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Sample records for 89y nmr signal

  1. Producing >60,000-fold room-temperature 89Y NMR signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumata, Lloyd; Jindal, Ashish; Merritt, Matthew; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    89 Y in chelated form is potentially valuable in medical imaging because its chemical shift is sensitive to local factors in tumors such as pH. However, 89 Y has a low gyromagnetic ratio γn thus its NMR signal is hampered by low thermal polarization. Here we show that we can enhance the room-temperature NMR signal of 89 Y up to 65,000 times the thermal signal, which corresponds to 10 % nuclear polarization, via fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The relatively long spin-lattice relaxation time T1 (~ 500 s) of 89 Y translates to a long polarization lifetime. The 89 Y NMR enhancement is optimized by varying the glassing matrices and paramagnetic agents as well as doping the samples with a gadolinium relaxation agent. Co-polarization of 89 Y-DOTA with a 13 C sample shows that both nuclear spin species acquire the same spin temperature Ts , consistent with thermal mixing mechanism of DNP. The high room-temperature NMR signal enhancement places 89 Y, one of the most challenging nuclei to detect by NMR, in the list of viable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents when hyperpolarized under optimized conditions. This work is supported in part by the National Institutes of Health grant numbers 1R21EB009147-01 and RR02584.

  2. 89Y NMR of YBa 2Cu 3O 6.710 in the mixed state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Kiyoshi; Mahajan, Avinash; Alloul, Henri; Saito, Takahito

    1994-02-01

    We report NMR width and shift ΔK data of 89Y taken mainly from 2 to 100K in aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 6.710 powder. Under the magnetic field of 7.5T applied parallel to the c axis, we have observed motional narrowing of resonance width due to flux-lattice melting between 20K and Tc| = 61.1K. Non-monotonic temperature dependence of ΔK has been found below Tc, and is explained as an addition of spin-susceptibility shift Ks( T) and demagnetization shift Kdemag( T).

  3. Synthesis, 89Y and 51V-NMR of Er-doped zircon-type YVO 4 and LUVO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantea, R.; Ghigna, P.; Mustarelli, P.; Tartara, V.

    2005-05-01

    Y 0.99Er 0.01VO 4 and Lu 0.99Er 0.01VO 4 zircon-type compounds have been synthesized by solid-state reaction starting from the parent oxides. The obtained materials are single phase, well crystallized and homogeneous in the chemical composition. The magic angle spinning-NMR characterization points toward the substitutional nature of erbium on the rare earth site. The isotropic chemical shift of 89Y in an orthovanadate is reported for the first time.

  4. YPdSn and YPd{sub 2}Sn: Structure, {sup 89}Y solid state NMR and {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeting, Christoph; Eckert, Hellmut; Langer, Thorsten; Schellenberg, Inga; Poettgen, Rainer

    2012-06-15

    The stannides YPdSn and YPd{sub 2}Sn were synthesized by high-frequency melting of the elements in sealed tantalum tubes. Both structures were refined on the basis of single crystal X-ray diffractometer data: TiNiSi type, Pnma, a=715.4(1), b=458.8(1), c=789.1(1) pm, wR2=0.0461, 510 F{sup 2} values, 20 variables for YPdSn and MnCu{sub 2}Al type, Fm3 Macron m, a=671.44(8), wR2=0.0740, 55 F{sup 2} values, 5 parameters for YPd{sub 2}Sn. The yttrium atoms in the new stannide YPdSn are coordinated by two tilted Pd{sub 3}Sn{sub 3} hexagons (ordered AlB{sub 2} superstructure). In the Heusler phase YPd{sub 2}Sn each yttrium atom has octahedral tin coordination and additionally eight palladium neighbors. The cubic site symmetry of yttrium is reflected in the {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectrum which shows no quadrupole splitting. In contrast, YPdSn shows a single signal at {delta}=1.82(1) mm/s subjected to quadrupole splitting of {Delta}E{sub Q}=0.93(1) mm/s. Both compounds have been characterized by high-resolution {sup 89}Y solid state NMR spectroscopy, which indicates the presence of strong Knight shifts. The spectrum of YPd{sub 2}Sn is characterized by an unusually large linewidth, suggesting the presence of a Knight shift distribution reflecting local disordering effects. The range of {sup 89}Y Knight shifts of several binary and ternary intermetallic yttrium compounds is briefly discussed. - Graphical abstract: YPdSn and YPd{sub 2}Sn: Structure, {sup 89}Y solid state NMR and {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and structure of ternary stannides YPdSn and YPd{sub 2}Sn. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopic investigation of YPdSn and YPd{sub 2}Sn. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 89}Y solid state NMR of intermetallics.

  5. Synthesis, {sup 89}Y and {sup 51}V-NMR of Er-doped zircon-type YVO{sub 4} and LUVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Amantea, R.; Ghigna, P.; Mustarelli, P. . E-mail: mustarelli@matsci.unipv.it; Tartara, V.

    2005-05-15

    Y{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}VO{sub 4} and Lu{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}VO{sub 4} zircon-type compounds have been synthesized by solid-state reaction starting from the parent oxides. The obtained materials are single phase, well crystallized and homogeneous in the chemical composition. The magic angle spinning-NMR characterization points toward the substitutional nature of erbium on the rare earth site. The isotropic chemical shift of {sup 89}Y in an orthovanadate is reported for the first time.

  6. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  7. Hyperpolarized 89Y NMR spectroscopic detection of yttrium ion and DOTA macrocyclic ligand complexation: pH dependence and Y-DOTA intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging physics technique used to enhance the signal strength in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) experiments for nuclear spins such as yttrium-89 by >10,000-fold. One of the most common and stable MRI contrast agents used in the clinic is Gd-DOTA. In this work, we have investigated the binding of the yttrium and DOTA ligand as a model for complexation of Gd ion and DOTA ligand. The macrocyclic ligand DOTA is special because its complexation with lanthanide ions such as Gd3+ or Y3+ is highly pH dependent. Using this physics technology, we have tracked the complexation kinetics of hyperpolarized Y-triflate and DOTA ligand in real-time and detected the Y-DOTA intermediates. Different kinds of buffers were used (lactate, acetate, citrate, oxalate) and the pseudo-first order complexation kinetic calculations will be discussed. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  8. Real-time tracking of dissociation of hyperpolarized 89Y-DTPA: a model for degradation of open-chain Gd3+ MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Sarah; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Gadolinium (Gd) complexes are widely used relaxation-based clinical contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gd-based MRI contrast agents with open-chain ligand such as Gd-DTPA, commercially known as magnevist, are less stable compared to Gd complexes with macrocyclic ligands such as GdDOTA (Dotarem). The dissociation of Gd-DPTA into Gd ion and DTPA ligand under certain biological conditions such as high zinc levels can potentially cause kidney damage. Since Gd is paramagnetic, direct NMR detection of the Gd-DTPA dissociation is quite challenging due to ultra-short relaxation times. In this work, we have investigated Y-DTPA as a model for Gd-DPTA dissociation under high zinc content solutions. Using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), the 89Y NMR signal is amplified by several thousand-fold. Due to the the relatively long T1 relaxation time of 89Y which translates to hyperpolarization lifetime of several minutes, the dissociation of Y-DTPA can be tracked in real-time by hyperpolarized 89Y NMR spectroscopy. Dissociation kinetic rates and implications on the degradation of open-chain Gd3+ MRI contrast agents will be discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Defense Award Number W81XWH-14-1-0048 and by the Robert A. Welch Foundation research Grant Number AT-1877.

  9. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  10. Experimentally constrained (p ,γ )89Y and (n ,γ )89Y reaction rates relevant to p -process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Schwengner, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Goriely, S.; Harissopulos, S.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Byun, Y.; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Klintefjord, M.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A. V.; Wiedeking, M.

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear level density and the γ -ray strength function have been extracted for 89Y by using the Oslo method on 89Y(p ,p'γ )89Y coincidence data. The γ -ray strength function displays a low-energy enhancement consistent with previous observations in this mass region (Mo-9893). Shell-model calculations support the conclusion that the observed enhancement is due to strong, low-energy M 1 transitions at high excitation energies. The data were further used as input for calculations of the 88Sr(p ,γ )89Y and 88Y(n ,γ )89Y cross sections with the talys reaction code. Comparison with cross-section data, where available, as well as with values from the BRUSLIB library, shows a satisfying agreement.

  11. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fan; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials comprised of TiO2/PMAA (poly methacrylic acid) and PVP (polyvinyl pyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particles, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ~(−)40-fold and ~(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  12. Extraction of quadrature phase information from multiple pulse NMR signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Burum, D. P.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A multiple pulse sequence (8-pulse sequence) used for high-resolution solid state NMR is analyzed with regard to the information available from each of the four wide sampling windows. It is demonstrated that full quadrature phase information can be obtained using only a single phase detector and that, for the commonly encountered situation where the spectral width is much less than the folding frequency, the signals from the various windows can be combined easily using standard complex Fourier transform software. An improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio equal to the square root of 3 is obtained over either standard single or quadrature phase detection schemes. Procedures for correcting spectral distortions are presented.

  13. Fusion of the weakly bound projectile {sup 9}Be with {sup 89}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Palshetkar, C. S.; Santra, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Ramachandran, K.; Pandit, S. K.; Mahata, K.; Shrivastava, A.; Thakur, Shital; Parkar, V. V.; Nanal, V.

    2010-10-15

    The excitation function for the complete fusion of {sup 9}Be+{sup 89}Y has been measured at near-barrier energies, and the barrier distribution has been extracted from the fusion data. Coupled-channels calculations have been carried out to understand the effect of coupling of both the projectile and target excitations on the above quantities. The complete fusion cross sections, especially at above-barrier energies, have been found to be suppressed by (20{+-}5)% compared to the ones predicted by the coupled-channels calculations that do not include the couplings to the projectile continuum, indicating the loss of flux from the entrance channel before fusion. This conclusion is also supported by a considerable incomplete fusion cross section observed for this system. Fusion measurements for two more systems have been carried out, namely, for {sup 4}He+{sup 93}Nb and {sup 12}C+{sup 89}Y, which involve tightly bound projectiles and form compound nuclei nearby to that formed in {sup 9}Be+{sup 89}Y fusion. Comparison of the fusion data obtained for all three systems further confirms the suppression of complete fusion in the {sup 9}Be+{sup 89}Y system. Systematics of the suppression factor observed for {sup 9}Be induced fusion in different mass targets is discussed.

  14. Measurements of the ^89Y(n,n')^89Y^m reaction cross section using the ASP D-T fusion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Andrew; Gardner, Matthew; Williams, Ben; Rubery, Michael

    2012-10-01

    A programme of measurements of the ^89Y(n,n')^89Y^m reaction cross section has commenced at AWE using the ASP accelerator to impinge deuterons onto tritiated titanium layers mounted on copper discs producing fluxes of approximately 10^11 neutrons per second. The neutrons are generated for up to half an hour and are used to excite Yttrium into its first isomeric state at 909.1 keV which then decays with a half life of 15.7 seconds. Two other high purity foils (of ^27Al and ^63,65Cu) are used as a reference to establish consistency between the isotopes energetic and temporal decay signatures. These foils mainly serve to check the reported total neutron fluence, produced by the accelerator, incident on the targets. The activation foils are extracted from the irradiation position by a pneumatic transfer system in ˜ 7 seconds and are transferred to the counting station in 5 to 30 seconds. Data are taken with a BEGe detector and recorded with both a Canberra Genie analogue system and a Xia Pixie-4 digital system. The results from the first campaigns are presented with a discussion of improvements and future plans.

  15. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas; Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23011410

  16. Neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectra of 89Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Okamiya, Tohomohiro; Yanagida, Shotaro; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Terada, Kazushi; Kimura, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Igashira, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 89Y was measured by the time-of-flight method in an energy range from 15 to 100 keV. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the capture yield. The absolute cross section was determined based on the standard reaciotn 197 Au(n, γ)198 Au reaction. The neutron capture γ-ray spectrum was derived by unfolding the pulse-height spectrum with detector response functions.

  17. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields. PMID:27417269

  18. Maximum entropy signal processing in practical NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibisi, Sibusiso; Skilling, John; Brereton, Richard G.; Laue, Ernest D.; Staunton, James

    1984-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is intrinsically insensitive, a frequently serious limitation especially in biochemical applications where sample size is limited and compounds may be too insoluble or unstable for data to be accumulated over long periods. Fourier transform (FT) NMR was developed by Ernst1 to speed up the accumulation of useful data, dramatically improving the quality of spectra obtained in a given observing time by recording the free induction decay (FID) data directly in time, at the cost of requiring numerical processing. Ernst also proposed that more information could be obtained from the spectrum if the FID was multiplied by a suitable apodizing function before being Fourier transformed. For example (see ref. 2), an increase in sensitivity can result from the use of a matched filter1, whereas an increase in resolution can be achieved by the use of gaussian multiplication1,3, application of sine bells4-8 or convolution difference9. These methods are now used routinely in NMR data processing. The maximum entropy method (MEM)10 is theoretically capable of achieving simultaneous enhancement in both respects11, and this has been borne out in practice in other fields where it has been applied. However, this technique requires relatively heavy computation. We describe here the first practical application of MEM to NMR, and we analyse 13C and 1H NMR spectra of 2-vinyl pyridine. Compared with conventional spectra, MEM gives considerable suppression of noise, accompanied by significant resolution enhancement. Multiplets in the 1H spectra are resolved better leading to improved visual clarity.

  19. High-spin states in the semimagic nucleus 89Y and neutron-core excitations in the N =50 isotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. Q.; Wang, S. Y.; Niu, C. Y.; Qi, B.; Wang, S.; Sun, D. P.; Liu, C.; Xu, C. J.; Liu, L.; Zhang, P.; Wu, X. G.; Li, G. S.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, C. B.; Yu, B. B.; Hu, S. P.; Yao, S. H.; Cao, X. P.; Wang, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The semimagic nucleus 89Y 89 has been investigated using the 82Se(11>B,4 n ) reaction at beam energies of 48 and 52 MeV. More than 24 new transitions have been identified, leading to a considerable extension of the level structures of 89Y. The experimental results are compared with the large-basis shell model calculations. They show that cross-shell neutron excitations play a pivotal role in high-spin level structures of 89Y. The systematic features of neutron-core excitations in the N =50 isotones are also discussed.

  20. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  1. Lithological control on gas hydrate saturation as revealed by signal classification of NMR logging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole logging data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). In NMR logging, transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves are usually used to determine single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity or hydrocarbon saturation. Our approach analyzes the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. We apply self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal amplitudes for all relaxation times. Most importantly, two subtypes of hydrate-bearing shaly sands were identified. They show distinct NMR signals and differ in hydrate saturation and gamma ray values. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate saturation and clay content was concluded. Finally, we infer that the gas hydrate is not grain coating, but rather, pore filling with matrix support is the preferred growth habit model for the studied formation.

  2. NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange of Sulfur-Heterocyclic Compounds Found In Petroleum

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Goodson, Boyd M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2016-01-01

    NMR hyperpolarization via Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) was employed to investigate the feasibility of enhancing the NMR detection sensitivity of sulfur-heterocycles (specifically 2-methylthiophene and dibenzothiophenes), a family of compounds typically found in petroleum and refined petroleum products. SABRE hyperpolarization of sulfur-heterocycles (conducted in seconds) offers potential advantages of providing structural information about sulfur-containing contaminants in petroleum, thereby informing petroleum purification and refining to minimize sulfur content in refined products such as gasoline. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy sensitivity gains endowed by hyperpolarization potentially allows for performing structural assays using inexpensive, low-magnetic-field (ca. 1 T) high-resolution NMR spectrometers ideally suited for industrial applications in the field. PMID:27500206

  3. Theory of NMR signal behavior in magnetically inhomogeneous tissues: the static dephasing regime.

    PubMed

    Yablonskiy, D A; Haacke, E M

    1994-12-01

    This paper is devoted to a theory of the NMR signal behavior in biological tissues in the presence of static magnetic field inhomogeneities. We have developed an approach that analytically describes the NMR signal in the static dephasing regime where diffusion phenomena may be ignored. This approach has been applied to evaluate the NMR signal in the presence of a blood vessel network (with an application to functional imaging), bone marrow (for two specific trabecular structures, asymmetrical and columnar) and a ferrite contrast agent. All investigated systems have some common behavior. If the echo time TE is less than a known characteristic time tc for a given system, then the signal decays exponentially with an argument which depends quadratically on TE. This is equivalent to an R2* relaxation rate which is a linear function of TE. In the opposite case, when TE is greater than tc, the NMR signal follows a simple exponential decay and the relaxation rate does not depend on the echo time. For this time interval, R2* is a linear function of a) volume fraction sigma occupied by the field-creating objects, b) magnetic field Bo or just the objects' magnetic moment for ferrite particles, and c) susceptibility difference delta chi between the objects and the medium. PMID:7869897

  4. Lithological controls on gas hydrate saturation: Insights from signal classification of NMR downhole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). NMR logging is a powerful tool to study geological reservoir formations. The measurements are based on interactions between the magnetic moments of protons in geological formation water and an external magnetic field. Inversion of the measured raw data provides so-called transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves or spectra. Different parts of the T2 curve are related with distinct pore radii and corresponding fluid components. A common practice in the analysis of T2 distribution curves is to extract single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity. Moreover, the derived total NMR apparent porosity and the gamma-gamma density log apparent porosity can be combined to estimate gas hydrate saturation in hydrate-bearing sediments. To avoid potential loss of information, in our new approach we analyze the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. The approach is applied to NMR data measured in gas hydrate research well Mallik 5L-38. We use self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR T2 distribution curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, photo-electric factor, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal

  5. Radiative capture mechanisms in the {sup 89}Y({rvec p},{gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.E.; Dietrich, F.S.; Sale, K.E.; Kammeraad, J.E.; Luke, S.J.; Weller, H.R.; Chasteler, R.M.; Godwin, M.A.; Kramer, L.; Schmid, G.J.

    1993-07-28

    We have measured the spectra of gamma rays from approximately 14 MeV to the endpoint in the {sup 89}Y({rvec p},{gamma}) reaction with 19.6 MeV polarized protons from the TUNL tandem accelerator. Gamma spectra were measured with a pair of 25.4 cm {times} 25.4 cm anticoincidence shielded NaI detectors at angles of 30, 55, 90, 125, and 150{degrees} with respect to the incident beam. The {gamma}-ray spectra show significant analyzing powers and forward peaking of the angular distributions. These features allow for the discrimination between compound processes which do not exhibit interference between different channels, and direct processes. The observed interference effects indicate that multistep-direct processes are important at {gamma}-ray energies lower than those for which direct-semidirect capture is the dominant mechanism.

  6. Differential (p,p') and (p,d) Cross Sections of 89Y and 92Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeling, Molly; Burke, Jason; Koglin, Johnathon; McClory, John

    2016-03-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on 89Y and 92Zr were measured using a 28.5-MeV proton beam at the 88-inch cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Angular distributions were obtained for the ground state and several excited states of each isotope using silicon detector telescopes over angles 10° to 140° in the reaction plane. Angular distributions for unresolved higher-energy states up to 22 MeV were also obtained. These data were obtained by fitting a Gaussian function to each peak in the energy spectra using the ROOT toolkit and integrating the number of counts under each peak. The cross sections will be included in nuclear structure models so that neutron and other particle reaction cross sections can be predicted for other isotopes, including eventually those farther from stability and those whose half-lives are too short to measure experimentally.

  7. Mapping hypoxia-induced bioenergetic rearrangements and metabolic signaling by 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Dzeja, Petras P; Bast, Peter; Gumina, Richard J; Drahl, Carmen; Lim, Lynette; Juranic, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Terzic, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Brief hypoxia or ischemia perturbs energy metabolism inducing paradoxically a stress-tolerant state, yet metabolic signals that trigger cytoprotection remain poorly understood. To evaluate bioenergetic rearrangements, control and hypoxic hearts were analyzed with 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The 18O-induced isotope shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of CrP, betaADP and betaATP was used to quantify phosphotransfer fluxes through creatine kinase and adenylate kinase. This analysis was supplemented with determination of energetically relevant metabolites in the phosphomonoester (PME) region of 31P NMR spectra, and in both aromatic and aliphatic regions of 1H NMR spectra. In control conditions, creatine kinase was the major phosphotransfer pathway processing high-energy phosphoryls between sites of ATP consumption and ATP production. In hypoxia, creatine kinase flux was dramatically reduced with a compensatory increase in adenylate kinase flux, which supported heart energetics by regenerating and transferring beta- and gamma-phosphoryls of ATP. Activation of adenylate kinase led to a build-up of AMP, IMP and adenosine, molecules involved in cardioprotective signaling. 31P and 1H NMR spectral analysis further revealed NADH and H+ scavenging by alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alphaGPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase contributing to maintained glycolysis under hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced accumulation of alpha-glycerophosphate and nucleoside 5'-monophosphates, through alphaGPDH and adenylate kinase reactions, respectively, was mapped within the increased PME signal in the 31P NMR spectrum. Thus, 18O-assisted 31P NMR combined with 1H NMR provide a powerful approach in capturing rearrangements in cardiac bioenergetics, and associated metabolic signaling that underlie the cardiac adaptive response to stress. PMID:14977188

  8. Parameterized signal calibration for NMR cryoporometry experiment without external standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoch, Grzegorz; Krzyżak, Artur T.

    2016-08-01

    In cryoporometric experiments non-linear effects associated with the sample and the probehead bring unwanted contributions to the total signal along with the change of temperature. The elimination of these influences often occurs with the help of an intermediate measurement of a separate liquid sample. In this paper we suggest an alternative approach under certain assumptions, solely based on data from the target experiment. In order to obtain calibration parameters the method uses all of these raw data points. Its reliability is therefore enhanced as compared to other methods based on lesser number of data points. Presented approach is automatically valid for desired temperature range. The need for intermediate measurement is removed and parameters for such a calibration are naturally adapted to the individual sample-probehead combination.

  9. Suppressing background signals in solid state NMR via the Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Giulia; Ziarelli, Fabio; Tintaru, Aura; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A simple procedure to effectively suppress background signals arising from various probe head components (e.g. stator, rotors, inserts) in solid state NMR is presented. Similarly to the ERETIC™ method, which uses an electronic signal as an internal standard for quantification, the proposed scheme is based on an electronically generated time-dependent signal that is injected into the receiver coil of the NMR probe head during signal acquisition. More specifically, the line shape, width and frequency of this electronic signal are determined by deconvoluting the background signal in the frequency domain. This deconvoluted signal is then converted into a time-dependent function through inverse Fourier Transform, which is used to generate the shaped pulse that is fed into the receiver coil during the acquisition of the Free Induction Decay. The power of the shaped pulse is adjusted to match the intensity of the background signal, and its phase is shifted by 180° with respect to the receiver reference phase. This so-called Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) methodology is demonstrated here with a 13C Single Pulse Magic Angle Spinning spectrum of an isotopically enriched 13C histidine solid sample recorded under quantitative conditions.

  10. Temporal characteristics of NMR signals from spin 3/2 nuclei of incompletely disordered systems.

    PubMed

    Woessner, D E; Bansal, N

    1998-07-01

    Anisotropic nuclear quadrupole interactions can produce residual quadrupole splitting in the NMR spectra of rapidly moving quadrupolar nuclei in incompletely disordered aqueous heterogeneous systems. Such systems may include hydrated sodium nuclei in biological tissue and biopolymer gels. To describe the NMR signals from such samples, we use a domain model in which each domain is characterized by a quadrupole frequency and a residence time of the nucleus. We show that the signals from each domain after one pulse, the quadrupole echo sequence, and the various multiple quantum filters (MQFs) can be expressed as a linear combination of five different phase coherences. To simulate the effect of various distributions (Pake powder pattern, Gaussian, etc.) of quadrupole frequencies for different domains on the NMR signal, we have written the computer program CORVUS. CORVUS also includes the effects of exchange between different domains using diffusion and random jump models. The results of computer simulations show that the Gaussian and Pake powder pattern quadrupole frequency distributions produce very different phase coherences and observable NMR signals when the exchange rate (1/taue) between different domains is slow. When 1/taue is similar to the root mean square quadrupole frequency (final sigma), the signals from the two distributions are similar. When 1/taue is an order of magnitude greater than final sigma, there is no apparent evidence of quadrupole splitting in the shape of the signal following one pulse, but the residual effects of the quadrupole splitting make a significant contribution to the fast transverse relaxation rate. Therefore, in this case, it is inappropriate to use the observed biexponential relaxation rates to obtain a single correlation time. The quadrupole echo and the various MQF signals contain an echo from the satellite transitions in the presence of quadrupole splitting. The peak of this echo is very sensitive to 1/taue. The time domain

  11. Pore size distribution calculation from 1H NMR signal and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Jamal

    2012-09-01

    The pore size distribution (PSD) of nano-material MCM-41 is determined using two different approaches: N2 adsorption-desorption and 1H NMR signal of water confined in silica nano-pores of MCM-41. The first approach is based on the recently modified Kelvin equation [J.V. Rocha, D. Barrera, K. Sapag, Top. Catal. 54(2011) 121-134] which deals with the known underestimation in pore size distribution for the mesoporous materials such as MCM-41 by introducing a correction factor to the classical Kelvin equation. The second method employs the Gibbs-Thompson equation, using NMR, for melting point depression of liquid in confined geometries. The result shows that both approaches give similar pore size distribution to some extent, and also the NMR technique can be considered as an alternative direct method to obtain quantitative results especially for mesoporous materials. The pore diameter estimated for the nano-material used in this study was about 35 and 38 Å for the modified Kelvin and NMR methods respectively. A comparison between these methods and the classical Kelvin equation is also presented.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Underlie the Nature of MRI Signals: The NMR Shutter-Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Charles S., Jr.

    2007-03-01

    Motions of the spin-bearing molecules can have profound effects on the very nature (the exponentiality) of the macroscopic NMR signal. Quantitative mechanistic protocols often involve varying the equilibrium molecular kinetics (usually by temperature change) relative to the ``NMR time-scale'' (SS-1), usually ill-defined as the absolute difference of resonance frequencies [|δφ|] in sites between which spins are exchanged. This holds true for the equilibrium water molecule exchange between tissue compartments and distinct populations. However, in vivo studies must [by regulation] be isothermal, and the tissue ^1H2O MRI signals remain essentially isochronous [δφ = 0]. In NMR, an equilibrium process is manifest in the context of its ``exchange condition.'' It only ``appears'' to be fast or slow by comparison of its actual rate constant with its system ``shutter-speed'' (SS). [A nonzero δφ is the first, but not only, SS: its dimension is reciprocal time.] The process kinetics can be measured only if its NMR condition is varied at least partway between the fast- and slow exchange limits. In an isothermal study with no catalyst, this can be accomplished only by varying the pertinent SS. An MRI contrast reagent (CR) increases the laboratory frame ^1H2O relaxation rate constant, Ri [≡ (Ti)-1; i = 1,2]. For an isochronous exchange process, the SS is the intrinsic |δRi| for the sites. In quantitative dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) studies, analytical pharmacokinetic modeling is accomplished on region-of-interest (ROI) or pixel by pixel ^1H2O signal time-courses following bolus CR injections. Accounting for the equilibrium transendothelial and transcytolemmal water interchange processes (a three-site exchange situation) is crucial for modeling accuracy: the relevant SS values vary during the CR bolus passage. This is so for DCE studies of cancer, multiple sclerosis, and myocardial blood flow variation. It is necessary for the successful discrimination of malignant

  13. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  14. Surface coil localization of /sup 31/P NMR signals from orthotopic human kidney and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Lohman, J.A.B.; Hughes, E.W.; Hanstock, C.C.; Shulman, R.G.

    1988-02-01

    By incorporating the hyperbolic secant inversion pulses with the image-selected in vivo spectroscopy localization technique and by applying a gradient-echo imaging method, the authors have selected only the /sup 31/P NMR signals from orthotopic human kidney and liver, using a single concentric /sup 1/H//sup 31/P surface coil. Corresponding to the experimental results on animal studies, the phosphocreatine signal is dramatically reduced in the localized spectra. The localization strategy also allows them to shim easily on the well-defined volume of interest and leads to high-resolution spectra that exhibit multiplet structure. The results indicate that they can obtain localized signals from deep small organs and point the way for other human metabolism studies.

  15. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  16. Signal enhancement in protein NMR using the spin-noise tuning optimum.

    PubMed

    Nausner, Martin; Goger, Michael; Bendet-Taicher, Eli; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Jerschow, Alexej; Müller, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    We have assessed the potential of an alternative probe tuning strategy based on the spin-noise response for application in common high-resolution multi-dimensional biomolecular NMR experiments with water signal suppression on aqueous and salty samples. The method requires the adjustment of the optimal tuning condition, which may be offset by several 100 kHz from the conventional tuning settings using the noise response of the water protons as an indicator. Although the radio frequency-pulse durations are typically longer under such conditions, signal-to-noise gains of up to 22% were achieved. At salt concentrations up to 100 mM a substantial sensitivity gain was observed. PMID:20924647

  17. Non-Linear Signal Detection Improvement by Radiation Damping in Single-Pulse NMR Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Morgan, Steven W; Nausner, Martin; Müller, Norbert; Desvaux, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    When NMR lines overlap and at least one of them is affected by radiation damping, the resonance line shapes of all lines are no longer Lorentzian. We report the appearance of narrow signal distortions, which resemble hole-burnt spectra. This new experimental phenomenon facilitates the detection of tiny signals hidden below the main resonance. Theoretical analysis based on modified Maxwell–Bloch equations shows that the presence of strong transverse magnetization creates a feedback through the coil, which influences the magnetization of all spins with overlapping resonance lines. In the time domain this leads to cross-precession terms between magnetization densities, which ultimately cause non-linear behavior. Numerical simulations corroborate this interpretation. PMID:22266720

  18. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  19. Irreversible Catalyst Activation Enables Hyperpolarization and Water Solubility for NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activation of a catalyst [IrCl(COD)(IMes)] (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene; COD = cyclooctadiene)] for signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was monitored by in situ hyperpolarized proton NMR at 9.4 T. During the catalyst-activation process, the COD moiety undergoes hydrogenation that leads to its complete removal from the Ir complex. A transient hydride intermediate of the catalyst is observed via its hyperpolarized signatures, which could not be detected using conventional nonhyperpolarized solution NMR. SABRE enhancement of the pyridine substrate can be fully rendered only after removal of the COD moiety; failure to properly activate the catalyst in the presence of sufficient substrate can lead to irreversible deactivation consistent with oligomerization of the catalyst molecules. Following catalyst activation, results from selective RF-saturation studies support the hypothesis that substrate polarization at high field arises from nuclear cross-relaxation with hyperpolarized 1H spins of the hydride/orthohydrogen spin bath. Importantly, the chemical changes that accompanied the catalyst’s full activation were also found to endow the catalyst with water solubility, here used to demonstrate SABRE hyperpolarization of nicotinamide in water without the need for any organic cosolvent—paving the way to various biomedical applications of SABRE hyperpolarization methods. PMID:25372972

  20. 89Y(γ,xn) reaction cross-section measurements with bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50-65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shahid, Muhammad; Naik, Haladhara; Yang, Sungchul; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    The cross-sections for 89Y(γ, n)88Y, 89Y(γ, 2n)87Y, 89Y(γ, 3n)86Y, and 89Y(γ, 4n)85Y reactions for the end-point bremsstrahlung energies of 50 and 65 MeV were determined by using an activation and an off-line γ-ray spectrometric techniques with the electron linear accelerator at the Pohang Accelerator laboratory (PAL), Korea. The photon-induced reaction cross-sections of 89Y as functions of the photon energy were taken from the TENDL-2013 nuclear data library based on the TALYS 1.6 program. For comparison with our experimental results, the flux-weighted average cross-sections for the existing experimental data with mono-energetic photons and the theoretical values from TENDL-2013 were obtained. The reaction cross-section values measured at different end-point bremsstrahlung energies from the present work and from literature are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. The 89Y(γ, xn, x = 1 - 4) reaction cross-sections were observed to increase sharply from their threshold values to certain energies, until the next reaction channel opens, after which it remained constant for a while until the next reaction channel opened. Then, it decrease slowly with increasing of end-point bremsstrahlung energy due to the opening of different reaction channels.

  1. Signal Selection in High-Resolution NMR by Pulsed Field Gradients. I. Geometrical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschang, Lorenz

    1999-03-01

    A geometrical description for the selection of coherence transfer pathways in high resolution NMR by the application of pulsed field gradients along three orthogonal directions in space is presented. The response of the spin system is one point of the three-dimensional Fourier transform of the sample volume affected by a sequence of field gradients. The property that a pathway is retained (or suppressed) when a sequence of field gradients is applied is expressed by the property of vectors, representing the pathway and the sequence, respectively, to be orthogonal (or not orthogonal). Ignoring imperfections of RF pulses, and with the exception of sensitivity enhanced experiments and experiments where the relevant coherence order is zero while field gradients are applied, it is shown that at most only half of the relevant pathways, as compared to a phase cycled experiment, are retained when field gradients are used for signal selection.

  2. Differences in Lysine pKa Values May Be Used to Improve NMR Signal Dispersion in Reductively Methylated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Solaro, R. John; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Summary Reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins offers a way to introduce 13C methyl groups into otherwise unlabeled molecules. The 13C methyl groups on lysines possess favorable relaxation properties that allow highly sensitive NMR signal detection. One of the major limitations in the use of reductive methylation in NMR is the signal overlap of 13C methyl groups in NMR spectra. Here we show that the uniform influence of the solvent on chemical shifts of exposed lysine methyl groups could be overcome by adjusting the pH of the buffering solution closer to the pKa of lysine side chains. Under these conditions, due to variable pKa values of individual lysine side chains in the protein of interest different levels of lysine protonation are observed. These differences are reflected in the chemical shift differences of methyl groups in reductively methylated lysines. We show that this approach is successful in four different proteins including Ca2+-bound Calmodulin, Lysozyme, Ca2+-bound Troponin C, and Glutathione S-Transferase. In all cases significant improvement in NMR spectral resolution of methyl signals in reductively methylated proteins was obtained. The increased spectral resolution helps with more precise characterization of protein structural rearrangements caused by ligand binding as shown by studying binding of Calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine to Calmodulin. Thus, this approach may be used to increase resolution in NMR spectra of 13C methyl groups on lysine residues in reductively methylated proteins that enhances the accuracy of protein structural assessment. PMID:19280122

  3. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  4. Backbone NMR reveals allosteric signal transduction networks in the β1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Shin; Deupi, Xavier; Opitz, Christian; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Brueckner, Florian; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are physiologically important transmembrane signalling proteins that trigger intracellular responses upon binding of extracellular ligands. Despite recent breakthroughs in GPCR crystallography, the details of ligand-induced signal transduction are not well understood owing to missing dynamical information. In principle, such information can be provided by NMR, but so far only limited data of functional relevance on few side-chain sites of eukaryotic GPCRs have been obtained. Here we show that receptor motions can be followed at virtually any backbone site in a thermostabilized mutant of the turkey β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Labelling with [(15)N]valine in a eukaryotic expression system provides over twenty resolved resonances that report on structure and dynamics in six ligand complexes and the apo form. The response to the various ligands is heterogeneous in the vicinity of the binding pocket, but gets transformed into a homogeneous readout at the intracellular side of helix 5 (TM5), which correlates linearly with ligand efficacy for the G protein pathway. The effect of several pertinent, thermostabilizing point mutations was assessed by reverting them to the native sequence. Whereas the response to ligands remains largely unchanged, binding of the G protein mimetic nanobody NB80 and G protein activation are only observed when two conserved tyrosines (Y227 and Y343) are restored. Binding of NB80 leads to very strong spectral changes throughout the receptor, including the extracellular ligand entrance pocket. This indicates that even the fully thermostabilized receptor undergoes activating motions in TM5, but that the fully active state is only reached in presence of Y227 and Y343 by stabilization with a G protein-like partner. The combined analysis of chemical shift changes from the point mutations and ligand responses identifies crucial connections in the allosteric activation pathway, and presents a general experimental

  5. Measurement of reaction cross-sections for 89Y at average neutron energies of 7.24-24.83 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shahid, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    We measured neutron-induced reaction cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions with the average neutron energy region from 7.45 to 24.83 MeV by an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the MC-50 Cyclotron at Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The neutron-induced reaction cross-sections of 89Y as a function of neutron energy were taken from the TENDL-2013 library. The flux-weighted average cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions were calculated from the TENDL-2013 values based on mono-energetic neutron and by using the neutron energy spectrum from MCNPX 2.6.0 code. The present results are compared with the flux-weighted values of TENDL-2013 and are found to be in good agreement

  6. Hyperpolarization of “Neat” Liquids by NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) hyperpolarization of the rare isotopes in “neat” liquids, each composed only of an otherwise pure target compound with isotopic natural abundance (n.a.) and millimolar concentrations of dissolved catalyst. Pyridine (Py) or Py derivatives are studied at 0.4% isotopic natural abundance 15N, deuterated, 15N enriched, and in various combinations using the SABRE-SHEATH variant (microTesla magnetic fields to permit direct 15N polarization from parahydrogen via reversible binding and exchange with an Ir catalyst). We find that the dilute n.a. 15N spin bath in Py still channels spin order from parahydrogen to dilute 15N spins, without polarization losses due to the presence of 14N or 2H. We demonstrate P15N ≈ 1% (a gain of 2900 fold relative to thermal polarization at 9.4 T) at high substrate concentrations. This fundamental finding has a significant practical benefit for screening potentially hyperpolarizable contrast agents without labeling. The capability of screening at n.a. level of 15N is demonstrated on examples of mono- and dimethyl-substituted Py (picolines and lutidines previously identified as promising pH sensors), showing that the presence of a methyl group in the ortho position significantly decreases SABRE hyperpolarization. PMID:26029349

  7. Time-Domain Frequency Correction Method for Averaging Low-Field NMR Signals Acquired in Urban Laboratory Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Long-Qing; Liu, Chao; Dong, Hui; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yi; Hans-Joachim, Krause; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Andreas, Offenhäusser

    2012-10-01

    Using a second-order helium-cooled superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer as the detector, ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) signals of protons are recorded in an urban environment without magnetic shielding. The homogeneity and stability of the measurement field are investigated. NMR signals of protons are studied at night and during working hours. The Larmor frequency variation caused by the fluctuation of the external magnetic field during daytime reaches around 5 Hz when performing multiple measurements for about 10 min, which seriously affects the results of averaging. In order to improve the performance of the averaged data, we suggest the use of a data processor, i.e. the so-called time-domain frequency correction (TFC). For a 50-times averaged signal spectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced from 30 to 120 when applying TFC while preserving the NMR spectrum linewidth. The TFC is also applied successfully to the measurement data of the hetero-nuclear J-coupling in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol.

  8. (14)N overtone NMR under MAS: signal enhancement using symmetry-based sequences and novel simulation strategies.

    PubMed

    Haies, Ibraheem M; Jarvis, James A; Bentley, Harry; Heinmaa, Ivo; Kuprov, Ilya; Williamson, Philip T F; Carravetta, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Overtone (14)N NMR spectroscopy is a promising route for the direct detection of (14)N signals with good spectral resolution. Its application is currently limited, however, by the absence of efficient polarization techniques for overtone signal enhancement and the lack of efficient numerical simulation techniques to aid in both the development of new methods and the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. In this paper we report a novel method for the transfer of polarization from (1)H to the (14)N overtone using symmetry-based R-sequences that overcome many of the limitations of adiabatic approaches that have worked successfully on static samples. Refinement of these sequences and the analysis of the resulting spectra have been facilitated through the development of an efficient simulation strategy for (14)N overtone NMR spectroscopy of spinning samples, using effective Hamiltonians on top of Floquet and Fokker-Planck equations. PMID:25662410

  9. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignment of cucurbitacin derivatives from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader and Ecballium elaterium L. (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Seger, Christoph; Sturm, Sonja; Mair, Maria-Elisabeth; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    2D NMR-derived 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of six structurally closely related cucurbitacin derivatives are presented. The investigated 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylcucurbitacins I, J, K, and L were obtained from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader whereas the aglyca cucurbitacin E and I were isolated from Ecballium elaterium L. PMID:15772995

  10. Lifetime-parameters for quasi elastic and deep inelastic collisions extracted from complete angular distributions of89Y(19F, x) y reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomijärvi, T.; Lucas, R.; Mermaz, M. C.; Coffin, J.-P.; Guillaume, G.; Heusch, B.; Jundt, F.; Rami, F.

    1985-09-01

    Energy spectra and angular distributions of heavy fragments produced in 19F + 89Y reaction at 140 MeV incident energy have been measured. Two different domains of reaction mechanism are observed at forward and backward angles respectively; the corresponding lifetime parameters are extracted from their angular distributions.

  11. A View into the Blind Spot: Solution NMR Provides New Insights into Signal Transduction Across the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Call, Matthew E.; Chou, James J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in cell biology concerns how cells communicate with their surroundings through surface receptors. The last few decades have seen major advances in understanding the mechanisms of receptor-ligand recognition and the biochemical consequences of such encounters. This review describes the emergence of solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the structural characterization of membrane-associated protein domains involved in transmembrane signaling. We highlight particularly instructive examples from the fields of immunoreceptor biology, growth hormone signaling, and cell adhesion. These signaling complexes comprise multiple subunits each spanning the membrane with a single helical segment that links extracellular ligand-binding domains to the cell interior. The apparent simplicity of this domain organization belies the complexity involved in cooperative assembly of functional structures that translate information across the cellular boundary. PMID:21134635

  12. Quantitative evaluation of the lactate signal loss and its spatial dependence in press localized (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jung, W I; Bunse, M; Lutz, O

    2001-10-01

    Localized (1)H NMR spectroscopy using the 90 degrees -t(1)-180 degrees -t(1)+t(2)-180 degrees -t(2)-Acq. PRESS sequence can lead to a signal loss for the lactate doublet compared with signals from uncoupled nuclei which is dependent on the choice of t(1) and t(2). The most striking signal loss of up to 78% of the total signal occurs with the symmetrical PRESS sequence (t(1)=t(2)) at an echo time of 2/J (approximately 290 ms). Calculations have shown that this signal loss is related to the pulse angle distributions produced by the two refocusing pulses which leads to the creation of single quantum polarization transfer (PT) as well as to not directly observable states (NDOS) of the lactate AX(3) spin system: zero- and multiple-quantum coherences, and longitudinal spin orders. In addition, the chemical shift dependent voxel displacement (VOD) leads to further signal loss. By calculating the density operator for various of the echo times TE=n/J, n=1, 2, 3,..., we calculated quantitatively the contributions of these effects to the signal loss as well as their spatial distribution. A maximum signal loss of 75% can be expected from theory for the symmetrical PRESS sequence and TE=2/J for Hamming filtered sinc pulses, whereby 47% are due to the creation of NDOS and up to 28% arise from PT. Taking also the VOD effect into account (2 mT/m slice selection gradients, 20-mm slices) leads to 54% signal loss from NDOS and up to 24% from PT, leading to a maximum signal loss of 78%. Using RE-BURP pulses with their more rectangular pulse angle distributions reduces the maximum signal loss to 44%. Experiments at 1.5 T using a lactate solution demonstrated a maximum lactate signal loss for sinc pulses of 82% (52% NDOS, 30% PT) at TE=290 ms using the symmetrical PRESS sequence. The great signal loss and its spatial distribution is of importance for investigations using a symmetrical PRESS sequence at TE=2/J. PMID:11567573

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of the Lactate Signal Loss and Its Spatial Dependence in PRESS Localized 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Bunse, Michael; Lutz, Otto

    2001-10-01

    Localized 1H NMR spectroscopy using the 90°-t1-180°-t1+t2-180°-t2-Acq. PRESS sequence can lead to a signal loss for the lactate doublet compared with signals from uncoupled nuclei which is dependent on the choice of t1 and t2. The most striking signal loss of up to 78% of the total signal occurs with the symmetrical PRESS sequence (t1=t2) at an echo time of 2/J (≃290 ms). Calculations have shown that this signal loss is related to the pulse angle distributions produced by the two refocusing pulses which leads to the creation of single quantum polarization transfer (PT) as well as to not directly observable states (NDOS) of the lactate AX3 spin system: zero- and multiple-quantum coherences, and longitudinal spin orders. In addition, the chemical shift dependent voxel displacement (VOD) leads to further signal loss. By calculating the density operator for various of the echo times TE=n/J, n=1, 2, 3, …, we calculated quantitatively the contributions of these effects to the signal loss as well as their spatial distribution. A maximum signal loss of 75% can be expected from theory for the symmetrical PRESS sequence and TE=2/J for Hamming filtered sinc pulses, whereby 47% are due to the creation of NDOS and up to 28% arise from PT. Taking also the VOD effect into account (2 mT/m slice selection gradients, 20-mm slices) leads to 54% signal loss from NDOS and up to 24% from PT, leading to a maximum signal loss of 78%. Using RE-BURP pulses with their more rectangular pulse angle distributions reduces the maximum signal loss to 44%. Experiments at 1.5 T using a lactate solution demonstrated a maximum lactate signal loss for sinc pulses of 82% (52% NDOS, 30% PT) at TE=290 ms using the symmetrical PRESS sequence. The great signal loss and its spatial distribution is of importance for investigations using a symmetrical PRESS sequence at TE=2/J.

  14. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  15. The Interaction between tRNALys3 and the Primer Activation Signal Deciphered by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Franck; Tisne, Carine

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the opening of the three-dimensional structure of the primer tRNALys3 for its annealing to the viral RNA at the primer binding site (PBS). Despite the fact that the result of this rearrangement is thermodynamically more stable, there is a high-energy barrier that requires the chaperoning activity of the viral nucleocapsid protein. In addition to the nucleotide complementarity to the PBS, several regions of tRNALys3 have been described as interacting with the viral genomic RNA. Among these sequences, a sequence of the viral genome called PAS for “primer activation signal” was proposed to interact with the T-arm of tRNALys3, this interaction stimulating the initiation of reverse transcription. In this report, we investigate the formation of this additional interaction with NMR spectroscopy, using a simple system composed of the primer tRNALys3, the 18 nucleotides of the PBS, the PAS (8 nucleotides) encompassed or not in a hairpin structure, and the nucleocapsid protein. Our NMR study provides molecular evidence of the existence of this interaction and highlights the role of the nucleocapsid protein in promoting this additional RNA-RNA annealing. This study presents the first direct observation at a single base-pair resolution of the PAS/anti-PAS association, which has been proposed to be involved in the chronological regulation of the reverse transcription. PMID:23762248

  16. Imaging of the B1 distribution and background signal in a MAS NMR probehead using inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields.

    PubMed

    Odedra, Smita; Wimperis, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Several widely used methods for suppressing the "background" signal in (1)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy are based on the assumption of a significant difference between the B1 radiofrequency field experienced by the sample (within the MAS rotor) and that felt by static components of the probehead (where the background signal is believed to originate). In this work, a two-dimensional correlation experiment employing inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields is used to image the B1 distribution in a MAS NMR probehead. The experiment, which can be performed on any spectrometer, allows the distribution of the B1 field to be measured and also correlated with the spatial location of the NMR signal within the probehead. The method can also readily be combined with various "depth pulse" techniques for background suppression, allowing their performances to be more rigorously evaluated. PMID:23644349

  17. On the suppression of background signals originating from NMR hardware components. Application to zero echo time imaging and relaxation time analysis.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Wolfgang; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Huang, Li; Bäumer, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Modern NMR imaging systems used for biomedical research are equipped with B0 gradient systems with strong maximum gradient strength and short switching time enabling (1)H NMR measurements of samples with very short transverse relaxation times. However, background signal originating from non-optimized RF coils may hamper experiments with ultrashort delays between RF excitation and signal reception. We demonstrate that two simple means, outer volume suppression and the use of shaped B0 fields produced by higher-order shim coils, allow a considerable suppression of disturbing background signals. Thus, the quality of NMR images acquired at ultrashort or zero echo time is improved and systematic errors in quantitative data evaluation are avoided. Fields of application comprise MRI with ultrashort echo time or relaxation time analysis, for both biomedical research and characterizing porous media filled with liquids or gases. PMID:26597837

  18. NMR signal for particles diffusing under potentials: From path integrals and numerical methods to a model of diffusion anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcu, Cem; Memiç, Muhammet; Şimşek, Kadir; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Özarslan, Evren

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of diffusion on NMR experiments when the molecules undergo random motion under the influence of a force field and place special emphasis on parabolic (Hookean) potentials. To this end, the problem is studied using path integral methods. Explicit relationships are derived for commonly employed gradient waveforms involving pulsed and oscillating gradients. The Bloch-Torrey equation, describing the temporal evolution of magnetization, is modified by incorporating potentials. A general solution to this equation is obtained for the case of parabolic potential by adopting the multiple correlation function (MCF) formalism, which has been used in the past to quantify the effects of restricted diffusion. Both analytical and MCF results were found to be in agreement with random walk simulations. A multidimensional formulation of the problem is introduced that leads to a new characterization of diffusion anisotropy. Unlike the case of traditional methods that employ a diffusion tensor, anisotropy originates from the tensorial force constant, and bulk diffusivity is retained in the formulation. Our findings suggest that some features of the NMR signal that have traditionally been attributed to restricted diffusion are accommodated by the Hookean model. Under certain conditions, the formalism can be envisioned to provide a viable approximation to the mathematically more challenging restricted diffusion problems.

  19. NMR signal analysis to characterize solid, aqueous, and lipid phases in baked cakes.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, F; Cambert, M; Mariette, F

    2007-12-26

    Proton mobility was studied in molecular fractions of some model systems and of cake using a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation technique. For cake, five spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were obtained from transverse relaxation curves: T2 (1) approximately 20 micros, T2 (2) approximately 0.2 ms, T2 (3) approximately 3 ms, T2 (4) approximately 50 ms, and T2 (2) approximately 165 ms. The faster component was attributed to the solid phase, components 2 and 3 were associated with the aqueous phase, and the two slowest components were linked to the lipid phase. After cooking, the crust contained more fat but less water than the center part of the cake. The amount of gelatinized starch was lower in the crust, and water was more mobile due to less interaction with macromolecules. This preliminary study revealed different effects of storage on the center and crust. PMID:18044835

  20. Simple Resolution of Enantiomeric NMR Signals of α-Amino Acids by Using Samarium(III) Nitrate With L-Tartarate.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Kidani, Takahiro; Takada, Sayuri; Ofusa, Yumika

    2015-05-01

    Readily available L-tartaric acid, which is a bidentate ligand with two chiral centers forming a seven-membered chelate ring, was applied to the chiral ligand for the chiral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shift reagent of samarium(III) formed in situ. This simple method does not cause serious signal broadening in the high magnetic field. Enantiomeric (13)C and (1)H NMR signals and enantiotopic (1)H NMR signals of α-amino acids were successfully resolved at pH 8.0 and the 1:3 molar ratio of Sm(NO3)3:L-tartaric acid. It is elucidated that the enantiomeric signal resolution is attributed to the anisotropic magnetic environment for the enantiomers induced by the chiral L-tartarato samarium(III) complex rather than differences in stability of the diastereomeric substrate adducts. The present (13)C NMR signal resolution was also effective for the practical simultaneous analysis of plural kinds of DL-amino acids. PMID:25847749

  1. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA-adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  2. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W. Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A.; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA–adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  3. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells. PMID:24889211

  4. Elimination of surface signals by a surface-spoiling magnetic field gradient. Theoretical optimization and application to human in vivo NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehenson, P.; Bloch, G.

    W. Chen and J. J. H. Ackerman ( J. Magn. Reson.82, 655, 1989; NMR Biomed.2, 267, 1989) used a superficial magnetic field gradient to eliminate surface signals when observing rat liver in vivo. We have developed a method for computing the optimal gradient coil for a given in vivo application. An analytical solution for the magnetic field created by a planar array of antiparallel current elements was derived for the calculations. The surface-signal suppression obtained by gradient coils of various sizes is presented in a synthetic plot which directly provides the electrical and geometrical parameters of the optimal coil as well as the residual signal in the deep-lying region of interest. This approach was applied to in vivo31P and 31C spectroscopy of the human liver. Hepatic glycogen was detected by natural-abundance 13C NMR without contamination from muscle glycogen, and physiological variation during starvation could be observed.

  5. Site-assignment of 17O-NMR signals in itinerant metamagnetic compound Sr 3Ru 2O 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kentaro; Ishida, Kenji; Perry, Robin S.; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2006-05-01

    We have performed an 17O-NMR measurement in the bilayered perovskite ruthenate Sr 3Ru 2O 7 which shows itinerant metamagnetism at low temperatures. Three oxygen sites are identified in the 17O-NMR spectrum. NMR lines arising from the outer-apical O site are observable in the vicinity of a metamagnetic quantum critical point in spite of strong spin fluctuations. The field dependence of the Knight shift scales with the bulk magnetization.

  6. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  7. Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms for improved spectral deconvolution of overlapped signals in 1H NMR analysis: application to foods and related products.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Tsikin, Alexey M; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Mushtakova, Svetlana P

    2014-05-01

    The major challenge facing NMR spectroscopic mixture analysis is the overlapping of signals and the arising impossibility to easily recover the structures for identification of the individual components and to integrate separated signals for quantification. In this paper, various independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms [mutual information least dependent component analysis (MILCA); stochastic non-negative ICA (SNICA); joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices (JADE); and robust, accurate, direct ICA algorithm (RADICAL)] as well as deconvolution methods [simple-to-use-interactive self-modeling mixture analysis (SIMPLISMA) and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS)] are applied for simultaneous (1)H NMR spectroscopic determination of organic substances in complex mixtures. Among others, we studied constituents of the following matrices: honey, soft drinks, and liquids used in electronic cigarettes. Good quality spectral resolution of up to eight-component mixtures was achieved (correlation coefficients between resolved and experimental spectra were not less than 0.90). In general, the relative errors in the recovered concentrations were below 12%. SIMPLISMA and MILCA algorithms were found to be preferable for NMR spectra deconvolution and showed similar performance. The proposed method was used for analysis of authentic samples. The resolved ICA concentrations match well with the results of reference gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as the MCR-ALS algorithm used for comparison. ICA deconvolution considerably improves the application range of direct NMR spectroscopy for analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:24604756

  8. Fragment Assembly Approach Based on Graph/Network Theory with Quantum Chemistry Verifications for Assigning Multidimensional NMR Signals in Metabolite Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Yu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-15

    The abundant observation of chemical fragment information for molecular complexities is a major advantage of biological NMR analysis. Thus, the development of a novel technique for NMR signal assignment and metabolite identification may offer new possibilities for exploring molecular complexities. We propose a new signal assignment approach for metabolite mixtures by assembling H-H, H-C, C-C, and Q-C fragmental information obtained by multidimensional NMR, followed by the application of graph and network theory. High-speed experiments and complete automatic signal assignments were achieved for 12 combined mixtures of (13)C-labeled standards. Application to a (13)C-labeled seaweed extract showed 66 H-C, 60 H-H, 326 C-C, and 28 Q-C correlations, which were successfully assembled to 18 metabolites by the automatic assignment. The validity of automatic assignment was supported by quantum chemical calculations. This new approach can predict entire metabolite structures from peak networks of biological extracts. PMID:26789380

  9. Quantitative analysis of ³¹P NMR spectra of soil extracts--dealing with overlap of broad and sharp signals.

    PubMed

    Doolette, Ashlea L; Smernik, Ronald J

    2015-09-01

    Solution (31)P NMR analysis following extraction with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid is the most widely used method for detailed characterization of soil organic P. However, quantitative analysis of the (31)P NMR spectra is complicated by severe spectral overlap in the monoester region. Various deconvolution procedures have been developed for the task, yet none of these are widely accepted or implemented. In this mini-review, we first describe and compare these varying approaches. We then review approaches to similar issues of spectral overlap in biomedical science applications including NMR-based metabolic profiling and analyzing (31)P magnetic resonance spectra of ex vivo and in vivo intact tissues. The greater maturity and resourcing of this biomedical research means that a wider variety of approaches has been developed. Of particular relevance are approaches to dealing with overlap of broad and sharp signals. Although the existence of this problem is still debated in the context of soil analyses, not only is it well-recognized in biomedical applications, but multiple approaches have been developed to deal with it, including T2 editing and time-domain fitting. Perhaps the most transferable concept is the incorporation of 'prior knowledge' in the fitting of spectra. This is well established in biomedical applications but barely touched in soil analyses. We argue that shortcuts to dealing with overlap in the monoester region (31)P NMR soil spectra are likely to be found in the biomedical literature, although some degree of adaptation will be necessary. PMID:25854619

  10. Multiple quantum filtered 23Na NMR in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart: Ratio of triple/double quantum filtered signals correlates with [Na]i

    PubMed Central

    Eykyn, Thomas R.; Aksentijević, Dunja; Aughton, Karen L.; Southworth, Richard; Fuller, William; Shattock, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential of multiple quantum filtered (MQF) 23Na NMR to probe intracellular [Na]i in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart. In the presence of Tm(DOTP) shift reagent the triple quantum filtered (TQF) signal originated largely from the intracellular sodium pool with a 32 ± 6% contribution of the total TQF signal arising from extracellular sodium, whilst the rank 2 double-quantum filtered signal (DQF), acquired with a 54.7° flip-angle pulse, originated exclusively from the extracellular sodium pool. Given the different cellular origins of the 23Na MQF signals we propose that the TQF/DQF ratio can be used as a semi-quantitative measure of [Na]i in the mouse heart. We demonstrate a good correlation of this ratio with [Na]i measured with shift reagent at baseline and under conditions of elevated [Na]i. We compare the measurements of [Na]i using both shift reagent and TQF/DQF ratio in a cohort of wild type mouse hearts and in a transgenic PLM3SA mouse expressing a non-phosphorylatable form of phospholemman, showing a modest but measurable elevation of baseline [Na]i. MQF filtered 23Na NMR is a potentially useful tool for studying normal and pathophysiological changes in [Na]i, particularly in transgenic mouse models with altered Na regulation. PMID:26196304

  11. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  12. Construction and 13C NMR signal-amplification efficiency of a dynamic nuclear polarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging technique in biomedical and metabolic imaging since it amplifies the liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) signals by >10,000-fold. Originally used in nuclear scattering experiments, DNP works by creating a non-Boltzmann nuclear spin distribution by transferring the high electron (γ = 28,000 MHz/T) thermal polarization to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of the sample at high magnetic field and low temperature. A dissolution device is used to rapidly dissolve the frozen sample and consequently produces an injectable ``hyperpolarized'' liquid at physiologically-tolerable temperature. Here we report the construction and performance evaluation of a dissolution DNP hyperpolarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K using a continuous-flow cryostat. The solid and liquid-state 13C NMR signal enhancement levels of 13C acetate samples doped with trityl OX063 and 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals will be discussed and compared with the results from the 3.35 T commercial hyperpolarizer. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  13. Cross section measurements of proton capture reactions relevant to the p process: The case of 89Y(p,γ)90Zr and 121,123Sb(p,γ)122,124Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harissopulos, S.; Spyrou, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Demetriou, P.; Hammer, J. W.; Kunz, R.; Becker, H.-W.

    2013-02-01

    The cross sections of the 89Y(p,γ)90Zr and the 121,123Sb(p,γ)122,124Te reactions were determined from γ-angular distribution measurements at beam energies from 1.6 to 3.4 MeV. In addition, angle-integrated cross sections were also measured at Ep=2, 3, 4, and 4.8 MeV for the 89Y(p,γ)90Zr reaction using the 4π γ-summing method. Astrophysical S factors and reaction rates were deduced from the measured cross sections. Statistical model calculations were performed using the nuclear-reaction code talys. The results from the comparison between theory and experiment are discussed in detail.

  14. Using "On/Off" (19)F NMR/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals to Sense Tyrosine Kinase/Phosphatase Activity in Vitro and in Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Sun, Hongbin; Hu, Chen; Li, Gongyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Peiyao; Cui, Yusi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-03-15

    Tyrosine kinase and phosphatase are two important, antagonistic enzymes in organisms. Development of noninvasive approach for sensing their activity with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Herein, we rationally designed a hydrogelator Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr-Ile-OH (1a) whose supramolecular hydrogel (i.e., Gel 1a) can be subjected to tyrosine kinase-directed disassembly, and its phosphate precursor Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Ile-OH (1b), which can be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-instructed self-assembly to form supramolecular hydrogel Gel 1b, respectively. Mechanic properties and internal fibrous networks of the hydrogels were characterized with rheology and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Disassembly/self-assembly of their corresponding supramolecular hydrogels conferring respective "On/Off" (19)F NMR/MRI signals were employed to sense the activity of these two important enzymes in vitro and in cell lysates for the first time. We anticipate that our new (19)F NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method would facilitate pharmaceutical researchers to screen new inhibitors for these two enzymes without steric hindrance. PMID:26901415

  15. Summary of Miniature NMR Development

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gennady; Feinerman, Alan

    2000-12-31

    The effort in this project has been in 3 distinct directions: (1) First, they focused on development of miniature microfabricated micro-coil NMR detectors with maximum Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio. (2) Secondly, they focused on design of miniature micro-coil NMR detectors that have minimal effect on the NMR spectrum distortions. (3) Lastly they focused on the development of a permanent magnet capable of generating fields on the order of 1 Tesla with better than 10 ppm uniformity.

  16. Tautomeric states of the active-site histidines of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated IIIGlc, a signal-transducing protein from Escherichia coli, using two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J. G.; Torchia, D. A.; Meadow, N. D.; Roseman, S.

    1993-01-01

    IIIGlc is an 18.1-kDa signal-transducing phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system from Escherichia coli. The 1H, 15N, and 13C histidine ring NMR signals of both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc have been assigned using two-dimensional 1H-15N and 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments and a two-dimensional 13C-13C-1H correlation spectroscopy via JCC coupling experiment. The data were acquired on uniformly 15N-labeled and uniformly 15N/13C-labeled protein samples. The experiments rely on one-bond and two-bond J couplings that allowed for assignment of the signals without the need for the analysis of through-space (nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) correlations. The 15N and 13C chemical shifts were used to determine that His-75 exists predominantly in the N epsilon 2-H tautomeric state in both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc, and that His-90 exists primarily in the N delta 1-H state in the unphosphorylated protein. Upon phosphorylation of the N epsilon 2 nitrogen of His-90, the N delta 1 nitrogen remains protonated, resulting in the formation of a charged phospho-His-90 moiety. The 1H, 15N, and 13C signals of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated proteins showed only minor shifts in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0. These data indicate that the pK alpha values for both His-75 and His-90 in IIIGlc and His-75 in phospho-IIIGlc are less than 5.0, and that the pK alpha value for phospho-His-90 is greater than 10. The results are presented in relation to previously obtained structural data on IIIGlc, and implications for proposed mechanisms of phosphoryl transfer are discussed. PMID:8518729

  17. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  18. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  19. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  20. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  1. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  2. Experimental cross-sections of deuteron-induced reaction on 89Y up to 20 MeV; comparison of natTi(d,x)48V and 27Al(d,x)24Na monitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan

    2015-10-01

    We measured cross-sections of the deuteron-induced reactions on 89Y in the energy range of 3.9-19.5 MeV. Excitation functions for formation of 88Zr, 89mZr, 89Zr, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were determined and compared with previously published data and prediction of the TALYS code. Thick target yields for production of 88Zr, 89Zrcum, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were calculated from the measured cross-sections. Achievable activity versus radionuclidic purity of medically relevant 89Zr is discussed and compared with the production via the 89Y(p,n) reaction. Parallel use of titanium and aluminium beam monitors revealed systematic difference between the recommended cross-sections of both monitoring reactions and provided new cross-section data for formation of 24Na, 27Mg, 43Sc, 44mSc, 44Sc, 46Sc, 47Sc and 48Sc. The cross-sections for the natTi(d,x)46Sc reactions agree very well with recently proposed recommended values.

  3. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence*

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L.; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly 15N-labeled Ras as well as [13C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  4. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  5. 14N overtone NMR under MAS: signal enhancement using symmetry-based sequences and novel simulation strategies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cp03994g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Haies, Ibraheem M.; Jarvis, James A.; Bentley, Harry; Heinmaa, Ivo; Kuprov, Ilya; Williamson, Philip T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Overtone 14N NMR spectroscopy is a promising route for the direct detection of 14N signals with good spectral resolution. Its application is currently limited, however, by the absence of efficient polarization techniques for overtone signal enhancement and the lack of efficient numerical simulation techniques to aid in both the development of new methods and the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. In this paper we report a novel method for the transfer of polarization from 1H to the 14N overtone using symmetry-based R-sequences that overcome many of the limitations of adiabatic approaches that have worked successfully on static samples. Refinement of these sequences and the analysis of the resulting spectra have been facilitated through the development of an efficient simulation strategy for 14N overtone NMR spectroscopy of spinning samples, using effective Hamiltonians on top of Floquet and Fokker–Planck equations. PMID:25662410

  6. Two-current model of the composition dependence of resistivity in amorphous (Fe100-xCox)(89-y)Zr7B4Cuy alloys using a rigid-band assumption

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Ohodnicki, PR; Kernion, SJ; McHenry, ME

    2012-11-15

    Composition dependence of resistivity is studied in amorphous (Fe100-xCox)(89-y)Zr7B4Cuy (0 <= x <= 50, y = 0, 1) alloys. The two-current model proposed by Mott for crystalline materials is extended to a disordered amorphous system where s-d scattering is dominant in electron conduction. A rigid-band assumption is made due to the small atomic number difference between Fe and Co. Band structures with a constant density of states (DOS), parabolic distributed DOS, and Gaussian distributed DOS were investigated to fit experimental data. The Gaussian distributed DOS was found to simulate the resistivity maximum and magnetic moment maximum in the Fe-rich region. The basic concepts presented here can potentially provide insight into the optimization of FeCo-based HITPERM alloys for applications at increased frequencies. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4765673

  7. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  8. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  9. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  10. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  11. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  12. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; et al

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  13. NMR Relaxation and Petrophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marc

    2011-03-01

    NMR relaxation is routinely used in the field of geosciences to give basic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, saturation etc. In this tutorial, we focus on the pore size distribution deduced from NMR. We recall the basic principle used in the interpretation of the NMR signal and compare the results with other standard petrophysical techniques such as mercury pore size distribution, BET specific surface measurements, thin section visualizations. The NMR pore size distribution is a unique information available on water saturated porous media and can give similar results as MICP in certain situations. The scaling of NMR relaxation time distribution (s) into pore sizes (μm) requires the knowledge of the surface relaxivity (μm/s) and we recommend using specific surface measurements as an independent determination of solid surface areas. With usual surface relaxivities, the NMR technique can explore length-scales starting from nano-meters and ending around 100 μm. Finally, we will introduce briefly recent techniques sensitive to the pore to pore diffusional exchange, providing new information on the connectivity of the pore network, but showing another possibility of discrepancy in the determination of pore size distribution with standard techniques.

  14. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  15. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  16. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  17. Cold-adaptation in sea-water-borne signal proteins: sequence and NMR structure of the pheromone En-6 from the Antarctic ciliate Euplotes nobilii.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Placzek, William J; Koculi, Eda; Alimenti, Claudio; LaTerza, Antonietta; Luporini, Pierangelo; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2007-09-14

    Ciliates of Euplotes species constitutively secrete pleiotropic protein pheromones, which are capable to function as prototypic autocrine growth factors as well as paracrine inducers of mating processes. This paper reports the amino acid sequence and the NMR structure of the pheromone En-6 isolated from the antarctic species Euplotes nobilii. The 63-residue En-6 polypeptide chain forms three alpha-helices in positions 18-25, 36-40 and 46-56, which are arranged in an up-down-up three-helix bundle forming the edges of a distorted trigonal pyramid. The base of the pyramid is covered by the N-terminal heptadecapeptide segment, which includes a 3(10)-turn of residues 3-6. This topology is covalently anchored by four long-range disulfide bonds. Comparison with the smaller pheromones of E. raikovi, a closely related species living in temperate waters, shows that the two-pheromone families have the same three-helix bundle architecture. It then appears that cold-adaptation of the En proteins is primarily related to increased lengths of the chain-terminal peptide segments and the surface-exposed loops connecting the regular secondary structures, and to the presence of solvent-exposed clusters of negatively charged side-chains. PMID:17663000

  18. NMR Studies of the original magnetic properties of the cuprates: influence of impurities and defects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloul, Henri

    1998-03-01

    The cuprates display original magnetic properties, both in their insulating and metallic phases. In underdoped metallic systems, a pseudo gap in the density of magnetic q=3D0 excitations is observed from local susceptibility measurements, as well as from specific heat and transport properties. A pseudo spin-gap in the AF excitations at the AF wave vector is detected both by NMR and inelastic neutron scattering. From the NMR measurements it can be concluded that these magnetic anomalies are quite similar in single layer(J. Bobroff, H.. Alloul, P. Mendels, V. Viallet, J. F. Marucco and D. Colson, Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 3757 (1997).), bilayer and trilayer underdoped cuprates. The modifications of magnetic properties induced by substitutions or defects in the planes, which do not modify appreciably the charge transfer have been studied. The spatial dependence of the spin susceptibility \\chi ' (r) of the pure material can be directly probed through the study of the modifications of the NMR spectra of various nuclei (^89Y, ^17O, ^63Cu) induced by such localised magnetic impurities. Large qualitative differences between the underdoped and slightly overdoped YBCO are evidenced from ^17O NMR line broadening in Ni substituted YBCO. This allows us to propose a quite powerful method for studying the q and T dependence of the static magnetic susceptibility (J. Bobroff et al, Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 3757 (1997).). The impurity magnetic state also directly reflects the occurence of electronic correlations in the metallic state. The case of Zn will be examined in some detail. ^89Y NMR has revealed that the substitution of this 3d^10 non magnetic atom on a Cu site induces a Curie like contribution to the local susceptibility on the near neighbour coppers ( A. V. Mahajan, H. Alloul, G. Collin and J. F. Marucco, Physical Review Letters 72, 3100 (1994).). The effective induced moment decreases with hole doping and becomes rather weak, but is still present for optimal doping

  19. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  20. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  1. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  2. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Endo, Yuki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems. PMID:25856081

  3. Nano-mole scale side-chain signal assignment by 1H-detected protein solid-state NMR by ultra-fast magic-angle spinning and stereo-array isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Endo, Yuki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52-57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems. PMID:25856081

  4. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  5. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  6. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  7. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  8. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  9. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  10. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  11. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  12. NMR study of some coumarins and furocoumarins methylated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, R.; Santana, L.; Uriarte, E.; Zagotto, G.

    1994-01-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of various methylcoumarins and methylfurocoumarins are reported. All signals were assigned and the influence on chemical shifts of methylation at various positions was determined.

  13. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  14. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  15. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  16. Yttrium NMR of YBCO at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandor, V. A.; Pennington, C. H.; Martindale, J. A.; Hults, W. L.; Smith, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    It is well known that in the normal state of YBa_2Cu_3O_7, the ^89Y and planar ^17O spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T_1) have a Korringa temperature dependence. However, the planar ^63Cu 1/T1 has a very different, sub-Korringa behavior(T. Imai et. al), Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1002 (1993).. In the Millis, Monien, and Pines (MMP) model(A.J. Millis, H. Monien and D. Pines, Phys Rev. B. 42), 167 (1990)., these contrasting behaviors are explained in terms of hyperfine "form factor" effects: antiferromagnetic fluctuations, which play a dominant role in ^63Cu relaxation, do not hyperfine couple to ^89Y or ^17O which are situated equidistant from the antiferromagnetically aligned spins. One expects, however, that at high temperatures, spin correlations will be diminished, and that the 1/T1 behaviors of (^17O,^89Y) and that of ^63Cu may converge. We report measurements of ^89Y 1/T1 at high temperatures, on unaligned powder YBa_2Cu_3O7 samples, and compare the results with these expectations.

  17. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  18. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  19. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Jorand, R.; Nordlund, C.; Klitzsch, N.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. Estimations of these properties are based on the direct link of the initial NMR signal amplitude to porosity (water content) and of the NMR relaxation time to pore size. Herein, pore shapes are usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks may differ strongly from the responses calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes do not account for water menisci remaining in the corners of desaturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of desaturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, the NMR amplitudes and NMR relaxation times at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape, i.e., arising from the capillary pressure and pore shape-dependent water distribution in desaturated pores with triangular cross sections. Even so, the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation-dependent relaxation-time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  20. Enhanced staggered magnetization probed by NMR in Zn-doped YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Marc-Henri

    2001-03-01

    We present NMR measurements in Zn-doped YBCO. The electronic spin polarization of Cu sites is probed through 63Cu NMR spectra, and is found to grow rapidly on cooling, in agreement with previous 63Cu, 89Y and 17O NMR works [1]. This is attributed to staggered magnetic moments induced on many sites around the impurity, presumably including also the first neighbor sites. Hence, the notion of destruction of AF correlations by Zn is not valid, as also shown by the enhanced low temperature/low energy spectral weight at Q=(pi/a,pi/a), detected in inelastic neutron scattering [2] and NMR T1 measurements [3]. In Ref. [3], we have used the expression "enhancement of AF correlations", proposed in another context [4]. Strictly speaking, however, it is the staggered polarization, rather than the strength of AF correlations, which is enhanced with respect to the pure material: Zn only reveals the already-existing AF-correlated Cu2+ moments. Actually, this kind of magnetic response is expected for any kind of local disorder in CuO2 planes. The staggered magnetic moments with spatially distributed amplitude in CuO2 planes (AF-like patches) give rise to a Curie-like contribution in the bulk susceptibility. They may also have an important impact in transport or spectroscopic measurements. [1] R.E. Walstedt et al., PRB 48, 10646 (1993); A.V. Mahajan et al. PRL 72, 3100 (1994); J. Bobroff et al., Physica C 282-287, 139 (1997). [2] Y. Sidis et al., PRB 53, 6811 (1996); P. Bourges et al., Czech. J. Phys 46, 1155 (1996). [3] M.-H. Julien et al., PRL 84, 3422 (2000). [4] G.B. Martins, PRL 78, 3563 (1997).

  1. Remote NMR/MRI detection of laser polarized gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Saxena, Sunil; Moule, Adam; Spence, Megan; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Han, Song-I; Granwehr, Josef

    2006-06-13

    An apparatus and method for remote NMR/MRI spectroscopy having an encoding coil with a sample chamber, a supply of signal carriers, preferably hyperpolarized xenon and a detector allowing the spatial and temporal separation of signal preparation and signal detection steps. This separation allows the physical conditions and methods of the encoding and detection steps to be optimized independently. The encoding of the carrier molecules may take place in a high or a low magnetic field and conventional NMR pulse sequences can be split between encoding and detection steps. In one embodiment, the detector is a high magnetic field NMR apparatus. In another embodiment, the detector is a superconducting quantum interference device. A further embodiment uses optical detection of Rb--Xe spin exchange. Another embodiment uses an optical magnetometer using non-linear Faraday rotation. Concentration of the signal carriers in the detector can greatly improve the signal to noise ratio.

  2. An on-line NMR technique with a programmable processor

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to determine molecular content of materials, mainly in laboratory measurements. The reduced cost of fast computer processors, together with recent break throughs in digital signal processor technology, has facilitated the on-line use of NMR by allowing modifications of the available technology. This paper describes a system and an algorithm for improving the on-line operations. It is base on the time-domain NMR signal detected by the controller and some prior knowledge of chemical signal patterns. The desired signal can be separated from a composite signal by using an adaptive line enhancer (ALE) filter. This technique would be useful for upgrading process procedures in on-line manufacturing.

  3. Performance Assessment in Fingerprinting and Multi Component Quantitative NMR Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Vito; Intini, Nicola; Mastrorilli, Piero; Latronico, Mario; Scapicchio, Pasquale; Triggiani, Maurizio; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Fanizzi, Paolo; Acquotti, Domenico; Airoldi, Cristina; Arnesano, Fabio; Assfalg, Michael; Benevelli, Francesca; Bertelli, Davide; Cagliani, Laura R; Casadei, Luca; Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Colafemmina, Giuseppe; Consonni, Roberto; Cosentino, Cesare; Davalli, Silvia; De Pascali, Sandra A; D'Aiuto, Virginia; Faccini, Andrea; Gobetto, Roberto; Lamanna, Raffaele; Liguori, Francesca; Longobardi, Francesco; Mallamace, Domenico; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Menegazzo, Ileana; Milone, Salvatore; Mucci, Adele; Napoli, Claudia; Pertinhez, Thelma; Rizzuti, Antonino; Rocchigiani, Luca; Schievano, Elisabetta; Sciubba, Fabio; Sobolev, Anatoly; Tenori, Leonardo; Valerio, Mariacristina

    2015-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison (ILC) was organized with the aim to set up quality control indicators suitable for multicomponent quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A total of 36 NMR data sets (corresponding to 1260 NMR spectra) were produced by 30 participants using 34 NMR spectrometers. The calibration line method was chosen for the quantification of a five-component model mixture. Results show that quantitative NMR is a robust quantification tool and that 26 out of 36 data sets resulted in statistically equivalent calibration lines for all considered NMR signals. The performance of each laboratory was assessed by means of a new performance index (named Qp-score) which is related to the difference between the experimental and the consensus values of the slope of the calibration lines. Laboratories endowed with a Qp-score falling within the suitable acceptability range are qualified to produce NMR spectra that can be considered statistically equivalent in terms of relative intensities of the signals. In addition, the specific response of nuclei to the experimental excitation/relaxation conditions was addressed by means of the parameter named NR. NR is related to the difference between the theoretical and the consensus slopes of the calibration lines and is specific for each signal produced by a well-defined set of acquisition parameters. PMID:26020452

  4. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments. PMID:18374613

  5. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  6. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  7. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  8. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  9. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  10. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Huber, Gaspard; Luong, Michel; Desvaux, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a "bump" or as a "dip" superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  11. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  12. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    spectroscopic methods to weight or filter the spin signals represents the core of the book. This is a subject where Blümich is deeply involved with substantial contributions. The chapter includes a lot of ideas to provide MR contrast between different regions based on their mobility, diffusion, spin couplings or NMR spectra. After describing NMR imaging methods for solids with broad lines, Blümich spends time on applications in the last two chapters of the book. This part is really fun to read. It underlines the effort to bring NMR into many kinds of manufacturing. Car tyres and high-voltage cables are just two such areas. Elastomeric materials, green-state ceramics and food science represent other interesting fields of applications. This part of the book represents a personal but nevertheless extensive compilation of modern applications. As a matter of course the MOUSE is presented, a portable permanent-magnet based NMR developed by Blümich and his co-workers. Thus the book is not only of interest to NMR spectroscopists but also to people in material science and chemical engineering. The bibliography and indexing are excellent and may serve as an attractive reference source for NMR spectroscopists. The book is the first on the subject and likely to become the standard text for NMR imaging of materials as the books by Abragam, Slicher and Ernst et al are for NMR spectroscopy. The purchase of this beautiful book for people dealing with NMR spectroscopy or medical MRI is highly recommended. Ralf Ludwig

  13. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  14. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  15. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  16. Saturation-Transfer Difference (STD) NMR: A Simple and Fast Method for Ligand Screening and Characterization of Protein Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viegas, Aldino; Manso, Joao; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Cabrita, Eurico J.

    2011-01-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR has emerged as one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. The success of this technique is a consequence of its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need of processing NMR information about the receptor…

  17. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  18. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  19. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, Erin E.; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce,Kimberly; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal, and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  20. Detecting and Quantifying Organic Contaminants in Sediments with NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the potential to detect and monitor free-phase organic contaminants in sediments, both in the laboratory and in the field. NMR directly detects signal from hydrogen-bearing fluids; the signal amplitude is proportional to the total amount of hydrogen present, while the signal decay rate provides information about fluid properties and interactions with the surrounding sediments. Contrasting relaxation times (T2) or diffusion coefficients (D) allow the separation of water signal from contaminant signal. In this work, we conduct a laboratory study to assess the use of NMR measurements to detect and quantify diesel, gasoline, crude oil, and tri-chloroethylene in sediments. We compare the T2 distributions for sediments containing only water, only contaminant, and both water and contaminant, confirming that the identification and quantification of contaminants using T2 data alone is limited by overlapping water and contaminant T2 distributions in some sediments. We leverage the contrast between the diffusion coefficient of water and that of diesel and crude oil to separate contaminant signal from water signal in D-T2 maps. D-T2 distributions are measured both using a pulsed gradient method and a static gradient method similar to methods used with logging tools, allowing us to compare the ability of each method to quantify diesel and crude oil when water is also present. There is the potential to apply these methods to characterize and monitor contaminated sites using commercially available NMR logging tools.

  1. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  2. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  3. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  4. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  5. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  6. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  7. Isolation and 2D NMR Studies of Alkaloids from Comptonella sessilifoliola1.

    PubMed

    Pusset, J; Lopez, J L; Pais, M; Neirabeyeh, M A; Veillon, J M

    1991-04-01

    Six known furanoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from the wood and trunk bark of COMPTONELLA SESSILIFOLIOLA (Guillaumin) Hartley (Rutaceae). 2D NMR experiments gave the assignment of all the signals for both (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. Pteleine and kokusaginine were used as models. The two-dimensional carbon-proton correlation experiments, performed for the first time on furanoquinoline alkaloids, led us to correct (13)C-NMR assignments previously described in the literature. PMID:17226139

  8. Parallel NMR spectroscopy with simultaneous detection of (1) H and (19) F nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Helena; Kupče, Ēriks

    2016-07-01

    Recording NMR signals of several nuclear species simultaneously by using parallel receivers provides more information from a single measurement and at the same time increases the measurement sensitivity per unit time. Here we present a comprehensive series of the most frequently used NMR experiments modified for simultaneous direct detection of two of the most sensitive NMR nuclei - (1) H and (19) F. We hope that the presented material will stimulate interest in and further development of this technique. PMID:27021630

  9. Targeted Molecular Imaging of Cancer Cells Using MS2-Based (129)Xe NMR.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keunhong; Netirojjanakul, Chawita; Munch, Henrik K; Sun, Jinny; Finbloom, Joel A; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander; Francis, Matthew B

    2016-08-17

    We have synthesized targeted, selective, and highly sensitive (129)Xe NMR nanoscale biosensors using a spherical MS2 viral capsid, Cryptophane A molecules, and DNA aptamers. The biosensors showed strong binding specificity toward targeted lymphoma cells (Ramos line). Hyperpolarized (129)Xe NMR signal contrast and hyper-CEST (129)Xe MRI image contrast indicated its promise as highly sensitive hyperpolarized (129)Xe NMR nanoscale biosensor for future applications in cancer detection in vivo. PMID:27454679

  10. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  11. Study of molecular interactions with 13C DNP-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Mathilde H.; Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Baumann, Herbert; Petersen, Bent O.; Karlsson, Magnus; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2010-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an established, versatile technique for the detection of molecular interactions, even when these interactions are weak. Signal enhancement by several orders of magnitude through dynamic nuclear polarization alleviates several practical limitations of NMR-based interaction studies. This enhanced non-equilibrium polarization contributes sensitivity for the detection of molecular interactions in a single NMR transient. We show that direct 13C NMR ligand binding studies at natural isotopic abundance of 13C gets feasible in this way. Resultant screens are easy to interpret and can be performed at 13C concentrations below μM. In addition to such ligand-detected studies of molecular interaction, ligand binding can be assessed and quantified with enzymatic assays that employ hyperpolarized substrates at varying enzyme inhibitor concentrations. The physical labeling of nuclear spins by hyperpolarization thus provides the opportunity to devise fast novel in vitro experiments with low material requirement and without the need for synthetic modifications of target or ligands.

  12. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  13. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  14. 1H and 13C NMR investigation of 20-hydroxyecdysone dioxolane derivatives, a novel group of MDR modulator agents.

    PubMed

    Balázs, Attila; Hunyadi, Attila; Csábi, József; Jedlinszki, Nikoletta; Martins, Ana; Simon, András; Tóth, Gábor

    2013-12-01

    The synthesis, structure elucidation and the complete (1)H and (13)C signal assignment of a series of dioxolane derivatives of 20-hydroxyecdysone, synthesized as novel modulators of multidrug resistance, are presented. The structures and NMR signal assignment were established by comprehensive one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy supported by mass spectrometry. PMID:24114927

  15. Paramagnetic effects on the NMR spectra of isotropic bicelles with headgroup modified chelator lipids and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Mao, Kevin; Li, Stacey; Zhuang, Jianqin; Diallo, Koumba

    2016-06-21

    We characterized the paramagnetic effects of nine metal ions on NMR signals of isotropic bicelles with headgroup-modified lipids. We found that Mn(2+), Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) show evidence for influencing NMR signals on the surface more than inside and on the disc edge, providing distance information in the bilayers. PMID:27240538

  16. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  17. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  18. NMR Methods, Applications and Trends for Groundwater Evaluation and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have a tremendous potential for improving groundwater characterization, as they provide direct detection and measurement of groundwater and unique information about pore-scale properties. NMR measurements, commonly used in chemistry and medicine, are utilized in geophysical investigations through non-invasive surface NMR (SNMR) or downhole NMR logging measurements. Our recent and ongoing research has focused on improving the performance and interpretation of NMR field measurements for groundwater characterization. Engineering advancements have addressed several key technical challenges associated with SNMR measurements. Susceptibility of SNMR measurements to environmental noise has been dramatically reduced through the development of multi-channel acquisition hardware and noise-cancellation software. Multi-channel instrumentation (up to 12 channels) has also enabled more efficient 2D and 3D imaging. Previous limitations in measuring NMR signals from water in silt, clay and magnetic geology have been addressed by shortening the instrument dead-time from 40 ms to 4 ms, and increasing the power output. Improved pulse sequences have been developed to more accurately estimate NMR relaxation times and their distributions, which are sensitive to pore size distributions. Cumulatively, these advancements have vastly expanded the range of environments in which SNMR measurements can be obtained, enabling detection of groundwater in smaller pores, in magnetic geology, in the unsaturated zone, and nearby to infrastructure (presented here in case studies). NMR logging can provide high-resolution estimates of bound and mobile water content and pore size distributions. While NMR logging has been utilized in oil and gas applications for decades, its use in groundwater investigations has been limited by the large size and high cost of oilfield NMR logging tools and services. Recently, engineering efforts funded by the US Department of

  19. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    Although solid-state NMR (SSNMR) provides rich information about molecular structure and dynamics, the small spin population differences between pairs of spin states that give rise to NMR transitions make it an inherently insensitive spectroscopic technique in terms of signal acquisition. Scientists have continuously addressed this issue via improvements in NMR hardware and probes, increases in the strength of the magnetic field, and the development of innovative pulse sequences and acquisition methodologies. As a result, researchers can now study NMR-active nuclides previously thought to be unobservable or too unreceptive for routine examination via SSNMR. Several factors can make it extremely challenging to detect signal or acquire spectra using SSNMR: (i) low gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., low Larmor frequencies), (ii) low natural abundances or dilution of the nuclide of interest (e.g., metal nuclides in proteins or in organometallic catalysts supported on silica), (iii) inconvenient relaxation characteristics (e.g., very long longitudinal or very short transverse relaxation times), and/or (iv) extremely broad powder patterns arising from large anisotropic NMR interactions. Our research group has been particularly interested in efficient acquisition of broad NMR powder patterns for a variety of spin-1/2 and quadrupolar (spin > 1/2) nuclides. Traditionally, researchers have used the term "wideline" NMR to refer to experiments yielding broad (1)H and (2)H SSNMR spectra ranging from tens of kHz to ∼250 kHz in breadth. With modern FT NMR hardware, uniform excitation in these spectral ranges is relatively easy, allowing for the acquisition of high quality spectra. However, spectra that range in breadth from ca. 250 kHz to tens of MHz cannot be uniformly excited with conventional, high-power rectangular pulses. Rather, researchers must apply special methodologies to acquire such spectra, which have inherently low S/N because the signal intensity is spread across such

  20. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  1. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  2. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sten Uldall Hansen Terry Kiper, Tom Regan, John Lofgren et al.

    2002-11-20

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10{sup 5}. To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV.

  3. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (θ), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin θ. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(θ) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(θ) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(θ), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(θ) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  4. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  5. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  6. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  7. Probing cation and vacancy ordering in the dry and hydrated yttrium-substituted BaSnO3 perovskite by NMR spectroscopy and first principles calculations: implications for proton mobility.

    PubMed

    Buannic, Lucienne; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2012-09-01

    Hydrated BaSn(1-x)Y(x)O(3-x/2) is a protonic conductor that, unlike many other related perovskites, shows high conductivity even at high substitution levels. A joint multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (total energy and GIPAW NMR calculations) investigation of BaSn(1-x)Y(x)O(3-x/2) (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.50) was performed to investigate cation ordering and the location of the oxygen vacancies in the dry material. The DFT energetics show that Y doping on the Sn site is favored over doping on the Ba site. The (119)Sn chemical shifts are sensitive to the number of neighboring Sn and Y cations, an experimental observation that is supported by the GIPAW calculations and that allows clustering to be monitored: Y substitution on the Sn sublattice is close to random up to x = 0.20, while at higher substitution levels, Y-O-Y linkages are avoided, leading, at x = 0.50, to strict Y-O-Sn alternation of B-site cations. These results are confirmed by the absence of a "Y-O-Y" (17)O resonance and supported by the (17)O NMR shift calculations. Although resonances due to six-coordinate Y cations were observed by (89)Y NMR, the agreement between the experimental and calculated shifts was poor. Five-coordinate Sn and Y sites (i.e., sites next to the vacancy) were observed by (119)Sn and (89)Y NMR, respectively, these sites disappearing on hydration. More five-coordinated Sn than five-coordinated Y sites are seen, even at x = 0.50, which is ascribed to the presence of residual Sn-O-Sn defects in the cation-ordered material and their ability to accommodate O vacancies. High-temperature (119)Sn NMR reveals that the O ions are mobile above 400 °C, oxygen mobility being required to hydrate these materials. The high protonic mobility, even in the high Y-content materials, is ascribed to the Y-O-Sn cation ordering, which prevents proton trapping on the more basic Y-O-Y sites. PMID:22691062

  8. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  9. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  10. DSP-based on-line NMR spectroscopy using an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.; Bobis, J.P. |

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that uses an adaptive algorithm to carry out real-time NMR spectroscopy. The system employs a digital signal processor (DSP) chip to regulate the transmitted and received signal together with spectral analysis of the received signal to determine free induction decay (FID). To implement such a signal-processing routine for detection of the desired signal, an adaptive line enhancer filter that uses an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm is applied to the FID spectra. The results indicate that the adaptive filter can be a reliable technique for on-line spectroscopy study.

  11. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  12. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules. PMID:25759048

  13. Sensitization of a stray-field NMR to vibrations: A potential for MR elastometry with a portable NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Barnhill, Marie

    2014-11-01

    An NMR signal from a sample in a constant stray field of a portable NMR sensor is sensitized to vibrations. The CPMG sequence is synchronized to vibrations so that the constant gradient becomes an "effective" square-wave gradient, leading to the vibration-induced phase accumulation. The integrating nature of the spot measurement, combined with the phase distribution due to a non-uniform gradient and/or a wave field, leads to a destructive interference, the drop in the signal intensity and changes in the echo train shape. Vibrations with amplitudes as small as 140 nm were reliably detected with the permanent gradient of 12.4 T/m. The signal intensity depends on the phase offset between the vibrations and the pulse sequence. This approach opens the way for performing elastometry and micro-rheology measurements with portable NMR devices beyond the walls of a laboratory. Even without synchronization, if a vibration frequency is comparable to 1/2TE of the CPMG sequence, the signal can be severely affected, making it important for potential industrial applications of stray-field NMR.

  14. Study of the New Pulse NMR System for the Jefferson Lab Helium-3 Polarized Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a polarized Helium-3 target is used to study the neutron. The Helium-3 target is undergoing an upgrade to improve its polarization. Measuring it involved a new technique known as pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The focus of this project was to find noise in the Pulse NMR signal and to compute the calibration constant to make the polarization easier to deduce. Pulse NMR calibration tests were performed by doing AFP NMR measurements followed by Pulse NMR measurements while varying certain conditions. These included the convection heater, the operation of the oven, and the operation of the laser. Data analysis was done by fitting the pulse NMR signal from the oscilloscope and utilizing the Fourier Transform. Noise was analyzed in the fitting and the Fourier Transform. The calibration constants were affected by the convection heater. The values deviated between the pumping and target chambers of the cell when there was no convection but the values were closer when convection was induced. As far as the noise, it was found to be significant. These results will enable the calculation of the polarization with pulse NMR. In addition, the signal analysis provided insight into the influence of background noise on the pulse NMR measurement. This research was done though the SULI program of the Department of Energy.

  15. Accelerating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Analysis of Soil Organic Matter with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, A. E.; Smith, A. N.; Long, J. R.; Reddy, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    13C magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR) has become an essential tool for discerning the chemical composition of soil organic matter (SOM). However, the technique is limited due to the inherent insensitivity of NMR resulting in long acquisition times, especially for low carbon (C) soil. The pursuits of higher magnetic fields or concentrating C with hydrofluoric acid are limited solutions for signal improvement. Recent advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) have addressed the insensitivity of NMR. DNP utilizes the greater polarization of an unpaired electron in a given magnetic field and transfers that polarization to an NMR active nucleus of interest via microwave irradiation. Signal enhancements of up to a few orders of magnitude have been achieved for various DNP experiments. In this novel study, we conduct DNP 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS ssNMR experiments of SOM varying in soil C content and chemical composition. DNP signal enhancements reduce the experiment run time allowing samples with low C to be analyzed in hours rather than days. We compare 13C CP MAS ssNMR of SOM with multiple magnetic field strengths, hydrofluoric acid treatment, and novel DNP approaches. We also explore DNP surface enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (SENP) to determine the surface chemistry of SOM. The presented results and future DNP MAS ssNMR advances will lead to further understanding of the nature and processes of SOM.

  16. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  17. NMR-based analysis of the chemical composition of Japanese persimmon aqueous extracts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shoraku; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Wei, Feifei; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    Japanese persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) is recognized as an outstanding source of biologically active compounds relating to many health benefits. In the present study, NMR spectroscopy provided a comprehensive metabolic overview of Japanese persimmon juice. Detailed signal assignments of Japanese persimmon juice were carried out using various 2D NMR techniques incorporated with broadband water suppression enhanced through T1 effects (BB-WET) or WET sequences, and 26 components, including minor components, were identified. In addition, most components were quantitatively evaluated by the integration of signals using conventional (1) H NMR and BB-WET NMR. This is the first detailed analysis combined with quantitative characterization of chemical components using NMR for Japanese persimmon. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26482562

  18. Development of an NMR microprobe procedure for high-throughput environmental metabolomics of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Edward G; Lankadurai, Brian P; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary platform used in high-throughput environmental metabolomics studies because its non-selectivity is well suited for non-targeted approaches. However, standard NMR probes may limit the use of NMR-based metabolomics for tiny organisms because of the sample volumes required for routine metabolic profiling. Because of this, keystone ecological species, such as the water flea Daphnia magna, are not commonly studied because of the analytical challenges associated with NMR-based approaches. Here, the use of a 1.7-mm NMR microprobe in analyzing tissue extracts from D. magna is tested. Three different extraction procedures (D2O-based buffer, Bligh and Dyer, and acetonitrile : methanol : water) were compared in terms of the yields and breadth of polar metabolites. The D2O buffer extraction yielded the most metabolites and resulted in the best reproducibility. Varying amounts of D. magna dry mass were extracted to optimize metabolite isolation from D. magna tissues. A ratio of 1-1.5-mg dry mass to 40 µl of extraction solvent provided excellent signal-to-noise and spectral resolution using (1)H NMR. The metabolite profile of a single daphnid was also investigated (approximately 0.2 mg). However, the signal-to-noise of the (1)H NMR was considerably lower, and while feasible for select applications would likely not be appropriate for high-throughput NMR-based metabolomics. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on D. magna extracts were also performed using the 1.7-mm NMR probe to confirm (1)H NMR metabolite assignments. This study provides an NMR-based analytical framework for future metabolomics studies that use D. magna in ecological and ecotoxicity studies. PMID:25891518

  19. Proton Fingerprints Portray Molecular Structures: Enhanced Description of the 1H NMR Spectra of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Niemitz, Matthias; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic signals observed in NMR spectra encode essential information on the structure of small molecules. However, extracting all of this information from complex signal patterns is not trivial. This report demonstrates how computer-aided spectral analysis enables the complete interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated with a set of organic molecules, for which replicas of their 1H NMR spectra were generated. The potential impact of this methodology on organic chemistry research is discussed. PMID:24007197

  20. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  1. Single bead detection with an NMR microcapillary probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Boss, Michael; Russek, Stephen E.; Moreland, John

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microcapillary probe for the detection of single magnetic microbeads. The geometry of the probe has been optimized so that the signal from the background water has a similar magnitude compared to the signal from the dephased water nearby a single magnetic bead within the probe detector coil. In addition, the RF field of the coil must be uniform within the effective range of the magnetic bead. Three different RF probes were tested in a 7 T (300 MHz) pulsed NMR spectrometer with sample volumes ranging from 5 nL down to 1 nL. The 1 nL probe had a single-shot signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for pure water of 27 and a volume resolution that exhibits a 600-fold improvement over a conventional (5 mm tube) NMR probe with a sample volume of 18 μL. This allowed for the detection of a 1 μm magnetite/polystyrene bead (m = 2 × 10-14 A m2) with an estimated experimental SNR of 30. Simulations of the NMR spectra for the different coil geometries and positions of the bead within the coil were developed that include the B0 shift near a single bead, the inhomogeneity of the coils, the local coil sensitivity, the skin effect of the coil conductor, and quantitated estimates of the proximity effect between coil windings.

  2. Solution NMR of polypeptides hyperpolarized by dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Mukundan; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Hyperpolarization of nuclear spins through techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can greatly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in NMR measurements, thus eliminating the need for signal averaging. This enables the study of many dynamic processes which would otherwise not be amenable to study by NMR spectroscopy. A report of solid- to liquid-state DNP of a short peptide, bacitracin A, as well as of a full-length protein, L23, is presented here. The polypeptides are hyperpolarized at low temperature and dissolved for NMR signal acquisition in the liquid state in mixtures of organic solvent and water. Signal enhancements of 300-2000 are obtained in partially deuterated polypeptide when hyperpolarized on (13)C and of 30-180 when hyperpolarized on (1)H. A simulated spectrum is used to identify different resonances in the hyperpolarized (13)C spectra, and the relation between observed signal enhancement for various groups in the protein and relaxation parameters measured from the hyperpolarized samples is discussed. Thus far, solid- to liquid-state DNP has been used in conjunction with small molecules. The results presented here, however, demonstrate the feasibility of hyperpolarizing larger proteins, with potential applications toward the study of protein folding or macromolecular interactions. PMID:21651293

  3. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  4. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  5. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  6. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-05-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature inmore » the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.« less

  7. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  8. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Malone, Michael W; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F; Espy, Michelle A; Dickman, Lee T; Nelson, Ron O; Vogel, Sven C; Sandin, Henrik J; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  9. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  10. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  11. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  12. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  13. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  14. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  15. NMR/MS Translator for the Enhanced Simultaneous Analysis of Metabolomics Mixtures by NMR Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry: Application to Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    A novel metabolite identification strategy is presented for the combined NMR/MS analysis of complex metabolite mixtures. The approach first identifies metabolite candidates from 1D or 2D NMR spectra by NMR database query, which is followed by the determination of the masses (m/z) of their possible ions, adducts, fragments, and characteristic isotope distributions. The expected m/z ratios are then compared with the MS(1) spectrum for the direct assignment of those signals of the mass spectrum that contain information about the same metabolites as the NMR spectra. In this way, the mass spectrum can be assigned with very high confidence, and it provides at the same time validation of the NMR-derived metabolites. The method was first demonstrated on a model mixture, and it was then applied to human urine collected from a pool of healthy individuals. A number of metabolites could be detected that had not been reported previously, further extending the list of known urine metabolites. The new analysis approach, which is termed NMR/MS Translator, is fully automated and takes only a few seconds on a computer workstation. NMR/MS Translator synergistically uses the power of NMR and MS, enhancing the accuracy and efficiency of the identification of those metabolites compiled in databases. PMID:25881480

  16. Transient protein-protein interactions visualized by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Tang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Proteins interact with each other to establish their identities in cell. The affinities for the interactions span more than ten orders of magnitude, and KD values in μM-mM regimen are considered transient and are important in cell signaling. Solution NMR including diamagnetic and paramagnetic techniques has enabled atomic-resolution depictions of transient protein-protein interactions. Diamagnetic NMR allows characterization of protein complexes with KD values up to several mM, whereas ultraweak and fleeting complexes can be modeled with the use of paramagnetic NMR especially paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). When tackling ever-larger protein complexes, PRE can be particularly useful in providing long-range intermolecular distance restraints. As NMR measurements are averaged over the ensemble of complex structures, structural information for dynamic protein-protein interactions besides the stereospecific one can often be extracted. Herein the protein interaction dynamics are exemplified by encounter complexes, alternative binding modes, and coupled binding/folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further integration of NMR with other biophysical techniques should allow better visualization of transient protein-protein interactions. In particular, single-molecule data may facilitate the interpretation of ensemble-averaged NMR data. Though same structures of proteins and protein complexes were found in cell as in diluted solution, we anticipate that the dynamics of transient protein protein-protein interactions be different, which awaits awaits exploration by NMR. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25896389

  17. Miniaturized multi-coil arrays for functional planar imaging with a single-sided NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Oligschläger, Dirk; Lehmkuhl, Sören; Watzlaw, Jan; Benders, Stefan; de Boever, Eva; Rehorn, Christian; Vossel, Manuel; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays most low-field NMR sensors, such as the single-sided Profile NMR-MOUSE®, still suffer from poor sensitivity, either resulting from low magnetic field strengths and correspondingly low NMR frequencies, or lack of sensitivity. Generally, micro-coils can improve sensitivity, but due to their small size, and thus small inductance, they are mainly used for high-field NMR. Their main application field is parallel imaging, where those coils are typically assembled to receive-only coil-arrays and increase the field-of-view. Prominent signal combination techniques such as GRAPPA and SENSE are used to combine the spatially independent NMR signals to images in order to increase acquisition speed. A decisive disadvantage of today's single-sided NMR probes is the limited accessibility for NMR imaging. Although it is possible to use flat gradient coils on top of the NMR-MOUSE® to apply imaging techniques, such images can only be recorded with very long acquisition times, excluding the NMR-MOUSE® for lateral imaging of time-dependent processes. In this study sensitivity improved micro-structured RF coils, optimized for low frequencies, and correspondingly arrays of these coils, were employed to improve sensitivity and gave access to lateral spatial resolution within the sensitive plane at several observation points at the same time. Recently developed three- and four-coil arrays were combined with a Profile NMR-MOUSE® and characterized in terms of coil coupling, noise correlation and signal combination. The three-coil array was used for lateral imaging of moisture transport in travertine rock samples and to study the one-dimensional drying of paint. PMID:25771358

  18. Miniaturized multi-coil arrays for functional planar imaging with a single-sided NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oligschläger, Dirk; Lehmkuhl, Sören; Watzlaw, Jan; Benders, Stefan; de Boever, Eva; Rehorn, Christian; Vossel, Manuel; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays most low-field NMR sensors, such as the single-sided Profile NMR-MOUSE®, still suffer from poor sensitivity, either resulting from low magnetic field strengths and correspondingly low NMR frequencies, or lack of sensitivity. Generally, micro-coils can improve sensitivity, but due to their small size, and thus small inductance, they are mainly used for high-field NMR. Their main application field is parallel imaging, where those coils are typically assembled to receive-only coil-arrays and increase the field-of-view. Prominent signal combination techniques such as GRAPPA and SENSE are used to combine the spatially independent NMR signals to images in order to increase acquisition speed. A decisive disadvantage of today's single-sided NMR probes is the limited accessibility for NMR imaging. Although it is possible to use flat gradient coils on top of the NMR-MOUSE® to apply imaging techniques, such images can only be recorded with very long acquisition times, excluding the NMR-MOUSE® for lateral imaging of time-dependent processes. In this study sensitivity improved micro-structured RF coils, optimized for low frequencies, and correspondingly arrays of these coils, were employed to improve sensitivity and gave access to lateral spatial resolution within the sensitive plane at several observation points at the same time. Recently developed three- and four-coil arrays were combined with a Profile NMR-MOUSE® and characterized in terms of coil coupling, noise correlation and signal combination. The three-coil array was used for lateral imaging of moisture transport in travertine rock samples and to study the one-dimensional drying of paint.

  19. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes. PMID:3226235

  20. Selective NMR excitation in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Todica, M; Fechete, R; Blümich, B

    2003-10-01

    The NMR-MOUSE is a unilateral and mobile NMR sensor which operates with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To produce a mobile NMR unit, RF excitation is sought, which can be produced with the most simple equipment, in particular nonlinear, low-power amplifiers, and to observe a free induction decay in strongly inhomogeneous fields, the excitation needs to be selective. The possibility to produce selective excitation by sequences of hard low-power radiofrequency pulses in the strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the NMR-MOUSE is explored. The use of the DANTE sequence for selection of magnetization from parts of the sensitive volume was investigated for longitudinal and transverse magnetization by computer simulations and experiments. The spectra of the recorded FIDs and echo signals are in good agreement with those simulated for the excitation, which verifies the concept of the DANTE excitation. The results obtained are an important step towards a low-power operation of the NMR-MOUSE to improve its mobility. PMID:14511590

  1. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  2. ImatraNMR: novel software for batch integration and analysis of quantitative NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, A V; Heikkilä, O; Kilpeläinen, I; Heikkinen, S

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative NMR spectroscopy is a useful and important tool for analysis of various mixtures. Recently, in addition of traditional quantitative 1D (1)H and (13)C NMR methods, a variety of pulse sequences aimed for quantitative or semiquantitative analysis have been developed. To obtain actual usable results from quantitative spectra, they must be processed and analyzed with suitable software. Currently, there are many processing packages available from spectrometer manufacturers and third party developers, and most of them are capable of analyzing and integration of quantitative spectra. However, they are mainly aimed for processing single or few spectra, and are slow and difficult to use when large numbers of spectra and signals are being analyzed, even when using pre-saved integration areas or custom scripting features. In this article, we present a novel software, ImatraNMR, designed for batch analysis of quantitative spectra. In addition to capability of analyzing large number of spectra, it provides results in text and CSV formats, allowing further data-analysis using spreadsheet programs or general analysis programs, such as Matlab. The software is written with Java, and thus it should run in any platform capable of providing Java Runtime Environment version 1.6 or newer, however, currently it has only been tested with Windows and Linux (Ubuntu 10.04). The software is free for non-commercial use, and is provided with source code upon request. PMID:21705250

  3. ImatraNMR: Novel software for batch integration and analysis of quantitative NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, A. V.; Heikkilä, O.; Kilpeläinen, I.; Heikkinen, S.

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative NMR spectroscopy is a useful and important tool for analysis of various mixtures. Recently, in addition of traditional quantitative 1D 1H and 13C NMR methods, a variety of pulse sequences aimed for quantitative or semiquantitative analysis have been developed. To obtain actual usable results from quantitative spectra, they must be processed and analyzed with suitable software. Currently, there are many processing packages available from spectrometer manufacturers and third party developers, and most of them are capable of analyzing and integration of quantitative spectra. However, they are mainly aimed for processing single or few spectra, and are slow and difficult to use when large numbers of spectra and signals are being analyzed, even when using pre-saved integration areas or custom scripting features. In this article, we present a novel software, ImatraNMR, designed for batch analysis of quantitative spectra. In addition to capability of analyzing large number of spectra, it provides results in text and CSV formats, allowing further data-analysis using spreadsheet programs or general analysis programs, such as Matlab. The software is written with Java, and thus it should run in any platform capable of providing Java Runtime Environment version 1.6 or newer, however, currently it has only been tested with Windows and Linux (Ubuntu 10.04). The software is free for non-commercial use, and is provided with source code upon request.

  4. Analysis of organic matter at the soil-water interface by NMR spectroscopy: Implications for contaminant sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M.; Simpson, A.

    2009-05-01

    Contaminant sorption to soil organic matter (OM) is the main fate of nonionic, hydrophobic organic contaminants in terrestrial environments and a number of studies have suggested that both soil OM structure and physical conformation (as regulated by the clay mineral phase) govern contaminant sorption processes. To investigate this further, a number of soil samples were characterized by both solid-state 13 C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CPMAS) NMR and 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR- MAS) NMR. HR-MAS NMR is an innovative NMR method that allows one to examine samples that are semi- solid using liquid state NMR methods (ie: observe 1H which is more sensitive than 13C). With HR-MAS NMR, only those structures that are in contact with the solvent are NMR visible thus one can probe different components within a mixture using different solvents. The 1H HR-MAS NMR spectrum of a grassland soil swollen in water (D2O) is dominated by signals from alkyl and O-alkyl structures but signals from aromatic protons are negligible (the peak at ~8.2ppm is attributed to formic acid). When the soil is swollen in DMSO-d6, a solvent which is more penetrating and capable of breaking hydrogen bonds, aromatic signals are visible suggesting that the aromatic structures are buried within the soil matrix and do not exist at the soil-water interface. The 13C solid-state NMR data confirms that aromatic carbon is present in substantial amounts (estimated at ~40% of the total 13C signal) therefore, the lack of 1H aromatic signals in the HR-MAS NMR spectrum indicates that aromatic structures are buried and that the soil-water interface is dominated by aliphatic chains, carbohydrates, and peptides. The NMR data indicates that the mineral component of soils governs the physical conformation of OM at the soil-water interface.

  5. Dolphin: a tool for automatic targeted metabolite profiling using 1D and 2D (1)H-NMR data.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Josep; Brezmes, Jesús; Mallol, Roger; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Vinaixa, Maria; Salek, Reza M; Correig, Xavier; Cañellas, Nicolau

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics is to obtain valuable metabolic information from large datasets of raw NMR spectra in a high throughput, automatic, and reproducible way. To date, established software packages used to match and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra remain mostly manually operated, leading to low resolution results and subject to inconsistencies not attributable to the NMR technique itself. Here, we introduce a new software package, called Dolphin, able to automatically quantify a set of target metabolites in multiple sample measurements using an approach based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques to overcome the inherent limitations of 1D (1)H-NMR spectra in metabolomics. Dolphin takes advantage of the 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy signal dispersion to avoid inconsistencies in signal position detection, enhancing the reliability and confidence in metabolite matching. Furthermore, in order to improve accuracy in quantification, Dolphin uses 2D NMR spectra to obtain additional information on all neighboring signals surrounding the target metabolite. We have compared the targeted profiling results of Dolphin, recorded from standard biological mixtures, with those of two well established approaches in NMR metabolomics. Overall, Dolphin produced more accurate results with the added advantage of being a fully automated and high throughput processing package. PMID:25370160

  6. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  7. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  8. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. PMID:25641013

  9. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  10. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  11. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  12. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  13. Practical model fitting approaches to the direct extraction of NMR parameters simultaneously from all dimensions of multidimensional NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Chylla, R A; Volkman, B F; Markley, J L

    1998-08-01

    A maximum likelihood (ML)-based approach has been established for the direct extraction of NMR parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, phase, and decay rate) simultaneously from all dimensions of a D-dimensional NMR spectrum. The approach, referred to here as HTFD-ML (hybrid time frequency domain maximum likelihood), constructs a time-domain model composed of a sum of exponentially-decaying sinusoidal signals. The apodized Fourier transform of this time-domain signal is a model spectrum that represents the 'best-fit' to the equivalent frequency-domain data spectrum. The desired amplitude and frequency parameters can be extracted directly from the signal model constructed by the HTFD-ML algorithm. The HTFD-ML approach presented here, as embodied in the software package CHIFIT, is designed to meet the challenges posed by model fitting of D-dimensional NMR data sets, where each consists of many data points (10(8) is not uncommon) encoding information about numerous signals (up to 10(5) for a protein of moderate size) that exhibit spectral overlap. The suitability of the approach is demonstrated by its application to the concerted analysis of a series of ten 2D 1H-15N HSQC experiments measuring 15N T1 relaxation. In addition to demonstrating the practicality of performing maximum likelihood analysis on large, multidimensional NMR spectra, the results demonstrate that this parametric model-fitting approach provides more accurate amplitude and frequency estimates than those obtained from conventional peak-based analysis of the FT spectrum. The improved performance of the model fitting approach derives from its ability to take into account the simultaneous contributions of all signals in a crowded spectral region (deconvolution) as well as to incorporate prior knowledge in constructing models to fit the data. PMID:9751999

  14. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  15. NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-11-13

    The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

  16. NMR solvent peak suppression by nonlinear excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1988-03-01

    Most existing NMR solvent peak suppression sequences provide a satisfactory dependence of the intensity of excited signals on frequency but poor phase characteristics. In practice this leads to spectral distortions which generally become more severe as the frequency selectivity of the sequence is increased. However, it is shown that by working well outside the linear response regime, excitation schemes which combine high frequency selectivity with good phase properties may be devised. Sequences of six rectangular radio-frequency pulses were discovered using a combination of coherent averaging theory to treat the near-resonant behavior and numerical simulation further from resonance. Extensive use of symmetry greatly simplifies both the coherent averaging calculations and the numerical simulations. The new pulse sequences have been given the acronym NERO (nonlinear excitation rejecting on-resonance). Experimental spectra of an enzyme in dilute aqueous solution are shown.

  17. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  18. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay A; Daniëls, Mark; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Folkers, Gert E; Baldus, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR. PMID:25956570

  19. Chemometric Analysis of Two Dimensional Decay Data: Application to {sup 17}O NMR Relaxation Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.K.; Alam, T.M.

    1999-03-18

    The use of {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy as a tool to investigate aging in polymer systems has recently been demonstrated. Because the natural abundance of {sup 17}O is extremely low (0.037%), the use of labeled {sup 17}O{sub 2} during the oxidation of polymers produces {sup 17}O NMR spectra whose signals arise entirely from the degradation species (i.e. signals from the bulk or unaged material are not observed). This selective isotopic labeling eliminates the impact of interference from the unaged material, cause (1) above. As discussed by Alam et al. spectral overlap between different degradation species as well as errors in quantification remains a major difficulty in {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. As a demonstration of the DECRA and CTBSA methods, relaxation matrices obtained from {sup 17}O NMR for model alcohol systems are evaluated. The benefits and limitations of these newly developed chemometric techniques are discussed.

  20. New formulation of Magnetization Equation for Flowing Nuclear Spin under NMR/MRI Excitation(I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Emetere, Moses; Omotosho, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We have obtained for the first time from the Bloch NMR equations the correct dependence of the single component of magnetization, My and Mz at resonance (NMR/MRI) on relaxation times, rf B1 field (pulsed or continuous), blood(nuclear spin) flow velocity, etc. in the rotating frame of reference. The equations are applicable for both CW and pulsed NMR experiments with or without flow of spins. Our approaches can be extended easily to include gradient fields and diffusion of spins, if needed in NMR/MRI experiments. We also discuss the application of our equations to a specific case of MR excitation scheme: Free induction decay. The first time new equations of single component of MR magnetization and further equations that can be derived with the methodologies used here, can be applied towards accurate simulation of MR images/signals and extraction of parameters of clinical importance through comparison of the measured and the simulated images/signals.

  1. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  2. 1H NMR detection of small molecules in human urine with a deep cavitand synthetic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Daniel A; Rebek, Julius

    2013-02-21

    A water-soluble deep cavitand recognized alkylammonium salts, including the drug amantadine hydrochloride, in spiked samples of human urine. The signals of the guests are detected by (1)H NMR upfield of 0 ppm and so occur in a spectroscopic window that is outside of the normal region and distinct from the signals of the biofluid components. PMID:23304698

  3. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance

  4. A statistical analysis of NMR spectrometer noise.

    PubMed

    Grage, Halfdan; Akke, Mikael

    2003-05-01

    Estimation of NMR spectral parameters, using e.g. maximum likelihood methods, is commonly based on the assumption of white complex Gaussian noise in the signal obtained by quadrature detection. Here we present a statistical analysis with the purpose of discussing and testing the validity of this fundamental assumption. Theoretical expressions are derived for the correlation structure of the noise under various conditions, showing that in general the noise in the sampled signal is not strictly white, even if the thermal noise in the receiver steps prior to digitisation can be characterised as white Gaussian noise. It is shown that the noise correlation properties depend on the ratio between the sampling frequency and the filter cut-off frequency, as well as the filter characteristics. The theoretical analysis identifies conditions that are expected to yield non-white noise in the sampled signal. Extensive statistical characterisation of experimental noise confirms the theoretical predictions. The statistical methods outlined here are also useful for residual analysis in connection with validation of the model and the parameter estimates. PMID:12762994

  5. A (13)C NMR analysis of the effects of electron radiation on graphite/polyetherimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1989-01-01

    Initial investigations have been made into the use of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the characterization of radiation effects in graphite and Kevlar fibers, polymers, and the fiber/matrix interface in graphite/polyetherimide composites. Sample preparation techniques were refined. Essential equipment has been procured. A new NMR probe was constructed to increase the proton signal-to-noise ratio. Problem areas have been identified and plans developed to resolve them.

  6. Applications of Nanoscale NMR Using Ensembles of NV Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Dominik; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    Ensembles of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are now the frontier modality for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals at length-scales of microns to Angstroms. Promising applications including NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy in sub-nanoliter volumes, studies of diffusion and transport in small samples of biological tissue, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of individual biological cells and molecules. Here, we describe recent progress toward such applications.

  7. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  8. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  9. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  10. Combining NMR of dynamic and paramagnetic molecules: fluxional high-spin nickel(II) complexes bearing bisguanidine ligands.

    PubMed

    Roquette, Pascal; Maronna, Astrid; Reinmuth, Matthias; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Enders, Markus; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2011-03-01

    A detailed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was carried out on a series of paramagnetic, tetrahedrally coordinated nickel(II) dihalide complexes featuring chelating guanidine ligands. A complete assignment of the NMR signals for all complexes was achieved by sophisticated NMR experiments, including correlation spectra. The effects of halide exchange, as well as the variation in the guanidine-metal bite angles on the paramagnetic shifts, were assessed. The paramagnetic shift was derived with the aid of the diamagnetic NMR spectra of the analogous Zn complexes, which were synthesized for this purpose. The experimentally derived paramagnetic shift was then compared with the values obtained from quantum chemical (DFT) calculations. Furthermore, variable-temperature NMR studies were recorded for all complexes. It is demonstrated that NMR spectroscopy can be applied to evaluate the rate constants of fast fluxional processes within paramagnetic and catalytically active metal complexes. PMID:21268654

  11. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (1H, 13C, and 31P) and two-dimensional (1H-13C and 1H-31P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the 1H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative 1H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the 1H-31P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  12. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (¹H, (13)C, and (31)P) and two-dimensional (¹H-(13)C and ¹H-(31)P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. ¹H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the ¹H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative ¹H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the ¹H-(31)P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  13. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  14. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  15. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  16. Role of NMR in diagnosis and evaluation of stroke: 303 studies of 152 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, R.L.; Kertesz, A.; Black, S.; Carr, T.; McFadden, L.; Cooper, P.E.; Stewart, S.

    1985-05-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton imaging of 158 patients with clinical stroke was done over 18 months (0.15T Technicare resistive prototype imager). Spin echo (TR250-2150, TE30-240 m sec.) and inversion spin echo (TR1600, TI450, TE30 m sec.) sequences were used. Early sensitivity of NMR was superior to CT and 24 and 48 hours but not at 48-72 hours from clinical onset. Cerebral hemorrhage was studied by NMR in 18 patients (7 within 72 hours); all could be diagnosed as hemorrhage within 72 hours though findings were more subtle than CT. NMR findings became striking by 5 days and persisted longer than CT on late follow-up. Increased NMR signal on spin echo imaging in acute stroke correlated with tissue oedema and necrosis on pathologic study, while high signal in sub-acute stroke corresponded to gliosis, microcystic change, and macrophage infiltration. Zones of altered TI-weighted signal are presently under comparison by digitizer to pathologic zones in a patient with cerebral hemorrhage. NMR convincingly demonstrates superior early sensitivity in diagnoses of stroke but uncertainty remains concerning reliable detection of early hemorrhage.

  17. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  18. The effect of biradical concentration on the performance of DNP-MAS-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Sascha; Linden, Arne H.; Akbey, Ümit; Trent Franks, W.; Loening, Nikolaus M.; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2012-03-01

    With the technique of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) signal intensity in solid-state MAS-NMR experiments can be enhanced by 2-3 orders of magnitude. DNP relies on the transfer of electron spin polarization from unpaired electrons to nuclear spins. For this reason, stable organic biradicals such as TOTAPOL are commonly added to samples used in DNP experiments. We investigated the effects of biradical concentration on the relaxation, enhancement, and intensity of NMR signals, employing a series of samples with various TOTAPOL concentrations and uniformly 13C, 15N labeled proline. A considerable decrease of the NMR relaxation times (T1, T2∗, and T1ρ) is observed with increasing amounts of biradical due to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). For nuclei in close proximity to the radical, decreasing T1ρ reduces cross-polarization efficiency and decreases in T2∗ broaden the signal. Additionally, paramagnetic shifts of 1H signals can cause further line broadening by impairing decoupling. On average, the combination of these paramagnetic effects (PE; relaxation enhancement, paramagnetic shifts) quenches NMR-signals from nuclei closer than 10 Å to the biradical centers. On the other hand, shorter T1 times allow the repetition rate of the experiment to be increased, which can partially compensate for intensity loss. Therefore, it is desirable to optimize the radical concentration to prevent additional line broadening and to maximize the signal-to-noise observed per unit time for the signals of interest.

  19. Amplification of Xenon NMR and MRI by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moule, Adam J.; Spence, Megan M.; Han, Song-I.; Seeley, JulietteA.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Saxena, Sunil; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    A novel technique is proposed in which a nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) spectrum or magnetic resonance image (MRI) is encoded andstored as spin polarization and is then moved to a different physicallocation to be detected. Remote detection allows the separateoptimization of the encoding and detection steps, permitting theindependent choice of experimental conditions, and excitation anddetection methodologies. In the first experimental demonstration of thistechnique, we show that NMR signal can be amplified by taking diluted129Xe from a porous sample placed inside a large encoding coil, andconcentrating it into a smaller detection coil. In general, the study ofNMR active molecules at low concentration that have low physical fillingfactor is facilitated by remote detection. In the second experiment, MRIinformation encoded in a very low field magnet (4-7mT) is transferred toa high field magnet (4.2 T) in order to be detected under optimizedconditions. Furthermore, remote detection allows the utilization ofultra-sensitive optical or superconducting detection techniques, whichbroadens the horizon of NMR experimentation.

  20. NMR of thin layers using a meanderline surface coil

    DOEpatents

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature meanderline sensor coil which extends the capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to provide analysis of thin planar samples and surface layer geometries. The sensor coil allows standard NMR techniques to be used to examine thin planar (or curved) layers, extending NMRs utility to many problems of modern interest. This technique can be used to examine contact layers, non-destructively depth profile into films, or image multiple layers in a 3-dimensional sense. It lends itself to high resolution NMR techniques of magic angle spinning and thus can be used to examine the bonding and electronic structure in layered materials or to observe the chemistry associated with aging coatings. Coupling this sensor coil technology with an arrangement of small magnets will produce a penetrator probe for remote in-situ chemical analysis of groundwater or contaminant sediments. Alternatively, the sensor coil can be further miniaturized to provide sub-micron depth resolution within thin films or to orthoscopically examine living tissue. This thin-layer NMR technique using a stationary meanderline coil in a series-resonant circuit has been demonstrated and it has been determined that the flat meanderline geometry has about he same detection sensitivity as a solenoidal coil, but is specifically tailored to examine planar material layers, while avoiding signals from the bulk.

  1. NMR Studies of the Li-Mg-N-H Phases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Robert; Reiter, J. W.; Kulleck, J. G.; Hwang, S.-J.; Luo, Weifang

    2007-03-01

    Solid state NMR including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and cross-polarization (CP) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various amide and imide phases containing Li and/or Mg. MAS-NMR spectra for the ^1H, ^6Li, ^7Li, and ^15N nuclei have been obtained to improve understanding on formation, processing, and degradation behavior. Only limited information could be obtained from the proton and ^7Li MAS-NMR spectra to due large dipolar interactions and small chemical shifts. However, more success was obtained from the ^6Li and ^15N nuclei although their very long spin-lattice relaxation times did impact signal acquisition times. For example, three distinct ^6Li peaks were resolved from LiNH2 phases that were clearly separated from the LiH secondary phase in these samples. While the ^15N spectra for LiNH2 phase in isotopically enriched samples exhibited only a single peak at least three distinct ^15N peaks were observed from the similarly enriched Mg amide samples. These differences will be related to crystal structures. The NMR spectra also revealed very little motion in these hydrides upon to nearly 500 K.

  2. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Klitzsch, N.; Clauser, C.

    2009-12-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). We aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere’s law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT). In this respect substantial

  3. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  4. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  5. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  6. NMR Studies of Enzyme Structure and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildvan, Albert

    2006-03-01

    At least three NMR methodologies pioneered by Al Redfield, have greatly benefited enzymology: (1) the suppression of strong water signals without pre-saturation; (2) sequence specific NH/ND exchange; and (3) dynamic studies of mobile loops of proteins. Water suppression has enabled us to identify unusually short, strong H-bonds at the active sites of five enzymes (three isomerases and two esterases), and to measure their lengths from both the chemical shifts and D/H fractionation factors of the deshielded protons involved (J. Mol. Struct. 615, 163 (2002)). Backbone NH exchange studies were used to detect regions of an NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in which NH groups became selectively protected against exchange on Mg(2+) binding, and further protected on product (NMP) binding, thus locating binding sites as well as conformationally linked remote sites (Biochemistry 42, 10140 (2003)). Dynamic studies were used to elucidate the frequency of motion of a flexible loop of GDP-mannose hydrolase (66,000/sec) containing the catalytic base His-124, from exchange broadening of the side chain NH signals of His-124 in the free enzyme. The binding of Mg(2+) and GDP-mannose lock His-124 in position to deprotonate the entering water and complete the reaction.

  7. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  8. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  9. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  10. Dual-path NMR receiver using double transceiver microcoils.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    We present a fully integrated CMOS dual path front-end receiver for NMR applications. Instead of conventional NMR systems which are using one transceiver coil, we propose a dual-path receiver in which it has two transceiver microcoils. This structure cancels the background signal and consequently improving the sensitivity. Spectral simulations of the dual-path receiver are used to verify cancellation of the background signal in this structure. The front-end receiver contains two differential low-noise amplifiers (LNA), two voltage buffers (for conventional mode), two phase shifters, two variable gain amplifiers (VGA), one differential LNA and voltage buffer at the end. This chain of dual-path receiver is designed for 21 MHz NMR settings. The front-end receiver achieves an input referred noise of 2.7 nV/√Hz and voltage gain of 80 dB. The chip is designed in a 0.13-μm CMOS technology and occupies an area of 1 mm × 2 mm. PMID:26737930

  11. Chirped CPMG for well-logging NMR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casabianca, Leah B.; Mohr, Daniel; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-05-01

    In NMR well-logging, the measurement apparatus typically consists of a permanent magnet which is inserted into a bore, and the sample is the rock surrounding the borehole. When compared to the conditions of standard NMR experiments, this application is thus challenged by relatively weak and invariably inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields. Chemical shift information is not generally obtained in these measurements. Instead, diffusivity, porosity and permeability information is collected from multi-echo decay measurements - most often using a Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence to enhance the experiment’s limited sensitivity. In this work, we explore the consequences of replacing the hard square pulses used in a typical CPMG sequence with chirped pulses sweeping a range of frequencies. The greater bandwidths that for a maximum B1 level can be excited by chirped pulses translates into marked expansion of the detection volume, and thus significant signal-to-noise improvements when compared to standard CPMG acquisitions using hard pulses. This improvement, usually amounting to signal enhancements ⩾3, can be used to reduce the experimental time of NMR well-logging measurements, for measuring T2 even when B0 and B1 inhomogenieties complicate the measurements, and opening new opportunities in the determination of diffusional properties.

  12. Highly Repeatable Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Heteronuclear NMR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Aurélien; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Ji, Xiao; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Moing, Annick; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-06-21

    At natural (13)C abundance, metabolomics based on heteronuclear NMR is limited by sensitivity. We have recently demonstrated how hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) assisted by cross-polarization (CP) provides a reliable way of enhancing the sensitivity of heteronuclear NMR in dilute mixtures of metabolites. In this Technical Note, we evaluate the precision of this experimental approach, a critical point for applications to metabolomics. The higher the repeatability, the greater the likelihood that one can detect small biologically relevant differences between samples. The average repeatability of our state-of-the-art D-DNP NMR equipment for samples of metabolomic relevance (20 mg dry weight tomato extracts) is 3.6% for signals above the limit of quantification (LOQ) and 6.4% when all the signals above the limit of detection (LOD) are taken into account. This first report on the repeatability of D-DNP highlights the compatibility of the technique with the requirements of metabolomics and confirms its potential as an analytical tool for such applications. PMID:27253320

  13. Microcoils and microsamples in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on microcoils are reviewed. The first part of the review includes a discussion of how the geometries of the sample and coil affect the NMR signal intensity. In addition to derivation of the well-known result that the signal intensity increases as the coil size decreases, the prediction that dilution of a small sample with magnetically inert matter leads to better sensitivity if a tiny coil is not available is given. The second part of the review focuses on the issues specific to solid-state NMR. They include realization of magic-angle spinning (MAS) using a microcoil and harnessing of such strong pulses that are feasible only with a microcoil. Two strategies for microcoil MAS, the piggyback method and magic-angle coil spinning (MACS), are reviewed. In addition, MAS of flat, disk-shaped samples is discussed in the context of solid-state NMR of small-volume samples. Strong RF irradiation, which has been exploited in wide-line spectral excitation, multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS), and dipolar decoupling experiments, has been accompanied by new challenges regarding the Bloch-Siegert effect, the minimum time resolution of the spectrometer, and the time scale of pulse transient effects. For a possible solution to the latter problem, recent reports on active compensation of pulse transients are described. PMID:23083521

  14. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  15. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  16. 500-fold enhancement of in situ 13C liquid state NMR using gyrotron-driven temperature-jump DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Caspers, Christian; Braunmueller, Falk; Genoud, Jérémy; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A 550-fold increase in the liquid state 13C NMR signal of a 50 μL sample was obtained by first hyperpolarizing the sample at 20 K using a gyrotron (260 GHz), then, switching its frequency in order to apply 100 W for 1.5 s so as to melt the sample, finally, turning off the gyrotron to acquire the 13C NMR signal. The sample stays in its NMR resonator, so the sequence can be repeated with rapid cooling as the entire cryostat stays cold. DNP and thawing of the sample are performed only by the switchable and tunable gyrotron without external devices. Rapid transition from DNP to thawing in one second time scale was necessary especially in order to enhance liquid 1H NMR signal.

  17. 500-fold enhancement of in situ (13)C liquid state NMR using gyrotron-driven temperature-jump DNP.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Caspers, Christian; Braunmueller, Falk; Genoud, Jérémy; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A 550-fold increase in the liquid state (13)C NMR signal of a 50μL sample was obtained by first hyperpolarizing the sample at 20K using a gyrotron (260GHz), then, switching its frequency in order to apply 100W for 1.5s so as to melt the sample, finally, turning off the gyrotron to acquire the (13)C NMR signal. The sample stays in its NMR resonator, so the sequence can be repeated with rapid cooling as the entire cryostat stays cold. DNP and thawing of the sample are performed only by the switchable and tunable gyrotron without external devices. Rapid transition from DNP to thawing in one second time scale was necessary especially in order to enhance liquid (1)H NMR signal. PMID:27490302

  18. Probing oxidative degradation in polymers using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Click, C.A.; Assink, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of oxidative degradation remains an important goal in being able to predict the aging process in polymer materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has previously been utilized to investigate polymer degradation, including both proton ({sup 1}H) and carbon ({sup 13}C) studies. These previous NMR studies, as well as other spectroscopic investigations, are complicated by the almost overwhelming signal arising from the native undegraded polymer. This makes the identification and quantification of degradation species at small concentrations difficult. In this note we discuss recent investigation into the use of oxygen ({sup 17}O) NMR spectroscopy to probe the oxidative degradation process in polymers at a molecular level. Due to the low natural abundance (0.037%) and a nuclear spin of I=5/2 possessing an appreciable quadrupolar moment, the use of {sup 17}O NMR in polymer investigations has been limited. By utilizing synthetically enriched oxygen gas during the accelerated aging process, both the difficulties of low natural abundance and background interference signals are eliminated. For enriched samples {sup 17}O NMR spectra now provide a unique probe since all of the observed NMR resonances are the direct result of oxidative degradation.

  19. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR. PMID:26967906

  20. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brächer, A.; Hoch, S.; Albert, K.; Kost, H. J.; Werner, B.; von Harbou, E.; Hasse, H.

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

  1. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

    PubMed

    Brächer, A; Hoch, S; Albert, K; Kost, H J; Werner, B; von Harbou, E; Hasse, H

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions. PMID:24650728

  2. A 1H/19F minicoil NMR probe for solid-state NMR: application to 5-fluoroindoles.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; DeVries, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Robert; Rakovszky, Melissa L; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-01-01

    We show that it is feasible to use a minicoil for solid-state 19F 1H NMR experiments that has short pulse widths, good RF homogeneity, and excellent signal-to-noise for small samples while using low power amplifiers typical to liquid-state NMR. The closely spaced resonant frequencies of 1H and 19F and the ubiquitous use of fluorine in modern plastics and electronic components present two major challenges in the design of a high-sensitivity, high-field 1H/19F probe. Through the selection of specific components, circuit design, and pulse sequence, we were able to build a probe that has low 19F background and excellent separation of 1H and 19F signals. We determine the principle components of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor of 5-fluoroindole-3-acetic acid (5FIAA) and 5-fluorotryptophan. We also solve the crystal structure of 5FIAA, determine the orientation dependence of the chemical shift of a single crystal of 5FIAA, and predict the 19F chemical shift based on the orientation of the fluorine in the crystal. The results show that this 1H/19F probe is suitable for solid-state NMR experiments with low amounts of biological molecules that have been labeled with 19F. PMID:16198131

  3. /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies of glycolytic regulation during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell-Burk, S.L.; den Hollander, J.A.; Alger, J.R.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-11-17

    /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer techniques have been employed in glucose-gown derepressed yeast to determine unidirectional fluxes in the upper part of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. The experiments were performed during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis by saturating the ATP/sub ..gamma../ resonances and monitoring changes in the phosphomonoester signals from glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. These experiments were supplemented with /sup 13/C NMR measurements of glucose utilization rates and /sup 13/C NMR label distribution studies. Combined with data obtained previously from radioisotope measurement, these /sup 31/P and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies allowed estimation of the net glycolytic flow in addition to relative flows through phosphofructokinase (PFK) and Fru-1,6-P/sub 2/ase during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis. The /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer results are consistent with previous results obtained from measurements of metabolite levels, radioisotope data, and /sup 13/C NMR studies, providing additional support for in vivo measurement of the flows during glycolysis.

  4. Homogeneity of doping with paramagnetic ions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyu; Celinski, Vinicius R; Weber, Johannes; Kunkel, Nathalie; Kohlmann, Holger; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn

    2016-04-14

    In NMR, paramagnetic dopants change the relaxation behavior and the chemical shift of the nuclei in their immediate environment. Based on the concept that the "immediate environment" in a diamagnetic host material can be described as a sphere with radius r0, we developed a function for the fraction of unperturbed nuclei (the fraction of nuclei outside the sphere) which gives a link between the effective radius and the doping concentration. In the case of a homogeneous doping scenario a characteristic dependence is observed in both theory and experiment. We validated the model on a sample series where paramagnetic Eu(II) ions are doped into crystalline SrH2. The fraction of unperturbed nuclei was determined from the (1)H NMR signal and follows the predicted curve for a homogeneous doping scenario where the radius r0 is 17 Å. PMID:27003194

  5. Joint numerical microscale simulations of multiphase flow and NMR relaxation behavior in porous media using Lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Stiebler, M.; Klitzsch, N.

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a useful tool to estimate transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. However, as there is no unique relation between the NMR signal and these properties in rocks, a variety of empirical models on deriving hydraulic properties from NMR relaxometry data have been published. Complementary to laboratory measurements, this paper introduces a numerical framework to jointly simulate NMR relaxometry experiments and two-phase flow on the micrometer scale. Herein, the NMR diffusion equations were tied to an established Lattice Boltzmann algorithm used in computational fluid dynamics. The numerically simulated NMR data were validated for both surface-limited and diffusion-limited relaxation regimes using analytical solutions available for fully and partially water-saturated simple pore geometries. Subsequently, simulations were compiled using a complex pore space derived from three-dimensional computer tomography (CT) data of an unconsolidated sand and the results were compared to respective NMR T1 relaxometry data. The NMR transients simulated for different water saturations matched the measured data regarding initial amplitudes (i.e., porosity and saturation) and relaxation behavior (i.e., distribution of water-saturated pores). Thus, we provide a simulation tool that enables study of the influences of structural and physicochemical properties, such as pore connectivity and pore coupling, surface relaxivity, or diffusivity, on partially saturated porous media, e.g, rocks or soils, with NMR T1 relaxometry data.

  6. Detailed 1H and 13C NMR structural assignment and relative stereochemistry determination for three new and one known semi-synthetic sesquiterpene lactones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Daiane Cristina; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes; Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Lopes, João Luis Callegari; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes

    2012-01-01

    In this work is described a complete 1H and 13C NMR analysis for a group of four sesquiterpene lactones, three previously unknown. The unequivocal assignments were achieved by 1H NMR, 13C{ 1H} NMR, J-resolved, gCOSY, gHMQC, gHMBC and NOESY experiments and no ambiguities were left behind. All hydrogen coupling constants were measured, clarifying all hydrogen signals multiplicities.

  7. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  8. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  9. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  10. NMR analysis of the transient complex between membrane photosystem I and soluble cytochrome c6.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Molina-Heredia, Fernando P; Nieto, Pedro M; Hansson, Orjan; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Karlsson, B Göran

    2005-03-01

    A structural analysis of the surface areas of cytochrome c(6), responsible for the transient interaction with photosystem I, was performed by NMR transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy. The hemeprotein was titrated by adding increasing amounts of the chlorophyllic photosystem, and the NMR spectra of the free and bound protein were analyzed in a comparative way. The NMR signals of cytochrome c(6) residues located at the hydrophobic and electrostatic patches, which both surround the heme cleft, were specifically modified by binding. The backbones of internal residues close to the hydrophobic patch of cytochrome c(6) were also affected, a fact that is ascribed to the conformational changes taking place inside the hemeprotein when interacting with photosystem I. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy of a transient complex between soluble and membrane proteins. PMID:15611120

  11. Resonator with reduced sample heating and increased homogeneity for solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, Alexander; Priller, Uwe; Emsley, Lyndon; Engelke, Frank

    2008-03-01

    In the application of solid-state NMR to many systems, the presence of radiofrequency (rf) electric fields inside classical solenoidal coils causes heating of lossy samples. In particular, this is critical for proteins in ionic buffers. Rf sample heating increases proportional to frequency which may result in the need to reduce the rf pulse power to prevent partial or total sample deterioration. In the present paper, we propose a multifrequency-tunable NMR resonator where the sample is electrically shielded from the NMR coil by a conductive sheet that increases the magneto-electric ratio. Expressions for the B1 efficiency as function of magnetic and electric filling factors are derived that allow a direct comparison of different resonators. Rf efficiency, homogeneity, signal-to-noise, and rf sample heating are compared. NMR spectra at 700 MHz on ethylene glycol, glycine, and a model protein were acquired to compare the resonators under realistic experimental conditions.

  12. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation. PMID:26558760

  13. Solution- and solid-state NMR studies of GPCRs and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Tapaneeyakorn, Satita; Goddard, Alan D; Oates, Joanne; Willis, Christine L; Watts, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the major targets of new drugs on the market given their roles as key membrane receptors in many cellular signalling pathways. Structure-based drug design has potential to be the most reliable method for novel drug discovery. Unfortunately, GPCR-ligand crystallisation for X-ray diffraction studies is very difficult to achieve. However, solution- and solid-state NMR approaches have been developed and have provided new insights, particularly focussing on the study of protein-ligand interactions which are vital for drug discovery. This review provides an introduction for new investigators of GPCRs/ligand interactions using NMR spectroscopy. The guidelines for choosing a system for efficient isotope labelling of GPCRs and their ligands for NMR studies will be presented, along with an overview of the different sample environments suitable for generation of high resolution structural information from NMR spectra. PMID:20951674

  14. Performance trade-offs in in situ chemostat NMR.

    PubMed

    Castro, C D; Koretsky, A P; Domach, M M

    1999-01-01

    Investigating cell cultures with NMR requires high cell densities to provide adequate signal-to-noise, or scans must be summed over long time periods and short-term events are lost. The mixing within a chemostat can be used to shorten the time required to acquire informative in situ NMR spectra from cell cultures. However, performance trade-offs can occur between net signal, spectral resolution, and oxygenation due to sampling volume, conductivity, gas bubble, and fluid flow effects. These trade-offs and the effect of different mixing regimes were theoretically analyzed to quantify how device design decisions impact performance. The results were found to concur with data from cell-free NMR experiments performed in 18 mS/cm conductivity medium. The results also guided the redesign of an NMR bioreactor in terms of relative radio frequency (rf) coil and sample dimensions and other factors. The design, which entails using chemostat mixing to shunt sample through a rf coil in ca. 0.4 s, provides adequate oxygenation for the 4-16% (v/v) cell suspensions examined. Gains realized include lower conductive losses, better magnetic field homogeneity, and the exclusion of gas bubbles from the sampling zone. These gains enable the acquistion of spectra from dilute (3-4% v/v) Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultures in 6.9 min with high resolution in both the orthophosphate and the beta-NTP regions. Samples with 16% (v/v) cells also yield useful spectra within 0.5-1.0 min. PMID:10194393

  15. Elucidating Structural Characteristics of Biomass using Solution-State 2 D NMR with a Mixture of Deuterated Dimethylsulfoxide and Hexamethylphosphoramide.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Pu, Yunqiao; Li, Mi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2016-05-23

    Recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6 ) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18 ). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. The structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6 /HMPA-d18 ; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. It also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities. PMID:27116696

  16. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  17. Pseudogap in Fe2VGa: NMR evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Ross, Joseph H.

    2001-02-01

    We report the results of a 51V and 69Ga nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of Fe2VGa at temperatures between 4 and 450 K. The presence of magnetic antisite defects is deduced from the NMR linewidth, which displays a Curie-law temperature dependence. The absence of associated NMR shifts indicates the material to be intrinsically nonmagnetic. At low temperatures the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate exhibits Korringa behavior, indicating a small carrier density at the Fermi level. At elevated temperatures, the Knight shifts and NMR relaxation rates go over to a thermally activated response, a semiconductor-like behavior. These results are consistent with pseudogap features identified by recent band structure calculations. The Fermi level density of states deduced from NMR is considerably smaller than given by the specific heat coefficient, γ. The electronic properties are compared to the isostructural semimetal Fe2VAl.

  18. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from (1)H and (19)F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions. PMID:27423094

  19. Shimming of a Magnet for Calibration of NMR Probes for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielajew, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment aμ ≡ (g-2)/2 of the muon to the precision of 0.14 parts per million. This experimental value of aμ can then be compared to the similarly precise theoretical predictions of the Standard Model in order to test the completeness of the model. The value of aμ is extracted from muons precessing in a magnetic field. The magnetic field will be measured with a set of 400 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes, which have the ability to measure the field to a precision of tens of parts per billion. Before the Muon g-2 Experiment can take place, new NMR probes must be designed, built, and tested using a 1.45 Tesla test magnet at the University of Washington Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics (CENPA). In order to achieve a significant signal from NMR probes, the magnetic field in which the probes are immersed must be extremely uniform. The existing magnet at CENPA has an approximately linear gradient in magnetic field of about 1 Gauss per centimeter in the smoothest direction. A pair of adjacent square Helmholtz coils was designed and built to create a linear gradient in order to cancel the existing gradient. The length of the NMR signals improved with the implementation of the coils. The results of the addition of the coils to the magnet on the signals from the NMR probes will be presented.

  20. An NMR log echo data de-noising method based on the wavelet packet threshold algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangning; Xie, Ranhong; Li, Changxi; Hu, Falong; Li, Chaoliu; Zhou, Cancan

    2015-12-01

    To improve the de-noising effects of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log echo data, this paper applies the wavelet packet threshold algorithm to the data. The principle of the algorithm is elaborated in detail. By comparing the properties of a series of wavelet packet bases and the relevance between them and the NMR log echo train signal, ‘sym7’ is found to be the optimal wavelet packet basis of the wavelet packet threshold algorithm to de-noise the NMR log echo train signal. A new method is presented to determine the optimal wavelet packet decomposition scale; this is within the scope of its maximum, using the modulus maxima and the Shannon entropy minimum standards to determine the global and local optimal wavelet packet decomposition scales, respectively. The results of applying the method to the simulated and actual NMR log echo data indicate that compared with the wavelet threshold algorithm, the wavelet packet threshold algorithm, which shows higher decomposition accuracy and better de-noising effect, is much more suitable for de-noising low SNR-NMR log echo data.

  1. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  2. Processing of Surface-NMR Data From Sites With High Noise Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, A. A.; Larsen, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The applicability of surface NMR in investigations of groundwater is often limited by high noise levels in many areas of interest. In this paper we present measurements from a high noise level area in Ristrup, Denmark. Standard multichannel filtering techniques for noise reduction are inadequate for several data sets acquired in this area and surface-NMR signals cannot be resolved from the acquired data. With a careful assessment of the frequency content of the data, we show how a model-based approach can be used to subtract two harmonic noise components from the data and reliable surface-NMR data can be extracted from the noise-reduced data. Moreover, we show the impact of the proposed processing approaches on the inversion results and also present an example where the proposed methodology allows us to reveal and avoid an otherwise overlooked contamination of the reference coil signals with surface-NMR signal. The results of this study show that a careful processing of the data makes it possible to extract surface-NMR data in more places of interest.

  3. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  4. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables

  5. Applications of NMR in Dairy Research

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Anthony D.; Rochfort, Simone J.

    2014-01-01

    NMR is a robust analytical technique that has been employed to investigate the properties of many substances of agricultural relevance. NMR was first used to investigate the properties of milk in the 1950s and has since been employed in a wide range of studies; including properties analysis of specific milk proteins to metabolomics techniques used to monitor the health of dairy cows. In this brief review, we highlight the different uses of NMR in the dairy industry. PMID:24958391

  6. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854997

  7. Probing surface interactions by combining NMR cryoporometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Stark, S. C.; Strange, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    To further expand on the understanding of surface interactions at the liquid/solid interface on pore walls, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cryoporometry and relaxometry have been combined. The combination of these techniques allows variations in NMR relaxation parameters from pore surface to volume ratio changes and from surface interaction changes to be distinguished. By studying a range of sol-gel silicas from two different sources, it was noted that the relaxation time measurements were not consistent with the pore diameters determined by cryoporometry and N2 gas adsorption. Instead distinctly different relaxivity constants were determined for each absorbate in each of the two brands of silica. It was clear that the relaxation times were modified by more than just the pore geometry. Independent experiments on the two brands of silica suggested that the relaxometry results were heavily influenced by the concentration of paramagnetic relaxation centres in the silica gels. The strength of surface interaction, and hence surface affinity, was seen to depend on the liquid in the pores. Using this difference in surface affinities, binary mixtures of alkanes placed in sol-gel silicas were separated via preferential absorption and their components identified using cryoporometry, whereas the components could not be distinguished in the bulk liquid.

  8. Spin-Exchange-Pumped NMR Gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. G.; Larsen, M. S.

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  9. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  10. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  11. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  12. Towards Using NMR to Screen for Spoiled Tomatoes Stored in 1,000 L, Aseptically Sealed, Metal-Lined Totes

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Michael D.; Harter, Tod; McCarthy, Michael J.; Augustine, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to track factory relevant tomato paste spoilage. It was found that spoilage in tomato paste test samples leads to longer spin lattice relaxation times T1 using a conventional low magnetic field NMR system. The increase in T1 value for contaminated samples over a five day room temperature exposure period prompted the work to be extended to the study of industry standard, 1,000 L, non-ferrous, metal-lined totes. NMR signals and T1 values were recovered from a large format container with a single-sided NMR sensor. The results of this work suggest that a handheld NMR device can be used to study tomato paste spoilage in factory process environments. PMID:24594611

  13. Towards using NMR to screen for spoiled tomatoes stored in 1,000 L, aseptically sealed, metal-lined totes.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Michael D; Harter, Tod; McCarthy, Michael J; Augustine, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to track factory relevant tomato paste spoilage. It was found that spoilage in tomato paste test samples leads to longer spin lattice relaxation times T1 using a conventional low magnetic field NMR system. The increase in T1 value for contaminated samples over a five day room temperature exposure period prompted the work to be extended to the study of industry standard, 1,000 L, non-ferrous, metal-lined totes. NMR signals and T1 values were recovered from a large format container with a single-sided NMR sensor. The results of this work suggest that a handheld NMR device can be used to study tomato paste spoilage in factory process environments. PMID:24594611

  14. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  15. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  16. NMR response of non-reservoir fluids in sandstone and chalk.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, C H; Stallmach, F; Skjetne, T; Veliyulin, E

    2001-01-01

    Transverse (T2) NMR relaxation time at 2 MHz proton resonance frequency was measured on core plug samples from two different lithologies, sandstone and chalk, before and after exposure to selected drilling fluids. The results show that NMR signal response was significantly altered after displacing 50% of the original pore fluids, crude oil and water, by drilling fluid filtrate. Relaxation spectra of the rock samples invaded by water-based filtrate shift to significantly shorter T2-values. This shift yields an underestimation of the free-fluid volumes when selecting cut-off values of 33 ms and 100 ms for sandstone and chalk, respectively. In opposite, rock samples affected by oil-based filtrate respond with a signal indicating significantly larger free-fluid volumes than present before exposure. NMR-permeability calculated based on the Timur-Coates Free Fluid model altered in some cases by one order of magnitude. PMID:11445352

  17. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  18. Para-hydrogen perspectives in hyperpolarized NMR.

    PubMed

    Glöggler, Stefan; Colell, Johannes; Appelt, Stephan

    2013-10-01

    The first instance of para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) in an NMR experiment was serendipitously observed in the 1980s while investigating a hydrogenation reaction (Seldler et al., 1983; Bowers and Weitekamp, 1986, 1987; Eisenschmid et al., 1987) [1-4]. Remarkably a theoretical investigation of the applicability of para-hydrogen as a hyperpolarization agent was being performed in the 1980's thereby quickly providing a theoretical basis for the PHIP-effect (Bowers and Weitekamp, 1986) [2]. The discovery of signal amplification by a non-hydrogenating interaction with para-hydrogen has recently extended the interest to exploit the PHIP effect, as it enables investigation of compounds without structural alteration while retaining the advantages of spectroscopy with hyperpolarized compounds [5]. In this article we will place more emphasis of the future applications of the method while only briefly discussing the efforts that have been made in the understanding of the phenomenon and the development of the method so far. PMID:23932399

  19. Silver-109 NMR spectroscopy of inorganic solids.

    PubMed

    Penner, Glenn H; Li, Wenli

    2004-09-01

    In this study the (109)Ag NMR spectra of the following solid inorganic silver-containing compounds were investigated: AgNO(3), AgNO(2), Ag(2)SO(4), Ag(2)SO(3), AgCO(3), Ag(3)PO(4), AgCl, AgBr, AgI, AgSO(3)CH(3), silver p-toluenesulfonate, NaAg(CN)(2), KAg(CN)(2), K(3)Ag(CN)(4), Me(4)NAgCl(2), silver diethylthiocarbamate, silver lactate, silver acetate, silver citrate, and bis[(N,N(1)-di-tert-butylformamidinato)silver(I)]. The magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra of all compounds were obtained. In some cases, when protons were available, the (1)H to (109)Ag cross-polarization (CP) technique was used to enhance the signal and shorten the experimental relaxation delay. It was possible to obtain slow MAS (or CP/MAS) or nonspinning spectra for 10 samples, allowing the determination of the principal components of the (109)Ag chemical shift (CS) tensors. The isotropic chemical shifts and the CS tensors are discussed in light of the available crystal structures. The need for an accepted standard for referencing (109)Ag chemical shifts and the use of AgSO(3)CH(3) as a CP setup sample are also discussed. PMID:15332810

  20. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  1. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  2. Is solid-state NMR enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization?

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    The recent trend of high-field (~5-20 T), low-temperature (~100 K) ssNMR combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions is analyzed. A brief overview of the current theory of hyperpolarization for so-called MAS-DNP experiments is given, along with various reasons why the DNP-enhancement, the ratio of the NMR signal intensities obtained in the presence and absence of microwave irradiation suitable for hyperpolarization, should not be used alone to gauge the value of performing MAS-DNP experiments relative to conventional ssNMR. This is demonstrated through a dissection of the current conditions required for MAS-DNP with particular attention to resulting absolute sensitivities and spectral resolution. Consequently, sample preparation methods specifically avoiding the surplus of glass-forming solvents so as to improve the absolute sensitivity and resolution are discussed, as are samples that are intrinsically pertinent for MAS-DNP studies (high surface area, amorphous, and porous). Owing to their pertinence, examples of recent applications on these types of samples where chemically-relevant information has been obtained that would have been impossible without the sensitivity increases bestowed by MAS-DNP are also detailed. Additionally, a promising further implementation for MAS-DNP is exampled, whereby the sensitivity improvements shown for (correlation) spectroscopy of nuclei at low natural isotopic abundance, facilitate internuclear distance measurements, especially for long distances (absence of dipolar truncation). Finally, we give some speculative perspectives for MAS-DNP. PMID:25779337

  3. MOTOR: model assisted software for NMR structure determination.

    PubMed

    Schieborr, Ulrich; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Elshorst, Bettina; Maurer, Marcus; Saxena, Krishna; Stehle, Tanja; Kudlinzki, Denis; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Schwalbe, Harald

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic proteins with important biological function can be partially unstructured, conformational flexible, or heterogenic. Crystallization trials often fail for such proteins. In NMR spectroscopy, parts of the polypeptide chain undergoing dynamics in unfavorable time regimes cannot be observed. De novo NMR structure determination is seriously hampered when missing signals lead to an incomplete chemical shift assignment resulting in an information content of the NOE data insufficient to determine the structure ab initio. We developed a new protein structure determination strategy for such cases based on a novel NOE assignment strategy utilizing a number of model structures but no explicit reference structure as it is used for bootstrapping like algorithms. The software distinguishes in detail between consistent and mutually exclusive pairs of possible NOE assignments on the basis of different precision levels of measured chemical shifts searching for a set of maximum number of consistent NOE assignments in agreement with 3D space. Validation of the method using the structure of the low molecular-weight-protein tyrosine phosphatase A (MptpA) showed robust results utilizing protein structures with 30-45% sequence identity and 70% of the chemical shift assignments. About 60% of the resonance assignments are sufficient to identify those structural models with highest conformational similarity to the real structure. The software was benchmarked by de novo solution structures of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and the extracellular fibroblast growth factor receptor domain FGFR4 D2, which both failed in crystallization trials and in classical NMR structure determination. PMID:23852655

  4. New insights into phase distribution, phase composition and disorder in Y2(Zr,Sn)2O7 ceramics from NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Mitchell, Martin R; Sneddon, Scott; Moran, Robert F; de los Reyes, Massey; Lumpkin, Gregory R; Whittle, Karl R

    2015-04-14

    A combination of (89)Y and (119)Sn NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations are used to investigate phase evolution, local structure and disorder in Y2Zr2-xSnxO7 ceramics, where a phase change is predicted, from pyrochlore to defect fluorite, with increasing Zr content. The ability of NMR to effectively probe materials that exhibit positional and compositional disorder provides insight into the atomic-scale structure in both ordered and disordered phases and, by exploiting the quantitative nature of the technique, we are able to determine detailed information on the composition of the phase(s) present and the average coordination number (and next-nearest neighbour environment) of the cations. In contrast to previous studies, a more complex picture of the phase variation with composition emerges, with single-phase pyrochlore found only for the Sn end member, and a single defect fluorite phase only for x = 0 to 0.6. A broad two-phase region is observed, from x = 1.8 to 0.8, but the two phases present have very different composition, with a maximum of 13% Zr incorporated into the pyrochlore phase, whereas the composition of the defect fluorite phase varies throughout. Preferential ordering of the anion vacancies in the defect fluorite phase is observed, with Sn only ever found in a six-coordinate environment, while remaining vacancies are shown to be more likely to be associated with Zr than Y. Our findings are then discussed in the light of those from previous studies, many of which utilize diffraction-based approaches, where, in most cases, a single phase of fixed composition has been assumed for the refinement procedure. The significant and surprising differences encountered demonstrate the need for complementary approaches to be considered for a detailed and accurate picture of both the long- and short-range structure of a solid to be achieved. PMID:25754713

  5. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Szulik, Marta W.; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state of the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed. PMID:25501592

  6. NMR assignments of mitochondrial cyclophilin Cpr3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Singh, Jai Shankar; Trivedi, Dipesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophilins regulate protein folding, transport and signalling through catalysis of proline isomerization, and are ubiquitously expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Cpr3 is the yeast mitochondrial cyclophilin and it is structurally and biophysically uncharacterized so far. Yeast cyclophilin gene cpr3 is essential for the lactate metabolism. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of Cpr3 protein determined by various 2D and 3D heteronuclear NMR experiments at pH 6.5, and temperature 298 K. PMID:26897529

  7. UV-vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies and characterization of ionic-pair crystal violet-oxytetracycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Sandra; Soto, César; Toral, M. Inés

    2010-01-01

    The present study shows the formation and characterization of the ionic-pair between the antibiotic oxytetracycline and the dye crystal violet in ammonia solution pH 9.0 ± 0.2 extracted into chloroform. The characterization was demonstrated using UV-vis spectrophotometry, 1H NMR, measurement of relaxation times T1 and IR spectroscopy, using a comparison between the signals of individual pure compounds with the signals with the mixture CV-OTC in different alkaline media. The formation of ionic-pair was also corroborated by new signals and chemical shifts. (2D) NMR spectroscopy experiments show that the interaction is electrostatic.

  8. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  9. Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence Algorithm and its Application to Complete Labeling of Peak Lists from Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Assadi, Amir H.; Markley, John L.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.

    2009-01-01

    The process of assigning a finite set of tags or labels to a collection of observations, subject to side conditions, is notable for its computational complexity. This labeling paradigm is of theoretical and practical relevance to a wide range of biological applications, including the analysis of data from DNA microarrays, metabolomics experiments, and biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We present a novel algorithm, called Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence (PINE), that achieves robust, unsupervised probabilistic labeling of data. The computational core of PINE uses estimates of evidence derived from empirical distributions of previously observed data, along with consistency measures, to drive a fictitious system M with Hamiltonian H to a quasi-stationary state that produces probabilistic label assignments for relevant subsets of the data. We demonstrate the successful application of PINE to a key task in protein NMR spectroscopy: that of converting peak lists extracted from various NMR experiments into assignments associated with probabilities for their correctness. This application, called PINE-NMR, is available from a freely accessible computer server (http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu). The PINE-NMR server accepts as input the sequence of the protein plus user-specified combinations of data corresponding to an extensive list of NMR experiments; it provides as output a probabilistic assignment of NMR signals (chemical shifts) to sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side chain atoms plus a probabilistic determination of the protein secondary structure. PINE-NMR can accommodate prior information about assignments or stable isotope labeling schemes. As part of the analysis, PINE-NMR identifies, verifies, and rectifies problems related to chemical shift referencing or erroneous input data. PINE-NMR achieves robust and consistent results that have been shown to be effective in subsequent steps of NMR structure determination. PMID

  10. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  11. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  12. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  13. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  14. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  15. Dynamic and structural aspects of PEGylated liposomes monitored by NMR.

    PubMed

    Leal, Cecília; Rögnvaldsson, Sibylla; Fossheim, Sigrid; Nilssen, Esben A; Topgaard, Daniel

    2008-09-15

    Proton-detected NMR diffusion and (31)P NMR chemical shifts/bandwidths measurements were used to investigate a series of liposomal formulations where size and PEGylation extent need to be controlled for ultrasound mediated drug release. The width of the (31)P line is sensitive to aggregate size and shape and self-diffusion (1)H NMR conveys information about diffusional motion, size, and PEGylation extent. Measurements were performed on the formulations at their original pH, osmolality, and lipid concentration. These contained variable amounts of PEGylated phospholipid (herein referred to as PEG-lipid) and cholesterol. At high levels of PEG-lipid (11.5 and 15 mol%) the self-diffusion (1)H NMR revealed the coexistence of two entities with distinct diffusion coefficients: micelles (1.3 to 3x10(-11) m(2)/s) and liposomes (approximately 5x10(-12) m(2)/s). The (31)P spectra showed a broad liposome signal and two distinct narrow lines that were unaffected by temperature. The narrow lines arise from mixed micelles comprising both PEG-lipids and phospholipids. The echo decay in the diffusion experiments could be described as a sum of exponentials revealing that the exchange of PEG-lipid between liposomes and micellar aggregates is slower than the experimental observation time. For low amounts of PEG-lipid (1 and 4.5 mol%) the (31)P spectra consisted of a broad signal typically obtained for liposomes and the diffusion data were best described by a single exponential decay attributed solely to liposomes. For intermediate amounts of PEG-lipid (8 mol%), micellization started to occur and the diffusion data could no longer be fitted to a single or bi-exponential decay. Instead, the data were best described by a log-normal distribution of diffusion coefficients. The most efficient PEG-lipid incorporation in liposomes (about 8 mol%) was achieved for lower molecular weight PEG (2000 Da vs 5000 Da) and when the PEG-lipid acyl chain length matched the acyl chain length of the

  16. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  17. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples. PMID:17466778

  18. Internal Referencing for ¹³C Position-Specific Isotope Analysis Measured by NMR Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bayle, Kevin; Grand, Mathilde; Chaintreau, Alain; Robins, Richard J; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-08-01

    The intramolecular (13)C composition of a molecule retains evidence relevant to its (bio)synthetic history and can provide valuable information in numerous fields ranging from biochemistry to environmental sciences. Isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C NMR spectrometry (irm-(13)C NMR) is a generic method that offers the potential to conduct (13)C position-specific isotope analysis with a precision better than 1‰. Until now, determining absolute values also required measurement of the global (or bulk) (13)C composition (δ(13)Cg) by mass spectrometry. In a radical new approach, it is shown that an internal isotopic chemical reference for irm-(13)C NMR can be used instead. The strategy uses (1)H NMR to quantify both the number of moles of the reference and of the studied compound present in the NMR tube. Thus, the sample preparation protocol is greatly simplified, bypassing the previous requirement for precise purity and mass determination. The key to accurate results is suppressing the effect of radiation damping in (1)H NMR which produces signal distortion and alters quantification. The methodology, applied to vanillin with dimethylsulfone as an internal standard, has an equivalent accuracy (<1‰) to that of the conventional approach. Hence, it was possible to clearly identify vanillin from different origins based on the (13)C isotopic profiles. PMID:26158226

  19. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  20. Inverse problem for in vivo NMR spatial localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenfeld, A.C.

    1985-11-01

    The basic physical problem of NMR spatial localization is considered. To study diseased sites, one must solve the problem of adequately localizing the NMR signal. We formulate this as an inverse problem. As the NMR Bloch equations determine the motion of nuclear spins in applied magnetic fields, a theoretical study is undertaken to answer the question of how to design magnetic field configurations to achieve these localized excited spin populations. Because of physical constraints in the production of the relevant radiofrequency fields, the problem factors into a temporal one and a spatial one. We formulate the temporal problem as a nonlinear transformation, called the Bloch Transform, from the rf input to the magnetization response. In trying to invert this transformation, both linear (for the Fourier Transform) and nonlinear (for the Bloch Transform) modes of radiofrequency excitation are constructed. The spatial problem is essentially a statics problem for the Maxwell equations of electromagnetism, as the wavelengths of the radiation considered are on the order of ten meters, and so propagation effects are negligible. In the general case, analytic solutions are unavailable, and so the methods of computer simulation are used to map the rf field spatial profiles. Numerical experiments are also performed to verify the theoretical analysis, and experimental confirmation of the theory is carried out on the 0.5 Tesla IBM/Oxford Imaging Spectrometer at the LBL NMR Medical Imaging Facility. While no explicit inverse is constructed to ''solve'' this problem, the combined theoretical/numerical analysis is validated experimentally, justifying the approximations made. 56 refs., 31 figs.

  1. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  2. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  3. Electronic structure and solvatochromism of merocyanines NMR spectroscopic point of view.

    PubMed

    Kulinich, Andrii V; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Groth, Ulrich M

    2007-09-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of two series of malononitrile-based merocyanines, which possess positive and negative solvatochromism have been in detail investigated in low polar chloroform and polar dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Careful attribution of signals in spectra has been made with the help of two-dimensional NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HMBC, and HMQC). Hence, the dependence of merocyanines electronic structure on their chemical structure and solvent nature has been studied by this powerful method. It has been shown that there exists a good correlation between the calculated charges on carbon atoms of a polymethine chain and their chemical shifts in (13)C NMR spectra. The influence of solvent polarity on bond orders for dyes with positive and negative solvatochromism is also observed. The comparison of (13)C NMR spectra of merocyanines and corresponding parent ionic dyes allows to determine their sign of solvatochromism irrespectively of electronic spectra, and also to find the key atoms of chromophore whose signals in (13)C NMR spectra are most informative. PMID:17188560

  4. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58T.

    PubMed

    Kohlrautz, J; Reichardt, S; Green, E L; Kühne, H; Wosnitza, J; Haase, J

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with (27)Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, (27)Al NMR and (69)Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively. PMID:26760950

  5. ASIC-based design of NMR system health monitor for mission/safety-critical applications.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P

    2016-01-01

    N-modular redundancy (NMR) is a generic fault tolerance scheme that is widely used in safety-critical circuit/system designs to guarantee the correct operation with enhanced reliability. In passive NMR, at least a majority (N + 1)/2 out of N function modules is expected to operate correctly at any time, where N is odd. Apart from a conventional realization of the NMR system, it would be useful to provide a concurrent indication of the system's health so that an appropriate remedial action may be initiated depending upon an application's safety criticality. In this context, this article presents the novel design of a generic NMR system health monitor which features: (i) early fault warning logic, that is activated upon the production of a conflicting result by even one output of any arbitrary function module, and (ii) error signalling logic, which signals an error when the number of faulty function modules unfortunately attains a majority and the system outputs may no more be reliable. Two sample implementations of NMR systems viz. triple modular redundancy and quintuple modular redundancy with the proposed system health monitoring are presented in this work, with a 4-bit ALU used for the function modules. The simulations are performed using a 32/28 nm CMOS process technology. PMID:27330894

  6. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlrautz, J.; Reichardt, S.; Green, E. L.; Kühne, H.; Wosnitza, J.; Haase, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58 T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with 27Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, 27Al NMR and 69Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively.

  7. Bulk magnetization and 1H NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E M; Bud' ko, S L

    2011-04-28

    Bulk magnetization and ¹H static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two magnetically heterogeneous model systems based on laponite (LAP) layered silicate or polystyrene (PS) with low and high proton concentration, respectively, and ferrimagnetic Fe₂O₃ nano- or micro-particles have been studied. In LAP+Fe₂O₃, a major contribution to the NMR signal broadening is due to the dipolar coupling between the magnetic moments of protons and magnetic particles. In PS+Fe₂O₃, due to the higher proton concentration in polystyrene and stronger proton–proton dipolar coupling, an additional broadening is observed, i.e. ¹H MAS NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous systems are sensitive to both proton–magnetic particles and proton–proton dipolar couplings. An increase of the volume magnetization by ~1 emu/cm³ affects the ¹H NMR signal width in a way that is similar to an increase of the proton concentration by ~2×10²²/cm³. ¹H MAS NMR spectra, along with bulk magnetization measurements, allow the accurate determination of the hydrogen concentration in magnetically heterogeneous systems.

  8. Genetic algorithm-based feature selection in high-resolution NMR spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Myong K.; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has provided a new means for detection and recognition of metabolic changes in biological systems in response to pathophysiological stimuli and to the intake of toxins or nutrition. To identify meaningful patterns from NMR spectra, various statistical pattern recognition methods have been applied to reduce their complexity and uncover implicit metabolic patterns. In this paper, we present a genetic algorithm (GA)-based feature selection method to determine major metabolite features to play a significant role in discrimination of samples among different conditions in high-resolution NMR spectra. In addition, an orthogonal signal filter was employed as a preprocessor of NMR spectra in order to remove any unwanted variation of the data that is unrelated to the discrimination of different conditions. The results of k-nearest neighbors and the partial least squares discriminant analysis of the experimental NMR spectra from human plasma showed the potential advantage of the features obtained from GA-based feature selection combined with an orthogonal signal filter. PMID:21472035

  9. mQTL.NMR: an integrated suite for genetic mapping of quantitative variations of (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Hedjazi, Lyamine; Gauguier, Dominique; Zalloua, Pierre A; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-04-21

    High-throughput (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an increasingly popular robust approach for qualitative and quantitative metabolic profiling, which can be used in conjunction with genomic techniques to discover novel genetic associations through metabotype quantitative trait locus (mQTL) mapping. There is therefore a crucial necessity to develop specialized tools for an accurate detection and unbiased interpretability of the genetically determined metabolic signals. Here we introduce and implement a combined chemoinformatic approach for objective and systematic analysis of untargeted (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiles in quantitative genetic contexts. The R/Bioconductor mQTL.NMR package was designed to (i) perform a series of preprocessing steps restoring spectral dependency in collinear NMR data sets to reduce the multiple testing burden, (ii) carry out robust and accurate mQTL mapping in human cohorts as well as in rodent models, (iii) statistically enhance structural assignment of genetically determined metabolites, and (iv) illustrate results with a series of visualization tools. Built-in flexibility and implementation in the powerful R/Bioconductor framework allow key preprocessing steps such as peak alignment, normalization, or dimensionality reduction to be tailored to specific problems. The mQTL.NMR package is freely available with its source code through the Comprehensive R/Bioconductor repository and its own website ( http://www.ican-institute.org/tools/ ). It represents a significant advance to facilitate untargeted metabolomic data processing and quantitative analysis and their genetic mapping. PMID:25803548

  10. NMR Mechanisms and Fluid Typing Based on Numerical Simulation in Gas-Bearing Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, M.; Xu, J.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    In Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) survey of oil- or gas-bearing shales, the relaxation is so fast and the diffusion is so low, and oil or gas typing is difficult to distinguish from each other using the previous analysis method. To study the NMR responses in gas-bearing shale, we supposed an ideal shale model including incredible water, free and adsorbed gas, and kerogen. Firstly, we supposed a series of ideal shale models with incredible water, free and adsorbed gas, and kerogen. Then, some simulations are performed for two-dimensional T2-D plots, and NMR characteristics are summarized successfully. Then, a series of simulations of different models with different adsorbed gas fractions are made, and the NMR responses are analyzed, from which we can identify the adsorbed gas and free gas. In inversion, a hybrid method with LSQR and TSVD is proved suitable for D-T2 NMR of gas shale with slow and fast diffusion, and short and long relaxation. It is noticed that the activation sequence of NMR is also important for accurate fluid typing in gas-bearing shale. We design a series of activation sequences, and simulate the corresponding NMR echo decays, and invert the fluid properties to search for an optimal activation sequence for fluid typing purpose. Figure 1 SEM picture and petrophysical model of organic shale. (a) 2D SEM shows pore and kerogen within shale. Black deposits pore, and dark gray is kerogen, light grey is matrix including clay and silica; (b) Petrophysical model Figure 2 Comparison of 2D-NMR simulations with different adsorbed gas fractions, (a) ɛ =0.0, (b) ɛ =0.2, (c) ɛ=0.4, t (d) ɛ =0.6, (e) ɛ =0.8, and (f) ɛ=1.0. From D-T2 plots, the position and amplitude of signals in T2-D plots indicate the fluid typing and fraction of the gas or adsorbed gas.

  11. 1H NMR Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Alzheimer's Disease Patients: An Example of a Possible Misinterpretation Due to Non-Adjustment of pH.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Thomas; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Vincent, Christian; Pariente, Jérémie; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Two publications from the same research group reporting on the detection of new possible biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), based on the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid samples (CSF) with 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), are at the origin of the present study. The authors observed significant differences in 1H NMR spectra of CSF from AD patients and healthy controls and, thus, proposed some NMR signals (without attribution) as possible biomarkers. However, this work was carried out in non-standardized pH conditions. Our study aims at warning about a possible misinterpretation that can arise from 1H NMR analyses of CSF samples if pH adjustment is not done before NMR analysis. Indeed, CSF pH increases rapidly after removal and is subject to changes over conservation time. We first identify the NMR signals described by the authors as biomarkers. We then focus on the chemical shift variations of their NMR signals as a function of pH in both standard solutions and CSF samples. Finally, a principal component analysis of 1H NMR data demonstrates that the same CSF samples recorded at pH 8.1 and 10.0 are statistically differentiated. PMID:24958390

  12. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  13. NMR studies of multiple conformations in complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with analogues of pyrimethamine

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Carr, M.D. ); Arnold, J.R.P.; Thomas, J.A.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Griffin, R.J.; Stevens, M.F.G. )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR signals from bound ligands have been assigned in one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with various pyrimethamine analogues. The signals were identified mainly by correlating signals from bound and free ligands by using 2D exchange experiments. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues containing asymmetrically substituted aromatic rings exist as mixtures of two rotational isomers (an enantiomeric pair) because of this hindered rotation and the NMR spectra revealed that both isomers (forms A and B) bind to the enzyme with comparable, though unequal, binding energies. In this case two complete sets of bound proton signals were observed. The relative orientations of the two forms have been determined from NOE through-space connections between protons on the ligand and protein. Ternary complexes with NADP{sup {plus}} were also examined.

  14. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  15. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  16. On the Tuning of High-Resolution NMR Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Huber, Gaspard; Nausner, Martin; Horničáková, Michaela; Desvaux, Hervé; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Three optimum conditions for the tuning of NMR probes are compared: the conventional tuning optimum, which is based on radio-frequency pulse efficiency, the spin noise tuning optimum based on the line shape of the spin noise signal, and the newly introduced frequency shift tuning optimum, which minimizes the frequency pushing effect on strong signals. The latter results if the radiation damping feedback field is not in perfect quadrature to the precessing magnetization. According to the conventional RLC (resistor–inductor–capacitor) resonant circuit model, the optima should be identical, but significant deviations are found experimentally at low temperatures, in particular on cryogenically cooled probes. The existence of different optima with respect to frequency pushing and spin noise line shape has important consequences on the nonlinearity of spin dynamics at high polarization levels and the implementation of experiments on cold probes. PMID:25210000

  17. On the tuning of high-resolution NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Huber, Gaspard; Nausner, Martin; Horničáková, Michaela; Desvaux, Hervé; Müller, Norbert

    2014-11-10

    Three optimum conditions for the tuning of NMR probes are compared: the conventional tuning optimum, which is based on radio-frequency pulse efficiency, the spin noise tuning optimum based on the line shape of the spin noise signal, and the newly introduced frequency shift tuning optimum, which minimizes the frequency pushing effect on strong signals. The latter results if the radiation damping feedback field is not in perfect quadrature to the precessing magnetization. According to the conventional RLC (resistor-inductor-capacitor) resonant circuit model, the optima should be identical, but significant deviations are found experimentally at low temperatures, in particular on cryogenically cooled probes. The existence of different optima with respect to frequency pushing and spin noise line shape has important consequences on the nonlinearity of spin dynamics at high polarization levels and the implementation of experiments on cold probes. PMID:25210000

  18. A new NMR approach for the assignment of symmetric isomers.

    PubMed

    Lunazzi, Lodovico; Mazzanti, Andrea

    2004-09-29

    Irradiation of the (13)C satellite (1% natural abundance) of the NMR (1)H signals yields NOE effects on the spatially close hydrogens of the same isotopomer but not on the hydrogens of the 99% isotopomer having only (12)C atoms. In a DPFGSE-NOE sequence, the latter signals are completely canceled, and it is possible, therefore, to detect NOE effects experienced by isochronous lines that would not be otherwise observable. This allows the structural assignments of symmetric isomers to be unambiguously obtained. Examples are reported for the cases of the cis and trans dimethylstilbene, cis and trans stilbeneoxide, 2,5- and 3,4-dimethylthiophene, 1,8- and 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene, syn and anti 1,2-bis(2-methyl-1-naphthyl)benzene, 1,3-cyclooctadiene, and cycloheptatriene. PMID:15382951

  19. SQUID-detected NMR in Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, L. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Krause, H.-J.; Braginski, A. I.

    2008-02-01

    Under the highly homogeneous Earth's magnetic field (EMF), nuclear magnetic resonance experiments were performed utilizing a nitrogen-cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The Larmor frequency fL of protons is around 2060 Hz in our environment. The sensitivity of our SQUID magnetometer in EMF reached about 70 fT/√Hz near this fL. Free induction decay curves were obtained with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The amplitude of the NMR signal agreed with the theoretical value. The 1H spectra of some samples, for instance, tap water, benzene, ethanol and toluene were studied. The hetero-nuclear J coupling spectrum of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was clearly obtained. The influence of EMF fluctuations on the linewidth is also observed.

  20. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  1. Fast multi-dimensional NMR acquisition and processing using the sparse FFT.

    PubMed

    Hassanieh, Haitham; Mayzel, Maxim; Shi, Lixin; Katabi, Dina; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu

    2015-09-01

    Increasing the dimensionality of NMR experiments strongly enhances the spectral resolution and provides invaluable direct information about atomic interactions. However, the price tag is high: long measurement times and heavy requirements on the computation power and data storage. We introduce sparse fast Fourier transform as a new method of NMR signal collection and processing, which is capable of reconstructing high quality spectra of large size and dimensionality with short measurement times, faster computations than the fast Fourier transform, and minimal storage for processing and handling of sparse spectra. The new algorithm is described and demonstrated for a 4D BEST-HNCOCA spectrum. PMID:26123316

  2. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  3. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  4. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  5. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Suiter, Christopher L; Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates. PMID:25797001

  6. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  7. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  8. NMR data handbook for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, P.T.; Amtey, S.R.; Kasturi, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The text is divided into 10 chapters, each of which covers a specific block of material and has its own references. The volume is meant to serve as a laboratory handbook and a desk reference, containing basic NMR theory, useful formulae and physical constants, and compiled data from the NMR literature. The volume attempts to cover the development of biological NMR through several decades of in vitro experiments that have laid the groundwork for and pointed to profitable areas of investigation for new in vivo techniques.

  9. Measuring chirality in NMR in the presence of a time-dependent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.; Harris, Robert A.

    2014-06-21

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are “blind” to chirality since the spectra for left and right handed enantiomers are identical in an achiral medium. However, theoretical arguments have suggested that the effective Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 nuclei in the presence of electric and magnetic fields can be different for left and right handed enantiomers, thereby enabling NMR to be used to spectroscopically detect chirality even in an achiral medium. However, most proposals to detect the chiral NMR signature require measuring signals that are equivalent to picomolar concentrations for {sup 1}H nuclei, which are outside current NMR detection limits. In this work, we propose to use an AC electric field that is resonantly modulated at the Larmor frequency, thereby enhancing the effect of the chiral term by four to six orders of magnitude. We predict that a steady-state transverse magnetization, whose direction will be opposite for different enantiomers, will build up during application of an AC electric field. We also propose an experimental setup that uses a solenoid coil with an AC current to generate the necessary periodic electric fields that can be used to generate chiral signals which are equivalent to the signal from a {sup 1}H submicromolar concentration.

  10. Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for NMR/MRI instruments at low-field.

    PubMed

    Asfour, Aktham; Raoof, Kosai; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF) electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems at low-field (0.1 T) is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer). The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…). The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to "enjoy" from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay) signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed. PMID:24287540

  11. Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for NMR/MRI Instruments at Low-Field

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Raoof, Kosai; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF) electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems at low-field (0.1 T) is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer). The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…). The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to “enjoy” from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay) signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed. PMID:24287540

  12. O-tert-Butyltyrosine, an NMR tag for high-molecular-weight systems and measurements of submicromolar ligand binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Kuppan, Kekini Vahini; Lee, Michael David; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Huber, Thomas; Otting, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    O-tert-Butyltyrosine (Tby) is an unnatural amino acid that can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins using established orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA systems. Here we show that the tert-butyl group presents an outstanding NMR tag that can readily be observed in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectra without any isotope labeling. Owing to rapid bond rotations and the chemical equivalence of the protons of a solvent-exposed tert-butyl group from Tby, the singlet resonance from the tert-butyl group generates an easily detectable narrow signal in a spectral region with limited overlap with other methyl resonances. The potential of the tert-butyl (1)H NMR signal in protein research is illustrated by the observation and assignment of two resonances in the Bacillus stearothermophilus DnaB hexamer (320 kDa), demonstrating that this protein preferentially assumes a 3-fold rather than 6-fold symmetry in solution, and by the quantitative measurement of the submicromolar dissociation constant Kd (0.2 μM) of the complex between glutamate and the Escherichia coli aspartate/glutamate binding protein (DEBP, 32 kDa). The outstanding signal height of the (1)H NMR signal of the Tby tert-butyl group allows Kd measurements using less concentrated protein solutions than usual, providing access to Kd values 1 order of magnitude lower than established NMR methods that employ direct protein detection for Kd measurements. PMID:25789794

  13. Soluble yttrium chalcogenides: syntheses, structures, and NMR properties of Y[eta 3-N(SPPh2)2]3 and Y[eta 2-N(SePPh2)2]2[eta 3-N(SePPh2)2].

    PubMed

    Pernin, C G; Ibers, J A

    2000-03-20

    The compounds Y[N(QPPh2)2]3 (Q = S (1), Se (2)) have been synthesized in good yield from the protonolysis reactions between Y[N(SiMe3)2]3 and HN(QPPh2)2 in methylene chloride (CH2Cl2). The compounds are not isostructural. In 1, the Y atom is surrounded by three similar [N(SPPh2)2]- ligands bound eta 3 through two S atoms and an N atom. The molecule possesses D3 symmetry, as determined in the solid state by X-ray crystallography and in solution by 89Y and 31P NMR spectroscopies. In 2, the Y atom is surrounded again by three [N(SePPh2)2]- ligands, but two are bound eta 2 through the two Se atoms and the other ligand is bound eta 3 through the two Se atoms and an N atom. Although a fluxional process is detected in the 31P and 77Se NMR spectra, a triplet is found in the 89Y NMR spectrum of 2 (delta = 436 ppm relative to YCl3 in D2O, 2JY-P = 5 Hz). This implies that on average the conformation of one eta 3- and two eta 2-bound ligands is retained in solution. Crystallographic data for 1: C72H60N3P6S6Y, rhombohedral, R3c, a = 14.927(5) A, c = 56.047(13) A, V = 10815(6) A3, T = 153 K, Z = 6, and R1(F) = 0.042 for the 1451 reflections with I > 2 sigma(I). Crystallographic data for 2: C72H60N3P6Se6Y.Ch2-Cl2, monoclinic, P2(1)n, a = 13.3511(17) A, b = 38.539(7) A, c = 14.108(2) A, beta = 94.085(13) degrees, V = 7241(2) A 3, T = 153 K, Z = 4, and R1(F) = 0.037 for the 8868 reflections with I > 2 sigma(I). PMID:12526414

  14. Reaction of vanadate with aquatic humic substances: An ESR and {sup 51}V NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xi.; Johnson, W.D.; Hook, J.

    1998-08-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and {sup 51}V nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been used to study the interaction of vanadate with aqueous solutions of humic substances (HS) at different pH values and at different concentrations. Under acidic pH conditions, ESR spectra show that humic substances reduce vanadium(V) to vanadium(IV) without further reduction to vanadium(III). The reduced vanadium(IV) ion is bound to oxygen donor atoms, probably at carboxylic acid sites in the humic substances. {sup 51}V NMR spectra show that the VO{sub 2}{sup +} cation is immediately reduced and that the decavanadate cation decomposes to the VO{sub 2}{sup +} cation prior to reduction. The overall rate of reduction depends on both concentration and pH. There is no reduction above pH 6, which suggests that the standard reduction potential of humic substances is about +0.65 V. Near pH 7, vanadate is stabilized by binding to humic substances. As the concentration of humic substances increases, the total vanadium NMR signal intensity decreases. This is due to the quadrupolar nature of the {sup 51}V nucleus that, when bound to humic substances, is invisible in NMR measurements. Quantitative models applied to intensity changes show that the vanadate monomer forms HS0V(V) complexes. The formation equilibrium constant is estimated to be 108 M{sup {minus}1}. At pH above 9, NMR signals appear at {minus}623.6 and at {minus}763.2 ppm when humic substances are added to vanadate solution. The intensities of the signals increase with increasing pH and with increasing concentration of humic substances. These signals appear to be associated with peroxyvanadate anions, which are not bound to humic substances.

  15. Filtering and parameter estimation of surface-NMR data using singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanati, Reza; Kazem Hafizi, Mohammad; Mahmoudvand, Rahim; Fallahsafari, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Ambient electromagnetic interferences at the site of investigation often degrade the signal quality of the Surface-NMR measurements leading to inaccurate estimation of the signal parameters. This paper proposes a new powerful de-noising method based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA), which is a nonparametric method for analyzing time series. SSA is a relatively simple method and can be understood using basic algebra notations. Singular value decomposition (SVD) plays a crucial role in SSA. As the length of recordings increases, the computational time required for computing SVD raises which restricts the usage of SSA in long-term time series. In order to overcome this drawback, we propose a randomized version of the singular value decomposition to accelerate the decomposition step of the algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the proposed strategy, the method is tested on synthetic signals corrupted by both simulated noise (including Gaussian white noise, spiky events and harmonic noise) and real noise recordings obtained from surface-NMR field surveys and a real data set. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can enhance the signal to noise ratio significantly, and gives an improvement in estimation of the surface-NMR signal parameters.

  16. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  17. Quantitative analysis of NMR spectra with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winning, H.; Larsen, F. H.; Bro, R.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The number of applications of chemometrics to series of NMR spectra is rapidly increasing due to an emerging interest for quantitative NMR spectroscopy e.g. in the pharmaceutical and food industries. This paper gives an analysis of advantages and limitations of applying the two most common chemometric procedures, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR), to a designed set of 231 simple alcohol mixture (propanol, butanol and pentanol) 1H 400 MHz spectra. The study clearly demonstrates that the major advantage of chemometrics is the visualisation of larger data structures which adds a new exploratory dimension to NMR research. While robustness and powerful data visualisation and exploration are the main qualities of the PCA method, the study demonstrates that the bilinear MCR method is an even more powerful method for resolving pure component NMR spectra from mixtures when certain conditions are met.

  18. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  19. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  20. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates. PMID:27490497

  1. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  2. Rheology of Blood by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song-I.; Marseille, Oliver; Gehlen, Christa; Blümich, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect.

  3. Rheology of blood by NMR.

    PubMed

    Han, S I; Marseille, O; Gehlen, C; Blümich, B

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect. PMID:11531367

  4. Application of the integrated NMR-TDEM method in groundwater exploration in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Rabinovich, B.; Rabinovich, M.; Gilad, D.; Gev, I.; Schirov, M.

    1994-02-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) method is the only physical tool currently available which is able to detect directly the presence of fresh water in the subsurface. The Time Domain Electromagnetic (TDEM) method, in turn, has been proven highly efficient in detecting saline groundwater. The combined application of these two methods is the most promising way to delineate accurately groundwater-bearing aquifers and to evaluate the quality of the water. This idea was tested during the feasibility study carried out under different hydrogeological conditions throughout Israel during August-September 1992. The Russian Hydroscope and Geonics P ROTEM-IV instruments were used for the NMR and TDEM measurements, respectively. A total of 36 NMR and 12 TDEM stations was established, mostly in close proximity to existing observation wells. Among these only 19 NMR measurements showed reasonable signal-to-noise characteristics, while the rest were obviously distorted by ambient noise. The number of distorted measurements could have been even greater had they been carried out at all points planned. However, a significant number of the NMR stations were cancelled due to their proximity (less than 1-1.5 km) to electric power lines. As a result almost the entire Mediterranean coast of Israel, which was originally chosen as the main test site for this survey, turned out to be unsuitable owing to the low ambient noise protection of the Hydroscope. Another serious limitation of NMR measurements is the maximum penetration depth. The deepest information obtained during the feasibility study was from a depth of 74 m. Nevertheless, within the framework of its applicability, the NMR measurements proved to be sufficiently accurate and to have a high resolving capability. A comparison with the borehole data shows that, in most cases, NMR is able not only to detect the presence of water, but also to delineate different subaquifers. At the same time, however, the transmissivity and aquifer

  5. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  6. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  7. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  8. NMR difference spectroscopy with a dual saddle-coil difference probe.

    PubMed

    Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P; Goldsbrough, Peter B; Santini, Robert E; Raftery, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    A new difference probe for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented. The difference probe uses two saddle-shaped coils to excite and detect two samples simultaneously. The samples are held in a specially modified 3-mm NMR tube with an Ultem plastic disk to separate the samples. The probe's resonant circuit contains two crossed diodes that passively switch the relative phase of each coil during the NMR experiment. The result is a difference spectrum from the two samples. The degree of cancellation of common signals was determined to be approximately 90%, and the application of the probe to relaxation-edited difference spectroscopy for identifying protein-ligand interactions was demonstrated using glutathione and glutathione S-transferase binding protein. PMID:15214412

  9. Line-Integral Projection Reconstruction (LPR) with Slice Encoding Techniques: Multislice Regional Imaging in NMR Tomography.

    PubMed

    Oh, C H; Park, H W; Cho, Z H

    1984-01-01

    Line-integral projection reconstruction (LPR) in NMR imaging was found to be useful and has several advantages such as the imaging capability of objects having short T2 and compensation of phase fluctuations arising from the system instability. Although single slice LPR is found to be inefficient and poor in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the multislice encoded LPR method is of interest since it has a high SNR and also the capability of selected regional volume or multislice imaging. The latter, i.e., regional volume imaging capability, is a unique property of NMR imaging and offers a variety of imaging capabilities such as simultaneous multislice imaging of sagittal, transaxial, or coronal views. In this paper, we have investigated two basic forms of the multislice encoded imaging methods using LPR, i.e., Fourier and Hadamard-like encoding matrices. Applications of the methods to the experimented NMR imaging show good agreement with predicted behavior. PMID:18234626

  10. Detection of virgin olive oil adulteration using low field unilateral NMR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Morris, Robert H; Bencsik, Martin; Newton, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    The detection of adulteration in edible oils is a concern in the food industry, especially for the higher priced virgin olive oils. This article presents a low field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for the detection of the adulteration of virgin olive oil that can be performed through sealed bottles providing a non-destructive screening technique. Adulterations of an extra virgin olive oil with different percentages of sunflower oil and red palm oil were measured with a commercial unilateral instrument, the profile NMR-Mouse. The NMR signal was processed using a 2-dimensional Inverse Laplace transformation to analyze the transverse relaxation and self-diffusion behaviors of different oils. The obtained results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting adulterations of olive oil with percentages of at least 10% of sunflower and red palm oils. PMID:24469355

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization experiments at 14.1 T for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Takahashi, Hiroki; Ueda, Keisuke; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ogawa, Isamu; Toda, Mitsuru; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2010-06-14

    Instrumentation for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 14.1 T was developed to enhance the nuclear polarization for NMR of solids. The gyrotron generated 394.5 GHz submillimeter (sub-mm) wave with a power of 40 W in the second harmonic TE(0,6) mode. The sub-mm wave with a power of 0.5-3 W was transmitted to the sample in a low-temperature DNP-NMR probe with a smooth-wall circular waveguide system. The (1)H polarization enhancement factor of up to about 10 was observed for a (13)C-labeled compound with nitroxyl biradical TOTAPOL. The DNP enhancement was confirmed by the static magnetic field dependence of the NMR signal amplitude at 90 K. Improvements of the high-field DNP experiments are discussed. PMID:20518128

  12. Metabolomic differentiation of Cannabis sativa cultivars using 1H NMR spectroscopy and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Hazekamp, Arno; Erkelens, Cornelis; Lefeber, Alfons W M; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-06-01

    The metabolomic analysis of 12 Cannabis sativa cultivars was carried out by 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis techniques. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the 1H NMR spectra showed a clear discrimination between those samples by principal component 1 (PC1) and principal component 3 (PC3) in cannabinoid fraction. The loading plot of PC value obtained from all 1)H NMR signals shows that Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) are important metabolites to differentiate the cultivars from each other. The discrimination of the cultivars could also be obtained from a water extract containing carbohydrates and amino acids. The level of sucrose, glucose, asparagine, and glutamic acid are found to be major discriminating metabolites of these cultivars. This method allows an efficient differentiation between cannabis cultivars without any prepurification steps. PMID:15217272

  13. Perspectives in magnetic resonance: NMR in the post-FFT era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyberts, Sven G.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Robson, Scott A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Multi-dimensional NMR spectra have traditionally been processed with the fast Fourier transformation (FFT). The availability of high field instruments, the complexity of spectra of large proteins, the narrow signal dispersion of some unstructured proteins, and the time needed to record the necessary increments in the indirect dimensions to exploit the resolution of the highfield instruments make this traditional approach unsatisfactory. New procedures need to be developed beyond uniform sampling of the indirect dimensions and reconstruction methods other than the straight FFT are necessary. Here we discuss approaches of non-uniform sampling (NUS) and suitable reconstruction methods. We expect that such methods will become standard for multi-dimensional NMR data acquisition with complex biological macromolecules and will dramatically enhance the power of modern biological NMR.

  14. Perspectives in magnetic resonance: NMR in the post-FFT era.

    PubMed

    Hyberts, Sven G; Arthanari, Haribabu; Robson, Scott A; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Multi-dimensional NMR spectra have traditionally been processed with the fast Fourier transformation (FFT). The availability of high field instruments, the complexity of spectra of large proteins, the narrow signal dispersion of some unstructured proteins, and the time needed to record the necessary increments in the indirect dimensions to exploit the resolution of the highfield instruments make this traditional approach unsatisfactory. New procedures need to be developed beyond uniform sampling of the indirect dimensions and reconstruction methods other than the straight FFT are necessary. Here we discuss approaches of non-uniform sampling (NUS) and suitable reconstruction methods. We expect that such methods will become standard for multi-dimensional NMR data acquisition with complex biological macromolecules and will dramatically enhance the power of modern biological NMR. PMID:24656081

  15. Perspectives in Magnetic Resonance: NMR in the Post-FFT Era

    PubMed Central

    Hyberts, Sven G.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Robson, Scott A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Multi-dimensional NMR spectra have traditionally been processed with the fast Fourier transformation (FFT). The availability of high field instruments, the complexity of spectra of large proteins, the narrow signal dispersion of some unstructured proteins, and the time needed to record the necessary increments in the indirect dimensions to exploit the resolution of the highfield instruments make this traditional approach unsatisfactory. New procedures need to be developed beyond uniform sampling of the indirect dimensions and reconstruction methods other than the straight FFT are necessary. Here we discuss approaches of non-unifom sampling (NUS) and suitable reconstruction methods. We expect that such methods will become standard for multi-dimensional NMR data acquisition with complex biological macromolecules and will dramatically enhance the power of modern biological NMR. PMID:24656081

  16. Spectroscopic separation of (13) C NMR spectra of complex isomeric mixtures by the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Moreno, Aitor; Fieber, Wolfgang; Brauchli, Robert; Sommer, Horst

    2015-04-01

    Isomeric mixtures from synthetic or natural origins can pose fundamental challenges for their chromatographic separation and spectroscopic identification. A novel 1D selective NMR experiment, chemical shift selective filter (CSSF)-TOCSY-INEPT, is presented that allows the extraction of (13) C NMR subspectra of discrete isomers in complex mixtures without physical separation. This is achieved via CSS excitation of proton signals in the (1) H NMR mixture spectrum, propagation of the selectivity by polarization transfer within coupled (1) H spins, and subsequent relaying of the magnetization from (1) H to (13) C by direct INEPT transfer to generate (13) C NMR subspectra. Simple consolidation of the subspectra yields (13) C NMR spectra for individual isomers. Alternatively, CSSF-INEPT with heteronuclear long-range transfer can correlate the isolated networks of coupled spins and therefore facilitate the reconstruction of the (13) C NMR spectra for isomers containing multiple spin systems. A proof-of-principle validation of the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment is demonstrated on three mixtures with different spectral and structural complexities. The results show that CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT is a versatile, powerful tool for deconvoluting isomeric mixtures within the NMR tube with unprecedented resolution and offers unique, unambiguous spectral information for structure elucidation. PMID:25616134

  17. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25616193

  18. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two

  19. A HTS dc SQUID-NMR: fabrication of the SQUID and application to low-field NMR for fruit quality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Linus U.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have made the detection of low-field (LF) and ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) a reality. The latter has been proven to be a potential tool for non-destructive quality testing of horticultural products, amongst many other applications. High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) dc SQUIDS are likely to allow for the development of not only low-cost NMR systems but also prototypes that are mobile and easily maintainable. A HTS dc SQUID was manufactured on an YBCO thin film, using a novel laser based lithography method. The lithography was implemented by a new laser system developed in-house, as a model of low-cost lithography systems. The junctions of the dc SQUID were tested and displayed normal I-V characteristics in the acceptable range for the application. In order to determine the viability of low-field NMR for non-destructive quality measurement of horticultural products, a commercial HTS dc SQUID-NMR system was used to measure quality parameters of banana during ripening. The trend of color change and sugar increase of the banana during ripening were the most highly correlated attributes to the SQUID-NMR measured parameter, average T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time). Further studies were done, that involved processing of the NMR signal into relaxation time resolved spectra. A spectral signature of banana was obtained, where each peak is a T1 value corresponding to a proton pool, and is reported here. These results will potentially lead to deeper understanding of the quality of the samples under study.

  20. Uniform procedure of (1)H NMR analysis of rat urine and toxicometabonomics Part II: comparison of NMR profiles for classification of hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Schoonen, Willem G E J; Kloks, Cathelijne P A M; Ploemen, Jan-Peter H T M; Smit, Martin J; Zandberg, Pieter; Horbach, G Jean; Mellema, Jan-Remt; Thijssen-Vanzuylen, Carol; Tas, Albert C; van Nesselrooij, Joop H J; Vogels, Jack T W E

    2007-07-01

    A procedure of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) urinalysis using pattern recognition is proposed for early detection of toxicity of investigational compounds in rats. The method is applied to detect toxicity upon administration of 13 toxic reference compounds and one nontoxic control compound (mianserine) in rats. The toxic compounds are expected to induce necrosis (bromobenzene, paracetamol, carbon tetrachloride, iproniazid, isoniazid, thioacetamide), cholestasis (alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), chlorpromazine, ethinylestradiol, methyltestosterone, ibuprofen), or steatosis (phenobarbital, tetracycline). Animals were treated daily for 2 or 4 days except for paracetamol and bromobenzene (1 and 2 days) and carbon tetrachloride (1 day only). Urine was collected 24 h after the first and second treatment. The animals were sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment, and NMR data were compared with liver histopathology as well as blood and urine biochemistry. Pathology and biochemistry showed marked toxicity in the liver at high doses of bromobenzene, paracetamol, carbon tetrachloride, ANIT, and ibuprofen. Thioacetamide and chlorpromazine showed less extensive changes, while the influences of iproniazid, isoniazid, phenobarbital, ethinylestradiol, and tetracycline on the toxic parameters were marginal or for methyltestosterone and mianserine negligible. NMR spectroscopy revealed significant changes upon dosing in 88 NMR biomarker signals preselected with the Procrustus Rotation method on principal component discriminant analysis (PCDA) plots. Further evaluation of the specific changes led to the identification of biomarker patterns for the specific types of liver toxicity. Comparison of our rat NMR PCDA data with histopathological changes reported in humans and/or rats suggests that rat NMR urinalysis can be used to predict hepatotoxicity. PMID:17420222

  1. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  2. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis. PMID:25619991

  3. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis. PMID:25619991

  4. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  5. A Quantitative NMR Analysis of Phosphorus in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasek, M. A.; Smith, V. D.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus is important in a number of biochemical molecules, from DNA to ATP. Early life may have depended on meteorites as a primary source of phosphorus as simple dissolution of crustal apatite may not produce the necessary concentration of phosphate. Phosphorus is found in several mineral phases in meteorites. Apatite and other Ca- and Mg phosphate minerals tend to be the dominant phosphorus reservoir in stony meteorites, whereas in more iron-rich or reduced meteorites, the phosphide minerals schreibersite, (Fe, Ni)3P, and perryite, (Ni, Fe)5(Si, P)2 are dominant. However, in CM chondrites that have experienced significant aqueous alteration, phosphorus has been detected in more exotic molecules. A series of phosphonic acids including methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butyl- phosphonic acids were observed by GC-MS in Murchison. Phosphorian sulfides are in Murchison and Murray. NMR spectrometry is capable of detecting multiple substances with one experiment, is non-destructive, and potentially quantitative, as discussed below. Despite these advantages, NMR spectrometry is infrequently applied to meteoritic studies due in large part to a lack of applicability to many compounds and the relatively high limit of detection requirements. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR has been applied to macromolecular carbon in Murchison. P-31 NMR has many advantages over aqueous carbon-13 NMR spectrometry. P-31 is the only isotope of phosphorus, and P-31 gives a signal approximately twice as strong as C-13. These two factors together with the relative abundances of carbon and phosphorus imply that phosphorus should give a signal approximately 20 as strong as carbon in a given sample. A discussion on the preparation of the quantitative standard and NMR studies are presented

  6. Measurement and Quantification of Heterogeneity, Flow, and Mass Transfer in Porous Media Using NMR Low-Field Techiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciok, E.; Olaru, A. M.; Haber, A.; van Landeghem, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Sucre, O. E.; Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.; RWTH Aachen Mobile Low-Field NMR

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is renowned for its unique potential to both reveal and correlate spectroscopic, relaxometric, spatial and dynamic properties in a large variety of organic and inorganic systems. NMR has no restrictions regarding sample opacity and is an entirely non-invasive method, which makes it the ideal tool for the investigation of porous media. However, for years NMR research of soils was limited by the use of high-field NMR devices, which necessitated elaborate NMR experiments and were not applicable to bulky samples or on-site field measurements. The evolution of low-field NMR devices during the past 20 years has brought forth portable, small-scale NMR systems with open and closed magnet arrangements specialized to specific NMR applications. In combination with recent advances in 2D-NMR Laplace methodology [1], low-field NMR has opened up the possibility to study real-life microporous systems ranging from granular media to natural soils and oil well boreholes. Thus, information becomes available, which before has not been accessible with high-field NMR. In this work, we present our recent progress in mobile low-field NMR probe design for field measurements of natural soils: a slim-line logging tool, which can be rammed into the soil of interest on-site. The performance of the device is demonstrated in measurements of moisture profiles of model soils [2] and field measurements of relaxometric properties and moisture profiles of natural soils [3]. Moreover, an improved concept of the slim-line logging tool is shown, with a higher excitation volume and a better signal-to-noise due to an improved coil design. Furthermore, we present our recent results in 2D exchange relaxometry and simulation. These include relaxation-relaxation experiments on natural soils with varying degree of moisture saturation, where we could draw a connection between the relaxometric properties of the soil to its pore size-related diffusivity and to its clay content

  7. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  8. Nondestructive high-resolution solid-state NMR of rotating thin films at the magic-angle.

    PubMed

    Inukai, Munehiro; Noda, Yasuto; Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to nondestructive magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for thin films. In this scheme, the sample put on the top of a rotor is spun using the conventional MAS system, and the NMR signals are detected with an additional coil. Stable spinning of disk-shaped samples with diameters of 7 mm and 12 mm at 14.2 and 7 kHz are feasible. We present 7Li MAS NMR experiments of a thin-film sample of LiCoO2 with a thickness of 200 nm. Taking advantage of the nondestructive feature of the experiment, we also demonstrate ex situ experiments, by tracing conformation change upon annealing for various durations. This approach opens the door for in situ MAS NMR of thin-film devices as well. PMID:21958755

  9. Nondestructive high-resolution solid-state NMR of rotating thin films at the magic-angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inukai, Munehiro; Noda, Yasuto; Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to nondestructive magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for thin films. In this scheme, the sample put on the top of a rotor is spun using the conventional MAS system, and the NMR signals are detected with an additional coil. Stable spinning of disk-shaped samples with diameters of 7 mm and 12 mm at 14.2 and 7 kHz are feasible. We present 7Li MAS NMR experiments of a thin-film sample of LiCoO 2 with a thickness of 200 nm. Taking advantage of the nondestructive feature of the experiment, we also demonstrate ex situ experiments, by tracing conformation change upon annealing for various durations. This approach opens the door for in situ MAS NMR of thin-film devices as well.

  10. Numerical simulation of ( T 2, T 1) 2D NMR and fluid responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mao-Jin; Zou, You-Long; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Xin

    2012-12-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology is limited for fluid typing, while two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) logging can provide more parameters including longitudinal relaxation time ( T 1) and transverse relaxation time ( T 2) relative to fluid types in porous media. Based on the 2D NMR relaxation mechanism in a gradient magnetic field, echo train simulation and 2D NMR inversion are discussed in detail. For 2D NMR inversion, a hybrid inversion method is proposed based on the damping least squares method (LSQR) and an improved truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) algorithm. A series of spin echoes are first simulated with multiple waiting times ( T W s) in a gradient magnetic field for given fluid models and these synthesized echo trains are inverted by the hybrid method. The inversion results are consistent with given models. Moreover, the numerical simulation of various fluid models such as the gas-water, light oil-water, and vicious oil-water models were carried out with different echo spacings ( T E s) and T W s by this hybrid method. Finally, the influences of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on inversion results in various fluid models are studied. The numerical simulations show that the hybrid method and optimized observation parameters are applicable to fluid typing of gas-water and oil-water models.

  11. Detection and characterization of xenon-binding sites in proteins by 129Xe NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Seth M; Lee, Seok-Yong; Ruiz, E Janette; Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E

    2002-09-13

    Xenon-binding sites in proteins have led to a number of applications of xenon in biochemical and structural studies. Here we further develop the utility of 129Xe NMR in characterizing specific xenon-protein interactions. The sensitivity of the 129Xe chemical shift to its local environment and the intense signals attainable by optical pumping make xenon a useful NMR reporter of its own interactions with proteins. A method for detecting specific xenon-binding interactions by analysis of 129Xe chemical shift data is illustrated using the maltose binding protein (MBP) from Escherichia coli as an example. The crystal structure of MBP in the presence of 8atm of xenon confirms the binding site determined from NMR data. Changes in the structure of the xenon-binding cavity upon the binding of maltose by the protein can account for the sensitivity of the 129Xe chemical shift to MBP conformation. 129Xe NMR data for xenon in solution with a number of cavity containing phage T4 lysozyme mutants show that xenon can report on cavity structure. In particular, a correlation exists between cavity size and the binding-induced 129Xe chemical shift. Further applications of 129Xe NMR to biochemical assays, including the screening of proteins for xenon binding for crystallography are considered. PMID:12217701

  12. Quantification of taurine in energy drinks using ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Monika; Felbinger, Christine; Christoph, Norbert; Wachter, Helmut; Wiest, Johannes; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The consumption of so called energy drinks is increasing, especially among adolescents. These beverages commonly contain considerable amounts of the amino sulfonic acid taurine, which is related to a magnitude of various physiological effects. The customary method to control the legal limit of taurine in energy drinks is LC-UV/vis with postcolumn derivatization using ninhydrin. In this paper we describe the quantification of taurine in energy drinks by (1)H NMR as an alternative to existing methods of quantification. Variation of pH values revealed the separation of a distinct taurine signal in (1)H NMR spectra, which was applied for integration and quantification. Quantification was performed using external calibration (R(2)>0.9999; linearity verified by Mandel's fitting test with a 95% confidence level) and PULCON. Taurine concentrations in 20 different energy drinks were analyzed by both using (1)H NMR and LC-UV/vis. The deviation between (1)H NMR and LC-UV/vis results was always below the expanded measurement uncertainty of 12.2% for the LC-UV/vis method (95% confidence level) and at worst 10.4%. Due to the high accordance to LC-UV/vis data and adequate recovery rates (ranging between 97.1% and 108.2%), (1)H NMR measurement presents a suitable method to quantify taurine in energy drinks. PMID:24094700

  13. The ABC exporter MsbA probed by solid state NMR – challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos, Andrea; Spadaccini, Roberta; Vogel, Ramona; Hoffmann, Christian; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Mchaourab, Hassane; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-09-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a superfamily of integral membrane proteins involved in translocation of substrates across the membrane driven by ATP hydrolysis. Despite available crystal structures and extensive biochemical data, many open questions regarding their transport mechanisms remain. Therefore, there is a need to explore spectroscopic techniques such as solid state NMR in order to bridge the gap between structural and mechanistic data. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using Escherichia coli MsbA as a model ABC transporter for solid state NMR studies. We show that optimised solubilisation and reconstitution procedures enable preparing stable and homogenous protein samples. Depending on the duration of solubilisation, MsbA can be obtained in either an apo- or in a native lipid A bound form. Building onto these optimisations, the first promising MAS-NMR spectra with narrow lines have been recorded. However, further sensitivity improvements are required so that complex NMR experiments can be recorded within a reasonable amount of time. We therefore demonstrate the usability of paramagnetic doping for rapid data acquisition and explore dynamic nuclear polarisation as a method for general signal enhancement. Our results demonstrate that solid state NMR provides an opportunity to address important biological questions related to complex mechanisms of ABC transporters. PMID:25849794

  14. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  15. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  16. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  17. Solid-state NMR study of fluorinated steroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Jay; Lin, Su-Ching; Huang, Shing-Jong; Ching, Wei-Min; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2014-02-01

    Solid-state {(1)H}(13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy was performed to analyze two fluorinated steroids, i.e., betamethasone (BMS) and fludrocortisone acetate (FCA), that have fluorine attached to C9, as well as two non-fluorinated analogs, i.e., prednisolone (PRD) and hydrocortisone 21-acetate (HCA). The (13)C signals of BMS revealed multiplet patterns with splittings of 16-215Hz, indicating multiple ring conformations, whereas the (13)C signals of FCA, HCA, and PRD exhibited only singlet patterns, implying a unique conformation. In addition, BMS and FCA exhibited substantial deviation (>3.5ppm) in approximately half of the (13)C signals and significant deviation (>45ppm) in the (13)C9 signal compared to PRD and HCA, respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that fluorinated steroids, such as BMS and FCA, have steroidal ring conformation(s) that are distinct from non-fluorinated analogs, such as PRD and HCA. PMID:24316163

  18. Using radial NMR profiles to characterize pore size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriche, Rachid; Treilhard, John

    2012-02-01

    Extracting information about axon diameter distributions in the brain is a challenging task which provides useful information for medical purposes; for example, the ability to characterize and monitor axon diameters would be useful in diagnosing and investigating diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)1 or autism.2 Three families of operators are defined by Ozarslan,3 whose action upon an NMR attenuation signal extracts the moments of the pore size distribution of the ensemble under consideration; also a numerical method is proposed to continuously reconstruct a discretely sampled attenuation profile using the eigenfunctions of the simple harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian: the SHORE basis. The work presented here extends Ozarlan's method to other bases that can offer a better description of attenuation signal behaviour; in particular, we propose the use of the radial Spherical Polar Fourier (SPF) basis. Testing is performed to contrast the efficacy of the radial SPF basis and SHORE basis in practical attenuation signal reconstruction. The robustness of the method to additive noise is tested and analysed. We demonstrate that a low-order attenuation signal reconstruction outperforms a higher-order reconstruction in subsequent moment estimation under noisy conditions. We propose the simulated annealing algorithm for basis function scale parameter estimation. Finally, analytic expressions are derived and presented for the action of the operators on the radial SPF basis (obviating the need for numerical integration, thus avoiding a spectrum of possible sources of error).

  19. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  1. Estimation and reduction of temporal magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets using inductive and NMR feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Brian F.

    Powered magnets provide high magnetic fields that promise to significantly improve nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Higher fields increase NMR chemical shift resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while decreasing quadrupolar line broadening in solids. High resolution NMR is typically performed using superconducting magnets, which are currently limited to 24 Tesla. Powered magnets can provide continuous fields up to 45 Tesla, significantly larger than that achievable by superconducting magnets. This will dramatically expand opportunities in the areas of material science, chemistry, and biology. However, temporal magnetic field fluctuations due to both the power supply and cooling water system currently render these magnets unsuitable for high resolution NMR. The focus of this dissertation is to design, synthesize, and verify a feedback control system that reduces temporal field fluctuations so that powered magnets can be used for high resolution NMR. Earlier studies have shown that feedback control using inductive measurements significantly reduces higher frequency field fluctuations associated with power supply ripple, but are limited in their ability to reduce lower frequency field fluctuations associated with variations in the cooling water system. Conversely, feedback control using NMR measurements are more conducive to reducing lower frequency field fluctuations and less successful at higher frequencies. Feedback control systems which use NMR measurements are often referred to as field-frequency locks (FFLs). Earlier studies have shown that FFLs can estimate and reduce lower frequency field fluctuations in superconducting magnets, but have limited ability to do the same in powered magnets. This dissertation investigates why such FFLs are limited in powered magnets, and demonstrates some alternative methods for estimating lower frequency field fluctuations using NMR measurements in powered magnets. A digital sampled-data feedback control

  2. Cellular Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Membrane Protein Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A.; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of structural biology studies successfully demonstrate the power of high-resolution structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in fully understanding their function, there is considerable interest in developing NMR approaches to obtain such information in a cellular setting. As long as the proteins inside the living cell tumble rapidly in the NMR timescale, recently developed in-cell solution NMR approaches can be applied towards the determination of 3D structural information. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be overcome to study membrane proteins inside a cell. Research in our laboratory is focused on developing a combination of solid-state NMR and biological approaches to overcome these challenges with a specific emphasis on obtaining high-resolution structural insights into electron transfer biological processes mediated by membrane-bound proteins like mammalian cytochrome b5, cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the signal-enhancement rendered by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy for in-cell studies on a membrane-anchored protein. Our experimental results obtained from 13C-labeled membrane-anchored cytochrome b5 in native Escherichia coli cells show a ~16-fold DNP signal enhancement (ε). Further, results obtained from a 2D 13C/13C chemical shift correlation MAS experiment demonstrates that it is highly possible to suppress the background signals from other cellular contents for high-resolution structural studies on membrane proteins. We believe that this study would pave new avenues for high-resolution 3D structural studies on a variety of membrane-associated proteins and their complexes in the cellular context to fully understand their functional roles in physiological processes. PMID:25017802

  3. Simultaneous detection of distinct ubiquitin chain topologies by 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Pham, Grace H; Prabakaran, Jyothiprashanth; Strieter, Eric R

    2014-10-17

    The dynamic interplay between ubiquitin (Ub) chain construction and destruction is critical for the regulation of many cellular pathways. To understand these processes, it would be ideal to simultaneously detect different Ub chains as they are created and destroyed in the cell. This objective cannot be achieved with existing detection strategies. Here, we report on the use of 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect and characterize conformationally distinct Ub oligomers. By exploiting the environmental sensitivity of the 19F nucleus and the conformational diversity found among Ub chains of different linkage types, we can simultaneously resolve the 19F NMR signals for mono-Ub and three distinct di-Ub oligomers (K6, K48, and K63) in heterogeneous mixtures. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the ability to interrogate the selectivity of deubiquitinases with multiple Ub substrates in real time. We also demonstrate that 19F NMR can be used to discern Ub linkages that are formed by select E3 ligases found in pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, our results assert the potential of 19F NMR for monitoring Ub signaling in cells to reveal fundamental insights about the associated cellular pathways. PMID:25119846

  4. Survey and qualification of internal standards for quantification by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Torgny; Mathiasson, Marie; Bekiroglu, Somer; Hakkarainen, Birgit; Bowden, Tim; Arvidsson, Torbjörn

    2010-09-01

    In quantitative NMR (qNMR) selection of an appropriate internal standard proves to be crucial. In this study, 25 candidate compounds considered to be potent internal standards were investigated with respect to the ability of providing unique signal chemical shifts, purity, solubility, and ease of use. The (1)H chemical shift (delta) values, assignments, multiplicities and number of protons (for each signal), appropriateness (as to be used as internal standards) in four different deuterated solvents (D(2)O, DMSO-d(6), CD(3)OD, CDCl(3)) were studied. Taking into account the properties of these 25 internal standards, the most versatile eight compounds (2,4,6-triiodophenol, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-nitrobenzene, 3,4,5-trichloropyridine, dimethyl terephthalate, 1,4-dinitrobenzene, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid) were qualified using both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and NMR spectroscopy employing highly pure acetanilide as the reference standard. The data from these two methods were compared as well as utilized in the quality assessment of the compounds as internal standards. Finally, the selected internal standards were tested and evaluated in a real case of quantitative NMR analysis of a paracetamol pharmaceutical product. PMID:20207092

  5. Monitoring polydispersity by NMR diffusometry with tailored norm regularisation and moving-frame processing.

    PubMed

    Urbańczyk, Mateusz; Bernin, Diana; Czuroń, Alan; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is currently one of the main analytical techniques applied in numerous branches of chemistry. Furthermore, NMR has been proven to be useful to follow in situ reactions occurring on a time scale of hours and days. For complicated mixtures, NMR experiments providing diffusion coefficients are particularly advantageous. However, the inverse Laplace transform (ILT) that is used to extract the distribution of diffusion coefficients from an NMR signal is known to be unstable and vulnerable to noise. Numerous regularisation techniques to circumvent this problem have been proposed. In our recent study, we proposed a method based on sparsity-enforcing l1-norm minimisation. This approach, which is referred to as ITAMeD, has been successful but limited to samples with a 'discrete' distribution of diffusion coefficients. In this paper, we propose a generalisation of ITAMeD using a tailored lp-norm (1 ≤ p ≤ 2) to process, in particular, signals arising from 'polydisperse' samples. The performance of our method was tested on simulations and experimental datasets of polyethylene oxides with varying polydispersity indices. Finally, we applied our new method to monitor diffusion coefficient and polydispersity changes of heparin undergoing enzymatic degradation in real time. PMID:26824089

  6. Simultaneous Detection of Distinct Ubiquitin Chain Topologies by 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between ubiquitin (Ub) chain construction and destruction is critical for the regulation of many cellular pathways. To understand these processes, it would be ideal to simultaneously detect different Ub chains as they are created and destroyed in the cell. This objective cannot be achieved with existing detection strategies. Here, we report on the use of 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect and characterize conformationally distinct Ub oligomers. By exploiting the environmental sensitivity of the 19F nucleus and the conformational diversity found among Ub chains of different linkage types, we can simultaneously resolve the 19F NMR signals for mono-Ub and three distinct di-Ub oligomers (K6, K48, and K63) in heterogeneous mixtures. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the ability to interrogate the selectivity of deubiquitinases with multiple Ub substrates in real time. We also demonstrate that 19F NMR can be used to discern Ub linkages that are formed by select E3 ligases found in pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, our results assert the potential of 19F NMR for monitoring Ub signaling in cells to reveal fundamental insights about the associated cellular pathways. PMID:25119846

  7. Uncertainty measurement for automated macro program-processed quantitative proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Hays, Patrick A; Schoenberger, Torsten

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of a fully automated quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (qNMR) processing program, including the determination of its processing uncertainty, and the calculations of the combined uncertainty of the qNMR result, is presented with details on the use of a trimmed purity average. Quantitative NMR spectra (1359) were collected over a 4-month period on various concentrations of pseudoephedrine HCl dissolved in D2O (0.0610 to 93.60 mg/mL) containing maleic acid (the internal standard) to yield signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 3 to 72,000 for analyte integral regions. The resulting 5436 purities exhibited a normal distribution about the best estimate of the true value. The median absolute deviation (MAD) statistical method was used to obtain a model of uncertainty relative to the signal-to-noise of the analyte's integral peaks. The model was then tested using different concentrations of known purity chloroquine diphosphate. qNMR results of numerous illicit heroin HCl samples were compared to those obtained by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25273593

  8. Differentiating and characterizing geminal silanols in silicas by (29)Si NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-12-01

    Single and geminal hydroxyl species in silicas have been characterized using solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy. Differentiating hydroxyl types is important in understanding their roles in chemical toxicity mechanisms for inhaled crystalline silicas responsible for silicosis. (1)H-(29)Si cross polarization NMR spectroscopy has been employed to obtain (29)Si NMR chemical shift data and signal accrual and relaxation characteristics. Spectral deconvolution is used to examine relative single and geminal hydroxyl resonance areas for a series of representative silicas and silica gels. Silicon-containing materials examined include 1878a quartz, and 1879a cristobalite from the National Institute for Science and Technology, kaolin, and several widely used respirable silicas and silica gels. Geminal hydroxyls were observed in every case, with relative resonance areas accounting for 21-65% of total hydroxyl signals. Factors affecting relative areas measured as a function of contact time, relaxation, and surface area are discussed. Subsequent (29)Si and (31)P NMR studies of a silica coated with various sodium hydrogen phosphates show preferential single silanol-phosphate interaction for basic phosphates, and oligomerization products for acidic phosphates. Geminal hydroxyl resonance areas displayed significant error (4-17%) for low surface area silicas, limiting this method to studies exhibiting major changes in chemical or spectroscopic properties. PMID:20825948

  9. Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR spectroscopy as a novel approach for real-time investigations of Li- and Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, Oliver; Bayley, Paul M.; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zigeng; Trease, Nicole M.; Grey, Clare P.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and explored the use of a new Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR probe system to track the formation of intermediate phases and investigate electrolyte decomposition during electrochemical cycling of Li- and Na-ion batteries (LIBs and NIBs). The new approach addresses many of the issues arising during in situ NMR, e.g., significantly different shifts of the multi-component samples, changing sample conditions (such as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity) during cycling, signal broadening due to paramagnetism as well as interferences between the NMR and external cycler circuit that might impair the experiments. We provide practical insight into how to conduct ATMC in situ NMR experiments and discuss applications of the methodology to LiFePO4 (LFP) and Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathodes as well as Na metal anodes. Automatic frequency sweep 7Li in situ NMR reveals significant changes of the strongly paramagnetic broadened LFP line shape in agreement with the structural changes due to delithiation. Additionally, 31P in situ NMR shows a full separation of the electrolyte and cathode NMR signals and is a key feature for a deeper understanding of the processes occurring during charge/discharge on the local atomic scale of NMR. 31P in situ NMR with "on-the-fly" re-calibrated, varying carrier frequencies on Na3V2(PO4)2F3 as a cathode in a NIB enabled the detection of different P signals within a huge frequency range of 4000 ppm. The experiments show a significant shift and changes in the number as well as intensities of 31P signals during desodiation/sodiation of the cathode. The in situ experiments reveal changes of local P environments that in part have not been seen in ex situ NMR investigations. Furthermore, we applied ATMC 23Na in situ NMR on symmetrical Na-Na cells during galvanostatic plating. An automatic adjustment of the NMR carrier frequency during the in situ experiment ensured on-resonance conditions for the Na metal and

  10. Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR spectroscopy as a novel approach for real-time investigations of Li- and Na-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Pecher, Oliver; Bayley, Paul M; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zigeng; Trease, Nicole M; Grey, Clare P

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and explored the use of a new Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR probe system to track the formation of intermediate phases and investigate electrolyte decomposition during electrochemical cycling of Li- and Na-ion batteries (LIBs and NIBs). The new approach addresses many of the issues arising during in situ NMR, e.g., significantly different shifts of the multi-component samples, changing sample conditions (such as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity) during cycling, signal broadening due to paramagnetism as well as interferences between the NMR and external cycler circuit that might impair the experiments. We provide practical insight into how to conduct ATMC in situ NMR experiments and discuss applications of the methodology to LiFePO4 (LFP) and Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathodes as well as Na metal anodes. Automatic frequency sweep (7)Li in situ NMR reveals significant changes of the strongly paramagnetic broadened LFP line shape in agreement with the structural changes due to delithiation. Additionally, (31)P in situ NMR shows a full separation of the electrolyte and cathode NMR signals and is a key feature for a deeper understanding of the processes occurring during charge/discharge on the local atomic scale of NMR. (31)P in situ NMR with "on-the-fly" re-calibrated, varying carrier frequencies on Na3V2(PO4)2F3 as a cathode in a NIB enabled the detection of different P signals within a huge frequency range of 4000ppm. The experiments show a significant shift and changes in the number as well as intensities of (31)P signals during desodiation/sodiation of the cathode. The in situ experiments reveal changes of local P environments that in part have not been seen in ex situ NMR investigations. Furthermore, we applied ATMC (23)Na in situ NMR on symmetrical Na-Na cells during galvanostatic plating. An automatic adjustment of the NMR carrier frequency during the in situ experiment ensured on-resonance conditions for the Na metal and

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  12. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  13. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  14. A Solid-State NMR Investigation of MQ Silicone Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergey G; Volkov, Vitaly I; Tatarinova, Elena A; Muzafarov, Aziz M

    2013-01-01

    The structure of MQ copolymers of the general chemical formula [(CH3)3SiO0.5]m [SiO2]n was characterized by means of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The MQ copolymers are highly branched polycyclic compounds (densely cross-linked nanosized networks). MQ copolymers were prepared by hydrolytic polycondensation in active medium. (29)Si NMR spectra were obtained by single pulse excitation (or direct polarization, DP) and cross-polarization (CP) (29)Si{(1)H} techniques in concert with MAS. It was shown that material consist of monofunctional M (≡SiO Si (CH3)3) and two types of tetrafunctional Q units: Q(4) ((≡SiO)4 Si) and Q(3) ((≡SiO)3 SiOH). Spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 measurements of (29)Si nuclei and analysis of (29)Si{(1)H} variable contact time signal intensities allowed us to obtain quantitative data on the relative content of different sites in copolymers. These investigations indicate that MQ copolymers represent dense structure with core and shell. PMID:23914072

  15. NMR evidence for the metallic nature of highly conducting polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbert, A.C. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Caldarelli, S. ); Thier, K.F. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Sariciftci, N.S. ); Cao, Y. ); Heeger, A.J. )

    1995-01-15

    Polyaniline doped with camphor sulphonic acid (PANI-CSA) has been shown to yield a material that, after casting from solution in [ital meta]-cresol, exhibits a temperature-independent magnetic susceptibility [Y. Cao, P. Smith, and A. J. Heeger, Synth. Met. 48, 91 (1992); N. S. Sariciftici, A. J. Heeger, and Y. Cao, Phys. Rev. B 49, 5988 (1994)]. We report recent [sup 13]C NMR experiments on uniformly [sup 13]C-enriched PANI-CSA in which the [sup 13]C spin-lattice relaxation rates are shown to obey a modified Korringa relation for relaxation via the hyperfine coupling to conduction electrons. This observation of Korringa relaxation in polyaniline provides strong evidence for a metallic state in this material. An estimate is made of the Korringa enhancement factor that provides a measure of the degree of electron-electron correlations present. Two-dimensional spin-exchange experiments are also reported, which show that the [sup 13]C NMR signal results from a heterogeneity in the sample over at least a 30-A distance scale. These results are discussed in terms of the spatial extent of the doping-induced defect.

  16. Multinuclear NMR Imaging of Fluid Phases in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S. N.; Dechter, J. J.; Komoroski, R. A.

    Multinuclear NMR of 7Li, 19F, and 1H has been investigated as a method for discriminating multiple fluid phases in porous rock. Good 7Li NMR images from LiCl brine in saturated Berea sandstone were obtained within a few hours at 1 × 1 × 5 mm 3 resolution using a low-TE, 3D volume imaging sequence. At 4.7 T, the 7Li T1 was 750 ms, and T2 was 10 ms. High-quality 19F and 1H images of a model fluorinated injectant (trifluorotoluene) in Berea were obtained at 0.4 × 0.4 × 3 mm 3 resolution in a few hours. Fluorine-19 imaging was found to be easier than 1H imaging due to the narrower 19F resonance and comparable T1 and T2 in Berea sandstone. Lithium-7 and 19F imaging offer alternatives for discriminating aqueous and organic phases unambiguously in flooded oil cores, especially where 1H signals for the two phases are unresolved.

  17. Molecular structure from a single NMR sequence (fast-PANACEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2010-09-01

    The PANACEA experiment combines three standard NMR pulse sequences (INADEQUATE, HSQC and HMBC) into a single entity, and is designed for spectrometers with two or more receivers operating in parallel. For small molecules it offers a direct route to molecular structure. Often the INADEQUATE feature is the rate-determining step, being limited by the low natural abundance of directly coupled 13C sbnd 13C pairs. This new version, fast-PANACEA, speeds up this measurement by two alternative schemes. In the first, the individual 13C sites are excited by selective radiofrequency pulses acting on double-quantum coherence, and encoded according to the rows of a Hadamard matrix. The columns of this matrix are used to decode the experimental data into separate F 2 spectra. This reduction in the number of required scans secures a faster result than the conventional stepwise exploration of the evolution dimension where the Nyquist condition and the resolution requirements must both be satisfied. The second scheme makes use of multiple aliasing in the evolution dimension. Significant speed improvements are achieved by either technique, illustrated by measurements made on samples of menthol and cholesterol. A new stabilization scheme (i-lock) is introduced. This is a software program that corrects the final NMR frequencies based on the observed frequency of a strong X-spin signal. It replaces the conventional deuterium lock, permitting measurements on neat liquids such as peanut oil and silicone oil, and offering advantages where deuterated solvents are undesirable.

  18. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  19. NMR study of cluster-assembled nanophase copper

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, B.H.; Meng, M. . Dept. of Physics); Siegel, R.W.; Liao, Y.X. )

    1992-12-01

    [sup 63]Cu and [sup 65]Cu NMR spectra from cluster-assembled nanophase copper with an average grain size between 5 and 10mn show a broadened peak, at the normal Knight-shifted frequency for copper meta which arises from only the central 1/2 to -1/2 transition. A very broad background is observed on either side of that peak. Some samples exhibit a second broad peak at a position normally associated with non-metallic copper. Pulsed NMR measurements of the central peak show that virtually all the copper signals are significantly broadened and have a spin-spin relaxation time longer than larger grained copper samples. Line shape measurements, using spin echoes, as a function of delay between rf excitation and measurement show there are a number of copper sites with longer relaxation times which have a significantly larger broadening. Those sites are tentatively identified as being at or near a grain boundary or free surface. A small orientation effect is observed indicating an anisotropy within the samples. An isochronal anneal of one sample showed significant, but not complete, line narrowing after an anneal at 450C consistent with other nanophase metals which show grain growth above 40--50% of the melting temperature.

  20. NMR study of cluster-assembled nanophase copper

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, B.H.; Meng, M.; Siegel, R.W.; Liao, Y.X.

    1992-12-01

    {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu NMR spectra from cluster-assembled nanophase copper with an average grain size between 5 and 10mn show a broadened peak, at the normal Knight-shifted frequency for copper meta which arises from only the central 1/2 to -1/2 transition. A very broad background is observed on either side of that peak. Some samples exhibit a second broad peak at a position normally associated with non-metallic copper. Pulsed NMR measurements of the central peak show that virtually all the copper signals are significantly broadened and have a spin-spin relaxation time longer than larger grained copper samples. Line shape measurements, using spin echoes, as a function of delay between rf excitation and measurement show there are a number of copper sites with longer relaxation times which have a significantly larger broadening. Those sites are tentatively identified as being at or near a grain boundary or free surface. A small orientation effect is observed indicating an anisotropy within the samples. An isochronal anneal of one sample showed significant, but not complete, line narrowing after an anneal at 450C consistent with other nanophase metals which show grain growth above 40--50% of the melting temperature.

  1. Spherical tensor analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Carravetta, Marina; Antonioli, Gian Carlo; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2005-06-22

    In a nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment, the spin density operator may be regarded as a superposition of irreducible spherical tensor operators. Each of these spin operators evolves during the NMR experiment and may give rise to an NMR signal at a later time. The NMR signal at the end of a pulse sequence may, therefore, be regarded as a superposition of spherical components, each derived from a different spherical tensor operator. We describe an experimental method, called spherical tensor analysis (STA), which allows the complete resolution of the NMR signal into its individual spherical components. The method is demonstrated on a powder of a (13)C-labeled amino acid, exposed to a pulse sequence generating a double-quantum effective Hamiltonian. The propagation of spin order through the space of spherical tensor operators is revealed by the STA procedure, both in static and rotating solids. Possible applications of STA to the NMR of liquids, liquid crystals, and solids are discussed. PMID:16035785

  2. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  3. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  4. Modified OMP Algorithm for Exponentially Decaying Signals

    PubMed Central

    Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Kasprzak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    A group of signal reconstruction methods, referred to as compressed sensing (CS), has recently found a variety of applications in numerous branches of science and technology. However, the condition of the applicability of standard CS algorithms (e.g., orthogonal matching pursuit, OMP), i.e., the existence of the strictly sparse representation of a signal, is rarely met. Thus, dedicated algorithms for solving particular problems have to be developed. In this paper, we introduce a modification of OMP motivated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) application of CS. The algorithm is based on the fact that the NMR spectrum consists of Lorentzian peaks and matches a single Lorentzian peak in each of its iterations. Thus, we propose the name Lorentzian peak matching pursuit (LPMP). We also consider certain modification of the algorithm by introducing the allowed positions of the Lorentzian peaks' centers. Our results show that the LPMP algorithm outperforms other CS algorithms when applied to exponentially decaying signals. PMID:25609044

  5. 31P NMR study of magnetic phase transitions of MnP single crystal under 2 GPa pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, GuoZhi; Zhao, Bo; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Ping; Luo, JianLin

    2016-05-01

    Superconductivity on the border of the long-range magnetic order has been discovered in MnP under high pressures. In order to investigate the nature of the magnetic properties adjacent to the superconducting state, we performed zero-field 31P NMR for MnP single crystal under ambient and hydrostatic pressure of 2 GPa, respectively. Radio frequency power level was used to determine whether NMR signal originates from a helical state or not. When 2 GPa pressure was applied, the signal from helical state exists even above 160 K, while that from the ferromagnetic phase was not observed. Our NMR results indicate that the magnetic phase which is adjacent to the superconducting state is in a helical magnetic structure.

  6. NMR Spectra Transformed by Electron-Nuclear Coupling as Indicator of Structural Peculiarities of Magnetically Active Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Vladimir K

    2016-09-01

    The peculiarities of nuclear spin relaxation in the paramagnetic systems have been analyzed taking into account the exchange processes. The analysis is based on the modified Solomon-Bloembergen equations. In this line, the conditions of detecting of the NMR signals of samples are discussed depending on resonance frequency of the NMR spectrometer and characteristic relaxation time. On this basis, (1)H NMR spectra of cobalt semiquinolate complex have been analyzed. It has been shown that the satellite signals observed in the spectrum are caused by hyperfine coupling of the tert-butyl group protons with α and β states (localized on pz orbital of the aromatic carbon) of unpaired electron spin. The relaxation process of the resonance protons is controlled by paramagnetic dipole-dipole coupling. The contact hyperfine coupling does not contribute to the paramagnetic broadening. A mechanism involving paramagnetic molecular structures, which are responsible for intramolecular exchange processes in the cobalt semiquinolate complex, is given. PMID:27513208

  7. Wide-line NMR and protein hydration.

    PubMed

    Tompa, K; Bokor, M; Tompa, P

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the reader is introduced to the basics of wide-line NMR, with particular focus on the following: (1) basic theoretical and experimental NMR elements, necessary before switching the spectrometer and designing the experiment, (2) models/theories for the interpretation of measured data, (3) definition of wide-line NMR spectrometry, the description of the measurement and evaluation variants, useful hints for the novice, (4) advice on selecting the solvent, which is not a trivial task, (5) a note of warning that not all data are acceptable in spite of the statistical confidence. Finally, we wrap up the chapter with the results on two proteins (a globular and an intrinsically disordered). PMID:22760320

  8. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    PubMed

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. PMID:10783273

  9. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  10. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  11. An instrument control and data analysis program for NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.S.; Mushlin, R.A.; Veklerov, E.; Port, J.D.; Ladd, C.; Harrison, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a software environment created to support real-time instrument control and signal acquisition as well as array-processor based signal and image processing in up to five dimensions. The environment is configured for NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. It is designed to provide flexible tools for implementing novel NMR experiments in the research laboratory. Data acquisition and processing operations are programmed in macros which are loaded in assembled from to minimize instruction overhead. Data arrays are dynamically allocated for efficient use of memory and can be mapped directly into disk files. The command set includes primitives for real-time control of data acquisition, scalar arithmetic, string manipulation, branching, a file system and vector operations carried out by an array processor. 6 figs.

  12. Temperature response of 129Xe depolarization transfer and its application for ultra-sensitive NMR detection

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2008-03-20

    Temporary trapping of atomic xenon in functionalized cryptophane cages makes the high sensitivity of hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe available for highly specific NMR detection of biomolecules like proteins in solution. Here, we study the signal transfer onto a reservoir of unbound hp xenon by gating the residence time of the nuclei in the cage through the temperature-dependent exchange rate. Temperature changes were detectable immediately as an altered reservoir signal and yielded a sensitivity of 0.6 K. The temperature response is adjustable with lower concentrations of caged xenon providing more sensitivity at higher temperatures and allows ultra-sensitive detection of such molecular cages at 310 K. Functionalized cryptophane could be detected at concentrations as low as 10nM which corresponds to a 4000-fold sensitivity enhancement compared to conventional detection. This sensitivity makes hp-NMR capable of detecting such constructs in concentrations far belowthe detection limit by UV-visible light absorbance.

  13. Synthesis and solid state NMR characterization of novel peptide/silica hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Werner, Mayke; Heil, Andreas; Rothermel, Niels; Breitzke, Hergen; Groszewicz, Pedro Braga; Thankamony, Aany Sofia; Gutmann, Torsten; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    The successful synthesis and solid state NMR characterization of silica-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials is presented. For this, collagen-like peptides are immobilized on carboxylate functionalized mesoporous silica (COOH/SiOx) materials. A pre-activation of the silica material with TSTU (O-(N-Succinimidyl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium tetrafluoroborate) is performed to enable a covalent binding of the peptides to the linker. The success of the covalent immobilization is indicated by the decrease of the (13)C CP-MAS NMR signal of the TSTU moiety. A qualitative distinction between covalently bound and adsorbed peptide is feasible by (15)N CP-MAS Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). The low-field shift of the (15)N signal of the peptide's N-terminus clearly identifies it as the binding site. The DNP enhancement allows the probing of natural abundance (15)N nuclei, rendering expensive labeling of peptides unnecessary. PMID:26411982

  14. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  15. NMR of laser-polarized 129Xe in blood foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Peled, S.; Nascimben, L.; Oteiza, E.; Walsworth, R. L.; Jolesz, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-polarized 129Xe dissolved in a foam preparation of fresh human blood was investigated. The NMR signal of 129Xe dissolved in blood was enhanced by creating a foam in which the dissolved 129Xe exchanged with a large reservoir of gaseous laser-polarized 129Xe. The dissolved 129Xe T1 in this system was found to be significantly shorter in oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood. The T1 of 129Xe dissolved in oxygenated blood foam was found to be approximately 21 (+/-5) s, and in deoxygenated blood foam to be greater than 40 s. To understand the oxygenation trend, T1 measurements were also made on plasma and hemoglobin foam preparations. The measurement technique using a foam gas-liquid exchange interface may also be useful for studying foam coarsening and other liquid physical properties.

  16. Basic facts and perspectives of Overhauser DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    After the first surprisingly large 1H DNP enhancements of the water signal in aqueous solutions of nitroxide radicals observed at high magnetic fields, Overhauser DNP is gaining increasing attention for a number of applications now flourishing, showing the potentialities of this mechanism in solution and solid state NMR as well as in MRI. Unexpected Overhauser DNP enhancements in insulating solids were recently measured at 100 K, with a magnitude which increases with the applied magnetic field. We recapitulate here the theoretical premises of Overhauser DNP in solution and analyze the effects of the various parameters on the efficacy of the mechanism, underlining the link between the DNP enhancements and the field dependent relaxation properties. Promisingly, more effective DNP enhancements are expected by exploiting the potentialities offered by 13C detection and the use of supercritical fluids.

  17. Noise properties of a NMR transceiver coil array.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Robert G; Barberi, Enzo A; Menon, Ravi S

    2004-11-01

    The use of multiple radiofrequency (RF) surface coil elements has applications in both fast parallel imaging and conventional imaging techniques. Through implementation of a simple magnetic decoupling network, 50 Omega matching can be achieved in both the transmitter and receiver chains, enabling the use of conventional RF power amplifiers and preamplifiers for transceive applications. Unlike phased array coil arrangements using low impedance preamplifiers for decoupling, the noise correlation between 50 Omega coils decoupled with discrete components has not been characterized. We have measured the dependence of coil quality factor (Q-factor) and noise correlation on coil separation and shown these quantities to be consistent with theoretical arguments, at least at 4 T (170 MHz). Our results suggest that a coil system for transmission and reception of NMR signals with 50 Omega coils can be built to take advantage of all the benefits of conventional array coils and with the added advantages of using conventional amplifiers. PMID:15504694

  18. Basic facts and perspectives of Overhauser DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    After the first surprisingly large (1)H DNP enhancements of the water signal in aqueous solutions of nitroxide radicals observed at high magnetic fields, Overhauser DNP is gaining increasing attention for a number of applications now flourishing, showing the potentialities of this mechanism in solution and solid state NMR as well as in MRI. Unexpected Overhauser DNP enhancements in insulating solids were recently measured at 100K, with a magnitude which increases with the applied magnetic field. We recapitulate here the theoretical premises of Overhauser DNP in solution and analyze the effects of the various parameters on the efficacy of the mechanism, underlining the link between the DNP enhancements and the field dependent relaxation properties. Promisingly, more effective DNP enhancements are expected by exploiting the potentialities offered by (13)C detection and the use of supercritical fluids. PMID:26920833

  19. Saturation in Deuteron Hadamard NMR Spectroscopy of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greferath, M.; Blumich, B.; Griffith, W. M.; Hoatson, G. L.

    Hadamard NMR was investigated for wide-line solid-state deuteron spectroscopy by numerical simulations and experiments on hexamethylbenzene. Similar signal-to-noise ratios were obtained at large filter bandwidths (500 kHz) by both the quadrupolar echo and the Hadamard methods, although the excitation power differs by up to four orders in magnitude. Increasing the excitation power leads to systematic, noise-like features in Hadamard spectra. In contrast to phase modulation, simulations indicate that for amplitude modulation of the pseudorandom excitation, the pulse sequence burns a saturation hole into the lineshape at the carrier frequency. Violation of the cyclicity requirement by introduction of a recycle delay between successive Hadamard scans results in a high-frequency noise contribution. Finite pulse widths are shown not to cause significant spectral distortions.

  20. Conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites LaNaY and HY investigated by gas chromatography and in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, M.; Horvath, T.

    1997-04-01

    The conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites HY and LaNaY has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions using a new MAS NMR microreactor with cylindrical catalyst bed. At reaction temperatures of T = 373 K and T = 393 K a propan-2-ol conversion of 50 and 100%, respectively, and the formation of propene, diisopropyl. ether, and small amounts of acetone was determined by GC. Applying in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy, the initial step of the reaction was found to be the physisorption of propan-2-ol on Bronsted acid sites. A formation of isopropoxy species could be excluded by {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy indicated that the Bronsted acid sites of the zeolites LaNaY and HY were hydrated by water molecules in the first part of the induction period. These water molecules were formed in result of the propan-2-ol dehydration. The strong low-field shift of the {sup 1}H MAS NMR signals of the hydrated Bronsted acid sites is due to a partial protonation of adsorbed water molecules. At T = 393 K, a significant {sup 13}C MAS NMR signal of strongly bonded acetone molecules appeared at 220 ppm in the spectra of zeolites LaNaY and HY. As demonstrated by propan-2-ol conversion on a partially dealuminated zeolite HY, this by-reaction is promoted by extra-framework aluminium species. The formation of coke precursors which caused {sup 13}C MAS NMR signals at 10-50 ppm is explained by an oligomerization of propene. In situ {sup 13}C MAS NMR experiments carried out under a continuous flow of propene showed that the above-mentioned coke precursors are also formed on partially rehydrated zeolite HY. 25 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Signal Words

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signal Words? Signal words are found on pesticide product labels, and they describe the acute (short-term) toxicity ... red letters on the front panel of the product label. 2,4 Acute Oral LD 50 Inhalation LC ...

  2. Application of high-performance liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance coupling to the identification of limonoids from mahogany tree (Switenia macrophylla, Meliaceae) by stopped-flow 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schefer, Alexandre B; Braumann, Ulrich; Tseng, Li-Hong; Spraul, Manfred; Soares, Marisi G; Fernandes, João B; da Silva, Maria F G F; Vieira, Paulo C; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2006-09-22

    Separation and characterization of limonoids from Switenia macrophylla (Meliaceae) by HPLC-NMR technique has been described. Analyses were carried out using reversed-phase gradient HPLC elution coupled to NMR (600 MHz) spectrometer in stopped-flow mode. Separated peaks were collected into an interface unit prior to NMR measurements, which were performed with suppression of solvent signals by shaped pulses sequences. Structure elucidation of the limonoids was attained by data obtained from 1H NMR, TOCSY, gHSQC and gHMBC spectra without conventional isolation that is usually applied in natural products studies. PMID:16904679

  3. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  4. 14 N NMR of tetrapropylammonium based crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, E.; Mineva, T.; Gaveau, P.; Alonso, B.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated using 14N NMR different types of materials containing tetrapropylammonium cations. We consider the tetrapropylammonium bromide crystal as well as two different microporous materials silicalite-1 and AlPO-5, with MFI and AFI topology respectively, where the tetrapropylammonium cation plays the role of structure directing agent. 14N NMR quadrupolar coupling parameters were determined experimentally for all the crystals. In addition calculations based on Density Functional Theory with empirical dispersion (DFT-D) were performed on the MFI type zeolite. The sensitivity of the 14N quadrupolar coupling parameters to the spatial distribution of the anions in the zeolite's framework is emphasized.

  5. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  6. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  7. NMR investigation of the quantum pigeonhole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S., Anjusha; Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    NMR quantum simulators have been used for studying various quantum phenomena. Here, using a four-qubit NMR quantum simulator, we investigate the recently postulated quantum pigeonhole effect. In this phenomenon, a set of three particles in a two-path interferometer often appears to be in such a superposition that no two particles can be assigned a single path, thus exhibiting the nonclassical behavior. In our experiments, quantum pigeons are emulated by three nuclear qubits whose states are probed jointly and noninvasively by an ancillary spin. The experimental results are in good agreement with quantum theoretical predictions.

  8. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  9. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. PMID:26549846

  10. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  11. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  12. Metabolite localization in living drosophila using High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Joudiou, Nicolas; Louat, Fanny; Yon, Maxime; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Même, Sandra; Massiot, Dominique; Decoville, Martine; Fayon, Franck; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    We have developed new methods enabling in vivo localization and identification of metabolites through their 1H NMR signatures, in a drosophila. Metabolic profiles in localized regions were obtained using HR-MAS Slice Localized Spectroscopy and Chemical Shift Imaging at high magnetic fields. These methods enabled measurement of metabolite contents in anatomic regions of the fly, demonstrated by a decrease in β-alanine signals in the thorax of flies showing muscle degeneration. PMID:25892587

  13. Metabolite localization in living drosophila using High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Joudiou, Nicolas; Louat, Fanny; Yon, Maxime; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Même, Sandra; Massiot, Dominique; Decoville, Martine; Fayon, Franck; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    We have developed new methods enabling in vivo localization and identification of metabolites through their (1)H NMR signatures, in a drosophila. Metabolic profiles in localized regions were obtained using HR-MAS Slice Localized Spectroscopy and Chemical Shift Imaging at high magnetic fields. These methods enabled measurement of metabolite contents in anatomic regions of the fly, demonstrated by a decrease in β-alanine signals in the thorax of flies showing muscle degeneration. PMID:25892587

  14. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  15. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  16. Total assignment and structure in solution of tetrandrine by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevand, André; Stanculescu, Ioana; Mandravel, Cristina; Woisel, Patrice; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution 1- and 2D NMR spectra of tetrandrine and molecular modelling were employed to characterise its structure in solution. Complete and unambiguous assignment of all proton and carbon resonance signals is reported. Scalar couplings were determined from dihedral angles with the Karplus equation. Inter-proton distances were evaluated from NOE correlation peaks. Comparison of simulated and X-ray conformations of tetrandrine reveals only small differences.

  17. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Perras, Frédéric A; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J; Dumesic, James A; Shanks, Brent H; Pruski, Marek

    2016-01-31

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticle catalysts. By offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of (13)C-(13)C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface. PMID:26675287

  18. NMR as a method to determine water content changes in the upper soil layer during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Steffen; Pohlmeier, Andreas; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Water exchange between bare soil and atmosphere is controlled by evaporation. In the topmost soil layer moisture content and hydraulic conductivity may change strongly and capillary film flow (stage I) from saturated regions to the surface discontinues. Evaporation is now mainly driven by vapor diffusion through a dry layer (stage II). Water vaporizes in the unsaturated zone inside the soil what strongly reduces the evaporation rate and also soil surface temperature to a considerable amount. The dynamics of the transition from stage I to stage II as well as film flow and vapor diffusion at low water contents have received little attention. In this study we investigated water content changes in the uppermost soil layer with high spatial resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR is a feasible noninvasive method where the received signal of hydrogen protons allows conclusions on moisture and pore size distribution. The overall aim is to apply a mobile nuclear magnetic resonance surface sensor (NMR-MOUSE) directly for field measurements. This sensor has a max. measurement depth of 25 mm and operates at a Larmor frequency of 13.4 MHz. The general challenges of NMR in soils are the inherent fast transversal relaxation times of the soil matrix especially next to the residual moisture content. Therefore, as a first step of validation we applied and compared NMR-MOUSE measurements with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an initially saturated sand column. The column was evaporated over 67 days and water content profiles were recorded by 1D-T2 relaxation measurements using the NMR-MOUSE as well as different 3D-MRI sequences during drying. Firstly, we report on the sensitivities and limits of the different devices and measurement sequences. Considering these data, we could monitor that over a period of 58 days the moisture decreased rather uniform until the onset of stage II. Thereafter, a dry surface layer developed and a retreating drying front was observed.

  19. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by [sup 31]P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G. )

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used [sub 31]P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.[sup 31]P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different [sup 31]P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a [sup 31]P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe[sub 2]CMe[sub 2]O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G.

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used {sub 31}P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.{sup 31}P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different {sup 31}P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a {sup 31}P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  1. Estimation of procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavanol ratios of condensed tannin fractions by 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy: Correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of cross-peak contours of H/C-2’,6’ signals from prodelphinidin (PD) and of H/C-6’ signals from procyanidin (PC) units in 1H-13C HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of condensed tannins yielded nuclei-adjusted PC/PD estimates that were highly correlated with PC/PD ratios obtain...

  2. Strategy for Enhancement of (13)C-Photo-CIDNP NMR Spectra by Exploiting Fractional (13)C-Labeling of Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Joshi, Monika; Illarionov, Boris; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Lukaschek, Michail; Kothe, Gerd; Budisa, Nediljko; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2015-10-29

    The photo-CIDNP effect has proven to be useful to strongly enhance NMR signals of photochemically active proteins simply by irradiation with light. The evolving characteristic patterns of enhanced absorptive and emissive NMR lines can be exploited to elucidate the photochemistry and photophysics of light-driven protein reactions. In particular, by the assignment of (13)C NMR resonances, redox-active amino acids may be identified and thereby electron-transfer pathways unraveled, in favorable cases, even with (13)C at natural abundance. If signal enhancement is weak, uniform (13)C isotope labeling is traditionally applied to increase the signal strength of protein (13)C NMR. However, this typically leads to cross relaxation, which transfers light-induced nuclear-spin polarization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, thereby preventing an unambiguous analysis of the photo-CIDNP effect. In this contribution, two isotope labeling strategies are presented; one leads to specific but ubiquitous (13)C labeling in tryptophan, and the other is based on fractional isotope labeling affording sets of isotopologs with low probability of next-neighbor isotope accumulation within individual tryptophan molecules. Consequently, cross relaxation is largely avoided while the signal enhancement by (13)C enrichment is preserved. This results in significantly simplified polarization patterns that are easier to analyze with respect to the generation of light-generated nuclear-spin polarization. PMID:26244593

  3. Tannin fingerprinting in vegetable tanned leather by solid state NMR spectroscopy and comparison with leathers tanned by other processes.

    PubMed

    Romer, Frederik H; Underwood, Andrew P; Senekal, Nadine D; Bonnet, Susan L; Duer, Melinda J; Reid, David G; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2011-01-01

    Solid state ¹³C-NMR spectra of pure tannin powders from four different sources--mimosa, quebracho, chestnut and tara--are readily distinguishable from each other, both in pure commercial powder form, and in leather which they have been used to tan. Groups of signals indicative of the source, and type (condensed vs. hydrolyzable) of tannin used in the manufacture are well resolved in the spectra of the finished leathers. These fingerprints are compared with those arising from leathers tanned with other common tanning agents. Paramagnetic chromium (III) tanning causes widespread but selective disappearance of signals from the spectrum of leather collagen, including resonances from acidic aspartyl and glutamyl residues, likely bound to Cr (III) structures. Aluminium (III) and glutaraldehyde tanning both cause considerable leather collagen signal sharpening suggesting some increase in molecular structural ordering. The ²⁷Al-NMR signal from the former material is consistent with an octahedral coordination by oxygen ligands. Solid state NMR thus provides easily recognisable reagent specific spectral fingerprints of the products of vegetable and some other common tanning processes. Because spectra are related to molecular properties, NMR is potentially a powerful tool in leather process enhancement and quality or provenance assurance. PMID:21278677

  4. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphingomyelin and its hydrogenated derivative, dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) are interacted with Ca2+ ions to develop human cataracts. Previously, we have investigated conformational differences between an isolated SM/DHSM molecule and Ca2+-coordinated form by using density functional theory (DFT) for geometry optimization and normal mode analysis. As a result, one of stable conformers of SMs has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group and phosphate group, whereas another conformer has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl and phosphate amide group. In this study, 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) shielding constants of the obtained conformers are investigated by using ab initio and DFT with NMR-gauge invariant atomic orbitals (NMR-GIAO) calculations. The experimental 31P-NMR chemical shifts of SMs and DHSMs have significant small value around 0.1 ppm. We consider the relative conformational changes between SMs and DHSMs affect the slight deviations of 31P-NMR chemical shifts, and discuss intramolecular hydrogen bondings and the solvent effect in relation to NMR experimental reference.

  5. The application of HPLC and microprobe NMR spectroscopy in the identification of metabolites in complex biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhaoxia; Jin, Mengxia; Liu, Xia; Guo, Wei; Jin, Xiangju; Liu, Hongyue; Wang, Yinghong

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics can be used directly to identify a variety of metabolites in biological fluids and tissues. Metabolite analysis is an important part of life science and metabolomics research. However, the identification of some metabolites using NMR spectroscopy remains a big challenge owing to low abundance or signal overlap. It is important to develop a method to measure these compounds accurately. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, metabolite prediction software packages, and spike-in experiments with authentic standards are often used to solve these problems, but they are costly and time-consuming. In this study, methods were developed to identify metabolites in complex biological mixtures using both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and off-line microprobe NMR spectroscopy. With use of these methods, 83 and 73 metabolites were identified in Sprague Dawley rat urine and feces, respectively. Among them, 40 and 45 metabolites, respectively, could not be identified with traditional NMR methods. Our research revealed that the combination of HPLC and NMR techniques could significantly improve the accuracy of trace and overlapped metabolite identification, while offering an effective and convenient approach to identify potential biomarkers in complex biological systems. PMID:25814271

  6. Microfabricated Inserts for Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) Wireless NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Badilita, Vlad; Fassbender, Birgit; Kratt, Kai; Wong, Alan; Bonhomme, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Korvink, Jan G.; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS) NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i) reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii) improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the “magic angle” of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning – MAS), accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii) given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz) involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz) testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds. PMID:22936994

  7. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS) wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Badilita, Vlad; Fassbender, Birgit; Kratt, Kai; Wong, Alan; Bonhomme, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Korvink, Jan G; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS) NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i) reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii) improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS), accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii) given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz) involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz) testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds. PMID:22936994

  8. Optimization and stabilization of Rho small GTPase proteins for solution NMR studies: The case of Rnd1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Buck, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    Rho GTPases of the Ras superfamily have important roles in regulating the organization of the actin filament system, morphogenesis and migration of cells. Structural details for these proteins are still emerging, and information on their dynamics in solution is much needed to understand the mechanisms underlying their signaling functions. This report reviews conditions for solution NMR studies of Rho GTPases and describes our optimization and stabilization of Rnd1 for such experiments. Rnd1 belongs to the Rnd protein subfamily branch of Rho small GTPases and functions in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development and in axon guidance. However, as we report here, solution NMR studies of this protein are challenging. Multiple methods have been employed to enhance the stability of Rnd1, including by cleavage of an N-terminal His expression tag and by addition of non-hydrolysable GMPPNP (β: γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate) nucleotide. Further stabilization of Rnd1 against aggregation was achieved through a structure informed point mutation while maintaining its conformation and binding affinity for a partner protein. The NMR spectrum of the optimized protein reveals significant improvement in NMR signal dispersion and intensity. This work paves the way for structural and protein-protein/protein-ligand interaction studies of Rnd1 by solution NMR and also provides a guide for optimization and stabilization of other Rho GTPases. PMID:22545226

  9. Proton and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen ion-dependent pseudo-halide ion binding to chloroperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Goff, H.M.

    1986-12-15

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of several chloroperoxidase-inhibitor complexes have been investigated. Titrations of chloroperoxidase with azide, thiocyanate, cyanate, or nitrite ions indicate that only the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex exhibits slow ligand exchange on the 360-MHz NMR time scale. The temperature dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the complexes suggests that, although the complexes are predominantly low-spin ferric heme iron, a spin equilibrium is present presumably between S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 states. The pH dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the psuedo-halide-chloroperoxidase complexes was examined at 360 and 90 MHz. Chloroperoxidase complexes with azide and cyanate show similar behavior; 360-MHz proton spectra are readily observed at low pH (less than 5.0) but not at high pH. At high pH, the ligand exchange rate falls in an intermediate time range. When the complexes are examined at 90 MHz, however, spectra consisting of averaged signals are observed. The chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex does not form at high pH values; the proton NMR spectrum observed is that of native chloroperoxidase. The pKa for the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate heme-linked ionizable amino acid residue falls between 4.2 and 5.0. Only an averaged azide signal was observed in the nitrogen-15 NMR spectra for solutions that contained the azide complex of chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and myoglobin.

  10. Proton and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen ion-dependent pseudo-halide ion binding to chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lukat, G S; Goff, H M

    1986-12-15

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of several chloroperoxidase-inhibitor complexes have been investigated. Titrations of chloroperoxidase with azide, thiocyanate, cyanate, or nitrite ions indicate that only the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex exhibits slow ligand exchange on the 360-MHz NMR time scale. The temperature dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the complexes suggests that, although the complexes are predominantly low-spin ferric heme iron, a spin equilibrium is present presumably between S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 states. The pH dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the psuedo-halide-chloroperoxidase complexes was examined at 360 and 90 MHz. Chloroperoxidase complexes with azide and cyanate show similar behavior; 360-MHz proton spectra are readily observed at low pH (less than 5.0) but not at high pH. At high pH, the ligand exchange rate falls in an intermediate time range. When the complexes are examined at 90 MHz, however, spectra consisting of averaged signals are observed. The chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex does not form at high pH values; the proton NMR spectrum observed is that of native chloroperoxidase. The pKa for the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate heme-linked ionizable amino acid residue falls between 4.2 and 5.0. Only an averaged azide signal was observed in the nitrogen-15 NMR spectra for solutions that contained the azide complex of chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and myoglobin. PMID:3023353

  11. NMR studies on interaction of lauryl maltoside with cytochrome c oxidase: a model for surfactant interaction with the membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda; Das, Tapan Kanti; Majumdar, Ananya; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2002-07-25

    Interaction of lauryl maltoside (LM) surfactant with bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) has been studied by NMR techniques. Detailed 2-D (1)H and (13)C NMR techniques were used to assign the NMR signals of the surfactant nuclei. Paramagnetic dipolar shift of the surfactant (13)C NMR signals were used to identify the atoms close to the enzyme. The diamagnetic carbon monoxide complex of CcO did not cause any shift in the surfactant NMR spectra suggesting that the paramagnetic centres of the native CcO cause the shifts by dipolar interactions. The results showed that the polar head groups of the surfactant comprised of two maltoside rings are more affected, while the hydrophobic tail groups did not show any significant change on binding of the surfactant to the enzyme. This indicated that surfactant head groups possibly bind to the enzyme surface and the hydrophobic tail of the surfactant forms micelles and remains away from the enzyme. Based on the results, we propose that the membrane bound enzyme is possibly stabilised in aqueous solution by association with the micelles of the neutral surfactant so that the polar heads of the micelles bind to the polar surface of the enzyme. These micelles might form a 'belt like' structure around the enzyme helping it to remain monodispersed in the active form. PMID:12121768

  12. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate silica fume mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J. M.; de Aza, A. H.; Turrillas, X.; Sobrados, I.; Sanz, J.

    2008-08-01

    Partially deuterated Ca 3Al 2(SiO 4) y(OH) 12-4y-Al(OH) 3 mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca 3Al 2O 6 (C 3A), Ca 12Al 14O 33 (C 12A 7) and CaAl 2O 4 (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by 29Si and 27Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca 3Al 2(OH) 12 and Al(OH) 3 phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of 27Al NMR signals, the Al(OH) 3/Ca 3Al 2(OH) 12 ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca 3Al 2(SiO 4) 3-x(OH) 4x, was followed by 27Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of 27Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH) 6 and Al(OSi)(OH) 5 environments. The 29Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From 29Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures.

  13. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  14. A Primer of Fourier Transform NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Roger S.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a new spectroscopic technique that is often omitted from undergraduate curricula because of lack of instructional materials. Therefore, information is provided to introduce students to the technique of data collection and transformation into the frequency domain. (JN)

  15. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  16. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  17. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  18. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  19. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  1. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  2. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  3. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:26845204

  4. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  5. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  6. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  7. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  8. Dynalets: a new method for modelling and compressing biological signals. Applications to physiological and molecular signals.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, Jacques; Hansen, Olivier; Hamie, Ali; Franco, Céline; Sutton, Brian; Cohen, Elie-Paul

    2014-11-01

    The biological information coming from electrophysiologic sensors like ECG, pulse sensor or from molecular signal devices like NMR spectrometry has to be visualized and manipulated in a compressed way for an efficient medical use by clinicians, if stored in scientific data bases or in personalized patient records repositories. Here, we define a new transform called Dynalet based on Liénard ordinary differential equations susceptible to model the mechanism at the source of the studied signal, and we propose to apply this new technique first to the modelling and compression of real biological periodic signals like ECG and pulse rhythm. We consider that the cardiovascular activity results from the summation of cellular oscillators located in the cardiac sinus node and we show that, as a result, the van der Pol oscillator (a particular Liénard system) fits well the ECG signal and the pulse signal. The reconstruction of the original signal (pulse or ECG) using Dynalet transform is then compared with that of Fourier, counting the number of parameters to be set for obtaining an expected signal-to-noise ratio. Then, we apply the Dynalet transform to the modelling and compression of molecular spectra obtained by protein NMR spectroscopy. The reconstruction of the original signal (peak) using Dynalet transform is again compared with that of Fourier. After reconstructing visually the peak, we propose to periodize the signal and give it to hear, the whole process being called the protein "stethoscope". PMID:25444705

  9. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of

  10. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint. PMID:20513646

  11. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  12. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  13. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    PubMed Central

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5–15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  14. An efficient spectra processing method for metabolite identification from 1H-NMR metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Daniel; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick

    2013-06-01

    The spectra processing step is crucial in metabolomics approaches, especially for proton NMR metabolomics profiling. During this step, noise reduction, baseline correction, peak alignment and reduction of the 1D (1)H-NMR spectral data are required in order to allow biological information to be highlighted through further statistical analyses. Above all, data reduction (binning or bucketing) strongly impacts subsequent statistical data analysis and potential biomarker discovery. Here, we propose an efficient spectra processing method which also provides helpful support for compound identification using a new data reduction algorithm that produces relevant variables, called buckets. These buckets are the result of the extraction of all relevant peaks contained in the complex mixture spectra, rid of any non-significant signal. Taking advantage of the concentration variability of each compound in a series of samples and based on significant correlations that link these buckets together into clusters, the method further proposes automatic assignment of metabolites by matching these clusters with the spectra of reference compounds from the Human Metabolome Database or a home-made database. This new method is applied to a set of simulated (1)H-NMR spectra to determine the effect of some processing parameters and, as a proof of concept, to a tomato (1)H-NMR dataset to test its ability to recover the fruit extract compositions. The implementation code for both clustering and matching steps is available upon request to the corresponding author. PMID:23525538

  15. Analysis of electron donors in photosystems in oxygenic photosynthesis by photo-CIDNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Najdanova, M; Janssen, G J; de Groot, H J M; Matysik, J; Alia, A

    2015-11-01

    Both photosystem I and photosystem II are considerably similar in molecular architecture but they operate at very different electrochemical potentials. The origin of the different redox properties of these RCs is not yet clear. In recent years, insight was gained into the electronic structure of photosynthetic cofactors through the application of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) with magic-angle spinning NMR (MAS NMR). Non-Boltzmann populated nuclear spin states of the radical pair lead to strongly enhanced signal intensities that allow one to observe the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect from both photosystem I and II from isolated reaction center of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and duckweed (Spirodela oligorrhiza) and from the intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis by (13)C and (15)N MAS NMR. This review provides an overview on the photo-CIDNP MAS NMR studies performed on PSI and PSII that provide important ingredients toward reconstruction of the electronic structures of the donors in PSI and PSII. PMID:26282679

  16. Characterisation of oxygen permeation into a microfluidic device for cell culture by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-05-24

    A compact microfluidic device for perfusion culture of mammalian cells under in situ metabolomic observation by NMR spectroscopy is presented. The chip is made from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and uses a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane to allow gas exchange. It is integrated with a generic micro-NMR detector developed recently by our group [J. Magn. Reson., 2016, 262, 73-80]. While PMMA is an excellent material in the context of NMR, PDMS is known to produce strong background signals. To mitigate this, the device keeps the PDMS away from the detection area. The oxygen permeation into the device is quantified using a flow chemistry approach. A solution of glucose is mixed on the chip with a solution of glucose oxidase, before flowing through the gas exchanger. The resulting concentration of gluconate is measured by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a function of flow rate. An oxygen equilibration rate constant of 2.4 s(-1) is found for the device, which is easily sufficient to maintain normoxic conditions in a cell culture at low perfusion flow rates. PMID:27149932

  17. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-01

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure. PMID:26365800

  18. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  19. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated. PMID:25429955

  20. In Situ Detection of Subsurface Biofilm Using Low-Field NMR: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Catherine M; Herrling, Maria P; Hiebert, Randy; Bender, Andrew T; Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David O; Codd, Sarah L

    2015-09-15

    Subsurface biofilms are central to bioremediation of chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater whereby micro-organisms degrade or sequester environmental pollutants like nitrate, hydrocarbons, chlorinated solvents and heavy metals. Current methods to monitor subsurface biofilm growth in situ are indirect. Previous laboratory research conducted at MSU has indicated that low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is sensitive to biofilm growth in porous media, where biofilm contributes a polymer gel-like phase and enhances T2 relaxation. Here we show that a small diameter NMR well logging tool can detect biofilm accumulation in the subsurface using the change in T2 relaxation behavior over time. T2 relaxation distributions were measured over an 18 day experimental period by two NMR probes, operating at approximately 275 kHz and 400 kHz, installed in 10.2 cm wells in an engineered field testing site. The mean log T2 relaxation times were reduced by 62% and 43%, respectively, while biofilm was cultivated in the soil surrounding each well. Biofilm growth was confirmed by bleaching and flushing the wells and observing the NMR signal's return to baseline. This result provides a direct and noninvasive method to spatiotemporally monitor biofilm accumulation in the subsurface. PMID:26308099