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  1. A Preliminary Investigation of Dual Mode Fracture Sustained by Graphite/Epoxy Laminates Impacted by High-Velocity Spherical Metallic Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    systems .. ............................. 8 Figure 3 Load vs displacement signals for static and dynamic cases . .................................. 8 Figure...4 Energy vs displacement for static and dynamic cases . .................................. 9 Figure 5 Delamination length vs impact load for static...and dynamic cases ....................... 10 Figure 6 Impact energy vs energy loss behavior for 16-ply graphite/epoxy laminates supported on a 2.8-inch

  2. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Yale: the first one hundred fifty years, from Nathan Smith to Lee Buxton.

    PubMed Central

    Kohorn, E. I.

    1993-01-01

    The persons who directed the academic teaching of women's health at Yale Medical School are presented by biographical sketches recounting their achievements and some of the difficulties they encountered. Three who provided particular catalysis were Nathan Smith, Herbert Thoms, and Lee Buxton. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:8303913

  3. Missed cervical spine fracture-dislocations prior to manipulation: A review of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Nykoliation, J. W.; Cassidy, J. D.; Dupuis, P.; Yong-Hing, K.; Crnec, M.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of patients with fracture-dislocations of their cervical spines following forced flexion injuries are presented. All received cervical manipulation without proper clinical and radiographic evaluation. These cases stress the importance of a thorough examination prior to the application of manipulative therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13

  4. Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in the First Two Weeks of Life

    PubMed Central

    Bessolo, Rodney J.; Vincent, William R.

    1969-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of congenital heart disease which presents cyanosis or respiratory distress, or both, in the first two weeks of life, is difficult. Close correlation of clinical features, electrocardiogram and chest roentgenogram is most helpful. The diagnosis of congenital heart disease should lead to immediate cardiac catheterization, angiocardiography and appropriate therapy. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:5773478

  5. Life-Threatening Dermatoses

    PubMed Central

    Cram, David L.

    1973-01-01

    Four life-threatening dermatoses—Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Kaposi's varicelliform eruption and purpura fulminans—are unique in their abrupt onset and rapid progress to death, but prompt diagnosis and proper therapy can often cure the condition or prevent undesirable sequelae. Since two of the four conditions can follow the use of a variety of drugs and all may be secondary to an infectious agent, any physician may encounter them in practice and should be aware of their seriousness. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:4701711

  6. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  7. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Mathias, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues. All health-care workers, including physicians and dental personnel, may be instrumental in recognizing risk factors associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Oral signs and symptoms of HIV infection may be the first presentation of the disease or may develop during the course of the disease and require management. Knowledge of the signs, symptoms and associated infections and tumours is needed to assist in recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13 PMID:21253078

  8. Heartrate Response to a Single Submaximal Workload (Astrand’s Test) as an Estimate of Maximal Oxygen Uptake in British Servicemen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    Sercemen 23 6 FIGURE 1 7 Estimated max 102 and measured (treadmill) max 10ý - Athletes 25 8 Duplicated tests - estimated max 102 26 8 FIGURE 2 9 FIGURE 3 10...FIGURE 4 11 Estimation of max VO.rom cycle load or from subtmaxlmal VO2 28 12 PUMr 5 13 Fuxsi 6 14 FIGURE 7 15 "Diurnal Effects 32 16 FMIURE 8 17...Confirmatory criteria were increased respiratory quotient, and heartate near ago-predicted maximum . Lt study 6 blood samples were taken after each rui from

  9. TREATMENT OF DIFFICULT AND INVOLVED COLLES' FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Francis J.; Meier, August W.

    1951-01-01

    Of 105 cases of Colles' fracture, 86 were treated by closed reduction and plaster immobilization alone; 19 cases in which the fractures were more severe were treated by fixed skeletal traction using an external skeletal traction splint. Despite the greater severity of the lesions, the end results, both anatomic and functional, were generally better in those cases in which skeletal traction was used than in those treated by closed reduction. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:14801716

  10. A proposal for a standardized system of reporting human lymph node morphology in relation to immunological function

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, H.; Turk, J.; Sobin, L.

    1972-01-01

    This Memorandum proposes a standardized system of reporting the histology of human lymph nodes based on commonly used simple staining techniques. The purpose is to provide a uniform, internationally acceptable system by which the histological structure of lymph nodes can be correlated with other parameters of immunological status. The proposed protocols are intended to provide information that is not available in conventional written reports, that use such terms as “hyperplasia” or “nonspecific lymphadenitis”. ImagesFigure 22Figure 13Figure 5Figure 4Figure 3Figure 14Figure 15Figure 9Figure 21Figure 8Figure 12Figure 17Figure 16Figure 2Figure 7Figure 6Figure 20Figure 19Figure 11Figure 10Figure 18 PMID:4539822

  11. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  12. Characterization of two types of crystalloids in pleomorphic adenomas of minor salivary glands. A light-microscopic, electron-microscopic, and histochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, W. G.; Priest, R. E.; Weathers, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crystalloids have been previously described in salivary gland tumors. In order to ascertain the incidence of these structures, the authors reviewed a series of 294 minor salivary gland tumors. One hundred thirty pleomorphic adenomas were identified, and 6 of these contained crystalloids. No crystalloids were found in other benign or malignant salivary gland tumors. These six file cases and a recent seventh case containing crystalloids were studied by light and electron microscopy and with histochemistry. Two types of crystalloids were found. One case contained previously described tyrosine-rich crystalloids, and the other six contained crystalloids composed of radially arranged collagen fibers. Both types of crystalloids are further characterized and discussed. Images Figure 1-3 Figure 4-6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:2982270

  13. SPLENOPORTAGRAPHY IN PORTAL HYPERTENSION—Its Value in Selecting the Operative Procedure of Choice

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, William P.; Pattison, Arthur C.

    1957-01-01

    Splenoportagraphy has become an almost indispensable adjunct to the surgical management of portal hypertension. In many instances it will provide the basis for the selection of the operative procedure. Certain instances of intrahepatic portal hypertension due to cirrhosis that might better be managed by splenorenal shunt rather than by the generally preferred method of direct end-to-side portacaval shunt may be determined by this procedure. The procedure finds its greatest application in the accurate delineation of the three major types of extrahepatic portal hypertension, each of which demands a different surgical approach. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13.Figure 14. PMID:13413692

  14. Ophthalmologic complications of meningomyelocele: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, A W

    1990-01-01

    Patients with spina bifida have multiple ophthalmologic problems, many of which are preventable. Most of the problems are related to the hydrocephalus, which is caused by the coexisting Arnold-Chiari malformation. When patients are treated for hydrocephalus, and comprehensive eye care is available, 94% of the patients will have 6/12 visual acuity or better. Strabismus is common but it responds well to medical and surgical treatment. Children with spina bifida should have frequent examinations by an ophthalmologist who is familiar with the diagnosis and management of the defects recorded in this study. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:2095031

  15. Tonsillar mapping of determinants found on normal lymphoreticular (T,B,K, immature and macrophage) and myeloblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, E. M.; Stoneking, L.; Humphrey, G. B.; Rapacz, J.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal immunocytochemical method with 25 monoclonal antibodies was used to study the distribution in human tonsil of determinants expressed on T cells (mature and immature), Langerhans cells, B cells, killer/natural killer cells, macrophages, immature myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Many of the respective determinants were found to have a discrete topographic distribution in normal reactive tonsil. The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen and a determinant found on myeloblastic leukemia cells (My10) were not found in the specimens of the tonsil examined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2435159

  16. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  17. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  18. Orbital extension of choroidal melanoma: within a long posterior ciliary nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, J R

    1983-01-01

    Following enucleation, an epithelioid type of malignant choroidal melanoma involving the posterior pole was grossly and histologically found to exhibit direct extraocular extension along the emissary for the long posterior ciliary artery and nerve on the temporal side. In addition to a small tumor nodule on the outside of the sclera, melanoma extension was found up to the cut end in the otherwise well preserved ciliary nerve. After tenonectomy, additional extraocular melanoma extension in the core of this long posterior ciliary nerve was demonstrated for a total distance of 5 mm. As a result of the present findings, intraneural melanoma extension into the orbit by the way of a ciliary nerve has to be added to the other possible ways of direct extraocular melanoma extension. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:6676977

  19. Differences in ligamenta flava among some mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Ponseti, I. V.

    1995-01-01

    The ligamenta flava of the thoracolumbar spine of mammals with great spinal mobility have a larger content of elastin than in animals with little spinal motion. The elastin content is also higher in the ligamenta flava of mammals with arched backs and prolonged sitting posture than in nonsitting mammals with the vertebral column in the shape of a flat bow. The ligamentum flavum appears to be important; a) in the control of intervertebra movements, b) in providing intrinsic stability to the spine in the sitting and standing postures and c) in maintaining a smooth surface in the posterior wall of the spinal canal and neural foraminae. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:7634024

  20. Pulmonary ultrastructure of the late aspects of human paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, L. C.; Fairshter, R. D.; McRae, D. M.; Smith, W. R.; Glauser, F. L.; Wilson, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The pulmonary ultrastructure of the late aspects of a case of human paraquat poisoning is investigated and compared with normal human pulmonary ultrastructure. Alveoli in the paraquat patient are numerically reduced in comparison to the control. They are filled with edematous proteinaceous plasma-like fluid containing erythrocytes, macrophages, leukocytes, fibroblast-like cells, platelets, and fibrin. These alveoli are lined by granular pneumocytes. Interstitial areas in the paraquat patient are greatly expanded and there are no alveolar septums. Interstitial areas contain proteinaceous plasma-like material, collagen, fibrin, platelets, mature fibroblasts, plasma cells, many leukocytes, numerous erythrocytes, and capillaries. Capillary permeability seems to be enhanced in the paraquat patient either by vesicles forming transendothelial channels or pores or by disruption of endothelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3-7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:213978

  1. Expression of the bcl-2 gene product in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gaulard, P.; d'Agay, M. F.; Peuchmaur, M.; Brousse, N.; Gisselbrecht, C.; Solal-Celigny, P.; Diebold, J.; Mason, D. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Expression of bcl-2 protein was analyzed in 140 cases of follicular lymphoma by immunohistologic staining of paraffin-embedded tissue; 85% of cases were positive, the frequency being related to histologic grade (100% for the small-cleaved cell type, 86% for the mixed cell type, and 76% for the large cell group). There was striking heterogeneity of bcl-2 content in a number of cases and the smaller neoplastic cells (i.e., centrocytes) were usually the most strongly labeled. In most cases, bcl-2 protein staining was much weaker in normal lymphoid cells than in the neoplastic cells. In several cases, staining for bcl-2 revealed patterns of neoplastic cell spread into adjacent tissue (e.g., normal follicles, lymphoid sinuses), and bcl-2 protein expression tended to be highest in these migratory cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1374590

  2. Cerebral scintigraphy--the phoenix rises again.

    PubMed Central

    Shepstone, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of cerebral scintigraphy from its early days of planar imaging with simple technetium-99m labelled compounds to the recent revival of the technique in the form of positron-emission and single-photon emission tomography. A short explanation of instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals is given as a prelude to a description of both techniques in normal and pathological situations. Particular emphasis is placed on the more readily-available single-photon emission-tomographic techniques using labelled amines in the functional investigation of disorders not readily diagnosed by computed tomography. Images Figure 2(a) Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3047720

  3. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  4. Phagocytosis by cells of the pulmonary alveoli. Transformation of crystalline particles.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.

    1978-01-01

    The progressive transformation of illite crystals in alveolar macrophages has been studied with x-ray microanalysis and electron microdiffraction. Illite particles captured by macrophages undergo a series of progressive modifications which affect their ultrastructure, crystalline state, and chemical composition. Crystalline structure progressively disappears and certain elements are eliminated. At the end of the experiment, which lasted more than 6 months, the initial characteristics of the particles were greatly transformed. The constitutive elements of the illite particles were also found in structures other than macrophages: Type I pneumocytes, interstitium, and blood platelets. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 3 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 4 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:211849

  5. Experimental lead nitrate poisoning: microscopic and ultrastructural study of the gills of tench (Tinca tinca, L.).

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, V; Vincente, J A; Redondo, E; Gãzquez, A; Duran, E

    1990-01-01

    A microscopic, ultrastructural, and morphometric study was made of the gills of tench (Tinca tinca, L.) subjected to acute experimental lead nitrate poisoning. Twenty-one adult tench were subjected to poisoning and a further 22 were used as controls. Lesions were characterized by the appearance of edema and epithelial hyperplasia and necrosis, both in cells forming part of the filtration barrier and in those in the interlamellar space. These processes developed in the course of the experiment, leading to the death of tench after 12 to 15 days of exposure to 75 ppm lead nitrate, at which point the concentrations of lead in the gills had reached their maximum. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. PMID:2088740

  6. Application of Electron Diffraction to Biological Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Glaeser, Robert M.; Thomas, Gareth

    1969-01-01

    Three methods by which electron diffraction may be applied to problems in electron microscopy are discussed from a fundamental point of view, and experimental applications with biological specimens are demonstrated for each case. It is shown that wide-angle electron diffraction provides valuable information for evaluating specimen damage that can occur either during specimen preparation or while in the electron beam. Dark-field electron microscopy can be used both to enhance the image contrast and to provide highly restricted and therefore highly specific information about the object. Low-angle electron diffraction provides quantitative information about the object structure in the range from 20 A to ∼ 1000 A. Lowangle electron diffraction also demonstrates the important role of Fourier contrast with biological specimens, which are usually characterized by structural features with dimensions of 20 A or larger. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:4896898

  7. A historical perspective of thirteen unheralded contributors to medicodental progress.

    PubMed Central

    Dummett, C. O.

    1989-01-01

    Brief highlights of the careers of 13 Afro-American dentists have been presented. Their professional lives demonstrated both a commitment to the advancement of dentistry and a dedication to the betterment of humanity. Of the 13, three spent their professional lives exclusively in dental education, research, and public health. The remaining 10 were dental clinicians who served patients with competence, care, and concern. Additionally, they contributed to dentistry's image and progress by improving medicodental relations, pioneering in university dental education, engaging in philanthropy, qualifying for dental specialties, exerting leadership in dental professional organizations, integrating dentistry in hospital care, solving community health problems, and participating in all aspects of dental journalism. A sizable portion of their energies was expended in enhancing the quality of life in their communities and the nation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2651678

  8. Embryonic rationale for the primary correction of classical congenital clefts of the lip and palate.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Primary correction of congenital clefts of the lip and palate should be designed to carry the interrupted embryonic process to normal completion. This is best accomplished by maxillary alignment with presurgical orthodontics, stabilisation of the maxillary alignment, obliteration of the alveolar cleft and construction of the nasal floor with periosteoplasty. This allows early construction of the lip by rotation and advancement and correction of the nose with columella lengthening, alar cartilage positioning and alar base cinching. This can be accomplished before school age. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:8017808

  9. Rainfall, Streamflow, and Water-Quality Data During Stormwater Monitoring, Halawa Stream Drainage Basin, Oahu, Hawaii, July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    8 Figure 4. Stream discharge at Xeriscape garden station (16226200) for July 1 to September 30, 2004 ……………………………………………………………………………… 9 Figure 5...the 3-hour period from 17:00 to 20:00 October 30, 2004 ………………………………………… 10 Figure 6. Stream discharge at Xeriscape garden station (16226200) for...period from 00:00 to 12:00 December 27, 2004 ……………………………………………………………………………… 12 Figure 8. Stream discharge at Xeriscape garden station (16226200) for

  10. Inhaled particles in human disease and animal models: use of electron beam instrumentation.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, A R

    1984-01-01

    The mineral pneumoconioses (lung disease caused by inhalation of inorganic dust) have been an important disease entity for centuries. In the last several decades, the electron microscope has been used to elucidate the distribution and identification of inhaled minerals, to aid in establishing etiologic factors, and less commonly, to determine the basic biologic mechanisms through which inhaled minerals cause lung disease. In this section, I review the instrumentation and tissue preparation currently used to address some modern problems in particle-induced lung disease. For example, human pneumoconioses of undetermined etiology can be clarified by electron microscopy and X-ray energy spectrometry. In addition, the initial deposition patterns of asbestos and silica are demonstrated in animal models, and the contributions of electron microscopy in establishing the initial lesions of asbestosis are described. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. PMID:6090114

  11. Development of In-Plane Surface Deformation Sensing for Thin Film PVDF Actuated Membrane Mirrors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Method (1) This method places the deformable mirror in one arm of a Twyman -Green interferometer . The data from the interferometer is then analyzed...9 Figure 5: Setup of the Interferometer Method (1) ........................................................................ 10 Figure 6: Design of a... interferometer and fringe pattern analysis. Figure 5 shows the setup of the optical train of this method. 10 Figure 5: Setup of the Interferometer

  12. Primary tumors of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B. B.; Ukah, F.; Tette, A.; Villaflor, S. G.; Koh, D.; Seton, P.

    1992-01-01

    Primary tumors of the liver that are of clinical significance are rare. Ninety-five percent of such lesions when encountered will be malignant and only 5% will be benign. Malignant primary hepatic lesions represent 2% to 3% of primary cancers encountered in the United States. Hepatocellular carcinoma constitutes 90% of malignant liver primaries in the adult. Seventy-five percent of cases are associated with cirrhosis of the liver and patients with hepatitis B infection have a 33- to 200-fold excess risk for this malignancy. Cholangiocarcinoma represents 5% to 10% of hepatic primary malignancies while hepatoblastoma is distinctly uncommon in adults. Treatment is primarily surgical, and resectability is limited by the presence of cirrhosis and spread of the tumor within and outside of the liver. Of the benign liver tumors, the liver cell adenoma seem to be associated with oral contraception and have a proclivity for intraperitoneal hemorrhage, especially during pregnancy. Focal nodular hyperplasia is a tumor-like condition that also may be associated with oral contraception. This article describes five cases, two of which had quite unique presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1602511

  13. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  14. Susceptible periods during embryogenesis of the heart and endocrine glands.

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, T W

    2000-01-01

    One of the original principles of teratology states that, "Susceptibility to teratogenesis varies with the developmental stage at the time of exposure to an adverse influence" [Wilson JG. Environment and Birth Defects. New York:Academic Press, 1973]. The time of greatest sensitivity encompasses the period of organ formation during weeks 3-8 following fertilization in human gestation. At this time, stem cell populations for each organ's morphogenesis are established and inductive events for the initiation of differentiation occur. Structural defects of the heart and endocrine system are no exception to this axiom and have their origins during this time frame. Although the function and maturation of these organs may be affected at later stages, structural defects and loss of cell types usually occur during these early phases of development. Thus, to determine critical windows for studying mechanisms of teratogenesis, it is essential to understand the developmental processes that establish these organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:10852854

  15. Periocular xanthogranulomas associated with severe adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A; Mills, M D; Hidayat, A A; Dallow, R L; Townsend, D J; Brinker, E A; Charles, N C

    1993-01-01

    This article describes six patients who presented, usually bilaterally, with yellow-orange, elevated, indurated, and nonulcerated xanthomatous eyelid lesions, typically extending into the anterior orbital fat, and sometimes involving the extraocular muscles and the lacrimal gland. Because the eyelids remained intact and because the process did not reach the deep orbital and perioptic connective tissues, visual acuity was well preserved. There is cosmetic morbidity and occasionally motility restriction with advancing involvement of the extraocular muscles. All patients had variably severe adult-onset asthma that required treatment with systemic prednisone and inhalants. No evidence of Erdheim-Chester disease was found in any patient, but the appearance in one patient, after 25 years of follow-up, of a separate subcutaneous necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous lesion in the mandibular region with an associated paraproteinemia, suggests that at least some of our cases might be a mild form of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. For this reason, we would suggest repeated periodic serum protein immunoelectrophoretic studies as well as evaluation for lymphoma. Therapy probably should consist of low doses of periorbital radiotherapy coupled with high doses of corticosteroids. Should this not be successful, then systemic administration of corticosteroids with chemotherapeutic agents might be efficacious, as in necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:8140711

  16. Suppression of local and systemic responses in streptococcal cell wall-induced acute inflammation of the air pouch by cyclosporine A. Comparison with the effects of two anti-inflammatory bis-benzimidazoles.

    PubMed Central

    Dieter Geratz, J.; Pryzwansky, K. B.; Schwab, J. H.; Anderle, S. K.; Tidwell, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Injection of streptococcus group A cell wall-derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide into a subcutaneous air pouch causes local outpouring of neutrophils and macrophages and distant hemopoietic proliferation in spleen and bone marrow. Cyclosporine A (CyA) suppressed neutrophil accumulation and all cell lines of hemopoiesis. trans-1,2-Bis(5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)ethene (BBE) also interfered with neutrophil exudation, yet reduced only the erythroid component of the hemopoietic process. The ethane analogue of BBE, on the other hand, did not prevent neutrophil emigration, but held down splenic erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis. All three compounds stimulated streptococcus group A cell wall-derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide uptake by pouch macrophages. CyA being the least active, BBE and its ethane analogue also produced a shift of wear-and-tear pigment from large numbers of small splenic macro-phages into small numbers of large macrophages. The pouch model is very useful in the study of anti-inflammatory compounds and has furnished the first evidence of CyA interference with massive neutrophilic infiltration and with hemopoietic signals. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8475995

  17. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  18. Intracellular viral localization in murine coxsackievirus-B3 myocarditis. Ultrastructural study by electron microscopic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Ukimura, A.; Deguchi, H.; Kitaura, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Hirasawa, M.; Kawamura, K.; Hirai, K.

    1997-01-01

    Group B Coxsackieviruses are a common cause of myocarditis. To detect the viral genome and its localization in the myocardium, we examined C3H/He mice with Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis on days 5, 8, and 14 after inoculation by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by in situ hybridization. Sense and antisense CVB3 RNA were detected in the myocardium of all mice up to day 14 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Light microscopic in situ hybridization with a cDNA probe for CVB3 showed clusters of positive signals in the areas of myocardial necrosis and cell infiltration. With electron microscopic in situ hybridization, CVB3 RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes, between the myofibrils, near the mitochondria, and in tubular or vesicular structures. Viral RNA was also detected in necrotic debris, in the cytoplasm of macrophages, and in the cytoplasm of interstitial fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CVB3 RNA is replicated in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes, transferred into tubular or vesicular structures, released into the interstitium, and phagocytosed by macrophages. Some positive signals were also detected in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes showing close contact with infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that the lymphocytes recognized virus-infected cardiocytes and caused cell-mediated immune cardiocyte damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:9176398

  19. Cortical and subcortical patterns of synaptophysinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Masliah, E.; Terry, R. D.; Alford, M.; DeTeresa, R.; Hansen, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Quantification of synaptophysinlike immunoreactivity is a valuable method for studying the presynaptic terminals in the normal and damaged nervous system. The present report shows that in the control brain, the predominant pattern of synaptic immunostaining in the neocortex was that of an evenly distributed densely granular immunolabeling of the neuropil, while in the paleocortex and in subcortical areas of the brain most of the presynaptic terminals were distributed along the dendritic arborizations or around the neuronal somata. The immunochemical and the immunohistochemical analysis of the Alzheimer's disease tissue showed that the frontal and parietal cortex presented the most severe and widespread loss, with a 45% loss in synaptophysin immunoreactivity. These areas showed an average 35% loss of large neurons. The visual cortex, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, nucleus basalis of Meynert, and locus ceruleus displayed some degree of loss, but to a lesser extent. In addition to this loss, the basic patterns of organization of the presynaptic terminals were altered, with the presence of abundant, enlarged synaptophysin-labeled terminals. This study further supports the role of synaptic pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 PMID:1899001

  20. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  1. An ultrastructural analysis of endothelial change paralleling platelet aggregation in a light/dye model of microvascular insult.

    PubMed Central

    Povlishock, J. T.; Rosenblum, W. I.; Sholley, M. M.; Wei, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Those microvascular endothelial events that parallel the evolution of platelet aggregation were evaluated in a well-controlled animal model. Cat pial microvessels were observed through a cranial window while local platelet aggregation was produced by intravenous injection of sodium fluorescein and simultaneous exposure of the pial vessels to light from a filtered mercury lamp that excited the fluorescein. The vessels were fixed in situ when the in vivo observations of a preselected vessel indicated early, intermediate, or advanced aggregation in that vessel. The preselected vessel was then harvested for ultrastructural study together with adjacent vessels from the illuminated field. These vessels and appropriate controls were compared in semiserial thin sections. The onset of platelet aggregation in both venules and arterioles was accompanied by focal endothelial lucency, vacuole formation, luminal membrane rupture, and swelling of the nuclear envelope. These changes were not found in control material. With intermediate aggregation these changes were more common, while with advanced aggregation these abnormalities occurred together with focal endothelial denudation. Thus, in this model denudation occurred only with advanced aggregation and was not a prerequisite for aggregation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6824062

  2. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Female Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Kevin E.; Arrigo, Christopher; Andrews, James R.; Clancy, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the rehabilitation program after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the female athlete. In addition, we will discuss 8 unique characteristics identified in the female athlete and specific training drills to address and correct the potentially deleterious effects of these unique characteristics. Background: The female athlete appears to be more susceptible to noncontact ACL injuries than the male athlete. There seem to be many differences between the female and male athlete that may contribute to the increased injury rate in the female athlete. These variations include anatomical and neuromuscular considerations and differences. Description: Based on the unique characteristics of the female athlete and the anatomical and neuromuscular dissimilarities, a specially designed rehabilitation program has been established for the female athlete after ACL surgery. Clinical Advantages: The rehabilitation drills discussed in this article challenge the neuromuscular system through proprioception, kinesthesia, dynamic joint stability, neuromuscular control, and perturbation training activities. Improving the female athlete's neuromuscular system will, we believe, expedite the injured athlete's recovery after ACL injury or surgery. Although the concepts discussed are part of a postoperative rehabilitation program after ACL surgery, these concepts may also be implemented as a preventive program to assist in reducing the incidence of ACL injuries in the female athlete. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13.Figure 14.Figure 15.Figure 16.Figure 17.Figure 18.Figure 19.Figure 20.Figure 21.Figure 22.Figure 23. PMID:16558561

  3. Ultrastructural studies on the gastrocnemius tendon of selenium-deficient ducklings.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeny, P. R.; Brown, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrastructural study of the changes occurring in the gastrocnemius tendon of normal and selenium-deficient ducklings from 1 to 12 days of age. The study revealed that the normal 1--8-day-old duckling tendon contained 2 morphologically distinct cell types and a third occurring at Days 8--12. The location of these cells within the endotendineum and fiber bundles and their morphologic characteristics are presented. Most cells showed cytologic alterations as early as 4 days on the deficient diet with progressive deterioration to Day 12. The various cell types showed a differential response to the deficiency. Changes included altered endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus and eventual cell rupture. The significance of these observations and their possible relationship to the etiology of selenium-deficiency-induced dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:7234963

  4. Familial canine dermatomyositis. Initial characterization of the cutaneous and muscular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Haupt, K. H.; Hegreberg, G. A.; Prieur, D. J.; Moore, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Familial canine dermatomyositis is a recently identified disease of collie dogs that resembles human juvenile dermatomyositis. The lesions in the skin and muscles obtained by biopsy from two litters of dogs were characterized for the purpose of determining the similarity of the lesions to those of human dermatomyositis. The cutaneous lesions began between 7 and 11 weeks of age and were present on the face, lips, ears, and skin over bony prominences of the limbs, feet, sternum, and tip of the tail. Histologically the cutaneous lesions frequently consisted of vesicles, pustules, and ulcers on the lips, face, and ears. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells, and macrophages were present throughout the dermis. Neutrophils and lymphocytes were also present in and around vessels. Between 13 and 19 weeks of age generalized muscle atrophy was noted. The muscle lesions consisted of interstitial lymphocyte, plasma cell, macrophage, and neutrophil accumulation; myofiber degeneration, regeneration, and atrophy; and fibrosis. Perivascular neutrophils, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were also seen. Histologically, the lesions resembled those present in human juvenile dermatomyositis; and these observations, coupled with clinical, immunologic, and clinical pathologic observations presented elsewhere, suggest that familial canine dermatomyositis is an appropriate and potentially useful model for human juvenile dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:6465285

  5. A brief history of historical scholarship in chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a cursory overview of attempts to discover, preserve and disseminate the history of the chiropractic profession, up to and including the organization of the Association for the History of Chiropractic (AHC). A surprisingly wide range of materials have been available for many decades, but sustained efforts at historical scholarship are more recent (past quarter century). The quality of these works has been uneven, but has improved with the emergence of chiropractic scholarly periodicals and interest from non-chiropractor investigators. Affiliates of the American-based AHC are located in Australia and Canada; organized historical scholarship in other regions of the world has yet to develop. Several substantial archival resources for historical investigations are available, and merit greater scrutiny and support within the profession. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25p136-ap136-bp136-cp136-dp136-e

  6. Streptococcus mutans-induced nephritis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Albini, B.; Nisengard, R. J.; Glurich, I.; Neiders, M. E.; Stinson, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous administration of disrupted Streptococcus mutans into rabbits over 23-76 weeks led to severe nephritis involving glomeruli, tubules, and interstitium. Light-microscopic observation of glomeruli documented diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis accompanied often (65%) by epithelial crescents. Electron-microscopic observation revealed humps in glomeruli of 70% of kidney specimens. In the glomeruli of some rabbits, extensive fibrin deposits and sclerosis were evident. Immunofluorescence showed linear, granular, often ribbonlike or patchy immune deposits encompassing, in order of decreasing frequency, C3, IgG, streptococcal antigen, IgA, and IgM. The histopathologic and immunohistologic features of the nephritis seen in rabbits given S mutans thus shows many features of Streptococcus-associated nephritides in man, in particular, the diffuse glomerular nephritis encountered in subacute bacterial endocarditis. Further, analysis of nephritis induced by administration of S mutans may have implications for the evaluation and purification of dental caries vaccines. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3976844

  7. Characterization of the choroidal mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, W A

    1987-01-01

    The experimental studies performed on nonpigmented rat choroids and the review of the important literature covered in this thesis seem to justify the following statements: 1. Mast cells are present in the choroid in significant numbers. 2. Mast cell numbers vary considerably from one individual to another and from one location in the choroid to another. 3. The major concentration of mast cells in the uvea is in the posterior choroid. 4. The mast cells of the choroid have a preferential location along arterial vessels. 5. Choroidal mast cell population density apparently decreases with senescence. 6. Mast cell products are present in sufficient quantity to exert substantial effects on physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory responses in the choroid. 7. Choroidal mast cell products are released with appropriate stimulation and share some properties with the connective-tissue mast cell. 8. Choroidal mast cell demonstrate enough differences to suggest that a local differentiation may be present and may represent a locally controlled modulating effect for choroidal physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory reactions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 PMID:3328921

  8. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  9. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of human and simian immunodeficiency viral antigens in fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Baskin, G. B.; Benveniste, R.; Harris, C. A.; Nara, P. L.; Rhodes, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    Antigens of human (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) were identified with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemistry in fixed surgical pathology and autopsy specimens of humans or monkeys with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With B-5 fixative, viral antigens were readily detected in lymph nodes of 8 of 13 patients with follicular hyperplasia, but in only 1 of 12 patients with follicular atrophy. Antigen was detected in follicular dendritic reticular cells and rare blastlike cells, extracellularly, and in postcapillary venules, medullary lymphocytes, sinus histiocytes, and macrophages in some lymph nodes. In the brain at autopsy, antigen could be found in gliomesenchymal-cell nodules, astrocytes, vascular endothelial cells, multinucleated cells, and astrocytes and macrophages associated with demyelination. In contrast, 4 rhesus monkeys with experimental SIV infection had abundant antigen in sinus histiocytes, macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells of lymph nodes and spleen and in thymic epithelial cells. Brain lesions of monkeys resembled those of humans, with antigen found in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Antibodies to HIV also were immunoreactive in formalin-fixed tissue sections of monkeys containing SIV antigens. The ABC technique provided a fast and efficient method for localizing HIV and SIV antigens in fixed surgical and autopsy specimens. These findings are consistent with those found with in situ hybridization, ultrastructural studies, frozen sections of lymph nodes, and permanent sections of brain. Images Figure 1 p[201]-b p[201]-c Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:3472469

  11. Ionescu-Shiley bovine pericardial bioprostheses. Histologic and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, S. L.; Ferrans, V. J.; McAllister, H. A.; Cooley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were done on the structural changes that develop in Ionescu-Shiley valves that are used as replacement heart valves for 4 to 8 years. These changes were compared with those found in similarly used porcine aortic valve (PAV) bioprostheses. A variety of morphologic differences were observed between bovine pericardial valve (BPV) and PAV bioprostheses after orthotopic implantation including: primary tissue failure associated with the use of an alignment suture, thickening of valve leaflet, leaflet tissue delamination, leaflet calcification, and dystrophic alterations of collagen. These findings indicate that valve design criteria directly influence the durability of pericardial valves. However, other factors unique to pericardial tissue also affect the durability and performance of BPVs. These factors include the inability of pericardial tissue to accommodate dynamic stresses; the extensive insudation of plasma proteins and lipids; and the inability to reduce leaflet calcification using agents that effectively mitigate calcification in PAV bioprostheses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:1580331

  12. Pulmonary response and transmigration of inorganic fibers by inhalation exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K. P.; Barras, C. E.; Griffith, F. D.; Waritz, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs were exposed by inhalation to different concentrations of potassium octatitanate fibers. Following 3 months of exposure, the animals were sacrificed between the 15th and 24th month. The exposed animals showed dose-related dust deposition and pulmonary fibrosis mainly in the respiratory bronchiolar region. Most short fibers (less than 5 micrograms) were phagocytized by alveolar macrophages, but long fibers (greater than 10 micrograms) were phagocytized by foreign body giant cells. Dust-laden macrophages (dust cells) entered into the lumen of bronchial lymphatic or pulmonary blood vessels. Numerous dust cells were transported from the lung to the tracheobronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes where some dust cells penetrated into the blood or lymphatic circulation. Massive direct cell migration of the mediastinal adipose tissue from the lymph nodes occurred occasionally. Dust-laden giant cells were found only occasionally in the liver, and there was widespread migration of the fibers into other vital organs and tissues without any significant responses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:7212016

  13. Structure of gramicidin A.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, B A

    1986-01-01

    Gramicidin A, a hydrophobic linear polypeptide, forms channels in phospholipid membranes that are specific for monovalent cations. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provided the first direct physical evidence that the channel conformation in membranes is an amino terminal-to-amino terminal helical dimer, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy has shown the sensitivity of its conformation to different environments and the structural consequences of ion binding. The three-dimensional structure of a gramicidin/cesium complex has been determined by x-ray diffraction of single crystals using single wavelength anomalous scattering for phasing. The left-handed double helix in this crystal form corresponds to one of the intermediates in the process of folding and insertion into membranes. Co-crystals of gramicidin and lipid that appear to have gramicidin in their membrane channel conformation have also been formed and are presently under investigation. Hence, we have used a combination of spectroscopic and diffraction techniques to examine the conformation and functionally-related structural features of gramicidin A. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:2420381

  14. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in relation to hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kameya, T.; Shimosato, Y.; Adachi, I.; Abe, K.; Kasai, N.; Kimura, K.; Baba, K.

    1977-01-01

    Eighteen cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid were analyzed immunohistochemically for calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells, and tumor cells in 8 cases were examined by an electron microscope and analyzed by manual and computer procedures with particular attention paid to the size and quality of secretory granules. Calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells were found singly or in clusters in 14 and 11 tumors, respectively. In 4 cases, calcitonin-positive cell clusters and an increase in number of singly scattered C cells were seen apart from the main tumor, suggesting a multicentric nature of certain medullary carcinomas. Some ACTH-containing cells were apparently also positive for calcitonin. In a case of familial Sipple disease, follicular lining cells were replaced in areas with ACTH-containing cells. Three to five frequency distribution curves of the size of secretory granules were obtained in all of 6 cases analyzed, and at least two different types of granule matrix were identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:202164

  15. Rehabilitation of a child with partial unilateral cryptophthalmos and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, H; Merriam, J C; Jones, I S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper describes the surgical rehabilitation of a child with craniofacial anomalies, unilateral syndactyly, and partial unilateral cryptophthalmos associated with inferior colobomata of the iris and optic nerve and agenesis of the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The clinical presentation of cryptophthalmos is described. METHODS: The medical literature since the original description of cryptophthalmos in 1872 was reviewed to define patterns of inheritance and the incidence of associated anomalies. RESULTS: Including this patient, 149 case reports of cryptophthalmos were identified. In two families transmission from parent to child suggests dominant inheritance. None of the five dominant cases had any other anomalies, and all had bilateral complete cryptophthalmos. The incidence of cryptophthalmos in the remaining families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. This group includes patients with bilateral, unilateral, and partial cryptophthalmos. Other anomalies are common, including those of the ear and nose, limbs, genitourinary system, and mouth and palate. Mortality in the perinatal period is associated with renal agenesis, laryngeal atresia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptophthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly with two patterns of inheritance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8719680

  16. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of dust-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R J; Curtis, C G

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of cellular and biochemical events in response to the deposition of dust particles in lung tissue is described. Primary reactions at the lung surface include changes in the free cell population, the alveolar surface protein and in the quantity of pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein-rich material secreted by Type II cells. The relationship between these changes and lung fibrogenesis is discussed. It is suggested that such primary changes are protective mechanisms which may assist in the prevention of fibrogenesis rather than lead to an increase in collagen formation and deposition. If these primary defenses are overcome, then the interstitial fibroblastlike cell may have a prominent role in fibrogenesis. Therefore detailed observations of the interaction between lung fibroblasts and mineral dusts in vitro are described. As fibrogenesis may be arrested in vivo, or possibly reversed, and does not always progress to fibrosis, final consideration is given to the step from fibrogenesis to fibrosis. It is suggested that this step may involve other tissue proteins apart from collagen and that the irreversible nature of fibrosis can be explained by the formation of strong intermolecular crosslinks between different proteins. The types of crosslinks that may be involved are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of calcium-dependent transglutaminases in fibrosis, as these enzymes have hitherto received little attention. Images FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 20. FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. FIGURE 23. PMID:6376109

  17. Morphologic studies in the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, D. O.; Horton, W. A.; Rimoin, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the delineation of the genetic skeletal dysplasias, a heterogeneous group of disorders, that consist of over 80 distinct conditions. Morphologic studies have added a further dimension to the delineation of these conditions, their diagnosis, and the investigation of their pathogenetic mechanisms. In certain diseases, the morphologic alterations are characteristic and pathognomonic. In others only nonspecific alterations are observed, whereas in still other disorders growth-plate structure is essentially normal. Histologic, histochemical, and electronmicroscopic studies of growth-plate cartilage have provided new insights into the complexity of morphogenetic events in normal growth through the demonstration of morphologic defects in the genetic disorders of skeletal growth. As yet, very little is known of the biochemical abnormalities underlying the morphologic abnormalities. However, the great variety of morphologic findings points to a number of different pathogenetic defects in the synthesis, release, and assembly of connective tissue macromolecules and in the cells involved in growth-plate metabolism. Images Figure 4 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 PMID:474720

  18. The pulmonary vascular lesions of the adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Tomashefski, J. F.; Davies, P.; Boggis, C.; Greene, R.; Zapol, W. M.; Reid, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    Specimen arteriography, morphometry, and light and electron microscopy were used for examination of the pulmonary vasculature of 22 patients who died with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), for the purpose of defining the lesions that contribute to pulmonary hypertension in this setting. The different lesions correlated with the duration rather than the cause of ARDS. Thromboemboli occurred in 21 patients, and macrothrombi found at autopsy correlated with the number of filling defects on antemortem angiography. Acute endothelial injury was documented ultrastructurally even in intermediate and late-stage patients. Fibrocellular intimal obliteration of arteries, veins, and lymphatics and infective vasculitis were prominent in those surviving beyond 10 days. In long-term survivors, tortuous arteries and irregularly dilated capillaries were striking features. Peripheral extension of vascular smooth muscle and a significant increase in the percentage of medial thickness of muscular arteries with duration of ARDS were noted. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of these lesions is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6859225

  19. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  20. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  1. A Combined Intradural Presigmoid-Transtransversarium-Transcondylar Approach to the Whole Clivus and Anterior Craniospinal Region

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Ma, Jianya; Canalis, Rinaldo; Martin, Neil; Black, Keith; Cheatham, Mel; Bloch, Joseph; Becker, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the clivus is difficult because of its proximity to vital neurovascular structures. The anatomic bases of a new surgical approach to this area are discussed. A supra-auricular skin incision is extended toward the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The vertebral artery is exposed from C2 to the occiput unroofing the foramen transversarium of C1. The bone removal consists of a posterior temporal craniotomy, a suboccipital craniectomy, including mastoidectomy with sigmoid sinus unroofing, removal of the lateral margin of the foramen magnum, of the medial third of the occipital condyle, and retrolabyrinthine petrous drilling. Posterior retraction of the vertebral artery facilitates occipital condyle drilling. Intradural exposure of the petroclival region is achieved by L-shaped cutting of the dura with the long branch placed infratentorially anterior to the sigmoid sinus. Intradural exposure of the craniospinal/upper cervical areas is achieved by cutting of the dura medial to the distal sigmoid sinus and by longitudinal cutting of the dura anterior to the vertebral artery. This approach allows multiple ports of entry to the clivus with full control of the vertebrobasilar system, and of the dural sinuses, and is anatomically suited for controlled removal of tumors located in these areas. This approach, or segments of it, has been used successfully in the treatment of large neoplasms of the craniovertebral junction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17170911

  2. Ultrastructural lesions of the liver in human peliosis. A report of 12 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, E. S.; Cazier, A.; Baudelot, A. M.; Feldmann, G.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrastructural lesions of the liver were studied in 12 patients with peliosis hepatis. This vascular lesion consisted of cavities filled with red blood cells and sometimes lined with an endothelial barrier; the cavities were due to cystic dilatation of the space of Disse and/or sinusoidal lumen. The passage of red blood cells through the endothelial barrier was occasionally demonstrated. Other striking alterations included the presence of numerous blebs on the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes and the existence of multiple cellular layers lining the sinusoids. Perisinusoidal fibrosis appeared on follow-up biopsies in 3 patients. There was no major abnormality of the hepatocytes or of the hepatic venules. These findings suggest that alterations of the sinusoidal barrier might constitute the primary event in peliosis, although secondary changes to increased pressure and hypoxia within the lobules cannot be excluded. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6696047

  3. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone. Images Figure 15 Figure 16 Figures 17 and 18 Figures 19 and 20 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figures 5 and 6 Figures 7 and 8 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 13 and 14 Figures 21 and 22 Figures 23 through 26 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:453324

  4. The pathology of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Liver changes and amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The pathogenesis of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) was studied from 5 to 60 days after inoculation. Ulcerative lesions were noted 10 to 60 days after inoculation. The sequential development of lesions was asynchronous and progressed from destruction of the interglandular epithelium and of glandular crypt elements to loss of mucosa and formation of granulomatous lesions in the submucosa involving the muscularis mucosae. Pathologic changes in the liver correlated with the formation of ulcerative cecal lesions. Subacute hepatic changes showed lymphocytic portal infiltrate, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, multinucleated giant cells, granuloma formation, and sinusoidal mononuclear and granulocytic infiltrates. Metastatic amebic liver abscesses occurred as early as 10 days after inoculation, and small abscesses were found in the portal areas of the right liver lobe. The sequential development and pathologic manifestation of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil for the study of human intestinal amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:4014436

  5. The pathogenesis of experimentally induced amebic liver abscess in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential development and pathology of experimentally induced amebic liver abscess in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) were studied from 1 to 60 days after inoculation. Early lesions were characterized by an acute inflammatory response, which became granulomatous at 5 days. Early granulomas were discrete, with well-defined fibrohistiocytic walls. Trophozoite dissemination as a result of fibrolysis of granuloma wall was confined to the liver parenchyma. The granulomatous cellular infiltrate (less than 20 days) was characterized by granulocytes and histiocytes; older granulomas (greater than 30 days) were composed of lymphocytic infiltrate, plasma cells, and a few granulocytes, and were characterized by the absence of epithelioid histiocytes. The degree of pathologic change adjacent to liver granulomas followed the sequential development of the amebic liver abscess. Severe changes observed were portal canal lymphocytic infiltration, the presence of foreign body giant cells, periportal fibrosis, proliferation of bile duct epithelium, and hepatocyte anisonucleosis and ballooning degeneration. The pathogenesis of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil model for the study of human amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:6385727

  6. Kinematics of red cell aspiration by fluorescence-imaged microdeformation.

    PubMed Central

    Discher, D E; Mohandas, N

    1996-01-01

    Maps of fluorescing red cell membrane components on a pipette-aspirated projection are quantitated in an effort to elucidate and unify the heterogeneous kinematics of deformation. Transient gradients of diffusing fluorescent lipid first demonstrate the fluidity of an otherwise uniform-density bilayer and corroborate a "universal" calibration scale for relative surface density. A steep but smooth and stable gradient in the densities of the skeleton components spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1 is used to estimate large elastic strains along the aspirated skeleton. The deformation fields are argued to be an unhindered response to loading in the surface normal direction. Density maps intermediate to those of the compressible skeleton and fluid bilayer are exhibited by particular transmembrane proteins (e.g., Band 3) and yield estimates for the skeleton-connected fractions. Such connected proteins appear to occupy a significant proportion of the undeformed membrane surface and can lead to steric exclusion of unconnected integral membrane proteins from regions of network condensation. Consistent with membrane repatterning kinematics in reversible deformation, final vesiculation of the projection tip produces a cell fragment concentrated in freely diffusing proteins but depleted of skeleton. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:8889146

  7. Age as a factor in the bacteriology and response to treatment of subperiosteal abscess of the orbit.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G J

    1993-01-01

    The clinical course of SPA of the orbit is associated with the age of the patient. That association might be explained through a series of intermediate relationships: the clinical course correlates with the bacterial constituency, the bacterial constituency is related to physiologic derangement within the sinuses, the physiologic derangement may vary with the degree of obstruction of the sinus ostia, and the ostial caliber relative to the volume of the cavity that must be drained decreases with patient age into late adolescence. The controversy between pediatricians and surgeons over the appropriate indications for drainage might be resolved with the acknowledgement that each side is correct on the basis of the patient populations treated. It is hoped that recognition of the age-related variations in SPA will permit a more systematic approach to the management of this complex infectious disease. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 PMID:8140703

  8. Use of tracheal organ cultures in toxicity testing.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B P; Miller, S L; Drummond, E J

    1976-01-01

    Fragments of tracheal epithelium alone or in continuity with connective tissues, can be maintained in culture medium and used for short term or long term studies of toxicity of a variety of chemicals. Large numbers of uniform cultures are prepared with the aid of a slicing device or by application of simple method for dissecting sheets of epithelium free from underlying cartilage. The cultures may be placed in an exposure chamber-incubator mounted on a microscope stage and monitored continually for ciliostasis and exfoliation of cells. Morphology is further studied by fixation of selected specimens and preparation for light microscopy and electron microscopy. Synthetic functions are evaluated by autoradiographic measurement of incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules and other dynamic features are indirectly assessed by histochemical and histoenzymatic methods. Short-term studies using these several techniques have shown that ciliostasis does not correlate with cell injury in all instances, and a long-term study has demonstrated dose dependence of a cytotoxic agent when duration of culture viability is measured. The method lends itself to a broad range of investigations in which dose, period of exposure, and role of cofactors must be independently and quantitatively assessed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:1017423

  9. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  10. Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice. The potential role of intravascular platelet aggregation in its genesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Gonçalves, S.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, R.

    1984-01-01

    In male BALB/c mice aged 5-6 weeks inoculated three times at intervals of 15 days with 1 X 10(7) epimastigote forms of the PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and challenged 30 days after the last inoculation with 2 X 10(4) trypomastigote forms of the Colombia strain of T cruzi (the mice were sacrificed 80-100 days after the challenge) a cardiomyopathy very similar to that observed in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease in man develops. The cardiac syndrome is characterized grossly by cardiomegaly with hypertrophy, dilatation of ventricular chambers, and thinning of the apex of the left ventricle (apical aneurysm) and microscopically by focal areas of myocytolytic necrosis and myocardial degeneration with an inflammatory response composed of mononuclear cells (predominantly macrophages and a few lymphocytes) with concurrent interstitial fibrosis and occasional myofibers containing pseudocysts. In addition, aggregated platelets and occlusive thrombi were found in small epicardial and intramyocardial vessels of infected mice as compared with controls. The potential role of intravascular platelet aggregation in the causation of focal myocardial necrosis and degeneration and apical aneurysm in experimental T cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6230012

  11. Chronic cutaneous graft-versus-host disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, H. M.; Sale, G. E.; Lerner, K. G.; Barker, E. A.; Weiden, P. L.; Sullivan, K.; Gallucci, B.; Thomas, E. D.; Storb, R.

    1978-01-01

    This clinicopathologic study of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic marrow transplantation emphasizes the most prominent feature of the syndrome, the cutaneous aspects, and describes the ophthalmic-oral sicca syndrome with sialoadenitis and the neurologic findings. Chronic cutaneous GVHD affected 19 of 92 recipients surviving 150 days or more. In 6 patients chronic GVHD presented as a continuation of acute GVHD; in 8 it occurred after the resolution of acute GVHD; and in 5 it arose without preceding acute GVHD, ie, de novo late onset. Two cutaneous types were distinguished. The generalized type affected 16 patients and ran a progressive course resulting in late complications of poikiloderma, diffuse dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled generalized morphea and lupus erythermatosus hypertrophicus et profundus. The local type affected 3 patients with a more variable picture of poikiloderma, dermal sclerosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled lupus of erythematosus profundus and scleroderma. Guidelines for defining and subclassifying chronic cutaneous GVHD are proposed. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:26221

  12. Inflammatory and immune processes in the human lung in health and disease: evaluation by bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, G. W.; Gadek, J. E.; Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage is an invaluable means of accurately evaluating the inflammatory and immune processes of the human lung. Although lavage recovers only those cells and proteins present on the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract, comparison with open lung biopsies shows that these constituents are representative of the inflammatory and immune systems of the alveolar structures. With the use of these techniques, sufficient materials are obtained from normal individuals to allow characterization of not only the types of cells and proteins present but their functions as well. Such observations have been useful in defining the inflammatory and immune capabilities of the normal lung and provide a basis for the study of lung disease. Lavage methods have been used to characterize inflammatory and immune processes of the lower respiratory tract in destructive, infectious, neoplastic, and interstitial disorders. From the data already acquired, it is apparent that bronchoalveolar lavage will yield major insights into the pathogenesis, staging, and therapy decisions involved in these disorders. (Am J Pathol 97:149--206, 1979). Images Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 PMID:495693

  13. Extension of the life span of pressure ulcer fibroblasts with recombinant human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Vande Berg, J. S.; Robson, M. C.; Mikhail, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 beta (rhuIL-1 beta) was investigated in a randomized, blinded placebo-controlled trial to evaluate its effect on the healing of chronic pressure ulcers. The influence of this topically applied cytokine to 26 pressure ulcer patients was correlated with tissue culture and electron microscopic evaluation. Cellular replication studies showed that low (0.01 micrograms/cm2/day) and medium (0.1 micrograms/cm2/day) concentrations of rhuIL-1 beta were not effective in extending replication in pressure ulcer fibroblasts, in vitro. Tissue culture measurements from pressure ulcer biopsies demonstrated that, after 29 days of a high level of rhuIL-1 beta treatment (1.0 micrograms/cm2/day), the cytokine was effective in extending the ability of pressure ulcer fibroblasts to replicate. Tissue culture and electron microscopy suggested that, although rhuIL-1 beta promoted increases in fibroblast numbers, the primary effect appeared to be development of the extracellular matrix. The possible direct and indirect influences of rhuIL-1 beta therapy on pressure ulcers are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:7747819

  14. Cell and tissue distribution of synthetic oligonucleotides in healthy and tumor-bearing nude mice. An autoradiographic, immunohistological, and direct fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Plenat, F.; Klein-Monhoven, N.; Marie, B.; Vignaud, J. M.; Duprez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have the ability to inhibit individual gene expression in the potential treatment of cancer and viral diseases. However, the way parenterally administered oligonucleotides distribute themselves into healthy tissues or tumors is poorly understood. In this study, the cell and tissue distribution of two modified or unmodified phosphodiester pentadeca-beta-oligonucleotides intravenously administered to healthy or tumor-bearing nude mice was assessed by autoradiography as well as by direct fluorescence and immunoenzymatic histological methods. Resistance of oligonucleotides to degradation by nuclease activity was previously studied in vitro. Using these methods we were able to show the following: 1) within minutes, oligonucleotides permeate all cells and tissues with the exceptions of erythrocytes and intervertebral discs; 2) cell and tissue distribution does not depend on the sequence of the given oligonucleotide; 3) concentration of oligonucleotides is higher within the connective tissue cells than in the interstitial matrix; 4) after uptake, oligomers partition throughout all of the cellular compartments, including at the highest intracellular concentrations in the nuclei; 5) oligonucleotides penetrate easily the tumor cell compartments, oligonucleotide diffusion being unimpeded by the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7604874

  15. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  16. Comparative analysis of tissue reactions to anesthetic solutions: histological analysis in subcutaneous tissue of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Paulo Domingos; Sanches, Marcio Giampietro; Okamoto, Tetuo

    2003-01-01

    Postanesthetic pain is a relatively common complication after local anesthesia. This complication may be caused by the anesthetic technique or by the anesthetic solution used. Tissue reactions induced by the anesthetic solutions may be one of the factors resulting in pain after anesthesia. The objective of this study was to comparatively analyze tissue reactions induced by different anesthetic solutions in the subcutaneous tissue of rats. The following solutions were utilized: 2% lidocaine without vasoconstrictor; a 0.5% bupivacaine solution with 1:200,000 adrenaline; a 4% articaine solution and 2% mepivacaine, both with 1:100,000 adrenaline; and a 0.9% sodium chloride solution as a control. Sterilized absorbent paper cones packed inside polyethylene tubes were soaked in the solutions and implanted in the subcutaneous region. The sacrifice periods were 1, 2, 5, and 10 days after surgery. The specimens were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological analysis. The results showed that there is a difference in tissue irritability produced by the local anesthetic solutions. The results also showed that there is no relation between the concentration of the drug and the inflammatory intensity, that the mepivacaine and articaine solutions promoted less inflammatory reaction than the bupivacaine, and that the lidocaine solution produced the least intense inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:14959905

  17. Kinetics and ultrastructural studies of the induction of rat alveolar macrophage fusion by mediators released from mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sone, S.; Bucana, C.; Hoyer, L. C.; Fidler, I. J.

    1981-01-01

    Treatment of F344 rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro with cell-free supernatant fluids obtained from concanavalin-A (Con A)-stimulated syngeneic lymphocytes induced extensive fusion. The lymphokine responsible for the fusion of AMs (but not other cells) is here referred to as AM fusion factor (Con-A-MFF). Fusion is dependent on the dose of Con-A-MFF and the population density of AM cultures and occurred 10 hours after Con-A-MFF was added to cultures of normal AMs. Con-A-MFF must interact with AMs for more than 8 hours before full expression of fusion is reached at 24 hours. Using a technique allowing for sequential scanning to transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells, the authors determined the relationship of the morphologic characteristics of the surface and the internal structure of cells fusing to form multinucleate giant cells (MGCs). The process of AM fusion begins with the aggregation of AMs, followed by interdigitation of cell processes. Serial sections of MGCs showed lysosomes associated with remnants of plasma membrane in the cytoplasm. The MGCs contained numerous organelles associated with increased secretory activity of cells. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7234965

  18. Cholangiocarcinomas induced by feeding 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene to rats. Histopathology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. P.; Buschmann, R. J.; Chomet, B.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a carcinogenic (0.064% 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene, 3'-Me-DAB) ground meal normal diet. After 12 weeks the ground meal diet was replaced with a normal pellet diet, and the 30 surviving animals were divided into three equal groups. One group was sacrificed at the twelfth week and the other groups 4 and 8 weeks later. Control animals were also run. Based on previous studies which used "tumor-promoting" diets and 3'-Me-DAB, we expected a less than 100% incidence of predominantly hepatocellular carcinomas. However, we found mucin-producing cholangiocarcinomas in all 30 animals and, in addition, a small hepatocellular component in 3 of the animals. By electron microscopy the intestinal mucosal features of microvillous border cells, goblet cells, and endocrine-like cells were found. We suggest that the tumors produced as described here provide a good animal model of mucin-producing cholangiocarcinomas. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:192081

  19. Ultrastructural analysis of contractile cell development in lung microvessels in hyperoxic pulmonary hypertension. Fibroblasts and intermediate cells selectively reorganize nonmuscular segments.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R.

    1992-01-01

    The current study traces the development of contractile cells in the nonmuscular segments of rat lung microvessels in hyperoxic pulmonary hypertension. New intimal cells first develop into a well-defined layer beneath the endothelium and internal to an elastic lamina. Ultrastructurally, these cells are found to be 1) fibroblasts recruited to the vessel wall from the interstitium and 2) intermediate cells, a population of preexisting vascular cells (structurally between a smooth muscle cell and a pericyte). Early in hyperoxia (days 3 through 7), interstitial fibroblasts migrate and align around the smallest vessels in which an elastic lamina is either absent or fragmentary. These cells then are incorporated into the vessel wall by tropoelastin secretion and the formation of an elastic lamina along their abluminal margin. After day 7, the new mural fibroblasts acquire the features of contractile cells, namely a basal lamina, extensive microfilaments, and dense bodies. In other vessels, as early as day 3 of hyperoxia, intermediate cells within the vessel intima begin to acquire the additional filaments and dense bodies of contractile cells. As hyperoxia continues, each cell pathway gives rise to vessels with distinct intimal or medial layers of contractile cells. In this way, thick-walled 'newly muscularized' vessel segments form adjacent to the capillary bed. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p1500-a Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:1466406

  20. Ultrastructural alterations in the atrial myocardium of pigs with acute monensin toxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monensin, A Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produces left atrial damage in pigs given toxic doses. Eight weanling pigs were given mycelial monensin orally (40 mg/kg body weight) and were killed on days 1, 2, 4, and 16 (two animals at each time interval) for ultrastructural study of the left atrial lesions. On days 1-4, extensive necrosis with contraction bands was present. Rapid macrophagic invasion and phagocytosis of sarcoplasmic debris was seen on days 2 and 4. Missing necrotic myocytes were outlined by persistent "tubes" of external laminas. In some surviving myocytes, sublethal injury was evident on day 1 by mitochondria with condensed conformation and on days 2, 4, and 16 by moderate to marked myofibrillar lysis and sarcoplasmic vacuolation. Monensin cardiotoxicity in pigs constitutes a unique example of selective injury to atrial myocardium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6696048

  1. The image and advocacy of public health in American caricature and cartoons from 1860 to 1900.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, B

    1997-01-01

    The decades just before and after the founding of the American Public Health Association in 1872 saw an efflorescence of political cartooning and caricature in national-circulation weeklies. Part of the political and social critique that cartoonists and their editors provided the public focused on needs or opportunities for preventing illness and accidents. This paper presents a small selection of editorial cartoons that agitated in support of public health activities over 4 decades. The goals are to illustrate several concerns that rose to national prominence in that era, to examine the kinds of imagery that newspapers and magazine editors offered their readers, and to observe how frequently the public was encouraged to see politicians and commercial interests as responsible for preventable health problems. This discussion focuses exclusively on propagandistic images, leaving aside the reportorial depictions of events in the news and the neutral illustrations of methods and machines in scientific and technical publications. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:9366637

  2. Histochemical and ultrastructural studies in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (myositis ossificans progressiva).

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, W. A.; Spicer, S. S.; Miller, R. L.; Halushka, P. V.; Westphal, M. C.; Setser, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    By light microscopy the subdermal nodule of a patient with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) had a fibromatoid histologic appearance. The cytoplasm of the cells stained strongly for mannose-rich glycoprotein with the concanavalin A-horseradish peroxidase (con A-HRP) method. The tumors also exhibited abundant hyaluronidase-digestible mucopolysaccharide in the interstitium with various basic staining reagents. This material appeared to consist principally of hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate with few or mainly masked sulfate esters. At the ultrastructural level, cells interpreted as the tumor cells in the subdermal nodule from the patient displayed extremely hyperplastic granular reticulum and well-developed Golgi elements and appeared very active in synthesis and secretion of protein. The material in the dilated cisternae of the granular reticulum stained for glycoprotein with the con-A-HRP method. Macrophages which comprised the other main cell type in the nodules commonly contacted the tumor cells and occasionally evidenced engulfment of these cells. The intercellular matrix of the nonossified subdermal nodule exhibited greatly increased mucosubstance and, by electron microscopy, showed an unusual network of dialyzed iron-reactive acid muco-substance in the interstitium. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figures 15-16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 1 Figures 2-3 PMID:141214

  3. Carcinoma of type II pneumocytes: immunodiagnosis of a subtype of "bronchioloalveolar carcinomas".

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Torikata, C.

    1981-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from North American (N = 12) and Japanese (N = 11) patients with lung carcinomas were stained by the immunoperoxidase method for surfactant-specific apoprotein. Cytoplasmic and focal nuclear staining was seen in three "bronchioloalveolar carcinomas" occurring in Japanese patients. We refer to these three tumors as carcinomas of Type II pneumocytes. These neoplasms formed discrete masses with minimal growth along the alveolar septa at margins of the tumors. Papillary growth with lymphocytic infiltrates in the stalks of the papillary processes was the usual growth pattern. Focal noncaseating granulomas were seen in the stroma of 2 cases, and similar granulomas in the draining lymph nodes were noted in 1. The abundant cytoplasm was foamy, and the nuclei were generally vacuolated with frequent eosinophilic inclusions in the vacuoles. By electron microscopy, osmiophilic lamellar bodies or whorled lamellas were seen in the cytoplasm of the 3 tumors staining for surfactant apoprotein. The nuclei in 2 of the 3 cases contained tubular inclusions; the tubules had a diameter of 60 nm and a 20-nm core. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 and 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6258440

  4. Pancreas transplantation. An immunohistologic and histopathologic examination of 100 grafts.

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, R. K.; Sutherland, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined tissues obtained by biopsy, pancreatectomy, and autopsy from 100 pancreas grafts to determine the cause of dysfunction or failure of the graft. Immunohistologic examination of 42 tissues to determine the mononuclear cell phenotypes and Class I and II antigen expression was performed as well. Technical factors--infections, thrombosis, obstruction--accounted for a large number of graft losses, but immunologic-mediated mechanisms resulted in graft dysfunction and failure as well. Pleomorphic inflammatory infiltrates were present in grafts with acute rejection, as well as Silastic and Prolamine duct-obstructed grafts. Criteria useful in the identification of acute rejection from pancreatitis included a more intense, predominantly mononuclear cell infiltration of transformed lymphocytes in the exocrine pancreas and evidence of vascular rejection--endovasculitis or fibrinoid necrosis. Increased expression and/or induction of Class I and II antigens on pancreatic constituents occurred in grafts with evidence of acute rejection, but also with Silastic and prolamine duct-obstructed pancreatitis. An isletitis occurred in 25% of the grafts. Nine of the 25 grafts (36%) with isletitis also had selective loss of beta cells from the islets. Recurrent diabetes mellitus appeared to have developed in these cases, which accounted for loss of graft function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3037911

  5. Surgical treatment of obesity: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fobi, M. A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease due to excess fat storage, a genetic predisposition, and strong environmental contributions. This problem is worldwide, and the incidence is increasing daily. There are medical, physical, social, economic, and psychological comorbid conditions associated with obesity. There is no cure for obesity except possibly prevention. Nonsurgical treatment has been inadequate in providing sustained weight loss. Currently, surgery offers the only viable treatment option with longterm weight loss and maintenance for the morbidly obese. Surgeries for weight loss are called bariatric surgeries. There is no one operation that is effective for all patients. Gastric bypass operations are the most common operations currently used. Because there are inherent complications from surgeries, bariatric surgeries should be performed in a multidisciplinary setting. The laparoscopic approach is being used by some surgeons in performing the various operations. The success rate--usually defined as >50% excess weight loss that is maintained for at least five years from bariatric surgery--ranges from 40% in the simple to >70% in the complex operations. The weight loss from surgical treatment results in significant improvements and, in some cases, complete resolution of comorbid conditions associated with obesity. Patients undergoing surgery for obesity need lifelong nutritional supplements and medical monitoring. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:14746355

  6. Early extracellular and cellular lipid deposits in aorta of cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1992-01-01

    Subendothelial accumulation of extracellular liposomes rich in unesterified cholesterol has been described as an early feature of atherosclerosis induced by cholesterol feeding in rabbits. Beta-very-low-density lipoproteins, however, the presumed source of atherogenic lipid in this animal model, contain mostly esterified cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to test for the presence of extracellular neutral lipid deposits consistent with esterified cholesterol, by employing new electron microscopic techniques. Rabbits were fed 0.5% cholesterol, 5% butter for 0, 1, 2, and 4 weeks. The lipid-preserving ultrastructural techniques showed, in control and atherosclerotic rabbit arteries, neutral lipid droplets adherent to the endothelial luminal surface. After 1 to 2 weeks, subendothelial extracellular deposits of mostly membranous lipid appeared; these deposits contained variable amounts of neutral lipid. At the same time, cytoplasmic neutral lipid droplets appeared in smooth muscle cells and in a small number of subendothelial macrophagelike cells. After 4 weeks, monocytic infiltration and macrophage foam cell development were prominent, but abundant extracellular lipid deposits also were found. Therefore, in arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits, deposition of membranous and neutral lipid in the extracellular space and neutral lipid accumulation in resident arterial cells are early and probably independent events, both occurring before monocytic infiltration of the arterial intima. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1415485

  7. Field and laboratory studies of the etiology of liver neoplasms in marine fish from Puget Sound.

    PubMed Central

    Malins, D C; McCain, B B; Myers, M S; Brown, D W; Krahn, M M; Roubal, W T; Schiewe, M H; Landahl, J T; Chan, S L

    1987-01-01

    A series of field studies was conducted between 1979 and 1985 in Puget Sound, Washington State, to investigate etiological relationships between prevalences of hepatic neoplasms in bottom-dwelling marine fish species, with emphasis on English sole (Parophrys vetulus), and concentrations of toxic chemicals in sediments and affected fish. Statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) correlations have been found between the prevalences of hepatic neoplasms in English sole and the following parameters: sediment concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons, and concentrations of the metabolites of aromatic compounds in the bile of affected sole. A significant difference (p less than 0.001) was also found between the relative concentrations of aromatic free radicals in the liver microsomes of English sole with liver lesions compared to sole without liver lesions. Laboratory studies designed to evaluate the etiology of the liver neoplasms in English sole have also yielded evidence that is consistent with the view that high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g., benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), are hepatocarcinogens in English sole. The current status of a series of long-term (up to 18 months) exposures of English sole and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) to selected fractions of Puget Sound sediment extracts, enriched with aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds, and to individual carcinogens (e.g., BaP) is discussed. Images FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:3297664

  8. Final Remedial Investigation Report Area of Contamination (AOC) 57. Volume I. Text Sections 1 Through 10, Figures and Tables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    plant species BAF data for leafy produce grown in sewage sludge . Variability in type of plant and substrate may make the chosen BAF values an...attemptwas made to have measurement end- points reflect assessment endpoints, limited available ecotoxicological literature resulted in the selection of...contaminants that exceed ecotoxicological benchmarks must be identified and carried through the risk assessment . Response: Using benchmarks for selecting CPCs is

  9. The Development of a Horizontal Impact Sled Facility and Subsequent Crashworthiness Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    A9 Figure 10: Relief Valve, Manual, Air Tanks A10 Figure 11: Safety Pin , Launch Station A10 Figure 12: Upper Probe Attach Points All Figure 13: Lower...POSITION; SAFETY PIN IS ENGAGED; AND, SAFETY INDICATOR IS GREEN. A-19 2.5 LAUNCH CHECK LIST NOTE At this time, all lab personnel, clieuts and observers are...Launch Station Refer to Figure 11. Apply power to SAFETY light assembly. Release light assembly relay by manually retracting SAFETY pin . GREEN light

  10. An age-specific kinetic model of lead metabolism in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, R W

    1993-01-01

    with data on human subjects exposed to lead under a variety of experimental and natural conditions. Images p598-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. D Figure 7. E Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 10. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 11. Figure 12. p613-a PMID:8143593

  11. IBHVG2: Mortar Simulation With Interior Propellant Canister

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    pressure igniter canister. The application allows initial pressurization of the canister until interior pressure reaches a force high enough to rupture... Pressure versus time curves from appendices A, B, D, and F.........................................8 Figure 3. Projectile velocity versus time...curves from appendices A, B, D, and F. ........................9 Figure 4. Canister interior pressures

  12. Common Elements of Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    21 CMU/SEI-2006-TN-014 i 5 Conclusion...8 Figure 5 : Threat and Operational Risk .................................................................... 9 Figure 6: Work Process...technical note might be applied to selected risk management topics. Finally, Section 5 , “Conclusion,” completes the report by summarizing the history

  13. Investigating the Naval Logistics Role in Humanitarian Assistance Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    2014). ......................................................................................................7 Figure 3. QR code for video of Matternet...7 Figure 4. DHL paketkopter (from DHL Trend Research, 2014). ......................................8 Figure 5. QR code for a video of the DHL...9 Figure 7. QR code for video of Lockheed Martin Skunk Works DARPA ARES VTOL simulation (from

  14. Multi-National Cooperation in Space Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    8 Figure 3 Sea Launch System (From: Energia ) .................................................................9 Figure 4 Primary...some lessons may still be drawn. Sea Launch is a joint effort between Boeing (U.S.), RSC Energia (Russia), SDO Yuzhnoye/PO Yuzhmash (Ukraine...operations, and home port management. RSC Energia provides the Block DM upper stage, launch vehicle integration, ground systems and launch operations. SDO

  15. Evaluation of the AMEREX Model 775 Wheeled Extinguisher with Novec 1230

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-18

    8 Figure 5. The F-100 Nacelle Mockup during the Pre-Burn Phase of a Rear Engine Fire Test .......9...Figure 6. A Firefighter Applying Agent into the F-100 Nacelle Mockup during a Rear Engine Fire Test...100 Mockup during an Access Panel Fire Test ..................................................................................................11

  16. Aqueous Solution Heat Pipe Transport: Qu-Tube vs. Capillary-Pumped Heat Pipe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    9 Figure 5: Progressive IR Images for the V- Meniscus of HP-1(left) and HP-1...N (right) ............................ 10 Figure 6: Progressive IR Images for the V- Meniscus of QT-1 (left) and HP-1 (right...11 Figure 7: Progressive IR Images for the H- Meniscus of QT-1 (left) and HP-1 (right) ............................... 13 Figure 8

  17. The pathogenesis of hyaline arteriolosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, C. N.

    1986-01-01

    Although hyaline arteriolosclerosis is very common and has been of interest to pathologists for well over 100 years, its pathogenesis has never been determined. This study demonstrates that iC3b bound via an ester linkage to hydroxyl groups on the repeating disaccharide units of hyaluronic acid is a major component of arteriolar hyaline. The deposition of iC3b within the walls of arterioles appears to be due to slow spontaneous activation of the alternative complement pathway and random binding of metastable C3b to proximate hyaluronic acid within the arteriolar wall. Since hyaluronic acid does not activate the alternative complement pathway, bound C3b is rapidly inactivated by factors I and H to iC3b, which, along with factor H, remains bound to hyaluronic acid. The hyaline in some hyalinized arterioles also contains IgM and early and late classical complement pathway components. Indirect evidence suggests that the IgM represents immunoconglutinin, an autoantibody to neoantigens on iC3b and that their interaction results in activation of the classical complement pathway. The gradual accumulation of iC3b, factor H, and, at times, IgM and classical complement pathway components within the walls of arterioles is considered to be a physiologic consequence of aging and probably cannot be prevented, because interruption of the initial binding of metastable C3b to hyaluronic acid would require abrogation of the critically important functions of the alternative complement pathway. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2420184

  18. Cardiac disease induced by chronic adriamycin administration in dogs and an evaluation of vitamin E and selenium as cardioprotectants.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.; Weirich, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic adriamycin (ADR) intoxication was produced in three groups of beagle dogs by weekly intravenous injections (1 mg/kg body weight) for 20 weeks (cumulative dose 400 mg/sq m). Group A (6 dogs) received ADR only; Group B (6 dogs) were given ADR and weekly doses of vitamin E (17 mg/kg body weight) as alpha-tocopherol acetate; and Group C (6 dogs) received ADR and weekly doses of vitamin E as did Group B and selenium (0.06 mg/kg body weight as selenite). Each of the 18 dogs developed ADR-induced cardiomyopathy (CMY), and death occurred in 11 dogs during Weeks 17-20. Mortality was lowest in Group B (2 of 6), but no differences between groups were seen either in survival time of the dogs that died or in severity of CMY. Cardiomyopathy was more severe in dogs that died than in survivors. Congestive heart failure with transudation was present in 4 of 11 dogs that died. Cardiac histopathology was characterized by vacuolar degeneration of myocytes. Myocardial damage was most severe in the left ventricle and the ventricular septum, intermediate in the right ventricle and the left atrium, and least in the right atrium. Ultrastructural study showed that an early alteration in damaged myocytes was distention of sarcoplasmic reticulum to form sarcoplasmic vacuoles. Occasional damaged fibers had myofibrillar lysis and focal proliferation of sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study demonstrates that the dog offers a suitable model for studies of chronic ADR cardiotoxicity in man. The lack of cardioprotection from vitamin E and selenium supplementation fails to support the proposed role of lipoperoxidative damage in the development of chronic ADR-induced CMY. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:7361854

  19. Hazard evaluation of chemicals that cause accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin, hyaline droplet nephropathy, and tubule neoplasia in the kidneys of male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, G C; Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P; Richards, W L; McGaughy, R E; Valcovic, L R

    1993-01-01

    This review paper examines the relationship between chemicals inducing excessive accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g) (CIGA) in hyaline droplets in male rat kidneys and the subsequent development of nephrotoxicity and renal tubule neoplasia in the male rat. This dose-responsive hyaline droplet accumulation distinguishes CIGA carcinogens from classical renal carcinogens. CIGA carcinogens also do not appear to react with DNA and are generally negative in short-term tests for genotoxicity, CIGA or their metabolites bind specifically, but reversibly, to male rat alpha 2u-g. The resulting complex appears to be more resistant to hydrolytic degradation in the proximal tubule than native, unbound alpha 2u-g. Single cell necrosis of the tubule epithelium, with associated granular cast formation and papillary mineralization, is followed by sustained regenerative tubule cell proliferation, foci of tubule hyperplasia in the convoluted proximal tubules, and renal tubule tumors. Although structurally similar proteins have been detected in other species, including humans, renal lesions characteristic of alpha 2u-g nephropathy have not been observed. Epidemiologic investigation has not specifically examined the CIGA hypothesis for humans. Based on cancer bioassays, hormone manipulation studies, investigations in an alpha 2u-g-deficient strain of rat, and other laboratory data, an increased proliferative response caused by chemically induced cytotoxicity appears to play a role in the development of renal tubule tumors in male rats. Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that the renal effects induced in male rats by chemicals causing alpha 2u-g accumulation are unlikely to occur in humans. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. PMID:7686485

  20. Reactive Neuromuscular Training for the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gray; Burton, Lee; Fields, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the response to a proprioceptive training model during a 1-week rehabilitation regime. The techniques were demonstrated on a college-aged female basketball player who had injured her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) several weeks earlier. The athlete was tested, trained, and then retested during her semester break. Background: The ACL injury has become a fairly common occurrence in the world of athletics. Knowing this, the athletic trainer is constantly searching for ways to improve the rehabilitative process. New research demonstrates that rehabilitation should be based on proprioception. The ACL not only serves a mechanical role by limiting passive knee mobility but also serves a sensory role through the mechanoreceptors deep in its tissue, which communicate with the neuromuscular system to provide proprioceptive feedback during training and competition. Differential Diagnosis: Partial or complete tear of the ACL. Treatment: The athlete was treated with a rehabilitation protocol based on proprioception, which uses reactive neuromuscular training. Uniqueness: Our rehabilitation focused on the muscular imbalances about the hip, knee, and ankle. The athlete achieved dramatic decreases in muscular imbalances about the hip and knee in only 1 week of rehabilitation through reactive neuromuscular training. Conclusions: The athlete had significant gains in strength over her brief period of therapy. However, these gains can be viewed only as neuromuscular changes and not strictly as gains in strength. The athlete returned to postseason competition under the supervision of her surgeon, who later recommended surgical reconstruction at the completion of the basketball season with rehabilitation during the offseason. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:16558562

  1. Toxicity and carcinogenicity of potassium bromate--a new renal carcinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Y; Maekawa, A; Takahashi, M; Hayashi, Y

    1990-01-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is an oxidizing agent that has been used as a food additive, mainly in the bread-making process. Although adverse effects are not evident in animals fed bread-based diets made from flour treated with KBrO3, the agent is carcinogenic in rats and nephrotoxic in both man and experimental animals when given orally. It has been demonstrated that KBrO3 induces renal cell tumors, mesotheliomas of the peritoneum, and follicular cell tumors of the thyroid. In addition, experiments aimed at elucidating the mode of carcinogenic action have revealed that KBrO3 is a complete carcinogen, possessing both initiating and promoting activities for rat renal tumorigenesis. However, the potential seems to be weak in mice and hamsters. In contrast to its weak mutagenic activity in microbial assays, KBrO3 showed relatively strong potential inducing chromosome aberrations both in vitro and in vivo. Glutathione and cysteine degrade KBrO3 in vitro; in turn, the KBrO3 has inhibitory effects on inducing lipid peroxidation in the rat kidney. Active oxygen radicals generated from KBrO3 were implicated in its toxic and carcinogenic effects, especially because KBrO3 produced 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in the rat kidney. A wide range of data from applications of various analytical methods are now available for risk assessment purposes. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:2269236

  2. The in vivo effect of leukotriene B4 on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and the microcirculation. Comparison with activated complement (C5a des Arg) and enhancement by prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed Central

    Movat, H. Z.; Rettl, C.; Burrowes, C. E.; Johnston, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of synthetic leukotriene B4 (LTB4) on chemotaxis in vivo (51Cr-polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN] accumulation) was examined and its potency compared with that of C5a des Arg-containing zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP). On a molar basis the amount of C5a des Arg calculated to be in our preparation of ZAP was found to be up to approximately 80 times more potent than LTB4, although in vitro the two chemotaxins have been reported to be about equipotent. ZAP is more representative of what may happen in vivo than its principal constituent C5a des Arg, but for a more precise comparison the purified and isolated peptide will have to be compared with synthetic LTB4. Whereas ZAP induced severe PMN-dependent microvascular injury (increase in vessel permeability [125I-albumin] and hemorrhage [59Fe-erythrocytes]), LTB4 only induced an increase in vascular permeability, and this occurred only in the presence of simultaneously injected prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 also enhanced substantially the number of PMNs and the amount of exuded plasma at injection sites of the chemotaxins. However, unlike in two other reports, LTB4 did not cause an immediate transient increase in vessel permeability, nor did it enhance the permeability-increasing effect of bradykinin. Furthermore, unlike PGE2 LTB4 did not induce an increase in blood flow, but a decrease (57Co-microspheres). It is concluded that LTB4 may act as a host-derived chemoattractant in vivo, but, compared with that of ZAP (primarily activated complement), its role in acute inflammation is probably less significant than that of the complement-derived chemotaxin(s). Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6326579

  3. Immunopathology of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Reed, S. G.; Roters, S. B.; Sadigursky, M.

    1984-01-01

    Relatively susceptible BALB/c and relatively resistant A/J mice were infected subcutaneously in the right hind footpad with promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. A large localized lesion developed within 2 months after infection in the BALB/c mice, while A/J mice exhibited a small discrete fibrotic nodule. Sequential immunologic and histologic examination demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed a nodular foam-cell type of lesion and progressive depression of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to leishmania antigen, while the A/J mice had a mixed cellular fibrosing and encapsulating reaction and developed and maintained positive DTH responses to leishmania antigen. Anti-leishmania antibody responses were positive at similar levels in both strains. The lesions in BALB/c mice were found in bone marrow, tendon, skin appendages, and regional lymph nodes, with a tendency toward cutaneous metastases. Lesions in A/J mice remained localized. Fibrosis, focal fibrinoid necrosis, and lymphocytic and macrophagic infiltration were the outstanding features. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies indicated that no outstanding destruction of leishmanias seemed to occur within macrophages of either mouse strain. In the more resistant A/J mice, however, parasitized macrophages were frequently necrotic, and degenerating leishmanias were often seen free in the interstitial tissue. These observations help the interpretation of the histologic features, as well as the pathogenesis, of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in man. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6691411

  4. Cell-substrate interactions and locomotion of Dictyostelium wild-type and mutants defective in three cytoskeletal proteins: a study using quantitative reflection interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schindl, M; Wallraff, E; Deubzer, B; Witke, W; Gerisch, G; Sackmann, E

    1995-01-01

    Reflection interference contrast microscopy combined with digital image processing was applied to study the motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in their pre-aggregative state on substrata of different adhesiveness (glass, albumin-covered glass, and freshly cleaved mica). The temporal variations of the size and shape of the cell/substratum contact area and the time course of advancement of pseudopods protruding in contact with the substratum were analyzed. The major goal was to study differences between the locomotion of wild-type cells and strains of triple mutants deficient in two F-actin cross-linking proteins (alpha-actinin and the 120-kDa gelation factor) and one F-actin fragmenting protein (severin). The size of contact area, AC, of both wild-type and mutant cells fluctuates between minimum and maximum values on the order of minutes, pointing toward an intrinsic switching mechanism associated with the mechanochemical control system. The fluctuation amplitudes are much larger on freshly cleaved mica than on glass. Wild-type and mutant cells exhibit remarkable differences on mica but not on glass. These differences comprise the population median of AC and alterations in pseudopod protrusion. AC is smaller by a factor of two or more for all mutants. Pseudopods protrude slower and shorter in the mutants. It is concluded that cell shape and pseudopods are destabilized by defects in the actin-skeleton, which can be overcompensated by strongly adhesive substrata. Several features of amoeboid cell locomotion on substrata can be understood on the basis of the minimum bending energy concept of soft adhering shells and by assuming that adhesion induces local alterations of the composite membrane consisting of the protein/lipid bilayer on the cell surface and the underlying actin-cortex. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:7756537

  5. Role of the Ito cell in liver parenchymal fibrosis in rats fed alcohol and a high fat-low protein diet.

    PubMed Central

    French, S. W.; Miyamoto, K.; Wong, K.; Jui, L.; Briere, L.

    1988-01-01

    Eight pairs of young adult rats were pair-fed a high fat-low protein diet and ethanol or isocaloric glucose by permanent intragastric cannula for up to 6 months. Biopsies of the liver were taken monthly and the fibrosis was quantitated morphometrically using the sirius red polarization method of collagen visualization by light microscopy. Morphometric analysis of the sinusoids and scars were performed on electron micrographs made from the liver biopsies. An increase in the collagen in both the central and portal areas was found when the livers of the alcohol-fed rats were compared with controls. The predominant cell in the scars was the Ito cell. An increase in the percentage of the total Ito cell square area made up of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was noted when the sinusoids of the liver of the ethanol-fed rats were compared with controls. No difference in the RER was found when the sinusoidal Ito cells were compared with the Ito cells located within the scars of the ethanol-fed rats. It was concluded that Ito cell "activation" by chronic ethanol feeding in the sinusoids of rats accurately predicts "activation" of the Ito cells within scars. The Ito cells are diffusely activated even though the scarring is localized. This implies that local factors as well as Ito cell activation are necessary for scar formation. In the case of alcoholic liver disease, scar formation may be initiated by centrilobular necrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3394803

  6. Increased lung vascular permeability after pancreatitis and trypsin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Tahamont, M. V.; Barie, P. S.; Blumenstock, F. A.; Hussain, M. H.; Malik, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the role of proteases in mediating lung vascular injury after acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Studies were made in sheep in which pulmonary lymph was collected for assessment of the changes in transvascular fluid and protein exchange. The induction of pancreatitis by injection of trypsin and sodium taurocholate into the pancreas resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance (lymph flow x lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio). The pulmonary vascular pressures did not change significantly after pancreatitis, indicating that the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and protein clearance were due to increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. The response to pancreatitis was also characterized by decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was a common morphologic feature in this group. In another group, an intravenous infusion of trypsin, which produced decreases in antiprotease activity comparable to those observed after pancreatitis, also resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance. These increases in lymph fluxes were comparable to those observed after pancreatitis and were also associated with decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was evident in this group upon histologic examination. In a third group, pretreatment with Trasylol prevented the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance after pancreatitis, suggesting that the pancreatitis-induced pulmonary vascular injury is the result of the release of proteases. The results indicate a common pulmonary vascular response to acute pancreatitis and trypsin infusion. The release of proteases into the circulation after acute pancreatitis may be the initiating event mediating the pulmonary vascular injury. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 11 and 12 PMID:6181692

  7. The development of the trabecular meshwork and its abnormality in primary infantile glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D R

    1981-01-01

    Tissue from ten eyes with infantile glaucoma and from 40 normal eyes of fetuses and infants without glaucoma were examined by light and electron microscopy. In normal development, the corneoscleral coat grows faster than the uveal tract during the last trimester, leading to a posterior migration of the ciliary body attachment from Schwalbe's line (5th month) to the scleral spur (9th month), and then to a location behind the scleral spur (postnatally). In infantile glaucoma, the insertion of the anterior ciliary body and iris overlaps the trabecular meshwork, similar to the late fetal position. The trabecular sheets are perforated, and there is no membrane over the surface of the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular beams are thicker than in normal infant eyes. There is both histologic and clinical evidence of traction on the iris root exerted by the thickened trabecular beams. These findings suggest that in congenital glaucoma the thickened beams had prevented the normal posterior migration of the ciliary body and iris root. This traction may compact the thickened trabecular beams, obstructing aqueous humor outflow. Release of the traction by an incision (goniotomy or trabeculotomy) of the thickened meshwork may relieve the obstruction. Of uncertain pathological significance is that there are no vacuoles in the endothelium of Schlemm's canal and there is a broad layer of collagen and amorphous material in the juxtacanalicular connective tissue. The ciliary processes are elongated inward, as if they were pulled by zonular traction (perhaps created by an enlarging diameter of the limbus with a fixed lens diameter). Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 20 A FIGURE 20 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:7342408

  8. Characterization of indoor particle sources: A study conducted in the metropolitan Boston area.

    PubMed Central

    Abt, E; Suh, H H; Allen, G; Koutrakis, P

    2000-01-01

    An intensive particle monitoring study was conducted in homes in the Boston, Massachusetts, area during the winter and summer of 1996 in an effort to characterize sources of indoor particles. As part of this study, continuous particle size and mass concentration data were collected in four single-family homes, with each home monitored for one or two 6-day periods. Additionally, housing activity and air exchange rate data were collected. Cooking, cleaning, and the movement of people were identified as the most important indoor particle sources in these homes. These sources contributed significantly both to indoor concentrations (indoor-outdoor ratios varied between 2 and 33) and to altered indoor particle size distributions. Cooking, including broiling/baking, toasting, and barbecuing contributed primarily to particulate matter with physical diameters between 0.02 and 0.5 microm [PM((0.02-0.5))], with volume median diameters of between 0.13 and 0.25 microm. Sources of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters between 0.7 and 10 microm [PM((0.7-10))] included sautéing, cleaning (vacuuming, dusting, and sweeping), and movement of people, with volume median diameters of between 3 and 4.3 microm. Frying was associated with particles from both PM((0.02-0.5)) and PM((0.7-10)). Air exchange rates ranged between 0.12 and 24.3 exchanges/hr and had significant impact on indoor particle levels and size distributions. Low air exchange rates (< 1 exchange/hr) resulted in longer air residence times and more time for particle concentrations from indoor sources to increase. When air exchange rates were higher (> 1 exchange/hr), the impact of indoor sources was less pronounced, as indoor particle concentrations tracked outdoor levels more closely. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:10620522

  9. Rat alveolar myofibroblasts acquire alpha-smooth muscle actin expression during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vyalov, S. L.; Gabbiani, G.; Kapanci, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of fibroblasts in alveolar septa are characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic bundles of microfilaments that contain cytoplasmic actin isoforms; these cells have been named contractile interstitial cells or V-type myofibroblasts. In the rat, they express desmin as intermediate filament protein. In this study, we explored the possibility that modulation and replication of such septal fibroblasts result in the appearance of alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin-positive myofibroblasts, typical of lung fibrosis. Experimental pulmonary fibrosis was produced by a unique intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to 28 rats. Eight additional rats used as controls received the equivalent volume of saline. Paraffin and frozen sections of lungs were examined at days 1, 3, 5 and 7 after treatment. Microfilaments and intermediate filaments were stained using antibodies against total actin, alpha-SM actin, desmin, vimentin, keratin, and SM myosin. Electron microscopic labeling of desmin and alpha-SM actin using immunogold technique was done on Lowicryl K4M resin-embedded specimens. alpha-SM actin appeared in desmin-positive alveolar fibroblasts as early as 24 hours after intratracheal bleomycin instillation; the modulation of alpha-SM actin in these cells was preceded by a lymphomonocytic infiltration of alveolar septa. Twenty-four hours to 3 days after bleomycin administration, a proliferation of alveolar myofibroblasts occurred. Fibrosis with laying down of collagen fibers took place after the above mentioned cellular modifications. Our results support the view that septal fibroblastic cells can modulate into typical alpha-SM actin-containing myofibroblasts during experimental bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In such a modulation a possible role of cytokines, particularly of transforming growth factor-beta, is considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

  10. Photochemical injury to the foveomacula of the monkey eye following argon blue-green panretinal photocoagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Parver, L M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Visual loss following panretinal photocoagulation was found in the Diabetic Retinopathy and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Studies. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that light scattered in the monkey eye during a procedure designed to mimic a clinical panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) can produce a photochemical injury to the foveomacula. METHODS: Ten eyes of 5 adult cynomologous monkeys underwent a PRP using an argon blue-green laser. Three eyes in 2 monkeys underwent a sham PRP, and an additional eye had a PRP with blue filtered slit-lamp illumination. The animals had baseline fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms that were repeated 24 hours after the experimental procedure. Forty-eight hours after the experimental procedure, the eyes were removed and processed for light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: There were no observable changes in the macula on fundus photography or fluorescein angiography 24 hours following PRP. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated changes in the retinal pigment epithelium and the outer photoreceptors, which were confined to the foveola. The control eyes showed no apparent effect from the slit lamp illumination used during the PRP. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of histologic evidence of retinal injury in the foveomacula of the monkey eye after a procedure designed to mimic clinical PRP supports the hypothesis that photochemical retinal damage in the foveola may be associated with this procedure. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 1C FIGURE 1D FIGURE 1E FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:11190033

  11. Ultrastructure of sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial myocardium of patients with mitral valvular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Thiedermann, K. U.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1976-01-01

    Alterations observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells in left and right atrial myocardium from 10 patients with mitral valvular disease consisted of: a) proliferation of rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, which formed large cisterns in perinuclear areas of hypertrophied cells and was considered indicative of increased protein synthesis; b) proliferation of free sarcoplasmic reticulum, a change that occurred in degenerated cells and appeared to be related to loss of contractile elements; c) two types of aggregates of tubules of free SR--one type was associated wtih abnormal Z-band material and was found only in cells showing loss of myofibrils and proliferation of free SR, whereas the other was not associated with either of these changes and occurred in less severely altered cells; and d) proliferation and enlargement of cisterns of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum, which formed two distinct types of complexes: the first of these consisted of large, convoluted (Type A) cisterns that were wide (550 to 650 A in thickness) and did not have a central dense lamina; the second was composed of stacks of concentric or parallel (Type B) cisterns that were narrower (220 to 300 A in thickness), had a central dense lamina, and were separated from one another by layers of glycogen granules. The formation of these complexes of cisterns was regarded as an extreme form of overdevelopment of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial muscle cells. Images Figure 21 Figures 22-25 Figures 1-3 Figures 26-29 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figures 30 and 31 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 32-36 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 37-39 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figures 40 and 41 Figure 18 Figures 19 and 20 PMID:1275054

  12. The soft keratoprosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, D R

    1997-01-01

    appearance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 17A FIGURE 17B FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:9440192

  13. The association of viruses with urveal melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, D M

    1979-01-01

    Electron microscopic examination of 57 ocular melanomas (54 human, two feline and one canine) revealed the presence of viral particles in six specimens. Herpesviruses particles were observed in one human specimen and were passed in human fibroblasts (WI-38), where they gave rise to intranuclear inclusions. A-type oncornavirus particles (oncogenic RNA virus) were observed in a second case, both in cells of tumor directly removed from an enucleated eye as well as in cells grown in tissue culture. In three human specimens and one feline specimen, togavirus particles were observed. Rubella is a member of this group, and the possibility that the presence of togavirus in these tumors is the result of latent ocular infection by rubella virus is raised. Herpes virus and RNA tumor viruses are widely considered as having a possible etiologic role for certain human cancers. The observation of togavirus is unexpected, as this virus has not been previously implicated in human or animal tumors. Injection of an RNA tumor virus (Gardner strain feline sarcoma virus) into the anterior chamber of newborn kittens resulted in the development of iris and ciliary body melanomas, many of which showed invasion and, in one instance, metastasis. This is the first animal model of a viral-induced uveal melanoma, and the histology and ultrastructure are described. These results emphasize the need for the continued investigation of the role of these viruses in uveal melanoma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 PMID:545833

  14. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle of pigs with acute monensin myotoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Large doses of monensin, a Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produce polyfocal, monophasic necrosis of skeletal muscle, with Type I fiber selectivity, in swine. For a study of the sequential ultrastructural alterations in affected skeletal muscles, 14 weanling pigs were given 40 mg monensin/kg body weight and were euthanatized 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 days later. Myotoxicosis and myoglobinuria were apparent clinically. At necropsy, white, dry areas of necrosis were present in the muscle masses of the anterior and posterior thigh, shoulder, and loin. Two patterns of skeletal muscle necrosis were observed on Day 1, especially in Type I fibers. In fibers exhibiting the first of these patterns, the contractile material was disrupted, forming dense amorphous and filamentous clumps scattered within the persistent sheaths of external lamina (sarcolemmal tubes); the mitochondria were swollen and contained flocculent matrix densities, and the nuclei were pyknotic. Fibers showing the second pattern were uniformly dense, but their sarcoplasm was not disrupted. Sublethally injured fibers were also observed and showed focal myofibrillar lysis. On Days 2 and 4, the necrotic muscle had marked infiltration of macrophages in the interstitium and within sarcolemmal tubes. Rapid resolution of the fiber necrosis occurred by phagocytosis of the sarcoplasmic debris. Regeneration of affected muscles developed early following injury and progressed rapidly to complete restoration of the necrotic muscles without residual fibrosis. Regeneration was initiated on Day 1 by activation of satellite cells to form presumptive myoblasts; on Days 4 and 8 these cells showed evidence of fusion, forming myotubes to restore the necrotic fibers. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6696050

  15. Immunohistochemical demonstration of Clara cell antigen in lung tumors of bronchiolar origin induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine in Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, S.; Takahashi, M.; Ward, J. M.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Henneman, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    pulmonary tumors of the hamsters progressed towards a squamoid cell type, CCA was no longer detectable but cells became immunoreactive for keratin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2464284

  16. Proteoglycans in the microvasculature. I. Histochemical localization in microvessels of the rabbit eye.

    PubMed Central

    Ausprunk, D. H.; Boudreau, C. L.; Nelson, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of ruthenium red (RR) stainable material within small blood vessels located in the limbus of the rabbit eye was studied. Proteoglycans were identified in this material by digesting tissues with Streptomyces hyaluronidase, testicular hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC, or heparinase before ruthenium red staining. Neuraminidase digestion enabled separate identification of sialoglycoprotein. The luminal surface of endothelial cells demonstrates an RR-stained glycocalyx containing both sialoglycoprotein and proteoglycans, which are removed by testicular hyaluronidase and crude heparinase. The basal coat of endothelial cells and small granules (10-20 nm in diameter) located within the basal lamina stain with RR and are removed only by crude heparinase. The surface coat of smooth muscle cells and small granules (10-20 nm) within their basal laminas are also digested by crude heparinase. Large proteoglycan granules (20-50 nm), which are completely removed by testicular hyaluronidase and partially digested by Streptomyces hyaluronidase, are deposited between the connective tissue fibers of the media and adventitia. Other large granules that are attached to collagen fibers contain enzyme-resistant anionic materials. The surface coat of adventitial fibroblasts is removed only by crude heparinase. Thin filaments (3-5 nm in diameter) interconnect the cell coat material, basal lamina granules, and large connective tissue granules, to form a network of proteoglycans that traverses the intima, media, and adventitia. The highly ordered arrangement of proteoglycans in the microvascular wall suggests that these macromolecules play several roles in microvascular function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6165246

  17. Human aortic fibrolipid lesions. Progenitor lesions for fibrous plaques, exhibiting early formation of the cholesterol-rich core.

    PubMed Central

    Bocan, T. M.; Guyton, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The early development of the lipid-rich core and other features of atherosclerotic fibrous plaques has been elucidated by examining discrete, small regions of raised intima in human aorta, which often bear a resemblance to both fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Approximately one-fourth of small raised lesions (less than 16 sq mm of surface area) contained little or no stainable lipid, while three-fourths had a characteristic appearance, which included a superficial layer of foam cells, a core of noncrystalline and/or crystalline lipid, and a developed or developing collagenous cap. Total intimal volumes of the lipid-containing lesions, termed "fibrolipid lesions," ranged from 3 to 43 microliters, with the majority less than 16 microliters. Core lipid in the smallest lesions was located in the musculoelastic layer of the intima. In larger lesions the core extended luminally into the elastic hyperplastic layer, and cholesterol crystals were found more frequently. Total cholesterol concentration in fibrolipid lesions was similar to that in fatty streaks; however, the ratio of unesterified to total cholesterol was relatively high, similar to that found in fibrous plaques. It is concluded that 1) the formation of a lipid-rich core and cholesterol crystallization are early events in the development of many raised lesions; 2) the consistent association between the superficial layer of foam cells and the deep-lying lipid-rich core raises the possibility of an influence, possibly indirect, of foam-cell lipid metabolism on core formation; and 3) the fibrolipid lesion may represent one stage in a potential transitional morphologic sequence between fatty streak and fibrous plaque. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:4025509

  18. Ultrastructural alterations in allylamine cardiovascular toxicity. Late myocardial and vascular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Boor, P. J.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    The late myocardial and vascular ultrastructural changes in rat hearts following consumption of the cardiovascular toxin allylamine were studied. Rats were given 0.1% allylamine HCl in drinking water for 10-104 days. From 10 to 21 days, there was organization of acute myocardial necrosis by macrophages and scattered polymorphonuclear leukocytes with prominent interstitial-cell proliferation. Alterations at 21-104 days included extensive scarring with formation of dense mature collagen with scattered fibroblasts present, grossly evident left-ventricular aneurysm, and gross and microscopic changes similar to those observed in the secondary form of endocardial fibroelastosis. Areas of scar contained highly cellular foci of smooth-muscle cells, myofibroblasts, and abundant extracellular elastin. Cardiac myocytes frequently showed markedly disorganized myofilaments, bizarrely distorted mitochondria with condensed cristae, and other severe degenerative changes. Small vessels within and adjacent to scar showed proliferation of intimal smooth-muscle cells. Endothelial lesions or recent or organized thrombi were not seen. Focal endocardial metaplasia, consisting of both chondroid and osseous tissue, was found in areas of transmural scarring, or ventricular aneurysm. Chondrocytes had the overall nuclear and cellular morphology, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, and surrounding lacunae typical of mature fibrocartilage. In some areas, the collagen matrix was undergoing calcification with the typical cross-banded pattern of calcifying connective tissue. Osteocytes were located in a densely calcified bone matrix and displayed characteristic cellular extensions into surrounding canaliculi. These findings indicate a severe myocardial, small-vessel, and endocardial injury during the course of chronic allylamine intoxication. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure

  19. Acute respiratory bronchiolitis: an ultrastructural and autoradiographic study of epithelial cell injury and renewal in rhesus monkeys exposed to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Dungworth, D. L.; Schwartz, L. W.; Tyler, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute respiratory bronchiolitis was examined in rhesus monkeys exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone fpr 4--50 hours. Epithelial injury and renewal was qualitatively and quantitatively characterized by correlated techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by light-microscopic autoradiography following labeling with tritiated thymidine. Extensive degeneration and necrosis of Type 1 epithelial cells occurred on the respiratory bronchiolar wall during the initial 4--12 hours of exposure. Increased numbers of labeled epithelial cells were present in this region after 18 hours of exposure, and the highest labeling index (18% was measured after 50 hours of exposure. Most (67--80%) of the labeled cells and all the mitotic epithelial cells (22) observed ultrastructurally were cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells. Of the labeled epithelial cells, 20--33% were Type 2 epithelial cells. After 50 hours of exposure the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium was hyperplastic. The predominant inflammatory cell in respiratory bronchiolar exudate was the alveolar macrophage. Monkeys that were exposed for 50 hours and allowed to recover in unozonized air for 7 days had incomplete resolution of respiratory bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia. The results indicate that Type 1 epithelial cells lining respiratory bronchioles are the cell type most sensitive to injury and that both cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells and Type 2 epithelial cells function as stem cells in epithelial renewal. Images Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6767409

  20. Cellular effects of asbestos and other fibers: correlations with in vivo induction of pleural sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, L E

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenon of fiber-induced cytotoxicity to P388D1 macrophagelike cells has been demonstrated to parallel (thus far without exception) the probability that the fiber will induce a pleural sarcoma (mesothelioma) in rats. This startling parallel in both cases seems to be essentially independent of the chemical nature of the fiber and correlates best with the presence of fibers greater than 8 micrometers in length and fibers with diameters in the range 0.5 to 1.0 micrometer (Stanton Hypothesis). In both systems evidence has been produced which cast strong doubts on any role played by absorbed (or adherent) impurities. The existence of multiple physical forms of the same chemical moiety (aluminum oxide, dihydroxy-sodium aluminum carbonate, borosilicate glass, etc.,) provides additional test material for the chemical independence corollary. The similar, cytotoxic or sarcomatogenous behavior of chemically different materials (e.g. amosite, chrysotile, aluminum oxide) exhibits the necessary converse argument. As long as the fiber size-shape dependency effect was limited to whole animal phenomena, such as tumor induction, one could make implicitly what were essentially statistical or probabilistic inferences involving transport and/or distribution of fibers to account for the physical effect. The demonstration of strict parallelism at the cellular level in vitro suggests the possibility that in the case of durable fiber toxicology we are dealing with a form of cell-solid interaction in which physical properties for which we have as yet no known receptors play a prominent role. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. PMID:7389690

  1. REVEAL: Receiver Exploiting Variability in Estimated Acoustic Levels FY08 Year End Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    processing structure developed under the REVEAL project 4 Figure 4: Performance of the REVEAL Likelihood Ratio processor under Gaussian noise and for...Figure 6: Likelihood ratio test constructed by point-wake dividing the kernel density estimates 9 Figure 7: Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC...curves for a detector like that shown in Fig. 6. . 10 Figure 9: Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves for likelihood ratio receivers applied

  2. Evaluation of Rotorwash Characteristics for Tiltrotor and Tiltwing Aircraft in Hovering Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 2. Government Accession No. 3 . Recipient’s Catalog No. DOT/FAA/RD-90/16 4. Title and Subtitle 5...Introduction ........................................... 1 2.0 Analysis Approach .................................. 3 3.0 Correlation of Flight Test Data with...9 Figure 3 Examples of Bell XV-15 Mean and Peak Outwash Velocity Profiles in a Zero Wind Hover ....... 10 Figure 4 Three-View Drawing of the

  3. Implementation of Autonomous Navigation and Mapping using a Laser Line Scanner on a Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Research (CAVR) . . . . . . . . 9 Figure 2.2 The regions of space observed by an ultrasonic sensor. From: [19] . . . 10 Figure 2.3 Obstacle Represented in...and presented by [19]. . Figure 2.2: The regions of space observed by an ultrasonic sensor. From: [19] A model for the occupancy of cells in a grid is...manage than conventional helicopters. Another advantage of using quadrotor design is that they are typically motorized by batteries 17 instead of a

  4. Limitations of a True Random Number Generator in a Field Programmable Gate Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    more hardware than addition. The first two numbers for a sequence from a Fibonacci generator must be supplied and generally m is usually chosen as...congruential generator with a lagged Fibonacci generator. The two generators should produce a good random sequence and tested to make sure the resulting...9 Figure 3 Von Neumann and Xor Corrector for Unbiasing Random Sequences ............. 10 Figure 4 Four Bit Linear

  5. B-LPS and Marksmanship as Tested on the Weaponeer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Weaponeer Performance - 250m High Contrast Target ................... 7 Figure 5. B-LPS and Weaponeer Performance - All Targets ( Group 1...9 Figure 6. B-LPS and Weaponeer Performance - 100m Target ( Group 1) ........................ 10 Figure 7. B-LPS and Weaponeer Performance...250m Low Contrast Target ( Group 1) .......... 11 Figure 8. B-LPS and Weaponeer Performance - 250m High Contrast Target ( Group 1) ........ 12 Figure 9. B

  6. Multiscale Traffic Processing Techniques for Network Inference and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    9 Figure 8: pathChirp provides accurate estimate of bandwidth on CAIDA Gigabit testbed..............10 Figure 9...track changes in available bandwidth on the CAIDA Gigabit testbed; observe how the pathChirp estimate rises and falls in proportion to the...Figure 8: pathChirp provides accurate estimate of bandwidth on CAIDA Gigabit testbed Our second edge-based probing tool, STAB (for

  7. Signal and Image Processing Algorithms for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Ultra-wideband (UWB) Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-TR-4784 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...acquisition technique. ...................................8 Figure 10 . The SIRE transmitting pulse in the time-domain and frequency-domain... 10 Figure 11. False color plot of one complete frame of radar data: 16 receiving records using the left transmitter and 16 receiving

  8. Optimal Data Transmission on MIMO OFDM Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    utilizing the Alamouti- based space-time block coding (STBC) technique. All cases are based on the IEEE 802.16-2004 standard with OFDM using different...Oscillator Based OFDM Transmitter, after [1]..................................................8 Figure 5. IDFT Based OFDM Transmitter, after [1...10 Figure 7. OFDM Signal Spectrum with Ten Sub-Carriers, after [2]...............................11 Figure 8. DFT Based OFDM Receiver

  9. Detailed Analysis Case Studies of Trapped Plasmas at the Earth’s Magnetic Equator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    5 Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance ...... ......... 7 Figure 3. Plasmapause Magnetic Activity Dependance . . 8 Figure 4. Plasma Density L... Dependance - Normalized . . 10 Figure 5. The Dusk Bulge . . . .............. 13 Figure 6. Magnetosphere’s Electric and Magnetic Fields 14 Figure 7...1970). 6 -. ~ .ZJ.:AUGUST 12,1968 . -. ----- OUTBOUND PASS - 2 3 4 5 ___ ... 7....9 L Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance 7 0D3 #n /2 OUT JND tN

  10. Rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine continuously administered at low doses. From basophilic areas of hepatocytes to hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, C.; Klimek, F.; Nogueira, E.

    1991-01-01

    application of some carcinogens at high doses, they are not obligatory precursors of hepatocellular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 PMID:1951631

  11. Products of cells cultured from gliomas. VI. Immunofluorescent, morphometric, and ultrastructural characterization of two different cell types growing from explants of human gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, P. E.; Smith, B. H.; Taren, J. A.; Wahl, R. L.; Kornblith, P. L.; Chronwall, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    cell types may increase our understanding of the mechanism of antigenic changes in gliomas and may provide clues to improved therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:3555104

  12. Fish models for environmental carcinogenesis: the rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, G S; Williams, D E; Hendricks, J D

    1996-01-01

    fish models can serve as highly useful adjuncts to conventional rodent models in the study of environmental carcinogenesis and its modulation. For some problems, fish models can provide wholly unique approaches. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. PMID:8722107

  13. A twin study on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S M

    1994-01-01

    ; this included the one dizygotic pair which was discordant for basal laminar drusen. The data of this study strongly suggest a genetic predisposition to AMD. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1 (cont.) FIGURE 2 FIGURE 2 (cont.) FIGURE 2 (cont.) FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 4 FIGURE 4 (cont.) FIGURE 5 FIGURE 5 (cont.) FIGURE 5 (cont.) FIGURE 6 FIGURE 6 (cont.) FIGURE 7 FIGURE 7 (cont.) FIGURE 8 FIGURE 8 (cont.) FIGURE 9 FIGURE 9 (cont.) FIGURE 9 (cont.) FIGURE 10 FIGURE 10 (cont.) FIGURE 11 FIGURE 11 (cont.) FIGURE 11 (cont.) FIGURE 12 FIGURE 12 (cont.) FIGURE 12 (cont.) PMID:7886884

  14. The type of dietary fat affects the severity of autoimmune disease in NZB/NZW mice.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, N. J.; Smythe, N. L.; Jokinen, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    immune cells. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:3565532

  15. Severe microvascular injury induced by lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Increase in vasopermeability, hemorrhage, and microthrombosis due to degradation of subendothelial and perivascular matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Movat, H. Z.; Wasi, S.

    1985-01-01

    lesions were usually walled off by platelet aggregates and fibrin. At times microthrombi occluded an entire vessel. These changes were interpreted as hemostasis. The mild accumulation of PMNs at the site of injury did not contribute significantly to the microvascular injury. The findings indicate that the unique changes in the microcirculation, not described before, may occur quite frequently, when the microvascular injury is elicited primarily by release of lysosomal constituents by phagocytic or nonphagocytic stimuli. One can conclude that the hallmark of this type of injury is disappearance of basement membrane followed secondarily by disintegration of the vascular wall, followed in turn by hemo Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:3907363

  16. Deficient liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride injury in mice lacking type 1 but not type 2 tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y.; Fausto, N.

    1998-01-01

    Signaling by tumor necrosis factor type 1 receptor (TNFR-1) is required for the initiation of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Using knockout mice that lack either TNFR-1 or TNFR-2, we determined whether signaling through TNF receptors is important for liver injury and hepatocyte proliferation induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Lack of TNFR-1 inhibited hepatocyte DNA synthesis after CCl4 injection. At 44 hours after the injection, replication of hepatocytes in TNFR-1 was 50% to 90% lower than in wild-type (WT) animals, depending on the dose injected. In WT animals, hepatocyte replication was essentially completed by 4 days after CCl4 injection, but replication at a low level persisted in TNFR-1 mice for at least 2 weeks. TNFR-1 knockout mice had little detectable NF-kappa B and STAT3 binding during the first 5 hours after CCl4, high plasma TNF, and reduced levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and liver IL-6 mRNA. Injection of IL-6 30 minutes before CCl4 administration corrected the deficiency of hepatocyte replication at 44 hours and restored STAT3 binding to normal levels. In contrast, mice lacking TNFR-2 did not differ significantly from WT mice in NF-kappa B and STAT3 binding, IL-6 and TNF levels, or hepatocyte replication. Although AP-1 binding was induced in WT TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 knockout mice, binding in TNFR-2 knockouts was lower than in WT mice. C/EBP binding was much lower in TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 knockout mice than in WT mice. As assessed by morphological analysis and alanine aminotransferase levels, the acute injury caused by CCl4 appeared to be similar in the three groups of animals, but subsequent regeneration was impaired in mice lacking TNFR-1. We conclude that a TNFR-1 signaling pathway involving NF-kappa B, IL-6, and STAT3 is an important component of the hepatocyte mitogenic response induced by CCl4 injury in mouse liver. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 12 PMID:9626061

  17. Ultrastructure of the myocardium after pulmonary embolism. A study in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cuénoud, H. F.; Joris, I.; Majno, G.

    1978-01-01

    of right-sided failure; it can be correlated with the electrocardiographic abnormalities found in the comparable human condition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 8 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 9 Figure 23 Figure 10 Figure 24 Figure 11 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 12 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:677269

  18. Experimental and clinical observations on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Lakhanpal, V

    1993-01-01

    in such future studies on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 51 figure 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 56 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 FIGURE 67 FIGURE 68 FIGURE 69 PMID:8140705

  19. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    a newly recognized, often fatal disease, with a spectrum of microscopic morphological changes, which may be an important cause of severe and fatal illness presenting as adult respiratory distress syndrome. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15 PMID:7887439

  20. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 A FIGURE 24 B FIGURE 24 C FIGURE 24 D FIGURE 24 E FIGURE 24 F FIGURE 25 A FIGURE 25 B FIGURE 25 C FIGURE 25 D FIGURE 25 E FIGURE 25 F FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 PMID:11190024

  1. Acquired color vision loss and a possible mechanism of ganglion cell death in glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Nork, T M

    2000-01-01

    FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:11190032

  2. A comparative clinicopathologic study of endogenous mycotic endophthalmitis: variations in clinical and histopathologic changes in candidiasis compared to aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Hidayat, A

    2000-01-01

    areas of deep retinitis/choroiditis. Contrary to the findings in Candida endophthalmitis, vitreous biopsy may not yield positive results in aspergillosis. Aspergillus endophthalmitis is usually associated with a high rate of mortality caused by cerebral and cardiac complications. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:11190022

  3. The response of the macaque tracheobronchial epithelium to acute ozone injury. A quantitative ultrastructural and autoradiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. W.; Plopper, C. G.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    important participants in the repair of chemically injured airway epithelium; stratification and increased amounts of cytoplasmic filament bundles and desmosomal attachments, rather than being evidence of squamous metaplasia or dysplastic change, might be stereotypic responses of airway epithelium to injury; and the ciliated cell population becomes less susceptible to ozone-induced necrosis with continuing exposure. Images Figure 21 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 26 Figure 27 PMID:6540523

  4. Cellular pathology of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed Central

    Buja, L. M.; Kovanen, P. T.; Bilheimer, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 24 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 22 Figure 23 PMID:118674

  5. Constitution and behavior of follicular structures in the human anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Ciocca, D. R.; Puy, L. A.; Stati, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    The follicular structures present in the human pituitary gland were studied, at the light-microscopic level, using histochemical and immunocytochemical techniques. The antisera applied in the peroxidase-antiperoxidase procedure were anti-hFSH beta, anti-hLH beta, anti-hPRL, anti-hGH, anti-hTSH beta, anti-hLPH beta, anti-pACTH, and anti-hACTH. In the 10 normal pituitaries examined, follicles were always found in the three areas of the adenohypophysis. The wall of the pars distalis follicles showed the seven immunoreactive cell types studied, while follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) cells were the only ones present in the wall of the pars tuberalis follicles. Most of the cell types studied were also present in the wall of the intermediate area follicles, but these follicles had characteristics not found in the other two areas. They were very large, with frequent interconnections forming a three-dimensional network of anastomotic cavities, and the colloid had different histochemical affinity. None of the hormones studied could be detected by immunocytochemistry within the follicular colloid. Three of the ten pituitary adenomas examined showed numerous follicular structures. Some of the follicles in the adenomatous pituitaries were similar to those found in the normal adenohypophysis, but there were also follicles filled with only traces of colloid and numerous blood cells in the cavity, and follicles filled with neoformed connective tissue. In one of these cases, FSH/LH immunoreactive adenoma cells were seen in the wall of the follicles. The results obtained suggest that the finding of pituitary adenomas with follicular structures is not uncommon and that the follicles originate from the tumor cells. In addition, the follicles seem to have several functional stages, explaining the finding of different types of follicular formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11

  6. Microtubule coils versus the surface membrane cytoskeleton in maintenance and restoration of platelet discoid shape.

    PubMed Central

    White, J. G.; Rao, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    in combination with taxol, inhibited the cold-induced shape change but not dilation of the open canalicular system. Rewarming eliminated open canalicular system dilation and restored lentiform appearance. The results indicate that microtubule coils are the major structural elements responsible for disc shape and its restoration after submaximal stimulation or rewarming of chilled platelets. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:9466587

  7. "Viable motheaten," a new allele at the motheaten locus. I. Pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, L. D.; Coman, D. R.; Bailey, C. L.; Beamer, W. G.; Sidman, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    spermatogenesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6380298

  8. Increased atherosclerosis and glomerulonephritis in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) given injections of BSA over an extended period of time.

    PubMed Central

    Stills, H. F.; Bullock, B. C.; Clarkson, T. B.

    1983-01-01

    , attached to, and penetrating into the intima of the coronary lesions. No correlation was seen between the development of glomerulonephritis and either aortic or coronary artery atherosclerosis. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6227252

  9. Kinetics of acute inflammation induced by Escherichia coli in rabbits. II. The effect of hyperimmunization, complement depletion, and depletion of leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kopaniak, M. M.; Movat, H. Z.

    1983-01-01

    demonstrable in lesions. Histologically more neutrophils were present in the hyperimmunized than in the normal rabbits, but this difference was striking when normal animals were compared with leukopenic animals, in some of which only very occasional small accumulations of neutrophils were present. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6336905

  10. Diagnosis of equine stifle joint disorders: three cases

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Marc R.; Hurtig, Mark B.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, arthrographic, arthroscopic, and pathological findings of three horses with femorotibial joint injuries are presented. Overall diagnostic accuracy is improved when clinical signs, arthrography, and arthroscopy are combined. Treatment of these injuries remains limited. One horse was euthanized, and two were treated by stall rest after diagnosis. Of the two surviving horses, one became a successful breeding animal, and the other was unable to perform as a pleasure horse. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17423858

  11. Current Status of Prosthetic Cardiac Valves

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Wilfred M.; Wareham, Ellsworth E.

    1967-01-01

    The majority of patients with acquired valvular heart disease have severe damage to valves which is not amenable to repair but can now be treated by valve replacement with an acceptable mortality and morbidity. The caged ball or disc valve is widely used and is proving clinically satisfactory for cardiac valve replacement. Thromboembolism is the significant complication. With improvement in technique the incidence of infection, detachment and other complications has been reduced. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:6039188

  12. Evaluation of the Implications of Nanoscale Architectures on Contextual Knowledge Discovery and Memory: Self-Assembled Architectures and Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    2002. [22] Y. Ohya , K. Yabuki, M . Hashimoto, A. Nakajima, and T. Ouchi, "Multistep Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Sequential... M ) 9 Figure 3: Instruction per Cycle (IPC) (Pentium III) Figure 4: L1 Data and L2 Cache Miss Rates (Pentium III) FPclose retail 0 0.2 0.4...45.3722.6911.345.671.130.570.110.060.030.01 Support % M is s Ra te % L1D Cache Miss Rate Global L2 Cache Miss Rate 10 Figure 5: Execution cycles (Pentium 4) Figure 6: Instruction

  13. Measuring Sleep by Wrist Actigraph.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    4 FIGURES 1 AND 2 5-7 FIGURE 3 8 EXPERIMENT 3: TRANSDUCER ORIENTATION 9 EXPERIMENT 4: TRANSDUCER PLACEMENT 9 FIGURE 4 10 FIGURE 5 11 EXPERIMENT 5...FIGURE 9 23 SLEEP RECOGNITION SOFTWARE 24 ASSESSMENT OF VALIDATION 25 TABLE 3 26 FIGURE 10 27 TABLE 4 28 HARDWARE SPECIFICATIONS OF A WRIST-WEARABLE...4.4 z 1.7 ca) and connected .e "he our channels of a Medilog recorder. line subjects completed o" 9 ., .o_ _ TRANSDUCER - ACCELER -OMETER 5SOC Figure 4

  14. Biotechnology at low Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, J P; Yager, P; Goldstein, R E; Austin, R H

    1996-01-01

    The shrinking of liquid handling systems to the micron and submicron size range entails moving into the area of small Reynolds numbers. The fluid dynamics in this regime are very different from the macroscale. We present an intuitive explanation of how the different physics of small Reynolds numbers flow, along with microscopic sizes, can influence device design, and give examples from our own work using fluid flow in microfabricated devices designed for biological processing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8968612

  15. Spatial frequency tuning of orientation-discontinuity-sensitive corticofugal feedback to the cat lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Cudeiro, J; Sillito, A M

    1996-01-01

    but only seen in the range 0.1-0.5 c.p.d. 5. The influence of the orientation alignment of inner and outer stimulus sections revealed a marked difference between cells studied with and without feedback. In the presence of feedback fully aligned stimuli enhanced surround antagonism of centre responses for spatial frequencies in the range 0.1-0.5 c.p.d., in X and Y cells. In the absence of corticofugal feedback this alignment effect was essentially eliminated. 6. These data show that surround antagonism of the centre response is influenced by orientation alignment of the stimulus sections at low spatial frequencies and in the presence of corticofugal feedback. They support a cortically driven enhancement of the inhibitory mechanisms reinforcing surround mechanisms in the dLGN. We propose that feedback enhances a low spatial frequency cut-off in the dLGN, that this effect is maximal for a continuous iso-orientated contour, but diminished whenever there is an orientation discontinuity. The hyperpolarizing influence underlying this effect may contribute to the recently described synchronizing influence of the direct corticofugal contacts onto relay cells. We suggest feedback of the cortical level of analysis refines the transfer of the visual input at geniculate level in a stimulus-context-dependent fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8821144

  16. Ocular explosion during cataract surgery: a clinical, histopathological, experimental, and biophysical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Warwar, R E; Green, W R

    1998-01-01

    -bank eyes and the theoretical analyses of this entity show that the pressure required to produce such an injury is much more easily obtained with a 3- or 5-mL syringe than with a syringe 10 mL or larger. CONCLUSIONS: Explosion of an eyeball during the injection of anesthesia for ocular surgery is a devastating injury that may go unrecognized. The probability of an ocular explosion can be minimized by careful use of a syringe 10 mL or larger with a blunt needle, by discontinuing the injection if resistance is met, and by inspecting the globe prior to ocular massage or placement of a Honan balloon. When ocular explosion occurs, immediate referral to and intervention by a vitreoretinal surgeon is optimal. Practicing ophthalmologists should be aware of this blinding but preventable complication of ocular surgery. Images FIGURE 1 Figure 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 PMID:10360292

  17. Acquired mitochondrial impairment as a cause of optic nerve disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sadun, A

    1998-01-01

    . ( Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURES 24 FIGURES 25 FIGURES 26 FIGURES 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 PMID:10360310

  18. Mast cell differentiation depends on T cells and granule synthesis on fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, S; Mansour, A; Gallily, R; Smolarski, M; Rofolovitch, M; Ginsburg, H

    1983-01-01

    increased (from 0.12 microgram per 10(6) vacuolated cells to 3.02 micrograms per 10(6) mast cells). These mast cells were readily degranulated by monoclonal anti-DNP-BSA IgE, and the antigen, releasing 90% of the histamine. The study shows that mucosal mast cells formation from 'large lymphoid-like' cells present in the blood and in the lymph, is stimulated by TCF. The condensation of the metachromatic material and histamine synthesis depends on other cells, presumably fibroblasts which comprise the principal cell in the embryonic skin monolayers. The mechanism of the fibroblast influence is not yet known. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6186596

  19. The ultrastructure of conjunctival melanocytic tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A

    1984-01-01

    melanocytes and exhibited more haphazard arrangements of the melanofilaments, which were only partially melaninized. Mitochondria were more numerous than in dendritic melanocytes, and monoribosomes predominated over polyribosomes. Cytoplasmic filaments were inconspicuous. Cells in the immediate subepithelial connective tissue zone had features identical to those of the cells within the junctional nests. Smaller, lymphocytoid cells with less numerous and more rudimentary melanosomes were found in the middle and deeper portions of the lesions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 67 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 56 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 FIGURE 68 FIGURE 69 FIGURE 70 FIGURE 71 FIGURE 72 FIGURE 73 FIGURE 74 FIGURE 75 FIGURE 76 FIGURE 77 FIGURE 78 FIGURE 79 FIGURE 80 FIGURE 81 FIGURE 82 FIGURE 83 FIGURE 84 FIGURE 85 FIGURE 86 FIGURE 87 FIGURE 88 FIGURE 89 PMID:6398936

  20. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene expression in vascular cells and in experimental and human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, S. K.; Underwood, R.; Hayes, L.; Sherman, M. L.; Kufe, D. W.; Libby, P.

    1992-01-01

    authors found no mRNA for the MCSF receptor, c-fms, in cultured EC or SMC macrophages are likely the primary target for MCSF within atheromatous vessels. The authors therefore investigated the effects of MCSF on monocyte functions related to foam cell development. Treatment of cultured human monocytes with recombinant human MCSF (10(3) U/ml, 72 hr) led to the accumulation of mRNA for the acetyl-LDL (scavenger) receptor and apolipoprotein E (apo E). These studies establish that vascular EC and SMC produce substantial MCSF in response to a variety of stimuli. The local production of MCSF during atherogenesis may contribute to macrophage survival and proliferation or activate specific macrophage functions such as expression of the scavenger receptor and secretion of apo E. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:1739124

  1. Myocardial diseases of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    seen less frequently; and, in contrast to man, coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia are rather infrequent in animals. The present review shows clearly that the spectrum of myocardial diseases in animals is enlarging and that many newly recognized diseases are emerging and assuming considerable importance. For example, various heritable cardiomyopathies have recently been described in the KK mouse, cattle, and rats. Increasingly recognized myocardial diseases include cardiomyopathies in cats, dogs, and birds; anthracycline cardiotoxicity; furazolidone cardiotoxicity; ionophore cardiotoxicity; myocardial damage associated with central nervous system injuries; myocardial hypertrophy in Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 45 Figure 46 Figure 47 Figure 48 Figure 61 Figure 62 Figure 63 Figure 64 Figure 79 Figure 75 Figure 76 Figure 77 Figure 78 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 & 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figure 37 Figure 38 Figure 39 Figure 40 Figure 41 Figure 42 Figure 43 Figure 44 Figure 49 Figure 50 Figure 51 Figure 52 Figure 53 Figure 54 Figure 55 Figure 56 Figure 57 Figure 58 Figure 59 Figure 60 Figure 65 Figure 66 Figure 67 Figure 68 Figure 69 Figure 70 Figure 71 & 72 Figure 73 & 74 PMID:3524254

  2. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    further study. Specimens from patients with intraocular hemorrhage should be viewed cautiously, since erythrocytes contain high levels of enolase. Analysis of subretinal aspirates is an extremely accurate method of confirming the diagnosis of Coats' disease. The key diagnostic findings are the presence of cholesterol crystals and pigment-laden macrophages and the absence of tumor cells on fresh preparations. The technique should be reserved for patients where retinoblastoma has been ruled out by all noninvasive means and massive subretinal drainage is anticipated. The natural progression in advanced Coats' disease is toward the development of a blind, painful eye. Spontaneous regression does rarely occur, and some eyes quietly progress to a phthisical state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 A FIGURE 34 B FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 A FIGURE 46 B FIGURE 47 A FIGURE 47 B FIGURE 48 A FIGURE 48 B FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 54 (cont.) FIGURE 55 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 A FIGURE 66 B FIGURE 67 A FIGURE 67 B PMID:1808814

  3. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  4. Red krypton and blue-green argon panretinal laser photocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy: a laboratory and clinical comparison.

    PubMed Central

    Blankenship, G W

    1986-01-01

    than the pretreatment acuities with fewer cases having larger losses of vision in the krypton treated group. Loss of peripheral visual field was equal with the two types of treatment having a minimal decrease with the IV-4e isopter, but substantial loss with the I-4e isopter. Additional vitreous hemorrhage rarely occurred in either group, but was slightly more frequent in those treated with krypton. Complete regression was accomplished in most eyes with pretreatment disc and/or NVE in both groups, but persistence of neovascularization was more frequent in those treated with krypton. Overall, the wavelength used seemingly had little effect on the result.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 PMID:2438841

  5. Occupational exposure to polychlorinated dioxins, polychlorinated furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, and biphenylenes after an electrical panel and transformer accident in an office building in Binghamton, NY.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A; Tiernan, T

    1985-01-01

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and tri- and tetrachlorinated benzene-containing electrical transformer was involved in an explosion and fire in a modern office building in Binghamton, New York, on February 5, 1981. Because of an unusual system of air shafts the entire building and adjacent garage became contaminated with toxic chemicals. Polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and biphenylenes were formed as pyrolytic by-products. Before the extent of the chemical contamination was appreciated workers were exposed to these chemicals. Four years after the explosion and after the expenditure of over $22 million for cleaning and other expenses, the building remains closed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:3928358

  6. Early chiropractic education in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2002-01-01

    Chiropractic education in the northwestern United States has its origins in the Marsh School & Cure in 1904. Most of the early schools were located in Portland, Oregon, including the D.D. Palmer College of Chiropractic (1908-1910), and several of these had merged by 1912 or 1913 to form the Pacific Chiropractic College, forerunner of today's Western States College. The latter was organized as a non-profit institution during the Great Depression, and struggled not only to survive but to create a higher standard. The early broad-scope of chiropractic training in the state probably encouraged the liberal scope of practice enjoyed in Oregon to this day. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 24

  7. Supramolecular ordering of DNA in the cholesteric liquid crystalline phase: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    1993-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 146-base pair DNA fragments form a cholesteric liquid crystalline phase in the range of about 160-290 mg/ml. We present a structural analysis of this phase by comparing the data obtained from polarizing and electron microscopy. This phase shows multiple aspects or "textures" which are presented and interpreted. They mainly depend on the orientation of the structure relative to the observation plane and on the nature, distribution, and amount of defects present in the phase. These defects are then analyzed with the two methods, and the molecular orientations can be defined precisely in their core. The biological interest of such structural analyses is discussed in relation with the understanding of chromatin structure and function. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 13 PMID:8369461

  8. Echocardiography as a Research and Clinical Tool in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Allen, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Echocardiography is the accepted term for the study of cardiac ultrasound. Although a relatively new tool for the study of the heart in man it has already found wide acceptance in the area of cardiac research and in the study of clinical cardiac disease. Animals had often been used in the early experiments with cardiac ultrasound, but only recently has echocardiography been used as a research and clinical tool in veterinary medicine. In this report echocardiography is used in the research of anesthetic effects on ventricular function and clinically in the diagnosis of congestive cardiomyopathy in a cat, ventricular septal defect in a calf, and pericardial effusion in a dog. Echocardiography is now an important adjunct to the field of veterinary cardiology. ImagesFigure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17422196

  9. Mucoceles of the sphenoid sinus: neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, M G

    1976-01-01

    Seven examples of mucocele of the sphenoid sinus have been described. The characteristic symptoms and signs have been described, and the diagnostic neuroradiologic features have been demonstrated. The condition is not a benign one, as is demonstrated by total blindness which occurred in one patient (Case 2). A high index of suspicion for this condition with early referral for neuroradiologic diagnosis leads to proper management and treatment which is usually successful. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 7 D FIGURE 7 E FIGURE 7 F FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 PMID:867637

  10. Experimental models of lymphoproliferative disease. The mouse as a model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mouse as an experimental immunopathologic model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias. Immunomorphologic evidence is presented that clearly demonstrates that B- and T-cell subtypes of mouse (murine) lymphoma/leukemia closely resemble and are analogous to B- and T-cell subtypes of human lymphoma/leukemia as defined by recently proposed immunomorphologic classifications. Further evidence is presented that favors the hypothesis that certain types of murine and human B-cell lymphoma develop out of prodromal, prelymphomatous states, which exhibit antecedent morphologic and immunologic abnormalities. The many experimental advantages of the murine systems are stressed, as well as the concept that the presently defined immunomorphologic approach should be effectively combined with molecular and cytogenetic parameters. Images Table 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Table 9 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6605691

  11. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  12. Studies on the Nature and Management of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.

    1971-01-01

    Prevalence of psoriasis in Caucasians is estimated as 2 to 3 percent. Sound epidemiologic studies on a worldwide basis are needed to secure accurate prevalence rates for comparative purposes. Utilizing Stanford's psoriasis life histories records, the genetics of psoriasis has been explored by various means: statistical census data, pedigree analysis, and twin studies. This research suggests a multifactorial pattern of inheritance for psoriasis, implying that both genetic and environmental components are responsible for the manifestation of the disease. At present it is not possible to point to any single causative factor. Some of the suggested areas for research include study of uninvolved skin, growth control in the psoriatic lesion, viral causes, immunological aspects, and lipid metabolism. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:5578103

  13. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Harrison

    1960-01-01

    The nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus and the Fanconi syndrome show characteristic changes with electron microscopy. Experimental studies of animals were carried out to determine the significance of such changes by observing reactions that occur under carefully controlled conditions. A lesion with collagen deposition that was found in the centrolobular region of glomeruli sheds new light on the function of this region. This evidence must be considered in developing an understanding of how the production of urine is controlled. Fluid-filled compartments and various bodies associated with the ultrastructure of tubule cells can be produced under conditions which suggest that these structures play a role in tubular resorption. ImagesFigure 1, 2.Figure 3.Figure 4, 5.Figure 6, 7.Figure 8, 9.Figure 10.Figure 11, 12.Figure 13, 14.Figure 15, 16.Figure 17. PMID:13759386

  14. Teaching electron diffraction and imaging of macromolecules.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, W; Schmid, M F; Prasad, B V

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic analysis can be used to determine the three-dimensional structures of macromolecules at resolutions ranging between 3 and 30 A. It differs from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy or x-ray crystallography in that it allows an object's Coulomb potential functions to be determined directly from images and can be used to study relatively complex macromolecular assemblies in a crystalline or noncrystalline state. Electron imaging already has provided valuable structural information about various biological systems, including membrane proteins, protein-nucleic acid complexes, contractile and motile protein assemblies, viruses, and transport complexes for ions or macromolecules. This article, organized as a series of lectures, presents the biophysical principles of three-dimensional analysis of objects possessing different symmetries. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 PMID:8324196

  15. Neovascularization and tumor growth in the rabbit brain. A model for experimental studies of angiogenesis and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Zagzag, D.; Brem, S.; Robert, F.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the study of tumor angiogenesis within the rabbit brain is presented. Implantation of the VX2 carcinoma provides a reproducible tumor accompanied by angiogenesis. The authors report the sequential growth, histology, tumor neovascularization, and vascular permeability of this tumor following its intracerebral implantation. Tumor angiogenesis correlates with the rapid and logarithmic intracerebral tumor growth. The proliferation of blood vessels in the tumor and the organization of tumor cells around tumor vessels are described. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (detected by Evans blue leakage) starts in the early stages of tumor development and becomes prominent as the tumor vasculature and size increase. This model is useful for experimental studies of angiogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 15 PMID:2451889

  16. Cultured corneal epithelia for ocular surface disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, I R

    1999-01-01

    from any eye is difficult, making confirmation of such work challenging. 7. The results of the rabbit model suggest that allogeneic grafts may restore a nearly normal ocular epithelial surface to certain ocular surface injuries. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 56 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 PMID:10703147

  17. The ocular manifestations of congenital infection: a study of the early effect and long-term outcome of maternally transmitted rubella and toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, J F

    1998-01-01

    and may vary from blindness and severe mental retardation to minor retinochoroidal lesions of little consequence. Effective solutions for either the prevention or treatment of congenital toxoplasmosis have not been developed in this country but are under intensive and continuing investigation. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5C FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15A FIGURE 15B FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20A FIGURE 20B FIGURE 20C FIGURE 20D FIGURE 20E FIGURE 20F FIGURE 20G FIGURE 20H FIGURE 20J FIGURE 20K FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 A FIGURE 24B FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 PMID:10360309

  18. Orbital blow-out fractures: correlation of preoperative computed tomography and postoperative ocular motility.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G J; Garcia, G H; Logani, S C; Murphy, M L; Sheth, B P; Seth, A K

    1998-01-01

    intrinsic damage and subsequent fibrosis, appear to result in poorer motility outcomes. Although this retrospective study does not conclusively prove its benefit, an urgent surgical approach to selected injuries should be considered. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:10360296

  19. The differential diagnosis and classification of eyelid retraction.

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, G B

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: Classification schemes are useful in the formulation of differential diagnoses. Thoughtful commentary has been devoted to the classification of blepharoptosis, but the causes of eyelid retraction have received less attention in published reports. Although eyelid retraction most frequently is associated with Graves' ophthalmopathy, numerous other entities may cause the sign. This study was undertaken to provide a more comprehensive differential diagnosis and classification of eyelid retraction. METHODS: A series of patients with eyelid retraction was studied, and pertinent published reports were reviewed. RESULTS: Forty-four patients with different causes for eyelid retraction are described. Normal thyroid function and regulation were confirmed in all patients in whom Graves' ophthalmopathy could not be excluded by clinical, biochemical, or historical criteria. CONCLUSION: Based on a series of patients and reported cases, a differential diagnosis for eyelid retraction is proposed using a classification system comprising three categories (neurogenic, myogenic, and mechanistic). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 7 D FIGURE 7 E FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 10 C FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B PMID:8719687

  20. Localization of hepatitis B surface antigen in conventional paraffin sections of the liver. Comparison of immunofluorescence, immunoperoxidase, and orcein staining methods with regard to their specificity and reliability as antigen marker.

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, N. C.; Sachdeva, R.

    1975-01-01

    Hepatitis B antigen (HBAg) has been demonstrated in conventional formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded liver tissue by peroxidase and fluorescent immunostaining as well as by orcein. Complete locational and morphologic identity is seen between material stained by specific immunologic methods and by orcein. The antigen is restricted to the cytoplasm and is generally observed in the hepatocyte; it is present in three morphologic forms. Certain morphologic forms can even be identified in hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue. Results of immunostaining procedures indicate that the antigen demonstrated in this study consists entirely of surface coat of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg). This seems to be the only component revealed by orcein staining. The latter is considered to be a good marker of the surface antigen and to have certain advantages over immunostaining. It is suggested that suitability of conventional paraffin sections for the detection of HBAg has wide and important implications. Images Figures 1-5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:55076

  1. Postmortem findings in four litters of dogs with familial canine dermatomyositis.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Prieur, D. J.; Haupt, K. H.; Collier, L. L.; Evermann, J. F.; Ladiges, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Postmortem evaluations were performed on 20 juvenile to young adult collie and collie-Labrador retriever crossbred dogs with dermatomyositis and 10 neonatal collies. Cutaneous, muscular, and vascular lesions were present in the juvenile and adult dogs and were most severe in areas of the head and distal extremities. In more severely affected dogs, lesions were more generalized, including myositis of esophageal muscle and arteritis of skin, muscle, bladder, and spermatic cord. Although viruses were not isolated from muscle, crystalline viral-like structures were present in cytoplasm of endothelial cells within skeletal muscle. The dogs with dermatitis and myositis consistently had lymphoid hyperplasia, especially of peripheral lymph nodes. More severely affected dogs were smaller than less severely affected littermates, and the more severely affected males had reduced weight of testicles and prostate glands, compared with body weight. The reduced weight of genital organs correlated positively with reduced fertility. A few lymphoid aggregates were present in or around thyroid glands of 6 of the 20 dogs. There was no histologic evidence of glomerular disease in any of the dogs. The neonatal collies had no evidence of dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3717301

  2. Pathologic findings in adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency. II. Thymus, spleen, lymph node, and gastrointestinal tract lymphoid tissue alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Ratech, H.; Hirschhorn, R.; Greco, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Eight autopsies of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency disease (ADA-SCID) were reviewed with special emphasis on the lymphoid tissues. The thymus histology in five cases was remarkably uniform, whether or not prior ADA enzyme replacement or immunologic reconstitution therapy had been administered. Lymph nodes and spleens in all cases examined showed a residual nonlymphoid architectural framework corresponding to usual T and B cell zones found in normals. The development of an extranodal, monoclonal IgA lambda B cell immunoblastic lymphoma as a terminal event in one patient after several years of successful ADA enzyme replacement therapy through multiple red blood cell transfusions is described. In another patient with long-term ADA enzyme replacement, a terminal autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed. Autopsy revealed severe deposits of iron in the B cell zones of the lymph nodes, which is an unusual location. In addition, iron deposits outlined the splenic trabeculae, as well as the ring fibers and bridging fibers of the splenic sinuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2596574

  3. Malignant histiocytosis. A phenotypic and genotypic investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Cattoretti, G.; Villa, A.; Vezzoni, P.; Giardini, R.; Lombardi, L.; Rilke, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ten cases of malignant histiocytosis (MH) were evaluated for clinical and histopathologic features, phenotype, and rearrangement of T cell receptor (TCR) beta, gamma, and alpha and immunoglobulin (Ig) genes (7/10). All cases were HLA-DR+ and CD30-positive. Four cases had molecular evidence of T cell lineage such as TCR beta, gamma, and alpha rearrangements, and one additional case synthesized the cytoplasmic TCR beta chain. The remaining five cases did not show unequivocal T, B, natural killer (NK) cell, or macrophagic origin, and three of them had germline TCR and Ig genes. Ultrastructural analysis was not helpful for the definition of the cell lineage. Most myelomonocytic markers (MAC387, CD13, CD14, CD64, CD68) were either negative on the MH cells or were expressed on cells with rearranged TCR gene. Precursor (CD34, CD7) and NK (CD16, CD56, and CD57) cell markers were not found. The lineage of a number of cases of MH remains unresolved. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2349962

  4. Immunohistochemical and biochemical indicators of muscle damage in vitro: the stability of control muscle and the effects of dinitrophenol and calcium ionophore.

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, T. R.; Jackson, M. J.; Phoenix, J.; MacLennan, P.; West-Jordan, J.; Edwards, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The biochemical, histological and ultrastructural effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol and the calcium ionophore, A23187, on rat soleus muscle incubated in vitro have been examined to test the hypothesis that immunohistochemical techniques can be used to recognize early structural features of fibre damage. In control muscles, despite mild glycogen depletion and a mild reduction in protein synthetic rate in the central portion of the muscle, fibres throughout the muscle appear to be viable with normal cytoskeletal and contractile protein architecture, normal concentrations of high energy phosphates and no creatine kinase efflux. Dinitrophenol causes rapid creatine kinase efflux, extensive loss of immunolabelling for desmin and dystrophin, and abnormal myosin immunolabelling. Creatine kinase efflux and the changes in desmin and dystrophin are reduced by the exclusion of calcium. A23187 causes more gradual creatine kinase efflux associated with changes in myosin immunolabelling, but loss of desmin and dystrophin immunolabelling is restricted to a few of the most peripheral fibres. The results suggest that immunohistochemical methods can be used to reveal differences in the intracellular mechanisms of muscle damage. Although both dinitrophenol and A23187 may act, in part, through calcium-mediated processes, their effects on cytoskeletal proteins differ. Creatine kinase efflux after A23187 may not be due to gross sarcolemmal damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7999634

  5. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  6. Multiple conductances in the large K+ channel from Chara corallina shown by a transient analysis method.

    PubMed Central

    Tyerman, S D; Terry, B R; Findlay, G P

    1992-01-01

    The large conductance K+ channel in the tonoplast of Chara corallina has subconductance states (substates). We describe a method that detects substates by monitoring the time derivative of channel current. Substates near to the full conductance tend to have long durations and high probabilities, while those of smaller amplitude occur with less probability and short duration. The substate pattern is similar in cell-attached, inside-out and outside-out patches over a range of temperatures. The pattern changes at high Ca2+ concentration (10 mol m-3) on the cytoplasmic face of inside-out patches. One substate at approximately 50% of the full conductance is characterized by a high frequency of transitions from the full conductance level. This midstate conductance is not a constant proportion of the full conductance but changes as a function of membrane potential difference (p.d.) showing strong inward rectification. We suggest that the channel is a single pore that can change conformation and/or charge profile to give different conductances. The mean durations of the full conductance level and the midstate decrease as the membrane p.d. becomes more negative. Programs for analysis of channel kinetics based on an half-amplitude detection criterion are shown to be unsuitable for analysis of the K+ channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:1504245

  7. VASCULAR LESIONS IN SARCOIDOSIS—Probable Relationship to Steroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Carl C.

    1957-01-01

    In two patients with sarcoidosis treated with cortisone, localized vascular lesions, proven by biopsy, subsequently developed. Vascular lesions occurring in sarcoidosis, basically a granulomatous disease, are rarely described. However, a clinical picture of combined arteritis-sarcoidosis with overlapping features is not infrequently observed. Hence clinical differentiation may be difficult. Some observers suggest an interrelationship, perhaps a common etiological grouping in the hypersensitivity disease classification, because of the basic pathological lesions of granuloma and arteritis. The possible relationship of steroid therapy to the development of diffuse vascular lesions or arteritis appears to be gaining recognition, particularly in the case of susceptible patients with rheumatoid arthritis, although in the two cases here reported the disease for which steroids were administered was sarcoidosis and the arterial lesions observed subsequent to therapy were localized rather than diffuse. Since it seems unlikely that arteritis would be part of the clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis, it is implied that a higher incidence of such lesions (localized or diffuse) may be related to prolonged steroid therapy. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:13489498

  8. Bay or baylike regions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were potent inhibitors of Gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, L M; Rummel, A M; Masten, S J; Trosko, J E; Upham, B L

    1998-01-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known carcinogens, and a considerable amount of research has been devoted to predicting the tumor-initiating potential of PAHs based on chemical structure. However, there has been little research into the effects of PAHs on the epigenetic events of tumor promotion and no structural correlation has been made thereof. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) activity was used in this study as an epigenetic biomarker to determine the structure-activity relationships of twelve different PAHs. The PAHs used were naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, anthracene, 1-methylanthracene, 2-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9, 10-dimethylanthracene, phenanthrene, fluorene, 1-methylfluorene, and fluoranthene. Results showed that PAHs containing bay or baylike regions inhibited GJIC more than did the linear PAHs. The nonnaphthalene PAHs were not cytotoxic as determined by a vital dye uptake assay, but the naphthalene compounds were cytotoxic at the higher doses, indicating that the down regulation of GJIC by these naphthalenes could be a consequence of general membrane damage. Inhibition of GJIC by all the inhibitory PAHs was reversed when the cells were refreshed with PAH-free growth medium. Inhibition of GJIC occurred within 0.5-5 min and correlated with the aqueous solubility of the PAHs. The present study revealed that there are structural determinants of epigenetic toxicity as determined by GJIC activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9417772

  9. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of a superstructure of fluid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Klösgen, B; Helfrich, W

    1997-01-01

    Using cryo-transmission electron microscopy, we have obtained abundant and reproducible evidence for a superstructure of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Dispersions of vesicles were prepared by gentle shaking of a 2% suspension of DOPC in water followed in part by extrusion through a porous technical membrane. Sampling and cryofixation took place at various times within 3 weeks after the preparation. From the micrographs we infer that the small fraction of vesicles enclosing one another develop passages (connections) between the bilayers. In contrast, the superstructure is basically a feature of disconnected membranes. Among its modifications are isolated membrane bends or folds and a grainy membrane texture with a minimal grain spacing of 4-6 nm. In the extruded dispersions the passages and the superstructure seem to be formed mostly within the first day. The fraction of smooth and unilamellar vesicles is large at all times and in all dispersions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:9414216

  10. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, D L

    1980-01-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 bacteriophage tail structure show that assembly can be controlled by switching the subunits from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called "autostery", by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of a latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assemblies of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6894706

  11. Intracellular calcium levels correlate with speed and persistent forward motion in migrating neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, J T; Ghosh, R N; Maxfield, F R

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and human neutrophil motility was studied by video microscopy. Neutrophils stimulated by a uniform concentration of an N-formylated peptide chemoattractant (f-Met-Leu-Phe) were tracked during chemokinetic migration on albumin, fibronectin, and vitronectin. [Ca2+]i buffering with quin2 resulted in significant decreases in mean speed on albumin. To further characterize the relationship between [Ca2+]i changes and motility we carried out a cross-correlation analysis of [Ca2+]i with several motility parameters. Cross-correlations between [Ca2+]i and each cell's speed, angle changes, turn strength, and persistent forward motion revealed (i) a positive correlation between [Ca2+]i and cell speed (p < 0.05), (ii) no significant correlation between turns and calcium spikes, and (iii) the occurrence of turns during periods of low speed. Significant negative correlations between [Ca2+]i and angle change were noted on the high adhesion substrates vitronectin and fibronectin but not on the low adhesion substrate albumin. These data imply that there is a general temporal relationship between [Ca2+]i, speed, and persistent motion. However, the correlations are not sufficiently strong to imply that changes in [Ca2+]i are required proximal signals for velocity changes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:7787012

  12. Electro-optical property of extremely stretched skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, Y; Fujime, S

    1975-01-01

    Skinned fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle could easily be stretched up to 8 mum or more in sarcomere length. Such extremely stretched fibers gave quite sharp optical diffraction patterns. The intensities of all observable diffraction lines were found to increase on application of electric field (10 similar to 100 V/cm) parallel to the fiber axis, provided that there was no overlap between thin and thick filaments. By use of a polarizing microscope, it was concluded that I-bands were mainly responsible for this intensity increase. By application of square pulses, the time course of the intensity increase and decay was followed. The analysis based on a simple model suggests: (a) Each thin filament has a permanent dipole movement and the movement directs from Z-bands to the free end of the thin filament. (b) The flexural rigidity of thin filaments is estimated to be similar to 3 with 10-17 dyn with cm-2. The present fibers will provide various applications in physiochemical studies of in vivo thin and thick filaments. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:1078630

  13. Relaxin protects against myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion in rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Bani, D.; Masini, E.; Bello, M. G.; Bigazzi, M.; Sacchi, T. B.

    1998-01-01

    Myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion comes from multiple pathogenic events, including endothelial damage, neutrophil extravasation into tissue, platelet and mast cell activation, and peroxidation of cell membrane lipids, which are followed by myocardial cell alterations resulting eventually in cell necrosis. The current study was designed to test the possible cardioprotective effect of the hormone relaxin, which has been found to cause coronary vessel dilation and to inhibit platelet and mast cell activation. Ischemia (for 30 minutes) was induced in rat hearts in vivo by ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery; reperfusion (for 60 minutes or less if the rats died before this predetermined time) was induced by removal of the ligature. Relaxin (100 ng) was given intravenously 30 minutes before ischemia. The results obtained showed that relaxin strongly reduces 1) the extension of the myocardial areas affected by ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage, 2) ventricular arrhythmias, 3) mortality, 4) myocardial neutrophil number, 5) myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil accumulation, 6) production of malonyldialdehyde, an end product of lipid peroxidation, 7) mast cell granule release, 8) calcium overload, and 9) morphological signs of myocardial cell injury. This study shows that relaxin can be regarded as an agent with a marked cardioprotective action against ischemia-reperfusion-induced myocardial injury. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9588905

  14. Basic fibroblast growth factor has a differential effect on MyoD conversion of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from newborn and adult rats.

    PubMed Central

    van Neck, J. W.; Medina, J. J.; Onnekink, C.; van der Ven, P. F.; Bloemers, H. P.; Schwartz, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    MyoD is a master regulatory gene for myogenesis that also converts many mesoderm-derived cells into the skeletal muscle phenotype. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells do not contain MyoD homologous mRNA. However, expression of an exogenously supplied MyoD gene in aortic smooth muscle cells cultured from newborn and adult animals converts these cells to elongated myoblasts and myotubes expressing the skeletal muscle genes for titin, nebulin, myosin, and skeletal alpha-actin. The presence of basic fibroblast growth factor during growth and serum starvation completely inhibits MyoD-mediated conversion in cultures of newborn smooth muscle cells. However, in smooth muscle cell cultures derived from adult rats the presence of fibroblast growth factor increases the conversion frequency. The differential response of exogenous MyoD suggests that the two morphological types of aortic smooth muscle cells, one typical for the newborn rat, the other for the adult rat, represent two distinctive states of differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8391216

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  16. Myocardial changes in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Ultrastructural evidence of immune damage and the role of microangiopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Andrade, S. G.; Correa, R.; Sadigursky, M.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1994-01-01

    Histological and ultrastructural studies of the hearts of dogs sacrificed 18 to 26 days after intraperitoneal inoculation with 4 x 10(5) blood forms of the 12 SF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi/kg of body weight disclosed myocarditis characterized by parasitic invasion of some myocytes, damage and necrosis of nonparasitized myocytes, and interstitial infiltration by mononuclear cells. Nonparasitized myocytes showed alterations ranging from mild edema to severe myocytolysis. These changes often were accompanied by contacts of myocytes with lymphocytes (both granular and agranular) and macrophages. These contacts were characterized by focal loss of the myocyte basement membrane and close approximation of the plasma membranes of the two cells. Contacts between lymphocytes and capillary endothelial cells were also frequent. Platelet aggregates and fibrin microthrombi were observed in some capillaries. Our findings suggest that immune effector cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the myocyte damage and the microangiopathy in acute Chagas' disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8203476

  17. A primer of osteotomy of the weight bearing long bones in children.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, F. R.

    1993-01-01

    A. Why Perform An Osteotomy In Childhood or Adolescence? 1. Progressive deformity for which osteotomy is curative. 2. Cosmesis. 3. To prevent the development of late osteoarthritis (unproven). 4. Progressive ligamentous laxity (rare). 5. Functionally limiting deformities (rare). 6. Development of adaptive joint deformity (rare). B. When To Perform An Osteotomy 1. Immediate correction for progressive deformities or functionally limiting deformities that can not be expected to improve by the natural history of the deformity. 2. Immediate correction if the problems listed under "A" are present such as the development of adaptive joint deformity or progressive ligamentous laxity. 3. If no indication for osteotomy exists except cosmesis, consider delaying correction to avoid the need for repeated osteotomies in disorders for which recurrence is common. C. How To Do The Osteotomies 1. Perform the osteotomy at the level of the deformity when possible. 2. Choose the simplest, safest method that will accomplish specific goals. 3. Complex restoration of perfect mechanical axis and joint alignment may not be necessary. The lesser risks of simpler techniques should be considered. 4. The specific technique chosen will depend on the experience and abilities of the treating physician. Images Figure 1 A Figure 1 B Figure 2 Figure 3A Figure 3B Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A and 6B Figure 6C and 6D Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11A Figure 11B PMID:7820734

  18. Granulophysin is located in the membrane of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils and mobilizes to the plasma membrane following cell stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cham, B. P.; Gerrard, J. M.; Bainton, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Granulophysin, a protein described in platelet dense granule membranes, has been shown to be similar or identical to CD63, a lysosomal membrane protein. We have previously shown granulophysin to be present in neutrophils using immunofluorescence. We now localize granulophysin to the neutrophil azurophilic granules by fine structural immunocytochemistry. Granulophysin expression on the surface membrane of the neutrophil is increased following stimulation of the cells, demonstrated by flow cytometry and fine structural immunocytochemistry. A similar pattern is shown for an anti-CD63 antibody. Incubation of activated neutrophils with D545, a monoclonal antibody to granulophysin, blocks subsequent binding of anti-CD63 antibodies to the cell surface, and anti-CD63 antibodies prevent subsequent binding of D545 as assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Our results support the homology of CD63 and granulophysin previously demonstrated in platelets and confirm CD63 as an activation marker in neutrophils and the first azurophilic granule membrane marker of neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8203473

  19. Structural characterization of the mesangial cell type IV collagenase and enhanced expression in a model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, D. H.; Johnson, R. J.; Marti, H. P.; Martin, J.; Davies, M.; Couser, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Secretion of glomerular cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their specific inhibitors, TIMP-1,2, may play an important role in the turnover of the glomerular extracellular matrix under basal and pathologic conditions. A 66-68 kd MMP secreted by cultured mesangial cells (MC) with activity against Type IV collagen and gelatin was purified and shown by amino-acid sequence analysis to be identical with a Type IV collagenase/gelatinase secreted by certain transformed tumor cell lines. The expression of the mesangial MMP in vivo was limited within the kidney to a small subset of the intrinsic glomerular mesangial cell population. After induction of acute anti-Thy 1.1 glomerulonephritis, there was a large increment in the number of Type IV collagenase-secreting MC, temporally coincident with the development of mesangial hypercellularity. The expression of the MMP inhibitor protein, TIMP-1, was not changed over this period. Ultrastructural studies localized the mesangial MMP to areas of evolving mesangiolysis and at sites of glomerular basement membrane disruption. Enhanced expression of the mesangial cell-derived Type IV collagenase may contribute to the evolution of glomerular injury in this model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis or may be involved in the extensive matrix remodeling process that accompanies this form of glomerular injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 and Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:1321565

  20. The neuropathology of AIDS. UCLA experience and review.

    PubMed Central

    Anders, K. H.; Guerra, W. F.; Tomiyasu, U.; Verity, M. A.; Vinters, H. V.

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has been examined at autopsy in 89 patients who died of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), including 14 patients who died primarily of neurologic complications of the disease. A total of 66 brains (74%) showed significant pathologic abnormalities, with opportunistic infections including cytomegalovirus (14) and cryptococcal (11) infections, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (6), toxoplasmosis (6), and histoplasma microabscesses (1). Incidental Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection was found in 4 cases. Simultaneous CNS infection by more than one microorganism was encountered in 5 patients. Subacute (microglial nodule) encephalitis-related to cytomegalovirus infection or possibly brain infection by the causative agent of AIDS was present in 56 cases. Primary CNS lymphoma was noted in 3 patients. Secondary CNS deposits of lymphoma were found in 1 patient, and another patient had lymphomatoid granulomatosis. Vascular complications were not infrequently seen, and included infarcts secondary to vessel occlusion and disseminated intravascular coagulation in 4 patients and intracranial hemorrhage of variable severity in 13. White matter changes included vacuolar myelopathy (3 cases), central pontine myelinolysis (1 case), and foci of calcified, necrotizing leukoencephalopathy in pontocerebellar fibers of the basis pontis (2 cases). These findings highlight the variety of CNS complications in AIDS, some of which are not associated with clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, characterization of all lesions may be important in understanding the neurologic sequelae of AIDS. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 p540-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2876640

  1. Cell-to-cell herniae in the arterial wall. I. The pathogenesis of vacuoles in the normal media.

    PubMed Central

    Joris, I.; Majno, G.

    1977-01-01

    Vacuoles were observed by light microscopy in the smooth muscle cells of the media in normal rat arteries. By electron microscopy these vacuoles were limited by two membranes; they usually contained myelin figures, a few organelles (especially mitochondria and microfilaments), and an amorphous background material that varied greatly in density. Morphologic evidence indicates that these structures arise by herniation of one smooth muscle cell into another; it is presumed that herniation occurs during contraction at weak points corresponding to areas where adjacent cells come in close contact. Such cell-to-cell herniae were mostly seen in small arteries (arterioles) with a diameter of 0.4 to 0.2 mm; however, none was found in coronary arteries of this size. This discrepancy suggests that the pathogenesis of cell-to-cell herniae is correlated not only with the caliber of the artery but also with functional demands. (Am J Pathol 87:375-398). Images Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:557903

  2. Before Nugent took charge: early efforts to reform chiropractic education, 1919-1941

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2003-01-01

    John J. Nugent, D.C. is remembered by many as either the “Abraham Flexner of Chiropractic” or the “anti-Christ of Chiropractic.” From 1941 until his forced retirement in 1959, the Irish-born Palmer graduate was one of the most important factors in the profession's educational reforms. Yet Nugent's work as the National Chiropractic Association's (NCA's) director of research was not the beginning of the campaign to upgrade chiropractic education. This paper looks at earlier influences and events which set the stage for Nugent's campaign. Among these were the introduction of licensure for chiropractors, the self-defeating actions of B.J. Palmer, the introduction of basic science legislation, the lethargy of the schools, and the struggle for control of education between the schools, on the one hand, and the NCA and the Council of State Chiropractic Examining Boards on the other ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25Figure 26Figure 28Figure 29Figure 30Figure 31Figure 32Figure 33Figure 34Figure 35Figure 36Figure 37Figure 38

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the glucocorticoid receptor DNA-binding domain in complex with DNA and free in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, M A; Härd, T; Nilsson, L

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the glucocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain (GR DBD) in aqueous solution as a dimer in complex with DNA and as a free monomer. In the simulated complex, we find a slightly increased bending of the DNA helix axis compared with the crystal structure in the spacer region of DNA between the two half-sites that are recognized by GR DBD. The bend is mainly caused by an increased number of interactions between DNA and the N-terminal extended region of the sequence specifically bound monomer. The recognition helices of GR DBD are pulled further into the DNA major groove leading to a weakening of the intrahelical hydrogen bonds in the middle of the helices. Many ordered water molecules with long residence times are found at the intermolecular interfaces of the complex. The hydrogen-bonding networks (including water bridges) on either side of the DNA major groove involve residues that are highly conserved within the family of nuclear receptors. Very similar hydrogen-bonding networks are found in the estrogen receptor (ER) DBD in complex with DNA, which suggests that this is a common feature for proper positioning of the recognition helix in ER DBD and GR DBD. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 14 PMID:7696496

  4. Reconstruction of the lids of a child with microblepharon and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J C; Stalnecker, M C; Merriam, G R

    1988-01-01

    The initial stages in the rehabilitation of a male child with severe microblepharon, corneal opacities, bilateral facial clefts, bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and unilateral syndactyly are described. Review of the literature suggests that severe microblepharon is associated with other craniofacial anomalies, and often the child is stillborn or retarded. Surviving children have been abandoned because of their appearance. The child described in this case appears to be unique because his intelligence is normal, and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of penetrating keratoplasty after reconstruction of functional eyelids. The principal problems after corneal grafting appear to have been chronic partial exposure due to inadequate lid length and a poor Bell's reflex and the persistence of a rim of vascularized fibrous tissue around the corneal graft. Future reconstructive surgery is outlined. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:2979029

  5. Leukocytes in chemotactic-fragment-induced lung inflammation. Vascular emigration and alveolar surface migration.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    Lung inflammation was induced in rabbits by intratracheal injections of chemotactic fragments obtained from zymosan-activated serum (CF-ZAS), and the route of vascular emigration and alveolar surface interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes migrating into the lung was characterized by transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron-microscopic examination. Leukocytes migrated from capillaries and venules into the alveolar wall interstitium by adherence to the vascular endothelium and migration through the endothelial intracellular junction to attain a position between a reapposed endothelial cell junction and the vascular basement membrane. The cells then migrated into the interstitium through a narrow opening in the basement membrane. Leukocyte entrance into the alveolar space from the interstitium appeared to occur through small openings in the epithelial basement membrane at or near the Type I epithelial intercellular junction. Once in the alveolus, PMNs and macrophages demonstrated surface adherence and spreading along with evidence of migration, pseudopod extension, interalveolar pore transit, and retraction fiber formation. This study indicates the leukocyte influx into the alveolus in acute chemotactic-factor-induced inflammation is via a continuum of migrational activity, beginning at the pulmonary capillary endothelial surface and persisting on the alveolar epithelial surface. Images Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 16 Figure 9 PMID:7435538

  6. The height of biomolecules measured with the atomic force microscope depends on electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, D J; Engel, A

    1997-01-01

    In biological applications of atomic force microscopy, the different surface properties of the biological sample and its support become apparent. Observed height differences between the biomolecule and its supporting surface are thus not only of structural origin, but also depend on the different sample-tip and support-tip interactions. This can result in negative or positive contributions to the measured height, effects that are described by the DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory. Experimental verification shows that the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample can strongly influence the result obtained. To overcome this problem, pH and electrolyte concentration of the buffer solution have to be adjusted to screen out electrostatic forces. Under these conditions, the tip comes into direct contact with the surface of support and biological system, even when low forces required to prevent sample deformation are applied. In this case, the measured height can be related to the thickness of the native biological structure. The observed height dependence of the macromolecules on electrolyte concentration makes it possible to estimate surface charge densities. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:9284330

  7. Interaction between model membranes and a new class of surfactants with antioxidant function.

    PubMed Central

    Przestalski, S; Hladyszowski, J; Kuczera, J; Rózycka-Roszak, B; Trela, Z; Chojnacki, H; Witek, S; Fisicaro, E

    1996-01-01

    The effect of two series of amphiphilic quaternary ammonium salts on some properties of phospholipid membranes was studied. The compounds of one series, N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-alkyl ammonium bromides, exert a destructive effect on membranes and are treated as reference compounds. The compounds of the other series, N-(3,5-di-t-butyl-4-hydroxy)benzyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-alkyl ammonium bromides, are derivatives of the former ones, exhibit antioxidant properties, and do only relatively slight damage to the membranes. The aim of the work was to explain the difference in molecular interaction with membranes between the two kinds of hydrophobic compounds. Thermodynamic methods, a new mixing technique, and monolayer and quantum calculation methods were used. It has been shown that the antioxidant molecules are less hydrophobic than those of the reference compounds and disturb the membrane organization to a lesser extent. On the basis of monolayer data, we suggest that the studied antioxidant behaves like a substitutional impurity, whereas the reference behaves like an interstitial one. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 PMID:9172744

  8. Specialized structure and metabolic activities of high endothelial venules in rat lymphatic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, N D; Anderson, A O; Wyllie, R G

    1976-01-01

    Microscopic, histochemical and ultrastructural techniques were used to define characteristics of high endothelial venules (HEV) in rat lymphatic tissues. This endothelium contained acetyl esterase and acid hydrolase activities which were not altered by lymphocyte depletion. No immunoglobulins were detected on luminal surfaces of HEV by fluorescent antibody staining. Only minor structural differences were seen between HEV within lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. At both sites, high endothelial cells were linked together by macular junctional complexes and interlocking basal foot processes. Endothelial cell cytoplasm moulded about surfaces of lymphocytes migrating through the venular wall, and flocculant deposits of basement membrane formed over lymphocytes penetrating the basal lamina. The endothelium was ensheathed by three to five layers of overlapping reticular cell plates and connective tissue. Each plate was linked to the reticular meshwork of the node by collagen bundles and anchoring filaments which inserted into the plate's external limiting membrane. This permitted individual paltes to separate or approximate each other as tissue and intravascular pressure varied, and lymphocytes moved across the sheath by insinuating themselves into gaps between overlapping plates. This composite structure of the HEV wall appeared to facilitate lymphocyte entry into the node and minimized vascular leakge. Images Figures 11-13 Figures 1-4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figures 9-10 Figures 14-15 Figure 16 Figures 17-20 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 PMID:1027726

  9. Effect of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) on the Thyroid Gland of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Collins, William T.; Capen, Charles C.; Kasza, Louis; Carter, Celester; Dailey, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) produced ultrastructural lesions in thyroid follicular cells and reductions in serum thyroxine levels in rats that were time- and dose-dependent. The acute effects (4 week) of PCB (50 and 500 ppm) consisted of an accumulation of lysosomal bodies and colloid droplets in follicular cells with abnormalities of microvilli on the luminal surface. The chronic administration (12 week) of PCB (50 and 500/250 ppm) resulted in a striking distention of many follicular cells with large lysosomal bodies with strong acid phosphatase activity and colloid droplets, blunt and abnormally branched microvilli, and mitochondrial vacuolation. These ultrastructural alterations in follicular cells were associated with a highly significant reduction in serum thyroxine with both the low and the high dose of PCB. Follicular cells remained responsive to the lowered thyroxine level after feeding PCB for 4 and 12 weeks and underwent moderate compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Thyroid follicles were smaller than in controls and were lined by more columnar cells that occasionally formed papillary projections into the colloid. Residual ultrastructural alterations persisted for 12 weeks following cessation of feeding the compound, and serum thyroxine levels were significantly lower than in control rats. However, 35 weeks after discontinuing PCB, thyroid follicular cells were similar to those in controls and serum thyroxine levels had returned to normal. The striking ultrastructural lesions in follicular cells produced by feeding PCB to rats appeared to contribute to the lowering of serum thyroxine levels, in combination with the known stimulation of peripheral thyroxine metabolism by these compounds. Certain metabolic alterations produced by PCB intoxication in experimental animals and human beings may be related to an alteration in thyroid function. ImagesFigure 7Figure 8Figure 11Figure 12Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 9Figure 10 PMID

  10. Ultrastructure of the attack of eosinophils stimulated by blood mononuclear cell products on schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, J. P.; Lenzi, H. L.; Elsas, P.; Dessein, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Purified human eosinophils were treated with peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants containing eosinophil cytotoxic enhancing activity (ECEA). Schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni which had been coated either with antibody (Ab) from the sera of infected patients or with the lectin concanavalin A (Con A) were incubated with ECEA-treated and untreated cells for 2 minutes to 12 hours and examined ultrastructurally. Killing was assayed at 18 hours. ECEA caused an increase in the killing of Ab-coated worms, but Con-A-coated worms were not killed by either ECEA-treated or untreated cells. Eosinophils began to degranulate on Ab-coated worms within 2 minutes and continued to degranulate, so that by 12 hours about half of the parasites had greater than 50% of their surface covered by discharge material. The ECEA-treated cells degranulated more than the untreated cells. There was much less discharge material on Con-A-coated worms than on Ab-coated worms. Eosinophils adhered to discharge material on the surface of both Ab- and Con-A-coated parasites. At 3 and 12 hours, lysed cells and cell fragments were also seen adhering to discharge material. In the absence of discharge material the cells adhered to residual glycocalyx or to the tegumental outer membrane. These studies suggest that eosinophils kill schistosomula by progressively degranulating onto their surface over many hours and that the increased toxicity caused by ECEA is due to an increase in discharge. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:4037065

  11. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-01-01

    . Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:9684044

  12. Skeletal Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, I. Ross

    1979-01-01

    Skeletal scintigraphy, using phosphates or diphosphonates labeled with technetium 99m, is a sensitive method of detecting bone abnormalities. The most important and most frequent role of bone scanning is evaluating the skeletal areas in patients who have a primary cancer, especially a malignant condition that has a tendency to spread to bone areas. The bone scan is superior to bone radiographs in diagnosing these abnormalities; 15 percent to 25 percent of patients with breast, prostate or lung cancer, who have normal roentgenograms, also have abnormal scintigrams due to metastases. The majority of bone metastases appear as hot spots on the scan and are easily recognized. The incidence of abnormal bone scans in patients with early stages (I and II) of breast cancer varies from 6 percent to 26 percent, but almost invariably those patients with scan abnormalities have a poor prognosis and should be considered for additional therapies. Progression or regression of bony lesions can be defined through scanning, and abnormal areas can be identified for biopsy. The incidence of metastases in solitary scan lesions in patients with known primary tumors varies from 20 percent to 64 percent. Bone scintigraphy shows positive uptake in 95 percent of cases with acute osteomyelitis. Stress fractures and trauma suspected in battered babies can be diagnosed by scanning before there is radiological evidence. The procedure is free from acute or long-term side effects and, except in cases of very young patients, sedation is seldom necessary. Although the test is sensitive, it is not specific and therefore it is difficult to overemphasize the importance of clinical, radiographic, biochemical and scanning correlation in each patient. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:390886

  13. Heavy Metal-Activated Synthesis of Peptides in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Gregg; Merchant, Sabeeha

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have addressed the capacity of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce metal-binding peptides in response to stress induced by the heavy metals Cd2+, Hg2+, and Ag+. Cells cultured in the presence of sublethal concentrations of Cd2+ synthesized and accumulated oligopeptides consisting solely of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine in an average ratio of 3:3:1. Cadmium-induced peptides were isolated in their native form as higher molecular weight peptide-metal complexes with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 6.5 × 103. The isolated complex bound cadmium (as evidenced by absorption spectroscopy) and sequestered (with a stoichiometry of 0.7 moles of cadmium per mole of cysteine) up to 70% of the total cadmium found in extracts of cadmium-treated cells. In Hg2+-treated cells, the principal thiol-containing compound induced by Hg2+ ions was glutathione. It is possible that glutathione functions in plant cells (as it does in animal cells) to detoxify heavy metals. Cells treated with Ag+ ions also synthesized a sulfur-containing component with a charge to mass ratio similar to Cd2+-induced peptides. But, in contrast to the results obtained using Cd2+ as an inducer, these molecules did not accumulate to significant levels in Ag+-treated cells. The presence of physiological concentrations of Cu2+ in the growth medium blocked the synthesis of the Ag+-inducible component(s) and rendered cells resistant to the toxic effects of Ag+, suggesting competition between Cu2+ and Ag+ ions, possibly at the level of metal uptake. ImagesFigure 2Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11 PMID:16668603

  14. Critical periods of vulnerability for the developing nervous system: evidence from humans and animal models.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D; Barone, S

    2000-01-01

    Vulnerable periods during the development of the nervous system are sensitive to environmental insults because they are dependent on the temporal and regional emergence of critical developmental processes (i.e., proliferation, migration, differentiation, synaptogenesis, myelination, and apoptosis). Evidence from numerous sources demonstrates that neural development extends from the embryonic period through adolescence. In general, the sequence of events is comparable among species, although the time scales are considerably different. Developmental exposure of animals or humans to numerous agents (e.g., X-ray irradiation, methylazoxymethanol, ethanol, lead, methyl mercury, or chlorpyrifos) demonstrates that interference with one or more of these developmental processes can lead to developmental neurotoxicity. Different behavioral domains (e.g., sensory, motor, and various cognitive functions) are subserved by different brain areas. Although there are important differences between the rodent and human brain, analogous structures can be identified. Moreover, the ontogeny of specific behaviors can be used to draw inferences regarding the maturation of specific brain structures or neural circuits in rodents and primates, including humans. Furthermore, various clinical disorders in humans (e.g., schizophrenia, dyslexia, epilepsy, and autism) may also be the result of interference with normal ontogeny of developmental processes in the nervous system. Of critical concern is the possibility that developmental exposure to neurotoxicants may result in an acceleration of age-related decline in function. This concern is compounded by the fact that developmental neurotoxicity that results in small effects can have a profound societal impact when amortized across the entire population and across the life span of humans. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 14 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:10852851

  15. Initial experience with transluminally placed endovascular grafts for the treatment of complex vascular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Marin, M L; Veith, F J; Cynamon, J; Sanchez, L A; Lyon, R T; Levine, B A; Bakal, C W; Suggs, W D; Wengerter, K R; Rivers, S P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Complex arterial occlusive, traumatic, and aneurysmal lesions may be difficult or impossible to treat successfully by standard surgical techniques when severe medical or surgical comorbidities exist. The authors describe a single center's experience over a 2 1/2-year period with 96 endovascular graft procedures performed to treat 100 arterial lesions in 92 patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients had 36 large aortic and/or peripheral artery aneurysms, 48 had 53 multilevel limb-threatening aortoiliac and/or femoropopliteal occlusive lesions, and 11 had traumatic arterial injuries (false aneurysms and arteriovenous fistulas). Endovascular grafts were placed through remote arteriotomies under local (16[17%]), epidural (42[43%]), or general (38[40%]) anesthesia. RESULTS: Technical and clinical successes were achieved in 91% of the patients with aneurysms, 91% with occlusive lesions, and 100% with traumatic arterial lesions. These patients and grafts have been followed from 1 to 30 months (mean, 13 months). The primary and secondary patency rates at 18 months for aortoiliac occlusions were 77% and 95%, respectively. The 18-month limb salvage rate was 98%. Immediately after aortic aneurysm exclusion, a total of 6 (33%) perigraft channels were detected; 3 of these closed within 8 weeks. Endovascular stented graft procedures were associated with a 10% major and a 14% minor complication rate. The overall 30-day mortality rate for this entire series was 6%. CONCLUSIONS: This initial experience with endovascular graft repair of complex arterial lesions justifies further use and careful evaluation of this technique for major arterial reconstruction. Images Figure 1. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 11. PMID:7574926

  16. Transplant arteriosclerosis in a rat aortic model.

    PubMed Central

    Isik, F. F.; McDonald, T. O.; Ferguson, M.; Yamanaka, E.; Gordon, D.

    1992-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) has emerged as an obstacle to the long-term survival of transplanted organs, especially cardiac transplants. The animal models that have been used to study TA have not been fully characterized with regard to features such as the time course of cell proliferation and the sequence of cell types arriving in the developing intimal lesion. We present a model of TA based on a transplanted segment of abdominal aorta that helps address these questions. Two strains of rats (PVG x DA) underwent orthotopic aortic transplantation without immunosuppression and were killed at 14, 20, 40, and 60 days after transplantation. The within-strain control group displayed minimal evidence of cellular rejection with minimal to absent intimal lesions. In contrast, the allograft group showed a linearly increasing intimal lesion, up through 60 days after transplantation. The mechanism of intimal thickening was by an increase in cell number at the earlier time points with the later deposition of extracellular matrix. The early intimal lesion consisted mostly of mononuclear inflammatory cells (45%) with gradually increasing presence of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the intima between 20 and 60 days. Conversely, the media showed gradual infiltration by macrophage-type cells with virtual loss of all SMC from the media by 40 days. The proliferative index showed a peak of 6% and 8% at 20 days in both the intima and media, respectively, and was preceded by the presence of macrophages. In fact, most of the proliferating cells at the earlier time points were either monocytes/macrophages, or were immediately adjacent to monocyte-/macrophage-rich regions. This straight artery segment model of transplant arteriosclerosis provides an easily quantifiable system in which the effects of different interventions (e.g., immunosuppressive regimens) can be tested. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure

  17. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    mutation yet reported in type II procollagen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7741714

  18. The eye in the Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Maumenee, I H

    1981-01-01

    One hundred sixty consecutive patients with the Marfan syndrome were reviewed for ocular, cardiovascular, and skeletal abnormalities, and were graded by severity. The most striking ocular abnormality was enlargement of the globe, presumably caused by scleral stretching. Staphylomata were not a feature of any of the patients seen, nor was keratoconus. The cornea, in fact, was flattened but not thinned. Among the 160 patients, 193 eyes showed dislocation of the lens. Dislocation of the lens was positively correlated with increased ocular axial length and with decreasing KJ readings. We postulate that the ocular pathologic changes are primarily caused by stretching of the tunica scleralis, and that the zonular fibers (thus under stress may "give" or may rupture in their area of presumably least density which may be the area of developmental fusion of the optic vesicle. In a small proportion of cases the lens dislocation was progressive. There was no correlation between ocular findings, on one hand, and the skeletal and cardiovascular abnormalities on the other. However, there was a good degree of intrafamilial consistency with regard to absence or presence of ocular pathology. The absence of correlation between the ocular and systemic findings in our data on these 160 patients is best explained by the existence of more than 1 point mutation, which may give rise to different but clinically similar phenotypes. The results of our calculations of mutation rate were compatible with such an explanation. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 A FIGURE 13 B FIGURE 13 C FIGURE 13 D PMID:7043871

  19. Apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat hepatocyte cell lines expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S.; Miller, T.; Cornman, G.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Three well differentiated SV40-immortalized rat hepatocyte cell lines, CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14, and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-producing cell lines derived from them were examined for sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14 cells were co-transfected with a DNA construct containing a dimer of the HBV genome and the neo gene and selected in G418 to generate stable cell lines. Characterization of these cell lines indicated that they contain integrated HBV DNA, contain low molecular weight HBV DNA compatible with the presence of HBV replication intermediates, express HBV transcripts, and produce HBV proteins. The viability of CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV2 cells was not significantly altered when they were treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations as high as 20,000 U/ml. The HBV-expressing CWSV1 cell line, SV1di36, and the HBV-expressing CWSV14 cell line, SV14di208, were also not killed when treated with TNF-alpha. However, the HBV-expressing CWSV2 cell line, SV2di366, was extensively killed when treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations ranging from 200 to 20,000 U/ml. Analysis of several different HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines indicated that TNF-alpha killing depended upon the level of HBV expression. The TNF-alpha-induced cell killing in high HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines was accompanied by the presence of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8774135

  20. An experimental approach to the study of intraocular Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Luxenberg, M N

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study of nematode endophthalmitis due to T canis and review of the literature has been presented. Six owl monkeys were infected either by nasogastric tube using embryonated T canis eggs or by carotid or intravitreal injection of second stage larvae. The clinical manifestations, especially ocular, were observed and various diagnostic tests performed. Only minimal or no intraocular changes were seen after systemic infection but significant abnormalities such as retinal hemorrhages and venous dilation were noted after intravitreal infection. Motile larvae were observed in the lenses of three eyes and in the vitreous of five eyes and, probably a sixth, after intravitreal injection. The intensity and timing of the intraocular reaction seemed to correlate with the infecting dose and apparent disappearance of larvae from the eye. Pathologic confirmation of larvae in the lens was obtained in one eye. A marked inflammatory reaction occurred in eyes receiving intraocular infection but none was seen in eyes with only systemic infectin. Various laboratory and serologic studies were performed, including the ELISA test, which were used to evaluate systemic as well as intraocular responses to infection with T canis. The two monkeys infected by nasogastric tube gave a positive ELISA response in the serum but intraocular fluids gave a negative response in all monkeys including those infected syst:mically and/or intraocularly. Problems in the understanding of clinical aspects of the disease, laboratory diagnosis and treatment are discussed. The need for future experimental studies is emphasized. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 2 D FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 PMID:120993

  1. What Happens When the Supply Chain Breaks? Implications for the Army Supply Chain Under Attack

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    56 FIGURES Figure 1: Generic SCOR Model ...34.....................................................................................................................9 Figure 3: Define, Measure, Improve Model ...15 Figure 4: DoD SCOR Model

  2. Seeing the Fisher Z-Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles F., Jr.; Richardson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Since 1915, statisticians have been applying Fisher's Z-transformation to Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. We offer new geometric interpretations of this transformation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  3. Joshua N Haldeman, DC: the Canadian Years, 1926-1950

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C; Haldeman, Scott

    1995-01-01

    aviator and explorer. Although he died in 1974, the values he instilled in his son, Scott Haldeman, D.C., Ph.D., M.D. continue to influence the profession. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10

  4. Pancreatic carcinomas deposit laminin-5, preferably adhere to laminin-5, and migrate on the newly deposited basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, T.; Lumme, A.; Linnala, A.; Kivilaakso, E.; Kiviluoto, T.; Burgeson, R. E.; Kangas, L.; Leivo, I.; Virtanen, I.

    1997-01-01

    integrin receptor recognizing laminin-5. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9358755

  5. Dynamic redistribution of major platelet surface receptors after contact-induced platelet activation and spreading. An immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, N.; Guichard, J.; Breton-Gorius, J.

    1992-01-01

    colocalization of Fg and TSP, GPIV and TSP, as well as Fg and GPIIb-IIIa, although no typical coclustering of GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV or GPIIb-IIIa and p24 was apparent. Our results further suggest that 1) on surface activated adherent platelets, not all GPIIb-IIIa molecules become competent to bind Fg, 2) GPIa-IIa is not anchored to the platelet membrane skeleton, and 3) during the early stage of platelet activation, a communication exists between the alpha granules and the platelet surface. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1309961

  6. Antibodies to glycolipids activate complement and promote proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Susani, M.; Schulze, M.; Exner, M.; Kerjaschki, D.

    1994-01-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis is an experimental rat model of human membranous nephropathy induced by injection of antisera against crude renal cortical fractions such as Fx1A or rat tubular microvilli. This results in the formation of subepithelial immune deposits, the activation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement, and severe proteinuria. While the formation of immune deposits is attributed to in situ immune complex formation with antibodies specific for the gp330-Heymann nephritis antigenic complex (HNAC), activation of complement and proteinuria appear to be caused by at least one additional antibody species present in anti-Fx1A sera. We have separated by affinity absorption polyspecific antisera against Fx1A and rat microvilli into one IgG fraction directed specifically against microvillar proteins (anti-Fx1A-prot) and another IgG fraction specific for glycolipids (ant-Fx1A-lip) of tubular microvilli. When injected into rats, the anti-Fx1A-prot fraction induced immune deposits but failed to activate complement or produce proteinuria, similar to results obtained with affinity-purified anti-gp330 IgG. When the antibodies of the anti-Fx1A-lip fraction were injected alone they did not bind to glomeruli. By contrast, when the IgGs specific for the Fx1A-prot fraction (or for gp330-HNAC) were combined with those directed against the Fx1A-lip glycolipid preparation, immune deposits were formed, in situ complement activation was observed, and also proteinuria was induced. It is concluded that within anti-Fx1A and anti-microvillar sera there are at least two IgG fractions of relevance for the development of PHN: one directed against the gp330-HNAC complex which is responsible for the development of immune deposits, and a second specific for glycolipid antigen(s) which activate(s) the complement cascade. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8160779

  7. The ophthalmic implications of the correction of late enophthalmos following severe midfacial trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, N T

    1991-01-01

    enophthalmos for which measurements were available produced an improvement; in 1 case the enophthalmos was thought to be worse postoperatively. Dystopia operations resulted in improvement in 40 of 48 operations; in 2 instances dystopia was worse postoperatively. Diplopia was unchanged by 33 operations, improved by 11 procedures, and worsened by 6. If patients are considered before and after their total reconstruction course, diplopia was improved in 9 of the 29 patients. In seven of these nine, diplopia was eliminated. There was no change in or production of diplopia in 19 patients, and 5 patients had worsening of their double vision.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE20 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 PMID:1808816

  8. Syphilis superinfection activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus I in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, C. K.; Hughes, M. A.; Hsu, P. L.; Mahoney, S.; Duvic, M.; Sell, S.

    1991-01-01

    lesions. These results indicate that latent HIV-infection of rabbits may be activated by immunostimulation and that latently HIV-infected rabbits have impaired delayed hypersensitivity reactions. It is hypothesized that true latent HIV-infection in the rabbits is in monocytes and postulated that further immunostimulation may produce infection of lymphocytes and activation of disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1850960

  9. Expanding the scope of lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Rich, L F

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether applications of current technology, such as cryolathe and excimer laser, might improve outcomes and increase use of lamellar keratoplasty. METHODS: Six studies were performed, beginning with animals and progressing to human subjects. The first study compared cryolathed with hand-dissected rabbit corneas to ascertain which created a smoother donor interface. The second animal pilot study was done to determine whether thickness of donor cornea resection could be accurately predicted with the cryolathe. A prospective animal trial was then undertaken to compare lamellar keratoplasty outcomes using cryolathed versus hand-dissected tissue. The fourth work extrapolated previous animal findings to lamellar keratoplasty in human disease. Finally, two ongoing studies are described. The first explores the possibility of sutureless lamellar keratoplasty. The second utilizes the excimer laser to dissect the recipient stromal bed. RESULTS: The initial animal pilot study demonstrated a clearer stromal surface in cryolathed versus hand-dissected corneal tissue. The second pilot showed that plano-powered donor tissue could be generated to predetermined thickness. The prospective animal trial revealed that clear grafts of intended thickness could be obtained with cryolathing. Human studies suggested that lamellar keratoplasty using cryolathe-prepared donor tissue may offer superior results to free-hand dissection. Finally, one ongoing study indicates that sutureless lamellar keratoplasty is untenable, and the other shows that clear grafts can be obtained by combining cryolathed donor tissue with recipient photoablation. CONCLUSION: This body of work demonstrates that use of new lamellar keratoplasty technology may offer expanded scope and better outcomes than traditional lamellar keratoplasty techniques. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4A FIGURE 4B FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 10B FIGURE 11A FIGURE 11B FIGURE 12A FIGURE 12B FIGURE 13

  10. Eduard Jaeger's Test-Types (Schrift-Scalen) and the historical development of vision tests.

    PubMed Central

    Runge, P E

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Eduard Jaeger's original Test-Types were carefully evaluated: (1) to determine whether Jaeger had maintained a consistent standard, (2) to establish the correct Snellen equivalent for Jaeger's Test-Types, (3) to answer the question of why and how the standard was lost, and (4) to compare the visual angle of optotypes to lines of continuous text. METHODS: All original Viennese editions of Jaeger's Test-Types, as well as first generation United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US) versions, were evaluated. Data were collected objectively using a microruler with a 20X loupe and subjectively using a laser distance-measuring device. The data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. All previous measurements of Jaeger's Test-Types, objective and subjective, collected over the past 133 years were compared to the current data and to each other. RESULTS: The correct Snellen equivalent of Jaeger's Test-Types was determined. The visual angle created from the measurement of the height of lowercase letters, without ascenders or descenders, provides an accurate method of assigning a visual angle of a line of continuous text. Comparing the typefaces used in printing first generation UK and US versions of Jaeger's Test-Types to the Viennese editions provided an explanation for the absence of a consistent standard for Jaeger's Test-Types today. CONCLUSIONS: All 10 versions of Jaeger's original Test-Types are virtually identical and established a gold standard for reading vision tests. Jaeger's standard was lost when his Test-Types were first printed in the UK and the US using local typefaces. The Jaeger standard has been re-established. Visual angles determined using continuous text are comparable to those obtained by using optotypes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7C FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19A FIGURE 19B p409-a FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE

  11. Mouse bronchiolar cell carcinogenesis. Histologic characterization and expression of Clara cell antigen in lesions induced by N-nitrosobis-(2-chloroethyl) ureas.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, S.; Lijinsky, W.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    neoplastic lesions. N-nitroso-methyl-bis-chloroethylurea- and NTCU-induced mouse bronchiolar cell alterations could be an interesting new model to study mechanisms of bronchiolar cell differentiation and tumor formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:1651059

  12. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 9 to Part 679 - Chum Savings Area (CSSA) of the CVOA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chum Savings Area (CSSA) of the CVOA 9 Figure 9 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 679—Chum Savings Area (CSSA) of the CVOA ER15NO99.007...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1633 - Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation 9 Figure 9 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1633 - Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation 9 Figure 9 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1633 - Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation 9 Figure 9 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1633 - Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation 9 Figure 9 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1633 - Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burner Placements on Mattress/Foundation 9 Figure 9 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  8. Brain and Optic System Pathology in Hypocholesterolemic Dogs Treated with a Competitive Inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Berry, P. H.; MacDonald, J. S.; Alberts, A. W.; Molon-Noblot, S.; Chen, J. S.; Lo, C.-Y. L.; Greenspan, M. D.; Allen, H.; Durand-Cavagna, G.; Jensen, R.; Bailly, Y.; Delort, P.; Duprat, P.

    1988-01-01

    evidence of drug induced adverse effects in the CNS of dogs given up to 30 mg/kg/day lovastatin for 2 years. ImagesFigure 7Figure 10Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:3414776

  9. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  11. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  12. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  13. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings...

  16. Campbell Systems Sampling Mean Conditions in an Urban Environment at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), NM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    41002 12 Plate Grill Radiation Shields (figure 8).............................................. 8 4.2 Field Study Preparation...8 Figure 8. The 41002 12 plate grill radiation shields. ...................................................................... 8 Figure 9...scientific objectives were addressed: the first was sensing the thermodynamic patterns in an urban environment and the second was placing two groups of

  17. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1203 - Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength 8 Figure 8 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1203 - Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength 8 Figure 8 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  12. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1203 - Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength 8 Figure 8 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  13. Demonstration of a Robust Sensor System for Remote Condition Monitoring of Heat-Distribution System Manholes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    2.1.4 Wiring diagrams ........................................................................................................ 10 2.2 Field work...10 Figure 11. SCADA system wiring diagram...11 Figure 12. Wiring diagram for cellular system. ........................................................................ 12

  14. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633—Jig...

  15. Theory and Device Modeling for Nano-Structured Transistor Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    ES) 10 . SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH... 10 Figure 4. ID-VDS characteristics illustrating the effect of the carrier density and longitudinal field dependent mobility terms... 10 Figure 5. ID-VGS characteristics

  16. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10...

  17. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633—Jig...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633—Jig...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633—Jig...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Jig for Setting Burners at Proper Distances From Mattress/Foundation 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1633—Jig...

  3. Dysfunction Junction: Intelligence, Peacekeeping, and the United Nations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    fingertips. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 121 14. SUBJECT TERMS Intelligence, Peacekeeping, United Nations, UN, Peace Operations, OSINT, JMAC 16...10 Figure 2. Potential Intelligence Sources Available to UN Missions...............................10 Figure 3. JMAC Tasks...53 Figure 4. JMAC Information Flow

  4. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10...

  5. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  11. FGPA Mission Assurance Center (FMAC) Support Activity at the University of New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-31

    simulation framework and verification suite ................................................................. 3 1.5 New hardware features to support ASIM...3 4.7.3 Simulations and Results...9 Figure 5. Memory collision detected during simulation . This error implies a hardware malfunction and required

  12. Voltage versus Current, or the Problem of the Chicken and the Egg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Antonio Alberto; Soares, Rolando

    2007-01-01

    In an electric circuit, is it the current that causes the voltage, or the inverse? This is a false dilemma, as shown by an introductory and qualitative approach to a circuit as a system. (Contains 9 figures and 7 footnotes.)

  13. Failure modes of a concrete nuclear-containment building subjected to hydrogen detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Fugelso, L.E.; Butler, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated response for the Indian Point reactor containment building to static internal pressure and one case of a dynamic pressure representing hydrogen combustion and detonation are presented. Comparison of the potential failure modes is made. 9 figures.

  14. A Path to Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemoller, William; Stegemoller, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The path taken and the turns made as a turtle traces a polygon are examined to discover an important theorem in geometry. A unique tool, the Angle Adder, is implemented in the investigation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  15. High Speed Linear Induction Motor Efficiency Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    58 4.2.2 Volts/H ertz D rives Sensorless Flux-V ector D rives...56 Figure 40 Fixed Volts/Hertz Controller [16] ............................................................................................ 58 Figure...9 Figure 57 DSLIM Operating Parameters vs. Speed ................................................................................ 84 Figure 58

  16. Real Graphs from Real Data: Experiencing the Concepts of Measurement and Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    A simple activity using cheap and readily available materials is described that allows students to experience first hand many of the concepts of measurement, uncertainty and graph drawing without laborious measuring or calculation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  17. Electromagnetic Interference Behavior of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Nanofibers Composites Under Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Figure 2. Buckminsterfullerene C60 (left) and CNT (right) [7], [ 8 ] ................................... 7 Figure 3 . CNFs under magnification [10......molecular schematic of MWNT. Figure 3 . CNFs under magnification [10] 9 Figure 4. MWNT [ 8 ] The testing process began by specimen preparation

  18. Low activated incore instrument

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.

    1994-04-19

    Instrumentation is described for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials. 9 figures.

  19. iPads: Intuitive Technology for 21st-Century Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for using iPad technology with young students. Various inexpensive apps are described that parents and educators will find useful. (Contains 9 figures.)

  20. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  1. Phase measurement system using a dithered clock

    DOEpatents

    Fairley, C.R.; Patterson, S.R.

    1991-05-28

    A phase measurement system is disclosed which measures the phase shift between two signals by dithering a clock signal and averaging a plurality of measurements of the phase differences between the two signals. 8 figures.

  2. Using Student-Made Games to Learn Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallegos, Irene; Flores, Alfinio

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students design and play their own games, including board, computer, and other kinds of games, to learn mathematical concepts and practice procedures for their pre-calculus and calculus courses. (Contains 2 tables and 8 figures.)

  3. Can the Full Moon and the Sun Be Observed on the Same Side of the Sky?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susman, Katarina; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    An ordinary flight became an interesting and amusing event when a look through the window of the plane revealed unusual light spots on the winglet. This article discusses the occurance we saw. Two possible explanations are presented. (Contains 8 figures.)

  4. Revision Process and Practice: A Kindergarten Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Many educators teach students that are reluctant about the revisions process in writing. However, this longitudinal study follows a group of students from kindergarten through 8th grade who embraced the importance of the revision process. (Contains 8 figures.)

  5. Validation of Modeling Flow Approaching Navigation Locks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    instrumentation, direction vernier . ........................................................................ 8  Figure 11. Plan A lock approach, upstream approach...13-9 8 Figure 9. Tools and instrumentation, bracket attached to rail. Figure 10. Tools and instrumentation, direction vernier . Numerical model

  6. Crema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Crema FizzBuzz Program .................................................. 8 Figure 4: Hello World program written in C...11 Figure 5: Hello World program written in Crema...KLEE Coverage for " Hello , World" Program ................................................................ 14 Table 2: Qmail State-space Explosion

  7. Starting to Explore Wind Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Described is a simple, cheap and versatile homemade windmill and electrical generator suitable for a school class to use to explore many aspects and practicalities of using wind to generate electrical power. (Contains 8 figures.)

  8. The neurofibrovascular bundle of the inferior oblique muscle as its ancillary origin.

    PubMed Central

    Stager, D R

    1996-01-01

    patients who have undergone anterior transposition surgery, the NFVB served as the ancillary origin of the IO. CONCLUSIONS: The name of the neurovascular bundle should be changed to the NFVB, since it has a prominent fibrocollagenous capsule and it is encased in fibrous tissue bands anteriorly. The NFVB has a linear course in the orbit from the apex to the IO muscle and is relatively stiff. The associated fibrous band extends posteriorly from the IO muscle capsule, encasing the nerve anteriorly and attaching 3 to 7 mm posteriorly into the capsule of the IR. The NFVB binds the mid posterior portion of the IO posteriorly. Its ligamentous qualities enable the NFVB to function as an ancillary origin for the IO. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 A FIGURE 13 B FIGURE 13 C PMID:8981719

  9. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    in cancer initiation. Comparative studies with the development of the human breast and the pathogenesis of breast cancer have contributed to validate rodent-to-human extrapolations. However, it has not been definitively established what type of information is necessary for human risk assessment, whether currently toxicity testing methodologies are sufficient for fulfilling those needs, or whether treatment-induced tumorigenic responses in rodents are predictive of potential human risk. An alternative to the traditional bioassays are mechanism-based toxicology and molecular and cellular approaches, combined with comparative in vitro systems. These approaches might allow the rapid screen of chemicals for setting priorities for further studies to determine the dose-response relationship for chemical effects at low doses, to assess effects other than mutagenesis and/or tumorigenesis, or to establish qualitative and quantitative relationships of biomarkers to toxic effects. Until there is enough information on the predictive value of mechanism-based toxicology for risk assessment, this approach should be used in conjunction with and validated by the traditional in vivo long-term bioassays. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. Figure 17. Figure 18. Figure 19. Figure 20. Figure 21. Figure 22. Figure 23. Figure 24. Figure 25. Figure 26. PMID:8899375

  10. Evaluation of Potential JHSV Port and Alternative Offload Sites in Coastal North Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    orthoimagery on USGS Seamless Distribution System...............................................................................................10 Figure 6...ft orthoimagery , but the images did not load for this author. Site address: http://nationalmap.usgs.gov/. National map interactive viewer

  11. Gas Gun Experiments to Determine Shock Wave Behavior in Snow: Methods and Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    7 7. Snow collection site in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains...1990). 10 Figure 7. Snwv collection site in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. ranging from 100 to 520 kg m-3. Sintered snow with jectile impact, a signal

  12. Numerical Study of Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Responses of Composite Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Strain ........................10 Figure 4. Normalized Displacement at Center of Top Skin Plate ...................................10 Figure 5...48 Figure 49. Experiment Strain Gage La yout on Underside of Composite Plate... skin plates, coupled through vertical stiffeners. Each skin plate is 0.3 m x 0.3 m and 0.002 m thick and is m odeled with e-glass com posite. The

  13. Multi-Impact Durability and Processing of Thick-Section Carbon-Glass/Epoxy Hybrid Composites Toughened With Thermoplastic Polyurethane Inter-Layer Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    2 2.2 Standard Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) with SC-15 Resin .......2... VARTM ). ................................................9 Figure 7. Force vs. displacement for Hybrid no. 5...12. C-scan image showing progression of delamination in Hybrid no. 4 (PA- VARTM ). 12 Figure 13. C-scan image showing progression of delamination in

  14. Development of the Hospital Ship Replacement (HSR) Concept - Maximizing Capability & Affordability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Max Power kW Emergency kW Launch Cruise Summer Winter Summer Winter 200 Propulsion Plant 0.8 25.2 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 300 Electrical Plant ...13 Resistance and Powering ...9 Figure 6: HSR(R) Speed- Power Curve

  15. Optimization and Statistical Evaluation of GOES Cloud-Top Properties for Nowcasting Lightning Initiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Adapted from Williams (1988) and COMET (2005)]............... 4 Figure 3. Electrical structure of thunderstorms across three varying regions and two...varying seasons from Krehbiel (1986). ................................... 9 Figure 4. Convective cloud properties as depicted by GOES-12’s visible ... Visible xviii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xix ACKNOWLEDGMENTS After months of seemingly endless work, one tends to accumulate a

  16. Study of Equatorial Ionospheric Irregularities for the Assessment of Impacts on Communication/Navigation System (7)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-27

    occurrences of density irregularities and the occurrences of OLR for the March equinox and June solstice . Figure 4(b). The seasonal distributions for the...occurrences of density irregularities and the occurrences of OLR for the September equinox and December solstice . 9 Figure 5. The monthly

  17. Development of an Advanced Flameless Combustion Heat Source Utilizing Heavy Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    captive flameless heat generation. CDI’s unique success in achieving stabilization in captive combustion for light fuels such as methanol, ethanol and...7 4.3.2 Light Fuel Testing/Calibration (Methanol and Ethanol ).............................................. 10 4.3.3 Heavy Fuel Testing...9 Figure 3. Catalytic Combustion Data for Methanol & Ethanol ...................................................11 Figure 4. Catalytic

  18. Orbital Transfer Rocket Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Inducer Tip Seal ......................... 21 Figure 13 - Crossover Tester Thrust Balance Disk...Crossover Tester Rotor Mode Shapes for 500 Kibin ............ ,.....2 9 Figure 18 - Inducer Deflections In Wattr . 0 ’Figure 19 - Impeller Tip...Inducer and Impeller subassembly cantilevered on a shalt supported by two ball bearings. The finite element model of the rotor Is shown in Figure 14

  19. Facilitating Naval Knowledge Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Transition ...................................................................... 9 Figure 5 Nonaka Knowledge Flow Theory...terms of the dimension reach above. Episteoloogical Explicit Tackt Individual Group Organizabori loter-organization Ontological Figure 5 Nonaka ... Knowledge Flow Theory (Adapted from [48]) As depicted in Figure 5, Nonaka views the interaction between these dimensions as the principal drivers of

  20. Engineering Design Guidance for Detached Breakwaters as Shoreline Stabilization Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Lakeview Park shoreline. Combinations of wave height, period, direction, and still-water levels were studied to determine test conditions that produced a...77 Structural Design Objectives ........................... 77 Design Wave and Water Level Selection .................... 77...Chesapeake Bay at Bay Ridge, Maryland ................... 9 Figure 8. Aerial view of Lakeview Park , Lorain, Ohio ......... 13 Figure 9. Detached

  1. Skill Matches to Job Requirements: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Chris; Sinning, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    This document serves as a support paper to the "Skill Matches to Job Requirements" report. This document includes the following sections: (1) Development of scales; (2) Definition of variables; and (3) Descriptive statistics. (Contains 3 tables and 9 figures.) [Funding for this document was provided through the Australian Department of…

  2. Method for fabricating a substrate having spaced apart microcapillaries thereon

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.

    1995-01-24

    Methods are disclosed for manufacturing a self-supporting substrate having a plurality of spaced-apart needles (spikes or microcapillaries) projecting upwardly from a major surface of the substrate. In a preferred method, metal is deposited onto a porous membrane such that the metal extends into the pores, after which the membrane is dissolved. 9 figures.

  3. Color Shade Instrumentation Correlation Study: Statistical Analysis. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Evaluation Procedure 9. Figure A-4 displays the observations for view environment. Illumination Brand Change Schedule Gretag MacBeth (1...3.90.00 (1) X Rite X Rite Colormaster 8.0.3 (1) Color iQC v.6.0 (1) Gretag MacBeth Gretag Quality Control System Version 329 (1) B-1 Appendix B

  4. The Northwest Tropical Atlantic Station (NTAS): NTAS-4 Mooring Turnaround Cruise Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    NTAS-4 M oored Station Log ............................................................ 56 Appendix 5. Evaluation of NTAS-3 swage failure...9 Figure 8. NTAS-3 swage failure...at the termination on the lower end of the first 500 m section of wire rope. The swage socket was fractured at the "shoulder" section, between the

  5. Wood Storks of the Birdsville colony and swamps of the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, J.M.

    1984-02-16

    Wood Stork feeding sites were studied during the second half of the nesting season for the Birdsville colony (Jenkins Co., Georgia). Foraging locations of the storks were determined. The microhabitat, water quality, and fish density were characterized at stork foraging sites and food resources determined. 14 references, 9 figures, 11 tables.

  6. Investigation of the Potential for FTIR as a Nondestructive Inspection Technique for Aircraft Coating Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    functions of a coating material is to protect against corrosion of the underlying panel. When the coating fails, moisture and air are able to penetrate...1.1. Background Aircraft have long been coated to protect against damage, provide camouflage, and aesthetic purposes. One of the most important...aircraft coating .................................... 9 Figure 2.3: Tapping mode AFM images of filiform corrosion

  7. Mid-Bay Islands Hydrodynamics and Sedimentation Modeling Study, Chesapeake Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    B3 Hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling with M2D ................. B7 Hydrodynamics...maximum current field, normal tide ............................... B6 Figure B6. Alt JI-7 M2D model grid...B7 Figure B7. Alt JI-7 maximum current field, NE33 ........................................ B9 Figure B8. Alt JI-7 M2D

  8. Method for radiation detection and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.D.

    1993-12-21

    Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. 9 figures.

  9. Determination of Critical Factors in Unmanned Casualty Evacuation in the Distributed Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    modem (Cerchie, Docker, Graham, Guthrie, & Hardesty , 2008). 9 Figure 2. Ground Control Station Components (From: Cerchie et al., 2008) 4...December 11). Retrieved December 15, 2008, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CASEVAC Cerchie, D., Docker, G., Graham, J., Guthrie, D., & Hardesty , M. (2008

  10. Analysis of the Lake Superior Watershed Seasonal Snow Cover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    9 Figure 7. Snow density by day of year at Sault Ste Marie , Duluth, and in the Lake Superior watershed and vicinity in Ontario...Canada ....................................................................................11 Figure 8. Snow density histogram for Sault Ste Marie ... Marys River. The outflow from Lake Superior is controlled under stringent regulation plans agreed upon by Canada and the United States through the

  11. Altering Flight Schedules for Increased Fuel Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    7 Air Force Aviation Operations Energy Plan... Aviation Operations Energy Plan Pillars (Air Force, 2010) .............. 9 Figure 4. Aviation Operations Energy Utilization (Air Force, 2010...USAF) is the largest user of aviation fuel in the Department of Defense (DoD), and air mobility operations consume the greatest amount. Rising

  12. Pions from and about heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1982-09-01

    A review is presented of the possibilities of pion production with heavy ion reactions. Major headings include: pion thermometry; hills and valleys in pion spectra; pionic orbits of nuclear size; pion confinement in the fireball; anomalons; and Schroedinger equation solutions for pionic atoms. 47 references, 9 figures. (GHT)

  13. Teaching Waves with Google Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logiurato, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Google Earth is a huge source of interesting illustrations of various natural phenomena. It can represent a valuable tool for science education, not only for teaching geography and geology, but also physics. Here we suggest that Google Earth can be used for introducing in an attractive way the physics of waves. (Contains 9 figures.)

  14. 46 CFR 56.30-10 - Flanged joints (modifies 104.5.1(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... on the flange for the full circumference as close as possible to the fillet of the flange. The number...-10 (b), Method 8. Welding neck flanges may be used on any piping provided the flanges are butt-welded..., refer to 46 CFR 56.30-5(b) for requirements. (9) Figure 56.30-10 (b), Method 9. Welding neck flanges...

  15. Design and Analysis of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury Mechanism Using a Surrogate Headform: Instrumentation and Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    51 4.5.1: FABRY -PÉROT FIBER OPTIC GAUGES...aggressive social behavior, impaired thinking, language, learning, emotions, behavior, sensation, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as epilepsy...Alzheimer’s disease , Parkinson’s disease , and other brain disorders that become more prevalent with age [9, Figure 2.1: Causes of TBI- A diagram of

  16. Elimination of Perchlorate Oxidizers from Pyrotechnic Flare Compositions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-09

    Figure 2. NJIT Scaled-up Planetary Mixer Mill for Mechanical Alloy Production......................9 Figure 3.NJIT Particle Size Distribution and SEM...Performance Parameters of Lab Scale Flares of Mk 124 and Perchlorate-Free RSF-4 Red Compositions...energy fuel ingredients as well as the pyrotechnic compositions made from them were measured, together with the performance parameters of the flare

  17. Measurements in Regions of Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction from Mach 3 to 10 for Open and Blind Code Evaluation/Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Figure 12 LENS Facilities Altitude/Velocity Map 9 Figure 13 Mach Number/Reynolds Number Envelope for LENS Tunnels The experimental...Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, NV, January 8-12, 2001. 2. Wadhams, T., Mundy , E., MacLean, M., and Holden, M., “Ground Test Studies of

  18. United States Marine Corps Reserve Prior Service Recruiting: A Future Command for Partially Manning the Reserves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    3 Figure 3. Map of USMC PSR HQ Locations ....................................................................9 Figure 4...and 27 total personnel assigned. Table 3 represents an example of an operational PSRS’ personnel structure. Figure 3. Map of USMC PSR HQ...Locations Source: Created by author. Map depicting MCRCs district boundaries and the location of each of the six PSRS headquarters responsible for

  19. Digital Fingerprinting of Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    PIC16F84 microcontroller packaged and depackaged. . . . . . . 10 2.5. FIB created image of a circuit altered by the FIB’s micro-machining capabilities...being examined is synchronous in nature, it is possible that not all states are seen leaving out vital functionality. 9 Figure 2.4: PIC16F84

  20. Aquagel electrode separator for use in batteries and supercapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1995-03-28

    An electrode separator is described for electrochemical energy storage devices, such as a high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes. The separator is derived from an aquagel of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers and containing ionically conducting electrolyte in the pores thereof. 9 figures.

  1. Helicopter Non-Unique Trim Strategies for Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-22

    1 Helicopter Non-Unique Trim Strategies for Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise Reduction Carlos Malpica Aerospace Engineer NASA Ames...34 global " effect of fuselage drag on BVI noise is illustrated in Figure 8 and Figure 9. Figure 8 highlights the effect of decreasing and increasing

  2. Advanced Energy Conversion Concept for Beamed-Energy Propulsion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-21

    geometry ................ 9 Figure HA Methods for incorporating variable geometry In radlally-eymmetric supersonic inlets...41 Figure 11. EB thrust vector geometry for rotating ine source(s) ... ........... 42 Ire 11-19. Energy deposition mode - bottom view...coniguration . ..... ................... 106 Figure V.2. LSD wave Laraglan view ..... ....................... 105 Figure V-.& Cylindrical blad wave geometry

  3. Using R in Introductory Statistics Courses with the pmg Graphical User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verzani, John

    2008-01-01

    The pmg add-on package for the open source statistics software R is described. This package provides a simple to use graphical user interface (GUI) that allows introductory statistics students, without advanced computing skills, to quickly create the graphical and numeric summaries expected of them. (Contains 9 figures.)

  4. A Note on Morley's Triangle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Nancy; Tikoo, Mohan; Wang, Haohao

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we offer a proof of a variant of Morley's triangle theorem, when the exterior angles of a triangle are trisected. We also offer a generalization of Morley's theorem when angles of an "n"-gon are "n"-sected. (Contains 9 figures.)

  5. Basic studies in the displacement of residual oil by chemical flooding. Quarterly report, December 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, R.W.; Payatakes, A.C.

    1980-03-31

    Objectives were to study dynamic interfacial effects on the recovery of residual oil in low tension displacements, and the dynamics of oil ganglion populations. Coalescence tests are underway. Experimental results on the behavior of oil ganglions are discussed. 9 figures. (DLC)

  6. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Subpart A of... - Flux Profile Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flux Profile Data Log Format 9 Figure 9 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flux Profile Data Log Format EC03OC91.039...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Subpart A of... - Flux Profile Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flux Profile Data Log Format 9 Figure 9 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flux Profile Data Log Format EC03OC91.039...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Subpart A of... - Flux Profile Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flux Profile Data Log Format 9 Figure 9 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flux Profile Data Log Format EC03OC91.039...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Subpart A of... - Flux Profile Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flux Profile Data Log Format 9 Figure 9 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flux Profile Data Log Format EC03OC91.039...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Subpart A of... - Flux Profile Data Log Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flux Profile Data Log Format 9 Figure 9 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flux Profile Data Log Format EC03OC91.039...

  11. Lock Culvert Valves; Hydraulic Design Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    lock culvert valves with particular emphasis on reverse tainter valves. Hydraulic coefficients, used to quantify energy losses at valves and the jet...due to a sudden culvert expansion did increase the energy losses in the flow as the jet was dissipated. This additional head loss and associated...8 Figure 5. Loss coefficient for vertical-lift valve having a 45 degree lip

  12. Pythagorean Theorem Proofs: Connecting Interactive Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Cheng-Yao

    2007-01-01

    There are over 400 proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem. Some are visual proofs, others are algebraic. This paper features several proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem in different cultures--Greek, Chinese, Hindu and American. Several interactive websites are introduced to explore ways to prove this beautiful theorem. (Contains 8 figures.)

  13. An Eight Element S-Band Antenna Array for Evaluating Directional Mesh Networking Using Software Definded Radios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    configuration is illustrated in Figures 70 and Figure 71. In this instance the antenna and Butler Matrix assembly would be installed in the front...5 FIGURE 5: 8 X 8 BUTLER MATRIX...VIEW. ....................................................................................................... 8 FIGURE 12: ASSEMBLED EIGHT ELEMENT S

  14. Legacy Chlordane in Soils from Housing Areas Treated with Organochlorine Pesticides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    moisture capacity (FMC) by controlled water addition...................... 8 Figure 3. Mushroom substrate (exhibiting vigorous fungal growth...12 Figure 4. McGuire AFB soil with used mushroom substrate ...chlordane concentration in two soils as a result of incubating with used mushroom substrate

  15. Multiyear Subcontractor Selection Criteria Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Operations Management b. Financial Management c. Contract Management d. Subcontract Management/Materials Management e . Marketing f. Other, (please...SUBCONTR4CT MANAGEMENT! 22 20.0% MATERIALS MANAGEMENT E MARKETING 14 12.7% F OTHER 2 1.8% Figure 11 Functional Areas Represented By Respondents 174 C.1.. -A135

  16. On the Competition Problems of IPhO 39 in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoi, Nguyen The; Tu, Pham Quy; Don, Dam Trung

    2009-01-01

    We report on the competition problems given at the 39th International Physics Olympiad held in Hanoi, Vietnam, which consist of three theoretical and one experimental problems. The abbreviated solutions are presented. The distribution of marks for the problems is also shown. (Contains 2 tables and 8 figures.)

  17. Prehensile apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.M.

    1993-10-12

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for handling a workpiece comprising a vessel that is longitudinally extensible and pressurizable, and a nonextensible and laterally flexible member on the vessel. The member constrains one side of the vessel to be nonextensible, causing the vessel to bend in the direction of the nonextensible member when pressurized. 8 figures.

  18. Efficiency Measurement Using a Motor-Dynamo Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we describe a simple method which can be used to measure the efficiency of a low power dc motor, a motor-converted dynamo and a coupled motor-dynamo module as a function of the speed of rotation. The result can also be used to verify Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. (Contains 1 table and 8 figures.)

  19. Models of Strategy and Strategy-Shifting in Spatial Visualization Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    figures. Model C-Ill represented a forword -stopping synthesis strategy. Subjects first attempt to synthesize the A and 8 figures into an AS product...other two groups, but these differences were not significant. The fast average response time for the feature-comparers was due primarily to those who

  20. Information Product Quality in Network Centric Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    sense) is laid out in Lee and Baskerville [7], consistent with Yin [8]. Figure 16 shows Yin’s conceptualization applied to the NCOCF case study...Information science,” Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 50(12), 1051 – 1063. [11] Lee, A.S., and R.L. Baskerville . 2003

  1. Decision Support Environment for Concurrent Engineering Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    52 iv LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Related Research Efforts ............. ................................... 2 Figure 2. Systems Engineering Model ...8 Figure 3. Concurrent Enginezring Model ................................................... 9...engineering model as depicted in Figure 2 doesn’t appear robust enough to handle the design, devel’opment, and acquisition of modern weapon systems. The

  2. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  3. Robotic Range Clearance Competition (R2C2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    was only done for the “subsurface real ” test range. After mapping the surface contour, the Rover was used to mark the locations of notable...8 Figure 6. Map of Wyoming Showing General Location of R2C2 Ranges...Figure 48. Team Sky Research Geophysical Coverage Map ........................................................49 Figure 49. Anomaly Location Accuracy

  4. PubMed Central

    Frenette, Gilles

    1978-01-01

    The implantation of an upper limb is probably better than the best prostheses available today, provided the patient gains some sensitivity. This is quite separate from the psychological advantage. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 3 PMID:21304806

  5. Distortion in Perspective Projection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelso, Robert P., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a unique approach in associating perspective projection with the image beheld by the eye and demonstrates that all graphical and photographic perspective projections must contain distortion when compared to the image beheld by the eye. (Contains 8 figures.)

  6. Applications of digital image restoration to photographic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Trussell, H.J.; Cannon, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the cepstral method of blur determination for motion blur and out-of-focus lens blur is given. A review of the maximum a posteriori restoration (MAP) method is given. The reasons why this method produces few artifacts are discussed. Results of the complete image restoration process are given. 8 figures.

  7. Applications of Adaptive Learning Controller to Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    FIGURE 37. Location of Two Sub- Phase Histories to be Utilized in Estimating Misfocus Coefficients A and C . . . A8 FIGURES 38.-94. ALC Learning Curves ...FIGURES (Concl uded) FIGURE 23. ALC Learning Curve .... .................. ... 45 .- " FIGURE 24. ALC Learning Curve ......... ................. 47 FIGURE...25. ALC Learning Curve .... .................. ... 48 FIGURE 26. ALC Learning Curve ....... .... ... .... 50 FIGURE 27. ALC Learning Curve

  8. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  9. The Pizza Problem: A Solution with Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Kathryn G.; Mast, Caleb J.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issues of coaching and assessing. A preservice middle school teacher's unique solution to the Pizza problem was not what the professor expected. The student's solution strategy, based on sequences and a reinvention of Pascal's triangle, is explained in detail. (Contains 8 figures.)

  10. Evaluation of Future Fuels in a High Pressure Common Rail System. Part 3. John Deere 4.5L Powertech Plus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    25 3.3 LOW PRESSURE PUMP GEAR ............................................................................... 26 3.4 UPPER PLUNGER FACE...Eccentric Lobe and Ring Cam ..................................................................... 8 Figure 6. High Pressure Pump Head and Plunger ...The high pressure pump consists of two plunger assemblies oriented in an opposed fashion and a transfer pump all driven from a common camshaft. The

  11. Identifying and Assessing Interaction Knowledge, Skills, and Attributes for Future Force Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    7 Figure 5 Sample SBISE animation showing a team leader talking to a group. .............................. 8 Figure 6...understand, and control a social situation (Witt & Ferris, 2003). The SBISE adopts that goal but substitutes animated characters for the role players that...would be typical in an action exam. The SBISE utilizes computer animation (see Figure 5) to present Soldiers with common interpersonal scenarios

  12. Predictive & Prognostic Controller for Wide Band Gap (Silicon Carbide) Power Conversion (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    line for bench testing. Figure 4 shows the motor and drive. Figure 4: SatCon BF46-H-500H BLDC Motor with Three-Phase Drive For this simple test...Figure 8: Simulation Diagram of BLDC Motor Drive 8 Figure 9: BLDC Motor Simulation Waveforms 5. UNIQUE FAILURE SIGNATURES IN SIC DEVICES One

  13. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1203 - Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength 8 Figure 8 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT...—Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength ER10MR98.008...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1203 - Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength 8 Figure 8 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT...—Apparatus for Test of Retention System Strength ER10MR98.008...

  15. Geolocation of Source Interference from a Single Satellite with Multiple Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Systems ............................................................................ 124 a. INMARSAT Global Xpress ...7 Figure 4. Ku Band Single Antenna Footprint (from [12]). ............................................. 8 Figure 5. INMARSAT Global Xpress ...this sort of antenna system. This image is from INMARSAT’s planned Global Xpress system. Shown is the expected coverage provided by three Global

  16. An Adventure in Stereochemistry: Alice in Mirror Image Land

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinan, Frank J.; Yee, Gordon T.

    2004-01-01

    This case is based on an article that considered the problems that would arise if a person were to cross over into a mirror-image environment (Yee 2002). Some of the stereochemistry problems posed in that article are woven into this case study. (Contains 8 figures.)

  17. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane 8 Figure 8 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane 8 Figure 8 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633,...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane 8 Figure 8 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633,...

  20. Design, Build and Validation of a Small-Scale Combustion Chamber Testing Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Page Figure 1 CAI Model 300- NDIR Analyzer .......................................................................... 8 Figure 2 Signal Versus...CAI Model 300- NDIR Analyzer. Figure 1 CAI Model 300- NDIR Analyzer Using a curved reflecting surface, all of the light from an infrared source is...minimizes the contribution by interference gasses. The differential pressure system of the CAI Model 300- NDIR reduces the effect of the extra

  1. Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers? Technical Appendix. NCEE 2011-4016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazerman, Steven; Max, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This appendix describes the methods and provides further detail to support the evaluation brief, "Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers?" (Contains 8 figures, 6 tables and 5 footnotes.) [For the main report, "Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers? NCEE…

  2. Defying Gravity Using Jenga[TM] Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Yin-Soo; Yap, Kueh-Chin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes how Jenga[TM] blocks can be used to demonstrate the physics of an overhanging tower that appears to defy gravity. We also propose ideas for how this demonstration can be adapted for the A-level physics curriculum. (Contains 8 figures and 1 table.)

  3. Chemical vs. Sonochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Silver, Gold, and Hybrid Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    characterized optically and structurally by using ultraviolet-visible ( UV -Vis) spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM...4 Figure 3. All solutions lined up in order, from Ag QD Solutions 2–7. ..........................................5 Figure 4. UV -Vis...8 Figure 10. UV -Vis absorption on hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles. .....................................................9

  4. Mooring Analysis of the Ocean Sentinel through Field Observation and Numerical Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-22

    8 Figure 10: Examples of typical spread mooring systems (SST 2009...general methods: driving, drilling, or pumping for suction piles. Suction piles are hollow, sealed tubes that are embedded into the seafloor by...simple passive moorings to complex active systems. The three main configuration categories are single-point moorings, spread moorings, and dynamic

  5. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane 8 Figure 8 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1633 - Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Jig for Setting Mattresses and Foundation Sides in Same Plane 8 Figure 8 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  7. A Challenge for Micro and Mini UAV: The Sensor Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    pressure airspeed sensors on one single circuit board (Figure 8). Figure 8: Autopilot. The Quadcopter The fourth and final MAV is a quad-copter with...UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Figure 9: Quadcopter MAV. Figure 10: Loopshaping Diagram. The IMU contains 3 MEMS gyros. These form the rotational sensors Gx

  8. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  9. It's a Holiday!!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Michael I.; Mc Shane, Janet M.

    2008-01-01

    This article studies various holiday distributions, the most interesting one being Easter. Gauss' Easter algorithm and Microsoft Excel are used to determine that the Easter distribution can be closely approximated by the convolution of two well-known uniform distributions. (Contains 8 figures.)

  10. A Sensitive Cloud Chamber without Radioactive Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeze, Syoji; Itoh, Akio; Oyama, Ayu; Takahashi, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitive diffusion cloud chamber which does not require any radioactive sources. A major difference from commonly used chambers is the use of a heat sink as its bottom plate. The result of a performance test of the chamber is given. (Contains 8 figures.)

  11. Some Problems of Extremes in Geometry and Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanovsky, Levi

    2008-01-01

    Two original problems in geometry are presented with solutions utilizing to differential calculus: (a) rectangle inscribed in a sector; (b) point on the ray of the angle. The possibility of applying mathematics in general and differential calculus in particular for solution of practical problems is discussed. (Contains 8 figures.)

  12. Free Electron Laser Stability Effects and Design of an Electrostatic Cathode Test Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    the core components of an FEL. Two options shown, run as an amplifier or an oscillator. In blue are the optical pulses and in red are the...7 Figure 3. Undulator, a schematic representation. In red is the electron beam undergoing transverse oscillations. The undulator...electron motion. [].............................8 Figure 4. Generic Oscillator schematic. The interaction of the electron pulses ( red ) with the

  13. Helping Teachers Connect Vocabulary and Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, A. Susan

    2008-01-01

    A focus on mathematics vocabulary must be part of teachers' instructional plans to develop students' understanding of key ideas. The author presents examples from work with preservice teachers regarding two vocabulary strategies and other related activities that can be used by middle and high school mathematics teachers. (Contains 8 figures.)

  14. Comfort Characterization of Various Fabrics for Extremity Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    clamped and sealed. ................................7 Figure 3. Moisture management tester Model M290 from SDL-Atlas...7 Figure 4. Air permeability tester , TexTest model FX 3300 from Advanced Testing Instruments.....8 Figure 5. Horizontal wicking test setup...Shirley Stiffness Tester model M003B from SDL-Atlas

  15. Complex Characters Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Sidney F. A.

    2009-01-01

    The physical significance of complex characters is explored with particular reference to the C[subscript 4] point group. While a diagrammatic representation of these characters in this group is possible, the extension to higher groups C[subscript n], n greater than 4 is left as a problem for discussion. (Contains 3 tables, 8 figures, and 1 note.)

  16. The Seasons Explained by Refutational Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frede, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the principles and investigation of a small-group laboratory activity based on refutational modeling to teach the concept of seasons to preservice elementary teachers. The results show that these teachers improved significantly when they had to refute their initial misconceptions practically. (Contains 8 figures and 1 table.)

  17. Teaching Motion with the Global Positioning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budisa, Marko; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2003-01-01

    We have used the GPS receiver and a PC interface to track different types of motion. Various hands-on experiments that enlighten the physics of motion at the secondary school level are suggested (visualization of 2D and 3D motion, measuring car drag coefficient and fuel consumption). (Contains 8 figures.)

  18. True Serials: A True Solution for Electronic Resource Management Needs in a Medium-Size Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milczarski, Vivian; Garofalo, Denise A.

    2011-01-01

    A desire for more functionality seemed to clash with the fiscal reality of limited funds, but after investigating alternatives, Mount Saint Mary College was able to provide its faculty and students with a more useful and function-rich electronic resource management through a move to a hosted open source service. (Contains 8 figures.)

  19. Using Your Inner Voice to Guide Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Doris J.; Walcott, Crystal Y.; Kastberg, Signe E.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a tool teachers can use to analyze student work and provides activity suggestions to guide instruction based on their findings. By integrating the voice of the child and the voice of the discipline, teachers can use their inner voice to build a model of the child's understanding. (Contains 8 figures.)

  20. A Safe and Effective Modification of Thomson's Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  1. Investigating the Investigative Task: Testing for Skewness--An Investigation of Different Test Statistics and Their Power to Detect Skewness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Josh

    2010-01-01

    On the 2009 AP[c] Statistics Exam, students were asked to create a statistic to measure skewness in a distribution. This paper explores several of the most popular student responses and evaluates which statistic performs best when sampling from various skewed populations. (Contains 8 figures, 3 tables, and 4 footnotes.)

  2. Piezocomposites for Active Surface Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-19

    section of 100 mm single layer SmartPanel 3 Figure 4. Preliminary design for 2-layer SmartPanel 3 Figure 5. Baseline SonoPanel configuration 4 Figure 6...baseline SonoPanel design 10 Figure 12. TVR of 100 x 100 mm baseline SonoPanel design 10 Figure 13. FFVS of 250 x 250 mm baseline SonoPanel design ...12 Figure 14. TVR of 250 x 250 mm baseline SonoPanel design 12 Figure15. 100 mm, 250 mm, and 750 mm SonoPanel transducers 13 Figure 16

  3. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  4. Fatigue Behavior of IM7/BMI 5250-4 Composite at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Tension-Tension Fatigue Tests ...............................................................21 4.2.5 Fully Reversed Fatigue Tests ...10 Figure 5: Example of Steel Reaching the Endurance Limit on S-N Curve [15] ............... 11 Figure 6: Tension-Tension Fatigue Test ...14 Figure 7: Tension-Compression Fatigue Test Specimen. All Dimension are in Inches. All Tolerances are ±0.001 in

  5. Simplifying the Mathematical Treatment of Radioactive Decay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Derivation of the law of radioactive decay is considered without prior knowledge of calculus or the exponential series. Calculus notation and exponential functions are used because ultimately they cannot be avoided, but they are introduced in a simple way and explained as needed. (Contains 10 figures, 1 box, and 1 table.)

  6. Human Short-Latency Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Impact Acceleration Research: Equipment, Procedures and Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Instrumentation Data Sheet .......................... 10 Figure 8. Human Physiology Screen One ....................................... 1I1 Figure 9. Human ... Physiology Screen Two...................................... 12 Figure 10. Human Physiology Screen Three ..................................... 12 Figure...Short-Latency Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Impact Acceleration Research ***** HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY SCREEN***** Please Read First To move from one

  7. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Gravity for Drop Assembly ER10MR98.010...

  12. Decision Analysis Using Value Focused Thinking to Select Renewable Energy Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    bladed Turbine ......................................................... 10 Figure 3. Wind Turbine Gearbox ..................................................................................... 10... Turbine Gearbox (DOE, 2003) - 11 - The foundation square footage required of the turbine is relatively small but the height is great. The...Figure 2. A Horizontal-axis Three-bladed Turbine (Vision Quest Windelectric, 2003) Figure 3. Wind

  13. 17. Dining area of lobby/dining room, view to southsoutheast. Scale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Dining area of lobby/dining room, view to south-southeast. Scale stick visible at left against corner of pillar; 5'10" figure for additional scale reference. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Big Sur Inn Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  14. Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    5 2.2 M IL-STD -1629 Tasks, ................................................................................................ 7 3.0 FMEA ...93 10.0 ADDITIONAL SOURCES/METHODS ................................................................ 95 10.1 Process FMEA ...CRTA-FMECA vii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1: FMEA Worksheet (Task 101) .................................................................... 10 Figure 2

  15. Dredging Research Program: Practices and Problems Associated with Economic Loading and Overflow of Dredge Hoppers and Scows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    of hopper dredges at any of the coastal entrances, the Columbia River , the Umpqua River , or in most of Coos Bay. Overflow is restricted at river mile...Valley Division................................... 32 Ohio River Division................................................. 32 North Atlantic Division...transported and permanently deposited outside the navigation 10 Figure 2. Clamshell dredge filling scow with overflow channel by tidal, river , or

  16. Mega-Universities and Knowledge Media: Technology Strategies for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, John S

    This book explores the essentials of distance education and reviews issues facing large open universities (mega-universities) worldwide. It uses examples from industry and the knowledge media, to show how technology-based learning can be made attractive both to students and to institutions. The book's eight chapters, including 10 figures and 5…

  17. Applications for fission product data to problems in stellar nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.

    1983-10-01

    A general overview of the nucleosynthesis mechanisms for heavy (A greater than or equal to 70) nuclei is presented with particular emphasis on critical data needs. The current state of the art in nucleosynthesis models is described and areas in which fission product data may provide useful insight are proposed. 33 references, 10 figures.

  18. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  19. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Horne, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array. 10 figures.

  20. Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass. Volume 1 - Results of Screening for Potential Candidates From Sugars and Synthesis Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    66 References Used to Develop Catalog for Potential Biobased Products ......................... 66...based Feedstocks .... 10 Figure 3 Analogous Model of a Biobased Product Flow-chart for Biomass Feedstocks .... 11 Figure 4 Star Diagram of 3...profitability makes it more attractive for new biobased companies to contribute to our domestic fuel and power supply by reinvesting in new biorefineries

  1. Process for Refining and Validating a Finite Element Model of an Experimental High-Altitude, Long-Endurance (HALE) Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    6 DARPA Vulture Program...2003) 10 Figure 7. Boeing’s Phantom Eye UAV [2] Figure 8. RQ-4 Global Hawk [3] 11 DARPA Vulture Program The Defense...Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) Vulture Program aims to push the goals of these previous efforts even further. DARPA set a goal of

  2. Giving Exponential Functions a Fair Shake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    This article details an exploration of exponential decay and growth relationships using M&M's and dice. Students collect data for mathematical models and use graphing calculators to make sense of the general form of the exponential functions. (Contains 10 figures and 2 tables.)

  3. The Use of Ultra-Violet (UV) Light Emitting Diodes (LEDS) in an Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with Brilliant Blue FCF as an Indicator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    indicated that it performed suitably as a witness dye with improved characteristics as compared to methylene blue. Further, the experiments indicated...light output by methylene blue adsorption on post experimentation reactor UV LEDsUV LED Quartz Lens Adsorption Experiment ...31 UV Brilliant Blue FCF...10 Figure 2 - Flow through reactor with UV LEDs

  4. Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Enterprise (JGRE), robotics, UAV, UGV, integration, Joint Capability Areas (JCA), UAS, JAUS, C4ISR, HMMWV, Mongoose , Multi-robot Operator Control Unit...7 Figure 2. HMMWV UGV, AUMS, and the Mongoose UAS ........................................................10 Figure 3. The AUMS...11 Figure 5. The Mongoose UAS

  5. An Experiment in Preventing Zebra Mussel Settlement Using Electro-Expulsive Separation Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    of field components .................................................................... 10 Figure 6. Timeline of EES system’s periods of operation...oxidizing chemical molluscicides (chlorine, chlorine dioxide) • CO2 injection • Anoxia/hypoxia • Biological (predators, parasites, diseases) Some of...The field components were arranged on site as shown in Figure 5. a. Assembling sets of small plates, one each of which was retrieved monthly and

  6. A Performance-Based Web Budget Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abou-Sayf, Frank K.; Lau, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    A web-based formula-driven tool has been developed for the purpose of performing two distinct academic department budgeting functions: allocation funding to the department, and budget management by the department. The tool's major features are discussed and its uses demonstrated. The tool's advantages are presented. (Contains 10 figures.)

  7. An Incremental Language Conversion Method to Convert C++ into Ada95

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    Background ........................................................................... 10 2.1 Software Layer Architecture... 10 2.2 The Object-Oriented Model of RDT ........................................... 12 3. Sum m ary of Current Knowledge... 10 Figure 2. The Object-Oriented Model of RDT ................................. 13 Figure 3. An example to describe the difference

  8. Simple Verification of the Parabolic Shape of a Rotating Liquid and a Boat on Its Surface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatka, Z.; Dvorak, L.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive way to create and to verify the parabolic surface of a rotating liquid. The liquid is water. The second part of the article deals with the problem of a boat on the surface of a rotating liquid. (Contains 1 table, 10 figures and 5 footnotes.)

  9. Optic Glomeruli: Biological Circuits that Compute Target Identity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    TERMS Optic glomeruli, glomerulus, Nasonia vitripennis, jewel wasp, Drosophila , vinegar fly, Giant Fiber, descending neuron, lobula, visual primitive...5 Figure 4. Optic glomerulus local interneuron in Drosophila . ...................................... 10 Figure 5. Giant fiber descending...studies are being performed on Drosophila , because genetic expression of green fluorescent protein provides identification of cell types in the living

  10. A Watery Whodunit: The Case of the Missing Zooxanthellae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kimberley A.; Bruno, Barbara C.; Achilles, Kate; Sherman, Sarah B.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding coral reefs and the threats they face is an essential precondition in preserving them. This activity helps to educate middle school students about coral biology and the problem of coral bleaching. It will inspire students to participate in marine conservation initiatives. (Contains 10 figures and 3 resources.)

  11. Fundamental Investigation of Interactions and Behavior Between Phase Change Materials and Liquid Metals in Nano-Micro Scale Volumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-26

    inventions to declare during the performance of this grant. Peter Nilsson, Björn Samel AAC Microtec AB Dag Hammarskjolds Vag 54 SE-751 83 Uppsala...10 Figure 3: Contact angle measurement for evaluation of wettability ..........................................................12 Figure 4...from the side. Figure 3 and Figure 4 show the contact angle measurement for evaluation of wettability and examples of different wetting cases. Figure

  12. IHE material qualification tests description and criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Slape, R J

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the qualification tests presently being used at Pantex Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory that are required by the Department of Energy prior to the approval for an explosive as an Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) material. The acceptance criteria of each test for IHE qualification is also discussed. 5 references, 10 figures.

  13. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ER15NO99.008...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ER15NO99.008...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ER15NO99.008...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ER15NO99.008...

  17. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ER15NO99.008...

  18. Alice in Numberland: Through the Standards in Wonderland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Donna; Lambe, Karen; Payson, Christine; Carnevale, Patricia; Scarpelli, Debra

    2008-01-01

    A whimsical mathematics event for children and adults, derived from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, was held at the Providence Children's Museum in Rhode Island. NCTM's Standards were the basis of all the activities. (Contains 10 figures and 1 table.)

  19. Finite Element and Molecular Dynamics Modeling and Simulation of Thermal Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    10 Figure 5. FCC structure of the primary material with two groups of atoms of a secondary material imbedded in the solid. The secondary...material atoms are the red asterisk. ................................................................. 23 Figure 6. FCC structure of the primary material...isotropic FCC structure was converted to a composite material by changing the epsilon or sigma values of selected atomic positions within the cubic

  20. New Approaches to the Parameterization of Gravity-Wave and Flow-Blocking Drag due to Unresolved Mesoscale Orography Guided by Mesoscale Model Predictability Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    red curves reveal a substantial cold bias in the analyzed NAVGEM stratospheric temperatures in boreal winter, when the Sun disappears at high...mean poleward and downwelling circulation cell that adiabatically warms the stratosphere . The black curves in Figure 6 show the results from a...NAVGEM prediction skill in the upper stratosphere . 10 Figure 7. Zonal-mean temperature increments versus NAVGEM model

  1. "Context and Spoken Word Recognition in a Novel Lexicon": Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revill, Kathleen Pirog; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    Reports an error in "Context and spoken word recognition in a novel lexicon" by Kathleen Pirog Revill, Michael K. Tanenhaus and Richard N. Aslin ("Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," 2008[Sep], Vol 34[5], 1207-1223). Figure 9 was inadvertently duplicated as Figure 10. Figure 9 in the original article was correct.…

  2. Earthquakes in the New Zealand Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Cleland

    1995-01-01

    Presents a thorough overview of earthquakes in New Zealand, discussing plate tectonics, seismic measurement, and historical occurrences. Includes 10 figures illustrating such aspects as earthquake distribution, intensity, and fissures in the continental crust. Tabular data includes a list of most destructive earthquakes and descriptive effects…

  3. The Corps of Engineers and Prairie Restoration: Synopsis of the First Corps Prairie Workshop, Follow-up Actions, and Thoughts on the Future of Prairie Restoration and Management on Operational Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    1 Figure 2. Grass strips and blocks have improved habitat conditions for pheasants and songbirds at...10 Figure 5. Native prairie remnants at Granger Lake, Texas, support a diversity of native grasses and forbs... grasses and forbs. Benefits of prairie restoration efforts noted by Corps personnel included erosion control, sediment management, control of non

  4. Ventilation of porous media

    DOEpatents

    Neeper, D.A.

    1994-02-22

    Methods are presented for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction. 10 figures.

  5. Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

    1984-05-25

    This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Plume Visualization of Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Jettison Motors Using Background-Oriented Schlieren

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    AEDC-TR-09-T-13 Plume Visualization of Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Jettison Motors Using Background-Oriented Schlieren...10 FIGURES Figure 1. Launch Abort System Test Article Details ......................................................................... 11...Development Center’s (AEDC) Propulsion Wind Tunnel (PWT) 16T was used to visualize the jettison motor (JM) plumes on a scaled NASA Orion Launch Abort

  7. Treatment of a unique natural gas: a comparison of SELEXOL and cryogenic purification methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrett, F.W.; Yoon, Y.K.; Newman, J.G.

    1983-06-01

    The gas studied contains 65% CO/sub 2/, essentially no ethane-plus components, is high in nitrogen and contains recoverable quantities of helium. Pipeline gas, high purity CO/sub 2/, and raw helium were required products. This combination presents some difficulties for both processes. 5 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Impact of Individual Differences on Reliance Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-31

    call recordings from 4 speakers , each including a specific call sign followed by a combination of one of four possible colors and a number from 1-8...Levels Of Autonomy simulation (ALOA) annotated screenshot. ... 10 Figure 2. Sample close-up of image analysis task window...11 Figure 3. Sample close-up of digit pairs task that overlaid the map. ........................................... 13

  9. NEMESIS: NEtwork Modeling Environment for Structural Intervention Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    needs of specific tools. One network analytical tool, Adaptive Safety and Monitoring ( ASAM ), matches transactions against a pattern library and manages...the uncertainties of the association. ASAM was extended in the second year of NEMESIS to include multiple model tracking, multiple hypothesis testing...10 Figure 5. ASAM Launcher Interface

  10. A Comparison of Nuclear Thermal and Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Interplanetary Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 FIGURE 6: 1000 kg Jupiter NEP mission Dumbkopff Chart - Pluto NTR 500 kg 0 18000 0 500 1000 1500 Isp (sec) In iti al M as s (k g...sec) In iti al M as s (k g) 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 FIGURE 8: 500 kg Pluto NEP mission 5 These graph yield starting points for the...were low; an actual scientific mission to Jupiter and possibly Pluto would require more ∆V to insert the spacecraft into orbit and maneuver along the

  11. Effects of Carbon Nanomaterial Reinforcement on Composite Joints Under Cyclic and Impact Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Molding ( VARTM ) technique with 7.5g/m2 of MWCNTs or CNFs dispersed at the joint interface ahead of the crack tip. The test coupons were loaded in 3...fabricated via Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) technique with 7.5g/m 2 of MWCNTs or CNFs dispersed at the joint interface ahead of... VARTM setup in the laboratory ........................................................................9 Figure 7. Arrangement of the various layers

  12. Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    drinking in the dark ’ 36, 37 6 Experimental design: 12 month old human tau transgenic mice were subjected to 5 concussive brain injuries or sham...tau immunohistochemistry 9 Figure 3: Silver stain analysis of white matter tracts in aged human transgenic mice. (A) Corticospinal tract. (B...the Dark " (DID): a simple mouse model of binge-like alcohol intake. Current protocols in neuroscience / editorial board, Jacqueline N Crawley [et

  13. Early Synthetic Prototyping: Exploring Designs and Concepts Within Games

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Known as the Big “A” (from Defense Acquisition University [DAU], 2014a) ..............................9 Figure 3. Interaction Between the Capability...Department of Defense Decision Support System The DOD Decision Support System, represented in Figure 2, also referred to as the Big “A” concept, can...and develop the best possible system to support the warfighter. Figure 2. Abstraction of the DOD Decision Support System, also Known as the Big

  14. Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Education and Training: A Review Across the Services and Joint Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    and Radiological • BECC – Basic Engineering Common Core • EPOC - Engineering Plant Operator Common Navy Indoctrination Apprentice Journeyman Master...LDR DCA/4811 EPOC Curriculum In Progress BECCBoot Camp E1-E3 E3-E4 E5-E6 E7-E9 Figure VI-1. Navy Five-Vector Model Apprentice-level training...Enlisted Profession Military Education EPOC Engineer Plant Operator Common ETIC Education and Training Integration Council EUCOM European Command EWSDEP

  15. Development of Na/sup +/-dependent hexose transport in cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK/sub 1/)

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, E.R.; Amsler, K.; Dawson, W.D.; Cook, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors were explored to analyze how they interact to yield the increasing transport capacity in differentiating cell populations. These factors include the number of functional transporters in the population, the distribution of these transporters among the individual cells, the Na/sup +/ chemical gradient, the transmembrane potential, the pathways and activities of these pathways for efflux of glucoside, and cell-cell coupling between accumulating and non-accumulating cells. 35 references, 9 figures, 2 tables. (ACR)

  16. In Situ Experimental Studies of Fundamental Degradation Processes in the Low Earth Orbit Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    novel oxidation models have been developed to explain the structural changes observed for Ag, Al and Si oxidation. B. PERSONEL The program started on...The dual sensor head QCM system permits the dynamical measurements of mass changes of two films simultaneously during AO exposure with extremely high...structure observed for MO oxidized sample (Figure 9). Figure 9. Plan -view TEM micrographs and SAED patterns of Si(100) oxidized (a) by hyperthermal atomic

  17. GENSIS: Generalized Model for Simulating Shoreline Change. Report 2. Workbook and System User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    18650 . 1664.3 18700. 1673.9 Figure 51. (Concluded) The output file 1982XY_2.ISH is generated by the program, and the file is listed in Figure 52. Again...1578.2 18350. 1586.7 18400. 1595.8 18450. 1603.7 18500. 1616.3 18550. 1627.4 18600. 1639.0 18650 . 1651.1 18700. 1663 Figure 52. (Concluded) by

  18. Sleep Resilience, Comorbid Anxiety, and Treatment in a Muring Model of PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    INTRODUCTION PTSD is a prevalent psychiatric disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts and images during wake and sleep, hyperarousal, and...compared to CS-. (E) time in REM sleep was averaged in two hour bins across the 24 hour re-exposure period for animals that were re-exposed to the CS...compared to CS-. 9 (Figure 5E), a pattern of decreased REM during the dark period in the mtHC group (Figure 5F) paralleled the pattern of

  19. Impact of acid precipitation on recreation and tourism in Ontario: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The impacts of acid precipitation on fishing opportunities, waterfowl and moose hunting, water contact activities, and the perception of the environment in Ontario are analyzed. Economic effects and future research needs are also estimated and discussed. These questions have been examined by identifying the likely links between acidic precipitation and recreation and tourism, by developing estimates of the importance of aquatic-based recreation and tourism, by describing the current and estimated future effects of acid precipitation. 101 references, 9 figures, 19 tables.

  20. UAV Mothership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    9 Figure 8: UAV Storage Racks on Third and Fourth Deck................................................ 10...the ship. UAVs such as the Integrator shown in Figure 7 are stored in the forward end of the ship below the launchers in secure racks . Two...automated forklift similar to existing automated pallet loading systems removes a UAV from the rack and deposits it on a conveyer ramp on the third deck

  1. Nanodesigning of Hierarchical Multifunctional Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-28

    conditions by reacting nanosized titanium oxide or titanium alkoxides with a solution of barium hydroxide. The powders produced by this approach range in...14 1.2.5 Density of Colloidal Aggregated Network Near a Hard Wall ...... 15 1.2.6 Synthesis of Lead- Zirconium -Titanate (Pb(Zr0.5 2Tio.4 8)0 3 ) (PZT...6 Figure 4: Spinnability map for poly(ethylene oxide )-based a-A120 3 suspensions ......... 9 Figure 5: High

  2. Knowledge Management Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Headquarters,Department of the Army,Washington,DC 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ; - 9. SPONSORING...Range of knowledge management strategies..................................................... 1-9 Figure 1-4. Knowledge management and the cognitive

  3. Develop Efficient Leak Proof M1 Abrams Plenum Seal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    SBIR report, M1 Abrams, plenum seal, turbine blade wear, FOD leakage, turbine failure, air cleaner plenum box, seal design, efficient leak proof seal...premature and excessive turbine blade wear. This in turn leads to a reduced time interval between turbine rebuilds and an estimated $3-$4 million in...Comparison – As drawn vs. actual installation ........................................... 9 Figure 5: Assembly model of M1 Turbine and related components

  4. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis for determining hydrogen and deuterium distribution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Altstetter, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams for materials analysis has made a successful transition from the domain of the particle physicist to that of the materials scientist. The subcategory of this field, nuclear reaction analysis, is just now undergoing the transition, particularly in applications to hydrogen in materials. The materials scientist must locate the nearest accelerator, because now he will find that using it can solve mysteries that do not yield to other techniques. 9 figures

  5. Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-01-10

    A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time. 9 figures.

  6. Any Peer Competitors Out There? An Economic Perspective to the Growth of Potential Peer Competitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Institute, World Resources 1994-1995, (New York: Oxford University Press , 1994), 335. 5 Chapter 2 Methodology Comparing Military Power The military power of a...Development Report 1992, (Oxford: Oxford University Press , 1992), Table 2, Table 9, Table 11, Table 26, Table 29. Many other national indicators were analyzed...China 1 sigm a devia tion Source: World Bank, World Development Report 1992, (Oxford: Oxford University Press , 1992), Table 2, Table 9. Figure 2

  7. Low-Cost Lattice Matching Zn(Se)Te/Si Composite Substrates for HgCdSe and Type-2 Superlattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    9 Figure 8. X-ray FWHMs of ZnTe/Si layers as a function of alloy composition...superlattices (T2-SLS) (15, 16) and HgCdSe (17, 18) alloys for LWIR applications. These compound semiconductor systems have lattice constants close to...lattice constant very near 6.1 Å, which can be tuned to lattice-match any configured T2-SLS system or HgCdSe alloys . For these reasons, we propose

  8. Design, Implementation, and Characterization of a Dedicated Breast Computed Mammo Tomography System for Enhanced Lesion Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    with development of a phantom for this purpose (Figure.7). 9 Figure.7 Schematic of cross phantom with 5mm acrylic spheres arranged in a cross...total of 9 spheres are placed on the sheet (graphic is courtesy of Priti Madhav). Cross phantom studies showed that lesion information may be...measurements of similar Varian devices. A phantom was developed specifically for the measurement of 3D MTF, NPS, and resulting DQE (Figure.9

  9. Locking Down the Software Development Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    the design of a component [3] and this is critical to looking at where the threats exist and oppor- tunities for threat exposure in the in the software...focus on building functionality, not managing the change [8]. Software CM ( SCM ) is the traditional technique for controlling the content of...deliverable components and is an essential element of a robust security policy [9]. Figure 1 illustrates a traditional unit-level development process

  10. Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  11. Basic Principles and Concepts for Achieving Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Conceptual Framework for Quality 10 2.1 Definitions and Concepts for Quality 10 2.1.1 Object (Entity) 10 2.1.2 Process 11 2.1.3 Requirement 12 2.1.4 User...between Extended Quality Conceptual Framework and Development Project 9 Figure 2: Customer and End User are the Same in Interactions With Organization 13...5: Interaction of Activities between Extended Quality Conceptual Framework and Development Project 21 Figure 6: Software Module Volatility 22 4

  12. A Residual Chlorine Removal Method to Allow Drinking Water Monitoring by Biological Early Warning Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    Aquatic Biomonitor Diagram Page 6 Figure 3. Dechlorinator System Page 9 Figure 4. Sodium Bisulfite Response Data Page 12 Table 1. Size of Fish Used in... sodium bisulfite into chlorinated water containing 1.5 to 2.0 mg/L TRC was effective in removing TRC-related toxicity during a nine month evaluation of...Fredericksburg, VA. Because of 2.3 Dechlorinator Testing the low toxicity of sodium bisulfite and This section describes the procedures the high concentrations

  13. Defining Genomic Changes in Triple Negative Breast Cancer in Women of African Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Instruments, Burlingame, CA, USA) and images will be processed using Genepix Pro 4.0 image analysis software (Axon Instruments). See Figure 4 below for an...example of hybridization of a Kijabe Native African case. Native African TN BC AA “Tumor Normal” 9 Figure 4. Scanned image of Kijabe...Native African Case. The image is the result of merging the reference sample data with that from the tumor

  14. High-Resolution Large-Field-of-View Ultrasound Breast Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    system was determined by acquiring 25 detector flood images using the same transducer settings for each acquisition. One such image is included in...Figure 5. For each flood image, a subsection of the total image matrix was extracted over which the detector illumination appeared highly uniform...component and plotted as a two- dimensional function of spatial frequency f. 9 Figure 5: Example of one of the detector flood images used to

  15. Implementation and Commercialization of New Plant Germplasms for Use on Military Ranges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    9 Figure 2. A conceptual model on how an introduced nurse- crop species acts as an “ecological bridge” on sandy soils at Fort Drum...introduced nurse- crop species acts as an “ecological bridge” on sandy soils at Fort Drum, allowing fescues and eventually the desired native grass, SG, to...elevation (Figure 5). The military mission of Fort Carson is to train, mobilize, deploy, and 19 sustain combat- ready , multicomponent integrated forces

  16. Chemical analysis of sediment cores from the East Waterway (Everett, Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crecelius, E.A.; Bloom, N.S.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Chemical data for two sediment cores from the East Waterway of Everett, Washington, indicate that 20 to 30 cm of contaminated sediments are accumulating per year. The concentrations of several heavy metals (Pb, Hg and Cu), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and petroleum hydrocarbons increase with depth in the sediments suggesting contamination of this waterway has varied by as much as a factor of 10 during the last 5 years. 7 references, 9 figures, 12 tables.

  17. Benchmarking GNU Radio Kernels and Multi-Processor Scheduling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-14

    Performance. GNU Radio, 9 edition, July 2008. http://gnuradio.org/redmine/projects/ gnuradio /wiki/MPSchedulerPerformance. 9 Figure 7: VOLK type conversion...Dale, Eric Firing, and Michael Droettboom. mat- plotlib, November 2012. http://matplotlib.org/contents.html. [6] Sean Nowlan. Discuss- gnuradio ...November 2011. http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/discuss- gnuradio /2011- 11/msg00151.html. [7] George Nychis, Thibaud Hottelier, Zhuocheng Yang, Srinivasan

  18. TAX-EXEMPT ORGANIZATIONS: Improvements Possible in Public, IRS, and State Oversight of Charities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    spend too much on fundraising and general management and not enough on program services to meet the charitable purposes related to the tax-exempt...Figures Figure 1: Charity Expenses for Program Services, General Management, and Fundraising as a Percentage of Total Expenses, 1994-1998. 9 Figure 2: Total...Contributions and Reporting No Fundraising Expenses, 1994-1998 12 Page iv GAO-02-526 Oversight of Charities Figure 4: Functional Expense Categories and

  19. Performance Evaluation of a Prototype Underwater Short-Range Acoustic Telemetry Modem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    9 Figure 6. Multipath propagation of eigenrays at a range of 500 m plotted by Bellhop ray trace. From [4...travels with a unique path, as illustrated by Figure 6. Each ray arriving at the receiver is called an eigenray . Since each eigenray has a unique path...propagation of eigenrays at a range of 500 m plotted by Bellhop ray trace. From [4] We can model the underwater acoustic communication channel as

  20. Clutter Identification Using Electromagnetic Survey Data, ESTCP MR-201001 Cost and Performance Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    demonstration was part of the ESTCP Live Site Demonstration at the former Spencer Artillery Range, TN, during May 2012. The dynamic test area covered...1.024 ms) from the MP system for the Dynamic Area at the former Spencer Artillery Range, TN. .......................................9 Figure 7-1...Cart Dynamic / Cued Classification Results for the former Spencer Artillery Range, TN. Classification performed by SAIC. ..............12 Tables

  1. An Experimental Model for Bubble Formation in Diving Seals and Porpoises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    imaging modality for gas bubble detection in bycatch and dead stranded marine mammals (Figure 7). Topographic landmarks were established (Figure 8...drowned at depth in gill nets. Veterinary Pathology 46:536-547 PATENTS None HONORS/AWARDS/PRIZES None 5 Figures 1 through 6 photographed by Tom...pressure. 9 Figure 8 – Terrason 3000 ultrasound system deployed on a single stranded pilot whale. Kidney Liver Umbilicus Figure 9 – Topographic

  2. Advanced Signal Processing & Classification: UXO Standardized Test Site Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The original document contains color images . 14. ABSTRACT Our objective was to...addition to the three GEM sensors, note the three GPS antennae and the IMU for platform motion measurement. ................ 9 Figure 4-5 Photograph of...i) the total area under the curve and (ii) the probability of false alarms at 0.95 probability of detection. We selected five data sets to include

  3. Restructuring Depot Maintenance Occupational Series to Improve Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Optimal Fraction of Flexible Servers (Chakravarthy & Agnihothri, 2005) ....... 9 Figure 2: Cross Training Employment Matrix (McCreery & Krajewski , 1999...coefficient. This coefficient is the “potential efficiencies gained as a result of consolidation, given as a percentage of original manpower levels.” ( p . 16...how do we ensure we don’t lose the depth of knowledge of experts when we cross-train—is directly addressed by McCreery and Krajewski , in “Improving

  4. Low temperature thin films formed from nanocrystal precursors

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Goldstein, A.N.

    1993-11-16

    Nanocrystals of semiconductor compounds are produced. When they are applied as a contiguous layer onto a substrate and heated they fuse into a continuous layer at temperatures as much as 250, 500, 750 or even 1000 K below their bulk melting point. This allows continuous semiconductor films in the 0.25 to 25 nm thickness range to be formed with minimal thermal exposure. 9 figures.

  5. The Effects of Cognitive Jamming on Wireless Sensor Networks Used for Geolocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    23 UDP User Datagram Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 MIMO Multiple Input Multiple Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70...processing 9 Figure 2.2: WBX Daughterboard [8]. complex waveforms at high sample rates [9]. A FPGA is like a small, massively parallel computer that a user...capable jammer. Another area to explore is using two or more USRP2 radios connected together by using the Multiple Input Multiple Output ( MIMO ) port on

  6. Analysis of the benefits of gas technology R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, K.G. Jr.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Six alternative scenarios were developed and analyzed to provide insights into the economic benefits of R and D on gaseous fuel supply and utilization technologies. The scenarios explore changes in the rate of new technology introduction under various assumptions regarding the future prices for oil, coal, and electricity. A long-range energy sector simulation model was used to analyze the scenarios. The model requires an extensive technology data base that was developed for this analysis. 6 references, 9 figures, 12 tables.

  7. Observed Statistics of Extreme Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    9 Figure 5. An energy stealing wave as a solution to the NLS equation . (From: Dysthe and...shown that nonlinear interaction between four colliding waves can produce extreme wave behavior. He utilized the NLS equation in his numerical ...2000) demonstrated the formation of extreme waves using the Korteweg de Vries ( KdV ) equation , which is valid in shallow water. It was shown in the

  8. Noise in Lead Beta Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    single crystal and ceramic samples. The temperature dependance for diffusion noise (I>O,1OHz) is greater than can be accounted for by Equation (1). This...3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 1000/T IN 1/9 Figure 2. Temperature Dependance of Nyqutst Noise (5kHz) and Diffusion Noise (lOHz) of Single Crystal and

  9. Air Mobility Command’s En Route Support Infrastructure: A Construct of Aircraft Type and Geographic Location Utilized to Assess En Route Aircraft Logistic Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    and during operations in Kosovo, C-5 major inspections were performed at Moron AB, Spain (AMC, 2002b). 9 Figure 2. Countries Visited by AMC...Minor LTAG Incirlik AB, Turkey 721 AMOG 728 Air Mobility Squadron Minor LPLA Lajes AB, Azores 721 AMOG 729 Air Mobility Squadron Minor LEMO Moron AB...A. (1999). Air mobility: The evolution of global reach. Vienna, VA: PointOne Publishing. International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). (2006

  10. Method of ultrasonic measurement of texture

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R.B.; Smith, J.F.; Lee, S.S.; Taejon Ch'ungmam; Yan Li.

    1993-10-12

    A method for measuring texture of metal plates or sheets using non-destructive ultrasonic investigation includes measuring the velocity of ultrasonic energy waves in lower order plate modes in one or more directions, and measuring phase velocity dispersion of higher order modes of the plate or sheet if needed. Texture or preferred grain orientation can be derived from these measurements with improves reliability and accuracy. The method can be utilized in production on moving metal plate or sheet. 9 figures.

  11. Data and Analysis Center for Software: An IAC in Transition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    DACS in Professional Journals by Paid Advertisements 9 Figure 9-3 is a reproduction of the advertisement for the DACS Annotated Bibliography. The ad... reproduction , handling, and sition frmework for the joint services. In mailing. Orders must be prepaid, and checks addition, it was found that the...CORPORATIONS & INDIVIDUALS TYPE OF INQUIRY USER TECHNICAL DATASET DOCUMENT SPRINGFIELD VA 1 ENVIRO CONTROL INC LEXINGTON PARK MD ENVIROMENTAL RES INST MI

  12. Understanding the Apoptotic Functions of IGFBP-3 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    6483–95. 29. Ikonen M, Liu B , Hashimoto Y, et al. Interaction between the Alzheimer’s survival peptide humanin and insulin-like growth factor-binding...CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b . ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U...PK CKII DNA-PK ATM 9 Figure 2 B Figure 2 - Incubation of IGFBP-3 with CK2 inhibitors results in

  13. Endgame Analyses Against a Ballistic Missile a Parametric Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Example of the Distribution (CEP 260 rn) of 35% Surviving Submun * 9 9 99 9 9 N9 Figure 23 Example otf the Distribution ( CEiP = 260 mn) otf 35%c...ORGANIZATION REPORT NO TD2005-0033 DV2 2005-A33 4. PROJECT/TASKJWORK UNIT NO 5. CONTRACT NO 6. REPORT DATE 014.13004 B01KLU4UU July 2005 7. NUMBER OF PAGES 8

  14. Source Characterization Model (SCM): A Predictive Capability for the Source Terms of Residual Energetic Materials from Burning and/or Detonation Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    9 Figure 6: Species mixing ratios for expansion along the C-J adiabat using the (a) nonideal equilibrium code CHEETAH and (b) the ideal gas...code written by McBride and Gordon [1996] was used as a prototypical ideal gas equilibrium code. CHEETAH developed by Fried [1996] and based on the... CHEETAH comes bundled with four product libraries, the remainder of this discussion is based on the BKW library which is a computer-optimized

  15. Seismic verification of a comprehensive test ban

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, W.J.

    1985-01-18

    The capabilities of in-country seismic-monitoring systems for verifying the absence of underground nuclear explosions are compared against challenges posed by possible clandestine testing schemes. Although analyses indicate that extensive networks of in-country seismic arrays are needed to verify a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, such networks cannot ensure that all underground nuclear explosions will be identified. Political and military judgments will determine the level of risk acceptable to each nation. 35 references, 9 figures.

  16. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-11-09

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

  17. Zachary-Fort Lauderdale pipeline construction and conversion project: final supplement to final environmental impact statement. Docket No. CP74-192

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    This Final Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final Supplement) evaluates the economic, engineering, and environmental aspects of newly developed alternatives to an abandonment/conversion project proposed by Florida Gas Transmission Company (Florida Gas). It also updates the staff's previous FEIS and studies revisions to the original proposal. Wherever possible, the staff has adopted portions of its previous FEIS in lieu of reprinting portions of that analysis which require no change. 60 references, 8 figures, 35 tables.

  18. An Optimal Static Scheduling Algorithm for Hard Real-Time Systems Specified in a Prototyping Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    identify by block number) e Computer Aided Prototyping System (CAPS) and the Prototype System Description Language (PSDL) are tools that have been...Prototype System Description Language ( PSDL ) are tools that have been designed to aid in rapid prototyping. Within the framework of CAPS the Execution...Prototype Development Using the Computer-Aided System ... ....... 6 Figure 4 Major Software Tools of CAPS ......... ................... 8 Figure 5 The

  19. Comparative Study of Nonlinear Time Warping Techniques in Isolated Word Speech Recognition Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-17

    all modules are loaded under a flexible research oriented supervisor, " Cicada ". Cicada allows for the integration of experimental ideas, extensions...evaluate alternate recognition methods. More detailed information about Cicada can be found in7 . In the following we limit our discussion to the design of...43.70 37.78 32.47 44.44 44.32 38 8. Figures Cicada - a flexible research oriented supervisor ReferenceSTernpl ates Front End Matching Digital Signal

  20. Hall Effect Spintronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-23

    resistance measurement, in which current sources can share a common ground, the Hall measurement requires electrically isolated current sources. It...8 Figure captions Fig. 1. Measurement setup for the non-switching van der Pauw Hall technique. IAC and IDB are electrically isolated...Longitudinal resistivity (measured along the electrical current) is expected to be an even function of magnetic induction B, whereas the transverse or Hall