetic stimulation is described which has the advantages of being small, simple in design, and permits automatic operation in four directions at two drum speeds. The device has a screened chamber allowing polygraphic recording of optokinetic reactions by EEG.

  15. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  16. SPEED READING--AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERGER, ALLEN

    APPROXIMATELY 125 REFERENCES TO SPEED READING APPEARING DURING THE PAST 40 YEARS ARE INCLUDED IN THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY. THEY ARE GROUPED INTO THE CATEGORIES OF TACHISTOSCOPIC AND CONTROLLED PACING, PAPERBACK SCANNING, RETENTION OF GAINS, FLEXIBILITY, PERCEPTION, PROCESSING INFORMATION, SEX DIFFERENCES, AND MEASUREMENT. MORE THAN 35 JOURNALS…

  17. Keeping Rural Schools up to Full Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beesley, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Rural schools are long accustomed to meeting challenges in innovative ways. For them, the challenge is not so much a lack of technology as it is adequate internet access, which affects both teachers and students. In this article, the author discusses how to keep rural schools up to full speed. The author suggests that the best approach when…

  18. Speed-sensing device aids crane operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    So that crane operators can judge payload movements accurately, a friction-driven multilobed cam device energizes a buzzer and indicator lamp in the crane cab. The signal frequency of this speed sensor has a sensitivity to hoist movement of 1/8 inch.

  19. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    DOEpatents

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  20. Measurement of Sound Speed in Thread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigemi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ichiki, Akira; Miyazaki, Akiho

    2006-05-01

    By employing thin wires, human hairs and threads, the measurement of sound speed in a thread whose diameter is smaller than 0.2 mm has been attempted. Preparing two cylindrical ceramic transducers with a 300 kHz resonance frequency, a perforated glass bead to be knotted by a sample thread is bonded to the center of the end surface of each transducer. After connecting these transducers with a sample thread, a receiving transducer is attached at a ceiling so as to hang another transmitting transducer with the thread. A glass bead is bonded to another end surface of the transmitting transducer so that tension, varied with a hanged plumb, can be applied to the sample thread. The time delay of the received signal relative to the transmitting pulse is measured while gradually shortening the thread. Sound speed is determined by the proportionality of time delay with thread length. Although the measured values for metallic wires are somewhat different from the values derived from the density and Young’s modulus cited in references, they are reproducible. The sound speed for human hairs of over twenty samples, which varies between 2000 and 2500 m/s, seems to depend on hair quality. Sound speed in a cotton thread is found to approach a constant value under large tension. An advanced measurement system available for uncut threads is also presented, where semi cylindrical transducers pinch the thread.

  1. Processing Speed in Children with Clinical Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Susan Dickerson

    2005-01-01

    The Processing Speed Index (PSI) was first introduced on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WISC-III; D. Wechsler, 1991), and little is known about its clinical significance. In a referred sample (N = 980), children with neurological disorders (ADHD, autism, bipolar disorder, and LD) had mean PSI and Freedom from Distractibility Index…

  2. Variable-speed Generators with Flux Weakening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fardoun, A. A.; Fuchs, E. F.; Carlin, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    A cost-competitive, permanent-magnet 20 kW generator is designed such that the following criteria are satisfied: an (over) load capability of at least 30 kW over the entire speed range of 60-120 rpm, generator weight of about 550 lbs with a maximum radial stator flux density of 0.82 T at low speed, unity power factor operation, acceptably small synchronous reactances and operation without a gear box. To justify this final design four different generator designs are investigated: the first two designs are studied to obtain a speed range from 20 to 200 rpm employing rotor field weakening, and the latter two are investigated to obtain a maximum speed range of 40 to 160 rpm based on field weakening via the stator excitation. The generator reactances and induced voltages are computed using finite element/difference solutions. Generator losses and efficiencies are presented for all four designs at rated temperature of Tr=120C.

  3. BMI, a Performance Parameter for Speed Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Sedeaud, Adrien; Marc, Andy; Marck, Adrien; Dor, Frédéric; Schipman, Julien; Dorsey, Maya; Haida, Amal; Berthelot, Geoffroy; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between anthropometric characteristics and performance in all track and field running events and assess Body Mass Index (BMI) as a relevant performance indicator. Data of mass, height, BMI and speed were collected for the top 100 international men athletes in track events from 100 m to marathon for the 1996–2011 seasons, and analyzed by decile of performance. Speed is significantly associated with mass (r = 0.71) and BMI (r = 0.71) in world-class runners and moderately with height (r = 0.39). Athletes, on average were continuously lighter and smaller with distance increments. In track and field, speed continuously increases with BMI. In each event, performances are organized through physique gradients. «Lighter and smaller is better» in endurance events but «heavier and taller is better» for sprints. When performance increases, BMI variability progressively tightens, but it is always centered around a distance-specific optimum. Running speed is organized through biometric gradients, which both drives and are driven by performance optimization. The highest performance level is associated with narrower biometric intervals. Through BMI indicators, diversity is possible for sprints whereas for long distance events, there is a more restrictive aspect in terms of physique. BMI is a relevant indicator, which allows for a clear differentiation of athletes' capacities between each discipline and level of performance in the fields of human possibilities. PMID:24587266

  4. Quantum speed meter based on dissipative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyatchanin, Sergey P.; Matsko, Andrey B.

    2016-06-01

    We show that generalized dissipative optomechanical coupling enables a direct quantum measurement of speed of a free test mass. An optical detection of a weak classical mechanical force based on this interaction is proposed. The sensitivity of the force measurement can be better than the standard quantum limit.

  5. Mathematical model to predict drivers' reaction speeds.

    PubMed

    Long, Benjamin L; Gillespie, A Isabella; Tanaka, Martin L

    2012-02-01

    Mental distractions and physical impairments can increase the risk of accidents by affecting a driver's ability to control the vehicle. In this article, we developed a linear mathematical model that can be used to quantitatively predict drivers' performance over a variety of possible driving conditions. Predictions were not limited only to conditions tested, but also included linear combinations of these tests conditions. Two groups of 12 participants were evaluated using a custom drivers' reaction speed testing device to evaluate the effect of cell phone talking, texting, and a fixed knee brace on the components of drivers' reaction speed. Cognitive reaction time was found to increase by 24% for cell phone talking and 74% for texting. The fixed knee brace increased musculoskeletal reaction time by 24%. These experimental data were used to develop a mathematical model to predict reaction speed for an untested condition, talking on a cell phone with a fixed knee brace. The model was verified by comparing the predicted reaction speed to measured experimental values from an independent test. The model predicted full braking time within 3% of the measured value. Although only a few influential conditions were evaluated, we present a general approach that can be expanded to include other types of distractions, impairments, and environmental conditions. PMID:22431214

  6. Motorcycle and scooter speeds approaching urban intersections.

    PubMed

    Walton, D; Buchanan, J

    2012-09-01

    Five urban, uncontrolled T-intersections known to be motorcycle crash 'black spots' were monitored using instrumentation and a roadside observer. Two sets of twelve-hour observations were collected for each site (N≈100,000). Instrumentation recorded the 'events' of vehicles passing to measure, speed, direction, lane position, vehicle type (broadly characterised) and headway. Observers further recorded times of bicycle events, type of motorcycle (scooters or motorcycles), the behaviour of motorcycles and the use of 'high conspicuity' gear such as clothing or helmets. Results establish that motorcycles travel around 10% faster than the other traffic (car mean speed=34.97 km/h), with motorcycles travelling on average 3.3 km/h faster than cars. Motorcycles were 3.4 times more likely to be exceeding the speed limit than cars. Similar results are described for scooters. Also examined are the influences on mean speeds such as the time of day, the presence of a car at the t-intersection, and the influence of free headway. The results are compared for robustness across locations and days. It is concluded that in urban areas motorcycles are travelling significantly faster than other traffic. These findings are discussed against a concern to reduce motorcycle crashes by improving conspicuity and previous research that implicates a 'looked-but-failed-to-see' effect for car drivers. PMID:22664698

  7. High-speed fiber grating pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric; Rodriguez, George; Sandberg, Richard L.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber grating pressure sensors have been used to support pressure measurements associated with burn, deflagration and detonation of energetic materials. This paper provides an overview of this technology and serves as a companion paper to the application of this technology to measuring pressure during high speed impacts.

  8. Rapid Naming Speed and Chinese Character Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Chen-Huei; Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between rapid naming speed (RAN) and Chinese character recognition accuracy and fluency. Sixty-three grade 2 and 54 grade 4 Taiwanese children were administered four RAN tasks (colors, digits, Zhu-Yin-Fu-Hao, characters), and two character recognition tasks. RAN tasks accounted for more reading variance in grade 4 than…

  9. High-speed civil transport study. Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system of study of the potential for a high speed commercial transport aircraft addressed technology, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicated a need for fleets of transport with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the years 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5000 to 6000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristics, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high speed civil transport. Significant advances are needed to take off gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environment acceptability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  10. Speed of Information Processing and General Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Philip A.

    1983-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between measures of speed of cognitive information processing and intelligence test scores. Cognitive processing measures were significantly related to IQ scores. Reaction time tests measure cognitive operations basic to intelligence, and individual differences in intelligence are partly due to variability…

  11. Low speed inducers for cryogenic upper stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Briefing charts are presented, which were used in an oral presentation of the results and recommendations for the design and analysis of low speed hydrogen and oxygen inducers and their drive systems applicable to the space tug. A discussion of the design of the 15K and RL-10 inducers is included.

  12. Speed trends in male distance running.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Timothy N; Carter, Rickey E; Rosedahl, Jordan K; Joyner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The major cycling "Grand Tours" have shown an attenuation of performance over the last decade. This has been interpreted as circumstantial evidence that newer anti-doping strategies have reduced the use of performance-enhancing drugs. To examine this idea under more controlled conditions, speed trends for world class 5000 m, 10000 m, and marathon performances by men from 1980 to 2013 were analyzed. We obtained comprehensive records from the International Association of Athletics Federations, Association of Road Racing Statisticians, and the Track and Field All-time Performances database webpages. The top 40 performances for each event and year were selected for regression analysis. For the three distances, we noted cumulative performance improvements in the 1990s thru the mid-2000s. After the peak speed years of the mid 2000 s, there has been limited improvement in the 5000 m and 10,000 m and world records set during that time remain in place today, marking the longest period of time between new records since the early 1940s. By contrast marathon speed continues to increase and the world record has been lowered four times since 2007, including in 2013. While the speed trends for 5000 m and 10000 m track results parallel those seen in elite cycling, the marathon trends do not. We discuss a number of explanations other than improved anti-doping strategies that might account for these divergent findings. PMID:25409192

  13. High-speed data word monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, M. N.

    1975-01-01

    Small, portable, self-contained device provides high-speed display of bit pattern or any selected portion of transmission, can suppress filler patterns so that display is not updated, and can freeze display so that specific event may be observed in detail.

  14. 32 CFR 636.22 - Speed regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.145). ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Speed regulations. 636.22 Section 636.22 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.22...

  15. The Speed of Light in Different Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Allan

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for measuring the speed of light using the assumption that the frequency of light remains unchanged as it moves from one medium to another is presented. A laser with a known wavelength and frequency in air was used as a light source. (KR)

  16. 32 CFR 636.22 - Speed regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.145). ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Speed regulations. 636.22 Section 636.22 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.22...

  17. Speeded Recognition of Ungrammaticality: Double Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy E.; Biederman, Irving

    1979-01-01

    The speed at which sentences with various kinds of violations could be rejected was studied. Compatible with the sequential model was the finding that noun-verb and adjective-noun double violations did not result in shorter reaction times than noun-verb single violations, although double violations were judged less acceptable. (Author/RD)

  18. Approaching the Speed of Light with Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dance, Rosalie A.; Sandefur, James T.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental approach to determining the speed of light in water using some simple observations and Fermat's principle. Enables students to integrate mathematical techniques and encourages mathematical exploration in which the students have control over what mathematics and technology to use and when to use them. Presents extensions…

  19. A Finite Speed Curzon-Ahlborn Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Curzon and Ahlborn achieved finite power output by introducing the concept of finite rate of heat transfer in a Carnot engine. The finite power can also be achieved through a finite speed of the piston on the four branches of the Carnot cycle. The present paper combines these two approaches to study the behaviour of output power in terms of…

  20. Separating Fact from Fiction: Increasing Running Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murgia, Carla

    2008-01-01

    From a biomechanical point of view, this article explores the common belief that one must increase stride length and frequency in order to increase running speed. The limb length, explosive power, and anaerobic capacity of the athlete, as well as the type of running (sprinting vs. long distance) must be considered before making such a…