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Sample records for 8th power torr

  1. Vacuum gage calibration system for 10 to the minus 8th power to 10 torr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1969-01-01

    Calibration system consists of a gas source, a source pressure gage, source volume, transfer volume and test chamber, plus appropriate piping, valves and vacuum source. It has been modified to cover as broad a range as possible while still providing accuracy and convenience.

  2. The 10 to the 8th power bit solid state spacecraft data recorder. [utilizing bubble domain memory technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, G. W.; Bohning, O. D.; Kinoshita, R. Y.; Becker, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    The results are summarized of a program to demonstrate the feasibility of Bubble Domain Memory Technology as a mass memory medium for spacecraft applications. The design, fabrication and test of a partially populated 10 to the 8th power Bit Data Recorder using 100 Kbit serial bubble memory chips is described. Design tradeoffs, design approach and performance are discussed. This effort resulted in a 10 to the 8th power bit recorder with a volume of 858.6 cu in and a weight of 47.2 pounds. The recorder is plug reconfigurable, having the capability of operating as one, two or four independent serial channel recorders or as a single sixteen bit byte parallel input recorder. Data rates up to 1.2 Mb/s in a serial mode and 2.4 Mb/s in a parallel mode may be supported. Fabrication and test of the recorder demonstrated the basic feasibility of Bubble Domain Memory technology for such applications. Test results indicate the need for improvement in memory element operating temperature range and detector performance.

  3. Thermodynamic properties and theoretical rocket performance of hydrogen to 100,000 K and 1.01325 x 10 to the 8th power N/sq m

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The composition and thermodynamic properties were calculated for 100 to 110,000 K and 1.01325 x 10 to the 2nd power to 1.01325 x 10 to the 8th power N/sq m for chemical equilibrium in the Debye-Huckel and ideal-gas approximations. Quantities obtained were the concentrations of hydrogen atoms, protons, free electrons, hydrogen molecules, negative hydrogen ions, hydrogen diatomic molecular ions, and hydrogen triatomic molecular ions, and the enthalpy, entropy, average molecular weight, specific heat at constant pressure, density, and isentropic exponent. Electronically excited states of H and H2 were included. Choked, isentropic, one-dimensional nozzle flow with shifting chemical equilibrium was calculated to the Debye-Huckel and ideal-gas approximations for stagnation temperatures from 2500 to 100,000 K. The mass flow per unit throat area and the sonic flow factor were obtained. The pressure ratio, temperature, velocity, and ideal and vacuum specific impulses at the throat and for pressure ratios as low as 0.000001 downstream were found. For high temperatures at pressures approaching 1.01325 x 10 to the 8th power N/sq m, the ideal-gas approximation was found to be inadequate for calculations of composition, precise thermodynamic properties, and precise nozzle flow. The greatest discrepancy in nozzle flow occurred in the exit temperature, which was as much as 21 percent higher when the Debye-Huckel approximation was used.

  4. Development of Concepts of Political Conflict and Power by 5th and 8th Graders. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, David O.

    This research investigated pre-adolescent children's concepts of political conflict and power, and the processes by which these are acquired. It focused particularly upon the acquisition of such attitudes by Black and Mexican-American children, minority groups currently involved in deep social and political conflicts. The data were obtained with a…

  5. EDITORIAL: Special issue for papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008) Special issue for papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji

    2009-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008) with the 2nd Symposium on Micro Environmental Machine Systems (μMEMS 2008). The workshop was held in Sendai, Japan on 9-12 November 2008 by Tohoku University. This is the second time that the PowerMEMS workshop has been held in Sendai, following the first workshop in 2000. Power MEMS is one of the newest categories of MEMS, which encompasses microdevices and microsystems for power generation, energy conversion and propulsion. The first concept of Power MEMS was born in the late 1990's from a MEMS-based gas turbine project at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After that, the research and development of Power MEMS have been promoted by the strong need for compact power sources with high energy and/or power density. Since its inception, Power MEMS has expanded to include not only various MEMS-based power generators but also small energy machines and microdevices for macro power generators. Previously, the main topics of the PowerMEMS workshop were miniaturized gas turbines and micro fuel cells, but recently, energy harvesting has been the hottest topic. In 2008, energy harvesting had a 41% share in the 118 accepted regular papers. This special issue includes 19 papers on various topics. Finally, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, the Local Organizing Committee and financial supporters. This special issue was edited in collaboration with the staff of IOP Publishing.

  6. Space nuclear power systems; Proceedings of the 8th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 6-10, 1991. Pts. 1-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Editor); Hoover, Mark D. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses NASA mission planning for space nuclear power, lunar mission design based on nuclear thermal rockets, inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion for space power, nuclear risk analysis of the Ulysses mission, the role of the interface in refractory metal alloy composites, an advanced thermionic reactor systems design code, and space high power nuclear-pumped lasers. Also discussed are exploration mission enhancements with power-beaming, power requirement estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars rover, SP-100 reactor design, safety, and testing, materials compatibility issues for fabric composite radiators, application of the enabler to nuclear electric propulsion, orbit-transfer with TOPAZ-type power sources, the thermoelectric properties of alloys, ruthenium silicide as a promising thermoelectric material, and innovative space-saving device for high-temperature piping systems. The second volume of this conference discusses engine concepts for nuclear electric propulsion, nuclear technologies for human exploration of the solar system, dynamic energy conversion, direct nuclear propulsion, thermionic conversion technology, reactor and power system control, thermal management, thermionic research, effects of radiation on electronics, heat-pipe technology, radioisotope power systems, and nuclear fuels for power reactors. The third volume discusses space power electronics, space nuclear fuels for propulsion reactors, power systems concepts, space power electronics systems, the use of artificial intelligence in space, flight qualifications and testing, microgravity two-phase flow, reactor manufacturing and processing, and space and environmental effects.

  7. Space nuclear power systems; Proceedings of the 8th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 6-10, 1991. Pts. 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Hoover, Mark D.

    1991-07-01

    The present conference discusses NASA mission planning for space nuclear power, lunar mission design based on nuclear thermal rockets, inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion for space power, nuclear risk analysis of the Ulysses mission, the role of the interface in refractory metal alloy composites, an advanced thermionic reactor systems design code, and space high power nuclear-pumped lasers. Also discussed are exploration mission enhancements with power-beaming, power requirement estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars rover, SP-100 reactor design, safety, and testing, materials compatibility issues for fabric composite radiators, application of the enabler to nuclear electric propulsion, orbit-transfer with TOPAZ-type power sources, the thermoelectric properties of alloys, ruthenium silicide as a promising thermoelectric material, and innovative space-saving device for high-temperature piping systems. The second volume of this conference discusses engine concepts for nuclear electric propulsion, nuclear technologies for human exploration of the solar system, dynamic energy conversion, direct nuclear propulsion, thermionic conversion technology, reactor and power system control, thermal management, thermionic research, effects of radiation on electronics, heat-pipe technology, radioisotope power systems, and nuclear fuels for power reactors. The third volume discusses space power electronics, space nuclear fuels for propulsion reactors, power systems concepts, space power electronics systems, the use of artificial intelligence in space, flight qualifications and testing, microgravity two-phase flow, reactor manufacturing and processing, and space and environmental effects. (For individual items see A93-13752 to A93-13937)

  8. Nuclear Science Symposium, 23rd, Scintillation and Semiconductor Counter Symposium, 15th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 8th, New Orleans, La., October 20-22, 1976, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The volume includes papers on semiconductor radiation detectors of various types, components of radiation detection and dosimetric systems, digital and microprocessor equipment in nuclear industry and science, and a wide variety of applications of nuclear radiation detectors. Semiconductor detectors of X-rays, gamma radiation, heavy ions, neutrons, and other nuclear particles, plastic scintillator arrays, drift chambers, spark wire chambers, and radiation dosimeter systems are reported on. Digital and analog conversion systems, digital data and control systems, microprocessors, and their uses in scientific research and nuclear power plants are discussed. Large-area imaging and biomedical nucleonic instrumentation, nuclear power plant safeguards, reactor instrumentation, nuclear power plant instrumentation, space instrumentation, and environmental instrumentation are dealt with. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  9. 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, J. L. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference was held in Huntsville, Alabama, October 20-24, 2003. Hosted by NASA s Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program and co-sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the European Space Agency (ESA), the 2003 conference saw attendance from eleven countries with over 65 oral papers and 18 poster papers. Presentation topics highlighted the latest in spacecraft charging mitigation techniques and on-orbit investigations, including: Plasma Propulsion and Tethers; Ground Testing Techniques; Interactions of Spacecraft and Systems With the Natural and Induced Plasma Environment; Materials Characterizations; Models and Computer Simulations; Environment Specifications; Current Collection and Plasma Probes in Space Plasmas; On-Orbit Investigations. A round-table discussion of international standards regarding electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing was also held with the promise of continued discussions in the off years and an official continuation at the next conference.

  10. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  11. The Great Debate: Should All 8th Graders Take Algebra?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKibben, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    While 8th grade algebra was once reserved as a course for the gifted, today, more U.S. 8th graders take algebra than any other math course. This article discusses a report from the Brookings Institution which chronicles the history of the 8th-grade algebra surge and its impact on today's low-performing students. The report indicates that many of…

  12. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  13. Brief Science Performance Evaluation on 8th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocanu, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to provide some statistics concerning the science performance of a group of 59 8th graders, studying in three different classes (may be regarded as different study groups). Eight science items were used, two from each content domain: chemistry, biology, mathematics and physics. These items were taken from the 2007 edition of the…

  14. Investigation into How 8th Grade Students Define Fractals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of 8th grade students' concept definitions and concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractals. There is limited research on students' understanding and definitions of fractals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the elementary students' definitions of fractals based on concept image and concept…

  15. Maker of SAT Aims New Test at 8th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Officials at the New York City-based College Board last week rolled out their newest product: ReadiStep. No, it is not a new piece of exercise equipment or a whipped dessert topping--it is a test for 8th graders that some critics are calling a pre-PSAT, referring to the Preliminary SAT assessment taken by 9th and 10th graders and owned by the…

  16. The 8th Century Megadrought Across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahle, D. W.; Therrell, M. D.; Cleaveland, M. K.; Fye, F. K.; Cook, E. R.; Grissino-Mayer, H. D.; Acuna-Soto, R.

    2002-12-01

    Tree-ring data suggest that the 8th and 16th century megadroughts may have been the most severe and sustained droughts to impact North America in the past 1500 years. The 16th century megadrought may have persisted for up to 40 years, and extended from the tropics to the boreal forest and from the Pacific to Atlantic coasts. Evidence for the 8th century drought is sparse, but tree-ring and lake sediment data indicate that this drought extended from the northern Great Plains, across the southwestern United States, and into central Mexico and the Yucatan peninsula. Tree-ring data from Colorado and New Mexico document severe drought from A.D. 735-765, and may provide accurate and precise dating for the onset of the epic droughts reconstructed during the late first millennium A.D. with sedimentary data from Elk Lake, Minnesota; Moon Lake, South Dakota; La Piscina de Yuriria, Guanajuato; and Lake Chichancanab, Yucatan. If these chronological refinements are correct, then the sedimentary records suggest much greater persistence to the 8th century megadrought than indicated by the very high resolution tree-ring data, and a strong second pulse of prolonged drought late in the first millennium. Analyses of instrumental precipitation and drought indices during the 20th century, along with tree-ring reconstructions of climate in Mexico and the Southwest, indicate that annual and decadal droughts can both simultaneously impact the entire region from New Mexico and Texas down into central Mexico. The intensity and large-scale impact of drought across this region seem to be greatest when La Nina conditions and the low phase of the North Pacific oscillation prevail. The tree-ring dated 8th century megadrought occurred near the decline of the Classic Period civilizations at Teotihuacan in central Mexico and in the Mayan region of the Yucatan. The 8th century megadrought may have interacted with anthropogenic environmental degradation, epidemic disease, and social upheaval to

  17. 8th International Symposium on Supramolecular and Macrocyclic Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jeffery T.

    2015-09-18

    This report summarizes the 8th International Conference on Supramolecular and Macrocyclic Chemistry (ISMSC-8). DOE funds were used to make it more affordable for students, post-docs and junior faculty to attend the conference by covering their registration costs. The conference was held in Crystal City, VA from July 7-11, 2013. See http://www.indiana.edu/~ismsc8/ for the conference website. ISMSC-8 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. We met our goal to bring together leading scientists in molecular recognition and supramolecular chemistry. New research directions and collaborations resulted this conference. The DOE funding was crucial for us achieving our primary goal.

  18. 8th Conference Quark Confinement and the Hadron Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QCHS 2008, the 8th International Conferencee on Quark Cofinement and the Hadron Spectrum was held from 1 - 6 September 2008 in Mainz at the Johannes-Gutenberg University. This conference was the eighth in a series whose aim it is to bring together people working in QCD and strong-interaction dynamics. This year 206 scientists from 24 countries met in Mainz, for the first time in Germany. The scientific program of the Confinement Conference consisted of 33 plenary talks and parallel sessions covering the following topics: - Vaccuum Structure and Confinement - Light Quarks - Heavy Quarks - Deconfinement - QCD and New Physics - Nuclear and Astroparticle Physics

  19. Proceedings of the 8th Annual Summer Conference: NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented at the 8th Annual Summer Conference are categorized as Space Projects and Aeronautics projects. Topics covered include: Systematic Propulsion Optimization Tools (SPOT), Assured Crew Return Vehicle Post Landing Configuration Design and Test, Autonomous Support for Microorganism Research in Space, Bioregenerative System Components for Microgravity, The Extended Mission Rover (EMR), Planetary Surface Exploration MESUR/Autonomous Lunar Rover, Automation of Closed Environments in Space for Human Comfort and Safety, Walking Robot Design, Extraterrestrial Surface Propulsion Systems, The Design of Four Hypersonic Reconnaissance Aircraft, Design of a Refueling Tanker Delivering Liquid Hydrogen, The Design of a Long-Range Megatransport Aircraft, and Solar Powered Multipurpose Remotely Powered Aircraft.

  20. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  1. PREFACE: 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS'07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoste, Serge; Ausloos, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains contributed papers presented at the 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS'07) that was held in Brussels, Belgium from 16-20 September 2007. The plenary and invited papers were published in the journal Superconductor Science and Technology. The scientific aims of EUCAS'07 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen (Germany), Edinburgh (United Kingdom), Eindhoven (The Netherlands), Sitges (Spain), Lyngby (Denmark), Sorrento (Italy) and Vienna (Austria). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with a very significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. Under the guidance of ESAS (the European Society for Applied Superconductivity) this Brussels conference was jointly organized by the University of Ghent and the University of Liege and attracted 795 participants to the scientific programme including a healthy number of 173 students. Participants from 46 countries included a considerable 30% attendance from the Far East and 7% from the United States and Canada. Thirty companies presented their latest developments in the field; 13 plenary and 28 invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale as well as small-scale applications were given. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, 347 papers were selected for publication in the IOP electronic journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series and in Superconductor Science and Technology. EUCAS'07 spread a lot of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the

  2. PREFACE: 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Marka, Szabolcs

    2010-04-01

    (The attached PDF contains select pictures from the Amaldi8 Conference) At Amaldi7 in Sydney in 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC), which oversees the Amaldi meetings, decided to hold the 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves at Columbia University in the City of New York. With this decision, Amaldi returned to North America after a decade. The previous two years have seen many advances in the field of gravitational wave detection. By the summer of 2009 the km-scale ground based interferometric detectors in the US and Europe were preparing for a second long-term scientific run as a worldwide detector network. The advanced or second generation detectors had well-developed plans and were ready for the production phase or started construction. The European-American space mission, LISA Pathfinder, was progressing towards deployment in the foreseeable future and it is expected to pave the ground towards gravitational wave detection in the milliHertz regime with LISA. Plans were developed for an additional gravitational wave detector in Australia and in Japan (in this case underground) to extend the worldwide network of detectors for the advanced detector era. Japanese colleagues also presented plans for a space mission, DECIGO, that would bridge the gap between the LISA and ground-based interferometer frequency range. Compared to previous Amaldi meetings, Amaldi8 had new elements representing emerging trends in the field. For example, with the inclusion of pulsar timing collaborations to the GWIC, gravitational wave detection using pulsar timing arrays was recognized as one of the prominent directions in the field and was represented at Amaldi8 as a separate session. By 2009, searches for gravitational waves based on external triggers received from electromagnetic observations were already producing significant scientific results and plans existed for pointing telescopes by utilizing gravitational wave trigger events. Such

  3. PREFACE: 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Marka, Szabolcs

    2010-04-01

    (The attached PDF contains select pictures from the Amaldi8 Conference) At Amaldi7 in Sydney in 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC), which oversees the Amaldi meetings, decided to hold the 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves at Columbia University in the City of New York. With this decision, Amaldi returned to North America after a decade. The previous two years have seen many advances in the field of gravitational wave detection. By the summer of 2009 the km-scale ground based interferometric detectors in the US and Europe were preparing for a second long-term scientific run as a worldwide detector network. The advanced or second generation detectors had well-developed plans and were ready for the production phase or started construction. The European-American space mission, LISA Pathfinder, was progressing towards deployment in the foreseeable future and it is expected to pave the ground towards gravitational wave detection in the milliHertz regime with LISA. Plans were developed for an additional gravitational wave detector in Australia and in Japan (in this case underground) to extend the worldwide network of detectors for the advanced detector era. Japanese colleagues also presented plans for a space mission, DECIGO, that would bridge the gap between the LISA and ground-based interferometer frequency range. Compared to previous Amaldi meetings, Amaldi8 had new elements representing emerging trends in the field. For example, with the inclusion of pulsar timing collaborations to the GWIC, gravitational wave detection using pulsar timing arrays was recognized as one of the prominent directions in the field and was represented at Amaldi8 as a separate session. By 2009, searches for gravitational waves based on external triggers received from electromagnetic observations were already producing significant scientific results and plans existed for pointing telescopes by utilizing gravitational wave trigger events. Such

  4. Evaluation of the Citizenship Consciousness of the 8th Year Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonga, Deniz; Keles, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    The prime purpose of this study is to elucidate the awareness level of citizenship of 8th year students. That was why the answer of the question "what is the level of citizenship consciousness of the 8th year students" was sought. The study was designed according to the descriptive survey method with the use of a scale with 7 open ended…

  5. Investigating How the Biographies of Today's Scientists Affect 8th Graders' Scientist Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaçam, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how a poster study focusing on the biographies of today's scientists affected 8th graders' scientist images. The study utilized a mixed model which combined qualitative and quantitative research techniques. 142 8th graders from a secondary school in Ankara Province Keçiören District participated in the study.…

  6. The Influence of Documentary Films on 8th Grade Students' Views about Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seckin Kapucu, Munise; Cakmakci, Gultekin; Aydogdu, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study aims to investigate the documentary films' influence on 8th grade students' nature of science views. The study's participants were 113 8th grade students from two different schools taught by two different teachers. The study was completed over a 6-week period, during which topics related to "Cell Division and…

  7. Banned Book Ethnographies: A Project with 8th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Drew

    2006-01-01

    The author learned that the book "The Catcher in the Rye," so important to him as a young man, had been challenged by adults and could easily have been barred from his school's reading list. He started thinking about who had the power to tell him what he could and could not read as a teenager and as a high school student. What were the reasons the…

  8. Operational warnings issued by the SMC in the 8th March snow event in Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaclara, E.; Segalà, S.; Andrés, A.; Aran, M.

    2010-09-01

    The snowfall event of 8th March 2010 was one of the most important of the last years in Catalonia, with high societal impact in the communication and in the power distribution. Since 2002, after an agreement between Meteorological Service of Catalonia (SMC) and Civil Protection authority, the SMC is the agency responsible to carry out meteorological warnings in Catalonia. These warnings are issued depending on the thresholds which are expected to be exceeded (three different probability degrees are defined), and are characterized by a high spatial and temporal resolution. In the snow event of 8th March, forecasting team of the SMC did the first meteorological warning three days before, on 5th March. During the two following days broadcasted four different warnings, taking into account the high probability of exceeding 2 cm of snow above 200 meters, 15 above 400 m and 30 above 800 m. Furthermore, the SMC disseminated also two special press releases with the aim to extend the forecast to the public. In the afternoon of Sunday, 7th March, the snow precipitation started in some areas of Catalonia. From this moment, the SMC followed the surveillance of situation with the remote sensing tools and the Meteorological Observers Network data. This network is formed by a hundred of spotters with mobile phones able to transmit observations in real time to our web site. This surveillance and the conceptual model of snow events in Catalonia allowed the forecasters to improve the estimation of the snow level forecasted by mesoscale meteorological models. In this event, the snow level obtained from these models was higher than the real one. In spite of the accuracy of the forecast, the impact was very important in Catalonia. On one hand, it was due to the exceptionality of the event, with 3 cm of snow in Barcelona in the afternoon of a working day. On the other hand, the large amount of wet snow precipitation (until 100 mm), and the wind, contributed to an important snow

  9. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  10. Family structure and childhood obesity: an analysis through 8th grade.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alex Y; Escarce, José J

    2014-09-01

    Research on the effect of family structure on childhood obesity is scarce. This study examines the effect of number of parents and number of siblings on US children's body mass index (BMI) and risk of obesity. We conducted a secondary data analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), which consists of a nationally representative cohort of children who entered kindergarten in 1998-1999, to examine the effect of family structure on children's body mass index and risk of obesity from kindergarten through 8th grade. Study outcomes were BMI in kindergarten and 8th grade, obesity status in kindergarten and 8th grade, and change in BMI from kindergarten through 8th grade. Multivariate regressions were used to assess the association between family structure and study outcomes while adjusting for other covariates. In 8th grade, children with no siblings had higher BMI (23.7 vs. 22.6; P ≤ 0.01) and higher probability of being obese (25.8 vs. 19.7 %; P ≤ 0.05) than their counterparts with two or more siblings. They also had a larger increase in BMI from kindergarten through 8th grade than children living with two or more siblings (7.3 vs. 6.3; P = 0.02). Our analysis suggests that the association between family structure and obesity persists and even intensifies through 8th grade. These findings have important implications for targeting obesity support and counseling for families.

  11. PREFACE: 8th International Symposium of the Digital Earth (ISDE8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium of Digital Earth (8th ISDE) 2013 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, 26th-29th August, 2013 Conference logo This proceedings consists of the peer-reviewed papers from 8th International Symposium for Digital Earth (ISDE) held in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia during 26th-29th August, 2013. The 8th ISDE was a successful event in the Symposium Series of the International Society of Digital Earth, that was previously held in China (1999), Canada (2001), Czech Republic (2003), Japan (2005), the United States (2007), China (2009), and Australia (2011). The 8th ISDE, with the theme 'Transforming Knowledge into Sustainable Practice' aims to enable digital earth scientists, experts and professionals related to the field of geospatial science and technology to provide a brand new opportunity to share their ideas and insights on how we share knowledge and act together globally. In addition, the ISDE symposium series has been providing a venue for researchers and industry practitioners to discuss new ideas, collaborate to solve complex solutions to various complex problems, and importantly, pave new ways in digital earth environment. This 8th ISDE included 20 technical sessions, workshops and student sessions in various areas of digital earth; ranging from digital earth vision & innovation; earth observation technologies; ICT technologies (including spatial data infrastructures); empowering the community and engaging society; applications and innovation of digital earth for environmental applications such as hazard, pollution, flood, air quality, disaster and health, biodiversity, sustainability, forestry, early warning and emergency management, national security, natural resource management and agriculture; mining, energy and resources development; transformation towards sustainable low carbon society; digital city and green cities: towards urban sustainability; and managing water environment for sustainable development. The success of the 8

  12. Muir-Torre syndrome: Facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ko, Christine J

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous presentation of a tumor sometimes has implications for a patient and his or her family, and Muir-Torre syndrome is an example of this. Because a single skin lesion can have broad consequences, it is important for clinicians to be aware of Muir-Torre syndrome. The definition, potential clues, the role of ancillary testing (microsatellite, immunohistochemical, and genetic), and screening recommendations are reviewed.

  13. Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES): comparative performance of 2nd-, 4th-, and 8th-grade Czech children.

    PubMed

    Otto, D A; Skalik, I; House, D E; Hudnell, H K

    1996-01-01

    The Neurobehavioral Evaluation System was designed for field studies of workers, but many NES tests can be performed satisfactorily by children as young as 7 or 8 years old and a few tests, such as simple reaction time, can be performed by preschool children. However, little comparative data from children of different ages or grade levels are available. Studies of school children in the Czech Republic indicate that 2nd-grade children could perform the following NES tests satisfactorily: Finger Tapping, Visual Digit Span. Continuous Performance, Symbol-Digit Substitution, Pattern Comparison, and simpler conditions of Switching Attention. Comparative scores of boys and girls from the 2nd, 4th, and 8th grades and power analyses to estimate appropriate sample size were presented. Performance varied systematically with grade level and gender. Larger samples were needed with younger children to achieve comparable levels of statistical power. Gender comparisons indicated that boys responded faster, but made more errors than girls. PMID:8866533

  14. The net water circulation through Torres strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Thomas, Christopher; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The extensive existing data set on the oceanography of Torres Strait (separating Australia and Papua New Guinea) is reviewed and is used to show that the long-term east to west water flux through Torres Strait is about 0.04 Sv. To explain this finding, a high resolution, finite element, depth-integrated (2D) model of Torres Strait is set-up. The model is driven by the wind and the open boundary conditions that are prescribed in the Coral Sea, the northern Great Barrier Reef continental shelf, the Gulf of Papua, and the Gulf of Carpentaria. The latter/open boundary conditions were taken from field data. The model suggests that the wind alone over Torres Strait generates negligible net currents; the net currents are instead generated by the wind setting up a water slope across Torres Strait through its opposing influence on the mean sea levels in the Gulf of Carpentaria and in the Coral Sea. The model predicts that the long-term, net east-west flow through Torres Strait is small to negligible, in agreement with field data. The model also reveals that large scale flow dynamics are largely restricted to reef passages and open waters, and that areas of shallow waters and areas densely populated with reefs and islands are poorly flushed. Finally, the model also reveals the prevalence of highly energetic tidal flows around shoals, reefs, islands and reef passages, and these swift tidal currents are responsible for the small net flow through Torres Strait through the sticky water effect. These findings enable us to propose a general water circulation model for the whole Great Barrier Reef during southeast winds.

  15. Bibliography of Research Support for K-8th Grade Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Schoolwide Inclusive School Reform: The SWIFT Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Presented here are references to books, chapters, and peer-reviewed journal articles that provide evidence for improved student outcomes through inclusive education in elementary and middle schools (K-8th grades). Not included here are the broad evidence bases for each feature in the SWIFT framework.

  16. Changes in Math Proficiency between 8th and 10th Grades. Statistics in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Don; And Others

    Between 8th and 10th grades, many students are asked to make curriculum-related decisions that may ultimately influence their achievement in core academic subjects such as mathematics. While past achievement often limits the level of courses available to a student, aspirations for postsecondary education ultimately determine the level of…

  17. Ready to Go: Using the EXPLORE Test to Increase 8th Grade Readiness for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochford, Joseph A.; O'Neill, Adrienne; Gelb, Adele

    2010-01-01

    During the 2009-10 academic year, 1,444 8th grade students in the Canton City, Plain and Marlington Local School Districts (hereafter called Stark students) took the EXPLORE Test as part of a pilot project, "Ready to Go: Increasing Eighth Grade Readiness," sponsored by the Stark Education Partnership with funding from the Ohio College Access…

  18. Measuring the Confidence of 8th Grade Taiwanese Students' Knowledge of Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brady Michael; Liu, Chia-Ju; Chiu, Houn-Lin; Tsai, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether gender differences were present on the confidence judgments made by 8th grade Taiwanese students on the accuracy of their responses to acid-base test items. A total of 147 (76 male, 71 female) students provided item-specific confidence judgments during a test of their knowledge of acids and bases. Using the…

  19. A World Worth Living in ICAE 8th World Assembly Declaration (June 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the International Council of Adult Education (ICAE) 8th World Assembly Declaration (June 2011). This declaration focuses on adult educators' conviction in the possibility of a "world worth living in," and their declaration of their collective determination to work towards making it a reality all around the planet.

  20. A Chemistry Course for High Ability 8th, 9th, and 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Richard, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a chemistry course designed, in cooperation with local public school districts, to intellectually challenge a group of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade students. Organic chemistry and biochemistry are integrated into the course (titled Chemistry and Everyday Life) to emphasize practical applications of chemistry. The course syllabus is included.…

  1. 77 FR 9927 - Filing Dates for the Arizona Special Election in the 8th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Arizona Special Election in the 8th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Arizona has scheduled elections...

  2. A Structural Equation Model Explaining 8th Grade Students' Mathematics Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurt, Eyüp; Sünbül, Ali Murat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate, via a model, the explanatory and predictive relationships among the following variables: Mathematical Problem Solving and Reasoning Skills, Sources of Mathematics Self-Efficacy, Spatial Ability, and Mathematics Achievements of Secondary School 8th Grade Students. The sample group of the study, itself…

  3. An Application of Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment on TIMMS-2007 8th Grade Mathematics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toker, Turker; Green, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The least squares distance method (LSDM) was used in a cognitive diagnostic analysis of TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) items administered to 4,498 8th-grade students from seven geographical regions of Turkey, extending analysis of attributes from content to process and skill attributes. Logit item positions were…

  4. The Effect of Project Based Learning on the Statistical Literacy Levels of Student 8th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koparan, Timur; Güven, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of project based learning on 8th grade students' statistical literacy levels. A performance test was developed for this aim. Quasi-experimental research model was used in this article. In this context, the statistics were taught with traditional method in the control group and it was taught using project based…

  5. Development of a Scale to Explore Technology Literacy Skills of Turkish 8th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misirli, Zeynel A.; Akbulut, Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    The use of emerging technologies shape learners' knowledge creation and transformation processes. In this regard, this study aimed to develop a scale to investigate 8 th graders' competencies regarding the educational technology standards based on ISTE-NETS. After a review of relevant literature, an item pool was prepared. The pool was improved…

  6. Determination of the Relationship between 8th Grade Students Learning Styles and TIMSS Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli; Koparan, Timur; Hanci, Alper

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to determination of the relationship between learning styles and TIMSS mathematics achievements of eighth grade students. Correlational research design that is one of the quantitative research methods, was used in this study. The sample of the research consists of 652 8th grade students 347 are male and 305 are female…

  7. Spatial Visualization as Mediating between Mathematics Learning Strategy and Mathematics Achievement among 8th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabab'h, Belal; Veloo, Arsaythamby

    2015-01-01

    Jordanian 8th grade students revealed low achievement in mathematics through four periods (1999, 2003, 2007 & 2011) of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). This study aimed to determine whether spatial visualization mediates the affect of Mathematics Learning Strategies (MLS) factors namely mathematics attitude,…

  8. Individual and Contextual Predictors of Inhalant Use among 8th Graders: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David; Pan, Zhenfeng; Johnson, Knowlton; Courser, Matthew; Shamblen, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Few studies of inhalant use have examined a large number of predictors at the individual level, including risk and protective factors and delinquent behavior, while also taking into account contextual variables (such as school size and poverty rates). This exploratory study uses 8th grade data from a large-scale survey of students in Kentucky to…

  9. The Effect on the 8th Grade Students' Attitude towards Statistics of Project Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koparan, Timur; Güven, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the project based learning approach on 8th grade students' attitude towards statistics. With this aim, an attitude scale towards statistics was developed. Quasi-experimental research model was used in this study. Following this model in the control group the traditional method was applied to teach statistics…

  10. Factors that Influence Mental Health Stigma among 8th Grade Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandra, Anita; Minkovitz, Cynthia S.

    2007-01-01

    Unmet mental health need is a significant problem for adolescents. Although stigma is identified as a major barrier to the use of mental health services among youth, there is limited research on this topic. In-depth interviews (n = 57) among a sample of 8th grade students in a suburban, mid-Atlantic community portray adolescent mental health…

  11. The 8th Latin American congress on surface science: Surfaces, vacuum, and their applications. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Calderon, I.; Asomoza, R.

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 8th Latin American Congress on Surface Science and its Applications. The wide spectrum of subjects covered included theoretical and experimental research in low dimensional systems, vacuum system design, biomaterial interfaces, surface magnetism, superconductivity, catalysis, adsorption, surface imaging, porous and amorphous materials, surface spectroscopies, electronic properties, and other topics. There were 131 papers presented and 26 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  12. [Lynch syndrome, Muir Torre variant: 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Castro-Mujica, María Del Carmen; Barletta-Carrillo, Claudia; Acosta-Aliaga, Marisa; Montenegro-Garreaud, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2). Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a phenotypic variant of LS that includes a predisposition to sebaceous glands tumors and keratoacanthomas. We report two patients with MTS, with more than one LS-related cancer, skin lesions, family history of cancer andmicrosatellite instability and immunohistochemistry analysis. PMID:27131946

  13. Proceedings from The 8th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) Conference.

    PubMed

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Olech, Ewa; Østergaard, Mikkel; Thiele, Ralf; Seraphine, Judy L; Bruyn, George A W; Peterfy, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in both clinical practice and research. The field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging is continuously evolving; therefore, education for healthcare providers in this field is of paramount importance. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts presented the newest information as it relates to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) at the 8th annual ISEMIR meeting that took place on April 17-18 in Santa Monica, California. Presentations from the meeting can be viewed at www.isemir.org.

  14. Unlocking the wasting enigma: Highlights from the 8th Cachexia Conference

    PubMed Central

    von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article highlights pre‐clinical and clinical studies into the field of wasting disorders that were presented at the 8th Cachexia Conference held in Paris, France December 2015. This year some interesting results of clinical trials and different new therapeutic targets were shown. This article presents the biological and clinical significance of different markers and new drugs for the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting. Effective treatments of cachexia and wasting disorders are urgently needed in order to improve the patients' quality of life and their survival. PMID:27128291

  15. Conference summary & recent advances: The 8th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xixi; Burchiel, Scott W.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diseases caused by occupational and environmental exposure to metals are a public health concern. The underlying molecular mechanisms of metal toxicity and carcinogenicity remain largely unknown. Over 130 scientists attended the 8th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis, presenting their various research concerns and recent findings to stimulate interactions and collaborations among scientists in the field. Several major areas were emphasized, including human & population studies, molecular & cellular mechanisms, biological targets, epigenetic effects, metabolism, and metal mixtures. Here we summarize presentations at the conference sessions and highlight the attendees’ latest work published in this special issue of Biological Trace Element Research. PMID:25975949

  16. PREFACE: The 8th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics The 8th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Nader; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2010-03-01

    The 8th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics (FLTPD) was held in Blansko, near Brno, Czech Republic. FLTPD is a biennial European event in which scientists working on low temperature plasmas present their recent results, pointing out in particular the originality of the diagnostic techniques used. The idea of starting this series of workshops was born out of a discussion between Frieder Döbele, Bill Graham and one of us when travelling together from Bar Harbor, USA (after the 6th LAPD) to Montreal, Canada, in October 1993. It became evident that we had been lacking a European meeting that could bring together experts in the field of low temperature plasma diagnostics and facilitate sharing the knowledge of these diagnostics with a new generation of scientists. The first FLTPD was held in Les Houches, France, in February 1995. Since then it has been held in the spring of every other year in different European countries, as shown below. The next meeting will be held in Zinnowitz, near Greifswald, Germany, in May 2011. Year Location Chair of LOC 1995 Les Houches, France J Derouard 1997 Bad Honnef, Germany F Döbele 1999 Saillon, Switzerland Ch Hollenstein 2001 Rolduc, The Netherlands R van de Sanden 2003 Specchia, Italy S De Benedictis 2005 Les Houches, France N Sadeghi 2007 Cumbria, United Kingdom M Bowden 2009 Blansko, Czech Republic F Krčma To favour brainstorming and extended discussions between participants, FLTPD meetings have always been organized in isolated locations with the number of attendees limited to about 70. Workshops are held over three and a half days with about ten expert presentations by invited speakers (a few from overseas), as well as short oral or poster contributions. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains 20 articles representative of contributions to the last FLTPD in Blansko. All invited speakers and others who gave presentations, as selected by the Scientific Committee, were invited

  17. Middle school science curriculum design and 8th grade student achievement in Massachusetts public schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Betsey A.

    The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) released proposed Science and Technology/Engineering standards in 2013 outlining the concepts that should be taught at each grade level. Previously, standards were in grade spans and each district determined the method of implementation. There are two different methods used teaching middle school science: integrated and discipline-based. In the proposed standards, the Massachusetts DESE uses grade-by-grade standards using an integrated approach. It was not known if there is a statistically significant difference in student achievement on the 8th grade science MCAS assessment for students taught with an integrated or discipline-based approach. The results on the 8th grade science MCAS test from six public school districts from 2010 -- 2013 were collected and analyzed. The methodology used was quantitative. Results of an ANOVA showed that there was no statistically significant difference in overall student achievement between the two curriculum models. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference for the various domains: Earth and Space Science, Life Science, Physical Science, and Technology/Engineering. This information is useful for districts hesitant to make the change from a discipline-based approach to an integrated approach. More research should be conducted on this topic with a larger sample size to better support the results.

  18. Examination of the 8th grade students' TIMSS mathematics success in terms of different variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleli-Yılmaz, Gül; Hanci, Alper

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how the TIMSS mathematics success of the 8th grade students differentiates according to the school type, gender, mathematics report mark, parents' education level, cognitive domains and cognitive domains by gender. Relational survey method was used in the study. Six-hundred fifty two 8th grade students studying in the same city in Turkey participated in this study. In this study, a 45 question test that was made up by choosing TIMSS 2011 mathematics questionnaire was used as a data collection tool. Quantitative data analysis methods were used in the data analysis, frequency, percentage, average, standard deviation, independent sample test, one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc tests were applied to data by using SPSS packaged software. At the end of the study, it was determined that the school type, mathematics school mark, parents' education level and cognitive domains influenced the students' TIMSS mathematics success but their gender was a neutral element. Moreover, it was seen that schools which are really successful in national exams are more successful in TIMSS exam; students whose mathematics school marks are 5 and whose parents graduated from university are more successful in TIMSS exams than others. This study was produced from Alper HANCİ's master thesis that is made consulting Asst. Prof. Gül KALELİ YILMAZ.

  19. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  20. Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Jane Lau of the Joint BioEnergy Institute on "Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  1. Regulation of Flowering in Brachypodium distachyon (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Amasino, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Rick Amasino of the University of Wisconsin on "Regulation of Flowering in Brachypodium distachyon" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  2. PMI: Plant-Microbe Interfaces (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Christopher Schadt of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Plant-Microbe Interactions" in the context of poplar trees at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 held in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  3. Genomics of Climate Resilience (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-03-27

    Eldredge Bermingham of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-Panama on "Genomics of climate resilience" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  4. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge", Napoli, December 5th-8th 2013.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Grimaldi, Antonio M; Anderson, Ana Carrizosa; Bifulco, Carlo; Cochran, Alistair; Garbe, Claus; Eggermont, Alexander M; Faries, Mark; Ferrone, Soldano; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Gajewski, Thomas F; Halaban, Ruth; Hodi, F Stephen; Kefford, Richard; Kirkwood, John M; Larkin, James; Leachman, Sancy; Maio, Michele; Marais, Richard; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Puzanov, Igor; Ribas, Antoni; Saenger, Yvonne; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Sullivan, Ryan; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2014-10-28

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 5 to 8th, 2013. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Diagnosis and New Procedures, Molecular Advances and Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers.

  5. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  6. [Review of WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy 8th report, --comparison to 7th report].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Shinichi; En, Junichiro; Kitajima, Shiori; Barua, Sumana; Goto, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy published its 8th report, 14 years after the publication of its 7th report in 1998. This report, the first since the leprosy reduction goal was met in 2000, highlights key points such as improvements in the quality of various services available to patients and the efforts of individuals and societies, in addition to medical progress in diagnosis and treatment. This review will mainly describe the changes made since the 7th report. Some of the main modifications are the deletion of single lesion paucibacillary type, elongated treatment of patients with high bacterial indices, the introduction of promising new drugs, and a shift from reducing the statistical number of patients to a new target for disability prevention.

  7. Epidemic waves during Justinian's plague in the Byzantine Empire (6th-8th c. AD).

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, C; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Tsakris, A; Petridou, E

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to collect the epidemic outbreaks and the epidemic waves of the bubonic plague of the Byzantine Empire during the first pandemic (541-751 AD). Human activities, such as trade and military movements have been speculated as underlying factors for the causation of the pandemic. Historical data combined with geographical spreading of the plague, allows an alternative speculation of suspicious enzootic areas in the Middle East. We conclude that the possible existence of enzootic areas in that region might have been responsible for the causation of the numerous outbreaks of the bubonic plague in the Eastern provinces of the Byzantine Empire during the 6th-8th century period.

  8. News and views from the 8th annual meeting of the Italian Society of Virology.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Elena; Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina

    2009-06-01

    The 8th annual meeting of the Italian Society of Virology (SIV) took place in Orvieto, Italy from the 21st to the 23rd of September 2008. The meeting covered different areas of Virology and the scientific sessions focused on: general virology and viral genetics; viral oncology, virus-host interaction and pathogenesis; emerging viruses and zoonotic, foodborne and environmental pathways of transmission; viral immunology and vaccines; viral biotechnologies and gene therapy; medical virology and antiviral therapy. The meeting had an attendance of about 160 virologists from all Italy. In this edition, a satellite workshop on "Viral biotechnologies" was organized in order to promote the role of virologists in the biotechnological research and teaching fields. A summary of the plenary lectures and oral selected presentations is reported. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 797-799, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Charge It! Translating Electric Vehicle Research Results to Engage 7th and 8th Grade Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbue, Ona; Long, Suzanna; Ng, Ean-Harn

    2015-10-01

    Despite attempts to generate interest in science and technology careers, US students continue to show reduced interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors at the collegiate level. If girls are not engaged in STEM learning by the middle school level, studies show that they are even less likely to choose a science- or engineering-related major. This article presents results from a workshop for 7th and 8th grade girls designed to promote knowledge building in the area of sustainability and alternative energy use in transportation and to stimulate greater interest in STEM subjects. The workshop based on research conducted at University X focused on basic concepts of electric vehicles and electric vehicles' batteries. Tests were conducted to evaluate the students' knowledge and perceptions of electric vehicles and to determine the impact of the workshop. Early exposure to meaningful engineering experiences for these young girls may boost interest and the eventual pursuit of engineering and technology education paths.

  10. Industrial Arts: Preparation for Life in a Technological World." Addresses and Proceedings of the 41st National and 8th International Annual Conference of the American Industrial Arts Association, (San Antonio, Texas, February 26-March 2, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Industrial Arts Association, Washington, DC.

    Included in this document are the addresses and proceedings of the 41st National and 8th International Annual Conference of the American Industrial Arts Association. The proceedings are organized by the following subject groups: curriculum, drafting, electricity/electronics, elementary school industrial arts, energy/power, evaluation, futurology,…

  11. Jaime Torres Bodet: Centenario de su Natalicio (Jaime Torres Bodet: 100th Anniversary of His Birth).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revista Interamericana de Educacion de Adultos, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Articles in this issue, written in Spanish, focus on the following: the philosophy of Jaime Torres Bodet (humanistic vision of adult education; objectives of public education in Mexico; Mexico and the issue of culture; The Mexican National Museum of History; Enrique Gonzalez Martinez, poet of all hours; Marti, Cuba's champion; educational…

  12. [Leonardo Torres Quevedo: the most prodigious inventor of his time].

    PubMed

    de Posada, Francisco González

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo Torres Quevedo's contribution to "the conquest of the air", to which humanity devoted so much effort in the early twentieth century is describe and his original inventions on dirigibles -the "Torres Quevedo", the "Astra-Torres" and the "Coastal"- and cable cars - Monte Ulía (San Sebastián) y Spanish Aerocar (Niágara, Canáda) are emphasised.

  13. Tobacco industry strategies to undermine the 8th World Conference on Tobacco or Health

    PubMed Central

    Muggli, M; Hurt, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate that Philip Morris and British American Tobacco Company attempted to initiate a wide ranging campaign to undermine the success of the 8th World Conference on Tobacco or Health held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1992. Data sources: Publicly available tobacco industry documents housed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; Guilford, UK; on-line document websites; and telephone interviews with informed parties. Study selection: Those documents determined to be relevant to the companies' campaigns against the 8th World Conference on Tobacco or Health. Data extraction: Revision of chapter VIII of the July 2000 WHO report by a committee of experts, entitled: Tobacco company strategies to undermine tobacco control activities at the World Health Organization: report of the committee of experts on tobacco industry documents. Data synthesis: Internal documents describe proposed media and science orientated campaigns developed by BAT, Philip Morris, and their consultants to divert attention away from the conference. Results and conclusion: This work shows that the tobacco industry has the resources and vested interest to combat perceived threats in its regional operating markets, in this case its Latin American market. It is important for the worldwide public heath community to become aware of the numerous ways in which the tobacco industry and its front groups can work against international tobacco control meetings, even including the manipulation of or working with other public health groups to oppose tobacco control efforts. Future world conference planners and participants should be aware that the tobacco industry is likely to continue to employ such methodology. There is no reason to think that the industry is paying less attention to such conferences in the present or future. Rather, it is likely the industry will adopt and expand strategies that were successful while abandoning those that were not effective. Required disclosure of financial support

  14. 8th Annual Glycoscience Symposium: Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Paratoo

    2015-09-24

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) of the University of Georgia holds a symposium yearly that highlights a broad range of carbohydrate research topics. The 8th Annual Georgia Glycoscience Symposium entitled “Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly” was held on April 7, 2014 at the CCRC. The focus of symposium was on the role of glycans in plant cell wall structure and synthesis. The goal was to have world leaders in conjunction with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and research scientists to propose the newest plant cell wall models. The symposium program closely followed the DOE’s mission and was specifically designed to highlight chemical and biochemical structures and processes important for the formation and modification of renewable plant cell walls which serve as the basis for biomaterial and biofuels. The symposium was attended by both senior investigators in the field as well as students including a total attendance of 103, which included 80 faculty/research scientists, 11 graduate students and 12 Postdoctoral students.

  15. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on Advanced Infocomm Technology (ICAIT 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, M.; Zhao, W.; Shum, P. Ping

    2016-02-01

    The 2015 IEEE 8th International Conference on Advanced Infocomm Technology (ICAIT 2015) was held in Hangzhou, China, during 25-27, October 2015, following the successes of previous events held in Shenzhan, Xi'an, Haikou, Wuhan, Paris, Hsinchu, and Fuzhou. This year the ICAIT 2015 aimed to bring together researchers, developers, and users in both industry and academia in the world for sharing state-of-art results, for exploring new areas of research and development, and to discuss emerging issues on advanced infocomm technology. The conference was hosted by Zhejiang University and China Satellite Maritime Tracking and Control Department. It was organized by the State Ley Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation of Zhejiang University, in collaboration with the Joint International Research Laboratory of Photonics of Zhejiang University. More than 150 international participants from 9 foreign countries attended the conference. The ICAIT 2015 was featured with 4 plenary lectures (by Xiaoyi Bao, Benjamin J. Eggleton, Min Gu, and Chinlon Lin, respectively), and 40 invited talks, in which a wide range of topics were covered and the most recent significant results were presented. Including oral and poster presentations, 138 abstracts were presented in the conference, some of which were selected to publish in full papers in this edition of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. With the excellent quality of the presentations, the ICAIT 2015 was a success. We also wish to thank the sponsors of the conference, and particularly the technical program committee and the local organizing committee.

  16. Science teaching efficacy beliefs of 5th and 8th grade science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Susan Melony

    The purpose of this study was to determine which, if any, variables had a significant relationship to personal science teaching efficacy beliefs and outcome expectancies. The independent variables tested were number of undergraduate science methods courses taken, level of teacher education, number of years as a classroom teacher, number of years as a science teacher, teacher beliefs regarding instructional strategies in science, and teacher beliefs regarding student engagement in the science classroom. Through surveys completed by 5th and 8th grade science teachers, the researcher analyzed data via multiple regressions to determine significance. Results of the data analysis showed the greatest significance was between personal science teaching efficacy beliefs and number of years as a classroom teacher, and teacher beliefs regarding instructional strategies in science and outcome expectancy and student engagement in the science classroom. Implications for current practice include a need for improved teacher education programs for pre-service science teachers, collaboration between universities and public school districts, improved methods for teacher retention in the science classroom, and the use of hands-on and minds-on instruction in the science classroom.

  17. BMI change, fitness change and cardiometabolic risk factors among 8th grade youth.

    PubMed

    Jago, Russell; Drews, Kimberly L; McMurray, Robert G; Baranowski, Tom; Galassetti, Pietro; Foster, Gary D; Moe, Ester; Buse, John B

    2013-02-01

    This paper examined whether a two-year change in fitness, body mass index (BMI) or the additive effect of change in fitness and BMI were associated with change in cardiometabolic risk factors among youth. Cardiometabolic risk factors, BMI group (normal weight, overweight or obese) were obtained from participants at the start of 6th grade and end of 8th grade. Shuttle run laps were assessed and categorized in quintiles at both time points. Regression models were used to examine whether changes in obesity, fitness or the additive effect of change in BMI and fitness were associated with change in risk factors. There was strong evidence (p < .001) that change in BMI was associated with change in cardiometabolic risk factors. There was weaker evidence of a fitness effect, with some evidence that change in fitness was associated with change in total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C and clustered risk score among boys, as well as HDL-C among girls. Male HDL-C was the only model for which there was some evidence of a BMI, fitness and additive BMI*fitness effect. Changing body mass is central to the reduction of youth cardiometabolic risk. Fitness effects were negligible once change in body mass had been taken into account.

  18. Intellectual Disability in Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In mid-2001, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Australia was approximately 458,500 people (2.4% of the national population). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia experience disadvantage compared to non-Indigenous Australians in a number of areas, including greater prevalence of health risk factors, early…

  19. The 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA' 05); Journal of Physics: Conference Series

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bauerle, Dieter W.; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-09-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11–16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications.

  20. Physical activity behavior and related characteristics of highly-active 8th grade girls

    PubMed Central

    Taverno Ross, Sharon E.; Dowda, Marsha; Beets, Michael W.; Pate, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While girls are generally less physically active than boys, some girls regularly engage in high levels of physical activity (PA); however, very little is known about these girls and how they differ from those who are less physically active. This study examined the PA behavior and related characteristics of highly-active adolescent girls and compared them with those who are less active. Methods Data from 1,866 8th grade girls from 6 field centers across the U.S. participating in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) were included in the present analysis. Mixed model ANOVAs examined differences in sociodemographic, anthropometric, psychosocial, and physical activity (accelerometry and self-report) variables between high- and low-active girls; effect sizes were calculated for the differences. Results High-active girls were taller, had lower BMIs and body fat, and were less sedentary. High-active girls scored higher on self-efficacy, enjoyment of PA, self-management strategies, outcome-expectancy value, and support from family and friends than low-active girls. Low-active girls participated in more leisure-time and educational sedentary activities than high-active girls. High-active girls participated in more PA classes/lessons outside of school, team sports, and individual sports. They were also more likely to participate in sports in an organized setting in the community or at school than low-active girls. Conclusions Health promotion efforts should focus on decreasing the amount of time girls spend in sedentary activities and replacing that time with organized PA opportunities; such efforts should seek to minimize perceived barriers and increase self-efficacy and support for PA. PMID:23384978

  1. PREFACE: The 8th China International NanoScience and Technology Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hailin

    2009-09-01

    The 8th China International NanoScience and Technology Symposium, Xiangtan (2009) - Nano-products Exposition, sponsored by Chinese Society of Miro-nanoTechnology and IEEE Nanotechnology Council, etc will be held on 23-27 October 2009 in Xiangtan, China. This symposium is held in order to promote the technology for the development of micro- and nano-scale, cross-scale integration, to share new micro/nano technologies, to exchange information and knowledge over all fields and promote the industrialization and development of nanotechnology. This is a leading professional and traditional conference with at least 400 participants every year. Famous experts, professors and government officials at home and abroad will give lectures during the symposium, which provides a good platform for delegates to discover the latest developments and dynamics of nanotechnology. Researchers, teachers and students in colleges, and technical personnel in the industrial community are welcome to contribute and actively participate in the symposium. In our last symposium held in 2008, over 600 participants from all over the world attended, and we received over 570 abstract and paper submissions for the proceedings published in different languages in famous professional journals. And this year, we have already received over 400 submissions. After strict peer review, 60 of them are published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are confident that the event will be even more successful this year. Consequently, the organizing committee and proceedings editorial committee would like to thank our colleagues at the IOP Publishing, the invited speakers, our sponsors and all the delegates for their great contributions in this conference. Hailin Cong Vice Chair of the proceedings editorial committee

  2. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Libraries Symposium (8th, Maryville, Missouri, November 7, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen scholarly papers and eighteen abstracts comprise the content of the 8th "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. Many of the…

  3. 3D Visualization Types in Multimedia Applications for Science Learning: A Case Study for 8th Grade Students in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korakakis, G.; Pavlatou, E. A.; Palyvos, J. A.; Spyrellis, N.

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to determine whether the use of specific types of visualization (3D illustration, 3D animation, and interactive 3D animation) combined with narration and text, contributes to the learning process of 13- and 14- years-old students in science courses. The study was carried out with 212 8th grade students in Greece. This…

  4. Estimation of chemical carcass composition from 8th rib characteristics with Belgian blue double-muscled bulls.

    PubMed

    De Campeneere, S; Fiems, L O; Van de Voorde, G; Vanacker, J M; Boucque, C V; Demeyer, D I

    1999-01-01

    Characteristics from the 8th rib cut: chemical composition, tissue composition after dissection, specific gravity (SG) and m. longissimus thoracis (LT) composition, collected on 17 Belgian Blue double-muscled fattening bulls were used to generate equations for predicting chemical carcass composition. Carcass composition was best predicted from chemical analysis of the 8th rib cut and the empty body weight (EBW) of the bull. Carcass chemical fat content (CCF, kg) was predicted from the 8th rib cut fat content (ether extract, 8RF, kg) by the following regression: CCF=1.94+27.37 8RF (R(2)=0.957, RSD =9.89%). A higher coefficient was found for carcass water (CCW, kg) predicted from 8RF and EBW: CCW=-2.26+0.28 EBW-34.28 8RF (R(2)=0.997, RSD=1.48%). No parameter was found to improve the prediction of CCP from EBW solely: CCP=-0.86+0.08 EBW (R(2) =0.992, RSD=2.61%). Prediction equations based solely on LT composition had low R(2) values of between 0.38 and 0.67, whereas no significant equations were found using SG. However, equations based on EBW had R(2) values between 0.78 and 0.99. Chemical components of the 8th rib cut in combination with EBW are most useful in predicting the chemical composition of the carcass of Belgian-Blue double-muscled bulls. PMID:22061533

  5. Primary School English Teachers' Perceptions of the English Language Curriculum of 6th, 7th and 8th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersen Yanik, Asli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how the teachers who have different background characteristics perceive the goals and content of the English language curriculum implemented at the 6th, 7th and 8th grades of public primary schools. The study was conducted during the 2004-2005 school year with 368 English teachers selected from the seven regions of…

  6. Examination of Gender Differences on Cognitive and Motivational Factors That Influence 8th Graders' Science Achievement in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Ömer; Türkmen, Lütfullah; Bilgin, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of several students' cognitive and motivational factors on 8th graders' science achievement and also gender differences on factors that significantly contribute to the science achievement model. A total of 99 girls and 83 boys responded all the instruments used in this study. Results showed that girls outperformed boys on…

  7. How (and How Much) Do Schools Matter? Variation in K-8th Grade Achievement Trajectories in a National Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Kate; Cappella, Elise; Scott, Marc; Seidman, Edward; Kim, Ha Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The current study extends research on the transition to early adolescence and middle grade schools by examining students' achievement trajectories from school entry through 8th grade in a national sample, and beginning to disassociate the role of school context and school grade configuration in achievement trajectories. Data were drawn from the…

  8. Native American Students' Understanding of Geologic Time Scale: 4th-8th Grade Ojibwe Students' Understanding of Earth's Geologic History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Younkyeong; Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Geologic time scale is a very important concept for understanding long-term earth system events such as climate change. This study examines forty-three 4th-8th grade Native American--particularly Ojibwe tribe--students' understanding of relative ordering and absolute time of Earth's significant geological and biological events. This study also…

  9. The Effect of Internet-Based Education on Student Success in Teaching of 8th Grade Triangles Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Deniz; Kesan, Cenk; Izgiol, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    In the study, it was researched the effect of internet-based application on student success. Internet-based application was used at the teaching of triangles subject which is included in 8th grade units of triangles and algebra. The study was carried out over the internet with a computer software program: Vitamin Program. The study was carried out…

  10. Proceedings of the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (8th, Madrid, Spain, June 26-29, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Olga Cristina, Ed.; Boticario, Jesus Gonzalez, Ed.; Romero, Cristobal, Ed.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola, Ed.; Merceron, Agathe, Ed.; Mitros, Piotr, Ed.; Luna, Jose Maria, Ed.; Mihaescu, Cristian, Ed.; Moreno, Pablo, Ed.; Hershkovitz, Arnon, Ed.; Ventura, Sebastian, Ed.; Desmarais, Michel, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The 8th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2015) is held under auspices of the International Educational Data Mining Society at UNED, the National University for Distance Education in Spain. The conference held in Madrid, Spain, July 26-29, 2015, follows the seven previous editions (London 2014, Memphis 2013, Chania 2012,…

  11. Estimation of chemical carcass composition from 8th rib characteristics with Belgian blue double-muscled bulls.

    PubMed

    De Campeneere, S; Fiems, L O; Van de Voorde, G; Vanacker, J M; Boucque, C V; Demeyer, D I

    1999-01-01

    Characteristics from the 8th rib cut: chemical composition, tissue composition after dissection, specific gravity (SG) and m. longissimus thoracis (LT) composition, collected on 17 Belgian Blue double-muscled fattening bulls were used to generate equations for predicting chemical carcass composition. Carcass composition was best predicted from chemical analysis of the 8th rib cut and the empty body weight (EBW) of the bull. Carcass chemical fat content (CCF, kg) was predicted from the 8th rib cut fat content (ether extract, 8RF, kg) by the following regression: CCF=1.94+27.37 8RF (R(2)=0.957, RSD =9.89%). A higher coefficient was found for carcass water (CCW, kg) predicted from 8RF and EBW: CCW=-2.26+0.28 EBW-34.28 8RF (R(2)=0.997, RSD=1.48%). No parameter was found to improve the prediction of CCP from EBW solely: CCP=-0.86+0.08 EBW (R(2) =0.992, RSD=2.61%). Prediction equations based solely on LT composition had low R(2) values of between 0.38 and 0.67, whereas no significant equations were found using SG. However, equations based on EBW had R(2) values between 0.78 and 0.99. Chemical components of the 8th rib cut in combination with EBW are most useful in predicting the chemical composition of the carcass of Belgian-Blue double-muscled bulls.

  12. Cultivating Environmental Virtue among 7th and 8th Graders in an Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Bruce; Bright, Alan; Cafaro, Philip; Mittelstaedt, Robin; Bruyere, Brett

    2008-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the development of environmental virtue in 7th and 8th grade students in an Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound school. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the researchers were interested in introducing a virtue ethics perspective into their teaching of environmental ethics. Second, the researchers were…

  13. K-8th Grade Korean Students' Conceptions of 'Changes of State' and 'Conditions for Changes of State'. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paik, Seoung-Hey; Kim, Hyo-Nam; Cho, Boo-Kyoung; Park, Jae-Won

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the various conceptions held by K-8th Korean grade students regarding the 'changes of state' and the 'conditions for changes of state'. The study used a sample of five kindergarteners, five secondgrade students, five fourth-grade students, five sixth-grade students, and five eighth-grade students. The 25 students attend…

  14. PREFACE: 8th Ibero-American Congress on Sensors (IBERSENSOR 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Idalia; Santiago-Avilés, Jorge J.

    2013-03-01

    The 8th Ibero-American Congress on Sensors (IBERSENSOR 2012) was held in Carolina, Puerto Rico on 16-19 October 2012. IBERSENSOR is a forum of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking scientific community, working in the fields of sensors of every possible kind and their applications. Previous conferences in the series were successfully carried out in La Habana, Cuba (1998); Buenos Aires, Argentina (2000); Lima, Perú (2002); Puebla, México (2004); Montevideo, Uruguay (2006); Sao Paulo, Brasil (2008) and Lisboa, Portugal (2010). IBERSENSOR 2012 participants included researchers from eleven countries in the Americas and Europe, in particular young men and women. The conference was organized and sponsored by the Partnership for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-DMR-0934195) a collaborative program between the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao (UPRH) and the University of Pennsylvania (PENN) Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, sponsored by the USA National Science Foundation (NSF). Other sponsors included the Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials of the University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras and the Nano/Bio Interface Center (NBIC) at PENN. The Proceedings of IBERSENSOR 2012 include a selection of 21 research papers in the areas of Materials and Processes for Sensor Development, Nano-Sensors, Chemical Sensors, Mechanical Sensors, Optical Sensors, Wireless Sensors, Sensor signal conditioning and Instrumentation, Microfluidic Devices, and Biomedical and Environmental Applications. Editors Idalia Ramos University of Puerto Rico at Humacao, Puerto Rico Jorge J Santiago-Avilés University of Pennsylvania, USA Group photograph Logos Ibero-American Congress on Sensors Ibero-American Congress on Sensors (Ibersensor) Main Sponsors PENN-UPRH-PREM Partnership for Research and Education in Materials (PENN-UPRH-PREM) University of Puerto Rico at Humacao USA National Science Foundation USA National Science Foundation Other Sponsors Center for Advanced

  15. PREFACE: SQM2004 The 8th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleymans, Jean; Steinberg, Peter; Vilakazi, Zeblon

    2005-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2004) was held at at the Breakwater Lodge, which is part of the Graduate School of Business of the University of Cape Town. The architecture of the Breakwater Lodge is a stark reminder of the fact that its original purpose was to serve as a municipal jail. It appears that the spectacular background of Table Mountain and the V&A Waterfront and an excellent set of speakers were sufficient to keep the lecture rooms full to capacity, despite the numerous temptations of Cape Town. This is the first time a major heavy ion conference has been held in South Africa, and the timing is fortuitous, with a long-delayed MoU between South Africa and CERN at last being signed and finalized. At last, funding is being made available for South African scientists to play a meaningful role and make contributions to the international effort in heavy ion physics. Despite the substantial distance from the major cities in the northern hemisphere, the conference was very well attended and the number of participants was about 50% larger than originally anticipated. Participants came from China, India, Japan, the United States, Brazil and many European countries. We would like to thank all of the SQM2004 participants for their efforts and, in particlular, all of the plenary and parallel speakers for their hard work in making this conference such a success. Of course, even more thanks go to all the chairpersons of the various sessions who struggled to keep the conference program on the (admittedly tight) schedule. For future conferences, we recommend keeping a bell handy! Photograph Participants gather on the UCT campus with Table Mountain in the backgound. We would like to thank Professor Tony Fairall for a most entertaining after-dinner talk about all that is unusual and fascinating about the southern hemisphere. It could not be emphasized enough that the daily working of the meeting would have ground to a halt without the

  16. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) was held in Perpignan from 24 to 27 June 2013, and was the continuation of the previous meetings held in Bangor (1996), Rome (1991), Barcelona (1999), Pittsburg (2002), London (2004), Rome (2007) and Uppsala (2010). The next meeting will be organized by Profs. Robert D. Shull, George Hadjipanayis and Cindi Dennis, in 2016 at NIST, Gaithersburg (USA). ICFPM is a small-sized conference focused on the magnetism of nanoparticles. It provides an international forum for discussing the state-of-the-art understanding of physics of these systems, of their properties and the underlying phenomena, as approached from a variety of directions: theory and modelling, experiments on well characterized or model systems (both fabricated and synthetised), as well as experiments on technologically-relevant non-ideal systems. This meeting brought together about 120 participants working on experimental, theoretical and applied topics of the multidisciplinary research areas covered by magnetic nanoparticles, with focused interest on either single-particle or collective phenomena. The technical program of the conference was based on keynote conferences, invited talks, oral contributions and poster sessions, covering the following aspects: . Fabrication, synthesis, characterization . Single particle, surface and finite-size effects on magnetic properties . Magnetization dynamics, micro-wave assisted switching, dynamical coupling . Assemblies, collective effects, self-assembling and nanostructuring . Applications : hyperthermia, drug delivery, magneto-caloric, magneto-resistance, magneto-plasmonics, magnetic particle imaging This ICFPM edition was organized by the group Nanoscale Spin Systems of the laboratory PROMES of the CNRS (UPR8521), and Université de Perpignan Via Domitia. The meeting took place at the Congress Center of the city of Perpignan providing high-quality facilities for the technical program as well for the

  17. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) was held in Perpignan from 24 to 27 June 2013, and was the continuation of the previous meetings held in Bangor (1996), Rome (1991), Barcelona (1999), Pittsburg (2002), London (2004), Rome (2007) and Uppsala (2010). The next meeting will be organized by Profs. Robert D. Shull, George Hadjipanayis and Cindi Dennis, in 2016 at NIST, Gaithersburg (USA). ICFPM is a small-sized conference focused on the magnetism of nanoparticles. It provides an international forum for discussing the state-of-the-art understanding of physics of these systems, of their properties and the underlying phenomena, as approached from a variety of directions: theory and modelling, experiments on well characterized or model systems (both fabricated and synthetised), as well as experiments on technologically-relevant non-ideal systems. This meeting brought together about 120 participants working on experimental, theoretical and applied topics of the multidisciplinary research areas covered by magnetic nanoparticles, with focused interest on either single-particle or collective phenomena. The technical program of the conference was based on keynote conferences, invited talks, oral contributions and poster sessions, covering the following aspects: . Fabrication, synthesis, characterization . Single particle, surface and finite-size effects on magnetic properties . Magnetization dynamics, micro-wave assisted switching, dynamical coupling . Assemblies, collective effects, self-assembling and nanostructuring . Applications : hyperthermia, drug delivery, magneto-caloric, magneto-resistance, magneto-plasmonics, magnetic particle imaging This ICFPM edition was organized by the group Nanoscale Spin Systems of the laboratory PROMES of the CNRS (UPR8521), and Université de Perpignan Via Domitia. The meeting took place at the Congress Center of the city of Perpignan providing high-quality facilities for the technical program as well for the

  18. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Lars E.; Bäck, S.; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    IC3DDose 2014, the 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry was held in Ystad, Sweden, from 4-7 September 2014. This grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The 7th and last meeting was held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012. It is worth remembering that the conference series started at the very beginning of the intensity modulated radiotherapy era and that the dosimeters being developed then were, to some extent, ahead of the clinical need of radiotherapy. However, since then the technical developments in radiation therapy have been dramatic, with dynamic treatments, including tracking, gating and volumetric modulated arc therapy, widely introduced in the clinic with the need for 3D dosimetry thus endless. This was also reflected by the contributions at the meeting in Ystad. Accordingly the scope of the meeting has also broadened to IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose. A multitude of dosimetry techniques and radiation detectors are now represented, all with the common denominator: three-dimensional or 3D. Additionally, quality assurance (QA) procedures and other aspects of clinical dosimetry are represented. The implementation of new dosimetric techniques in radiotherapy is a process that needs every kind of caution, carefulness and thorough validation. Therefore, the clinical needs, reformulated as the aims for IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose, are: • Enhance the quality and accuracy of radiation therapy treatments through improved clinical dosimetry. • Investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatment techniques. • Provide

  19. 8th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG): April 16-18, 2015, Republic of Malta.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Christopher G; Homberg, Anita; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, mobile health, sport science, and regulatory issues gathered for the 8(th) Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) with a focus on personalized diabetes management. The aim of this meeting was to facilitate new collaborations and research projects to improve the lives of people with diabetes. The 2015 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures.

  20. 8th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG): April 16-18, 2015, Republic of Malta.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Christopher G; Homberg, Anita; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, mobile health, sport science, and regulatory issues gathered for the 8(th) Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) with a focus on personalized diabetes management. The aim of this meeting was to facilitate new collaborations and research projects to improve the lives of people with diabetes. The 2015 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. PMID:26496678

  1. 8th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG): April 16–18, 2015, Republic of Malta

    PubMed Central

    Homberg, Anita; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Abstract International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, mobile health, sport science, and regulatory issues gathered for the 8th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) with a focus on personalized diabetes management. The aim of this meeting was to facilitate new collaborations and research projects to improve the lives of people with diabetes. The 2015 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. PMID:26496678

  2. Physical activity participation by parental language use in 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andrew E; Lewis, Kayan; Kelder, Steven H; Fernandez, Maria E; Barroso, Cristina S; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2010-10-01

    Research on physical activity (PA) by level of acculturation in Hispanic children is limited and findings have been mixed. We examined PA participation by primary language used with parents in a representative sample of 4th, 8th, and 11th grade Texas public school students. Mixed-effects regression models were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2004-2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition Study (n = 22,049). Self-reported PA was compared among three language-ethnic groups: Spanish-Hispanic (SH) (referent); English-Hispanic (EH); and English-Other (EO). EH and/or EO girls were generally between 1.25 and 2.58 [OR] times more likely to participate in PA across grade levels, with the largest differences found for school sports in 8th grade girls. EH and EO 8th grade boys were 1.71 (CI: 1.40, 2.10) and 2.06 (CI: 1.68, 2.51) times, respectively, more likely to participate in school sports. Findings indicate important disparities in Spanish-speaking Hispanic children's PA participation. PMID:19365728

  3. The Relationship between Interest in Teaching as a Career Choice and Perceptions of School/Classroom Environment of 7th and 8th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ray E.

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether future teachers, particularly students of color. can be identified at the 7th and 8th grade levels, and to determine whether their interest or noninterest in teaching is related to how they feel and think about school. Participants were 7th and 8th grade students (N=646) from eight California schools.…

  4. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    Adriana Scandurra Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Ing Graciela Secreto Universidad Favaloro Mg Pablo Solarz Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Mg Carolina Tabernig Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Ing Ricardo Taborda Universidad Nacional de Córdoba Dra María Eugenia Torres Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos - CONICET Ing Juan Carlos Tulli Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Gerardo Tusman Hospital Privado de Comunidad, Mar del Plata Dr Santiago Urquiza Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Andrés Valdez Universidad Nacional de San Juan Dr Máximo Valentinuzzi INSIBIO - CONICET - Universidad Nacional de Tucumán

  5. Hepatorenal syndrome: the 8th international consensus conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) Group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Renal dysfunction is a common complication in patients with end-stage cirrhosis. Since the original publication of the definition and diagnostic criteria for the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), there have been major advances in our understanding of its pathogenesis. The prognosis of patients with cirrhosis who develop HRS remains poor, with a median survival without liver transplantation of less than six months. However, a number of pharmacological and other therapeutic strategies have now become available which offer the ability to prevent or treat renal dysfunction more effectively in this setting. Accordingly, we sought to review the available evidence, make recommendations and delineate key questions for future studies. Methods We undertook a systematic review of the literature using Medline, PubMed and Web of Science, data provided by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and the bibliographies of key reviews. We determined a list of key questions and convened a two-day consensus conference to develop summary statements via a series of alternating breakout and plenary sessions. In these sessions, we identified supporting evidence and generated recommendations and/or directions for future research. Results Of the 30 questions considered, we found inadequate evidence for the majority of questions and our recommendations were mainly based on expert opinion. There was insufficient evidence to grade three questions, but we were able to develop a consensus definition for acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and provide consensus recommendations for future investigations to address key areas of uncertainty. Conclusions Despite a paucity of sufficiently powered prospectively randomized trials, we were able to establish an evidence-based appraisal of this field and develop a set of consensus recommendations to standardize care and direct further research for patients with cirrhosis and renal dysfunction. PMID:22322077

  6. The dwarf saltwort (Salicornia bigelovii Torr.): Evaluation of breeding populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding populations of the dwarf saltwort (Salicornia bigelovii Torr. [Chenopodiaceae]) have been evaluated under high seawater salinity (45 dS m-1) for phenotypic, morphometric, biomass and seed traits in an effort to select suitable families and genotypes within families for breeding purposes and...

  7. An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Torres Strait.

    PubMed

    Preston-Thomas, Annie; Gair, Richard W; Hosking, Kelly A; Devine, Gregor J; Donohue, Steven D

    2012-06-01

    This report describes the largest outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Torres Strait for more than 25 years. It details factors that may have contributed to the outbreak, the public health response and implications for the broader region. Eight cases of locally-acquired falciparum malaria occurred on Saibai and Dauan islands during March and April 2011. Including imports, there were 17 P. falciparum notifications between February and May 2011. Three cases of pure P. vivax malaria that might have been locally acquired have been omitted from this report. Malaria is endemic on the nearby coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG), and regularly imported to the Torres Strait where a competent vector exists in sufficient numbers to transmit the disease to the local population. The most common malaria vectors in northern Australia and Torres Strait are the Anopheles farauti complex. Factors contributing to the outbreak may include an increase in travel between the outer islands and PNG, inadequate local vector control and late or missed diagnoses of malaria. Outbreak management involved intensive case finding and treatment, vector control and health promotion. Reducing the risk of future outbreaks requires studies of vector behaviour, ecology and management, health promotion, improvements to protective infrastructure, and clinical guideline revision. Further malaria outbreaks are likely in the Torres Strait and elsewhere in northern Australia. It is important to maintain awareness and be prepared to respond rapidly. PMID:23186217

  8. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010 Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, Sasha; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2011-05-01

    The international research community interested in the Laser Interferometric Space Antenna (LISA) program meets every two years to exchange scientific and technical information. From 28 June-2 July 2010, Stanford University hosted the 8th International LISA Symposium. The symposium was held on the campus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Many of the foremost scientific and technological researchers in LISA and gravitational wave theory and detection presented their work and ideas. Over one hundred engineers and graduate students attended the meeting. The leadership from NASA and ESA research centers and programs joined the symposium. A total of 280 delegates participated in the 8th LISA Symposium, and enjoyed the scientific and social programs. The scientific program included 46 invited plenary lectures, 44 parallel talks, and 77 posters, totaling 167 presentations. The one-slide introduction presentation of the posters is a new format in this symposium and allowed graduate students the opportunity to talk in front of a large audience of scientists. The topics covered included LISA Science, LISA Interferometry, LISA PathFinder (LPF), LISA and LPF Data Analysis, Astrophysics, Numerical Relativity, Gravitational Wave Theory, GRS Technologies, Other Space Programs, and Ground Detectors. Large gravitational wave detection efforts, DECIGO, and LIGO were presented, as well as a number of other fundamental physics space experiments, with GP-B and STEP being examples. A public evening lecture was also presented at the symposium. Professor Bernard Schutz from the Albert Einstein Institute gave a general audience, multimedia presentation on `Gravitational waves: Listening to the music of spheres'. For more detailed information about the symposium and many presentation files, please browse through the website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/lisasymposium The Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium are jointly published by Classical and Quantum Gravity

  9. Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Allen of Scripps and UC San Diego on "Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  10. TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Karsenti, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Karsenti of EMBL delivers the closing keynote on "TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  11. New Approaches and Technologies to Sequence de novo Plant reference Genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Jeremy Schmutz of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology on "New approaches and technologies to sequence de novo plant reference genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  12. The Challenges and Opportunities for Extending Plant Genomics to Climate (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, David

    2013-03-01

    David Weston of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "The challenges and opportunities for extending plant genomics to climate" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  13. Succession of Phylogeny and Function During Plant Litter Decomposition (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Eoin

    2013-03-01

    Eoin Brodie of Berkeley Lab on "Succession of phylogeny and function during plant litter decomposition" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  14. Natural variation in Brachypodium disctachyon: Deep Sequencing of Highly Diverse Natural Accessions (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Sean

    2013-03-01

    Sean Gordon of the USDA on "Natural variation in Brachypodium disctachyon: Deep Sequencing of Highly Diverse Natural Accessions" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  15. Delineating Molecular Interaction Mechanisms in an In Vitro Microbial-Plant Community (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Peter Larsen of Argonne National Lab on "Delineating molecular interaction mechanisms in an in vitro microbial-plant community" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  16. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for Biofuel Production (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Adam Guss of Oak Ridge National Lab on "Metabolic engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for biofuel production" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. Modulation of Root Microbiome Community Assembly by the Plant Immune Response (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lebeis, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Sarah Lebeis of University of North Carolina on "Modulation of root microbiome community assembly by the plant immune response" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  18. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  20. Primary School 5th and 8th Graders' Understanding and Mental Models about the Shape of the World and Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öztürk, Ayse; Doganay, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated primary school 5th and 8th graders' understanding and mental models related to the shape of the world and gravity, and how these models reflected the fact and what kind of a change there is from 5th to 8th graders. This research is based on a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted in a low socioeconomic level…

  1. Kapua Gutchen: Educator, Mentor and Innovator of Torres Strait Islander Music, Dance and Language at Erub (Darnley Island), Torres Strait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costigan, Lyn; Neuenfeldt, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of local community members to Indigenous education can be an important component in curriculum programs. This article explores the contributions of one such dedicated and talented Torres Strait Islander community member: Meuram tribal elder Kapua Gutchen. He teaches at the Erub (Darnley Island) Campus of Tagai College in the…

  2. Rotavirus landscape in Africa-Towards prevention and control: A report of the 8th African rotavirus symposium, Livingstone, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Cheryl; Mwenda, Jason; Chilengi, Roma

    2015-06-26

    The 8th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Livingstone, Zambia from the 12-13 June 2014. Over 130 delegates from 35 countries - 28 from African nations - participated in this symposium, which included scientists, clinicians, immunisation managers, public health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers. The theme for the symposium was Rotavirus Landscape in Africa-Towards Prevention and Control. At the time of the symposium, a total of 21 African countries had introduced the rotavirus vaccine into their national immunisation schedules. This meeting was particularly timely and relevant to review early data on vaccine adoption and impact from these countries. The concluding panel discussion proposed several recommendations for areas of focus moving forward in rotavirus advocacy and research.

  3. Comparison of the 7th and proposed 8th editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7th and the proposed 8th edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan –Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7th AJCC T categories, the proposed 8th AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7th edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8th edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8th AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7th AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  4. Comparison of the 7(th) and proposed 8(th) editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7(th) and the proposed 8(th) edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan -Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7(th) AJCC T categories, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7(th) edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8(th) edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7(th) AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  5. Performance evaluation of a Loeb-Eiber mass filter at 1 Torr.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jin, Feng; Pedder, Randall E; Taormina, Christopher; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-02-01

    The Loeb-Eiber mass filter is best operated at relatively high pressures-such as 1 Torr-where collisional dampening of ions up to the mass filter thermalizes the ions' kinetic energy, which is a requirement for effective filtering. The inter-electrode gaps of ~8 μm require rf amplitudes on the order of 0-5 V p-p at approximately 50 MHz to achieve mass filtering up to m/z 40. Mass filtering between the 25-μm diameter wires, therefore, takes place on time frames less than the collision frequency at ~1 Torr. The low power and high pressure capabilities of the Loeb-Eiber mass filter make it ideally suited for miniaturization, where power and space are a premium. In the present work, a Loeb-Eiber mass filter was constructed using commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microfabrication techniques. Ions transmitting through the chip-based Loeb-Eiber mass filter were characterized in real time using a traditional linear quadrupole mass analyzer in series with the Loeb-Eiber mass filter. The new hybrid instrument has enabled us to verify several important claims regarding the operation of the Loeb-Eiber mass filter: (1) that ions can be effectively filtered at ~1 Torr, (2) that for ions of a fixed mass-to-charge ratio, the ion transmission current decreases linearly with increasing rf amplitude on the Loeb-Eiber mass filter, (3) that the cutoff voltage at which all ions of a particular m/z value are effectively blocked is linearly related to mass-to-charge, and (4) that square waveforms can filter ions more effectively than sinusoidal waveforms for a given peak-to-peak rf amplitude. PMID:25527329

  6. Spatially Controlled Fe Isotope Variations at Torres del Paine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajos, N.; Lundstrom, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in mass-spectrometry have identified systematic trends of non-traditional stable isotope variation in igneous rocks with differentiation index. We present new Fe isotope data for the Torres del Paine igneous complex in southern Chile. The multi-composition pluton consists of a 1 km vertical exposure of homogenous granite overlying a contemporaneous and possibly cogenetic 0.5 km mafic gabbro suite. Whereas previous isotopic investigations do little to address variations across important magmatic contacts, this study focuses on a first-of-its-kind spatially dependent non-traditional stable isotope investigation of an igneous pluton. Samples were collected at Torres del Paine in spatially significant transects, focusing on major contacts between country rock, granite and mafic units. Results collected by bracketed double spike MC-ICP-MS (2s precision of ×0.03) show an increase in δ56Fe towards the high silica margins of the pluton with values as high as δ56Fe 0.36. Additionally, the data show a decrease in δ56Fe toward the mafic center of the pluton with δ56Fe values ranging from δ56Fe -0.05 to 0.18. Samples collected on the contact between the granite and mafic complex show intermediate values of δ56Fe= 0.18(×) 0.03. Country rock samples in contact with granite show an isotopically light signature of δ56Fe=0.04 (×) 0.03. Analysis of 50 samples in total show a trend of increasing δ56Fe with SiO2 content. The process responsible for Fe isotope variations remains debated but is suggested to reflect four mechanisms: (1) crustal assimilation, (2) fractional crystallization, (3) late stage fluid exsolution [1] and (4) thermal migration [3]. Preliminary results show that mechanisms #1 and #2 would produce isotopic signatures opposite of those seen at Torres del Paine and other plutonic rocks. Isotopically light Torres country rock samples reveal that assimilation of rocks would not produce the isotopically heavy granites seen at Torres. Based on

  7. Fast Food Consumption and Food Prices: Evidence from Panel Data on 5th and 8th Grade Children

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tamkeen; Powell, Lisa M.; Wada, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Fast food consumption is a dietary factor associated with higher prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States. The association between food prices and consumption of fast food among 5th and 8th graders was examined using individual-level random effects models utilizing consumption data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K), price data from American Chamber of Commerce Researchers Association (ACCRA), and contextual outlet density data from Dun and Bradstreet (D&B). The results found that contextual factors including the price of fast food, median household income, and fast food restaurant outlet densities were significantly associated with fast food consumption patterns among this age group. Overall, a 10% increase in the price of fast food was associated with 5.7% lower frequency of weekly fast food consumption. These results suggest that public health policy pricing instruments such as taxes may be effective in reducing consumption of energy-dense foods and possibly reducing the prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children and young adolescents. PMID:22292115

  8. Fast food consumption and food prices: evidence from panel data on 5th and 8th grade children.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tamkeen; Powell, Lisa M; Wada, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Fast food consumption is a dietary factor associated with higher prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States. The association between food prices and consumption of fast food among 5th and 8th graders was examined using individual-level random effects models utilizing consumption data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K), price data from American Chamber of Commerce Researchers Association (ACCRA), and contextual outlet density data from Dun and Bradstreet (D&B). The results found that contextual factors including the price of fast food, median household income, and fast food restaurant outlet densities were significantly associated with fast food consumption patterns among this age group. Overall, a 10% increase in the price of fast food was associated with 5.7% lower frequency of weekly fast food consumption. These results suggest that public health policy pricing instruments such as taxes may be effective in reducing consumption of energy-dense foods and possibly reducing the prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children and young adolescents. PMID:22292115

  9. Remote ischemic conditioning: from experimental observation to clinical application: report from the 8th Biennial Hatter Cardiovascular Institute Workshop.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Jack M J; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Crimi, Gabriele; Davidson, Brian; Davidson, Sean M; Dutka, David; Ferdinandy, Peter; Ganske, Rocky; Garcia-Dorado, David; Giricz, Zoltan; Gourine, Alexander V; Heusch, Gerd; Kharbanda, Rajesh; Kleinbongard, Petra; MacAllister, Raymond; McIntyre, Christopher; Meybohm, Patrick; Prunier, Fabrice; Redington, Andrew; Robertson, Nicola J; Suleiman, M Saadeh; Vanezis, Andrew; Walsh, Stewart; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    In 1993, Przyklenk and colleagues made the intriguing experimental observation that 'brief ischemia in one vascular bed also protects remote, virgin myocardium from subsequent sustained coronary artery occlusion' and that this effect'... may be mediated by factor(s) activated, produced, or transported throughout the heart during brief ischemia/reperfusion'. This seminal study laid the foundation for the discovery of 'remote ischemic conditioning' (RIC), a phenomenon in which the heart is protected from the detrimental effects of acute ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), by applying cycles of brief ischemia and reperfusion to an organ or tissue remote from the heart. The concept of RIC quickly evolved to extend beyond the heart, encompassing inter-organ protection against acute IRI. The crucial discovery that the protective RIC stimulus could be applied non-invasively, by simply inflating and deflating a blood pressure cuff placed on the upper arm to induce cycles of brief ischemia and reperfusion, has facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical setting. Despite intensive investigation over the last 20 years, the underlying mechanisms continue to elude researchers. In the 8th Biennial Hatter Cardiovascular Institute Workshop, recent developments in the field of RIC were discussed with a focus on new insights into the underlying mechanisms, the diversity of non-cardiac protection, new clinical applications, and large outcome studies. The scientific advances made in this field of research highlight the journey that RIC has made from being an intriguing experimental observation to a clinical application with patient benefit.

  10. CD8+ Th17 Mediate Costimulation Blockade Resistant Allograft Rejection in T-bet Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Bryna E.; Csencsits, Keri; Lu, Guanyi; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Bishop, D. Keith

    2009-01-01

    While studying T helper (Th) responses induced by cardiac transplantation, we observed that mice deficient in the Th1 transcription factor T-bet (T-bet-/-) mount both Th1 and Th17 responses, while wild type (WT) recipients mount only Th1 responses. Cells producing both IFNγ and IL-17 were readily detectable within the rejecting graft of T-bet-/- recipients, but were absent from the spleen indicating that the in vivo microenvironment influences Th function. In addition, disrupting CD40 – CD40 ligand (CD40L) costimulatory interactions was highly effective at prolonging allograft survival in WT mice, but ineffective in T-bet-/- recipients. Herein, we report that CD8+ Th17 mediate costimulation blockade resistant rejection in T-bet-/- allograft recipients. Depleting CD8+ cells or neutralizing IL-17 or the Th17-inducing cytokine IL-6 ablated the Th17 response and reversed costimulation blockade resistant graft rejection. Neutralizing IL-4 in IFNγ-/- allograft recipients did not induce Th17, suggesting that T-bet, rather than IL-4 and IFNγ (known inhibitors of Th17), plays a critical role in negatively regulating Th17 in the transplant setting. PMID:18768845

  11. Geological evidence of paleotsunamis at Torre degli Inglesi (northeast Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantosti, D.; Barbano, M. S.; Smedile, A.; De Martini, P. M.; Tigano, G.

    2008-03-01

    Two layers of fine sand of marine origin occur in a sequence of organic rich colluvia in an archaeological excavation at Torre degli Inglesi, on Capo Peloro, northeast Sicily. Stratigraphic and micropaleontologic analyses support the hypothesis that these layers are related to deposition due to paleotsunami waves. Their ages are constrained both with radiocarbon and archaeological datings. The age of the oldest layer is coincident with the 17 A.D. earthquake that hit Reggio Calabria but for which no tsunami was previously reported. The age of the youngest layer can be only constrained in the range 3rd-19th century and is tentatively associated to the 6 Feb. 1783 event.

  12. Glioblastoma multiforme in the Muir–Torre syndrome☆

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Zev A.; Johnson, Michael W.; Joshi, Avadhut; Hann, Christine L; Griffin, Constance A.; Olivi, Alessandro; Riggins, Gregory J.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Muir–Torre syndrome (MTS) is an autosomal dominant subtype of nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) characterized by the development of sebaceous gland tumors and visceral malignancies. The most common subtype of MTS is characterized by germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes leading to microsatellite instability (MSI). Central nervous system tumors have only rarely been associated with MTS. In this report, we describe the development of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a patient with MTS. Immunohistochemical analysis of the patient's colon carcinoma and his GBM both revealed loss of the mismatch repair proteins mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) and mutS homolog 6 (MSH6). PMID:21288634

  13. An innovative nurse education program in the Torres Strait Islands.

    PubMed

    Usher, Kim; Lindsay, David; Mackay, Wendy

    2005-08-01

    As the most numerous and geographically dispersed professional group, registered nurses in Australia work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and other members of the multidisciplinary team in a variety of practice contexts to provide health care to Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. Despite the introduction of a variety of recruitment and proactive support strategies by employers, universities and State and Commonwealth governments, few Indigenous people in Australia enrol in, and graduate from, entry level higher education courses in the health professions. The reasons for this are complex and, as yet, not well understood or described; however, it is clear that the well-documented execrable health status of Indigenous Australians demands a response from universities, which are largely responsible for the education of health professionals. An innovative model of registered nurse education in the Torres Strait region of Australia is reported in this paper. A satellite campus established by James Cook University (JCU) on Thursday Island delivers the undergraduate nursing course by mixed mode, supplemented by specific strategies designed to improve Indigenous student recruitment and retention and thus increase the likelihood of graduation. The course and the strategies implemented are discussed in this paper. PMID:15967543

  14. Bedload parting in western Torres Strait, northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James J.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a new style of bedload parting from western Torres Strait, northern Australia. Outputs from a hydrodynamic model identified an axis of bedload parting centred on the western Torres Strait islands (~142°15‧E). This bedload parting is similar to others documented from mixed tidal regimes as it is driven dominantly by the O1, K1 and M2 tidal constituents. However, parting is aided by overtides on the eastern, mixed semidiurnal side of the strait. Bedload parting is also strongly impacted by wind-driven currents. Wind-driven currents during the trade wind season lead to the average estimates of bedload transport to be directed west, through the strait, over the 8 year model duration. As a result, east and west directed bedload parting is only active during the monsoon season when the influence of wind-driven circulation is negligible. A simulation of bedload transport using a range of sediment grain sizes indicated that sediments with a grainsize greater than ~2 mm were transported in a direction consistent with tidally driven bedload parting, as opposed to residual wind-driven flow.

  15. Science and Technology Teachers' Opinions about Problems Faced While Teaching 8th Grade Science Unit "Force and Motion" and Suggestions for Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Uzoglu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the problems encountered while teaching force and motion unit in 8th grade science and technology course from teachers' perspectives and offer solutions to eliminate these problems. The study was conducted with 248 science and technology teachers working in 7 regions in Turkey in 2012-2013 academic year.…

  16. Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes. Proceedings of the Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum. (8th, San Francisco, California, May 6-9, 1968.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    The theme of the 8th Annual Forum on Institutional Research was "Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes" -- intended as a continuation of the 1966 Forum discussion dealing with academic inputs and the 1967 Forum on the instructional process. After an address by the Association's president in which he urged his academic colleagues to…

  17. On the Relationship between Bonding Theory and Youth Gang Resistance in U.S. 8th Graders: Competing Structural Equation Models with Latent Structure Indirect Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Horst, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In a study of 5285 8th graders from the Gang Resistance and Education Training (G.R.E.A.T.) research, this study applied Travis Hirschi's social bonding theory to examine the curriculum's efficacy in increasing conventional bonding (friends with positive peers, succeeding at education etc.) and decreasing non-conventional bonding (drug…

  18. The Effect of Using the Constructivist Learning Model in Teaching Science on the Achievement and Scientific Thinking of 8th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qarareh, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of using constructivist learning model in teaching science, especially in the subject of light: its nature, mirrors, lens, and properties, on the achievement of eighth-grade students and their scientific thinking. The study sample consisted of (136) male and female 8th graders were chosen from two basic…

  19. Gender and Ethnic Differences in Smoking, Drinking and Illicit Drug Use among American 8th, 10th and 12th Grade Students, 1976-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, John M., Jr.; Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John E.; Cooper, Shauna M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2003-01-01

    Paper examines ethnic differences in licit and illicit drug use among American 8th, 10th, and 12th grade students, with a particular focus on girls. Across ethnic groups, drug use is highest among Native American girls and lowest among black and Asian American girls. Trend data suggest that girls' and boys' drug use patterns are converging.…

  20. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 8th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop, Milwaukee, WI, USA, 17-20 December 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bruce

    2004-10-01

    It is now almost two decades since Bernard Schutz organized a landmark meeting on data analysis for gravitational wave detectors at the University of Cardiff, UK [1]. The proceedings of that meeting make interesting reading. Among the issues discussed were optimal ways to carry out searches for binary inspiral signals, and ways in which the projected growth in computer speed, memory and networking bandwidth would influence searches for gravitational wave signals. The Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop traces its history to the mid-1990s. With the construction of the US LIGO detectors and the European GEO and VIRGO detectors already underway, Kip Thorne and Sam Finn realized that it was important for the world-wide data analysis community to start discussing some of the big unsettled issues in analysis. What was the optimal way to perform a pulsar search? To ensure confident detection, how accurately did binary inspiral waveforms have to be calculated? It was largely Kip and Sam's initiative that got the GWDAW started. The first (official) GWDAW was hosted by Rai Weiss at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA in 1996, as a follow-on to an informal meeting organized in the previous year by Sam Finn. I have pleasant memories of this first MIT GWDAW. I was new to the field and remember my excitement at learning that I had many colleagues interested in (and working on) the important issues. I also remember how refreshing it was to hear a pair of talks by Pia Astone and Marialessandra Papa who were not only studying methods but had actually carried out serious pulsar and burst searches using data from the Rome resonant bar detectors. A lot has changed since then. This issue is the Proceedings of the 8th Annual Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop, held on 17-20 December 2003 at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA. Many of the contributions concern technical details of the analysis of real data from resonant mass and interferometric detectors

  1. PREFACE: EUCAS '07: The 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Brussels Expo, Belgium, 16 20 September 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoste, Serge; Donaldson, Gordon; Ausloos, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SuST) contains plenary and invited papers presented at the 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '07) held in Brussels, Belgium between 16-20 September 2007. All the papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings and accepted by the referees are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS). The scientific aims of EUCAS '07 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen (Germany), Edinburgh (United Kingdom), Eindhoven (The Netherlands), Sitges (Spain), Lyngby (Denmark), Sorrento (Italy) and Vienna (Austria). The focus was on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. Under the guidance of ESAS (the European Society for Applied Superconductivity), this Brussels conference was jointly organized by the University of Ghent and the University of Liège and attracted 795 participants to the scientific programme, including 173 students. Participants from 46 countries included considerable attendance from the Far East (30%) and from the United States and Canada (7%). The latest developments from 30 companies were presented, and 13 plenary and 28 invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the area of materials (large- as well as small-scale applications were presented). A total of 347 papers from those submitted were selected for publication in JPCS and SuST. EUCAS '07 stimulated optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and its technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this conference. In addition, it gave the leading scientific authorities a forum in which

  2. Performance Evaluation of a Loeb-Eiber Mass Filter at 1 Torr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jin, Feng; Pedder, Randall E.; Taormina, Christopher; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-02-01

    The Loeb-Eiber mass filter is best operated at relatively high pressures—such as 1 Torr—where collisional dampening of ions up to the mass filter thermalizes the ions' kinetic energy, which is a requirement for effective filtering. The inter-electrode gaps of ~8 μm require rf amplitudes on the order of 0-5 V p-p at approximately 50 MHz to achieve mass filtering up to m/z 40. Mass filtering between the 25-μm diameter wires, therefore, takes place on time frames less than the collision frequency at ~1 Torr. The low power and high pressure capabilities of the Loeb-Eiber mass filter make it ideally suited for miniaturization, where power and space are a premium. In the present work, a Loeb-Eiber mass filter was constructed using commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microfabrication techniques. Ions transmitting through the chip-based Loeb-Eiber mass filter were characterized in real time using a traditional linear quadrupole mass analyzer in series with the Loeb-Eiber mass filter. The new hybrid instrument has enabled us to verify several important claims regarding the operation of the Loeb-Eiber mass filter: (1) that ions can be effectively filtered at ~1 Torr, (2) that for ions of a fixed mass-to-charge ratio, the ion transmission current decreases linearly with increasing rf amplitude on the Loeb-Eiber mass filter, (3) that the cutoff voltage at which all ions of a particular m/z value are effectively blocked is linearly related to mass-to-charge, and (4) that square waveforms can filter ions more effectively than sinusoidal waveforms for a given peak-to-peak rf amplitude.

  3. Genetic research and aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Emma; Pearson, Glenn; Rouhani, Lobna; Peacock, Chris S; Jamieson, Sarra E; Blackwell, Jenefer M

    2012-12-01

    While human genetic research promises to deliver a range of health benefits to the population, genetic research that takes place in Indigenous communities has proven controversial. Indigenous peoples have raised concerns, including a lack of benefit to their communities, a diversion of attention and resources from non-genetic causes of health disparities and racism in health care, a reinforcement of "victim-blaming" approaches to health inequalities, and possible misuse of blood and tissue samples. Drawing on the international literature, this article reviews the ethical issues relevant to genetic research in Indigenous populations and considers how some of these have been negotiated in a genomic research project currently under way in a remote Aboriginal community. We consider how the different levels of Indigenous research governance operating in Australia impacted on the research project and discuss whether specific guidelines for the conduct of genetic research in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are warranted.

  4. Torres strait islanders and Australian nationhood: Some educational perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Alan

    1992-01-01

    This article analyses the role of education in incorporating Australia's Melanesian minority, the Torres Strait Islanders, into the Australian nation. The analysis begins with the introduction of Queensland government schooling into Torres Strait in 1892, which fostered expectations of Queensland citizenship and employment opportunities available to other races in the economy of the Strait. From 1904 to the outbreak of world war II in the Pacific in 1942 these early directions were altered by educational policies which initially sought to train Islanders for a life in the Islands as a "race apart" from the rest of Australia. Subsequent syllabus reforms, paralleling but not equalling regular schooling offered in Queensland, did not meet Islanders' aspirations for "proper schooling" and the jobs they expected would flow from it. Following world war II, regulations confining Islanders to the Strait were relaxed and many migrated to the Queensland mainland in search of better jobs, better pay, and better education for their children. Those who remained in the Islands received an education which, by 1985, had been brought up to the mainland standard. Yet, neither group's educational aspirations were satisfied despite initiatives and financial incentives of the Commonwealth government aimed at keeping Islander children at school. The article concludes that the way ahead for Islanders in staking out their educational future in the Australian nation on a basis of equality with other Australians lies in educational developments in the Islands themselves, where Islanders are playing an active role in developing, managing, and guiding schooling in directions which recognise their identity and their citizenship aspirations.

  5. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy, held in Bad Essen, Germany, from 15 18th August 2005, attracted a record breaking number of participants presenting excellent contributions from a variety of scientific fields. This clearly demonstrated the high level of activity and innovation present in the community of NC-AFM researchers and the continuous growth of the field. The strongest ever participation of companies for a NC-AFM meeting is a sign for the emergence of new markets for the growing NC-AFM community; and the high standard of the products presented at the exhibition, many of them brand-new developments, reflected the unbroken progress in technology. The development of novel technologies and the sophistication of known techniques in research laboratories and their subsequent commercialization is still a major driving force for progress in this area of nanoscience. The conference was a perfect demonstration of how progress in the development of enabling technologies can readily be transcribed into basic research yielding fundamental insight with an impact across disciplines. The NC-AFM 2005 scientific programme was based on five cornerstones, each representing an area of vivid research and scientific progress. Atomic resolution imaging on oxide surfaces, which has long been a vision for the catalysis community, appears to be routine in several laboratories and after a period of demonstrative experiments NC-AFM now makes unique contributions to the understanding of processes in surface chemistry. These capabilities also open up new routes for the analysis of clusters and molecules deposited on dielectric surfaces where resolution limits are pushed towards the single atom level. Atomic precision manipulation with the dynamic AFM left the cradle of its infancy and flourishes in the family of bottom-up fabrication nanotechnologies. The systematic development of established and the introduction of new concepts of contrast

  6. High Pressure Mass Spectrometry: The Generation of Mass Spectra at Operating Pressures Exceeding 1 Torr in a Microscale Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Kenion H; Wolfe, Derek W; Cavanaugh, Craig A; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    We present the first demonstration of high pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS), which we define as mass spectrometry performed at pressures greater than 100 mTorr. Mass analysis is shown at operational pressures exceeding 1 Torr of helium buffer gas. A differentially pumped MS system was constructed for HPMS development consisting of two chambers. The first chamber (mass analysis chamber) was operated at pressures up to 1.2 Torr and contained the ionization source and a microscale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. The CIT had critical dimensions of r0 = 500 μm and z0 = 650 μm. The second chamber was held at a lower pressure (≤10 mTorr) and contained an electron multiplier for detection. Mass spectra for xenon, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and octane were acquired with helium buffer gas pressures ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 Torr in the mass analysis chamber. Full-width at half-maximum of mass spectral peaks was found to increase 143% for xenon, 40% for CEES, and 77% for octane over this pressure range, with maximum peak widths of 1.19, 1.26, and 0.82 Da, respectively. Data were fitted with an algebraic model that factors in ion-neutral collision peak broadening effects at high pressures. Experimental and theoretical peak broadening slopes showed good agreement at buffer gas pressures greater than 0.2 Torr. Experiments presented here demonstrate mass spectrometry at pressures orders of magnitude higher than conventionally practiced with any type of mass analyzer. The use of HPMS provides a way to eliminate turbo pumping requirements, leading to significant reduction in MS system size, weight, and power and facilitating a path toward compact/hand-held mass spectrometers with numerous potential applications.

  7. High Pressure Mass Spectrometry: The Generation of Mass Spectra at Operating Pressures Exceeding 1 Torr in a Microscale Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Kenion H; Wolfe, Derek W; Cavanaugh, Craig A; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    We present the first demonstration of high pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS), which we define as mass spectrometry performed at pressures greater than 100 mTorr. Mass analysis is shown at operational pressures exceeding 1 Torr of helium buffer gas. A differentially pumped MS system was constructed for HPMS development consisting of two chambers. The first chamber (mass analysis chamber) was operated at pressures up to 1.2 Torr and contained the ionization source and a microscale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. The CIT had critical dimensions of r0 = 500 μm and z0 = 650 μm. The second chamber was held at a lower pressure (≤10 mTorr) and contained an electron multiplier for detection. Mass spectra for xenon, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and octane were acquired with helium buffer gas pressures ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 Torr in the mass analysis chamber. Full-width at half-maximum of mass spectral peaks was found to increase 143% for xenon, 40% for CEES, and 77% for octane over this pressure range, with maximum peak widths of 1.19, 1.26, and 0.82 Da, respectively. Data were fitted with an algebraic model that factors in ion-neutral collision peak broadening effects at high pressures. Experimental and theoretical peak broadening slopes showed good agreement at buffer gas pressures greater than 0.2 Torr. Experiments presented here demonstrate mass spectrometry at pressures orders of magnitude higher than conventionally practiced with any type of mass analyzer. The use of HPMS provides a way to eliminate turbo pumping requirements, leading to significant reduction in MS system size, weight, and power and facilitating a path toward compact/hand-held mass spectrometers with numerous potential applications. PMID:27109864

  8. Chemistry to music: Discovering how Music-based Teaching affects academic achievement and student motivation in an 8th grade science class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, William Gavin Lodge, Jr.

    Teachers should have access to new and innovative tools in order to engage and motivate their students in the classroom. This is especially important as many students view school as an antiquated and dull environment - which they must seemingly suffer through to advance. School need not be a dreaded environment. The use of music as a tool for learning can be employed by any teacher to create an engaging and exciting atmosphere where students actively participate and learn to value their classroom experience. Through this study, a product and process was developed that is now available for any 8th grade science teacher interested in using music to enhance their content. In this study 8th grade students (n=41) in a public school classroom actively interacted with modern songs created to enhance the teaching of chemistry. Data were collected and analyzed in order to determine the effects that the music treatment had on student achievement and motivation, compared to a control group (n=35). Current literature provides a foundation for the benefits for music listening and training, but academic research in the area of using music as a tool for teaching content was noticeably absent. This study identifies a new area of research called "Music-based Teaching" which results in increases in motivation for 8th grade students learning chemistry. The unintended results of the study are additionally significant as the teacher conducting the treatment experienced newfound enthusiasm, passion, and excitement for her profession.

  9. 25 CFR 162.502 - Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations... Torres-Martinez Reservations, California. (a) Upon a determination by the Secretary that the owner or owners are not making beneficial use thereof, restricted lands on the Cabazon, Augustine, and...

  10. Improving the Participation and Engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students in Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dang, Thi Kim Anh; Vitartas, Peter; Ambrose, Kurt; Millar, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Most Australian universities have among their goals to increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at their institutions. In the Australian higher education context, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are seriously under-represented, particularly in business education compared to other disciplines. An…

  11. 25 CFR 162.502 - Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations... Torres-Martinez Reservations, California. (a) Upon a determination by the Secretary that the owner or...-Martinez Indian Reservations which are or may be irrigated from distribution facilities administered by...

  12. 25 CFR 162.502 - Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations... Torres-Martinez Reservations, California. (a) Upon a determination by the Secretary that the owner or...-Martinez Indian Reservations which are or may be irrigated from distribution facilities administered by...

  13. 25 CFR 162.502 - Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations... Torres-Martinez Reservations, California. (a) Upon a determination by the Secretary that the owner or...-Martinez Indian Reservations which are or may be irrigated from distribution facilities administered by...

  14. 25 CFR 162.602 - Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cabazon, Augustine, and Torres-Martinez Reservations... Torres-Martinez Reservations, California. (a) Upon a determination by the Secretary that the owner or...-Martinez Indian Reservations which are or may be irrigated from distribution facilities administered by...

  15. Effective Teaching Practices for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Natalie J.; Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis; Osborne, Barry; Boon, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature pertaining to the teacher actions that influence Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander student learning outcomes. This review investigates two foci: the identification of teacher actions influencing learning outcomes for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students and the methodological…

  16. Legally invisible: stewardship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health

    PubMed Central

    Howse, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The need to improve access to good health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has been the subject of policy debate for decades, but progress is hampered by complex policy and administrative arrangements and lack of clarity about the responsibilities of governments. This study aimed to identify the current legal basis of those responsibilities and define options available to Australian governments to enact enduring responsibility for Aboriginal health care. Methods: This study used a framework for public health law research and conducted a mapping study to examine the current legal underpinnings for stewardship and governance for Aboriginal health and health care. More than 200 pieces of health legislation were analysed in the context of the common and statutory law and health policy goals. Results: Very little specific recognition of the needs of Aboriginal people was found, and nothing that creates responsibility for stewardship and governance. The continuing absence of a legislative framework to address and protect Aboriginal health can be traced back to the founding doctrine of terra nullius (unoccupied land). Conclusions: We considered the results applying both a human rights perspective and the perspective of therapeutic jurisprudence. We suggest that national law for health stewardship would provide a strong foundation for progress, and should itself be based on recognition of Australia's First Peoples in the Australian Constitution, as is currently proposed. PMID:25903648

  17. Proceedings of the Symposium on Training of Nuclear Facility Personnel (8th, Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24-27, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge National Lab., TN.

    Education-related titles among the 56 papers are "Panel Discussion: Plant Expectation of Training" (Sellman, Zach, Cross); "Managing Training AT&T" (Solomon); "Training Management Systems" (Waylett); "Managing the Training Function" (Wiggin); "Training Management" (Newton); Three Alternative Simulation Systems for Training Nuclear Power Plant…

  18. Geographical Variation in Health-Related Physical Fitness and Body Composition among Chilean 8th Graders: A Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Michael D.; Sajuria, Marcelo; Lobelo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In addition to excess adiposity, low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and low musculoskeletal fitness (MSF) are important independent risk factors for future cardio-metabolic disease in adolescents, yet global fitness surveillance in adolescents is poor. The objective of this study was to describe and investigate geographical variation in levels of health-related physical fitness, including CRF, MSF, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC) in Chilean 8th graders. Methods This cross-sectional study was based on a population-based, representative sample of 19,929 8th graders (median age = 14 years) in the 2011 National Physical Education Survey from Chile. CRF was assessed with the 20-meter shuttle run test, MSF with standing broad jump, and body composition with BMI and WC. Data were classified according to health-related standards. Prevalence of levels of health-related physical fitness was mapped for each of the four variables, and geographical variation was explored at the country level by region and in the Santiago Metropolitan Area by municipality. Results Girls had significantly higher prevalence of unhealthy CRF, MSF, and BMI than boys (p<0.05). Overall, 26% of boys and 55% of girls had unhealthy CRF, 29% of boys and 35% of girls had unhealthy MSF, 29% of boys and 44% of girls had unhealthy BMI, and 31% of adolescents had unhealthy WC. High prevalence of unhealthy fitness levels concentrates in the northern and middle regions of the country and in the North and Southwest sectors for the Santiago Metropolitan Area. Conclusion Prevalence of unhealthy CRF, MSF, and BMI is relatively high among Chilean 8th graders, especially in girls, when compared with global estimates. Identification of geographical regions and municipalities with high prevalence of unhealthy physical fitness presents opportunity for targeted intervention. PMID:25255442

  19. Meeting highlights of the 8th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society For Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, January 21 to 23, 2005.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M; Friedrich, Matthias G; Neubauer, Stefan; Stuber, Matthias; Geva, Tal; Higgins, Charles B; Manning, Warren J

    2005-08-01

    Parallel tracks for clinical scientists, basic scientists, and pediatric imagers was the novel approach taken for the highly successful 8th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, held in San Francisco, California, January 21 to 23, 2005. Attendees were immersed in information on the latest scientific advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) from mice to man and technological advances from systems with field strengths from 0.5 T to 11.7 T. State-of-the-art applications were reviewed, spanning a wide range from molecular imaging to predicting outcome with CMR in large patient populations.

  20. The 8th international symposium on the breast: Using next-generation science to understand the normal breast and the development of breast cancer- conference report.

    PubMed

    Gomberawalla, Ameer; Love, Susan

    2015-12-01

    Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation is committed to performing and advancing research that will lead to the discovery of what causes cancer to develop in the human breast. As part of this effort, the Foundation hosted the 8th International Symposium on the Breast in Santa Monica, Calif., Feb. 19 to Feb. 21, 2015. More than 120 forward-thinking clinical researchers, epidemiologists, pathologists, basic scientists, translational investigators, and breast cancer advocates from six countries attended this year's conference, "Using Next Generation Science to Understand the Normal Breast and the Development of Cancer." The highlights from this year's symposium are summarized in this report.

  1. Reconciling Mixed Methods Approaches with a Community Narrative Model for Educational Research Involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakich, Eva; Watt, Tony; Hooley, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Researching the education of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Australian schools is an exceedingly difficult and uncompromising task. Working respectfully with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities must remain top priority with any research project regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewpoints of…

  2. The study of pressure measurement techniques and devices in the range of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure range was studied in a region where conventional pressure sensing devices do not provide meaningful measurements. However, a hot filament gauge was developed and miniaturized which will measure the pressure in the 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi) region, hence the name Micropsi gauge. Laboratory studies were made comparing the currently available devices with the newly developed miniature low power 'Micropsi' pressure sensor.

  3. High mountain soils and periglacial features at the Torres del Paine, National Park Torres del Paine, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senra, Eduardo; Schaefer, Carlos; Simas, Felipe; Gjorup, Davi

    2015-04-01

    The Torres del Paine National Park (TPNP) is located on the southern limit of the Andean Southern Ice Field, part of the Magallanes and Antartica Chilena region, in the province of Ultima Esperanza. The TPNP has a very heterogeneous climate due to orographic influence and wet air masses from the Pacific. The geology is basically Cretaceous metasedimentary rocks and Miocene granitic plutons and batholiths. We studied the main soils and geoenvironments of Mt Ferrier mountain and its surroundings, based on soils , landforms and vegetation aspects. The geoenvironmental stratification was based on the combined variation and integration of pedo-litho-geomorphological features with the vegetation. WE used detailed geological maps, a DEM and slope maps and WorlView II satellite images. Fifteen soils profiles were sampled and classified according to Soil Taxonomy (2010) at all genovironments, ranging from 50 m a.s.l to the at high plateau just below the permanent snowline, under periglacial conditions (~1004m asl). Three soil temperature and moisture monitoring sites were set, allowing for 24 consecutive months (2011 to 2013). Seven geoenvironments were identified with distinct soil and landform characteristics, all with a similar geological substrate. The landform and vegetation have a strong connection with the landscape dynamic, controlling erosional and depositional processes, resulting from glacier advances and retreats in the Late Quaternary. Wind blown materials is widespread, in the form of loess material, accumulating in the higher parts of the landscape. On the other hand, accumulation of organic matter in the water-saturated depressions is common in all altitudes. Generally the soils are acidic and dystrophic, with little exceptions. The following geoenvironments were identified: Periglacial Tundra, Loess slopes, Talus and scarpmentd, Fluvio-glacial terraces, Fluvio-lacustrine plains, Moraines and Paleodunes. The regional pedology show the occurrence of five soil

  4. Longitudinal Study of Career Cluster Persistence from 8th Grade to 12th Grade with a Focus on the Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math Career Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Judson

    Today's technology driven global economy has put pressure on the American education system to produce more students who are prepared for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Adding to this pressure is the demand for a more diverse workforce that can stimulate the development of new ideas and innovation. This in turn requires more female and under represented minority groups to pursue future careers in STEM. Though STEM careers include many of the highest paid professionals, school systems are dealing with exceptionally high numbers of students, especially female and under represented minorities, who begin but do not persist to STEM degree completion. Using the Expectancy-Value Theory (EVT) framework that attributes student motivation to a combination of intrinsic, utility, and attainment values, this study analyzed readily available survey data to gauge students' career related values. These values were indirectly investigated through a longitudinal approach, spanning five years, on the predictive nature of 8 th grade survey-derived recommendations for students to pursue a future in a particular career cluster. Using logistic regression analysis, it was determined that this 8 th grade data, particularly in STEM, provides significantly high probabilities of a 12th grader's average grade, SAT-Math score, the math and science elective courses they take, and most importantly, interest in the same career cluster.

  5. Essential service standards for equitable national cardiovascular care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex; O'Shea, Rebekah L; Mott, Kathy; McBride, Katharine F; Lawson, Tony; Jennings, Garry L R

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) constitute the largest cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and remain the primary contributor to life expectancy differentials between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians. As such, CVD remains the most critical target for reducing the life expectancy gap. The Essential Service Standards for Equitable National Cardiovascular Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (ESSENCE) outline elements of care that are necessary to reduce disparity in access and outcomes for five critical cardiovascular conditions. The ESSENCE approach builds a foundation on which the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians can be reduced. The standards purposefully focus on the prevention and management of CVD extending across the continuum of risk and disease. Each of the agreed essential service standards are presented alongside the most critical targets for policy development and health system reform aimed at mitigating population disparity in CVD and related conditions.

  6. Auxiliary titanium sublimation pump produces ultrahigh /10 to the minus 11 torr/ vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Sublimated titanium as a gettering agent in conjunction with a turbine-type pump provides a two-step procedure for obtaining an ultrahigh vacuum of 10 to the minus 11 torr. The pump alone evacuates the chamber to a pressure of 10 to the minus 9 torr. The residual gas is removed by the gettering agent at a pumping speed of 15 liters per second per square inch.

  7. Risk factors for cancer in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castles, Simon; Wainer, Zoe; Jayasekara, Harindra

    2016-01-01

    Cancer incidence in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is higher and survival lower compared with non-Indigenous Australians. A proportion of these cancers are potentially preventable if factors associated with carcinogenesis are known and successfully avoided. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to examine risk factors for cancer in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Electronic databases Medline, Web of Science and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Bibliographic Index were searched through August 2014 using broad search terms. Studies reporting a measure of association between a risk factor and any cancer site in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population were eligible for inclusion. Ten studies (1991-2014) were identified, mostly with small sample sizes, showing marked heterogeneity in terms of methods used to assess exposure and capture outcomes, and often using descriptive comparative analyses. Relatively young (as opposed to elderly) and geographically remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were found to be at increased risk for selected cancers while most modifiable lifestyle and behavioural risk factors were rarely assessed. Further studies examining associations between potential risk factors and cancer will help define public health policy for cancer prevention in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. PMID:27118100

  8. Risk factors for cancer in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castles, Simon; Wainer, Zoe; Jayasekara, Harindra

    2016-01-01

    Cancer incidence in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is higher and survival lower compared with non-Indigenous Australians. A proportion of these cancers are potentially preventable if factors associated with carcinogenesis are known and successfully avoided. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to examine risk factors for cancer in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Electronic databases Medline, Web of Science and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Bibliographic Index were searched through August 2014 using broad search terms. Studies reporting a measure of association between a risk factor and any cancer site in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population were eligible for inclusion. Ten studies (1991-2014) were identified, mostly with small sample sizes, showing marked heterogeneity in terms of methods used to assess exposure and capture outcomes, and often using descriptive comparative analyses. Relatively young (as opposed to elderly) and geographically remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were found to be at increased risk for selected cancers while most modifiable lifestyle and behavioural risk factors were rarely assessed. Further studies examining associations between potential risk factors and cancer will help define public health policy for cancer prevention in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

  9. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored, from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view, since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical relativistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Lindner et al [Physical Review Letters 95 0040401 (2005)] as well as the more recent proposal of Palacios et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)] and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg [Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)] could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular

  10. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored, from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view, since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical relativistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Lindner et al [Physical Review Letters 95 0040401 (2005)] as well as the more recent proposal of Palacios et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)] and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg [Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)] could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular

  11. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  12. Rates of Substance Use of American Indian Students in 8th, 10th, and 12th Grades Living on or Near Reservations: Update, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Susan D.; Swaim, Randall C.; Beauvais, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the similarities and differences between substance use rates for American Indian (AI) young people and young people nationally can better inform prevention and treatment efforts. We compared substance use rates for a large sample of AI students living on or near reservations for the years 2009–2012 with national prevalence rates from Monitoring the Future (MTF). Methods We identified and sampled schools on or near AI reservations by region; 1,399 students in sampled schools were administered the American Drug and Alcohol Survey. We computed lifetime, annual, and last-month prevalence measures by grade and compared them with MTF results for the same time period. Results Prevalence rates for AI students were significantly higher than national rates for nearly all substances, especially for 8th graders. Rates of marijuana use were very high, with lifetime use higher than 50% for all grade groups. Other findings of interest included higher binge drinking rates and OxyContin® use for AI students. Conclusions The results from this study demonstrate that adolescent substance use is still a major problem among reservation-based AI adolescent students, especially 8th graders, where prevalence rates were sometimes dramatically higher than MTF rates. Given the high rates of substance use-related problems on reservations, such as academic failure, delinquency, violent criminal behavior, suicidality, and alcohol-related mortality, the costs to members of this population and to society will continue to be much too high until a comprehensive understanding of the root causes of substance use are established. PMID:24587550

  13. Changing discourses in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, 1914-2014.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David P; Bainbridge, Roxanne; Tsey, Komla

    2014-07-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people strongly assert that health research has contributed little to improving their health, in spite of its obvious potential. The health concerns of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were largely ignored in early research published in the MJA, which reflected broader colonial history and racial discourses. This began to change with the demise of scientific racism, and changed policies and political campaigns for equal treatment of Indigenous people after the Second World War. In response to pressure from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations, in parallel to broader political struggles for Indigenous rights since the 1970s, there have been significant and measurable changes to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research. Many of these changes have been about the ethics of health research. Increasingly, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers, communities and organisations are now controlling and decolonising health research to better meet their needs, in collaboration with non-Indigenous researchers and research organisations.

  14. Effective communication tools to engage Torres Strait Islanders in scientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Barnett, B.; Williams, A. J.; Grayson, J.; Busilacchi, S.; Duckworth, A.; Evans-Illidge, E.; Begg, G. A.; Murchie, C. D.

    2008-09-01

    Often, research activities in Torres Strait have not delivered full benefit to Torres Strait Islanders due to a lack of consultation, ineffectual communication of research information and lack of empathy for the needs of Islander communities. As for other stakeholder groups, integration of Islanders into the research process through practical involvement in research may overcome these problems. Three case studies from research projects conducted in Torres Strait are discussed to highlight a variety of communication and engagement activities carried out by non-Indigenous researchers. How these communication and extension activities facilitate collaboration between Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous researchers provides insight in the importance of these activities to the relative success of research projects. The benefits for Islanders in collaborating with researchers may be: improved understanding of the research and how it contributes to natural resource management; a sense of control in future management decisions; a greater likelihood of successful self-regulatory management systems; enhanced skills; and increased employment opportunities. The potential benefits for researchers are enhanced support for research projects resulting in increased access to data and logistic support that may ultimately impact the successful completion of projects. Such an approach will require researchers to take time to develop relationships with Torres Strait Islanders, effectively involve Islanders in research on an equitable basis and be flexible. This will ultimately require funding organisations to recognise the importance of such activities in research proposals and provide support through sufficient funding to enable these activities to be carried out.

  15. Integrated global background monitoring network. Preliminary results from Torres del Paine and Olympic National Parks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, G.B.; Kohler, A.; Boelcke, C.; Baker, G.; Harmon, M.; Weber, C.; Gonzales, J.

    1985-10-01

    During 1984, a pilot project was initiated for monitoring pollution at Torres del Paine National Park in southern Chile and Olympic National Park in the United States. These are two of three initial sites that are to be established as part of an integrated global backgound monitoring network. Eventually, the plan is to establish a world-wide system of such sites. We collected and analyzed samples of the soil, water, air, and two species of plants (moss and lichen). We also collected and analyzed samples of the forest litter. We compared the samples of soil and vegetation against reference samples. We also compared samples of soil, vegetation, and of organic material from Torres del Paine against similar samples from Olympic and Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks in the United States. Although the data is preliminary, it is in agreement with out initial hypothesis that Torres del Paine and Olympic National Parks are not a polluted sites.

  16. Smoking and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Māori children.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David P; Glover, Marewa

    2010-09-01

    Smoking and the deaths and suffering it causes are more common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and Māori than other Australians and New Zealanders. While, many tobacco control activities that are not specifically targeted at children will have a positive impact on child health, this review concentrates on recent tobacco control research on pregnant women and children. The important tasks are to reduce smoking by pregnant Māori and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to reduce infant and child exposure to second-hand smoke and to reduce smoking initiation of children and adolescents. Health professionals who want to reduce the suffering caused by smoking among Māori and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children can be guided by much new relevant research evidence and clear frameworks about how to approach tobacco control in these communities.

  17. Acceptability of Mental Health Apps for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Patj Patj Janama Robert; Dingwall, Kylie Maree; Lowell, Anne; Singer, Judy; Rotumah, Darlene; Bennett-Levy, James; Nagel, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Background Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians experience high rates of mental illness and psychological distress compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. E-mental health tools offer an opportunity for accessible, effective, and acceptable treatment. The AIMhi Stay Strong app and the ibobbly suicide prevention app are treatment tools designed to combat the disproportionately high levels of mental illness and stress experienced within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. Objective This study aimed to explore Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members’ experiences of using two culturally responsive e-mental health apps and identify factors that influence the acceptability of these approaches. Methods Using qualitative methods aligned with a phenomenological approach, we explored the acceptability of two culturally responsive e-mental health apps through a series of three 3-hour focus groups with nine Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members. Thematic analysis was conducted and coresearcher and member checking were used to verify findings. Results Findings suggest strong support for the concept of e-mental health apps and optimism for their potential. Factors that influenced acceptability related to three key themes: personal factors (eg, motivation, severity and awareness of illness, technological competence, and literacy and language differences), environmental factors (eg, community awareness, stigma, and availability of support), and app characteristics (eg, ease of use, content, graphics, access, and security and information sharing). Specific adaptations, such as local production, culturally relevant content and graphics, a purposeful journey, clear navigation, meaningful language, options to assist people with language differences, offline use, and password protection may aid uptake. Conclusions When designed to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, e-mental health

  18. Study by Mars Express of the Response of the Martian Ionosphere to a Strong CME Directly Detected by MAVEN on March 8th, 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Halekas, J. S.; DeJong, W.; Ertl, C.; Venable, A.; Wilkinson, C.; Lundin, R. N. A.; Frahm, R. A.; Winningham, D.; Plaut, J. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study summarizes the effects of a strong coronal mass ejection (CME) on Mars as detected by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) in the solar wind and by Mars Express (MEX) in the nightside ionosphere. The Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) onboard MAVEN identified a strong CME on March 8th, 2015, characterized by an increase in the solar wind density and solar wind speeds up to about 800 km/s. Simultaneously with the MAVEN observations, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on MEX detected unusually high local electron density and local magnetic field values in the nightside Martian ionosphere. The Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) on Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) instrument, also on MEX, saw a sharp CME front followed by an increase in the ion speed and a sharp enhancement in the electron flux seen by the ASPERA-3 Electron Spectrometer (ELS) signals the CME. ASPERA-3 data also suggest an increase in the plasma temperature when the shock hits Mars. Finally, the peak ionospheric density obtained with MARSIS remote sounding exhibits a discrete enhancement over a period of about 30 hrs around the same latitude and local time. We believe that this high density ionospheric plasma is forced by the CME from dayside to the nightside towards high altitudes.

  19. Evaluation of the pilot phase of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Module.

    PubMed

    Tsey, Komla; Chigeza, Philemon; Holden, Carol A; Bulman, Jack; Gruis, Hilton; Wenitong, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This article evaluates the pilot phase of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Module. Although men experience higher levels of illness and die younger than women, educational programs to support health workers utilise a gender-based approach to increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males in health care are rare and lack appropriate content. Recognising this gap in service provision, and under the guidance of a Reference Group comprising community leaders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait male health, a comprehensive and culturally appropriate Male Health Module has been developed to enhance the capacity of health workers to improve access to services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males. Methods used were: in-depth interviews with Module developers, pilot workshops for trainers and health workers, questionnaires and focus group discussions with workshop participants, and participant observations. As well as enhancing capacity to facilitate access to health services for men, the Module was deemed relevant because of its potential to promote health worker empowerment and wellbeing. Findings revealed that improving access to services for men required male and female health workers working in partnership. Despite overall enthusiasm for the Module, the findings also revealed deep fear that it would end up 'collecting dust on shelves'. Strategies to improve the Module quality and accessibility are highlighted.

  20. Supporting Australian Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Nursing Students Using Mentoring Circles: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jane; Felton-Busch, Catrina; Park, Tanya; Maza, Karen; Mills, Frances; Ghee, McCauley; Hitchins, Marnie; Chamberlain-Salaun, Jennifer; Neuendorf, Nalisa

    2014-01-01

    Attempts to recruit Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students into nursing degrees have made minimal impact on the number of registered nurses working in Australia's healthcare sector. Yet increasing the number of Indigenous nurses remains one of the most important objectives in strategies to close the health gap between Indigenous and…

  1. Guide to Success for Organisations in Achieving Employment Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddy, Kristine; Lopez, Jessica; Redman, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Helping Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander job-seekers find and keep a job has been the focus of recent reforms announced by the Australian Government. This guide describes seven essential characteristics of employment service organisations that lead to successful employment outcomes for their Indigenous clients. Based on a selection of…

  2. Developing Future Health Professionals' Capacities for Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrick, Antonia; Britton, Katherine Frances; Hoffman, Julie; Kickett, Marion

    2014-01-01

    This article details reflections of an interdisciplinary team of educators working with groups of health sciences students in preparing them for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The first-year common core unit discussed here is one attempt to equip future health practitioners with skills and knowledges to work adequately…

  3. 76 FR 66968 - Abelardo E. Lecompte-Torres, M.D. Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... registration. Steven B. Brown, 75 FR 65660, 65663 (2010) (citing John B. Freitas, 74 FR 17524, 17525 (2009)); Dominick A. Ricci, 58 FR 51104, 51105 (1993); Bobby Watts, 53 FR 11919, 11920 (1988). It is undisputed that... Enforcement Administration Abelardo E. Lecompte-Torres, M.D. Decision and Order On April 29, 2010, the...

  4. Introducing Torres Strait Island Dance to the Australian High School Physical Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out within the context of a requirement for every Australian Capital Territory Education and Training Directorate (ACT ETD) high school to include Indigenous perspectives across all areas of the curriculum. For the first time ever in the case study school reported in this article, two Torres Strait Island dances were taught…

  5. Contextualising the Teaching and Learning of Measurement within Torres Strait Islander Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Bronwyn; Cooper, Thomas J.; Baturo, Annette R.; Matthews, Chris; Sun, Huayu

    2010-01-01

    A one-year mathematics project that focused on measurement was conducted with six Torres Strait Islander schools and communities. Its key focus was to contextualise the teaching and learning of measurement within the students' culture, communities and home languages. Six teachers and two teacher aides participated in the project. This paper…

  6. New species of Nuuanu (Amphipoda: Nuuanuidae) from Norfolk Island, Torres Strait and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands.

    PubMed

    Hughes, L E; Bopiah, A

    2013-01-01

    Three new species of Nuuanu, N. quintalana sp. nov., N. stuckeyorun sp. nov. and N. titaseyi sp. nov. are described from Norfolk Island, Tasman Sea; Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Indian Ocean and the Torres Strait, Australia, respectively. There are currently 17 described species of Nuuanu with the genus distributed world-wide.

  7. Mathematics Funds of Knowledge: "Sotmaute" and "Sermaute" Fish in a Torres Strait Islander Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a project with one Torres Strait Islander Community. It provides some insights into parents' funds of knowledge that are mathematical in nature, such as sorting shells and giving fish. The idea of funds of knowledge is based on the premise that people are competent and have knowledge that has been…

  8. Indigenous Language Learning and Maintenance among Young Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdon, Sarah; McLeod, Sharynne

    2015-01-01

    Internationally, cultural renewal and language revitalisation are occurring among Indigenous people whose lands were colonised by foreign nations. In Australia, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are striving for the re-voicing of their mother tongue and the re-practicing of their mother culture to achieve cultural renewal in the…

  9. A Profile of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Student Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Judith; Wilson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together recent statistics relating to the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education. A number of key statistical realities relating to their enrolment into, retention during, and completion of, their university courses are depicted. Foremost among these realities is that despite…

  10. Structural compartmentalisation of a geothermal system, the Torre Alfina field (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignaroli, Gianluca; Pinton, Annamaria; De Benedetti, Arnaldo A.; Giordano, Guido; Rossetti, Federico; Soligo, Michele; Berardi, Gabriele

    2013-11-01

    Recent surging of renewed industrial interest in the exploration of low and medium enthalpy geothermal fields makes the accurate assessment of the geothermal potential essential to minimise uncertainties during both exploration and exploitation. The Torre Alfina field is a case of abandoned, but promising, geothermal field of central Italy where the roles of the internal structural setting and of the recharge areas on the hydrothermal circulation are largely unconstrained. In this paper, field structural data integrated with geomorphic lineament analysis document the occurrence of post-orogenic deformation structures controlling the compartmentalisation of the Torre Alfina geothermal field. Strike-slip and subordinate normal fault systems (with associated network fractures) cut and dislocate the internal architecture of the reservoir and prevent its hydraulic connection with Mount Cetona, considered to be the recharge area and where hydrothermal manifestation, including travertine deposition, occurs. 230Th/234U radiometric dating of superposed travertine units gives 200, 120 and 90 ka respectively, inferred to correspond to the age of the fossil hydrothermal circulation during tectonic activity. The results have been used for illustrating a new geological conceptual model for the Torre Alfina area where the geothermal system is composed of different compartments. Tectonic structures define the main boundaries between compartments, helping the understanding of why productive and non-productive wells were found in apparently similar structural settings within the Torre Alfina field.

  11. New species of Nuuanu (Amphipoda: Nuuanuidae) from Norfolk Island, Torres Strait and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands.

    PubMed

    Hughes, L E; Bopiah, A

    2013-01-01

    Three new species of Nuuanu, N. quintalana sp. nov., N. stuckeyorun sp. nov. and N. titaseyi sp. nov. are described from Norfolk Island, Tasman Sea; Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Indian Ocean and the Torres Strait, Australia, respectively. There are currently 17 described species of Nuuanu with the genus distributed world-wide. PMID:26287075

  12. Introduced marine species: Management arrangements of consideration for the Torres Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Kerry M.; Hilliard, Robert; Russell, Barry; Clark, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Introduced marine species (IMS) can have significant impacts on economic, ecological, social and cultural aspects of coastal marine environments. There is, therefore, a need to minimise these impacts through the implementation of comprehensive and consistent management strategies and monitoring processes that work towards preventing introductions, detecting introductions if they were to occur and managing incursions should they be detected. There is also the need to ensure that approaches taken are comparable to provide consistency of IMS management effort, particularly across areas that are multi-jurisdictional (e.g. spanning State or Territory borders). A number of studies have examined IMS, their vectors and management arrangements for the Torres Strait region, a multi-jurisdictional area between Queensland, Australia and Papua New Guinea. This paper presents information from a baseline survey conducted in the Torres Strait for marine pests in conjunction with a synthesis of information from other studies on IMS risks, their vectors and management strategies of relevance to the Torres Strait region. A number of strengths, but also gaps, between the various jurisdictions have been identified and discussed. Processes such as the establishment of Biosecurity Queensland as a specialist group and the development of the National System for the Prevention and Management of Marine Pest Incursions are occurring. However, the Torres Strait region is at current risk of marine pest inoculation, particularly for species such as Perna viridis, and management strategies to minimise this risk are lacking. The information presented here will assist management groups in their ability to work towards mitigating the risk of an IMS being translocated to and negatively impacting the unique and diverse ecology of the marine systems, and the industries, people and customs that rely on the coastal marine environment for food, recreation and commerce in the Torres Strait.

  13. Consultation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Early Childhood Education: The Impact of Colonial Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melinda G.

    2015-01-01

    In Australian early years education, consultation and partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are central to embedding Indigenous perspectives. Building sustained and reciprocal partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people supports access to local knowledges and perspectives to inform curriculum planning,…

  14. Proposal for the 8th Edition of the AJCC/UICC Staging System for Nasopharyngeal Cancer in the Era of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jian Ji; Ng, Wai Tong; Zong, Jing Feng; Chan, Lucy L. K.; O’Sullivan, Brian; Lin, Shao Jun; Sze, Henry C. K.; Chen, Yun Bin; Choi, Horace C.W.; Guo, Qiao Juan; Kan, Wai Kuen; Xiao, You Ping; Wei, Xu; Le, Quynh Thu; Glastonbury, Christine M.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Weber, Randal S.; Shah, Jatin P.; Lee, Anne W. M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An accurate staging system is crucial for cancer management. Evaluations for continual suitability and improvement are needed as staging and treatment methods evolve. METHODS This was a retrospective study of 1609 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, staged with the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/International Union Against Cancer (UICC) staging system, and irradiated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy at 2 centers in Hong Kong and mainland China. RESULTS Among the patients without other T3/T4 involvement, there were no significant differences in overall survival (OS) between medial pterygoid muscle (MP)±lateral pterygoid muscle (LP), prevertebral muscle, and parapharyngeal space involvement. Patients with extensive soft tissue involvement beyond the aforementioned structures had poor OS similar to that of patients with intracranial extension and/or cranial nerve palsy. Only 2% of the patients had lymph nodes>6cm above the supraclavicular fossa (SCF), and their outcomes resembled the outcomes of those with low extension. Replacing SCF with the lower neck (extension below the caudal border of the cricoid cartilage) did not affect the hazard distinction between different N categories. With the proposed T and N categories, there were no significant differences in outcome between T4N0-2 and T1-4N3 disease. CONCLUSIONS After a review by AJCC/UICC preparatory committees, the changes recommended for the 8th edition include changing MP/LP involvement from T4 to T2, adding prevertebral muscle involvement as T2, replacing SCF with the lower neck and merging this with a maximum nodal diameter>6 cm as N3, and merging T4 and N3 as stage IVA criteria. These changes will lead not only to a better distinction of hazards between adjacent stages/categories but also to optimal balance in clinical practicability and global applicability. PMID:26588425

  15. Precambrian and Mesozoic plate margins: Montana, Idaho and Wyoming with field guides for the 8th international conference on basement tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, S.E.; Berg, R.B.

    1988-07-01

    Two field trips held in conjunction with the 8th International Conference on Basement Tectonics are the raison d'etre for this volume, which would perhaps otherwise seem an eclectic association. The unifying theme is an investigation of the nature of plate margins in time and space, consonant with the main theme of the conference, Characterization and Comparison of Precambrian Through Mesozoic Continental Margins. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a separate volume by the International Basement Tectonics Association, Inc. The first field trip is at least a preliminary attempt at an overview of the Precambrian (predominantly Archean) crystalline basement of southwestern Montana. A number of interesting investigations have been focused on this region in recent years. Thus, papers in the first part of this volume take the reader from the Stillwater Complex across the Beartooth Plateau, to the northern borders of Yellowstone National Park on to the southern Madison Range, and finally to some of the western-most (probable) Archean exposures in the Highland Mountains south of Butte. Moving considerably forward on the geologic time scale, the other broad topic dealt with in a second field trip and complementary articles is a relatively recent collisional terrane in central Idaho and eastern Oregon. Examined are portions of the Idaho batholith and its enigmatic and fascinating marginal rocks, and to the west, the heart of the suture zone itself in the Wallowa-Seven Devils terrane with its group of exotic intrusive, metavolcanic, and metasedimentary rocks. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  16. Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Wayne

    2013-03-01

    Wayne Reeve of Murdoch University on "Genomics Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB): a resource for microsymbiont genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. COMMENTS CONTRIBUTED BY ALAN HUBER TO AWMA AB-3 COMMITTEE FOR POSSIBLE INCLUSION IN THE COMMITTEE'S PRESENTATION AT EPA'S 8TH CONFERENCE ON AIR QUALITY MODELING - A&WMA AB-3 COMMENTS ON NONSTANDARD MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical comments are provided to the Air and waste Management Associations AB-3 committee for potential inclusion into the committee's comments to be made at EPA's 8th Conference on Air Quality Modeling. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can model specific cases wh...

  18. Constructing Counterfactuals in a Multisite Observational Study Using Propensity Score Matching and Multilevel Modeling: An Empirical Example Looking at the Effect of 8th Grade Algebra across Students and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan H.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to demonstrate a method for treatment effect estimation in a multisite observational study where the treatment is highly selective and the assignment mechanism varies across sites. The method is demonstrated by addressing three primary research questions about the effect of 8th grade algebra: (1) For students who take algebra in…

  19. Efficient program for decoding the /255, 223/ Reed-Solomon code over GF/2 to the 8th/ with both errors and erasures, using transform decoding. [FFT-like algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.; Truong, T. K.; Reed, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a method developed for decoding a (255, 223) Reed-Solomon code over GF(2 to the 8th) with both errors and erasures. The matrix of decoding times for correcting errors and erasures of the code using a simplified decoder is presented. It is shown that the algorithm proposed is faster by a factor of from three to seven.

  20. The Obstacles for the Teaching of 8th Grade TR History of Revolution and Kemalism Course According to the Constructivist Approach (An Example of Exploratory Sequential Mixed Method Design)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Yavuz; Demir, Selcuk Besir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to ascertain the problems social studies teachers face in the teaching of topics covered in 8th grade TRHRK Course. The study was conducted in line with explanatory sequential mixed method design, which is one of the mixed research method, was used. The study involves three phases. In the first step, exploratory process…

  1. Promoting Original Scientific Research and Teacher Training Through a High School Science Research Program: A Five Year Retrospective and Analysis of the Impact on Mentored 8th Grade Geoscience Students and the Mentors Themselves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danch, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In 2010 a group of 8th grade geoscience students participated in an extracurricular activity allowing them to conduct original scientific research while being mentored by students enrolled in a 3 - year high school Science Research program. Upon entering high school the mentored students themselves enrolled in the Science Research program and continued for 4 years, culminating with their participation in Science Research 4. This allowed them to continue conducting original scientific research, act as mentors to 8th grade geoscience students and to provide teacher training for both middle and high school teachers conducting inquiry-based science lessons. Of the 7 Science Research 4 students participating since 2010, 100% plan on majoring or minoring in a STEM - related field in college and their individual research projects have been been granted over 70 different awards and honors in science fair and symposia including a 3rd and 4th place category awards at two different international science fairs - the International Sustainable Energy Engineering and Environment Project (iSWEEP) and the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Science Research 4 students developed and conducted a Society for Science and the Public affiliated science fair for middle school students enrolled in an 8th grade honors geoscience program allowing over 100 students from 5 middle schools to present their research and be judged by STEM professionals. Students with research judged in the top 10% were nominated for participation in the National Broadcom MASTERS program which they successfully entered upon further mentoring from the Science Research 4 students. 8th grade enrollment in the Science Research program for 2015 increased by almost 50% with feedback from students, parents and teachers indicating that the mentorship and participation in the 8th grade science fair were factors in increasing interest in continuing authentic scientific research in high school.

  2. Multi-fluid MHD Study of the Solar Wind Interaction with Mars' Upper Atmosphere during the 2015 March 8th ICME Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, C.; Ma, Y.; Bougher, S. W.; Toth, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Halekas, J. S.; Dong, Y.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J. G.; Brain, D. A.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Lillis, R. J.; Jakosky, B. M.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The 3-D Mars multi-fluid BATS-R-US MHD code is used to study the solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere during the 2015 March 8th interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). We studied four steady-state cases, corresponding to three major ICME phases: pre-ICME phase (Case 1), sheath phase (Cases 2--3), and ejecta phase (Case 4). Detailed data-model comparisons demonstrate that the simulation results are in good agreement with Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) measurements, indicating that the multi-fluid MHD model can reproduce most of the features observed by MAVEN, thus providing confidence in the estimate of ion escape rates from its calculation. The total ion escape rate is increased by an order of magnitude, from 2.05×1024 s-1 (pre-ICME phase) to 2.25×1025 s-1 (ICME sheath phase), during this time period. The calculated ion escape rates were used to examine the relative importance of the two major ion loss channels from the planet: energetic pickup ion loss through the dayside plume and cold ionospheric ion loss through the nightside plasma wake region. We found that the energetic pickup ions escaping from the dayside plume could be as much as ~23% of the total ion loss prior to the ICME arrival. Interestingly, the tailward ion escape rate is significantly increased at the ejecta phase, leading to a reduction of the dayside ion escape to ~5% of the total ion loss. Under such circumstance, the cold ionospheric ions escaping from the plasma wake comprise the majority of the ion loss from the planet. Furthermore, by comparing four simulation results along the same MAVEN orbit, we note that there is no significant variation in the Martian lower ionosphere. Finally, both bow shock and magnetic pileup boundary (BS, MPB) locations are decreased from (1.2 RMars, 1.57 RMars) at the pre-ICME phase to (1.16 RMars, 1.47 RMars) respectively during the sheath phase along the dayside Sun-Mars line. MAVEN has provided a great opportunity to

  3. Overseas-trained doctors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services: many unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Arkles, Rachelle S; Hill, Peter S; Pulver, Lisa R Jackson

    2007-05-21

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services are heavily dependent on overseas-trained doctors (OTDs). These OTDs are increasingly from countries with variable English language and educational equivalency compared with locally trained doctors. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services create particular demands for all doctors, such as negotiating "cultural domains" and acknowledging the contribution of Aboriginal health workers. Little is known about the roles and experience of OTDs in health service provision in Indigenous communities. Barriers to effective research into the experience of OTDs include privacy legislation and a lack of standardised data. Researching the narratives of OTDs in Indigenous health services offers an opportunity to explore the diversity and complexity of the cultural interfaces in health service provision. PMID:17516902

  4. Characteristics and outcomes of critically ill Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Trout, M I; Henson, G; Senthuran, S

    2015-03-01

    A retrospective cohort analysis of an admission database for the intensive care unit at The Townsville Hospital was undertaken to describe the characteristics and short-term outcomes of critically ill Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. The Townsville Hospital is the tertiary referral centre for Northern Queensland and services a region in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people constitute 9.6% of the population. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients were significantly younger and had higher rates of invasive mechanical ventilation, emergency admissions and transfers from another hospital. Despite these factors, intensive care mortality did not differ between groups (9.4% versus 7.7%, P=0.1). Higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III-j scores were noted in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population requiring emergency admission (65 versus 60, P=0.022) but were lower for elective admission (38 versus 42, P <0.001). Despite higher predicted hospital mortality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients requiring emergency admission, no significant difference was observed (20.1% versus 19.1%, P=0.656). In a severity adjusted model, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status did not statistically significantly alter the risk of death (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 1.2, P=0.398). Though Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients requiring intensive care differed in admission characteristics, mortality was comparable to other critically ill patients.

  5. [The effects of TorR protein on initiation of DNA replication in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yao; Jiaxin, Qiao; Jing, Li; Hui, Li; Morigen, Morigen

    2015-03-01

    The two-component systems, which could sense and respond to environmental changes, widely exist in bacteria as a signal transduction pathway. The bacterial CckA/CtrA, ArcA/ArcB and PhoP/PhoQ two-component systems are associated with initiation of DNA replication and cell division, however, the effects of the TorS/TorR system on cell cycle and DNA replication remains unknown. The TorS/TorR system in Escherichia coli can sense changes in trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) concentration around the cells. However, it is unknown if it also affects initiation of DNA replication. We detected DNA replication patterns in ΔtorS and ΔtorR mutant strains by flow cytometry. We found that the average number of replication origins (oriCs) per cell and doubling time in ΔtorS mutants were the same while the average number of oriCs in ΔtorR mutants was increased compared with that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that absence of TorR led to an earlier initiation of DNA replication than that in wild-type cells. Strangely, neither overexpression of TorR nor co-expression of TorR and TorS could restore ΔtorR mutant phenotype to the wild type. However, overexpression of SufD in both wild type and ΔtorR mutants promoted initiation of DNA replication, while mutation of SufD delayed it in ΔtorR mutants. Thus, TorR may affect initiation of DNA replication indirectly through regulating gene expression of sufD.

  6. UP-TORR: online tool for accurate and Up-to-Date annotation of RNAi Reagents.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanhui; Roesel, Charles; Flockhart, Ian; Perkins, Lizabeth; Perrimon, Norbert; Mohr, Stephanie E

    2013-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely adopted tool for loss-of-function studies but RNAi results only have biological relevance if the reagents are appropriately mapped to genes. Several groups have designed and generated RNAi reagent libraries for studies in cells or in vivo for Drosophila and other species. At first glance, matching RNAi reagents to genes appears to be a simple problem, as each reagent is typically designed to target a single gene. In practice, however, the reagent-gene relationship is complex. Although the sequences of oligonucleotides used to generate most types of RNAi reagents are static, the reference genome and gene annotations are regularly updated. Thus, at the time a researcher chooses an RNAi reagent or analyzes RNAi data, the most current interpretation of the RNAi reagent-gene relationship, as well as related information regarding specificity (e.g., predicted off-target effects), can be different from the original interpretation. Here, we describe a set of strategies and an accompanying online tool, UP-TORR (for Updated Targets of RNAi Reagents; www.flyrnai.org/up-torr), useful for accurate and up-to-date annotation of cell-based and in vivo RNAi reagents. Importantly, UP-TORR automatically synchronizes with gene annotations daily, retrieving the most current information available, and for Drosophila, also synchronizes with the major reagent collections. Thus, UP-TORR allows users to choose the most appropriate RNAi reagents at the onset of a study, as well as to perform the most appropriate analyses of results of RNAi-based studies.

  7. Increased bone mineral density in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: impact of body composition differences.

    PubMed

    Maple-Brown, L J; Hughes, J; Piers, L S; Ward, L C; Meerkin, J; Eisman, J A; Center, J R; Pocock, N A; Jerums, G; O'Dea, K

    2012-07-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported to be both higher and lower in Indigenous women from different populations. Body composition data have been reported for Indigenous Australians, but there are few published BMD data in this population. We assessed BMD in 161 Indigenous Australians, identified as Aboriginal (n=70), Torres Strait Islander (n=68) or both (n=23). BMD measurements were made on Norland-XR46 (n=107) and Hologic (n=90) dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) machines. Norland BMD and body composition measurements in these individuals, and also in 36 Caucasian Australians, were converted to equivalent Hologic BMD (BMD(H)) and body composition measurements for comparison. Femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine Z-scores were high in Indigenous participants (mean FN Z-score: Indigenous men +0.98, p<0.0001 vs. mean zero; Indigenous women +0.82, p<0.0001 vs. mean zero). FN BMD(H) was higher in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander than Caucasian participants, after adjusting for age, gender, diabetes and height and remained higher in men after addition of lean mass to the model. We conclude that FN BMD is higher in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australians than Caucasian Australian reference ranges and these differences still remained significant in men after adjustment for lean mass. It remains to be seen whether these BMD differences translate to differences in fracture rates.

  8. D Model of the Torres Syncline in the PARANÁ-ETENDEKA Province, South Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Waichel, B. L.; Lima, E. F. D.; Rossetti, L. D. M. M.; Bueno, G. V.; Viana, A. R.; Barreto, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Volcanic Province (PEVP) is Early Cretaceous in age and precedes the fragmentation of the south Gondwana. These volcanic rocks cover an area in excess of 1,200,000 km2 and can reach a maximum thickness of 1,700 m. The PEVP is composed mainly of tholeiitic basalts and subordinately by andesites and rhyolites/quartz-latites. Recently new models considering physical characteristics of the lava flow stratigraphy on both sides, Africa and South America, have been built providing a new vision of the volcanic stratigraphy and flow morphologies inside the province. This work presents a 3D model of the volcanic sequence at theTorres Syncline (Brazil). The 3D model was build using the PETREL E&P Software Platform. Geological sections based on field data and Log data from Paraná Basin (Gama-ray and soniclogs) were used to build the model. The Torres Syncline is a tectonic structure located in southern Brazil with the main orientation NW-SE. In Torres Syncline the basal portion is characterized by pahoehoe lava flows in a compound braided architecture, followed by rubbly lavas in a tabular classic architecture, and in the upper portions silicic units interbedded with basaltic lavas. The central portion of the volcanic pile is characterized by thick tabular lavas with rubbly tops (25-50 m thick). These flows have an internal structure divided in four parts: a smooth vesicular base, aphanitic massive cores with irregular joints, upper vesicular portion and a rubbly top. This unit is thicker along of the Torres Syncline and represents the main phase of the volcanism. Silicic units occur in the upper parts of the PEVP stratigraphy and include lava domes interbedded with rubbly flows and thick tabular flows. The Torres Syncline and Huab constituted one Basin features single active structure in the Early Cretaceous and during the main rifting phase. The onset of the volcanism was characterized by low effusion rate eruptions over the paleoerg, forming pahoehoe

  9. Weldability characteristics of torr and corrosion-resistant TMT bars using SMAW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Ramen; Veeraraghavan, R.; Rohira, K. L.

    2002-08-01

    Torr steel rebars, also known as cold twisted deformed (CTD) rebars, are used extensively for the construction of reinforced cement concrete (RCC) structures. These steels, which are characterized by a high carbon content and are subjected to a cold twisting operation to attain the desired strength level and bond strength, suffer from low ductility and poor bendability properties. Furthermore, these rebars are not suitable for coastal, humid, and industrial conditions where corrosion rates are very high. To combat these problems, recent efforts at the Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL) have led to the successful development of corrosion-resistant thermomechanically treated (TMT) rebars with a minimum yield strength of 500 MPa. These rebars are characterized by a low carbon content, exhibit excellent strength-ductility-corrosion properties, and are rapidly replacing traditional torr rebars in corrosion-prone areas for a wide range of applications, namely, concrete reinforcement structures, bridges, flyovers on dams, etc. A comprehensive evaluation of the weldability properties of corrosion-resistant Cu-TMT rebars was carried out, and they were compared with those made of torr steel in order to assess their suitability for various structural applications. Implant and restraint cracking (RC) tests were carried out to assess the cold-cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. The static fatigue limit (SFL) values were found to be similar, namely, 640 MPa (torr steel) and 625 MPa (Cu-TMT steel) under condition of no preheating and no rebaking using a heat input of 7.5 KJ/cm, indicating adequate cold-cracking resistance for both the steels. Restraint cracking tests yielded critical restraint intensities (Kcr) in excess of 16,800 MPa for both of the steels. Based on the weldability tests, the optimized conditions for welding were formulated and extensive tests were carried out on the welded joints. Both of the steels exhibited adequate

  10. What factors help or hinder the achievement of low SES students? An international comparison using TIMSS 2011 8th grade science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Justin L.

    Focusing on science from a cross-country perspective, this study explores the relationship between 8th grade science achievement and student, teacher, and school characteristics. More specifically, this study will pay special attention to low socio-economic status (SES) students and seek to understand why some disadvantaged students are able to have higher than expected achievement in science given their SES while other disadvantaged students are not able to achieve beyond what would be expected given their background. This study will explore the multi-level relationship between the characteristics of students, their teachers, their schools, and student achievement in science. While looking at students in classrooms and in schools, this work will create as precise as possible a measure of student SES by drawing on recommendations of an expert panel commissioned by the National Association of Educational Progress (NAEP) study. The study uses the most recent cycle (2011) of the Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS), to strategically select a six-country sample from the 45 participating countries. This six-country sample was selected by using the country level achievement and the standard deviation of that achievement. This will create a sample that has a range of equality in achievement and strength in achievement. This allows for making comparisons both across and within countries to better understand variations in the factors of student performance, especially for disadvantaged students. This paper builds on the existing research around socio-economic status (SES) and achievement by exploring in more detail the conditions in schools and classrooms around the world that might magnify or reduce the effect of SES on student achievement. The analysis looks at these questions: "What conditions help low SES students achieve higher than what would be expected given their SES?" and "What conditions hinder low SES students to achieve at or below what would

  11. The Torres del Paine intrusion as a model for a shallow magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Lukas; Bodner, Robert; Leuthold, Julien; Muntener, Othmar; Putlitz, Benita; Vennemann, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    The shallow magmatic Torres del Paine Intrusive Complex (TPIC) belongs to a series of sub-volcanic and plutonic igneous bodies in Southern Chile and Argentina. This trench-parallel belt is located in a transitional position between the Patagonia Batholith in the West, and the alkaline Cenozoic plateau lavas in the East. While volumetrically small amounts of magmatism started around 28 my ago in the Torres del Paine area, and a second period occurred between 17-16 Ma, it peaked with the TPIC 12.59-12.43 Ma ago. The spectacular cliffs of the Torres del Paine National park provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a very shallow magma chamber and the interaction with its host rocks. Intrusion depth can be estimated based on contact metamorphic assemblages and granite solidus thermobarometry to 750±250 bars, corresponding to an intrusion depth of ca. 3km, ca. 500m above the base of the intrusion. Hornblende thermobarometry in mafic rocks agrees well with these estimates (Leuthold et al., 2014). The TPIC is composed of a granitic laccolith emplaced over 90ka (Michel et al., 2008) in 3 major, several 100m thick sheets, forming an overall thickness of nearly 2 km. Contacts are sharp between sheets, with the oldest sheet on the top and the youngest on the bottom (Michel et al., 2008). The granitic laccolith is under-plated by a ca. 400m thick mafic laccolith, built up over ca. 50ka (Leuthold et al. 2012), constructed from the bottom up. Granitic and mafic sheets are themselves composed of multiple metric to decametric pulses, mostly with ductile contacts between them, resulting in outcrop patterns resembling braided stream sediments. The contact of the TPIC with the Cretaceous flysch sediments document intrusion mechanism. Pre-existing sub-horizontal fold axes are rotated in the roof of the TPIC, clearly demonstrating ballooning of the roof; no ballooning was observed in the footwall of the intrusion. Extension during ballooning of the roof is indicated by

  12. Genomics in research and health care with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    PubMed

    McWhirter, Rebekah; Nicol, Dianne; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Genomics is increasingly becoming an integral component of health research and clinical care. The perceived difficulties associated with genetic research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people mean that they have largely been excluded as research participants. This limits the applicability of research findings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Emergent use of genomic technologies and personalised medicine therefore risk contributing to an increase in existing health disparities unless urgent action is taken. To allow the potential benefits of genomics to be more equitably distributed, and minimise potential harms, we recommend five actions: (1) ensure diversity of participants by implementing appropriate protocols at the study design stage; (2) target diseases that disproportionately affect disadvantaged groups; (3) prioritise capacity building to promote Indigenous leadership across research professions; (4) develop resources for consenting patients or participants from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds; and (5) integrate awareness of issues relating to Indigenous people into the governance structures, formal reviews, data collection protocols and analytical pipelines of health services and research projects. PMID:26507135

  13. Striking association between urinary cadmium level and albuminuria among Torres Strait Islander people with diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Haswell-Elkins, Melissa Satarug, Soisungwan; O'Rourke, Peter; Moore, Michael; Ng, Jack; McGrath, Victor; Walmby, Maria

    2008-03-15

    Objectives: Indigenous people of the Torres Strait (Australia) have greater potential for cadmium exposure and renal damage than other Australians due to high cadmium in some traditional seafood and a high prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and obesity. This study explored associations between albuminuria and an index of cadmium exposure (urinary cadmium excretion) in the presence and absence of Type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods: Two population-based, cross-sectional studies were undertaken in the Torres Strait to obtain data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, chronic disease, smoking, urinary cadmium, and albumin creatinine ratio (ACR). Results: Age- and BMI-adjusted urinary cadmium levels were significantly higher (p<0.01) among people with diabetes and albuminuria (n=22, geometric mean (GM) 1.91 {mu}g Cd/g creatinine) compared to those with diabetes and normal ACR (n=21, GM 0.74 {mu}g Cd/g creatinine). Urinary cadmium was also strongly associated (p<0.001) with ACR among people with diabetes in regression models and remained significant after controlling for age, sex, BMI, smoking status, and hypertension (or continuous systolic and diastolic measurements). Conclusions: While the study has methodological limitations and the nature of the association is unclear, the striking dose-dependent links between markers of cadmium exposure and of Type 2 diabetic nephropathy highlight the need for further definitive research on the health effects of cadmium in the presence of diabetes.

  14. Genomics in research and health care with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    PubMed

    McWhirter, Rebekah; Nicol, Dianne; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Genomics is increasingly becoming an integral component of health research and clinical care. The perceived difficulties associated with genetic research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people mean that they have largely been excluded as research participants. This limits the applicability of research findings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Emergent use of genomic technologies and personalised medicine therefore risk contributing to an increase in existing health disparities unless urgent action is taken. To allow the potential benefits of genomics to be more equitably distributed, and minimise potential harms, we recommend five actions: (1) ensure diversity of participants by implementing appropriate protocols at the study design stage; (2) target diseases that disproportionately affect disadvantaged groups; (3) prioritise capacity building to promote Indigenous leadership across research professions; (4) develop resources for consenting patients or participants from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds; and (5) integrate awareness of issues relating to Indigenous people into the governance structures, formal reviews, data collection protocols and analytical pipelines of health services and research projects.

  15. Biogeography of Burkholderia pseudomallei in the Torres Strait Islands of Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Anthony; Mayo, Mark; Owens, Leigh; Burgess, Graham; Norton, Robert; McBride, William John Hannan; Currie, Bart J; Warner, Jeffrey

    2013-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that biogeographical boundaries are a feature of Burkholderia pseudomallei ecology, and they impact the epidemiology of melioidosis on a global scale. This study examined the relatedness of B. pseudomallei sourced from islands in the Torres Strait of Northern Australia to determine if the geography of isolated island communities is a determinant of the organisms' dispersal. Environmental sampling on Badu Island in the Near Western Island cluster recovered a single clone. An additional 32 clinical isolates from the region were sourced. Isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing and a multiplex PCR targeting the flagellum gene cluster. Gene cluster analysis determined that 69% of the isolates from the region encoded the ancestral Burkholderia thailandensis-like flagellum and chemotaxis gene cluster, a proportion significantly lower than that reported from mainland Australia and consistent with observations of isolates from southern Papua New Guinea. A goodness-of-fit test indicated that there was geographic localization of sequence types throughout the archipelago, with the exception of Thursday Island, the economic and cultural hub of the region. Sequence types common to mainland Australia and Papua New Guinea were identified. These findings demonstrate for the first time an environmental reservoir for B. pseudomallei in the Torres Strait, and multilocus sequence typing suggests that the organism is not randomly distributed throughout this region and that seawater may provide a barrier to dispersal of the organism. Moreover, these findings support an anthropogenic dispersal hypothesis for the spread of B. pseudomallei throughout this region.

  16. The problem of dementia in Australian aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, P A

    1997-02-01

    The concept of dementia in old age in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is intrinsically paradoxical. Firstly, few indigenous people reach old age. Secondly, from some indigenous points of view, dementia is either not recognized as a condition or as a problem, or, in the case of the more disruptive manifestations of cognitive impairment, is perceived as 'madness'. Moreover, in the wider context of profound political, social and economic inequality experienced by most indigenous people, the western medical category of dementia may appear to be of relatively minor importance. However, government initiatives in aged care generally and dementia care in particular which are designed to address the ageing of the Australian population as a whole also include the nation's older indigenous people. This article-based on a review of published work, supplemented by discussions with indigenous and non-indigenous individuals involved in indigenous aged care and mental health-examines some of the issues surrounding cognitive decline in old age for Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders. More specifically, it looks at the problems involved in assessing and diagnosing cognitive decline and dementia, especially among people who follow more traditional ways of life, and in providing services to sufferers and their carers. In doing so, it considers some of the relative meanings of "old age', "abnormal old age', "mental disorder', "sickness' and "dementia'. PMID:9097208

  17. Isolation, identification and cytotoxicity of a new noroleanane-type triterpene saponin from Salicornia bigelovii Torr.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fuqin; Wang, Qizhi; Wang, Ming; Shan, Yu; Chen, Yu; Yin, Min; Zhao, Youyi; Feng, Xu; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Salicornia bigelovii Torr. has been consumed not only as a popular kind of vegetable, but also as a medicinal plant to treat hypertension, cephalalgia, scurvy and cancer. The present study was designed to investigate its chemical components and cytotoxic activity. A new noroleanane-type triterpene saponin, bigelovii C (1), was separated and purified from Salicornia bigelovii Torr., along with four known triterpene saponins 2-5. The structure of bigelovii C was elucidated as 3-O-(6-O-butyl ester)-β-D-glucuropyranosyl-23-aldehyde-30-norolean-12, 20 (29)-dien-28-oic acid-28-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, according to various spectroscopic analysis and chemical characteristics. Besides Compounds 3 and 5, bigelovii C had potent cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines, MCF7 (breast cancer), Lovo (colon cancer) and LN229 (glioblastoma), especially MCF7. Bigelovii C inhibited the growth of MCF7 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the percentage of apoptotic cells significantly increased upon bigelovii C treatment. Rh123 staining assay indicated that bigelovii C reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. The mechanism of cell death by bigelovii C may be attributed to the downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-7 and PARP. These results suggested that bigelovii C may impart health benefits when consumed and should be regarded as a potential chemopreventative agent for cancer. PMID:25867827

  18. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Australia 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Latika; Chiu, Clayton; Habig, Andrew; Lowbridge, Christopher; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Wang, Han; McIntyre, Peter; Menzies, Robert

    2013-12-31

    This report outlines the major positive impacts of vaccines on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from 2007 to 2010, as well as highlighting areas that require further attention. Hepatitis A disease is now less common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in their non-Indigenous counterparts. Hepatitis A vaccination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children was introduced in 2005 in the high incidence jurisdictions of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. In 2002–2005, there were 20 hospitalisations for hepatitis A in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged<5 years--over 100 times more common than in other children--compared to none in 2006/07–2009/10. With respect to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), there has been a reduction of 87% in notifications of IPD caused by serotypes contained in 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) since the introduction of the childhood 7vPCV program among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. However, due to a lower proportion of IPD caused by 7vPCV types prior to vaccine introduction, the decline in total IPD notifications has been less marked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in other children. Higher valency vaccines (10vPCV and 13vPCV) which replaced 7vPCV from 2011 are likely to result in a greater impact on IPD and potentially also non-invasive disease, although disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes appears likely to be an ongoing problem. Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged ≥50 years, there have been recent increases in IPD, which appear related to low vaccination coverage and highlight the need for improved coverage in this high-risk target group. Since routine meningococcal C vaccination for infants and the high-school catch-up program were implemented in 2003, there has been a significant decrease in cases caused by serogroup C. However, the predominant

  19. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Australia 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Latika; Chiu, Clayton; Habig, Andrew; Lowbridge, Christopher; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Wang, Han; McIntyre, Peter; Menzies, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This report outlines the major positive impacts of vaccines on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from 2007 to 2010, as well as highlighting areas that require further attention. Hepatitis A disease is now less common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in their non-Indigenous counterparts. Hepatitis A vaccination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children was introduced in 2005 in the high incidence jurisdictions of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. In 2002–2005, there were 20 hospitalisations for hepatitis A in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged<5 years--over 100 times more common than in other children--compared to none in 2006/07–2009/10. With respect to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), there has been a reduction of 87% in notifications of IPD caused by serotypes contained in 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) since the introduction of the childhood 7vPCV program among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. However, due to a lower proportion of IPD caused by 7vPCV types prior to vaccine introduction, the decline in total IPD notifications has been less marked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in other children. Higher valency vaccines (10vPCV and 13vPCV) which replaced 7vPCV from 2011 are likely to result in a greater impact on IPD and potentially also non-invasive disease, although disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes appears likely to be an ongoing problem. Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged ≥50 years, there have been recent increases in IPD, which appear related to low vaccination coverage and highlight the need for improved coverage in this high-risk target group. Since routine meningococcal C vaccination for infants and the high-school catch-up program were implemented in 2003, there has been a significant decrease in cases caused by serogroup C. However, the predominant

  20. The Hospital Microbiome Project: Meeting Report for the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project Workshop on sampling design and building science measurements, Chicago, USA, June 7th-8th 2012

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Alverdy, John; An, Gary; Coleman, Maureen; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Green, Jessica; Keegan, Kevin; Kelley, Scott T.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Kociolek, Larry; Levin, Hal; Landon, Emily; Olsiewski, Paula; Knight, Rob; Siegel, Jeffrey; Weber, Stephen; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project workshop held on June 7th-8th, 2012 at the University of Chicago, USA. The workshop was arranged to determine the most appropriate sampling strategy and approach to building science measurement to characterize the development of a microbial community within a new hospital pavilion being built at the University of Chicago Medical Center. The workshop made several recommendations and led to the development of a full proposal to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as well as to the creation of the Hospital Microbiome Consortium. PMID:23961316

  1. Iridoids and phenylethanoid from Pedicularis kerneri Dalla Torre growing in Dolomites, Italy.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Frezza, Claudio; Serafini, Mauro; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the first phytochemical analysis of polar fraction of Pedicularis kerneri Dalla Torre growing in Dolomites, Italy. Several iridoid glucosides were isolated, namely aucubin (1), monomelittoside (2), plantarenaloside (3), euphroside (4), mussaenosidic acid (5) and 8-epiloganic acid (6), showing a composition in accordance with previous study on this genus. The studied samples, collected from Dolomites, presented a chemotype already recognised in species from North America, characterised by euphroside (4) and aucubin (1) as main components, but the main character was the presence of monomelittoside (2) never reported in this genus. The identification of verbascoside (7), leucosceptoside A (9) and echinacoside (10) complete the systematic framing of this species since is ascertained the co-occurrence of phenylethanoid glycosides with iridoids in Lamiales species.

  2. Which way? Educating for nursing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2006-10-01

    Cross-Cultural Awareness Training has been seen as a way to improve nurses' knowledge and understanding of Indigenous peoples in Australia (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders) and to therefore improve service delivery and therapeutic care to them. Nurses may have undertaken this type of training in their workplace or as part of nurse education in an undergraduate degree program. In asking Which Way in regards to this type of training and education, this paper includes the views of a selection of Aboriginal women and highlights the need to extend beyond Cross-Cultural Awareness Training to Anti-Racism Training. Furthermore, that Anti-Racism Training and addressing white race privilege is required in order to address the inequities within the health system, the marginalisation and disempowerment of Indigenous peoples. PMID:17083322

  3. Which way? Educating for nursing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2006-10-01

    Cross-Cultural Awareness Training has been seen as a way to improve nurses' knowledge and understanding of Indigenous peoples in Australia (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders) and to therefore improve service delivery and therapeutic care to them. Nurses may have undertaken this type of training in their workplace or as part of nurse education in an undergraduate degree program. In asking Which Way in regards to this type of training and education, this paper includes the views of a selection of Aboriginal women and highlights the need to extend beyond Cross-Cultural Awareness Training to Anti-Racism Training. Furthermore, that Anti-Racism Training and addressing white race privilege is required in order to address the inequities within the health system, the marginalisation and disempowerment of Indigenous peoples.

  4. The genetic basis of Muir-Torre syndrome includes the hMLH1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bapat, B.; Xia, L.; Mitri, A.

    1996-09-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) (McKusick 158320) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of sebaceous gland tumors and skin cancers, including keratoacanthomas and basal cell carcinomas. Affected family members may manifest a wide spectrum of internal malignancies, which include colorectal, endometrial, urologic, and upper gastrointestinal neoplasms. Sebaceous gland tumors, which are rare in the general population, are considered to be the hallmark of MTS and may arise prior to the development of other visceral cancers. Despite the high incidence of synchronous and metachronous tumors, prognosis is often favorable. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the most common autosomal dominantly inherited colorectal cancer susceptibility syndromes. In some HNPCC families, extracolonic tumors of the endometrium, ovary, small bowel, and renal and biliary tract occur at an increased frequency. On the basis of similarities in clinical symptoms of MTS and HNPCC, it is proposed that these two syndromes may have a common genetic basis. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Later Middle Pleistocene human remains from the Almonda Karstic system, Torres Novas, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Trinkaus, Erik; Marks, Anthony E; Brugal, Jean Philip; Bailey, Shara E; Rink, W Jack; Richter, Daniel

    2003-09-01

    Later Middle Pleistocene archeological deposits of the Galeria Pesada (Gruta da Aroeira), Almonda Karstic System, Torres Novas, Portugal, yielded two archaic human teeth, a mandibular canine and a maxillary third molar. The C(1)presents moderate and asymmetrical shoveling with a stout root. The slightly worn M(3)exhibits at least four cusps with a large hypocone, three roots with large radicular plates, and an absence of taurodontism. They are moderately large for later Middle Pleistocene humans in their buccolingual crown diameters, although the M(3)mesiodistal diameter is modest. The C(1)exhibits labial calculus and multiple linear hypoplastic defects, but the M(3)is lesion free. Both teeth are morphologically similar to those of other Middle Pleistocene European humans and reinforce a pattern of dental hypertrophy among these archaic Homo.

  6. Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS): An update and approach to diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    John, Ann M; Schwartz, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a rare genetic condition that predisposes individuals to skin tumors and visceral malignancies. Because of the potentially aggressive nature of internal malignancies and sebaceous carcinoma, and the tendency to have multiple low-grade visceral cancers, close cancer surveillance is required in individuals and their families with this usually autosomal dominant disorder. Although the majority of MTS is caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes resulting in microsatellite instability, a newly described subtype of MTS does not demonstrate microsatellite instability and may be inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. In addition, MTS may be unmasked in transplant recipients taking specific immunosuppressant drugs or other immunosuppressed patients. Neoplasms may be subject to immunohistochemistry or both immunohistochemistry and genetic testing to confirm the diagnosis of MTS. Here, we offer an update and an approach to the diagnosis and management of MTS with a particular emphasis on the role of immunohistochemistry and genetic testing. PMID:26892655

  7. Sleep Disorders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and Residents of Regional and Remote Australia

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Cindy E.; McPherson, Karen; Tikoft, Erik; Usher, Kim; Hosseini, Fariborz; Ferns, Janine; Jersmann, Hubertus; Antic, Ral; Maguire, Graeme Paul

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare the use of sleep diagnostic tests, the risks, and cofactors, and outcomes of the care of Indigenous and non-indigenous Australian adults in regional and remote Australia in whom sleep related breathing disorders have been diagnosed. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 200 adults; 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and 100 non-indigenous adults with a confirmed sleep related breathing disorder diagnosed prior to September 2011 at Alice Springs Hospital and Cairns Hospital, Australia. Results: Results showed overall Indigenous Australians were 1.8 times more likely to have a positive diagnostic sleep study performed compared with non-indigenous patients, 1.6 times less likely in central Australia and 3.4 times more likely in far north Queensland. All regional and remote residents accessed diagnostic sleep studies at a rate less than Australia overall (31/100,000/y (95% confidence interval, 21–44) compared with 575/100,000/y). Conclusion: The barriers to diagnosis and ongoing care are likely to relate to remote residence, lower health self-efficacy, the complex nature of the treatment tool, and environmental factors such as electricity and sleeping area. Indigeneity, remote residence, environmental factors, and low awareness of sleep health are likely to affect service accessibility and rate of use and capacity to enhance patient and family education and support following a diagnosis. A greater understanding of enablers and barriers to care and evaluation of interventions to address these are required. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1255. Citation: Woods CE, McPherson K, Tikoft E, Usher K, Hosseini F, Ferns J, Jersmann H, Antic R, Maguire GP. Sleep disorders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and residents of regional and remote Australia. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1263–1271. PMID:26094934

  8. Seagrass-Watch: Engaging Torres Strait Islanders in marine habitat monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellors, Jane E.; McKenzie, Len J.; Coles, Robert G.

    2008-09-01

    Involvement in scientifically structured habitat monitoring is a relatively new concept to the peoples of Torres Strait. The approach we used was to focus on awareness, and to build the capacity of groups to participate using Seagrass-Watch as the vehicle to provide education and training in monitoring marine ecosystems. The project successfully delivered quality scientifically rigorous baseline information on the seasonality of seagrasses in the Torres Strait—a first for this region. Eight seagrass species were identified across the monitoring sites. Seagrass cover varied within and between years. Preliminary evidence indicated that drivers for seagrass variability were climate related. Generally, seagrass abundance increased during the north-west monsoon ( Kuki), possibly a consequence of elevated nutrients, lower tidal exposure times, less wind, and higher air temperatures. Low seagrass abundance coincided with the presence of greater winds and longer periods of exposure at low tides during the south-east trade wind season ( Sager). No seasonal patterns were apparent when frequency of disturbance from high sedimentation and human impacts was high. Seagrass-Watch has been incorporated in to the Thursday Island High School's Marine Studies Unit ensuring continuity of monitoring. The students, teachers, and other interested individuals involved in Seagrass-Watch have mastered the necessary scientific procedures to monitor seagrass meadows, and developed skills in coordinating a monitoring program and skills in mentoring younger students. This has increased the participants' self-esteem and confidence, and given them an insight into how they may participate in the future management of their sea country.

  9. EDITORIAL: Selected articles from `The 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (Amaldi 8)', Columbia University, New York, 22-26 June 2009 Selected articles from `The 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (Amaldi 8)', Columbia University, New York, 22-26 June 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Marka, Szabolcs

    2010-04-01

    At Amaldi7,which was held in Sydney in 2007, the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC), which oversees the Amaldi meetings, decided to hold the 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves at Columbia University in the City of New York. With this decision, Amaldi returned to North America after a decade. The previous two years have seen many advances in the field of gravitational-wave detection. By the summer of 2009 the km-scale ground based interferometric detectors in the USA and Europe were preparing for a second long-term scientific run as a worldwide detector network. The advanced or second-generation detectors had well-developed plans and were ready for the production phase or had started construction. The European-American space mission, LISA Pathfinder, is progressing towards deployment in the foreseeable future and it is expected to pave the way towards gravitational-wave detection in the millihertz regime with LISA. Plans were developed for an additional gravitational-wave detector in Australia and in Japan (in this case underground) to extend the worldwide network of detectors for the advanced detector era. Japanese colleagues also presented plans for a space mission, DECIGO, that would bridge the gap between the LISA and ground-based interferometer frequency range. Compared to previous Amaldi meetings, Amaldi8 had new elements representing emerging trends in the field. For example, with the inclusion of pulsar timing collaborations to the GWIC, gravitational-wave detection using pulsar timing arrays was recognized as one of the prominent directions in the field and was represented at Amaldi8 as a separate session. By 2009, searches for gravitational waves based on external triggers received from electromagnetic observations were already producing significant scientific results and plans existed for pointing telescopes by utilizing gravitational-wave trigger events. Such multimessenger approaches to gravitational-wave detection also

  10. Mobile Devices for Tertiary Study--Philosophy Meets Pragmatics for Remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Philip

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines PhD research which suggests mobile learning fits the cultural philosophies and roles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who are preservice teachers in the very remote Australian communities where the research was conducted. The problem which the research addresses is the low completion rates for two community-based…

  11. Everywhere and Nowhere: Invisibility of Aboriginal and Torres Strain Islander Contact Languages in Education and Indigenous Language Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellwood, Juanita; Angelo, Denise

    2013-01-01

    The language ecologies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Queensland are characterised by widespread language shift to contact language varieties, yet they remain largely invisible in discourses involving Indigenous languages and education. This invisibility--its various causes and its many implications--are explored through a…

  12. The Fallacy of the Bolted Horse: Changing Our Thinking about Mature-Age Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plater, Suzanne; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Lander, Jo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to critically review and analyse the public representations of mature-age university students in developed and some developing nations and how they compare to the public representations of mature-age Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander university students in Australia ("students" also refers to graduates…

  13. Establishing a Community-Controlled Multi-Institutional Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Leilani; Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2007-01-01

    The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) lead and govern the Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE), which has a focus on circulatory and associated conditions in urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The CCRE is a partnership between QAIHC and Monash University, the Queensland University of…

  14. Diabetic Foot Care: Developing Culturally Appropriate Educational Tools for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jennifer; Obersteller, Elizabeth A.; Rennie, Linda; Whitbread, Cherie

    2001-01-01

    Participatory research in Australia's Northern Territory sought opinions from nurses, general practitioners, Aboriginal health workers, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders on the development of culturally relevant foot care education for Indigenous people with diabetes. They decided to use a visual approach (posters and flip charts) to…

  15. Simulation of a non-equilibrium helium plasma bullet emerging into oxygen at high pressure (250-760 Torr) and interacting with a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Economou, Demetre J.

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional computational study of a plasma bullet emanating from a helium gas jet in oxygen ambient at high pressure (250-760 Torr) was performed, with emphasis on the bullet interaction with a substrate. Power was applied in the form of a trapezoidal +5 kV pulse lasting 150 ns. A neutral gas transport model was employed to predict the concentration distributions of helium and oxygen in the system. These were then used in a plasma dynamics model to investigate the characteristics of the plasma bullet during its propagation and interaction with a substrate. Upon ignition, the discharge first propagated as a surface wave along the inner wall of the containing tube, and then exited the tube with a well-defined ionization front (streamer or plasma bullet). The plasma bullet evolved from a hollow (donut-shaped) feature to one where the maximum of ionization was on axis. The bullet propagated in the gap between the tube exit and the substrate with an average speed of ˜2 × 105 m/s. Upon encountering a metal substrate, the bullet formed a conductive channel to the substrate. Upon encountering a dielectric substrate, the bullet turned into an ionization wave propagating radially along the substrate surface. For a conductive substrate, the radial species fluxes to the surface peaked on the symmetry axis. For a dielectric substrate, a ring-shaped flux distribution was observed. The "footprint" of plasma-surface interaction increased either by decreasing the gap between tube exit and substrate, decreasing the relative permittivity of an insulating substrate, or decreasing pressure. As the system pressure was lowered from 760 to 250 Torr, the discharge was initiated earlier, and the plasma bullet propagation speed increased. A reverse electric field developed during the late stages of the ramp-down of the pulse, which accelerated electrons forming a brief backward discharge.

  16. Glacial geomorphology of the Torres del Paine region (southern Patagonia): Implications for glaciation, deglaciation and paleolake history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Juan-Luis; Hall, Brenda L.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Strelin, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The processes affecting paleoclimate variability and Pleistocene glacial landscape development in the southern mid-latitudes remain poorly understood, in part because of the scarcity of comprehensive, well-studied records. Glacial landforms are invaluable for reconstructing past ice-sheet, climate, and associated environmental changes along the southern Andes, but there are significant spatial and temporal gaps in existing data. In this paper, we present new geomorphic and sedimentologic analyses, including surficial maps, for the Torres del Paine region (51°S, 73°W), southern South America. Our findings provide a new framework for understanding changes in the regional glacier history and Pleistocene landscape development. Glacial extent during the local last glacial maximum (LGM) remains unknown but new chronological data supported by geomorphic evidence afford evidence for a larger ice sheet at Torres del Paine than previously assumed. Deglaciation from the local LGM was underway by 17,400 ± 200 (1σ) cal. yr. BP. As opposed to previous suggestions, we have found that most of the moraines fringing the lakes in the Torres del Paine national park were deposited during a late-glacial expansion that occurred between 14,100 and 12,500 cal. yr. BP. Late-glacial advances also have been documented recently for the Última Esperanza and Lago Argentino basins to the south and north of Torres del Paine, respectively, suggesting an overall regional ice response to a climate signal. The Tehuelche paleolake accompanied each of the ice-sheet fluctuations in Torres del Paine. New data document at least three main phases of this paleolake, which drained eastward to the Atlantic Ocean, while the Andes gaps were blocked with ice. During the late phase of glacial lake formation, when water levels reached 125-155 m a.s.l., the lake likely merged with paleolake Consuelo in the Última Esperanza area at the end of the last glaciation. Lake Tehuelche in Torres del Paine had drained

  17. Using Indigenist and Indigenous methodologies to connect to deeper understandings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kite, Elaine; Davy, Carol

    2015-12-01

    The lack of a common description makes measuring the concept of quality of life (QoL) a challenge. Whether QoL incorporates broader social features or is attributed to health conditions, the diverse range of descriptions applied by various disciplines has resulted in a concept that is multidimensional and vague. The variety of theoretical conceptualisations of QoL confounds and confuses even the most astute. Measuring QoL in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is even more challenging. Instruments commonly developed and used to measure QoL are often derived from research methodologies shaped by Western cultural perspectives. Often they are simply translated for use among culturally and linguistically diverse Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This has implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations whose perceptions of health are derived from within their specific cultures, value systems and ways of knowing and being. Interconnections and relationships between themselves, their communities, their environment and the natural and spiritual worlds are complex. The way in which their QoL is currently measured indicates that very little attention is given to the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' beliefs or the ways in which those beliefs shape or give structure and meaning to their health and their lives. The use of Indigenist or Indigenous methodologies in defining what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples believe gives quality to their lives is imperative. These methodologies have the potential to increase the congruency between their perceptions of QoL and instruments to measure it. PMID:26686300

  18. Providing culturally appropriate mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent: development of expert consensus guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is estimated that the prevalence of mental illness is higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents compared to non-Aboriginal adolescents. Despite this, only a small proportion of Aboriginal youth have contact with mental health services, possibly due to factors such as remoteness, language barriers, affordability and cultural sensitivity issues. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for anyone who is providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. Methods A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal youth mental health, participated in a Delphi study investigating how members of the public can be culturally appropriate when helping an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent with mental health problems. The panel varied in size across the three sequential rounds, from 37–41 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about cultural considerations and communication strategies via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional content. All statements endorsed as either Essential or Important by ≥ 90% of panel members were written into a guideline document. To assess the panel members’ satisfaction with the research method, participants were invited to provide their feedback after the final survey. Results From a total of 304 statements shown to the panel of experts, 194 statements were endorsed. The methodology was found to be useful and appropriate by the panellists. Conclusion Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth mental health experts were able to reach consensus about what the appropriate communication strategies for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent. These outcomes will help ensure that the community provides the best possible support to Aboriginal adolescents who

  19. Using Indigenist and Indigenous methodologies to connect to deeper understandings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kite, Elaine; Davy, Carol

    2015-12-01

    The lack of a common description makes measuring the concept of quality of life (QoL) a challenge. Whether QoL incorporates broader social features or is attributed to health conditions, the diverse range of descriptions applied by various disciplines has resulted in a concept that is multidimensional and vague. The variety of theoretical conceptualisations of QoL confounds and confuses even the most astute. Measuring QoL in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is even more challenging. Instruments commonly developed and used to measure QoL are often derived from research methodologies shaped by Western cultural perspectives. Often they are simply translated for use among culturally and linguistically diverse Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This has implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations whose perceptions of health are derived from within their specific cultures, value systems and ways of knowing and being. Interconnections and relationships between themselves, their communities, their environment and the natural and spiritual worlds are complex. The way in which their QoL is currently measured indicates that very little attention is given to the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' beliefs or the ways in which those beliefs shape or give structure and meaning to their health and their lives. The use of Indigenist or Indigenous methodologies in defining what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples believe gives quality to their lives is imperative. These methodologies have the potential to increase the congruency between their perceptions of QoL and instruments to measure it.

  20. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander worldviews and cultural safety transforming sexual assault service provision for children and young people.

    PubMed

    Funston, Leticia

    2013-09-01

    Child Sexual Assault (CSA) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a complex issue that cannot be understood in isolation from the ongoing impacts of colonial invasion, genocide, assimilation, institutionalised racism and severe socio-economic deprivation. Service responses to CSA are often experienced as racist, culturally, financially and/or geographically inaccessible. A two-day forum, National Yarn Up: Sharing the Wisdoms and Challenges of Young People and Sexual Abuse, was convened by sexual assault services to identify the main practice and policy concerns regarding working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (C&YP), families and communities in the context of CSA. The forum also aimed to explore how services can become more accountable and better engaged with the communities they are designed to support. The forum was attended by eighty invited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal youth sexual assault managers and workers representing both "victim" and "those who sexually harm others" services. In keeping with Aboriginal Community-Based Research methods forum participants largely directed discussions and contributed to the analysis of key themes and recommendations reported in this article. The need for sexual assault services to prioritise cultural safety by meaningfully integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews emerged as a key recommendation. It was also identified that collaboration between "victims" and "those who sexually harm" services are essential given Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander C&YP who sexually harm others may have also been victims of sexual assault or physical violence and intergenerational trauma. By working with the whole family and community, a collaborative approach is more likely than the current service model to develop cultural safety and thus increase the accessibility of sexual assault services.

  1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews and Cultural Safety Transforming Sexual Assault Service Provision for Children and Young People

    PubMed Central

    Funston, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    Child Sexual Assault (CSA) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a complex issue that cannot be understood in isolation from the ongoing impacts of colonial invasion, genocide, assimilation, institutionalised racism and severe socio-economic deprivation. Service responses to CSA are often experienced as racist, culturally, financially and/or geographically inaccessible. A two-day forum, National Yarn Up: Sharing the Wisdoms and Challenges of Young People and Sexual Abuse, was convened by sexual assault services to identify the main practice and policy concerns regarding working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (C&YP), families and communities in the context of CSA. The forum also aimed to explore how services can become more accountable and better engaged with the communities they are designed to support. The forum was attended by eighty invited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal youth sexual assault managers and workers representing both “victim” and “those who sexually harm others” services. In keeping with Aboriginal Community-Based Research methods forum participants largely directed discussions and contributed to the analysis of key themes and recommendations reported in this article. The need for sexual assault services to prioritise cultural safety by meaningfully integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews emerged as a key recommendation. It was also identified that collaboration between “victims” and “those who sexually harm” services are essential given Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander C&YP who sexually harm others may have also been victims of sexual assault or physical violence and intergenerational trauma. By working with the whole family and community, a collaborative approach is more likely than the current service model to develop cultural safety and thus increase the accessibility of sexual assault services. PMID:23975109

  2. Measuring emotional and social wellbeing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations: an analysis of a Negative Life Events Scale.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Emma; Gunthorpe, Wendy; Bailie, Ross S

    2007-01-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians experience widespread socioeconomic disadvantage and health inequality. In an attempt to make Indigenous health research more culturally-appropriate, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have called for more attention to the concept of emotional and social wellbeing (ESWB). Although it has been widely recognised that ESWB is of crucial importance to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, there is little consensus on how to measure in Indigenous populations, hampering efforts to better understand and improve the psychosocial determinants of health. This paper explores the policy and political context to this situation, and suggests ways to move forward. The second part of the paper explores how scales can be evaluated in a health research setting, including assessments of endorsement, discrimination, internal and external reliability.We then evaluate the use of a measure of stressful life events, the Negative Life Events Scale (NLES), in two samples of Aboriginal people living in remote communities in the Northern Territory of Australia. We argue that the Negative Life Events Scale is a promising assessment of psychosocial wellbeing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. Evaluation of the scale and its performance in other samples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is imperative if we hope to develop better, rather than more, scales for measuring ESWB among Indigenous Australians. Only then will it be possible to establish standardized methods of measuring ESWB and develop a body of comparable literature that can guide both a better understanding of ESWB, and evaluation of interventions designed to improve the psychosocial health of Indigenous populations and decrease health inequalities.

  3. Measuring emotional and social wellbeing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations: an analysis of a Negative Life Events Scale

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Emma; Gunthorpe, Wendy; Bailie, Ross S

    2007-01-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians experience widespread socioeconomic disadvantage and health inequality. In an attempt to make Indigenous health research more culturally-appropriate, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have called for more attention to the concept of emotional and social wellbeing (ESWB). Although it has been widely recognised that ESWB is of crucial importance to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, there is little consensus on how to measure in Indigenous populations, hampering efforts to better understand and improve the psychosocial determinants of health. This paper explores the policy and political context to this situation, and suggests ways to move forward. The second part of the paper explores how scales can be evaluated in a health research setting, including assessments of endorsement, discrimination, internal and external reliability. We then evaluate the use of a measure of stressful life events, the Negative Life Events Scale (NLES), in two samples of Aboriginal people living in remote communities in the Northern Territory of Australia. We argue that the Negative Life Events Scale is a promising assessment of psychosocial wellbeing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. Evaluation of the scale and its performance in other samples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is imperative if we hope to develop better, rather than more, scales for measuring ESWB among Indigenous Australians. Only then will it be possible to establish standardized methods of measuring ESWB and develop a body of comparable literature that can guide both a better understanding of ESWB, and evaluation of interventions designed to improve the psychosocial health of Indigenous populations and decrease health inequalities. PMID:18001479

  4. Using Participatory Action Research to Share Knowledge of the Local Environment and Climate Change: Case Study of Erub Island, Torres Strait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Karen Elizabeth; McNamara, John Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Reading seasons and environments has been a long-held practice for Torres Strait Islanders through their close relationships with their islands and seas. This research project worked with elders on Erub (Darnley) Island, in the eastern group of islands in the Torres Strait, to document and synthesise their knowledge of seasonal patterns and…

  5. Childhood lead poisoning from the smelter in Torreón, México.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, Martin F; Flegal, Arthur R

    2011-05-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions in blood samples of 34 children (ages 2-17 years) living within a 113 km(2) area of a silver-zinc-lead smelter plant in Torreón, México were compared to those of associated environmental samples (soil, aerosols, and outdoor and indoor dust) to identify the principal source(s) of environmental and human lead contamination in the area. Lead concentrations of soil and outdoor dust ranged 130-12,050 and 150-14,365 μg g(-1), respectively. Concentrations were greatest near the smelter, with the highest levels corresponding with the prevailing wind direction, and orders of magnitude above background concentrations of 7.3-33.3 μg g(-1). Atmospheric lead depositions in the city varied between 130 and 1350 μg m(-2) d(-1), again with highest rates <1 km from the smelter. Blood lead (PbB) concentrations (11.0±5.3 μg dl(-1)) levels in the children ranged 5.0-25.8 μg dl(-1), which is 3-14 times higher than the current average (1.9 μg dl(-1)) of children (ages 1-5 years) in the US. Lead isotopic ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of the urban dust and soil (1.200±0.009, 2.467±0.003), aerosols (1.200±0.002, 2.466±0.002), and PbB (1.199±0.001, 2.468±0.002) were indistinguishable from each other, as well as those of the lead ores processed at the smelter (1.199±0.007, 2.473±0.007). Consequently, an elevated PbB concentrations of the children in Torreón, as well as in their environment, are still dominated by industrial emissions from the smelter located within the city, in spite of new controls on atmospheric releases from the facility. PMID:21329917

  6. Stratigraphical framework of basaltic lavas in Torres Syncline main valley, southern Parana-Etendeka Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Lucas M.; Lima, Evandro F.; Waichel, Breno L.; Scherer, Claiton M.; Barreto, Carla J.

    2014-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Volcanic Province records the volcanism of the Early Cretaceous that precedes the fragmentation of the South-Gondwana supercontinent. Traditionally, investigations of these rocks prioritized the acquisition of geochemical and isotopic data, considering the volcanic stack as a monotonous succession of tabular flows. Torres Syncline is a tectonic structure located in southern Brazil and where the Parana-Etendeka basalts are well preserved. This work provides a detailed analysis of lithofacies and facies architecture, integrated to petrographic and geochemical data. We identified seven distinct lithofacies grouped into four facies associations related to different flow morphologies. The basaltic lava flows in the area can be divided into two contrasting units: Unit I - pahoehoe flow fields; and Unit II - simple rubbly flows. The first unit is build up by innumerous pahoehoe lava flows that cover the sandstones of Botucatu Formation. These flows occur as sheet pahoehoe, compound pahoehoe, and ponded lavas morphologies. Compound lavas are olivine-phyric basalts with intergranular pyroxenes. In ponded lavas and cores of sheet flows coarse plagioclase-phyric basalts are common. The first pahoehoe lavas are more primitive with higher contents of MgO. The emplacement of compound pahoehoe flows is related to low volume eruptions, while sheet lavas were emplaced during sustained eruptions. In contrast, Unit II is formed by thick simple rubbly lavas, characterized by a massive core and a brecciated/rubbly top. Petrographically these flows are characterized by plagioclase-phyric to aphyric basalts with high density of plagioclase crystals in the matrix. Chemically they are more differentiated lavas, and the emplacement is related to sustained high effusion rate eruptions. Both units are low TiO2 and have geochemical characteristics of Gramado magma type. The Torres Syncline main valley has a similar evolution when compared to other Large Igneous Provinces

  7. Childhood lead poisoning from the smelter in Torreón, México.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, Martin F; Flegal, Arthur R

    2011-05-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions in blood samples of 34 children (ages 2-17 years) living within a 113 km(2) area of a silver-zinc-lead smelter plant in Torreón, México were compared to those of associated environmental samples (soil, aerosols, and outdoor and indoor dust) to identify the principal source(s) of environmental and human lead contamination in the area. Lead concentrations of soil and outdoor dust ranged 130-12,050 and 150-14,365 μg g(-1), respectively. Concentrations were greatest near the smelter, with the highest levels corresponding with the prevailing wind direction, and orders of magnitude above background concentrations of 7.3-33.3 μg g(-1). Atmospheric lead depositions in the city varied between 130 and 1350 μg m(-2) d(-1), again with highest rates <1 km from the smelter. Blood lead (PbB) concentrations (11.0±5.3 μg dl(-1)) levels in the children ranged 5.0-25.8 μg dl(-1), which is 3-14 times higher than the current average (1.9 μg dl(-1)) of children (ages 1-5 years) in the US. Lead isotopic ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of the urban dust and soil (1.200±0.009, 2.467±0.003), aerosols (1.200±0.002, 2.466±0.002), and PbB (1.199±0.001, 2.468±0.002) were indistinguishable from each other, as well as those of the lead ores processed at the smelter (1.199±0.007, 2.473±0.007). Consequently, an elevated PbB concentrations of the children in Torreón, as well as in their environment, are still dominated by industrial emissions from the smelter located within the city, in spite of new controls on atmospheric releases from the facility.

  8. EDITORIAL: Selected articles from `The 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (Amaldi 8)', Columbia University, New York, 22-26 June 2009 Selected articles from `The 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (Amaldi 8)', Columbia University, New York, 22-26 June 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Marka, Szabolcs

    2010-04-01

    At Amaldi7,which was held in Sydney in 2007, the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC), which oversees the Amaldi meetings, decided to hold the 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves at Columbia University in the City of New York. With this decision, Amaldi returned to North America after a decade. The previous two years have seen many advances in the field of gravitational-wave detection. By the summer of 2009 the km-scale ground based interferometric detectors in the USA and Europe were preparing for a second long-term scientific run as a worldwide detector network. The advanced or second-generation detectors had well-developed plans and were ready for the production phase or had started construction. The European-American space mission, LISA Pathfinder, is progressing towards deployment in the foreseeable future and it is expected to pave the way towards gravitational-wave detection in the millihertz regime with LISA. Plans were developed for an additional gravitational-wave detector in Australia and in Japan (in this case underground) to extend the worldwide network of detectors for the advanced detector era. Japanese colleagues also presented plans for a space mission, DECIGO, that would bridge the gap between the LISA and ground-based interferometer frequency range. Compared to previous Amaldi meetings, Amaldi8 had new elements representing emerging trends in the field. For example, with the inclusion of pulsar timing collaborations to the GWIC, gravitational-wave detection using pulsar timing arrays was recognized as one of the prominent directions in the field and was represented at Amaldi8 as a separate session. By 2009, searches for gravitational waves based on external triggers received from electromagnetic observations were already producing significant scientific results and plans existed for pointing telescopes by utilizing gravitational-wave trigger events. Such multimessenger approaches to gravitational-wave detection also

  9. Synchronous gastric and sebaceous cancers, a rare manifestation of MLH1-related Muir-Torre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Švec, Jiří; Schwarzová, Lucie; Janošíková, Bohumila; Štekrová, Jitka; Mandys, Václav; Kment, Milan; Vodička, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS), a rare variant of the hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome, is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterised by coincidence of sebaceous gland neoplasms (sebaceous adenoma, epithelioma, or carcinoma) and at least one internal malignancy. The underlying cause of MTS is a germline mutation in DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6. We report the case of a 52-year-old caucasian woman with the development of metachronous colon cancer at the age of 38 years, uterine cancer at the age of 43 years, and unique occurrence of synchronous gastric and sebaceous carcinomas related to germline point mutation c. 2194A>T in the last exon of MLH1 gene, resulting in truncated protein in C-terminal region p. Lys732X due to premature stop codon. This mutation, not previously reported in MTS, disrupts the function of MutL complexes presumably by preventing the interaction with PMS1/PMS2 and impairing the endonuclease active site. This case points out the importance of sebaceous neoplasia, especially sebaceous adenocarcinoma, as cutaneous markers of MTS for timely implementation of cancer screening programs. PMID:25197397

  10. Effect and mechanism of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. plant salt on blood pressure in SD rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumeng; Wei, Mingqian; Cao, Chunjie; Ju, Yaoyao; Deng, Yanqun; Ye, Tianwen; Xia, Zufeng; Chen, Meizhen

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect and mechanism of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. plant salt (SPS) on blood pressure in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were investigated. The results showed that the edible salt induced hypertension, but the SPS did not. Organ indices and Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) staining analysis indicated that SPS had a protective effect on the kidney and liver. In comparison with the edible salt-treated group, nitric oxide (NO) content, angiotensin-II (Ang-II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels in the serum of the SPS-treated group had no obvious changes, but serum creatinine concentration significantly decreased. Moreover, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity increased while malondialdehyde (MDA) content decreased in the SPS-treated group. In conclusion, a long-term high salt intake could lead to hypertension. SPS, as a salt substitute, could increase the body's antioxidant ability to protect the kidney and liver from the damage caused by a high salt intake and effectively avoid the occurrence of hypertension. PMID:25631641

  11. Effect and mechanism of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. plant salt on blood pressure in SD rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumeng; Wei, Mingqian; Cao, Chunjie; Ju, Yaoyao; Deng, Yanqun; Ye, Tianwen; Xia, Zufeng; Chen, Meizhen

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect and mechanism of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. plant salt (SPS) on blood pressure in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were investigated. The results showed that the edible salt induced hypertension, but the SPS did not. Organ indices and Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) staining analysis indicated that SPS had a protective effect on the kidney and liver. In comparison with the edible salt-treated group, nitric oxide (NO) content, angiotensin-II (Ang-II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels in the serum of the SPS-treated group had no obvious changes, but serum creatinine concentration significantly decreased. Moreover, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity increased while malondialdehyde (MDA) content decreased in the SPS-treated group. In conclusion, a long-term high salt intake could lead to hypertension. SPS, as a salt substitute, could increase the body's antioxidant ability to protect the kidney and liver from the damage caused by a high salt intake and effectively avoid the occurrence of hypertension.

  12. Fact or fiction? A critique of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002.

    PubMed

    Chikritzhs, Tanya; Brady, Maggie

    2006-05-01

    The ability of policy makers, practitioners and the broader public to respond appropriately in reducing the harms caused by alcohol misuse depends in large part on our understanding of the nature of the problem. In the case of consumption patterns and associated harms among indigenous minority peoples--in Australia and elsewhere--such an understanding is often difficult to achieve. There are a host of reasons for this including cultural differences between indigenous peoples and the broader populations within which they are located, cultural heterogeneity among indigenous peoples themselves, political and economic disadvantages which exacerbate misuse and its effects, methodological difficulties in the appropriate design of data collection instruments, sampling issues and the issues in the interpretation of data. All these difficulties mean that we need to subject any studies of substance misuse among indigenous peoples to a high level of scrutiny. This is particularly the case when such studies are conducted by organisations that are generally regarded as 'authoritative' sources of information. Chikritzhs & Brady have done this in the case of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002, conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In their review of this and other surveys, they demonstrate that to produce valid information about indigenous alcohol misuse, as well as having the skills to conduct broad population surveys, it is necessary to have an understanding of both methods of collecting data on alcohol consumption and Indigenous cultures themselves.

  13. Evaluating ecosystem-based management options: Effects of trawling in Torres Strait, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Nick; Pantus, Francis; Welna, Andrzej; Butler, Alan

    2008-09-01

    A suite of management options for a prawn trawl fishery in Torres Strait, Australia was assessed for impacts on the benthic fauna using a dynamic management strategy evaluation approach. The specification of the management options was gained through consultation with stakeholders. Data for the model was drawn from several sources: the fleet data from fishery logbooks and satellite vessel monitoring systems, benthic depletion rates from trawl-down experiments, benthic recovery rates from post-experiment recovery monitoring studies, and benthic distribution from large-scale benthic surveys. Although there were large uncertainties in the resulting indicators, robust measures relevant to management were obtained by taking ratios relative to the status quo. The management control with the biggest effect was total effort; reducing trawl effort always led to increases in benthic faunal density of up to 10%. Spatial closures had a smaller benefit of up to 2%. The effect of closing a set of buffer zones around reefs to trawling was indistinguishable from the status quo option. Closing a larger area, however, was largely beneficial especially for sea cucumbers. When the spatial distributions of fauna prior to fishing were accounted for, fauna with distributions positively correlated with effort improved relative to those negatively correlated. The reduction in prawn catch under effort reduction scenarios could be ameliorated by introducing temporal closures over the full-moon period.

  14. Instantaneous stroke volume by PDE during and after constant LBNP (-50 torr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Six male subjects were exposed to -50 torr lower body negative pressure (LBNP) for 10 min while stroke volume was recorded beat by beat at regular intervals before, during and after release of LBNP. Stroke volume was calculated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the vessel by M mode echocardiography. Changes in leg volume were recorded continuously and blood pressure was taken every minute. Stroke volume dropped by 51% of the control in the first 33 sec of LBNP and continued to decline slowly to -62% toward the end. Heart rate increased by 15% in the first 10 sec and was 22% above control at the end of exposure. The resulting cardiac output closely followed the course of stroke volume (-47% at 33 sec, -53% at 8 min) showing that the modest increase in heart rate did little to offset the drop in stroke volume. Leg volume increased markedly within the first 10 sec with a more gradual rise reaching +3.5% at the end. Upon sudden release of LBNP, leg volume dropped significantly during the first 3 sec simultaneously with an increase in stroke volume followed by a substantial decline in heart rate below the baseline.

  15. Childhood disability in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children have higher rates of disability than non-Indigenous children and are considered doubly disadvantaged, yet there is very little data reflecting prevalence and service access to inform design and delivery of services. Failing to address physical, social, and psychological factors can have life-long consequences and perpetuate longstanding health disparities. Methods A narrative literature review was undertaken to identify peer reviewed literature describing factors impacting on the prevention, recognition, and access to support and management of disability in Indigenous Australian children. Results Twenty-seven peer-reviewed journal articles met inclusion criteria. The majority of articles focused on the hearing loss and learning disabilities consequent of otitis media. Few articles reported data on urban or metropolitan Indigenous populations or described interventions. Individual/community-, provider-, and systems level factors were identified as impacting on recognition and management of disability in young Indigenous children. Conclusions Given the burden of childhood disability, the limited literature retrieved is concerning as this is a barometer of activity and investment. Solutions addressing childhood disability will require collaboration between health, social and educational disciplines as well as an increased investment in prevention, identification and promotion of access. PMID:23327694

  16. Simultaneous Muir-Torre and Turcot's syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Grandhi, Ramesh; Deibert, Christopher P.; Pirris, Stephen M.; Lembersky, Barry; Mintz, Arlan H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by neoplasms of the sebaceous gland or keratoacanthomas, in addition to visceral malignancies. Cerebral neoplasms in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or familial adenomatous polyposis suffer from Turcot's syndrome. Genetic mutations in MutS homolog (MSH)-2, MutL homolog (MLH)-1, and MutS homolog (MSH)-6 DNA mismatch repair genes are the most common in MTS with MSH-2 being the most predominant. In HNPCC MLH-1 and MSH-2 mutations are approximately equal in prevalence. Case Description: We present the case of a 58-year-old male with a prior history of being treated for colonic adenocarcinoma and skin lesions leading to a diagnosis of MTS. The patient later developed a World Health Organization (WHO) grade 4 glioma requiring surgical resection. Pathology revealed mutations in MSH-2 and MSH-6 mismatch repair genes. Conclusions: This case represents the first report of Turcot's and MTS with extensive molecular testing on the cerebral neoplasm demonstrating a molecular relationship between Turcot's and MTS and only the second published report of simultaneous Turcot's and MTS. PMID:23646262

  17. Effect of Salinity upon Cell Membrane Potential in the Marine Halophyte, Salicornia bigelovii Torr.

    PubMed

    L'roy, A; Hendrix, D L

    1980-03-01

    The electrophysiology of root cells of the marine halophyte, Salicornia bigelovii Torr., has been investigated. Cellular concentrations of K(+), Cl(-), and Na(+) and resulting cell membrane potentials were determined as functions of time and exposure to dilutions of artificial seawater. Treatment of these data by the Nernst criterion suggests that Cl(-) is actively transported into these root cells, but that active transport need not be invoked to explain the accumulation of Na(+) at all salinities investigated nor for K(+) at moderate to high salinities. In low environmental salinity, the cell electropotential of Salicornia root cells was found to respond to inhibitors in a fashion similar to that observed in glycophytes; in high environmental salinity, root cell membrane potential appears to be insensitive to bathing salinity and m-chlorocarbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone induces membrane hyperpolarization, in contrast to the response of glycophytes to such treatments. The fact that measured membrane potentials exceed diffusion potentials for Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) and the observation of a rapid depolarization by CO in the dark suggests an electrogenic component in Salicornia root cell membrane potentials. PMID:16661232

  18. Physics 152 Laboratory Manual, 8th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIssac, Dan; And Others

    This document is the laboratory manual for the Physics 152 course at Purdue University. It includes a laboratory introduction, hardware and software guide, and laboratory report guide. Labs include: (1) "Measurement Uncertainty and Propagation"; (2) "Introduction to Computer Data Acquisition and Relationships between Position, Velocity, and…

  19. 8th Annual School Construction Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Presents detailed data on U.S. school construction for 2002. Total construction in 2002 topped $21.6 billion, the third consecutive year that numbers have topped $20 billion; expectations for 2003 indicate things may be slowing down. Includes region-by-region analyses. (EV)

  20. La meridiana di Egnazio Danti nella Torre dei Venti in Vaticano: un'icona della riforma Gregoriana del calendario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    La Torre dei Venti domina l’angolo Sud Ovest del cortile della Pigna (nell'area dei Musei Vaticani), ed è inclusa negli ambienti dell'Archivio Segreto Vaticano. Non è aperta al pubblico, ma è universalmente nota per la fama che da oltre quattrocento anni la circonda, legata alle vicende della riforma Gregoriana del calendario. La meridiana tracciata da padre Egnazio Danti (1536-1586) nella torre dei Venti, fu visitata anche da Gregorio XIII, probabilmente il 21 marzo 1581 come suppone il padre Stein, per convincersi dell'anticipo ormai arrivato a dieci giorni dell'equinozio di primavera sulla data che il concilio di Nicea aveva fissato al 21 marzo per il computo pasquale. La ricognizione astrometrica del febbraio-marzo 2009 fatta dall'autore viene qui presentata.

  1. Making tuba in the Torres Strait Islands: the cultural diffusion and geographic mobility of an alcoholic drink.

    PubMed

    Brady, Maggie; McGrath, Vic

    2010-01-01

    There is relatively scant evidence of the Indigenous production and consumption of intoxicating drinks on the Australian mainland prior to the arrival of outsiders. Although Australian Aboriginal peoples had mastered fermentation in some regions, the Indigenous manufacture of much stronger drinks by distillation was unknown on the Australian mainland. However, following contact with Pacific Island and Southeast Asian peoples in the 19th century, Islanders in the Torres Strait adopted techniques for fermenting and distilling what became a quasi-indigenous alcoholic drink known as tuba. This paper discusses the historical process of the diffusion of this substance as a result of labour migration and internationalisation in the Strait, and provides present-day accounts of tuba production from Torres Strait Islanders.

  2. Indolizidine, Antiinfective and Antiparasitic Compounds from Prosopis glandulosa Torr. Var. glandulosa

    PubMed Central

    Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Ashfaq, Mohammad K.; Jacob, Melissa R.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, Shabana I.; Manly, Susan P.; Joshi, Vaishali C.; Walker, Larry A.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2013-01-01

    A new potent antiinfective and antiparasitic 2,3-dihydro-1H-indolizinium chloride, (1), was isolated from Prosopis glandulosa Torr. var. glandulosa. Three additional new (2–4) and one known (5), indolizidines were also isolated, and the dihydrochloride salts of 1–3 (compounds 6, 7 and 8) were prepared. Structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectra. Compound 1 showed potent in vitro antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus (IC50 values = 0.4 and 3.0 μg/mL, respectively), and antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium intracellulare (IC50 values of 0.35 and 0.9 μg/mL, respectively). The remarkable in vitro fungicidal activity of 1–4 against C. neoformans (MFCs = 0.63→1.25 μg/mL) and 2, 3, and 5 against A. fumigatus (MFCs = 0.63→2.5 μg/mL) were similar to amphotericin B, but >2–4-fold more potent than 6–8. Prosopilosidine (1) showed potent in vivo activity at 0.0625 mg/Kg/day/ip for 5 days in a murine model of cryptococcosis by eliminating ~76% of C. neoformans infection from brain tissue compared to ~83% with amphotericin B at 1.5 mg/Kg/day. Compounds 1 and 4 exhibited potent activity and high selectivity index (SI) values against chloroquine sensitive (D6) and chloroquine resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values of 39 and 95 ng/mL, and 42 and 120 ng/mL, respectively; (chloroquine, IC50 = 17 and 140 ng/mL). Prosopilosine (1) also showed in vivo antimalarial activity with an ED50 value of ~2 mg/Kg/day/ip against Plasmodium berghei-infected mice after 3 days of treatment. PMID:19105653

  3. A Review of Programs That Targeted Environmental Determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Leah; Doyle, Joyce; Morgan, Bec; Atkinson-Briggs, Sharon; Firebrace, Bradley; Marika, Mayatili; Reilly, Rachel; Cargo, Margaret; Riley, Therese; Rowley, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective interventions to improve population and individual health require environmental change as well as strategies that target individual behaviours and clinical factors. This is the basis of implementing an ecological approach to health programs and health promotion. For Aboriginal People and Torres Strait Islanders, colonisation has made the physical and social environment particularly detrimental for health. Methods and Results: We conducted a literature review to identify Aboriginal health interventions that targeted environmental determinants of health, identifying 21 different health programs. Program activities that targeted environmental determinants of health included: Caring for Country; changes to food supply and/or policy; infrastructure for physical activity; housing construction and maintenance; anti-smoking policies; increased workforce capacity; continuous quality improvement of clinical systems; petrol substitution; and income management. Targets were categorised according to Miller’s Living Systems Theory. Researchers using an Indigenous community based perspective more often identified interpersonal and community-level targets than were identified using a Western academic perspective. Conclusions: Although there are relatively few papers describing interventions that target environmental determinants of health, many of these addressed such determinants at multiple levels, consistent to some degree with an ecological approach. Interpretation of program targets sometimes differed between academic and community-based perspectives, and was limited by the type of data reported in the journal articles, highlighting the need for local Indigenous knowledge for accurate program evaluation. Implications: While an ecological approach to Indigenous health is increasingly evident in the health research literature, the design and evaluation of such programs requires a wide breadth of expertise, including local Indigenous knowledge. PMID

  4. Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics (HISTRAP) vacuum test stand for pressures of 10/sup -12/ Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Atkins, W.H.; Dowling, D.T.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-05-01

    HISTRAP (Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics) is a proposed synchrotron/cooler/storage ring accelerator optimized for advanced atomic physics research. The ring has a circumference of 46.8 m, a bore diameter of /similar to/15 cm, and requires a vacuum of 10/sup -12/ Torr to decelerate highly charged, very heavy ions down to low energies. To be able to test components and procedures to achieve this pressure, a test stand approximately modeling 1/16 of the ring vacuum chamber has been built. The 3.5-m-long test stand has been fabricated from 10-cm-diam components, with 316LN stainless-steel flanges. Prior to assembly, these components were vacuum fired at 950 /sup 0/C at a pressure of 10/sup -4/ Torr. The test stand is bakable in situ at 300 /sup 0/C. Pumping is achieved with two 750 l/s titanium sublimator pumps and one 60 l/s ion pump. Pressure is measured with two extractor ion gauges and a 10/sup -4/ partial pressure residual gas analyser. The roughing for the test stand consists of cryosorption pumps followed by a cryopump. A pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr has been achieved.

  5. HISTRAP (Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics) vacuum test stand for pressures of 10/sup -12/ Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Atkins, W.H.; Dowling, D.T.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed synchrotron/cooler/storage ring accelerator optimized for advanced atomic physics research. The ring has a circumference of 46.8 m, a bore diameter of about 15 cm, and requires a vacuum of 10/sup -12/ Torr in order to decelerate highly-charged very-heavy ions down to low energies. To be able to test components and procedures to achieve this pressure, a test stand approximately modeling one-sixteenth of the ring vacuum chamber has been built. The 3.5-m-long test stand has been fabricated from 10-cm-diameter components, with 316LN stainless steel flanges. Prior to assembly, these components were vacuum fired at 950/degree/C at a pressure of 10/sup -4/ Torr. The test stand is bakeable in situ at 300/degree/C. Pumping is achieved with two 750-L/s titanium sublimator pumps and one 60-L/s ion pump. Pressure is measured with two extractor ion gauges and a 10/sup -14/ PP RGA. The roughing for the test stand consists of cryosorption pumps followed by a cryopump. A pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr has been achieved. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Bedform facies in western Torres Strait and the influence of hydrodynamics, coastal geometry, and sediment supply on their distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James J.

    2015-04-01

    This study uses outputs from hydrodynamic and bedload transport models combined with satellite imagery, aerial photography, and bathymetric data to understand the distributions and mechanisms maintaining six spatially extensive bedform facies in western Torres Strait. Changes in bedform morphology occur along north-south variations in coastal geometry and east-west variations in hydrodynamic regime. Numerous islands create an environment that favours the formation of banner banks in the south, while other sandbank morphologies occur on an extensive and comparatively 'flat' basement to the north. The western side of Torres Strait experiences net bedload transport that is directed to the west throughout the year and favours the formation of bedforms that prefer unidirectional bedload transport regimes (i.e. barchan-shaped sandbanks and sand ribbons). The eastern side of the strait experiences seasonal changes in the direction of net bedload transport and maintains 'S' and 'V' shaped sandbanks. Sediment availability also influences the bedform facies. Western Torres Strait experiences net westward bedload transport through the Strait. However, sandbanks (indicating high sediment availability) are found in the central shallow and high current velocity areas, while sand ribbons (indicating low sediment availability) are a distal facies on the western side of the Strait. This sequence of bedforms indicates that sediments are preferentially trapped within the central portion of the Strait and not transported further west into the Gulf of Carpentaria.

  7. The Torres Reefs, North Queensland, Australia —strong tidal flows a modern control on their growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. R.

    1995-05-01

    High resolution seismic data from Torres Strait off northern Australia provide the first insights into the development of the striking platform reefs of the region. In the southern part of Torres Strait, where the sea floor is shallow and featureless, the Torres Reefs have developed as long, narrow platforms parallel to very strong east-west flowing tidal currents. The reefs have expanded since the end of the post-glacial marine transgression (approximately 6000 years ago) through preferential growth at each end of their platforms. In these localized areas sheltered from the strong tidal currents, patch reefs have developed. Sediments swept from the reef margin and the inter-reef channels are deposited in these current lee areas at the ends of the reefs. The combination of the patch reefs and reefal sediments provides the essentials for extension of the platform reefs. The seismic data confirm that modern reef expansion is occurring without there being a high substrate for coral colonization. The evolutionary sequence from an uncolonized seafloor to a mature platform reef envisages a synchronous process of patch reef development and sediment accumulation.

  8. Geological relationships of basalts, andesites and sand injectites at the base of the Paraná volcanic province, Torres, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L. A.; Arena, K. R.; Duarte, S. K.

    2012-09-01

    The Cretaceous interaction of the heated, giant Guarani aquifer with lavas, dikes and sills of the Paraná volcanic province is here evaluated based on the description of the large exposures in Torres, southernmost Brazil. Chalcedony silicified sandstone dikes, sills and breccias containing volcanic clasts in a sandstone matrix are common in the Paraná volcanic province. Sandstone layers mark either the contact between lava flows or the base of the vertically-jointed, massive core. In Torres, one basaltic andesite and one andesite lava flow of the low-Ti Gramado type, and basalt and basaltic andesite sills and dikes, are correlated over 10 km with rocks in the Graxaim quarry. Scintillometric emission rates vary systematically with contents of K, Th and U and are characteristic of each lava or intrusive rock. Major and trace elements are also characteristic of each lava. Three large outcrops of breccias display angular, amygdaloidal volcanic clasts immersed in a silicified sandstone matrix. No evidence was found of high temperature (1150 °C) interaction of the lava with the loose, erg of the Botucatu Formation, such as fluidal volcanic clasts, quenched rims or thermal recrystallization of the sand; only a thin (5 mm) layer of thermally modified sand is present on top of a paleodune in Torres. In Torres, the interaction of andesite with wet sand occurred after degassing of the lava, because the breccia clasts are amygdaloidal. All evidence points to hydrothermal processes for the formation of the breccias, such as lozenge fractures filled with silicified sandstone, preserved detrital characteristics of the sandstone grains and cold (below 130 °C) contact between the volcanic rock and the sand. Most significant is the timing of sand intrusion, because thin (1 mm) dikes of silicified sandstone cut fractures in the rock and the zeolite-filled amygdales. The sandstone dikes, sills and breccias are interpreted as a result of the ascent of overpressured heated water and

  9. Pressure-viscosity measurements for several lubricants to 5.5 x 10 to the 8th power Newtons per square meter (8 x 10 to the 4th psi) and 149 C (300 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Johnson, R. L.; Winer, W. O.; Sanborn, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A capillary viscometer was used to measure viscosity as a function of pressure, temperature, and shear stress for a number of lubricants. The conditions under which the measurements were made are specified. The results obtained for each material are analyzed. It was determined that all pressure-viscosity coefficients decreased with increasing temperature. Data from other techniques such as optical elastohydrodynamics, oscillating crystal, and low shear capillary viscometry were compared with the results obtained.

  10. IBC's 21st Annual Antibody Engineering and 8th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and 2010 Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society. December 5-9, 2010, San Diego, CA USA.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Samantha O; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Wurch, Theirry; Reichert, Janice M; Dunlop, Cameron; Huber, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The 21st Annual Antibody Engineering and 8th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2010 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-9, 2010 in San Diego, CA. The conferences were organized with a focus on antibody engineering only on the first day and a joint engineering/therapeutics session on the last day. Delegates could select from presentations that occurred in two simultaneous sessions on days 2 and 3. Day 1 included presentations on neutralizing antibodies and the identification of vaccine targets, as well as a historical overview of 20 years of phage display utilization. Topics presented in the Antibody Engineering sessions on day 2 and 3 included antibody biosynthesis, structure and stability; antibodies in a complex environment; antibody half-life; and targeted nanoparticle therapeutics. In the Antibody Therapeutics sessions on days 2 and 3, preclinical and early stage development and clinical updates of antibody therapeutics, including TRX518, SYM004, MM111, PRO140, CVX-241, ASG-5ME, U3-1287 (AMG888), R1507 and trastuzumab emtansine, were discussed, and perspectives were provided on the development of biosimilar and biobetter antibodies, including coverage of regulatory and intellectual property issues. The joint engineering/therapeutics session on the last day focused on bispecific and next-generation antibodies.

  11. Social determinants and psychological distress among Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander adults in the Australian state of Victoria: a cross-sectional population based study.

    PubMed

    Markwick, Alison; Ansari, Zahid; Sullivan, Mary; McNeil, John

    2015-03-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults in the Australian state of Victoria have a higher prevalence of psychological distress than their non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander counterparts. We sought to explain this inequality, focussing on the social determinants of health. We used population-based survey data from the 2008 Victorian Population Health Survey; a cross-sectional landline computer-assisted telephone survey of 34,168 randomly selected adults. We defined psychological distress as a score of 22 or more on the Kessler 10 Psychological Distress scale. We used logistic regression to identify socio-demographic characteristics and social capital indicators that were associated with psychological distress. We then created multivariable models to explore the association between psychological distress and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status that incorporated all significant socioeconomic status (SES) and social capital variables, adjusting for all non-SES socio-demographic characteristics. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victorians (24.5%) were more than twice as likely than their non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander counterparts (11.3%) to have psychological distress (odds ratio (OR) = 2.56, 95% confidence interval; 1.67-3.93). Controlling for SES, negative perceptions of the residential neighbourhood, lack of social support from family, social and civic distrust, and all non-SES socio-demographic variables (age, sex, marital status, household composition, and rurality), rendered the previously statistically significant inequality in the prevalence of psychological distress, between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victorians and their non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander counterparts, insignificant at the p = 0.05 level (OR = 1.50; 0.97-2.32). Psychological distress is an important health risk factor for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults that has yet to be widely acknowledged and addressed. Addressing the

  12. Measured and predicted temperature profiles along MEMS bridges at pressures from 0.05 to 625 torr.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2010-10-01

    We will present experimental and computational investigations of the thermal performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as a function of the surrounding gas pressure. Lowering the pressure in MEMS packages reduces gas damping, providing increased sensitivity for certain MEMS sensors; however, such packaging also dramatically affects their thermal performance since energy transfer to the environment is substantially reduced. High-spatial-resolution Raman thermometry was used to measure the temperature profiles on electrically heated, polycrystalline silicon bridges that are nominally 10 microns wide, 2.25 microns thick, 12 microns above the substrate, and either 200 or 400 microns long in nitrogen atmospheres with pressures ranging from 0.05 to 625 Torr. Finite element modeling of the thermal behavior of the MEMS bridges is performed and compared to the experimental results. Noncontinuum gas effects are incorporated into the continuum finite element model by imposing temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces that are determined from noncontinuum simulations. The experimental and simulation results indicate that at pressures below 0.5 Torr the gas-phase heat transfer is negligible compared to heat conduction through the thermal actuator legs. As the pressure increases above 0.5 Torr, the gas-phase heat transfer becomes more significant. At ambient pressures, gas-phase heat transfer drastically impacts the thermal performance. The measured and simulated temperature profiles are in qualitative agreement in the present study. Quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated temperature profiles requires accurate knowledge of temperature-dependent thermophysical properties, the device geometry, and the thermal accommodation coefficient.

  13. Stand-off laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aluminum and geochemical reference materials at pressure below 1 torr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang-Jae; Choi, Soo-Jin; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic emission spectroscopy that utilizes a highly irradiated pulse laser focused on the target surface to produce plasma. We obtain spectroscopic information from the microplasma and determine the chemical composition of the sample based on its elemental and molecular emission peaks. We develop a stand-off LIBS system to analyze the effect of the remote sensing of aluminum and various geochemical reference materials at pressures below 1 torr. Using a commercial 4 inch refracting telescope, our stand-off LIBS system is configured at a distance of 7.2 m from the four United States Geological Survey (USGS) geochemical samples that include granodiorite, quartz latite, shale-cody, and diabase, which are selected for planetary exploration. Prepared samples were mixed with a paraffin binder containing only hydrogen and carbon, and were pelletized for experimental convenience. The aluminum plate sample is considered as a reference prior to using the geochemical samples in order to understand the influence of a low pressure condition on the resulting LIBS signal. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and pulsed at 10 Hz with 21.7 to 48.5 mJ/pulse was used to obtain signals, which showed that the geochemical samples were successfully detected by the present stand-off detection scheme. A low pressure condition generally results in a decrease of the signal intensity, while the signal to noise ratio can vary according to the samples and elements of various types. We successfully identified the signals at below 1 torr with stand-off detection by a tightly focused light detection and by using a relatively larger aperture telescope. The stand-off LIBS detection at low pressure is promising for potential detection of the minor elements at pressures below 1 torr.

  14. Vicariance and dispersal across an intermittent barrier: population genetic structure of marine animals across the Torres Strait land bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirams, A. G. K.; Treml, E. A.; Shields, J. L.; Liggins, L.; Riginos, C.

    2011-12-01

    Biogeographic barriers, some transitory in duration, are likely to have been important contributing factors to modern marine biodiversity in the Indo-Pacific region. One such barrier was the Torres Strait land bridge between continental Australia and New Guinea that persisted through much of the late Pleistocene and separated Indian and Pacific Ocean taxa. Here, we examine the patterns of mitochondrial DNA diversity for marine animals with present-day distributions spanning the Torres Strait. Specifically, we investigate whether there are concordant signatures across species, consistent with either vicariance or recent colonization from either ocean basin. We survey four species of reef fishes ( Apogon doederleini, Pomacentrus coelestis, Dascyllus trimaculatus, and Acanthurus triostegus) for mtDNA cytochrome oxidase 1 and control region variation and contrast these results to previous mtDNA studies in diverse marine animals with similar distributions. We find substantial genetic partitioning (estimated from F-statistics and coalescent approaches) between Indian and Pacific Ocean populations for many species, consistent with regional persistence through the late Pleistocene in both ocean basins. The species-specific estimates of genetic divergence, however, vary greatly and for reef fishes we estimate substantially different divergence times among species. It is likely that Indian and Pacific Ocean populations have been isolated for multiple glacial cycles for some species, whereas for other species genetic connections have been more recent. Regional estimates of genetic diversity and directionality of gene flow also vary among species. Thus, there is no apparent consistency among historical patterns across the Torres Strait for these co-distributed marine animals.

  15. Spatial patterns of sub-tidal seagrasses and their tissue nutrients in the Torres Strait, northern Australia: Implications for management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, James K.; Carter, Alex B.; McKenzie, Len J.; Pitcher, C. Roland; Coles, Robert G.

    2008-09-01

    The distribution and nutritional profiles of sub-tidal seagrasses from the Torres Strait were surveyed and mapped across an area of 31,000 km 2. Benthic sediment composition, water depth, seagrass species type and nutrients were sampled at 168 points selected in a stratified representative pattern. Eleven species of seagrass were present at 56 (33.3%) of the sample points. Halophila spinulosa, Halophila ovalis, Cymodocea serrulata and Syringodium isoetifolium were the most common species and these were nutrient profiled. Sub-tidal seagrass distribution (and associated seagrass nutrient concentrations) was generally confined to northern-central and south-western regions of the survey area (Torres Strait. There were two regions in Torres Strait (north-central and south-western) where sub-tidal seagrass meadows were prevalent and of relatively higher

  16. Reducing SS 304/316 hydrogen outgassing to 2x10{sup -15} torr l/cm{sup 2} s

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Y. Tito

    2007-07-15

    Significant reduction in the outgassing rate of 300-series stainless steel is routinely attained through combination of electropolishing and vacuum baking. Preferential removal of Ni, Fe, and Mn from the surface of stainless steel by electropolishing creates a chromium-enriched surface. It also reduces the atomic surface area of the work piece closer to its geometric surface area. When the material is vacuum fired to remove interstitial hydrogen, the resultant stainless steel exhibits an outgassing rate of about 2x10{sup -15} torr l/cm{sup 2} s, as well as drastically reduced adsorption, absorption, and catalytic behaviors.

  17. Trail impacts and trail impact management related to ecotourism visitation at Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ecotourism and protected area visitation in Central and South America are largely dependent upon a relatively undisturbed quality of natural resources. However, visitation may impact vegetation, soil, water and wildlife resources, and degrade visitor facilities such as recreation sites and trails. Findings are reported from trail impact research conducted at Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile. The frequency and magnitude of selected trail impacts and the relative effect of the amount of use, vegetation type, trail position and trail grade are investigated. Findings differed from previous studies in that amount of use was significantly related to both trail width increases and trail erosion. Management actions to minimize trail impacts are offered.

  18. Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Relationship Between Parental Education and Substance Use Among U.S. 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-Grade Students: Findings From the Monitoring the Future Project*

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Schulenberg, John E.; Wallace, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Secondary school students' rates of substance use vary significantly by race/ethnicity and by their parents' level of education (a proxy for socioeconomic status). The relationship between students' substance use and race/ethnicity is, however, potentially confounded because parental education also differs substantially by race/ethnicity. This report disentangles the confounding by examining White, African American, and Hispanic students separately, showing how parental education relates to cigarette smoking, heavy drinking, and illicit drug use. Method: Data are from the 1999-2008 Monitoring the Future nationally representative in-school surveys of more than 360,000 students in Grades 8, 10, and 12. Results: (a) High proportions of Hispanic students have parents with the lowest level of education, and the relatively low levels of substance use by these students complicates total sample data linking parental education and substance use. (b) There are clear interactions: Compared with White students, substance use rates among African American and Hispanic students are less strongly linked with parental education (and are lower overall). (c) Among White students, 8th and 1 0th graders show strong negative relations between parental education and substance use, whereas by 12th grade their heavy drinking and marijuana use are not correlated with parental education. Conclusions: Low parental education appears to be much more of a risk factor for White students than for Hispanic or African American students. Therefore, in studies of substance use epidemiology, findings based on predominantly White samples are not equally applicable to other racial/ethnic subgroups. Conversely, the large proportions of minority students in the lowest parental education category can mask or weaken findings that are clearer among White students alone. PMID:21388601

  19. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu)

    PubMed Central

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C.; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002–2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world’s first climate change “refugees.” We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future. PMID:21795605

  20. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C.; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002-2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world's first climate change "refugees." We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future.

  1. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu).

    PubMed

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002-2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world's first climate change "refugees." We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future.

  2. Serum vitamin D levels, diabetes and cardio-metabolic risk factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of serum 25–hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), have been associated with development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD); however there are limited data on serum 25(OH)D in Indigenous Australians, a population at high risk for both diabetes and CVD. We aimed to assess levels of serum 25(OH)D in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and to explore relationships between 25(OH)D and cardio-metabolic risk factors and diabetes. Methods 592 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australian participants of The eGFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) Study, a cross-sectional analysis of a cohort study performed in 2007–2011, from urban and remote centres within communities, primary care and tertiary hospitals across Northern Territory, Far North Queensland and Western Australia. Assessment of serum 25(OH)D, cardio-metabolic risk factors (central obesity, diabetes, hypertension, history of cardiovascular disease, current smoker, low HDL-cholesterol), and diabetes (by history or HbA1c ≥6.5%) was performed. Associations were explored between 25(OH)D and outcome measures of diabetes and number of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Results The median (IQR) serum 25(OH)D was 60 (45–77) nmol/L, 31% had 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L. For participants with 25(OH)D < 50 vs ≥50 nmol/L, cardio-metabolic risk profile differed for: diabetes (54%, 36% p < 0.001), past history of cardiovascular disease (16%, 9%, p = 0.014), waist-hip ratio (0.98, 0.92, p < 0.001), urine albumin-creatinine ratio (2.7, 1.5 mg/mmol, p < 0.001). The OR (95% CI) for diabetes was 2.02 (1.03 – 3.95) for people in the lowest vs highest tertiles of 25(OH)D (<53 vs >72 nmol/L, respectively) after adjusting for known cardio-metabolic risk factors. Conclusion The percentage of 25(OH)D levels <50 nmol/L was high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians from Northern and Central Australia. Low 25(OH)D level was associated with

  3. Epidemiology, etiology, and motivation of alcohol misuse among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders of the Northern Territory: a descriptive review.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthi, Ramya; Jayaraj, Rama; Notaras, Leonard; Thomas, Mahiban

    2015-01-01

    The per capita alcohol consumption of the Northern Territory, Australia, is second highest in the world, estimated 15.1 liters of pure alcohol per year. Alcohol abuse is a major public health concern among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the Northern Territory consume approximately 16.9 liters of pure alcohol per year. This descriptive review is based on current published and grey literature in the context of high risk alcohol use, with a special focus on the epidemiological, etiological, and social factors, to predict alcohol misuse among the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Northern Territory. The methodology involved a descriptive search on PubMed, Northern Territory government reports, health databases, and Web sites with an emphasis on the etiology and epidemiology of high-risk alcohol consumption among the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders of the Northern Territory. This review has its own limitations because it does not rely on systematic review methodologies. However, it presents real data on the motives for binge drinking and alcohol-related violent assaults of this vulnerable population. Alcohol abuse and alcohol-related harms are considerably high among the rural and remote communities where additional research is needed. High-risk alcohol misuse within Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders communities often leads to a series of physical and social consequences. This review highlights the need for culturally appropriate intervention approaches focusing on alcohol misuse among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders population of the Northern Territory.

  4. LIBS-based detection of geological samples at low pressures (<0.001 torr) for moon and asteroid exploration.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R. D.; Cremers, D. A.; Khoo, C.; Benelli, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    LIBS is under development for future use on surface probes to Mars. Under simulated Mars atmospheric composition and pressure (7 torr, predominately CO{sub 2}), LIBS has been shown useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of geological samples at close and stand-off distances (19 m). Because of its many advantages compared to previously deployed and current in-use methods of elemental analysis (e.g. x-ray fluorescence, APXS), LIBS has potential for application to other planetary bodies. Of particular interest are the Moon and asteroids having very low ambient gas pressures at the surface. Because the laser plasma used by LIBS is sensitive to the surrounding atmosphere, it is important to determine analysis capabilities under these conditions. The results of a study of LIBS capabilities at low pressure is presented here for both in-situ and stand-off analysis.

  5. A vacuum (10 exp -9 torr) friction apparatus for determining friction and endurance life of MoS(x) films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Honecy, Frank S.; Abel, Phillip B.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Spalvins, Talivaldis; Wheeler, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrahigh-vacuum tribometer for use in a ball-on-disk configuration was specially designed for measuring the friction and endurance life of magnetron-sputtered solid lubricating MoS(x) films deposited on sputter-cleaned 400 C stainless-steel disks, when slid against a 6-mm-diameter 440 C stainless-steel ball. The results of tests showed that the tribometer performs satisfactorily in unidirectional rotation in vacuum at a pressure of 10 exp -7 Pa, 10 exp -9 torr. Similarities are observed in the life cycle friction behavior and the coefficient of friction as a function of the number of disk revolutions, for MoS(x) films at average Hertzian contact from 0.33 to 0.69 GPa.

  6. Muir-Torre syndrome in several members of a family with a variant of the Cancer Family Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Fusaro, R M; Roberts, L; Voorhees, G J; Lynch, J F

    1985-09-01

    Distinguishing cutaneous signs which are associated with hereditary cancer-prone syndromes are known as cancer-associated genodermatoses. Muir-Torre syndrome (M-T) is characterized by the occurrence of sebaceous hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation, and/or keratoacanthoma in association with visceral cancer (often multiple), and improved survival. Family studies of M-T have been either wholly lacking or too incomplete to elucidate hereditary aetiology. We describe the cutaneous phenotype of M-T in an extended kindred with a possible variant of the Cancer Family Syndrome. We emphasize the need for more thorough documentation of family histories and cancer association in this cancer-associated genodermatosis in order to clarify hereditary syndrome identification, and to improve cancer control through employment of cutaneous signs as a beacon for highly targeted forms of visceral cancer.

  7. A commentary on the NH&MRC Draft Values and Ethics in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Lynn; Pyett, Priscilla

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss and critically evaluate the National Health and Medical Research Council's recently released document entitled 'Draft Values and Ethics in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research'. We provide a brief account of its development, philosophy and contents, and then consider how the document could be used by HRECs. We recommend that three specially targeted documents be developed from this one document, to meet the particular needs of HRECs, Indigenous people and researchers. We propose a system of Indigenous ethics advisors as a way to implement the central ideas of the new draft guidelines, without falling into the legalism and rule-following that these guidelines explicitly aim to avoid.

  8. Deadly Choices™ community health events: a health promotion initiative for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

    PubMed

    Malseed, Claire; Nelson, Alison; Ware, Robert; Lacey, Ian; Lander, Keiron

    2014-01-01

    The present study was an evaluation of the effectiveness of Deadly Choices™ community events for improving participants' short-term knowledge of chronic disease and risk factors, and increasing community engagement with local health services. Surveys were completed directly before and after participating in health education activities (pre and post surveys, respectively) assessing knowledge of chronic diseases and risk factors at three Deadly Choices community events and four National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) events in south-east Queensland where Deadly Choices health education activities took place. An audit trail was conducted at two Deadly Choices community events in Brisbane to identify the proportion of participants who undertook a health screen at the event who then followed up for a Medicare-funded health check (MBS item 715) or other appointment at an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clinic in the local area within 2 months. Results were compared with a sample of participants who attended one Deadly Choices community event but did not complete a health screen. There were 472 community members who completed a pre and post survey. All knowledge scores significantly improved between baseline and follow up. Although based on a small sample, the audit trail results suggest individuals who participated in a health screen at the community day were approximately twice as likely to go back to a clinic to receive a full health check or have an alternative appointment compared with attendees who did not participate in a screen. Community events that include opportunities for health education and health screening are an effective strategy to improve chronic disease health literacy skills and appear to have the potential to increase community engagement with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services. PMID:25262748

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry and spectroscopy of V501 Mon (Torres+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, G.; Lacy, C. H. S.; Pavlovski, K.; Fekel, F. C.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic observations of V501 Mon were carried out with three different instruments. They began at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in 2005 November, using the now decommissioned Digital Speedometer (DS) mounted on the 1.5m Tillinghast reflector at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins (AZ). Seven spectra were recorded through 2009 March with an intensified photon-counting Reticon detector, and cover a narrow span of 45Å centered at 5190Å (MgIb triplet). The resolving power of this instrument was R~35000, and the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra range from 13 to 22 per resolution element of 8.5km/s. Thirty seven additional spectra were gathered from 2009 November to 2015 February with the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) on the same telescope. This bench-mounted, fiber-fed instrument provides a resolving power of R~44000 in 51 orders over the wavelength span 3900-9100Å. The signal-to-noise ratios of the 37 spectra range from 8 to 56 per resolution element of 6.8km/s. The heliocentric velocities we obtained from the DS and TRES spectra are listed in Table2. Between 2011 October and 2015 February we also obtained 57 usable spectra of V501 Mon with the Tennessee State University 2m Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope (AST) and a fiber-fed echelle spectrograph at Fairborn Observatory in southeast Arizona. The detector for these observations was a Fairchild 486 CCD, with 15μm pixels in a 4096*4096 format. The spectrograms have 48 orders ranging from 3800 to 8260Å. Because of the faintness of V501 Mon (V=12.32), we used a fiber that produced a spectral resolution of 0.4Å, corresponding to a resolving power of 15000 at 6000Å. Our spectra have typical signal-to-noise ratios per resolution element of 40 at 6000Å. We list the final values in Table3. An extensive program of CCD photometry was carried out using the NFO WebScope ear Silver City, New Mexico, for the purpose of gathering an accurate V-band light

  10. Epistemological Considerations for Approaching Teaching in an On-Line Environment Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teacher Education Program: Reconsidering TPACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis; Knight, Cecily; Lenoy, Max

    2015-01-01

    This research inquiry explores teacher educator knowledge, understandings and beliefs informing their teaching in a web-based Australian teacher education program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. Through the use of a phenomenologically aligned interview process, the study investigates instructors' consideration of practice for…

  11. Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. Proceedings of the Conference (Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia, November 17-18, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Languages and Literacy Inst., Deakin.

    Papers from the conference on the education of Australian Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders include: "English Language and Numeracy Program for Aboriginal Students" (Alison Jarred); "The Aboriginal Identity Course: A Midstream Evaluation" (Simon Vaughan); "Making the Curriculum Your Own: The Senior Girls at Lajamanu School Read Glenyse Ward's…

  12. Temporal variability in the life history and reproductive biology of female dugongs in Torres Strait: The likely role of sea grass dieback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Helene; Kwan, Donna

    2008-09-01

    The extensive sea grass meadows in Torres Strait enable it to be a globally important habitat for the dugong, Dugong dugon, a marine mammal of cultural and dietary significance to Torres Strait Islanders and the basis for the substantial island-based fishery in the Torres Strait Protected Zone. Torres Strait sea grass communities are subjected to episodic diebacks which are now believed to be largely natural events. Information on dugong life history was obtained from specimens obtained from female dugongs as they were butchered for food by Indigenous hunters at two major dugong hunting communities in Torres Strait: Daru (9.04°S, 143.21°E) in 1978-1982 (a time of sea grass dieback and recovery) and Mabuiag Island (9.95°S, 142.15°E) in 1997-1999 (when sea grasses were abundant). Dugongs sampled in 1997-1999 had their first calf at younger ages (minimum of 6 cf. 10 years), and more frequently (interbirth interval based on all possible pregnancies 2.6±0.4 (S.E.) yr cf. 5.8±1.0 yr) than the dugongs sampled in 1978-1982. Pregnancy rates increased monotonically during 1978-1982, coincident with sea grass recovery. The age distribution of the female dugongs collected in 1997-1999 also suggested a low birth rate between 1973 and 1983 and/or or a high level of mortality for animals born during this period. These results add to the evidence from other regions that the life history and reproductive rate of female dugongs are adversely affected by sea grass loss, the effect of which cannot be separated from a possible density-dependent response to changes in dugong population size. Many green turtles in Torres Strait were also in poor body condition coincident with the 1970s sea grass dieback. The impacts of future sea grass diebacks need to be anticipated when management options for the traditional Torres Strait fisheries for dugongs and green turtles are evaluated.

  13. Entomological and ecological studies in a new potential zoonotic leishmaniasis focus in Torres Novas municipality, Central Region, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Branco, S; Alves-Pires, C; Maia, C; Cortes, S; Cristovão, J M S; Gonçalves, L; Campino, L; Afonso, M O

    2013-03-01

    In Portugal human and canine leishmaniasis are caused by Leishmania infantum, and Phlebotomus perniciosus and P. ariasi are the proven vectors. Three main foci were identified in eighty's decade: Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro region, Lisbon region and Algarve region, but according to OnLeish observatory data, canine leishmaniasis cases have been reported from several other regions, for which sand fly species and their infection rates are unknown. This study is the first phlebotomine survey in Torres Novas municipality, Santarém District, Portugal. The main objectives were to identify the phlebotomine species, their bioecological aspects, Leishmania infection rate and the risk factors for the presence of phlebotomine species in the municipality. From June to November, 2010, 275 biotopes were surveyed with CDC light-traps. Captures covered the 17 parishes of the municipality and included domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic biotopes. Specimens were identified morphologically and females were used for molecular detection of Leishmania and bloodmeal identification. Simple and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to identify risk factors for phlebotomine presence. Nonparametric tests were used to compare densities of independent groups. A total of 1262 sand flies were captured and identified, and four species detected: P. perniciosus (73.69%), P. ariasi (8.16%), P. sergenti (6.58%) and Sergentomyia minuta (11.57%). In 71.4% localities at least one L. infantum proven vector species was present. Risk factors were identified as: high average temperatures and low relative humidities, sheltered locations and absence of strong wind, presence of pine trees as dominant vegetation, peridomestic biotopes, particularly sheep pens or proximity of sheep, poultry and house martin nests. L. infantum infection rate was 4% for P. ariasi and 0.48% for the total of Larroussius females. P. perniciosus females exhibited an opportunistic behavior, feeding in a wide variety of

  14. Building better systems of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: findings from the Kanyini health systems assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Australian federal and jurisdictional governments are implementing ambitious policy initiatives intended to improve health care access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In this qualitative study we explored Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) staff views on factors needed to improve chronic care systems and assessed their relevance to the new policy environment. Methods Two theories informed the study: (1) ‘candidacy’, which explores “the ways in which people’s eligibility for care is jointly negotiated between individuals and health services”; and (2) kanyini or ‘holding’, a Central Australian philosophy which describes the principle and obligations of nurturing and protecting others. A structured health systems assessment, locally adapted from Chronic Care Model domains, was administered via group interviews with 37 health staff in six AMSs and one government Indigenous-led health service. Data were thematically analysed. Results Staff emphasised AMS health care was different to private general practices. Consistent with kanyini, community governance and leadership, community representation among staff, and commitment to community development were important organisational features to retain and nurture both staff and patients. This was undermined, however, by constant fear of government funding for AMSs being withheld. Staff resourcing, information systems and high-level leadership were perceived to be key drivers of health care quality. On-site specialist services, managed by AMS staff, were considered an enabling strategy to increase specialist access. Candidacy theory suggests the above factors influence whether a service is ‘tractable’ and ‘navigable’ to its users. Staff also described entrenched patient discrimination in hospitals and the need to expend considerable effort to reinstate care. This suggests that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are still constructed as ‘non-ideal users

  15. Entomological and ecological studies in a new potential zoonotic leishmaniasis focus in Torres Novas municipality, Central Region, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Branco, S; Alves-Pires, C; Maia, C; Cortes, S; Cristovão, J M S; Gonçalves, L; Campino, L; Afonso, M O

    2013-03-01

    In Portugal human and canine leishmaniasis are caused by Leishmania infantum, and Phlebotomus perniciosus and P. ariasi are the proven vectors. Three main foci were identified in eighty's decade: Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro region, Lisbon region and Algarve region, but according to OnLeish observatory data, canine leishmaniasis cases have been reported from several other regions, for which sand fly species and their infection rates are unknown. This study is the first phlebotomine survey in Torres Novas municipality, Santarém District, Portugal. The main objectives were to identify the phlebotomine species, their bioecological aspects, Leishmania infection rate and the risk factors for the presence of phlebotomine species in the municipality. From June to November, 2010, 275 biotopes were surveyed with CDC light-traps. Captures covered the 17 parishes of the municipality and included domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic biotopes. Specimens were identified morphologically and females were used for molecular detection of Leishmania and bloodmeal identification. Simple and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to identify risk factors for phlebotomine presence. Nonparametric tests were used to compare densities of independent groups. A total of 1262 sand flies were captured and identified, and four species detected: P. perniciosus (73.69%), P. ariasi (8.16%), P. sergenti (6.58%) and Sergentomyia minuta (11.57%). In 71.4% localities at least one L. infantum proven vector species was present. Risk factors were identified as: high average temperatures and low relative humidities, sheltered locations and absence of strong wind, presence of pine trees as dominant vegetation, peridomestic biotopes, particularly sheep pens or proximity of sheep, poultry and house martin nests. L. infantum infection rate was 4% for P. ariasi and 0.48% for the total of Larroussius females. P. perniciosus females exhibited an opportunistic behavior, feeding in a wide variety of

  16. Anaerobic glycolysis and specific gravity of the red blood cells of rats exposed to pure oxygen at 600 torr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabine, J. C.; Leon, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 100% oxygen at 600 torr for up to 8 days. Highly significant increases in RBC anaerobic glycolysis occurred during the first 4 days of exposure and then subsided. Two significant peaks were found, one on days 1 and 2 and one on day 4. The first peak is attributed to reticulocytosis, which was maximal after 90 minutes and had disappeared by day 3. A second mechanism must account for the peak on day 4. An interpretation of the second peak is provided by existing evidence that selective removal of older RBCs occurs during the first few days of exposure to hypobaric oxygen, with maximum effect on day 4. Results in splenectomized, sham-operated and intact animals were indistinguishable from each other. A significant decrease in RBC specific gravity was found in exposed animals with spleens intact, but not in splenectomized animals. Theoretical aspects of age-related parameters as an aid to continuous detection and evaluation of changes in RBC populations are discussed.

  17. Interaction of O 2 with Pd single crystals in the range 1-150 Torr: Oxygen dissolution and reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinyi; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of O 2 with Pd(1 1 1), Pd(1 1 0) and Pd(1 0 0) was studied in the pressure range 1-150 Torr by the techniques of temperature programmed decomposition (TPD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The oxidation of Pd was rate-determined by oxygen diffusion into Pd metal followed by the diffusion into PdO once the bulk oxide layer was formed. The dissolution of oxygen atoms into Pd metal followed the Mott-Cabrera model with diffusion coefficient 10 -16 cm 2 s -1 at 600 K and activation energy of 60-85 kJ mol -1. The bulk oxide phase was formed when a critical oxygen concentration was reached in the near-surface region. The formation of PdO was characterized by a decrease in the oxygen uptake rate, the complete fading of the metallic Pd LEED pattern and an atomic ratio O/Pd of 0.15-0.7 as measured by AES. The diffusion of oxygen through the bulk oxide layer again conformed to the Mott-Cabrera parabolic diffusion law with diffusion coefficient 10 -18 cm 2 s -1 at 600 K and activation energy of 111-116 kJ mol -1. The values for the diffusion coefficient and apparent activation energy increased as the surface atom density of the single crystals increased.

  18. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. ~5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  19. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-20

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  20. A strategy for translating evidence into policy and practice to close the gap - developing essential service standards for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cardiovascular care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex; O'Shea, Rebekah L; Mott, Kathy; McBride, Katharine F; Lawson, Tony; Jennings, Garry L R

    2015-02-01

    The development and application of essential standards for cardiovascular care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people creates a strategic platform on which to systematically close the gap in the health outcomes and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous people in Australia. We outline six developmental stages that can be used to enhance the effective translation of evidence into practice that reduces life expectancy differentials. Focussing efforts where the biggest gain can be made; considering how to make a policy-relevant difference with an emphasis on translation into policy and practice; establishing a foundation for action by engaging with stakeholders throughout the process; developing a framework to guide action; drafting policy-relevant and framework-appropriate essential service standards; and defining standards that help policy decision makers achieve current priority policy targets.

  1. Muir-Torre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... inner lining of the uterus CA-125 blood test to look for a protein found to be elevated in the blood of some women with ovarian cancer Screening options may change over time as new technologies are developed and more is learned about Muir- ...

  2. Spatial clustering of toxic trace elements in adolescents around the Torreón, Mexico lead-zinc smelter.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Rothenberg, Stephen J; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Weaver, Virginia; Zamoiski, Rachel; Resnick, Carol; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J; Steuerwald, Amy J; Navas-Acién, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-11-01

    High blood lead (BPb) levels in children and elevated soil and dust arsenic, cadmium, and lead were previously found in Torreón, northern Mexico, host to the world's fourth largest lead-zinc metal smelter. The objectives of this study were to determine spatial distributions of adolescents with higher BPb and creatinine-corrected urine total arsenic, cadmium, molybdenum, thallium, and uranium around the smelter. Cross-sectional study of 512 male and female subjects 12-15 years of age was conducted. We measured BPb by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and urine trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, with dynamic reaction cell mode for arsenic. We constructed multiple regression models including sociodemographic variables and adjusted for subject residence spatial correlation with spatial lag or error terms. We applied local indicators of spatial association statistics to model residuals to identify hot spots of significant spatial clusters of subjects with higher trace elements. We found spatial clusters of subjects with elevated BPb (range 3.6-14.7 μg/dl) and urine cadmium (0.18-1.14 μg/g creatinine) adjacent to and downwind of the smelter and elevated urine thallium (0.28-0.93 μg/g creatinine) and uranium (0.07-0.13 μg/g creatinine) near ore transport routes, former waste, and industrial discharge sites. The conclusion derived from this study was that spatial clustering of adolescents with high BPb and urine cadmium adjacent to and downwind of the smelter and residual waste pile, areas identified over a decade ago with high lead and cadmium in soil and dust, suggests that past and/or present plant operations continue to present health risks to children in those neighborhoods.

  3. Spatial clustering of toxic trace elements in adolescents around the Torreón, Mexico lead–zinc smelter

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Weaver, Virginia; Zamoiski, Rachel; Resnick, Carol; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Navas-Acién, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    High blood lead (BPb) levels in children and elevated soil and dust arsenic, cadmium, and lead were previously found in Torreón, northern Mexico, host to the world’s fourth largest lead–zinc metal smelter. The objectives of this study were to determine spatial distributions of adolescents with higher BPb and creatinine-corrected urine total arsenic, cadmium, molybdenum, thallium, and uranium around the smelter. Cross-sectional study of 512 male and female subjects 12–15 years of age was conducted. We measured BPb by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and urine trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, with dynamic reaction cell mode for arsenic. We constructed multiple regression models including sociodemographic variables and adjusted for subject residence spatial correlation with spatial lag or error terms. We applied local indicators of spatial association statistics to model residuals to identify hot spots of significant spatial clusters of subjects with higher trace elements. We found spatial clusters of subjects with elevated BPb (range 3.6–14.7 µg/dl) and urine cadmium (0.18–1.14 µg/g creatinine) adjacent to and downwind of the smelter and elevated urine thallium (0.28–0.93 µg/g creatinine) and uranium (0.07–0.13 µg/g creatinine) near ore transport routes, former waste, and industrial discharge sites. The conclusion derived from this study was that spatial clustering of adolescents with high BPb and urine cadmium adjacent to and downwind of the smelter and residual waste pile, areas identified over a decade ago with high lead and cadmium in soil and dust, suggests that past and/or present plant operations continue to present health risks to children in those neighborhoods. PMID:24549228

  4. A mental health first aid training program for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: description and initial evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kanowski, Len G; Jorm, Anthony F; Hart, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Background Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training was developed in Australia to teach members of the public how to give initial help to someone developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis situation. However, this type of training requires adaptation for specific cultural groups in the community. This paper describes the adaptation of the program to create an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health First Aid (AMHFA) course and presents an initial evaluation of its uptake and acceptability. Methods To evaluate the program, two types of data were collected: (1) quantitative data on uptake of the course (number of Instructors trained and courses subsequently run by these Instructors); (2) qualitative data on strengths, weaknesses and recommendations for the future derived from interviews with program staff and focus groups with Instructors and community participants. Results 199 Aboriginal people were trained as Instructors in a five day Instructor Training Course. With sufficient time following training, the majority of these Instructors subsequently ran 14-hour AMHFA courses for Aboriginal people in their community. Instructors were more likely to run courses if they had prior teaching experience and if there was post-course contact with one of the Trainers of Instructors. Analysis of qualitative data indicated that the Instructor Training Course and the AMHFA course are culturally appropriate, empowering for Aboriginal people, and provided information that was seen as highly relevant and important in assisting Aboriginal people with a mental illness. There were a number of recommendations for improvements. Conclusion The AMHFA program is culturally appropriate and acceptable to Aboriginal people. Further work is needed to refine the course and to evaluate its impact on help provided to Aboriginal people with mental health problems. PMID:19490648

  5. Studies of the active substances in herbs used for hair treatment. III. Isolation of hair-regrowth substances from Polygara senega var. latifolia TORR. et GRAY.

    PubMed

    Ishida, H; Inaoka, Y; Okada, M; Fukushima, M; Fukazawa, H; Tsuji, K

    1999-11-01

    Four active principles, 1, 2, 3 and 4, were isolated from Polygara senega var. latifolia TORR. et GRAY by a combination of partition and column chromatography on silica gel and octadecyl silica gel (ODS), monitored by a hair-regrowth activity assay. Compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 were identified as senegose A, senegin II, senegin III, and senegasaponin b by comparison of their spectral data with those of authentic samples. PMID:10598039

  6. Validation of risk assessment scales and predictors of intentions to quit smoking in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: a cross-sectional survey protocol

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Gillian Sandra; Watt, Kerrianne; McEwen, Andy; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Clough, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco smoking is a very significant behavioural risk factor for the health of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and is embedded as a social norm. With a focus on women of childbearing age, and men of similar age, this project aims to determine how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers assess smoking risks and how these assessments contribute to their intentions to quit. The findings from this pragmatic study should contribute to developing culturally targeted interventions. Methods and analysis A cross-sectional study using quantitative and qualitative data. A total of 120 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members aged 18–45 years will be recruited at community events and through an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS). Participants will be interviewed using a tablet computer or paper survey. The survey instrument uses modified risk behaviour scales, that is, the Risk Behaviour Diagnosis (RBD) scale and the Smoking Risk Assessment Target (SRAT) (adapted from the Risk Acceptance Ladder) to determine whether attitudes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers to health risk messages are predictors of intentions to quit smoking. The questionnaire will be assessed for face and content validity with a panel of Indigenous community members. The internal consistency of the RBD subscales and their patterns of correlation will be explored. Multivariate analyses will examine predictors of intentions to quit. This will include demographics such as age, gender, nicotine dependence, household smoking rules and perceived threat from smoking and efficacy for quitting. The two risk-assessment scales will be examined to see whether participant responses are correlated. Ethics and dissemination The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council Ethics Committee and university ethics committees approved the study. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and a community report will be

  7. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Simon; Harrod, Mary-Ellen; Iversen, Jenny; Simone Hocking, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Context Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (Aboriginal) account for approximately 3% of the Australian population. They have the poorest health, economic and social outcomes. Higher notification rates of hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV) have been reported among Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal people. The identification of Aboriginal people in national surveillance has some weaknesses, with only four of the eight jurisdictions included in national reporting. To address some of these limitations, we aim to estimate the pooled prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in Australia. Evidence Acquisition We searched the databases: Pubmed, Web of Science and Informit, and the New South Wales and Northern Territory Public Health Bulletins. A study was included if it reported the number of Aboriginal people testing positive for anti-HCV and the number tested for anti-HCV. A meta-analysis by population-group was conducted if three or more studies reported a prevalence estimate. Variables included: author, year of publication, study design, study period, gender (female, male), age, population group (Aboriginal people in prison, Aboriginal people who inject drugs), number testing anti-HCV positive, number tested for anti-HCV and prevalence (%). Due to a long time period, we separated the studies estimating the prevalence anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in prison into two time periods, 1994 - 2004 and 2005 - 2012. Results Overall, 15 studies met our inclusion criteria. Among Aboriginal people in prison, the pooled prevalence of anti-HCV was 18.1% (95%CI: 6.6 - 29.7). The pooled prevalence among Aboriginal people in prison was 25.7% (95%CI: 4.1-47.3) in studies published between 1994 - 2004 and 14.5% (95%CI: 1.7 - 27.3) in studies published from 2005 - 2012. The pooled prevalence of anti-HCV was 58.7% (95%CI: 53.9 - 63.5) among Aboriginal people who inject drugs and 2.9% (95%CI: 0.30 - 6.1) among Aboriginal people who did not inject drugs, however there was

  8. The characteristics, implementation and effects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion tools: a systematic literature search

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health promotion by and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter Indigenous) Australians is critically important given a wide gap in health parity compared to other Australians. The development and implementation of step-by-step guides, instruments, packages, frameworks or resources has provided a feasible and low-resource strategy for strengthening evidence-informed health promotion practice. Yet there has been little assessment of where and how these tools are implemented or their effectiveness. This paper reviews the characteristics, implementation and effects of Indigenous health promotion tools. Methods Indigenous health promotion tools were identified through a systematic literature search including a prior scoping study, eight databases, references of other reviews and the authors’ knowledge (n = 1494). Documents in the peer reviewed and grey literature were included if they described or evaluated tools designed, recommended or used for strengthening Indigenous Australian health promotion. Eligible publications were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and documented tools classified according to their characteristics, implementation and effects. Quality was appraised using the Dictionary for Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) and Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) tools for quantitative and qualitative studies respectively. Results The review found that Indigenous health promotion tools were widely available. Of 74 publications that met inclusion criteria, sixty (81%) documented tools developed specifically for the Indigenous Australian population. All tools had been developed in reference to evidence; but only 22/74 (30%) publications specified intended or actual implementation, and only 11/74 (15%) publications evaluated impacts of the implemented tools. Impacts included health, environmental, community, organisational and health care improvements. The quality of impact evaluations was strong for only five (7

  9. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Simon; Harrod, Mary-Ellen; Iversen, Jenny; Simone Hocking, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Context Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (Aboriginal) account for approximately 3% of the Australian population. They have the poorest health, economic and social outcomes. Higher notification rates of hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV) have been reported among Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal people. The identification of Aboriginal people in national surveillance has some weaknesses, with only four of the eight jurisdictions included in national reporting. To address some of these limitations, we aim to estimate the pooled prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in Australia. Evidence Acquisition We searched the databases: Pubmed, Web of Science and Informit, and the New South Wales and Northern Territory Public Health Bulletins. A study was included if it reported the number of Aboriginal people testing positive for anti-HCV and the number tested for anti-HCV. A meta-analysis by population-group was conducted if three or more studies reported a prevalence estimate. Variables included: author, year of publication, study design, study period, gender (female, male), age, population group (Aboriginal people in prison, Aboriginal people who inject drugs), number testing anti-HCV positive, number tested for anti-HCV and prevalence (%). Due to a long time period, we separated the studies estimating the prevalence anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in prison into two time periods, 1994 - 2004 and 2005 - 2012. Results Overall, 15 studies met our inclusion criteria. Among Aboriginal people in prison, the pooled prevalence of anti-HCV was 18.1% (95%CI: 6.6 - 29.7). The pooled prevalence among Aboriginal people in prison was 25.7% (95%CI: 4.1-47.3) in studies published between 1994 - 2004 and 14.5% (95%CI: 1.7 - 27.3) in studies published from 2005 - 2012. The pooled prevalence of anti-HCV was 58.7% (95%CI: 53.9 - 63.5) among Aboriginal people who inject drugs and 2.9% (95%CI: 0.30 - 6.1) among Aboriginal people who did not inject drugs, however there was

  10. The Murri clinic: a comparative retrospective study of an antenatal clinic developed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Indigenous Australians are a small, widely dispersed population. Regarding childbearing women and infants, inequities in service delivery and culturally unsafe services contribute to significantly poorer outcomes, with a lack of high-level research to guide service redesign. This paper reports on an Evaluation of a specialist (Murri) antenatal clinic for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Methods A triangulated mixed method approach generated and analysed data from a range of sources: individual and focus group interviews; surveys; mother and infant audit data; and routinely collected data. A retrospective analysis compared clinical outcomes of women who attended the Murri clinic (n=367) with Indigenous women attending standard care (n=414) provided by the same hospital over the same period. Both services see women of all risk status. Results The majority of women attending the Murri clinic reported high levels of satisfaction, specifically with continuity of carer antenatally. However, disappointment with the lack of continuity during labour/birth and postnatally left some women feeling abandoned and uncared for. Compared to Indigenous women attending standard care, those attending the Murri clinic were statistically less likely to be primiparous or partnered, to experience perineal trauma, to have an epidural and to have a baby admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and were more likely to have a non-instrumental vaginal birth. Multivariate analysis found higher normal birth (spontaneous onset of labour, no epidural, non-instrumental vaginal birth without episiotomy) rates amongst women attending the Murri clinic. Conclusions Significant benefits were associated with attending the Murri clinic. Recommendations for improvement included ongoing cultural competency training for all hospital staff, reducing duplication of services, improving co-ordination and communication between community and tertiary services, and working in

  11. Changes in exposure to ‘life stressors’ in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, 2002 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Negative Life Events Scale (NLES) has been included in nationally representative surveys of the Indigenous and Australian population since 2002 as a measure of exposure to a range of ‘life stressors’. There has been limited reporting or analysis of estimates of the NLES from these surveys. This paper reports changes in exposure to stressors from 2002 to 2008 for the Indigenous population, and examines inter-relationships between eleven NLES items. Data for the 2006 Australian population is also included for comparative purposes. Methods Data from the 2002 and 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Surveys (NATSISS) and the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS) were accessed from the Australia Bureau of Statistics in order to determine significant changes in exposure to stressors for the 2002 and 2008 Indigenous population by remoteness and to compare this with the 2006 Australian population. Factor analysis was used to assess the inter-relationships between stressors for the Indigenous and Australian population by remoteness. Results In remote locations, between 2002 and 2008, exposure to life stressors decreased significantly for the Indigenous population across seven of the eleven stressors. In non-remote locations, exposure to four of the stressors increased significantly. Exposure to stressors in the 2002 and 2008 non-remote Indigenous population were significantly higher than those for the 2006 Australian population for all items, except ‘alcohol and/or drug problems’ and ‘trouble with the police’, which showed no evidence of a difference. The factor analysis of the NLES for the 2002 and 2008 remote and non-remote Indigenous populations and the 2006 Australian population showed a consistent clustering of items into three groups: social transgressions; grief and trauma; and labour market stressors. Conclusions The reduction in exposure to life stressors for the remote Indigenous population may be related to policy and

  12. Results of a preliminary, high power RF thruster test

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, L.; Karras, T.; Frind, G.; Holmes, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate a high power electrodeless, RF electric propulsion concept. This was successfully accomplished. No attempt was made to optimize the design of the thruster with regard to physical dimensions, mass flow, nozzle shape, operational frequency, or power level. Measurements made were chamber pressure, total and static pressures at the nozzle exit plane and exhaust tank pressure. Mass flows range from about 0.4 to 1 gm/sec and, assuming perfect gas relationships, specific impulses up to 580 sec were obtained. Typical chamber pressure was 300 torr exhausting to a tank pressure of about 10 torr. Working fluids used were argon, helium and mixtures of the two. No degration of the device was detected after 12 start/stop cycles, about three hours of total run time, and a maximum input power of 70 kW. 10 refs.

  13. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experiencing problems with substance use: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Problems with substance use are common in some Aboriginal communities. Although problems with substance use are associated with significant mortality and morbidity, many people who experience them do not seek help. Training in mental health first aid has been shown to be effective in increasing knowledge of symptoms and behaviours associated with seeking help. The current study aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person who is experiencing problem drinking or problem drug use (e.g. abuse or dependence). Methods Twenty-eight Aboriginal health experts participated in two independent Delphi studies (n = 22 problem drinking study, n = 21 problem drug use; 15 participated in both). Panellists were presented with statements about possible first aid actions via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional actions not covered by the content. Statements were accepted for inclusion in the guidelines if they were endorsed by ≥ 90% of panellists as either 'Essential' or 'Important'. At the end of the two Delphi studies, participants were asked to give feedback on the value of the project and their participation experience. Results From a total of 735 statements presented over two studies, 429 were endorsed (223 problem drinking, 206 problem drug use). Statements were grouped into sections based on common themes (n = 7 problem drinking, n = 8 problem drug use), then written into guideline documents. Participants evaluated the Delphi method employed, and the guidelines developed, as useful and appropriate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Conclusions Aboriginal health experts were able to reach consensus about culturally appropriate first aid for problems with substance use. Many first aid actions endorsed in the current studies were not endorsed in previous international Delphi studies, conducted on problem drinking and problem drug use

  14. Factors influencing attendance in a structured physical activity program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in an urban setting: a mixed methods process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women experience higher rates of obesity, chronic disease, and are less active than non-Indigenous Australian women. Lifestyle programs designed to increase physical activity and encourage healthy eating are needed to ameliorate this disparity. The aim of this study was to identify participants’ perceived barriers and enablers to attend group exercise classes as part of a 12-week fitness program. Methods To understand the factors that influence attendance, a mixed method process evaluation was undertaken in which a quantitative measure of attendance in the group exercise classes was used to identify cases for further qualitative investigation. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women aged 18 to 64 years were recruited to a research trial of a fitness program. The 12-week program included two 60-minute group exercise classes per week, and four nutrition education workshops. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at program completion. Participants were stratified by attendance, and interviews from the highest and lowest 25 percentiles analysed. Rigour was strengthened through use of multiple data analysts, member checking and prolonged engagement in the field. Results Analyses of the post-program interviews revealed that participants enrolled in the program primarily for the perceived health benefits and all (with one exception) found the program met their needs and expectations. The atmosphere of classes was positive and comfortable and they reported developing good relationships with their fellow participants and program staff. Low attendees described more barriers to attendance, such as illness and competing work and family obligations, and were more likely to report logistical issues, such as inconvenient venue or class times. Conclusions Attendance to the ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Fitness Program’ was primarily influenced by the participant’s personal health, logistics and

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior of a Filled Elastomer at Pressures Below 10 to the -6th Power Torr. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Polytechnic Inst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a filled elastomer was studied with emphasis on understanding the vacuum-material interactions occurring, and to develop analytical techniques for predicting the vacuum behavior. The test results indicate that two separate mechanisms are involved in the observed property changes: the first controls the time response to applied stress; the second determines the initial internal state of the materials as the result of stresses. It is concluded that the mechanical property changes are attributable to changes in the relaxation processes occurring in the material. These changes are brought about by outgassing of water. Recommendations for future investigations are included.

  16. Educational and Training Opportunities in Sustainable Agriculture. 8th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Jane Potter

    This directory provides information on over 200 institutions and organizations that are involved in organic, alternative, or sustainable agriculture and that also focus on education, training, or provision of information. The directory was compiled by the Alternative Farming Systems Information Center (AFSIC), which is 1 of 10 information centers…

  17. Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference on Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pew, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The volume presents recent developments in the field of manual control theory and applications. The papers give analytical methods as well as examples of the important interplay between man and machine, such as how man controls and stabilizes machine dynamics, and how machines extend man's capability. Included in the broad range of subjects are procedures to evaluate and identify display systems, controllers, manipulators, human operators, aircraft, and non-flying vehicles. Of particular interest is the continuing trend of applying control theory to problems in medicine and psychology, as well as to problems in vehicle control.

  18. Intermountain Leisure Symposium (8th, Ogden, Utah, November 19, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dennis A., Ed.

    Contained in this conference report are 22 selected papers presented at a symposium of leisure and recreation professionals. Titles and authors are: (1) "Ethics in Recreation and Leisure Services" (S. Harold Smith); (2) "Growing Opportunities: The Aging Population Market" (Nila M. Ipson); (3) "The Myth of Comfort" (Daniel L. Dustin); (4) "Golf as…

  19. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  20. 8(th) Symposium on Hemostasis: Translational and Basic Science Discoveries.

    PubMed

    Margaritis, Paris; Key, Nigel S

    2016-05-01

    It has been 14 years since the first symposium on hemostasis at UNC Chapel Hill that focused primarily on the tissue factor (TF) and Factor VIIa (FVIIa) biology, biochemistry and translational work for the treatment of bleeding. Concepts, mechanistic data and therapeutic agents have since emerged that permeate not only aspects of the TF and FVIIa functions, but also broader processes in hemostasis and thrombosis. These processes involve circulating proteins, receptors, cells and cellular components that interact within the coagulation system as well as with additional systems that are dysregulated in disorders seemingly unrelated to bleeding/thrombosis. The reviews in this symposium provide the research background to understand such interactions and integrations.

  1. "Palisades": An 8th Grade Language Arts Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Jandira

    1987-01-01

    Describes a magazine project developed by students in seventh and eighth grade language arts classes. Discusses the formation of small work groups, group dynamics problems, peer tutoring, learning interview skills, and selling the magazine. (SV)

  2. Occupational Exploration at Ontario Junior High School: 8th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Gene; And Others

    The document contains 47 activities for Grade 8. The contents include the following areas: questionnaires; work vocabularies; employment seeking procedures--employment ads, application forms, resumes, job interviews, and resume preparation advice; a 24-page unit presenting occupational information in relation to career choice and job application…

  3. 8th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The workshop will bring together the community of experimental and theoretical physicists working on top quark physics, 20 years after its first discovery, and at the beginning of the exploration of the new energy regime at the Large Hadron Collider. The workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of the latest results from the LHC and Tevatron experiments as well as the most recent theoretical developments and an outlook on top-quark physics at future colliders. The programme will consist of plenary presentations, a Poster Session, a Young Scientists Forum and 'Question and Answers' sessions, targeted for young researchers. A significant fraction of the workshop time will be devoted to discussions. The goal of the workshop is to provide a comprehensive picture of top-quark physics and a forum where experimentalists and theorists can discuss the interpretation of top quark results and plan future measurements. EDITORIAL BOARD: Luca Lista (INFN Naples), Fabrizio Margaroli (Univ. of Rome "La Sapienza") and Francesco Tramontano (Univ. of Naples "Federico II"). REFEREES: Luca Lista (INFN Naples), Fabrizio Margaroli (Univ. of Rome "La Sapienza"), Francesco Tramontano (Univ. of Naples "Federico II"), Francesco Fabozzi (Univ. of Basilicata), Alberto Orso Maria Iorio (Univ. of Naples "Federico II"), Antonello Davide Polosa (Univ. of Rome "La Sapienza") and Marco Rescigno (INFN Rome-I)

  4. Measurement and Evaluation in Psychology and Education, 8th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorndike, Robert M.; Thorndike-Christ, Tracy M.

    2010-01-01

    In this classic introduction to educational and psychological measurement, Thorndike and Thorndike-Christ provide all of the pertinent information future professionals need to know in order to develop the skills to use test information wisely. Incorporating standard measurement concepts as they apply to both educational and psychological…

  5. Nutrition Super Stars [7th and 8th Grades].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtkooper, Linda; And Others

    This kit is designed to be used as part of health, science, physical education, and home economics education at the middle school level. It provides current information about and describes student learning activities in food, nutrition, physical fitness, and ecology. Class plans are offered for five lesson topics: (1) Food supplies nutrients,…

  6. The table of isotopes-8th edition and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    A new edition of the Table of Isotopes has been published this year by John Wiley and Sons, Inc. This edition is the eighth in a series started by Glenn T. Seaborg in 1940. The two-volume, 3168-page, cloth-bound edition is twice the size of the previous edition published in 1978. It contains nuclear structure and decay data, based mainly on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), for >3100 isotopes and isomers. Approximately 24000 references are cited, and the appendices have been updated and extended. The book is packaged with an interactive CD-ROM that contains the Table of Isotopes in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format for convenient viewing on personal computer (PC) and UNIX workstations. The CD-ROM version contains a chart of the nuclides graphical index and separate indices organized for radioisotope users and nuclear structure physicists. More than 100000 hypertext links are provided to move the user quickly through related information free from the limitations of page size. Complete references with keyword abstracts are provided. The CD-ROM also contains the Table of Super-deformed Nuclear Bands and Fission Isomers; Tables of Atoms, Atomic Nuclei, and Subatomic Particles by Ivan P. Selinov; the ENSDF and nuclear structure reference (NSR) databases; the ENSDF manual by Jagdish K. Tuli; and Abode Acrobat Reader software.

  7. 8th Grade Students Metaphors for the Concept of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalçinkaya, Elvan

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: History is a science that helps people guide their futures; it is an indispensable part of education. It is important for students to know the past well in order to understand the present better and direct their future. History does not have magical laws to generalize in predicting future. However, we have to know that history…

  8. Implementing Mapping the Beat in the 8th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Ronald Craig

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a doctoral dissertation study, "Expanding Geographic Understanding in Grade 8 Social Studies Classes through Integration of Geography, Music, and History: A QuasiExperimental Study" that took place in a high-achieving, suburban middle school in Southern California. The study compared learning as a result of nine…

  9. Curriculum Manual: 6th, 7th, 8th Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Ednell M.; Snapp, Betty Lou

    This home economics curriculum for the middle school (grades 6-8) is designed to assist students in developing self-concept, making decisions, and developing basic skills. Written by a group of home economics teachers, this curriculum contains nine learning packages on the following topics: (1) consumer management; (2) decision management; (3)…

  10. 8th INTEGRAL Workshop "The Restless Gamma-ray Universe"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The main goal of this workshop is to present and to discuss (via invited and contributed talks and posters) latest results obtained in the field of high energy astrophysics using the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL, as well as results from related observations from other ground- and space-based high energy observatories. Topics: X-ray binaries (IGR sources, black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs) Isolated neutron stars (gamma-ray pulsars, magnetars) Nucleosynthesis (SNe and SNRs), gamma-ray lines, diffuse line and continuum emission Massive black holes in AGNs, elliptical galaxies, nucleus of the Galaxy Surveys, source populations and unidentified sources Cosmic background radiation Gamma-ray bursts Coordinated observations with other ground- and space-based observatories Science data processing and analysis (posters only) Future instruments and missions (posters only)

  11. 8th international conference on electronic spectroscopy and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2000-10-16

    Gathering from 33 countries around the world, 408 registrants and a number of local drop-in participants descended on the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from Monday, August 7 through Saturday, August 12, 2000 for the Eighth International Conference on Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy (ICESS8). At the conference, participants benefited from an extensive scientific program comprising more than 100 oral presentations (plenary lectures and invited and contributed talks) and 330 poster presentations, as well as ample time for socializing and a tour of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the nearby Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  12. Lithofacies analysis of basic lava flows of the Paraná igneous province in the south hinge of Torres Syncline, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Carla Joana Santos; de Lima, Evandro Fernandes; Scherer, Claiton Marlon; Rossetti, Lucas de Magalhães May

    2014-09-01

    The Paraná igneous province records the volcanism of the earlier Cretaceous that preceded the fragmentation of the Gondwana supercontinent. Historically, investigations of these rocks prioritized the acquisition of geochemical and isotopic data, considering the volcanic pile as a monotonous succession of tabular flows. This work provides a detailed analysis of the emplacement conditions of these basic volcanic rocks, applying the facies analysis method integrated to petrographic and geochemical data. The Torres Syncline is a NW-SE tectonic structure, located in southern Brazil, where a thick sequence of the Paraná-Etendeka volcanic rocks is well preserved. This study was performed in the south hinge of the syncline, where the basaltic lava flows are divided into three lithofacies associations: early compound pahoehoe, early simple pahoehoe and late simple rubbly. The first lavas that erupted were more primitive compound pahoehoe flow fields composed of olivine basalts with higher MgO contents and covered the sandstones of the Botucatu Formation. The emplacement of compound pahoehoe flow fields is possibly related to intermittent low effusion rates, whereas the emplacement of simple pahoehoe is related to sustained low effusion rates with continuous supply. The thick simple rubbly lavas are associated with high effusion rates and were formed during the main phase of volcanism in the area. The absence of paleosoils between the lavas and lithofacies associations suggests that the successive emplacement of the lava flows occurred in a relatively short time gap. Geochemically, the lithofacies associations are low-TiO2 and belong to Gramado magma type. The lavas of the south hinge of the Torres Syncline have a similar evolution when compared to other Continental Basaltic Provinces with earlier compound flows at the base and thicker simple flows in the upper portions.

  13. Implication of EAS data for the study of primary cosmic rays above 10 to the 5th power GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popova, L.; Wdowczyk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Due to the strong decrease of the energetic cosmic ray flux its direct detection at the top of atmosphere with aircraft is limited at the present time to about 100,000 GeV. The intensity of all primary particles can be approximated in the range 100 to 100,000 GeV by power function with power index 2.65. There are predominantly protons and the rest is represented by several groups of nuclei. In the range of 100,000 to 10 to the 8th power GeV considerable disagreement is most probably connected with the uncertainity of the indirect derivation of the parameters of extensive air showers. Results for the primary spectrum in the range to the 8th power GeV, obtained by implication of extensive air showers (EAS) data from mountain altitudes are discussed.

  14. Potential for genotoxic and reprotoxic effects of vanadium compounds due to occupational and environmental exposures: an article based on a presentation at the 8th International Symposium on Vanadium Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Toxicology, Washington DC, August 15-18, 2012.

    PubMed

    Altamirano-Lozano, M A; Álvarez-Barrera, L; Mateos-Nava, R A; Fortoul, T I; Rodríguez-Mercado, J J

    2014-01-01

    Research on the biological effects of vanadium in humans has shown that acute poisoning in workers can manifest itself in a number of symptoms. There are no reports in humans about reproductive and developmental effects induced by vanadium compounds in humans; however, some studies with rats and mice indicate that vanadium can cross the placental barrier and accumulate in fetal membranes rather than the fetus itself. In this case, probably most consequences of administration of vanadium to pregnant females like reabsorptions, fetal death and reduction in size can be the result of maternal toxicity. Concerning genetic and related effects in humans exposed to different vanadium compounds, data are controversial. Data on genotoxic effects in workers exposed to vanadium indicate that they can have an increased risk to develop cancer, and DNA instability can give rise to an onset of genetic syndromes, fetal malformations, and cancer. This paper presents materials presented at the 8th International Symposium on Vanadium Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Toxicology in a session titled 'Relationship between occupational and environmental exposure to vanadium compounds and the reprotoxic and genotoxic effects'.

  15. "For the Life of Me, I Can't See Why Those Students Were Let Go on So Long": Educating the Educators, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plater, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, almost 40% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion at The University of Sydney failed to complete the course. Although this was not considered unusual when compared to previous years, the decision was made to investigate why so many students struggled to meet the…

  16. A low-power nitriding technique utilizing a microwave-excited radical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Hirotomo; Hirose, Shingo; Kim, Jaeho; Ogura, Mutsuo; Wang, Xuelun; Nonaka, Atsushi; Ogiso, Hisato; Sakakita, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel low-power nitriding technique by utilizing a 2.45 GHz microwave-excited nitrogen radical flow system. Nitrogen plasma was produced at the nozzle with dimensions of 50 × 0.5 mm2 and blown onto the surface of a target substrate. A titanium substrate has been used as a target plate since it is easy to visualize a nitriding effect. The titanium substrate was treated under the conditions of 60 W microwave power, 20 Torr of nitrogen gas pressure, and a plate temperature of ∼800 °C. As a result, we have succeeded in nitriding of the titanium substrate in a quasi-atmospheric region of 20 Torr and of a very low power of 60 W with the hardness kept high, which is almost the same as the hardness processed by conventional nitriding methods.

  17. The influence of desorption gas to high power microwave window multipactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Tang Chuanxiang; Liu Guozhi; Chen Changhua; Qiu Shi; Fang Jinyong; Hou Qin

    2008-09-15

    Gas desorbed by electrons plays a key role in multipactor saturation and final plasma breakdown at the vacuum side of the window in high power microwave systems. A multipactor model involving electron-neutral collision and ionization is established. When desorption gas pressure reaches 1 Torr, the electron impact energy apparently decreases, multipactor saturates at a lower surface charging field, and multipactor saturation meets easier, compared to vacuum. Experiments for different material windows of high power microwave, with the power of 1 GW, frequency of 9.4 GHz, and 20 ns single and multiple pulses was conducted. It was discovered that gas pressure rose prominently in the horn, when breakdown occurred. The increase in local gas pressure during the 20 ns pulse is estimated from the experiment to reach several Torr, a pressure that is consistent with the presented dynamic model.

  18. The influence of desorption gas to high power microwave window multipactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao; Liu, Guozhi; Tang, Chuanxiang; Chen, Changhua; Qiu, Shi; Fang, Jinyong; Hou, Qin

    2008-09-01

    Gas desorbed by electrons plays a key role in multipactor saturation and final plasma breakdown at the vacuum side of the window in high power microwave systems. A multipactor model involving electron-neutral collision and ionization is established. When desorption gas pressure reaches 1Torr, the electron impact energy apparently decreases, multipactor saturates at a lower surface charging field, and multipactor saturation meets easier, compared to vacuum. Experiments for different material windows of high power microwave, with the power of 1GW, frequency of 9.4GHz, and 20ns single and multiple pulses was conducted. It was discovered that gas pressure rose prominently in the horn, when breakdown occurred. The increase in local gas pressure during the 20ns pulse is estimated from the experiment to reach several Torr, a pressure that is consistent with the presented dynamic model.

  19. Rapid Rejuvenation of the Source of a Backarc Sheeted Magmatic Complex (Torres del Paine, Patagonia): Evidence From Hf isotopes in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, T. A.; Muntener, O.; Leuthold, J.; Chiaradia, M.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Putlitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Miocene Torres del Paine intrusive complex (TPIC) in Patagonia is a spectacularly exposed example of a bimodal shallow crustal laccolith, made up of a sill complex and a subvertical feeder system. The TPIC was emplaced in a back-arc setting, but slightly older arc-related intrusive units in this area testify to an earlier shift from an arc to a backarc setting. The entire ~88 km3 main complex was emplaced over short time scales of 162 ± 11 ka between ~12.4 and 12.6 Ma, with mafic units from the feeder zone found to be older than mafic units from the sill complex1,2. We aim to assess whether successive pulses of mafic magmatism can tap different geochemical reservoirs in sheeted magmatic complexes emplaced on such short timescales. Hf isotope compositions of individual zircons from mafic units from both the feeder zone and the sill complex were determined by solution MC-ICPMS. Zircons from all units have Hf isotope compositions that indicate a slightly enriched mantle source. Zircons from the mafic sill complex units have higher (more juvenile) initial ɛHf than zircons from feeder zone mafic units. The shift towards more depleted Hf isotope compositions in the sill complex units, which are younger, demonstrates the rapid input of new juvenile material into the source region between ~12.6 Ma and ~12.5 Ma. A similar shift is also seen in bulk rock Nd and Sr isotope data for related samples3. The Hf isotope data demonstrate that significant variability in source geochemistry is possible for sheeted magmatic complexes built up on very short timescales. Analysis of zircons from a range of dikes and intrusive bodies external to the main Torres del Paine complex, with ages that span ~12-29 Ma, will provide a more complete picture in time and space of the geochemical evolution of this magmatic system as it switches between an arc and backarc setting. 1Leuthold et al., 2012, EPSL, 325: 85-92 2Michel et al., 2008, Geology, 36: 459-462 3Leuthold et al., 2013, JPET, 54

  20. Association of Arsenic and Metals with Concentrations of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D among Adolescents in Torreón, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zamoiski, Rachel D.; Guallar, Eliseo; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Resnick, Carol; Andrade, Marisela Rubio; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Weaver, Virginia M.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limited data suggest that lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and uranium (U) may disrupt vitamin D metabolism and inhibit production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active vitamin D metabolite, from 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the kidney. Objectives: We evaluated the association between blood lead (BPb) and urine arsenic (As), Cd, molybdenum (Mo), thallium (Tl), and U with markers of vitamin D metabolism [25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D]. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 512 adolescents in Torreón, a town in Mexico with a Pb smelter near residential areas. BPb was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine As, Cd, Mo, Tl, and U were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Multivariable linear models with vitamin D markers as the outcome were used to estimate associations of BPb and creatinine-corrected urine As and metal concentrations with serum vitamin D concentrations, controlling for age, sex, adiposity, smoking, socioeconomic status, and time outdoors. Results: Serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with urine Mo and Tl [1.5 (95% CI: 0.4, 2.6) and 1.2 (95% CI: 0.3, 2.1) ng/mL higher with a doubling of exposure, respectively]. Serum 1,25(OH)2D was positively associated with urine As and U [3.4 (95% CI: 0.9, 5.9) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.7, 3.7) pg/mL higher, respectively], with little change in associations after additional adjustment for serum 25(OH)D. Pb and Cd were not associated with 25(OH)D or 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. Conclusions: Overall, our findings did not support a negative effect of As or metal exposures on serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. Additional research is needed to confirm positive associations between serum 1,25(OH)2D and urine U and As concentrations and to clarify potential underlying mechanisms. Citation: Zamoiski RD, Guallar E, García-Vargas GG, Rothenberg SJ

  1. Up in smoke: I. Smoke-derived germination cues for postfire annual,Nicotiana attenuata torr. Ex. Watson.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T; Staszak-Kozinski, L; Davidson, R

    1994-09-01

    thermally desorbing smoke produced by cellulose combustions that was trapped on Chromosorb 101, we demonstrate that the cue is desorbed between 125 and 150°C. We estimate that the germination cues are active at concentrations of less than 1 pg/seed and, due to their chromatographic behavior, infer that a number of different chemical structures are active. In separate experiments, we demonstrate that cues remain active for at least 53 days in soil under greenhouse conditions and that the application of aqucous extracts of smoke to soil containing seeds results in dramatic increases in germination of artificial seed banks. Hence, although the chemical nature of the germination cue remains elusive, the stability of the germination cues, their water-solubility, and their activity in low concentrations suggest that these cues could serve as powerful tools for the examination of dormant seed banks and the selective factors thought to be important in the evolution of postfire plant communities.

  2. Correlating metastable-atom density, reduced electric field, and electron energy distribution in the post-transient stage of a 1-Torr argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, J. B.; Nogami, S. H.; Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Barnat, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    Temporal measurement of electron density, metastable-atom density, and reduced electric field are used to infer the dynamic behavior of the excitation rates describing electron-atom collision-induced excitation in the positive column of a 1 Torr argon plasma by invoking plausible assumptions regarding the shape of the electron energy distribution function performed in Adams et al (2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 023510). These inferred rates are used to predict the 420.1 nm to 419.8 nm argon emission ratio, which agree with experimental results when the assumptions are applicable. Thus the observed emission ratio is demonstrated to be dependent on the metastable-atom density, electron density, and reduced electric field. The established confidence in the validity of this emission-line-ratio model allows us to predict metastable argon-atom density during the post-transient phase of the pulse as suggested by De Joseph et al (2005 Phys. Rev. E 72 036410). Similar inferences of electron density and reduced electric field based on readily available diagnostic signatures may also be afforded by this model.

  3. High-Resolution Geophysical 3D Imaging for Archaeology by Magnetic and EM data: The Case of the Iron Age Settlement of Torre Galli, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic and electromagnetic surveying are effective techniques frequently used in archaeology because the susceptibility and the electric resistivity contrast between the cover soil and several buried finds often lead to detectable anomalies. Significant advances were recently achieved by 3D imaging methods of potential field data that provide an estimate of the magnetization distribution within the subsurface. They provide a high-resolution image of the source distribution, thanks to the differentiation of the field and to the stability of the process. These techniques are fast and quite effective in the case of a compact, isolated, and depth-limited source, i.e., just the kind of source generally occurring in archaeological investigations. We illustrate the high-resolution imaging process for a geophysical study carried out at Torre Galli ( Vibo Valentia, Calabria, Italy), one of the most significant sites of the early Iron Age in Italy. Multi-scale derivative analysis of magnetic data revealed the trends of anomalies shaped and aligned with a regular geometry. This allowed us to make an outline of the buried structures, and then to characterize them in terms of size, shape, and depth by means of the imaging technique. Targeted excavations were therefore addressed to the locations selected by our analysis, revealing structures showing exactly the predicted features and confirming the archaeological hypothesis concerning the settlement organization partitioned in terms of functional differentiation: an intermediate area occupied mostly by defensive structures placed between the village, westward, and the necropolis, eastward.

  4. Alcohol-Related Violence among the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders of the Northern Territory: Prioritizing an Agenda for Prevention-Narrative Review Article.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthi, Ramya; Jayaraj, Rama; Notaras, Leonard; Thomas, Mahiban

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol - related violence among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (also called as "Indigenous") is a major public health concern in Northern Territory of Australia. There is dearth of epidemiological data that link three contributing epidemics: alcohol misuse, violence, and trauma in the Northern Territory. In this review, we aimed to concentrate on how these epidemics intersect among the Indigenous people in the Northern Territory. In our descriptive review, we have searched published papers, publicly available government and health department reports web sites reporting relevant data on these three risk factors in the Northern Territory. The high rate of family and domestic violence and assaults in the Australian Territory indicates an increased correlation with high risk alcohol use compared to unintentional injuries. Heavy drinking pattern and harmful use of alcohol among Indigenous people are more likely to be associated with the incidence of violent assaults and physical injuries in the Northern Territory. We are trying to emphasize our understanding of co-occurring risk factors on the alcohol - violence relationship and urging a need for interventional approaches to reduce the public health issues in the Northern Territory.

  5. Effects of low-pressure air on oxygen contamination and lithium corrosion of a tantalum alloy, T-111, at 980 and 1260 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The effects were studied of low-pressure air on contamination and corrosion in the tantalum alloy T-111/lithium system at 980 and 1260 C. Capsules of T-111 containing lithium were exposed to six vacuum levels between 1 x 10 to the 8th power and 0.0003 torr by controlled air leakage into a vacuum system. Capsules exposed at 980 C and 0.0002 torr failed from intragranular oxidation. The remainder of the capsules completed the 96-hour tests. The depth of oxygen contamination was greater at 980 C than at 1260 C. Tests made at 0.0001 and 0.00001 torr levels caused large increases in the oxygen content of the T-111. Tests at 0.000001 torr or less produced no significant contamination. No lithium corrosion of the T-111 was observed under any of the conditions.

  6. Direct effects of soil amendments on field emergence and growth of the invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum L. and the native perennial grass Hilaria jamesii (Torr.) Benth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newingham, B.A.; Belnap, J.

    2006-01-01

    Bromus tectorum L. is a non-native, annual grass that has invaded western North America. In SE Utah, B. tectorum generally occurs in grasslands dominated by the native perennial grass, Hilaria jamesii (Torr.) Benth. and rarely where the natives Stipa hymenoides Roem. and Schult. and S. comata Trin. & Rupr. are dominant. This patchy invasion is likely due to differences in soil chemistry. Previous laboratory experiments investigated using soil amendments that would allow B. tectorum to germinate but would reduce B. tectorum emergence without affecting H. jamesii. For this study we selected the most successful treatments (CaCl2, MgCl2, NaCl and zeolite) from a previous laboratory study and applied them in the field in two different years at B. tectorum-dominated field sites. All amendments except the lowest level of CaCl2 and zeolite negatively affected B. tectorum emergence and/or biomass. No amendments negatively affected the biomass of H. jamesii but NaCl reduced emergence. Amendment effectiveness depended on year of application and the length of time since application. The medium concentration of zeolite had the strongest negative effect on B. tectorum with little effect on H. jamesii. We conducted a laboratory experiment to determine why zeolite was effective and found it released large amounts of Na+, adsorbed Ca2+, and increased Zn2+, Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, exchangeable Mg2+, exchangeable K, and NH 4+ in the soil. Our results suggest several possible amendments to control B. tectorum. However, variability in effectiveness due to abiotic factors such as precipitation and soil type must be accounted for when establishing management plans. ?? Springer 2006.

  7. Kinetics study of reactions of α-pinene and β-pinene with hydroxyl radical at 1-8 Torr and 240-340 K using the relative rate/discharge flow/mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Anthony; Ishibashi, Jacob S A; Lam, Phuong; Li, Zhuangjie

    2012-12-13

    The kinetics of reactions of α-pinene and β-pinene with hydroxyl radicals (OH) has been investigated at 1-8 Torr and 240-340 K using the relative rate/discharge flow/mass spectrometry (RR/DF/MS) technique. Our kinetic results indicate that at 298 K the rate constant of the reactions of α-pinene and β-pinene with hydroxyl radicals has little pressure dependence over the 1-8 Torr pressure range, suggesting that the high pressure limit of these reactions has been reached at 1 Torr. The rate constant of these reactions was found to negatively depend on the temperature at 240-340 K, which is consistent with previous investigations using different techniques. The Arrhenius equation for α-pinene and β-pinene with hydroxyl radical was determined to be k(α-pinene) = (1.21 ± 0.20) × 10(-11)exp[(441 ± 46)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(β-pinene) = (1.65 ± 0.10) × 10(-11)exp[(470 ± 17)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. Using the rate constant determined at 277 K in this work and the average global hydroxyl radical concentration, the atmospheric lifetime of α-pinene and β-pinene was estimated to be 5.8 and 3.8 h, respectively.

  8. The Power of Learning from Inquiry: Teacher Research as a Professional Development Tool in Multilingual Schools. Adult Education Special Topics: Theory, Research and Practice in LifeLong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevarez-La Torre, Aida A.

    2010-01-01

    The power of teacher inquiry is revealed when educators examine their practices with the purpose of making necessary changes to improve the learning opportunities of their multilingual students, and working conditions in schools. Dr. Nevarez-La Torre, proposes a model for conducting classroom inquiry that teachers may follow to pursue important…

  9. High power switching and other high power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1992-09-01

    High power thyratrons and devices such as high power microwave sources have cathode-related performance limits. Research is described of a simple, robust 'super-emissive' cathode that produces greater than 10,000 A/sq cm from a macroscopic area (approx. 1 sq cm), and operates with a low pressure (approx. 0.1 torr), spatially uniform glow plasma (density greater than 1015 cu cm). The cathode also can operate as a hollow cathode, and is at the heart of the operation of the pseudospark and back-lighted thyratron. The physics of this hollow and super-emissive cathode is very rich. The hollow cathode geometry traps electrons in the hollow cathode backspace. The lifetime of these electrons enables them to ionize a spatially homogeneous high density glow, and this hollow cathode mode of operation is responsible for certain types of electron and ion beam behavior. A plasma cathode sheath that is formed during this phase leads to super-emissive behavior, which is responsible for high current emission. Super-emissive cathode thyratron-type switches (with higher peak current, voltage, di/dt) being developed for pulsed power switching of lasers, accelerators, high current and high coulomb transfer, Marx bank operation, transfer of technology to commercial applications, high current electron beams, and millimeter wave generation (1 to 100 GHz) are described.

  10. Space Power Facility Readiness for Space Station Power System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roger L.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides information which shows that the NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) will be ready to execute the Space Station electric power system thermal vacuum chamber testing. The SPF is located at LeRC West (formerly the Plum Brook Station), Sandusky, Ohio. The SPF is the largest space environmental chamber in the world, having an inside horizontal diameter of 100 ft. and an inside height at the top of the hemisphere of 122 ft. The vacuum system can achieve a pressure lower than 1 x 10(exp -5) Torr. The cryoshroud, cooled by gaseous nitrogen, can reach a temperature of -250 F, and is 80 ft. long x 40 ft. wide x 22 ft. high. There is access to the chamber through two 50 ft. x 50 ft. doors. Each door opens into an assembly area about 150 ft. long x 70 ft. wide x 80 ft. high. Other available facilities are offices, shop area, data acquisition system with 930 pairs of hard lines, 7 megawatts of power to chamber, 245K gal. liquid nitrogen storage, cooling tower, natural gas, service air, and cranes up to 25 tons.

  11. Petrological constraints on the recycling of mafic crystal mushes, magma ascent and intrusion of braided sills in the Torres del Paine mafic complex (Patagonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, Julien; Müntener, Othmar; Baumgartner, Lukas; Putlitz, Benita

    2014-05-01

    Cumulate and crystal mush disruption and reactivation are difficult to recognise in coarse grained shallow plutonic rocks. Mafic minerals included in hornblende and zoned plagioclase provide snapshots of early crystallization and cumulate formation, but are difficult to interpret in terms of the dynamics of magma ascent and possible links between silicic and mafic rock emplacement. We will present the field relations, the microtextures and the mineral chemistry of the Miocene mafic sill complex of the Torres del Paine intrusive complex (Patagonia, Chile) and its sub-vertical feeder-zone. The mafic sill complex was built up by a succession of braided sills of shoshonitic and high-K calc-alkaline porphyritic hornblende-gabbro and fine grained monzodioritic sills. The mafic units were over-accreted over 41±11 ka, underplating the overlying granite. Local diapiric structures and felsic magma accumulation between sills indicate limited separation of intercumulus liquid from the mafic sills. Anhedral hornblende cores, with olivine + clinopyroxene ± plagioclase ± apatite inclusions, crystallized at temperatures >900°C and pressures of ~300 to ~500 MPa. The corresponding rims and monzodiorite matrix crystallized at <830°C, ~70 MPa. This abrupt compositional variation suggests stability and instability of hornblende during mafic roots recycling and subsequent decompression. The near lack of intercumulus crystals in the sub-vertical feeder zone layered gabbronorite and pyroxene-hornblende gabbronorite stocks testifies that melt is more efficiently extracted than in sills, resulting in a cumulate signature in the feeding system. The emplacement age of the sill complex topmost granitic unit is identical, within uncertainties, to the feeder zone mafic cumulates. Granitic liquids formed by AFC processes and were extracted at high temperature (T>950°C) from the middle crust reservoir to the emplacement level. We show that hornblende-plagioclase thermobarometry is a useful

  12. Evolution of the mantle source in an evolving arc-backarc system (Torres del Paine, Patagonia): Evidence from Hf isotopes in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, T. A.; Muntener, O.; Leuthold, J.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Putlitz, B.; d'Abzac, F. X.; Chiaradia, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Miocene Torres del Paine intrusive complex (TPIC) in Patagonia is a transitional alkaline backarc intrusion1 emplaced on short timescales of 162 ± 11 ka2. It is subdivided into two units with distinct ages of ~12.6 Ma and ~12.45 Ma1. Smaller intrusive bodies in the area record a change in chemistry from calc-alkaline at ~16 Ma, to transitional alkaline at ~12.5 Ma. Zircons from ~16 Ma intrusives and the 12.6 Ma part of the TPIC have remarkably consistent, slightly enriched Hf isotope compositions with ɛHf(i) of -1 to +2. An abrupt shift towards more juvenile Hf isotope compositions is observed in the ~12.45 Ma part of the TPIC, with ɛHf(i) of +3 to +6. Bulk rock Nd and Sr isotopes for the TPIC show the same shift towards more juvenile compositions at this time1. The long-term consistency of ɛHf(i) from 16 to 12.6 Ma is surprising, given that in the same period the bulk rock chemistry changes from calc-alkaline to transitional alkaline. Conversely, the major shift in ɛHf(i) is not correlated with any change in bulk rock chemistry, which remains transitional alkaline from 12.6 to 12.45 Ma. The decoupling of major element chemical evolution and Hf isotope signatures suggests that the subsequent rapid influx of juvenile material recorded by our Hf isotope data must have occurred by renewed mantle melting. Subduction of the Chile ridge at ~12.5 Ma in this area caused arc magmatism to move westwards and back-arc extension to initiate. We propose that the first TPIC magmas (12.6 Ma) came from a mantle wedge with a residual subduction signature. Subsequent melting of more juvenile mantle, less contaminated by a subduction component, generated the 12.45 Ma TPIC magmas. These results demonstrate that magmatic complexes such as the TPIC may tap distinct mantle sources even on very short timescales, fingerprinting arc-backarc transition processes. 1Leuthold et al., 2013, JPET, 54: 273-303 2Leuthold et al., 2012, EPSL, 325: 85-92

  13. Soil amendment effects on the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum L. and facilitation of its growth by the native perennial grass Hilaria jamesii (Torr.) Benth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Sherrod, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were undertaken to identify soil factors that curtail growth of the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass) without significantly inhibiting growth of native perennial grasses (here represented by Hilaria jamesii [Torr.] Benth). We grew B. tectorum and H. jamesii alone (monoculture pots) and together (combination pots) in soil treatments that manipulated levels of soil phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. Hilaria jamesii showed no decline when its aboveground biomass in any of the applied treatments was compared to the control in either the monoculture or combination pots. Monoculture pots of B. tectorum showed a decline in aboveground biomass with the addition of Na2HPO4 and K2HPO4. Interestingly, in pots where H. jamesii was present, the negative effect of these treatments was ameliorated. Whereas the presence of B. tectorum generally decreased the aboveground biomass of H. jamesii (comparing aboveground biomass in monoculture versus combination pots), the presence of H. jamesii resulted in an enhancement of B. tectorum aboveground biomass by up to 900%. We hypothesize that B. tectorum was able to obtain resources from H. jamesii, an action that benefited B. tectorum while generally harming H. jamesii. Possible ways resources may be gained by B. tectorum from native perennial grasses include (1) B. tectorum is protected from salt stress by native plants or associated soil biota; (2) when B. tectorum is grown with H. jamesii, the native soil biota is altered in a way that favors B. tectorum growth, including B. tectorum tapping into the mycorrhizal network of native plants and obtaining resources from them; (3) B. tectorum can take advantage of root exudates from native plants, including water and nutrients released by natives via hydraulic redistribution; and (4) B. tectorum is able to utilize some combination of the above mechanisms. In summary, land managers may find adding soil treatments can temporarily suppress B. tectorum

  14. Patterns and correlates of self-reported racial discrimination among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, 2008–09: analysis of national survey data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is now considerable evidence that racism is a pernicious and enduring social problem with a wide range of detrimental outcomes for individuals, communities and societies. Although indigenous people worldwide are subjected to high levels of racism, there is a paucity of population-based, quantitative data about the factors associated with their reporting of racial discrimination, about the settings in which such discrimination takes place, and about the frequency with which it is experienced. Such information is essential in efforts to reduce both exposure to racism among indigenous people and the harms associated with such exposure. Methods Weighted data on self-reported racial discrimination from over 7,000 Indigenous Australian adults participating in the 2008–09 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey, a nationally representative survey conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, were analysed by socioeconomic, demographic and cultural factors. Results More than one in four respondents (27%) reported experiencing racial discrimination in the past year. Racial discrimination was most commonly reported in public (41% of those reporting any racial discrimination), legal (40%) and work (30%) settings. Among those reporting any racial discrimination, about 40% experienced this discrimination most or all of the time (as opposed to a little or some of the time) in at least one setting. Reporting of racial discrimination peaked in the 35–44 year age group and then declined. Higher reporting of racial discrimination was associated with removal from family, low trust, unemployment, having a university degree, and indicators of cultural identity and participation. Lower reporting of racial discrimination was associated with home ownership, remote residence and having relatively few Indigenous friends. Conclusions These data indicate that racial discrimination is commonly experienced across a wide variety of settings, with public

  15. Vibrational distribution of nitrogen molecules in the C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} state in a near-surface microwave plasma in nitrogen at pressures of 1-5 Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Yu. A. Epshtein, I. L.; Yusupova, E. V.

    2013-02-15

    The radiation of the second positive nitrogen system has been used to study the spatial dependence of the vibrational distribution of nitrogen molecules in the C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} state in the near-surface plasma layer of an electrode microwave discharge in nitrogen at pressures of 1-5 Torr. It has been shown that the vibrational distribution changes at a scale of 100 {mu}m. It has been concluded that this state is populated owing to the electron impact from the ground state. The possibility of using the local approximation for the electron energy distribution function to explain the experimental results has been analyzed.

  16. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  17. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, T.; Bartoszek, L.; Tilles, E.; Petter, J.; McCarthy, J.

    1985-05-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10/sup -10/ torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Output power characteristics of thin film-coated waveguide CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wagatsuma, Yoshihiko; Nishida, Shigeo; Hongo, Akihito

    1987-02-01

    An output power efficiency of 9 percent is achieved in a germanium-coated brass waveguide CO2 laser at a gas pressure of 50 Torr and input RF power of 40 W. Pyrex glass is used as the insulator, and the germanium layer has a thickness of 0.5 micron. The direction of the polarization in the germanium coated brass-pyrex glass composite waveguide laser is found to be parallel to the metal plates. It is shown that the oscillating mode is the lowest-order mode, and that the profile can be approximately described by a Gaussian distribution when the noise level is properly subtracted.

  19. A study of the nitrogen laser power density and some design considerations.

    PubMed

    Ali, A W

    1969-05-01

    The laser power density and its time history from a pulsed molecular nitrogen laser are calculated. Their dependence on the fill pressure and on various parameters of an electric circuit, in which the nitrogen gas acts as a variable resistor, is illustrated. It is shown that the peak power density increases in a circuit with low inductance and high capacitor voltage and that the energy density has an optimum at a fill pressure of ~28 Torr. Based on these and the gain calculations, some design considerations are also discussed. PMID:20072361

  20. On the electron energy in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Sigurjonsson, P.; Larsson, P.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2009-06-15

    The temporal variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) was measured with a Langmuir probe in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge at 3 and 20 mTorr pressures. In the HiPIMS discharge a high power pulse is applied to a planar magnetron giving a high electron density and highly ionized sputtered vapor. The measured EEDF is Maxwellian-like during the pulse; it is broader for lower discharge pressure and it becomes narrower as the pulse progresses. This indicates that the plasma cools as the pulse progresses, probably due to high metal content of the discharge.

  1. [Environmental, social, and roadway vulnerability in accidents involving transportation of hazardous products: a case study of the BR-101 highway between Osório and Torres in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Maria Auxiliadora Cannarozzo; Nodari, Christine Tessele; Pereira, Kimberllyn Rosa da Silva

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the environmental and social vulnerability and identify critical highway stretches for accidents involving transportation of hazardous products on the BR-101 highway between the cities of Osório and Torres in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The study's approach consisted of a multiple-criteria analysis combining highway safety analysis and environmental and social vulnerability analysis in the occurrence of accidents with hazardous products, plus cartographic analysis techniques. Thirty-eight kilometers of the highway showed high vulnerability, of which 8 kilometers with critical vulnerability, associated with bridges over rivers, water uptake points, a tunnel, environmental preservation areas, and an urban area. These stretches should be prioritized when developing action plans for accident mitigation and development of public policies for this highway. This proved to be an unprecedented approach when compared to existing studies and a potentially useful tool for decision-making in emergency operations. PMID:27653196

  2. Are the processes recommended by the NHMRC for improving Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people being implemented?: an assessment of CR Services across Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of premature death of Indigenous Australians, and despite evidence that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and secondary prevention can reduce recurrent disease and deaths, CR uptake is suboptimal. The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines Strengthening Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, published in 2005, provide checklists for services to assist them to reduce the service gap for Indigenous people. This study describes health professionals' awareness, implementation, and perspectives of barriers to implementation of these guidelines based on semi-structured interviews conducted between November 2007 and June 2008 with health professionals involved in CR within mainstream health services in Western Australia (WA). Twenty-four health professionals from 17 services (10 rural, 7 metropolitan) listed in the WA Directory of CR services were interviewed. Results The majority of respondents reported that they were unfamiliar with the NHMRC guidelines and as a consequence implementation of the recommendations was minimal and inconsistently applied. Respondents reported that they provided few in-patient CR-related services to Indigenous patients, services upon discharge were erratic, and they had few Indigenous-specific resources for patients. Issues relating to workforce, cultural competence, and service linkages emerged as having most impact on design and delivery of CR services for Indigenous people in WA. Conclusions This study has demonstrated limited awareness and poor implementation in WA of the recommendations of the NHMRC Strengthening Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: A Guide for Health Professionals. The disproportionate burden of CVD morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians mandates urgent attention to this problem and alternative approaches to CR

  3. Characterization of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in High Power, High Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Kenney, Jason; Agarwal, Ankur; Nichols, Michael; Rogers, James; Rauf, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are widely used in the microelectronic industry for thin film etching. ICPs have typically been operated at low gas pressures (<50 mTorr) and they have been well-characterized in this regime. Several applications requiring high etch rates (e.g., vertical NAND etch) have recently extended the use of ICPs to the high power (>4000 W) and high pressure (>100 mTorr) regime. ICP operation in this high-power, high-pressure regime imposes a tremendous challenge of achieving good plasma uniformity over large substrates. This necessitates a good theoretical understanding of the underlying physics, thorough experimental characterization, and more accurate numerical models for hardware design guidance. In this study, we will focus on the characterization of ICP in the high-power, high-pressure regime. Computational modeling is done using CRTRS, our in-house 2D/3D plasma model. The fluid plasma model is coupled to a circuit model to self-consistently account for the capacitive coupling from the coils that is expected to dominate in this operating regime. Properties of Ar plasma will be discussed and compared with experiments. The impact of critical operating parameters such as ICP power, pressure, flow rate, and current ratio (in multi-coil antenna structures) on plasma characteristics will be examined. Results in relevant processing gases will also be discussed.

  4. Magma Pulsing and Internal Structure of the Torres del Paine Laccolith (Patagonia) Constrained by High Precision Zircon U-Pb Dating, and Thermal and Crystal Size Modeling of its Contact Aureole.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, L. P.; Bodner, R.; Leuthold, J.; Muntener, O.; Putlitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The shallow Torres del Paine Intrusive Complex (TPIC) belongs to a trench-parallel belt of igneous bodies in Southern Chile and Argentina. It is located in a transitional position between the Patagonia Batholith in the West, and the alkaline Cenozoic plateau lavas in the East. Volumetrically small amounts of magmatism started around 28 my ago in the Torres del Paine area. A second period occurred between 17-16 Ma, and igneous activity peaked with the TPIC 12.59-12.43 Ma ago. Finally, very minor magmatism occurred less than a million year ago. Intrusion depth, estimated based on contact metamorphic assemblages, decreased from ca. 10-12km at 17 Ma to ca. 3km at 12.5 Ma, the latter depth corresponding well with hornblende thermobarometry in mafic rocks and the water saturated granite solidus compositions observed. The TPIC is composed of a granitic laccolith emplaced over 90ka (1) in 3 several 100m thick sheets, forming an overall thickness of nearly 2 km. The granitic laccolith is under-plated by a ca. 400m thick mafic laccolith, built up over 50ka (2), constructed bottom up. Each sheet is itself composed of a multitude (>10) of metric to decametric pulses with mostly ductile contacts, resulting in outcrop patterns resembling braided stream sediments. Thermal modeling of the contact metamorphism, including heat of crystallization and the enthalpy of metamorphic reactions constrains the granite intrusion temperature to ca. 1000°C. Peak metamorphic temperatures suggest that intrusion of magma had to occur in a rapid succession of pulses, preferentially along the granite-host rock contact. Enthalpy released due to hydration of the biotite and feldspar of the immature sediments in the outer aureole contributed significantly to the far-field temperatures in the host-rock. Numerical crystal growth models matching the crystal size distribution indicate significant overstepping during onset of the contact metamorphic reactions. Nevertheless, sharp isogrades are predicted by

  5. Power processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Processing of electric power has been presented as a discipline that draws on almost every field of electrical engineering, including system and control theory, communications theory, electronic network design, and power component technology. The cost of power processing equipment, which often equals that of expensive, sophisticated, and unconventional sources of electrical energy, such as solar batteries, is a significant consideration in the choice of electric power systems.

  6. Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate directions for the applied research and technology programs that will develop space power systems for U.S. future space missions beyond 1995 are explored. Spacecraft power supplies; space stations, space power reactors, solar arrays, thermoelectric generators, energy storage, and communication satellites are among the topics discussed.

  7. Power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Hamilton, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  8. Self-induced gaseous plasma as high power microwave opening switch medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.; Liu, C.

    2015-04-15

    Self-induced gaseous plasma is evaluated as active opening switch medium for pulsed high power microwave radiation. The self-induced plasma switch is investigated for N{sub 2} and Ar environments under pressure conditions ranging from 25 to 700 Torr. A multi-pass TE{sub 111} resonator is used to significantly reduce the delay time inherently associated with plasma generation. The plasma forms under the pulsed excitation of a 4 MW magnetron inside the central dielectric tube of the resonator, which isolates the inner atmospheric gas from the outer vacuum environment. The path from the power source to the load is designed such that the pulse passes through the plasma twice with a 35 ns delay between these two passes. In the first pass, initial plasma density is generated, while the second affects the transition to a highly reflective state with as much as 30 dB attenuation. Experimental data revealed that virtually zero delay time may be achieved for N{sub 2} at 25 Torr. A two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the plasma formation times for comparison with experimental data. The delay time predicted from this model agrees well with the experimental values in the lower pressure regime (error < 25%), however, due to filamentary plasma formation at higher pressures, simulated delay times may be underestimated by as much as 50%.

  9. Middle School Science Curriculum Design and 8th Grade Student Achievement in Massachusetts Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Betsey A.

    2016-01-01

    The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) released proposed Science and Technology/Engineering standards in 2013 outlining the concepts that should be taught at each grade level. Previously, standards were in grade spans and each district determined the method of implementation. There are two different methods used…

  10. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 3: Student Achievement at 8th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudowsky, Naomi; Chudowsky, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few decades, concerns have escalated about the quality of education in the U.S. for students in the middle grades. Children entering adolescence have unique educational, social, and emotional needs. How effectively the nation is educating these students has long been a topic of research and debate. This study by the Center on…

  11. International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines, 8th, Cincinnati, OH, June 14-19, 1987, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Billig, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on air-breathing aircraft engine technology considers topics in inlet design, radial-flow turbomachinery, fuel injection and combustion systems, axial flow compressor design and performance, ramjet configurations, turbine flow phenomena, engine control and service life, fluid flow-related problems, engine diagnostic methods, propfan design, combustor performance and pollutant chemistry, combustion dynamics, and engine system analysis. Attention is given to thrust-vectoring systems, supersonic missile air intakes, three-dimensional centrifugal compressors, airblast atomizers, secondary flows in axial flow compressors, axial compressor blade tip clearance flows, hydrogen scramjets with sidewall injection, the performance of a variable-geometry turbine, advanced tip clearance control systems, rotary jet mixing, fan blade aeroelastic behavior, flow dynamics in combustion processes, and the technology of low cost turbomachinery.

  12. Charge It! Translating Electric Vehicle Research Results to Engage 7th and 8th Grade Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egbue, Ona; Long, Suzanna; Ng, Ean-Harn

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to generate interest in science and technology careers, US students continue to show reduced interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors at the collegiate level. If girls are not engaged in STEM learning by the middle school level, studies show that they are even less likely to choose a science- or…

  13. Electromagnetic Spectrum. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide, the second in a set of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on the electromagnetic spectrum prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for…

  14. Electrical Energy. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide, the fifth in a set of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on electrical energy prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for students in grades…

  15. Tuition Rises 7 Pct., Outruns Inflation for 8th Straight Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evangelauf, Jean

    1988-01-01

    The annual survey of college costs by the College Board is described. Students at four-year public institutions will pay 5 percent more than last year while students at four-year private institutions will pay 9 percent more. (MLW)

  16. 8th Grade Physical Science Units Modified for ESOL Students, Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waynant, Louise F.

    A packet of supplementary materials for eighth grade science instruction for limited-English-proficient students is intended for beginning and intermediate students of English as a second language (ESOL). It contains worksheets and activities designed to increase student participation, challenge them within their language ability, create positive…

  17. Learning Packet in Social Studies (8th Grade) for ESOL Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Jacquelyn; And Others

    The learning packet is intended to provide the eighth grade social studies teacher with supplemental material for teaching beginning and intermediate students of English as a second language. It contains a variety of activities to assist in developing the student's vocabulary skills, reading comprehension, writing skills, and a working knowledge…

  18. LIS review 1994. 8th annual state-of-the-lab.

    PubMed

    Winsten, D

    1994-03-01

    1993 was a year of turmoil, uncertainty, restructuring and consolidation in the laboratory information systems industry. There were mergers and acquisitions among both vendors and buyers, major product announcements, looming healthcare reform: it was an interesting year. PMID:10132950

  19. Wellness Promotion Strategies. Selected Proceedings of the Annual National Wellness Conference (8th, Stevens Point, Wisconsin).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opatz, Joseph P., Ed.

    A major concern to practitioners in the wellness movement has been the dearth of high quality up-to-date information about their field. This book provides a comprehensive and current look at the wellness field. Presentations in part 1 include: (1) "The History and Future of the Wellness Movement" (Donald B. Ardell); (2) "Presenting the Wellness…

  20. From Confrontation to Cooperation: 8th International Seminar on Nuclear War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, A.; Dardo, M.

    1992-09-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * OPENING SESSION * A. Zichichi: Opening Statements * R. Nicolosi: Opening Statements * MESSAGES * CONTRIBUTIONS * "The Contribution of the Erice Seminars in East-West-North-South Scientific Relations" * 1. LASER TECHNOLOGY * "Progress in laser technology" * "Progress in laboratory high gain ICF: prospects for the future" * "Applications of laser in metallurgy" * "Laser tissue interactions in medicine and surgery" * "Laser fusion" * "Compact X-ray lasers in the laboratory" * "Alternative method for inertial confinement" * "Laser technology in China" * 2. NUCLEAR AND CHEMICAL SAFETY * "Reactor safety and reactor design" * "Thereotical analysis and numerical modelling of heat transfer and fuel migration in underlying soils and constructive elements of nuclear plants during an accident release from the core" * "How really to attain reactor safely" * "The problem of chemical weapons" * "Long terms genetic effects of nuclear and chemical accidents" * "Features of the brain which are of importance in understanding the mode of operation of toxic substances and of radiation" * "CO2 and ultra safe reactors" * 3. USE OF MISSILES * "How to convert INF technology for peaceful scientific purposes" * "Beating words into plowshares: a proposal for the peaceful uses of retired nuclear warheads" * "Some thoughts on the peaceful use of retired nuclear warheads" * "Status of the HEFEST project" * 4. OZONE * "Status of the ozone layer problem" * 5. CONVENTIONAL AND NUCLEAR FORCE RESTRUCTURING IN EUROPE * 6. CONFLICT AVOIDANCE MODEL * 7. GENERAL DISCUSSION OF THE WORLD LAB PROJECTS * "East-West-North-South Collaboration in Subnuclear Physics" * "Status of the World Lab in the USSR" * CLOSING SESSION

  1. A Guide for Teaching General Science 1-2 (8th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Philip D.

    This guide was prepared as an aid to teachers of general science 1-2, grade 8. One of the major purposes of the guide is to assist the teachers in adopting a discovery-oriented approach in the classroom. The course is designed to prepare able students for the advanced science courses, grades 9-12. Teaching techniques, homework, laboratory…

  2. A Study of the 8th Grade Technology Literacy of a Michigan Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spruill, James E.

    2014-01-01

    As states adopt the common core state standards and next generation assessments for the 2014-2015 school year, the importance of students' technology literacy will increase Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. The next generation assessments will require students to complete technology performance tasks. For the first time in mandatory testing,…

  3. Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    These Proceedings contain papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, held October 2nd through 6th, 1972, on the campus of the University of Michigan. The symposium was conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing Information and Analysis of the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (formerly the University of Michigan's Willow Run Laboratories) as a part of a continuing program investigating current activities in the field of remote sensing. Presentations include those on the use of this technology by regional governmental units and by federal governmental agencies, as well as various applications in monitoring and managing the earth's resources and man's global environment. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne sensor systems and manual and machine-assisted data analysis and interpretation are included.

  4. Sustainability and Science Learning: Perceptions from 8th Grade Students Involved with a Role Playing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Sofia; Baptista, Mónica; Freire, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Raising awareness about sustainability is an urgent need and as such education for sustainability has gained relevancy for the last decades. It is acknowledged that science education can work as an important context for educating for sustainability. The goal of the present paper is to describe a role-playing activity about the construction of a…

  5. Lifelong Learning Research Conference Proceedings (8th, College Park, Maryland, February 19-20, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, William M., Comp.; Walker, Sharon M., Comp.

    Among the 46 papers in this proceedings are the following 36 selected titles: "The Intergenerational Exercise/Movement Program" (Ansello); "Using Computers for Adult Literacy Instruction" (Askov et al.); "Measuring Adults' Attitudes toward Computers" (Delcourt, Lewis); "Issues in Computers and Adult Learning" (Gerver); "Preassessment of Adult…

  6. Heat Energy. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide the first of a series of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on heat energy prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for students in grades 8-10…

  7. Evaluation of Reading Attitudes of 8th Grade Students in Primary Education According to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahbaz, Namik Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Reading skill is a cognitive process in which the words are perceived, given a meaning, comprehended and then interpreted. The last year in primary education is a critical period when this skill is changed into a habit. As reading attitudes are important for an individual throughout the life, it is necessary to determine according to which…

  8. Educating for Peace and Justice: Religious Dimensions, K-6. 8th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, James

    This revised teacher's manual focuses on the need to develop compassionate concern in students if they are to be moved to action. The 12-step processes in the 8 units promote a personal relationship or friendship with the persons or groups involved. The units include: (1) "Of Dreams and Vision"; (2) "Interpersonal Peacemaking/Reconciliation"; (3)…

  9. The 8th Annual AP[R] Report to the Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In classrooms around the country, AP (Advanced Placement) teachers are preparing students for tomorrow by teaching them how to think and learn today. AP students learn to construct solid arguments, test theories, and see many sides of an issue--the kind of thinking that solves tough problems both in and outside the classroom, in college and…

  10. Friendly and Hostility Perception of 8th Grade Students about Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Beytullah

    2015-01-01

    The course contents taught in social sciences, revolution history and Kemalism at different stages of primary schools in Turkey form in learners political, social and economical behavioural patterm towards their neighbouring countries. The students try to form friendly or hostile behaviour against other countries. The study aims to determine what…

  11. Evidence-Based Practice Guideline: Increasing Physical Activity in Schools--Kindergarten through 8th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagby, Karen; Adams, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Because of the growing obesity epidemic across all age groups in the United States, interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors have become a priority. Evidence is growing that interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors have positive results and are generally inexpensive to implement.…

  12. 78 FR 9916 - Filing Dates for the Missouri Special Election in the 8th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... General Election on June 4, 2013, shall file a 12-day Pre-General Report, and a 30-day Post-General Report... Missouri Special General Election shall file a 12-day Pre-General Report on May 23, 2013, and a 30-day Post...-General 05/15/13 05/20/13 05/23/13 Post-General 06/24/13 07/04/13 07/04/13 \\2\\ July Quarterly 06/30/13...

  13. Collected Papers: Inter-Institutional Seminar in Childhood Education (8th, Ogden, Utah, August, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Ruth C., Ed.

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented during the 1979 Utah Inter-Institutional Seminar in Childhood Education. Introductory lectures provide an overview of theories of human development and indicate techniques for understanding child behavior. Self-reflection by teachers and techniques for influencing children are emphasized.…

  14. Culture and Development. Farm House Dialogue (8th, Ota, Nigeria, February 2-4, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Africa Leadership Forum.

    This document summarizes discussions at an invitational workshop on the role of culture in development in Nigeria. The discussion centered on encouraging those elements of traditional African culture that contribute to the national development and on identifying a national Nigerian culture. The following broad topics were discussed: (1) the…

  15. The 8th and 9th Grades Students' Attitude towards Teaching and Learning Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefan, Monica; Ciomos, Florentina

    2010-01-01

    The students' interest and attitude towards Physics have been the object of international testing, the most recent of which is the PISA testing from 2006. The students' attitude towards sciences is considered to be a significant predictor of their school results in science, respectively of pursuing a career in areas related to Science. The present…

  16. Technical Assistance and Dissemination Conference (8th, Washington, D.C., March 2-4, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Resource Center for Special Education, Washington, DC.

    This document reports on a 1998 conference on technical assistance and dissemination attended by representatives from the Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), Technical Assistance and Dissemination (TA&D) projects, and regional resource centers. The conference was intended to increase knowledge concerning TA&D,…

  17. Proceedings of the 8th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Eight Annual Precise Time and Tme Interval PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. The edited record of the discussions following the papers and the panel discussions are also included. This meeting provided a forum for the exchange of information on precise time and frequency technology among members of the scientific community and persons with program applications. The 282 registered attendees came from various U.S. Government agencies, private industry, universities and a number of foreign countries were represented. In this meeting, papers were presented that emphasized: (1) definitions and international regulations of precise time sources and users, (2) the scientific foundations of Hydrogen Maser standards, the current developments in this field and the application experience, and (3) how to measure the stability performance properties of precise standards. As in the previous meetings, update and new papers were presented on system applications with past, present and future requirements identified.

  18. Teacher Turnover Impact on 1st-8th Grade Student Academic Achievement: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Johnnie M.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of schools and students not meeting academic achievement standards affects the community and the nation's future workforce. This paper examines many of the factors influencing achievement with special attention given to the facts of teacher turnover in the schools. Teacher turnover and the sad state of the academic achievement of…

  19. Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Applications, 8th, Monterey, CA, Mar. 2-6, 1992, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various artificial intelligence applications, with attention given to integrating rule-base systems, enabling technologies, knowledge acquisition and learning, and intelligent interfaces and natural language processing. Other topics discussed include planning, scheduling, and constraint satisfaction; case-based reasoning, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy logic; design; and distributed problem solving and real-time systems. Papers are presented on representation and control of knowledge bases for support of multiple tasks, a multilevel diagnosis methodology for complex systems, intelligent assistance for the communication of information in large organizations, and qualitative/fuzzy approach to document recognition.

  20. Space Cryogenic Workshop, 8th, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, July 31, Aug. 1, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in cryogenic technology for space applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include very-low-force cooling contacts for the ISO cryostat cover, convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs, liquid-acquisition devices for superfluid He transfer, and pressure drop in the SHOOT superfluid-He acquisition system. Consideration is given to a liquid-He vibration cryostat for space qualification tests, closed-cycle coolers for temperatures below 30 K, stress analysis down to liquid-He temperature, a cryogenic valve actuator, and a spaceborne He-3 refrigerator. Also discussed are an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF, rejection of waste heat from O liquefaction operations at a lunar O production plant, SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers, and space qualification of the ISO cryogenic rupture disks.

  1. Proceedings of the National Technical Literacy Conference (8th, Arlington, Virginia, January 15-17, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Science, Technology, and Society, University Park, PA.

    This document of conference proceedings is divided into five sections. The first, STS (Science Technology and Society) Studies, contains five papers: (1) "Scientific Discourse and Public Policy" (Jane C. Webb; George R. Webb; Charolette Webb); (2) "An Answer to Neil Postman's 'Technopoly'" (David K. Nations); (3) "Reflections on the Theory and…

  2. Proceedings of the 8th annual conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

    SciTech Connect

    Kondraske, G.V.; Robinson, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 200 selections. Some of the titles are: Clinical Engineering in Nuclear Medicine in a Rapidly Developing Country; Microscopic NMR Imaging; Computer Graphics Imaging of T1 and T2 mappings for NMR Data: High Detail Magnetic Resonance Images using SIFFT; Waveform Analysis of EMG Evoked During Muscle Relaxation; and Sinus Arrhythmia and REM/NREM Sleep.

  3. Space Cryogenic Workshop, 8th, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, July 31, Aug. 1, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-03-01

    Recent advances in cryogenic technology for space applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include very-low-force cooling contacts for the ISO cryostat cover, convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs, liquid-acquisition devices for superfluid He transfer, and pressure drop in the SHOOT superfluid-He acquisition system. Consideration is given to a liquid-He vibration cryostat for space qualification tests, closed-cycle coolers for temperatures below 30 K, stress analysis down to liquid-He temperature, a cryogenic valve actuator, and a spaceborne He-3 refrigerator. Also discussed are an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF, rejection of waste heat from O liquefaction operations at a lunar O production plant, SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers, and space qualification of the ISO cryogenic rupture disks.

  4. Conference on Fluid Machinery, 8th, Budapest, Hungary, Sept. 1987, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, A.; Kisbocskoi, L.

    The present conference on turbomachine fluid mechanics gives attention to the analysis of labyrinth seals, irrigation turbomachinery, axial-flow fans, poppet valves, the generation of Karman vortices, self-rectifying Wells-type air turbines, computer simulations for water-supply systems, the computation of meridional flow in turbomachines, entrained air effects on vortex pump performance, the three-dimensional potential flow in a draft tube, and hydro powerplant diagnostic methods. Also discussed are a mathematical model for the initiation of cavitation wear, cryogenic flow in ejectors, flow downstream of guide vanes in a Kaplan turbine, unsteady flow in rotating cascades, novel methods for turbomachine vibration monitoring, cavitation breakdown in centrifugal pumps, test results for Banki turbines, centrifugal compressor return-channel flow, performance predictions for regenerative turbomachines, and secondary flows in a centrifugal pump.

  5. Mechanical Advantage. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide, the fourth in a set of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on mechanical engineering prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for students in…

  6. Implementation of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) Approach in 8th Grade Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Jeonghee; Choi, Aeran; Hand, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Current initiatives in science education in Korea have emphasized science literacy as the most important purpose of science education; that is, science education needs to focus on helping each student to become a scientifically literate person who is able to make reasoned decisions. In attempting to address this focus concern about science…

  7. Exploring 8th Grade Middle School Science Teachers' Use of Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Antwuan

    2015-01-01

    Educational research focuses on the way teachers and students interact and how teachers structure learning environments to promote interactions. Rural schools require more efficient use of limited human resources if they are not able to hire sufficient numbers of teachers who possess the knowledge and skills. The researcher used a phenomenological…

  8. Welded pressure transducer made as small as 1/8th-inch in diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1964-01-01

    A special spot welding technique is used to make miniature capacitance transducers for placing in a wind tunnel model. Rugged and relatively low in cost, they have a flat response up to one-third of the resonant frequency.

  9. Pre Vocational Interdisciplinary Education: Consumer and Homemaking, Industrial Arts, Mathematics. 8th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck. Research Coordinating Unit.

    The guideline presents two 12-week courses involving an interdisciplinary, partly coeducational, prevocational career exploration program in consumer and homemaking and industrial arts at the eighth grade level, and also a supplementary mathematics program. It is designed to give students an opportunity to explore occupations for themselves and to…

  10. Theoretical summary of the 8th International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.

    1999-11-15

    The Constituent Quark Model has provided a remarkable description of the experimentally observed hadron spectrum but still has no firm theoretical basis. Attempts to provide a QCD justification discussed at Hadron99 include QCD Sum Rules, instantons, relativistic potential models and the lattice. Phenomenological analyses to clarify outstanding problems like the nature of the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons and the low branching ratio for {psi} {prime} {r_arrow} {rho} {r_arrow} {pi} were presented. New experimental puzzles include the observation of {anti p}p {r_arrow} {phi}{pi}.

  11. Why Singaporean 8th Grade Students Gain Highest Mathematics Ranking in TIMSS (1999-2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessani, Abdolreza; Yunus, Aida Suraya Md; Tarmiz, Rohani Ahmad; Mahmud, Rosnaini

    2014-01-01

    The international comparison of students' mathematics knowledge and competencies is an effective method of evaluating students' mathematics performance and developing policies to improve their achievements in mathematics. Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) are among the most well-recognized international comparisons that…

  12. Large - Small or Mini Group Instruction in English, 8th and 9th Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Herman W.

    This curriculum guide describes courses and provides some sample lesson plans for an English program for eighth and ninth grade students. All of the students are required to take a basic writing course for the first nine weeks of the semester. For the next nine weeks some students receive large group instruction in linguistics and the other…

  13. Water Quality-8th Grade Earth Science, or "Lets Get Relevant."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezabek, Edward

    This document describes some experiences in a science/technology/society (STS) program for an eighth grade science course at a small rural school in Iowa. The background information about the school and the general goal of the STS program are outlined. The curriculum structure of the program related to water as a reusable resource is presented.…

  14. Understanding of Pollution among 4th, 8th, and 11th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Utilizing student interviews, this study assessed fourth, eighth, and eleventh graders (n=105) in 11 Maine schools concerning their understanding of 4 natural and social science concepts related to pollution. The results hold direct implications for teaching strategies and curriculum design within the environmental and science education domains.…

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 8th, Honolulu, HI, June 9-11, 1987, Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on CFD methods considers upwind schemes for the solution of the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, separated flow simulations using the vortex method on a hypercube, a hybrid expert system for complex CFD problems, three-dimensional hypersonic flow simulations with an implicit upwind N-S method, conservation cells for finite volume calculations, three-dimensional mesh generation, and an extended grid-embedding scheme for viscous flows. Attention is also given to unsteady incompressible flow algorithms based on artificial compressibility, difference schemes for the three-dimensional Euler equations, combustor flow computations in general coordinates, a multigrid Euler method for fighter configurations, a prediction method for supersonic/hypersonic inviscid flow, adaptive methods for high Mach number reacting flow, low Mach number compressible flow solutions in constricted ducts, and the evaluation of flow topology for numerical data.

  16. Solar Energy. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide, the third in a set of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on solar energy prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for students in grades 8-10…

  17. Development of a Low Power Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ Detection of Organics in Martian Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinnick, Veronica; Buch, Arnaud; VanAmerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Cotter, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a joint venture by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop a sensitive, light-weight, low-power mass spectrometer for chemical analysis on Mars. MOMA is a key analytical instrument aboard the 2018 ExoMars rover mission seeking signs of past or present life. The current prototype was built to demonstrate operation of gas chromatography (OC) and laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry under martian ambient conditions (5-7 Torr of CO2-rich atmosphere). Recent reports have discussed the MO MA concept, design and performance. Here, we update the current prototype performance, focusing specifically on the GCMS mode.

  18. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  19. The effect of surface oxide layer on the rate of hydrogen emission from aluminum and its alloys in a high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarova, V. I.; Zyabrev, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of surface oxide layers on the kinetics of hydrogen emission at the high vacuum of 10 to the minus 8th power torr was investigated at temperatures from 20 to 450 C using samples of pure AB00 aluminum and the cast alloy AMg. Cast and deformed samples of AMts alloy were used to study the effect of oxide film thickness on the rate of hydrogen emission. Thermodynamic calculations of the reactions of the generation and dissociation of aluminum oxide show that degasification at elevated temperatures (up to 600 C) and high vacuum will not reduce the thickness of artificially-generated surface oxide layers on aluminum and its alloys.

  20. Power Source

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooley, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Principals are powerful: They are the primary catalysts for creating a lasting foundation for learning, driving school and student performance, and shaping the long-term impact of school improvement efforts. Yet few principals would characterize themselves as powerful. Rather, they're self-effacing, adaptable, pragmatic, and quick to share credit…

  1. Powerful Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Jim, Ed.; Hamilton, Mary, Ed.; Tett, Lyn, Ed.

    These 15 papers share a common theme: seeking to promote literacy as a powerful tool for challenging existing inequalities and dependencies. "Powerful Literacies" (Jim Crowther et al.) is an introduction. Section 1 establishes the theoretical and policy frameworks that underpin the book and shows how literacy is situated in different geographical…

  2. Power Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Power Teaching weaves four factors into a seamless whole: standards, teaching thinking, research based strategies, and critical inquiry. As a prototype in its first year of development with an urban fifth grade class, the power teaching model connects selected district standards, thinking routines from Harvard University Project Zero Research…

  3. Power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, G.

    1982-01-01

    Significant events in current, prototype, and experimental utility power generating systems in 1981 are reviewed. The acceleration of licensing and the renewal of plans for reprocessing of fuel for nuclear power plants are discussed, including the rise of French reactor-produced electricity to over 40% of the country's electrical output. A 4.5 MW fuel cell neared completion in New York City, while three 2.5 MW NASA-designed windpowered generators began producing power in the state of Washington. Static bar compensators, nonflammable-liquid cooled power transformers, and ZnO surge arrestors were used by utilities for the first time, and the integration of a coal gasifier-combined cycle power plant approached the planning phase. An MHD generator was run for 1000 hours and produced 50-60 kWe, while a 20 MVA superconducting generator was readied for testing.

  4. Power system

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-03-18

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  5. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-01

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N2, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  6. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  7. Mechanisms of anode power deposition in a low pressure free burning arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Myers, Roger M.

    1994-01-01

    Anode power deposition is a dominant power loss mechanism for arc jets and MPD thrusters. In this study, a free burning arc experiment was operated at pressures and current densities similar to those in arc jets and MPD thrusters in an attempt to identify the physics controlling this loss mechanism. Use of a free burning arc allowed for the isolation of independent variables controlling anode power deposition and provided a convenient and flexible way to cover a broad range of currents, anode surface pressures, and applied magnetic field strengths and orientations using an argon gas. Test results showed that anode power deposition decreased with increasing anode surface pressure up to 6.7 Pa (0.05 torr) and then became insensitive to pressure. Anode power increased with increasing arc current while the electron number density near the anode surface increased linearity. Anode power also increased with increasing applied magnetic field strength due to an increasing anode fall voltage. Applied magnetic field orientation had an effect only at high currents and low anode surface pressures, where anode power decreased when applied field lines intercepted the anode surface. The results demonstrated that anode power deposition was dominated by the current carrying electrons and that the anode fall voltage was the largest contributor. Furthermore, the results showed that anode power deposition can be reduced by operating at increased anode pressures, reduced arc currents, and applied magnetic field strengths and with magnetic field lines intercepting the anode.

  8. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  9. Power performance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.

    1996-04-01

    Two power generation engineering and construction firms with international markets are briefly described in this article. Bibb and Associates and Black & Veatch, both Kansas-based companies, are discussed. Current projects and services provided by the companies are described.

  10. Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Maxwell Laboratories capacitor charging power supply is the first commercial spinoff from the NASA CCDS program - a consortia of industries and government establishments to accelerate development of ground and space based commercial applications of NASA technology. The power supply transforms and conditions large voltages to charge capacitors used in x-ray sources, medical accelerators, etc. It is lighter, more reliable, more compact and efficient. Originally developed for space lasers, its commercial potential was soon recognized.

  11. Power combiner

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  12. Study of the Reaction Cl + Ethyl Formate at 700-950 Torr and 297 to 435 K: Product Distribution and the Kinetics of the Reaction C2H5OC(═O) → CO2 + C2H5.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E W

    2016-05-26

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of atomic chlorine with ethyl formate [Cl + CH3CH2O(C═O)H, reaction 1] have been examined. These experiments were performed at pressures of 760-950 Torr and temperatures from 297 to 435 K. Reactants and products were quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC/FID) analysis. The initial mixture contained ethyl formate, Cl2, and N2. Cl atoms were generated by UV photolysis of this initial mixture at 360 nm, which dissociates Cl2. The rate constant of reaction 1 was measured at 297 K relative to that of the reaction Cl + C2H5Cl (reaction 2), yielding the rate constant ratio k1/k2 = 1.09 ± 0.05. The final products formed from reaction 1 are ethyl chloroformate, 1-chloroethyl formate, and 2-chloroethyl formate. These products result from the reactions with Cl2 of the three free radicals formed by H atom abstraction from ethylformate in reaction 1. Based on the molar yields of these three chlorinated products, the yields of the three radicals formed from reaction 1 at 297 K are (25 ± 3) mole percent of CH3CH2O(C═O); (67 ± 5) mole percent of CH3CHO(C═O)H; and (8 ± 2) mole percent of CH2CH2O(C═O)H. A second phase of this experiment measured the rate constant of the decarboxylation of the ethoxy carbonyl radical [CH3CH2O(C═O) → CO2 + C2H5, reaction 4] relative to the rate constant of its reaction with Cl2 [CH3CH2O(C═O) + Cl2 → CH3CH2O(C═O)Cl + Cl, reaction 3a]. Over the temperature range 297 to 404 K at 1 atm total pressure, this ratio can be expressed by k4/k3a = 10(23.56±0.22) e(-(12700±375)/RT) molecules cm(-3). Estimating the value of k3a (which has not been measured) based on similar reactions, the expression k4 = 5.8 × 10(12) e(-(12700)/RT) s(-1) is obtained. The estimated error of this rate constant is ± a factor of 2 over the experimental temperature range. This rate expression is compared with recent ab initio calculations of the decarboxylation of the analogous methoxy

  13. Study of the Reaction Cl + Ethyl Formate at 700-950 Torr and 297 to 435 K: Product Distribution and the Kinetics of the Reaction C2H5OC(═O) → CO2 + C2H5.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E W

    2016-05-26

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of atomic chlorine with ethyl formate [Cl + CH3CH2O(C═O)H, reaction 1] have been examined. These experiments were performed at pressures of 760-950 Torr and temperatures from 297 to 435 K. Reactants and products were quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC/FID) analysis. The initial mixture contained ethyl formate, Cl2, and N2. Cl atoms were generated by UV photolysis of this initial mixture at 360 nm, which dissociates Cl2. The rate constant of reaction 1 was measured at 297 K relative to that of the reaction Cl + C2H5Cl (reaction 2), yielding the rate constant ratio k1/k2 = 1.09 ± 0.05. The final products formed from reaction 1 are ethyl chloroformate, 1-chloroethyl formate, and 2-chloroethyl formate. These products result from the reactions with Cl2 of the three free radicals formed by H atom abstraction from ethylformate in reaction 1. Based on the molar yields of these three chlorinated products, the yields of the three radicals formed from reaction 1 at 297 K are (25 ± 3) mole percent of CH3CH2O(C═O); (67 ± 5) mole percent of CH3CHO(C═O)H; and (8 ± 2) mole percent of CH2CH2O(C═O)H. A second phase of this experiment measured the rate constant of the decarboxylation of the ethoxy carbonyl radical [CH3CH2O(C═O) → CO2 + C2H5, reaction 4] relative to the rate constant of its reaction with Cl2 [CH3CH2O(C═O) + Cl2 → CH3CH2O(C═O)Cl + Cl, reaction 3a]. Over the temperature range 297 to 404 K at 1 atm total pressure, this ratio can be expressed by k4/k3a = 10(23.56±0.22) e(-(12700±375)/RT) molecules cm(-3). Estimating the value of k3a (which has not been measured) based on similar reactions, the expression k4 = 5.8 × 10(12) e(-(12700)/RT) s(-1) is obtained. The estimated error of this rate constant is ± a factor of 2 over the experimental temperature range. This rate expression is compared with recent ab initio calculations of the decarboxylation of the analogous methoxy

  14. Investigation of the delay time distribution of high power microwave surface flashover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J.; Krompholz, H.; Neuber, A.

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing and modeling the statistics associated with the initiation of gas breakdown has proven to be difficult due to a variety of rather unexplored phenomena involved. Experimental conditions for high power microwave window breakdown for pressures on the order of 100 to several 100 torr are complex: there are little to no naturally occurring free electrons in the breakdown region. The initial electron generation rate, from an external source, for example, is time dependent and so is the charge carrier amplification in the increasing radio frequency (RF) field amplitude with a rise time of 50 ns, which can be on the same order as the breakdown delay time. The probability of reaching a critical electron density within a given time period is composed of the statistical waiting time for the appearance of initiating electrons in the high-field region and the build-up of an avalanche with an inherent statistical distribution of the electron number. High power microwave breakdown and its delay time is of critical importance, since it limits the transmission through necessary windows, especially for high power, high altitude, low pressure applications. The delay time distribution of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover has been examined for nitrogen and argon as test gases for pressures ranging from 60 to 400 torr, with and without external UV illumination. A model has been developed for predicting the discharge delay time for these conditions. The results provide indications that field induced electron generation, other than standard field emission, plays a dominant role, which might be valid for other gas discharge types as well.

  15. Plasma Tunable LC Resonator for High-Power Electromagnetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semnani, Abbas; Macheret, Sergey; Peroulis, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    High-power tunable filters are in high demand in transmitters found in radars and many communication systems such as satellite and broadcasting stations. Limited power handling renders most semiconductor technologies inherently suboptimal options for these systems. Therefore, mechanically-tunable cavity-based filters are often employed in such cases, resulting in bulky, slow, and heavy systems. In this work, we study the application of plasma as an alternative frequency tuning mechanism for high-power applications even in environmentally and/or mechanically harsh conditions. For a given gas type and pressure, the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity of a plasma can be varied by changing the electron density, which, depending on the discharge regime, can be implemented by changing the discharge current, voltage, or the magnitude of an auxiliary electric field. In this work, a simple LC resonator tuned to several hundred MHz was fabricated and tested. The tunable capacitor of the resonator was implemented by a commercially available gas discharge tube (GDT), a mm-scale plasma device with gas pressure of 100s of mTorr. Measurement results reveal a continuous tuning range of more than 50% when the applied discharge current is increased from zero to 90 mA.

  16. Power inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David H.; Korich, Mark D.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2011-11-15

    Power inverters include a frame and a power module. The frame has a sidewall including an opening and defining a fluid passageway. The power module is coupled to the frame over the opening and includes a substrate, die, and an encasement. The substrate includes a first side, a second side, a center, an outer periphery, and an outer edge, and the first side of the substrate comprises a first outer layer including a metal material. The die are positioned in the substrate center and are coupled to the substrate first side. The encasement is molded over the outer periphery on the substrate first side, the substrate second side, and the substrate outer edge and around the die. The encasement, coupled to the substrate, forms a seal with the metal material. The second side of the substrate is positioned to directly contact a fluid flowing through the fluid passageway.

  17. Discharge resistance and power dissipation in the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2011-10-01

    Micro-hollow cathode discharges (MHCDs), driven by a dc voltage source, may operate in a self-pulsing regime during which the voltage and the current across the discharge are pulsed with a frequency of several tens of kilohertz. A model for the self-pulsing regime of MHCDs is proposed based on an equivalent electrical circuit of the whole device. The discharge itself is modeled by a non-linear resistance in series with an inductance, and it is placed in parallel with the capacitance of the electrode-dielectric-electrode sandwich hosting the discharge micro-hole. The capacitance of the coaxial cable used to feed the device is also included. It is shown that a detailed comparison between theory and experiments allows the discharge non-linear resistance to be accurately determined. When the discharge current is maximum, this resistance is about 2500 Ω at 50 Torr and decreases to about 750 Ω at 150 Torr. The absorbed power is calculated throughout the self-pulsing cycle and may be above 100 W at the current peak, while the time-averaged power remains a fraction of a Watt.

  18. Assessment of the technology required to develop photovoltaic power system for large scale national energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1974-01-01

    A technical assessment of a program to develop photovoltaic power system technology for large-scale national energy applications was made by analyzing and judging the alternative candidate photovoltaic systems and development tasks. A program plan was constructed based on achieving the 10 year objective of a program to establish the practicability of large-scale terrestrial power installations using photovoltaic conversion arrays costing less than $0.50/peak W. Guidelines for the tasks of a 5 year program were derived from a set of 5 year objectives deduced from the 10 year objective. This report indicates the need for an early emphasis on the development of the single-crystal Si photovoltaic system for commercial utilization; a production goal of 5 x 10 to the 8th power peak W/year of $0.50 cells was projected for the year 1985. The developments of other photovoltaic conversion systems were assigned to longer range development roles. The status of the technology developments and the applicability of solar arrays in particular power installations, ranging from houses to central power plants, was scheduled to be verified in a series of demonstration projects. The budget recommended for the first 5 year phase of the program is $268.5M.

  19. Stigma power.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo

    2014-02-01

    When people have an interest in keeping other people down, in or away, stigma is a resource that allows them to obtain ends they desire. We call this resource "stigma power" and use the term to refer to instances in which stigma processes achieve the aims of stigmatizers with respect to the exploitation, control or exclusion of others. We draw on Bourdieu (1987, 1990) who notes that power is often most effectively deployed when it is hidden or "misrecognized." To explore the utility of the stigma-power concept we examine ways in which the goals of stigmatizers are achieved but hidden in the stigma coping efforts of people with mental illnesses. We developed new self-report measures and administered them to a sample of individuals who have experienced mental illness to test whether results are consistent with the possibility that, in response to negative societal conceptions, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of people with psychosis lead them to be concerned with staying in, propelled to stay away and induced to feel downwardly placed - precisely the outcomes stigmatizers might desire. Our introduction of the stigma-power concept carries the possibility of seeing stigmatizing circumstances in a new light.

  20. Power, Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Power is a core theoretical construct in the field with amazing utility across substantive areas, levels of analysis and methodologies. Yet, its use along with associated assumptions--assumptions surrounding constraint vs. action and specifically organizational structure and rationality--remain problematic. In this article, and following an…

  1. Stigma power.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo

    2014-02-01

    When people have an interest in keeping other people down, in or away, stigma is a resource that allows them to obtain ends they desire. We call this resource "stigma power" and use the term to refer to instances in which stigma processes achieve the aims of stigmatizers with respect to the exploitation, control or exclusion of others. We draw on Bourdieu (1987, 1990) who notes that power is often most effectively deployed when it is hidden or "misrecognized." To explore the utility of the stigma-power concept we examine ways in which the goals of stigmatizers are achieved but hidden in the stigma coping efforts of people with mental illnesses. We developed new self-report measures and administered them to a sample of individuals who have experienced mental illness to test whether results are consistent with the possibility that, in response to negative societal conceptions, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of people with psychosis lead them to be concerned with staying in, propelled to stay away and induced to feel downwardly placed - precisely the outcomes stigmatizers might desire. Our introduction of the stigma-power concept carries the possibility of seeing stigmatizing circumstances in a new light. PMID:24507908

  2. Power sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, M. M. J.

    2014-05-01

    This paper explains how a large number of sprouts were used as a battery of cells and connected together to power a set of LED Christmas lights. All relevant calculations to find the number of sprouts needed, their arrangement in series and parallel, the charge stored on the required capacitor and the capacitor charging time are illustrated.

  3. Power Trains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukuk, Marvin; Mathis, Joe

    This curriculum guide is part of a series designed to teach students about diesel engines. The materials in this power trains guide apply to both on-road and off-road vehicles and include information about chain and belt drives used in tractors and combines. These instructional materials, containing nine units, are written in terms of student…

  4. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  5. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  6. Power Struggle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    California's "power struggle" will probably not be replicated in the other 23 states that have deregulated electricity, but costs are rising everywhere. The Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Energy's new Energy Star online rating system should help school officials measure their buildings' efficiency and remove barriers to improvement.…

  7. Leg joint power output during progressive resistance FES-LCE cycling in SCI subjects: developing an index of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Faghri, Pouran D; Adams, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the hip, knee and ankle during a progressive resistance cycling protocol in an effort to detect and measure the presence of muscle fatigue. It was hypothesized that knee power output can be used as an indicator of fatigue in order to assess the cycling performance of SCI subjects. Methods Six spinal cord injured subjects (2 incomplete, 4 complete) between the ages of twenty and fifty years old and possessing either a complete or incomplete spinal cord injury at or below the fourth cervical vertebra participated in this study. Kinematic data and pedal forces were recorded during cycling at increasing levels of resistance. Ankle, knee and hip power outputs and resultant pedal force were calculated. Ergometer cadence and muscle stimulation intensity were also recorded. Results The main findings of this study were: (a) ankle and knee power outputs decreased, whereas hip power output increased with increasing resistance, (b) cadence, stimulation intensity and resultant pedal force in that combined order were significant predictors of knee power output and (c) knowing the value of these combined predictors at 10 rpm, an index of fatigue can be developed, quantitatively expressing the power capacity of the knee joint with respect to a baseline power level defined as fatigue. Conclusion An index of fatigue was successfully developed, proportionalizing knee power capacity during cycling to a predetermined value of fatigue. The fatigue index value at 0/8th kp, measured 90 seconds into active, unassisted pedaling was 1.6. This indicates initial power capacity at the knee to be 1.6 times greater than fatigue. The fatigue index decreased to 1.1 at 2/8th kp, representing approximately a 30% decrease in the knee's power capacity within a 4 minute timespan. These findings suggest that the present cycling protocol is not sufficient for a rider to gain the benefits of FES and thus raises speculation as to

  8. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  9. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  10. The Power of Power Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Florence S.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional college algebra courses focus almost exclusively on power functions such as y = x[superscript 2] and y = x[superscript 3] rather than the more general y = x[superscript p]. However, it is the more general form that is the basis of the mathematical models that arise throughout the natural sciences in a host of unexpected and highly…

  11. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  12. Power supply

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Edward J.; Leeman, James E.; MacDougall, Hugh R.; Marron, John J.; Smith, Calvin C.

    1976-01-01

    An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

  13. Stigma Power

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bruce G.; Phelan, Jo

    2015-01-01

    When people have an interest in keeping other people down, in or away, stigma is a resource that allows them to obtain ends they desire. We call this resource “stigma power” and use the term to refer to instances in which stigma processes achieve the aims of stigmatizers with respect to the exploitation, control or exclusion of others. We draw on Bourdieu (1987; 1990) who notes that power is often most effectively deployed when it is hidden or “misrecognized.” To explore the utility of the stigma power concept we examine ways in which the goals of stigmatizers are achieved but hidden in the stigma coping efforts of people with mental illnesses. We developed new self-report measures and administered them to a sample of individuals who have experienced mental illness to test whether results are consistent with the possibility that, in response to negative societal conceptions, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of people with psychosis lead them to be concerned with staying in, propelled to stay away and induced to feel downwardly placed –precisely the outcomes stigmatizers might desire. Our introduction of the stigma power concept carries the possibility of seeing stigmatizing circumstances in a new light. PMID:24507908

  14. EOIL power scaling in a 1-5 kW supersonic discharge-flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Lee, Seonkyung; Oakes, David B.; Haney, Julie; Magill, John C.; Paulsen, Dwane A.; Cataldi, Paul; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin L.; Vu, Danthu; Polex, Jan; Kessler, William J.; Rawlins, Wilson T.

    2008-02-01

    Scaling of EOIL systems to higher powers requires extension of electric discharge powers into the kW range and beyond with high efficiency and singlet oxygen yield. We have previously demonstrated a high-power microwave discharge approach capable of generating singlet oxygen yields of ~25% at ~50 torr pressure and 1 kW power. This paper describes the implementation of this method in a supersonic flow reactor designed for systematic investigations of the scaling of gain and lasing with power and flow conditions. The 2450 MHz microwave discharge, 1 to 5 kW, is confined near the flow axis by a swirl flow. The discharge effluent, containing active species including O II(a1Δ g, b1Σ g +), O( 3P), and O 3, passes through a 2-D flow duct equipped with a supersonic nozzle and cavity. I2 is injected upstream of the supersonic nozzle. The apparatus is water-cooled, and is modular to permit a variety of inlet, nozzle, and optical configurations. A comprehensive suite of optical emission and absorption diagnostics is used to monitor the absolute concentrations of O II(a), O II(b), O( 3P), O 3, I II, I(2P 3/2), I(2P 1/2), small-signal gain, and temperature in both the subsonic and supersonic flow streams. We discuss initial measurements of singlet oxygen and I* excitation kinetics at 1 kW power.

  15. Ferroelectric Emission Cathodes for Low-Power Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, Scott D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Low- or no-flow electron emitters are required for low-power electric thrusters, spacecraft plasma contactors, and electrodynamic tether systems to reduce or eliminate the need for propellant/expellant. Expellant-less neutralizers can improve the viability of very low-power colloid thrusters, field emission electric propulsion devices, ion engines, Hall thrusters, and gridded vacuum arc thrusters. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is evaluating ferroelectric emission (FEE) cathodes as zero expellant flow rate cathode sources for the applications listed above. At GRC, low voltage (100s to approx. 1500 V) operation of FEE cathodes is examined. Initial experiments, with unipolar, bipolar, and RF burst applied voltage, have produced current pulses 250 to 1000 ns in duration with peak currents of up to 2 A at voltages at or below 1500 V. In particular, FEE cathodes driven by RF burst voltages from 1400 to 2000 V peak to peak, at burst frequencies from 70 to 400 kHz, emitted average current densities from 0.1 to 0.7 A/sq cm. Pulse repeatability as a function of input voltage has been initially established. Reliable emission has been achieved in air background at pressures as high as 10(exp -6) Torr.

  16. Transport of ionized metal atoms in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges assisted by inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-09

    Transporting metallic ions from the magnetron cathode to the substrate is essential for an efficient thin-film deposition process. This letter examines how inductively coupled plasma superimposed onto a high-power pulsed magnetron discharge can influence the mobility of titanium ions. To this effect, time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectrometry are conducted and the current at the substrate is measured. With this new hybrid technique, ions are found to reach the substrate in two successive waves. Metal ions, only present in the second wave, are found to accelerate proportionally to the power supplied to the inductively coupled plasma. All the measurements in this study are made at 10 and 30 mTorr, with 10 {mu}s long pulses at the magnetron cathode.

  17. Power optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  18. Power optics

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V V

    2014-02-28

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  19. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  20. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  1. Power management system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  2. Effects Of Pressure And Power On The Ionic Saturation Current And Self-Bias Voltage In A RF Discharge 13.56 MHz Of (SF{sub 6}, O{sub 2}) At Low Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Alim, M. M.; Zekara, M.; Henni, L.; Tadjine, R.; Lahmar, E.; Henda, K.

    2008-09-23

    In the present work, we are interested in RF plasma discharge for surface texturing in solar cells application. We then present the results of the electrical characterization of plasma reactor at low pressure (<1 Torr) in (SF{sub 6},O{sub 2}) gases mixtures at 13.56 MHz. We've particularly followed the self-bias voltage (V{sub DC}) and the density of ionic current saturation (J{sub s}) depending in various parameters of the discharge as pressure and power.

  3. Power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Gunda, R.; McCarty, M.R.; Rode, M.A.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes an electrohydraulic servo system which includes, in combination, a pressure compensated flow control servo valve for proportionally variably feeding hydraulic fluid to a load at a flow rate which is a predetermined proportional function of an electronic valve control signal, a variable output pump for coupling to a source of motive power to feed hydraulic fluid under pressure from a source to the servo valve, pump control means for controlling output of the pump, and an electronic servo control coupled to the valve and including means for receiving a first signal indicative of motion desired at the load, means for receiving a second signal indicative of actuation motion at the load and means for generating the valve control signal to the valve as a function of a difference between the first and second signals. The valve control signal is indicative of fluid flow velocity at the valve required to obtain the desired motion at the load, characterized in that the pump control means comprises: means for receiving the valve control signal, means for providing a signal indicative of fluid flow rate at the valve as the predetermined function of the valve control signal, and means for providing an output control signal to the pump as a function of the flow-indicative signal.

  4. Women, Power, and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Patricia Glass

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the concept of power in the context of women and the library profession, citing views of power by Max Weber, John Kenneth Galbraith, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, and Rosabeth Moss Kantor. Male power and female submission, defining power, organizing for power, and sharing power are highlighted. A 12-item bibliography is included. (EJS)

  5. Influence of pulse duration on the plasma characteristics in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Ricard, A.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron discharges have drawn an increasing interest as an approach to produce highly ionized metallic vapor. In this paper we propose to study how the plasma composition and the deposition rate are influenced by the pulse duration. The plasma is studied by time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectroscopies and the deposition rate is controlled thanks to a quartz microbalance. The pulse length is varied between 2.5 and 20 {mu}s at 2 and 10 mTorr in pure argon. The sputtered material is titanium. For a constant discharge power, the deposition rate increases as the pulse length decreases. With 5 {mu}s pulse, for an average power of 300 W, the deposition rate is {approx}70% of the deposition rate obtained in direct current magnetron sputtering at the same power. The increase of deposition rate can be related to the sputtering regime. For long pulses, self-sputtering seems to occur as demonstrated by time-resolved optical emission diagnostic of the discharge. In contrary, the metallic vapor ionization rate, as determined by absorption measurements, diminishes as the pulses are shortened. Nevertheless, the ionization rate is in the range of 50% for 5 {mu}s pulses while it lies below 10% in the case of a classical continuous magnetron discharge.

  6. Electron energy distributions and electron impact source functions in Ar/N{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas using pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Michael D. Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-01-28

    In plasma materials processing, such as plasma etching, control of the time-averaged electron energy distributions (EEDs) in the plasma allows for control of the time-averaged electron impact source functions of reactive species in the plasma and their fluxes to surfaces. One potential method for refining the control of EEDs is through the use of pulsed power. Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are attractive for using pulsed power in this manner because the EEDs are dominantly controlled by the ICP power as opposed to the bias power applied to the substrate. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of EEDs and electron impact source functions in low pressure (5–50 mTorr) ICPs sustained in Ar/N{sub 2} for various duty cycles. We find there is an ability to control EEDs, and thus source functions, by pulsing the ICP power, with the greatest variability of the EEDs located within the skin depth of the electromagnetic field. The transit time of hot electrons produced in the skin depth at the onset of pulse power produces a delay in the response of the EEDs as a function of distance from the coils. The choice of ICP pressure has a large impact on the dynamics of the EEDs, whereas duty cycle has a small influence on time-averaged EEDs and source functions.

  7. Health assessment for Utah Power and Light/American Barrel, Salt Lake City, Utah, Region 8. CERCLIS No. UTD980667240. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-20

    The Utah Power and Light (UP L) site, formerly known as American Barrel, is located one-half mile from downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. A creosote treatment facility operated there in the early 1900's. Later, a 55-gallon drum storage facility contaminated the soil and groundwater with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), volatile organic compounds (VOC's), pesticides, phthalates, and heavy metals. This site is of potential public health concern because humans maybe exposed to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Contamination has spread to off-site areas and children from the nearby residential area have access to contaminated soil. In addition, transients frequently use these areas and may be exposed to the contaminants. UP L is in the 8th update of the National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites.

  8. Secondary power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    In aeronautical engineering secondary power systems have long played second fiddle to the airframe, the engine, and indeed, the avionics. This collection of papers is thus timely, and its publication by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers appropriate, as secondary power systems in modern aircraft present challenging mechanical engineering problems. In military aircraft demands for electrical and hydraulic power and high pressure air have grown over the past two decades. To these basic needs are added requirements for emergency power, ground power, and independent engine starting. Additionally increased reliability and maintainability is demanded from all secondary power systems. Complete contents: What is a secondary power system. Modern technology secondary power systems for next generation military aircraft; Integrated power units; Secondary power system gearbox; Starting the system - air turbine starters; Auxiliary and emergency power system; Secondary hydraulic power generation; Advanced technology electrical power generation equipment.

  9. I Invite You To Know the Earth II. 5th to 8th Grade of Preparatory School Teacher's Guide [and] 5th to 8th Grade of Preparatory School Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    The student textbook is designed for grades 5-8 and explores various earth science topics. A cartoon character named Tommy Tsumi explores earth facts and concepts throughout the text. Activities, materials, and learning objectives for each unit in the textbook are presented in the teacher's guide. Units in both books include: (1) "The Outside of…

  10. Nuclear power: Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the basics of nuclear power generation, explaining both the benefits and the real and imagined risks of nuclear power. It includes a discussion of the Three Mile Island accident and its effects. Nuclear Power has been used in the public information programs of more than 100 utilities. The contents discussed are: Nuclear Power and People; Why Nuclear Power. Electricity produced by coal; Electricity produced by nuclear fuel; Nuclear plant sites in the United States; Short History of Commercial Nuclear Power; U.S. nuclear submarines, Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants; Licensing process, Nuclear Power Plant Operator Training; Nuclear power plant simulator, Are Nuclear Plants Safe.; Containment structure, Nuclear Power Plant Insurance; Is Radiation Dangerous.; Man-made radiation, What is Nuclear Fuel.; Fuel cycle for commercial nuclear power plants; Warm Water Discharge; Cooling tower; Protection of Radioactive Materials; Plutonium and Proliferation; Disposal of Radioactive Wastes; Are Alternate Energy Sources Available.; Nuclear Opposition; and Nuclear Power in the Future.

  11. Infrared power cells for satellite power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Christopher J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical investigation is performed to assess the feasibility of long-wavelength power converters for the direct conversion of IR radiation onto electrical power. Because theses devices need to operate between 5 and 30 um the only material system possible for this application is the HgCdTe system which is currently being developed for IR detectors. Thus solar cell and IR detector theories and technologies are combined. The following subject areas are covered: electronic and optical properties of HgCdTe alloys; optimum device geometry; junction theory; model calculation for homojunction power cell efficiency; and calculation for HgCdTe power cell and power beaming.

  12. A finite-difference time-domain simulation of high power microwave generated plasma at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Patrick J.; Beeson, Sterling R.; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2012-07-15

    A finite-difference algorithm was developed to calculate several RF breakdown parameters, for example, the formative delay time that is observed between the initial application of a RF field to a dielectric surface and the formation of field-induced plasma interrupting the RF power flow. The analysis is focused on the surface being exposed to a background gas pressure above 50 Torr. The finite-difference algorithm provides numerical solutions to partial differential equations with high resolution in the time domain, making it suitable for simulating the time evolving interaction of microwaves with plasma; in lieu of direct particle tracking, a macroscopic electron density is used to model growth and transport. This approach is presented as an alternative to particle-in-cell methods due to its low complexity and runtime leading to more efficient analysis for a simulation of a microsecond scale pulse. The effect and development of the plasma is modeled in the simulation using scaling laws for ionization rates, momentum transfer collision rates, and diffusion coefficients, as a function of electric field, gas type and pressure. The incorporation of plasma material into the simulation involves using the Z-transform to derive a time-domain algorithm from the complex frequency-dependent permittivity of plasma. Therefore, the effect of the developing plasma on the instantaneous microwave field is calculated. Simulation results are compared with power measurements using an apparatus designed to facilitate surface flashover across a polycarbonate boundary in a controlled N{sub 2}, air, or argon environment at pressures exceeding 50 Torr.

  13. Correlation between Grades 4th, 8th, and 11th English Language Arts Scores and High School Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parese, Errin C.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this research was on students' low graduation rate in a New York State high school, investigating a possible correlation between students' longitudinal English Language Arts (ELA) exams and their graduation status. In the 2010-11 school year, 25% of the students at the high school of study failed to graduate, a rate which was 5% lower…

  14. Pristine rocks (8th Foray) - 'Plagiophile' element ratios, crustal genesis, and the bulk composition of the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1984-11-01

    Eu/Al, Sr/Al, Eu/Sr, and similar ratios among pristine lunar nonmare lithologies with implications for nonmare petrogenesis and for the bulk composition of the moon are examined. On a plot of Eu/Al versus mg, ferroan anorthosites are separated from all other pristine nonmare rocks by a considerable gap. A nonrandom process must be invoked to account for the gap in the spectrum of ratios. A single magma probably cannot account for even the Mg-rich pristine rocks subset, based on diversity of plagiophile ratios among samples with similar mg ratios. Plagiophile ratios also constrain the bulk composition of the moon. Plagiophile ratios among ferroan anorthosites exactly match those expected under a model in which ferroan anorthosites formed by flotation of plagioclase cumulates over a primordial 'magmasphere'. Ratios among nonvolatile elements confirm that the moon formed out of materials akin to chondritic meteorites.

  15. Selected Papers from the National Conference on College Teaching and Learning (8th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 16-19, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    These 19 papers were selected from the Eighth National Conference on College Teaching and Learning and focus on the theme of "Teaching, Learning, and Technology: Creative Uses of the World Wide Web." Titles include: (1) "Guided Web Exploration for Teaching Critical Thinking" (Judith A. Baker); (2) "Top Ten Strategies for Using Humor as an…

  16. Pristine rocks (8th Foray) - 'Plagiophile' element ratios, crustal genesis, and the bulk composition of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Eu/Al, Sr/Al, Eu/Sr, and similar ratios among pristine lunar nonmare lithologies with implications for nonmare petrogenesis and for the bulk composition of the moon are examined. On a plot of Eu/Al versus mg, ferroan anorthosites are separated from all other pristine nonmare rocks by a considerable gap. A nonrandom process must be invoked to account for the gap in the spectrum of ratios. A single magma probably cannot account for even the Mg-rich pristine rocks subset, based on diversity of plagiophile ratios among samples with similar mg ratios. Plagiophile ratios also constrain the bulk composition of the moon. Plagiophile ratios among ferroan anorthosites exactly match those expected under a model in which ferroan anorthosites formed by flotation of plagioclase cumulates over a primordial 'magmasphere'. Ratios among nonvolatile elements confirm that the moon formed out of materials akin to chondritic meteorites.

  17. Pristine rocks (8th Foray) - Plagiophile element ratios, crustal genesis, and the bulk composition of the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, P.H.; Kallemeyn, G.W.

    1984-11-15

    Eu/Al, Sr/Al, Eu/Sr, and similar ratios among pristine lunar nonmare lithologies with implications for nonmare petrogenesis and for the bulk composition of the moon are examined. On a plot of Eu/Al versus mg, ferroan anorthosites are separated from all other pristine nonmare rocks by a considerable gap. A nonrandom process must be invoked to account for the gap in the spectrum of ratios. A single magma probably cannot account for even the Mg-rich pristine rocks subset, based on diversity of plagiophile ratios among samples with similar mg ratios. Plagiophile ratios also constrain the bulk composition of the moon. Plagiophile ratios among ferroan anorthosites exactly match those expected under a model in which ferroan anorthosites formed by flotation of plagioclase cumulates over a primordial magmasphere. Ratios among nonvolatile elements confirm that the moon formed out of materials akin to chondritic meteorites.

  18. Two step hybrid methods of 7th and 8th order for the numerical integration of second order IVPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogiratou, Z.; Monovasilis, Th.; Simos, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we consider the numerical integration of second order ODEs where the first derivative is missing. We construct two step hybrid methods with six and seven stages and seventh and eighth algebraic order. We apply the new methods on the numerical integration of several test problems.

  19. Highlights of the 8th International Conference on Vaccines for Enteric Diseases: the Scottish Encounter To Defeat Diarrheal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Steele, A Duncan; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and of mortality; the burden of disease affects individuals of all ages but particularly young children, especially those living in poor regions where the disease is endemic. It is also a health concern for international travelers to these areas. Experts on vaccines and enteric infections and advocates for global health improvement gathered in Scotland from 8 to 10 July 2015 to discuss recent advances in the assessment and understanding of the burden of enteric diseases and progress in the development and implementation of strategies to prevent these infections. Highlights of the meeting included description of advances in molecular assays to estimate pathogen-specific prevalence, methods to model epidemiologic trends, novel approaches to generate broad-spectrum vaccines, new initiatives to evaluate vaccine performance where they are most needed, renewed interest in human challenge models, immunological readouts as predictors of vaccine efficacy, maternal immunization to prevent enteric infections, and the impact of maternal immunity on the vaccine take of infants. A follow-up scientific gathering to advance Shigella and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine efforts will be held from 28 to 30 June 2016 in Washington, DC. PMID:26936100

  20. Enhancing a Career Exploration Program for 8th Grade Students with an Assessment for the Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, C. Branton

    The use of a multiple intelligences (MI) assessment to enhance a career exploration program for eighth graders was studied. All of the eighth graders (n=160) in a suburban middle school completed three sets of activities as part of their career exploration program. Students completed a multiple intelligences self-assessment, the Multiple…

  1. Successes with Reversing the Negative Student Attitudes Developed in Typical Biology Classes for 8th and 10th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacieminoglu, Esme; Ali, Mohamed Moustafa; Oztas, Fulya; Yager, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare changes in attitudes of students about their study of biology in the classes thought by five biology teachers who experienced an Iowa Chautauqua workshop with and two non-Chautauqua teachers who had no experience with any professional development program. The results indicated that there are significant…

  2. Review of the novelties from the 31st ECTRIMS Congress, 2015, presented at the 8th Post-ECTRIMS meeting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, O; Rodriguez-Antiguedad, A; Olascoaga, J; Oreja-Guevara, C; Prieto, J M; Mendibe-Bilbao, M M; Garcia-Merino, J A; Ramio-Torrenta, Ll; Ginestal, R; Meca-Lallana, J E; Romero-Pinel, L; Munoz, D; Saiz, A; Calles-Hernandez, M C; Izquierdo, G; Villar, L M; Oliva-Nacarino, P; Arnal-Garcia, C; Comabella, M; Brieva, Ll; Arroyo, R; Montalban, X

    2016-06-16

    Renowned national specialists in multiple sclerosis (MS) met, for the eighth year in a row, to give details of the latest novelties presented at the last ECTRIMS Congress 2015, which are included in this review. One of the highlights at this Congress was the new classification of the phenotypes of MS. Both the diagnostic criteria of the neuromyelitis optica spectrum and the problems involved in the differential diagnosis derived from the lack of definition of the radiological spectrum were reviewed. The microbiota comes to the fore as a possible factor determining the disease, together with extrinsic factors such as tobacco, salt ingestion or vitamin D deficiency. Advances made in immunomodulation are driving the progress being made in the treatment of MS. Ocrelizumab is the first treatment with positive results in the primarily progressive forms and tocilizumab, a drug product for rheumatoid arthritis, stands out as a potential candidate for the treatment of neuromyelitis optica. Certain antibiotics and vitamins could also play a role in the treatment of MS. In this edition of the Congress special attention was paid to personalised therapy. To date, 11 drugs have been approved for use in Europe. There is a need for therapeutic algorithms that help us to choose the best treatment for each patient. Likewise, we need to be able to identify, in the early stages of the disease, the risk of developing disability, so as to be able to design therapeutic strategies. To do so, molecular biomarkers and other predictive tools are required. The problems that still exist in software technology in magnetic resonance hinder its application in daily clinical practice. PMID:27270678

  3. Interdisciplinary Health Team Care: Proceedings of the Annual Conference (8th, Columbus, Ohio, September 18-20, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Marjorie L., Ed.; Casto, R. Michael, Ed.

    The following are among the 40 papers included in this proceedings: "Code of Ethics for Interdisciplinary Care" (Thomasma); "Training Model for Increasing Team Excellence and Efficiency" (Clayton, Lund); "Organizational Structures of Health Care Teams" (Farrell, Schmitt, Heinemann); "Nutrition Support Practice" (Johnson); "Dividing up the Work on…

  4. Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Foundations of Quantum Mechanics in the Light of New Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Sachio; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2006-06-01

    Preface -- Committees -- Opening address / H. Fukuyama -- Welcoming address / N. Osakabe -- Special lecture. Albert Einstein: opportunity and perception / C. N. Yang -- Quantum information and entanglement. Quantum optics with single atoms and photons / H. J. Kimble. Quantum information system experiments using a single photon source / Y. Yamamoto. Quantum communication and quantum computation with entangled photons / A. Zeilinger. High-fidelity quantum teleportation and a quantum teleportation network for continuous variables / N. Takei, A. Furusawa. Long lived entangled states / H. Häffner ... [et al.]. Quantum non-locality using tripartite entanglement with non-orthogonal states / J. V. Corbett, D. Home. Quantum entanglement and wedge product / H Heydari. Analysis of the generation of photon pairs in periodically poled lithium niobate / J. Söderholm ... [et al.]. Generation of entangled photons in a semiconductor and violation of Bell's inequality / G. Oohata, R. Shimizu, K. Edamatsu -- Quantum computing. Decoherence of a Josephson junction flux qubit / Y. Nakamura ... [et al.]. Spectroscopic analysis of a candidate two-qubit silicon quantum computer in the microwave regime / J. Gorman, D. G. Hasko, D. A. Williams. Berry phase detection in charge-coupled flux-qubits and the effect of decoherence / H. Nakano ... [et al.]. Locally observable conditions for the successful implementation of entangling multi-qubit quantum gates / H. F. Hofmann, R. Okamoto, S. Takeuchi. State control in flux qubit circuits: manipulating optical selection rules of microwave-assisted transitions in three-level artificial atoms / Y.-X. Liu ... [et al.]. The effect of local structure and non-uniformity on decoherence-free states of charge qubits / T. Tanamoto, S. Fujita. Entanglement-assisted estimation of quantum channels / A. Fujiwara. Superconducting quantum bit with ferromagnetic [symbol]-Junction / T. Yamashita, S. Takahashi, S. Maekawa. Generation of macroscopic Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states in Josephson systems / T. Fujii, M. Nishida, N. Hatakenaka -- Quantum-dot systems. Tunable tunnel and exchange couplings in double quantum dots / S. Tarucha, T. Hatano, M. Stopa. Coherent transport through quantum dots / S. Katsumoto ... [et al.]. Electrically pumped single-photon sources towards 1.3 [symbol]m / X. Xu ... [et al.]. Aharonov-Bohm-type effects in antidot arrays and their decoherence / M. Kato ... [et al.]. Nonequilibrium Kondo dot connected to ferromagnetic leads / Y. Utsumi ... [et al.]. Full counting-statistics in a single-electron transistor in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations / Y. Utsumi -- Anomalous Hall effect and Spin-Hall effect. Geometry and the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets / N. P. Ong, W.-L. Lee. Control of spin chirality, Berry phase, and anomalous Hall effect / Y. Tokura, Y. Taguchi. Quantum geometry and Hall effect in ferromagnets and semiconductors / N. Nagaosa. Spin-Hall effect in a semiconductor two-dimensional hole gas with strong spin-orbit coupling / J. Wunderlich ... [et al.]. Intrinsic spin Hall effect in semiconductors / S. Murakami -- Spin related phenomena. Theory of spin transfer phenomena in magnetic metals and semiconductors / A. S. Núñez, A. H. MacDonald. Spin filters of semiconductor nanostructures / T. Dietl, G. Grabecki, J. Wróbel. Experimental study on current-driven domain wall motion / T. Ono ... [et al.]. Magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic nano-dot by non local spin injection / Y. Otani, T. Kimura. Theory of current-driven domain wall dynamics / G. Tatara ... [et al.]. Magnetic impurity states and ferromagnetic interaction in diluted magnetic semiconductors / M. Ichimura ... [et al.]. Geometrical effect on spin current in magnetic nano-structures / M. Ichimura, S. Takahashi, S. Maekawa. Ferromagnetism in anatase TiO[symbol] codoped with Co and Nb / T. Hitosugi ... [et al.] -- Superconductivity in nano-systems. Nonlinear quantum effects in nanosuperconductors / C. Carballeira ... [et al.]. Coalescence and rearrangement of vortices in mesoscopic superconductors / A. Kan

  5. Technological Literacy: An Educational Mandate. Technology Education Symposium Proceedings (8th, Roanoke, Virginia, October 17-18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark, Ed.

    This document contains the following 16 papers presented at a conference on teaching technical education and technical literacy: "British School Technology and the Industry Education Unit" (Eric Bates); "The Development of Technological Education through Bedfordshire Local Education Authority to British School Technology" (Ron Denney); "The…

  6. Safety Characteristics in System Application of Software for Human Rated Exploration Missions for the 8th IAASS Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and its industry and international partners are embarking on a bold and inspiring development effort to design and build an exploration class space system. The space system is made up of the Orion system, the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) system. All are highly coupled together and dependent on each other for the combined safety of the space system. A key area of system safety focus needs to be in the ground and flight application software system (GFAS). In the development, certification and operations of GFAS, there are a series of safety characteristics that define the approach to ensure mission success. This paper will explore and examine the safety characteristics of the GFAS development. The GFAS system integrates the flight software packages of the Orion and SLS with the ground systems and launch countdown sequencers through the 'agile' software development process. A unique approach is needed to develop the GFAS project capabilities within this agile process. NASA has defined the software development process through a set of standards. The standards were written during the infancy of the so-called industry 'agile development' movement and must be tailored to adapt to the highly integrated environment of human exploration systems. Safety of the space systems and the eventual crew on board is paramount during the preparation of the exploration flight systems. A series of software safety characteristics have been incorporated into the development and certification efforts to ensure readiness for use and compatibility with the space systems. Three underlining factors in the exploration architecture require the GFAS system to be unique in its approach to ensure safety for the space systems, both the flight as well as the ground systems. The first are the missions themselves, which are exploration in nature, and go far beyond the comfort of low Earth orbit operations. The second is the current exploration system will launch only one mission per year even less during its developmental phases. Finally, the third is the partnered approach through the use of many different prime contractors, including commercial and international partners, to design and build the exploration systems. These three factors make the challenges to meet the mission preparations and the safety expectations extremely difficult to implement. As NASA leads a team of partners in the exploration beyond earth's influence, it is a safety imperative that the application software used to test, checkout, prepare and launch the exploration systems put safety of the hardware and mission first. Software safety characteristics are built into the design and development process to enable the human rated systems to begin their missions safely and successfully. Exploration missions beyond Earth are inherently risky, however, with solid safety approaches in both hardware and software, the boldness of these missions can be realized for all on the home planet.

  7. 1989 American Control Conference, 8th, Pittsburgh, PA, June 21-23, 1989, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2, 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Papers are presented on such topics as the robust control of robotic manipulators, aircraft control, intelligent control systems, computer networking for real-time control, robust adaptive control, and nonlinear process control. Consideration is also given to advances in distributed detection, control issues for large flexible manipulators, aerospace guidance and control, optimization in biochemical engineering, advanced robotics, fuzzy logic and process control, vibration control, and special architectures in real-time control systems.

  8. Biocatalysis - Key Technology to Meet Global Challenges CCBIO Symposium at the 8(th) Waedenswil Day of Life Science.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2016-01-01

    In a world of dwindling fossil-based energy, global air pollution and warming, biocatalysis may be a perfect problem-solver. It has the potential to procure sustainable raw materials and energy from biomass, and enables chiral and highly functionalized compounds to be produced ecologically for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. At ZHAW Waedenswil on June 20, 2016, the Competence Center for Biocatalysis (CCBIO) gave European experts the opportunity to present the latest findings from science, research and practice in the future-oriented field of biocatalysis. PMID:27561617

  9. The Coalition of Essential Schools Announces "It's Elementary" a PreK-8th Grade National Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonchek, Steve

    2007-01-01

    In March 2006, Deborah Meier asked Harmony Education Center (HEC) in Bloomington, Indiana to lead a national effort to engage more pre-kindergarten through eighth grade schools across the country in the work of the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES). Meier believed that although CES had always welcomed these schools, elementary educators felt…

  10. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 8th, Portland, OR, Aug. 20-22, 1990, Technical Papers. Parts 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in CFD methods and their validation, vortices and vortical flows, STOL/VSTOL aerodynamics, boundary layer transition and separation, wing airfoil aerodynamics, laminar flow, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics, CFD for wing airfoil and nacelle applications, wind tunnel testing, flight testing, missile aerodynamics, unsteady flow, configuration aerodynamics, and multiple body/interference flows. Attention is given to the numerical simulation of vortical flows over close-coupled canard-wing configuration, propulsive lift augmentation by side fences, road-vehicle aerodynamics, a shock-capturing method for multidimensional flow, transition-detection studies in a cryogenic environment, a three-dimensional Euler analysis of ducted propfan flowfields, multiple vortex and shock interaction at subsonic and supersonic speeds, and a Navier-Stokes simulation of waverider flowfields. Also discussed are the induced drag of crescent-shaped wings, the preliminary design aerodynamics of missile inlets, finite wing lift prediction at high angles-of-attack, optimal supersonic/hypersonic bodies, and adaptive grid embedding for the two-dimensional Euler equations.

  11. Developing Effective Fractions Instruction for Kindergarten through 8th Grade. IES Practice Guide. NCEE 2010-4039

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert; Carpenter, Thomas; Fennell, Francis; Geary, David; Lewis, James; Okamoto, Yukari; Thompson, Laurie; Wray, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This practice guide presents five recommendations intended to help educators improve students' understanding of, and problem-solving success with, fractions. Recommendations progress from proposals for how to build rudimentary understanding of fractions in young children; to ideas for helping older children understand the meaning of fractions and…

  12. Highlights from the 38th SABCS annual meeting, 8th – 12th December 2015, San Antonio, USA

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Linda; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) annual meeting highlighted the latest discoveries in breast cancer research and as ever provided a unique opportunity for investigators from all over the world to meet and network. With the rapidly increasing pace of discoveries in the basic, translational, and clinical sciences, mainly because of the advent of new technologies, cancer researchers are making rapid progress that is having significant patient benefit. This year’s meeting featured studies on targeted therapy plus endocrine therapy for metastatic disease with a mutation of PIK3CA, chemotherapy combinations for HER-2-positive disease, long-term outcomes of different surgeries for early-stage cancers, and the first-ever trial of a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor as an adjuvant treatment for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. In the educational session, there was significant emphasis on the role of metabolic syndrome and lifestyle on breast cancer outcome. PMID:26913069

  13. Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Foundations of Quantum Mechanics in the Light of New Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Sachio; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2006-06-01

    Preface -- Committees -- Opening address / H. Fukuyama -- Welcoming address / N. Osakabe -- Special lecture. Albert Einstein: opportunity and perception / C. N. Yang -- Quantum information and entanglement. Quantum optics with single atoms and photons / H. J. Kimble. Quantum information system experiments using a single photon source / Y. Yamamoto. Quantum communication and quantum computation with entangled photons / A. Zeilinger. High-fidelity quantum teleportation and a quantum teleportation network for continuous variables / N. Takei, A. Furusawa. Long lived entangled states / H. Häffner ... [et al.]. Quantum non-locality using tripartite entanglement with non-orthogonal states / J. V. Corbett, D. Home. Quantum entanglement and wedge product / H Heydari. Analysis of the generation of photon pairs in periodically poled lithium niobate / J. Söderholm ... [et al.]. Generation of entangled photons in a semiconductor and violation of Bell's inequality / G. Oohata, R. Shimizu, K. Edamatsu -- Quantum computing. Decoherence of a Josephson junction flux qubit / Y. Nakamura ... [et al.]. Spectroscopic analysis of a candidate two-qubit silicon quantum computer in the microwave regime / J. Gorman, D. G. Hasko, D. A. Williams. Berry phase detection in charge-coupled flux-qubits and the effect of decoherence / H. Nakano ... [et al.]. Locally observable conditions for the successful implementation of entangling multi-qubit quantum gates / H. F. Hofmann, R. Okamoto, S. Takeuchi. State control in flux qubit circuits: manipulating optical selection rules of microwave-assisted transitions in three-level artificial atoms / Y.-X. Liu ... [et al.]. The effect of local structure and non-uniformity on decoherence-free states of charge qubits / T. Tanamoto, S. Fujita. Entanglement-assisted estimation of quantum channels / A. Fujiwara. Superconducting quantum bit with ferromagnetic [symbol]-Junction / T. Yamashita, S. Takahashi, S. Maekawa. Generation of macroscopic Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states in Josephson systems / T. Fujii, M. Nishida, N. Hatakenaka -- Quantum-dot systems. Tunable tunnel and exchange couplings in double quantum dots / S. Tarucha, T. Hatano, M. Stopa. Coherent transport through quantum dots / S. Katsumoto ... [et al.]. Electrically pumped single-photon sources towards 1.3 [symbol]m / X. Xu ... [et al.]. Aharonov-Bohm-type effects in antidot arrays and their decoherence / M. Kato ... [et al.]. Nonequilibrium Kondo dot connected to ferromagnetic leads / Y. Utsumi ... [et al.]. Full counting-statistics in a single-electron transistor in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations / Y. Utsumi -- Anomalous Hall effect and Spin-Hall effect. Geometry and the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets / N. P. Ong, W.-L. Lee. Control of spin chirality, Berry phase, and anomalous Hall effect / Y. Tokura, Y. Taguchi. Quantum geometry and Hall effect in ferromagnets and semiconductors / N. Nagaosa. Spin-Hall effect in a semiconductor two-dimensional hole gas with strong spin-orbit coupling / J. Wunderlich ... [et al.]. Intrinsic spin Hall effect in semiconductors / S. Murakami -- Spin related phenomena. Theory of spin transfer phenomena in magnetic metals and semiconductors / A. S. Núñez, A. H. MacDonald. Spin filters of semiconductor nanostructures / T. Dietl, G. Grabecki, J. Wróbel. Experimental study on current-driven domain wall motion / T. Ono ... [et al.]. Magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic nano-dot by non local spin injection / Y. Otani, T. Kimura. Theory of current-driven domain wall dynamics / G. Tatara ... [et al.]. Magnetic impurity states and ferromagnetic interaction in diluted magnetic semiconductors / M. Ichimura ... [et al.]. Geometrical effect on spin current in magnetic nano-structures / M. Ichimura, S. Takahashi, S. Maekawa. Ferromagnetism in anatase TiO[symbol] codoped with Co and Nb / T. Hitosugi ... [et al.] -- Superconductivity in nano-systems. Nonlinear quantum effects in nanosuperconductors / C. Carballeira ... [et al.]. Coalescence and rearrangement of vortices in mesoscopic superconductors / A. Kanda ... [et al.]. Superconductivity in topologically nontrivial spaces / M. Hayashi ... [et al.]. DC-SQUID ratchet using atomic point contact / Y. Ootuka, H. Miyazaki, A. Kanda. Superconducting wire network under spatially modulated magnetic field / H. Sano ... [et al.]. Simple and stable control of mechanical break junction for the study of superconducting atomic point contact / H. Miyazaki ... [et al.]. Critical currents in quasiperiodic pinning arrays: one-dimensional chains and Penrose lattices / V. R. Misko, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in high-Tc superconductor Josephson junctions / S. Kawabata -- Novel properties of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes and unique transport properties: importance of symmetry and channel number / T. Ando. Optical processes in single-walled carbon nanotubes threaded by a magnetic flux / J. Kono ... [et al.]. Non-equilibrium transport through a single-walled carbon nanotube with highly transparent coupling to reservoirs / P. Recher, N. Y. Kim, Y. Yamamoto -- Novel properties of nano-systems. Transport properties in low dimensional artificial lattice of gold nano-particles / S. Saito ... [et al.]. First principles study of dihydride-chain structures on H-terminated Si(100) surface / Y. Suwa ... [et al.]. Electrical property of Ag nanowires fabricated on hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface / M. Fujimori, S. Heike, T. Hashizume. Effect of environment on ionization of excited atoms embedded in a solid-state cavity / M. Ando ... [et al.]. Development of universal virtual spectroscope for optoelectronics research: first principles software replacing dielectric constant measurements / T. Hamada ... [et al.]. Quantum Nernst effect / H Nakamura, N. Hatano, R. Shirasaki -- Precise measurements. Quantum phenomena visualized using electron waves / A. Tonomura. An optical lattice clock: ultrastable atomic clock with engineered perturbation / H. Katori ... [et al.]. Development of Mach-Zehnder interferometer and "coherent beam steering" technique for cold neutron / K. Taketani ... [et al.]. Surface potential measurement by atomic force microscopy using a quartz resonator / S. Heike, T. Hashizume -- Fundamental Problems in quantum physics. Berry's phases and topological properties in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation / K. Fujikawa. Self-trapping of Bose-Einstein condensates by oscillating interactions / H. Saito, M. Ueda. Spinor solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates - atomic spin transport / J. Ieda. Spin decoherence in a gravitational field / H. Terashima, M. Ueda. Berry's phase of atoms with different sign of the g-factor in a conical rotating magnetic field observed by a time-domain atom interferometer / A. Morinaga ... [et al.] -- List of participants.

  14. The Inside Story [Learning Packages for Exploratory Career Education--7th and 8th Grades: Teacher and Student Editions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Louie E., Comp.

    The four learning packages for exploratory career education are designed for use at the seventh and eighth grade levels. Each unit includes coordinated teacher and student editions. The units are: Culinary Cubs, focusing on occupations in the areas of food management, production, and services, with special reference to dietitians; Mini Nursery,…

  15. Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings (8th, Providence, Rhode Island, April 22-24, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, P. Steven, Comp.; Jones, Maryhelen, Comp.

    The 27 papers that make up this Proceedings were presented at the Eighth Off-Campus Library Services Conference. The primary objective of the conference was to provide a forum where practitioners involved in library services for off-campus constituents could gather to exchange relevant ideas, concerns and perspectives, and to share research.…

  16. Teaching science to 8th graders by engaging them in a design and technology activity: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidawi, Mai M.

    This study described how students can apply science concepts to a Design and Technology task. It also examined whether the students could transfer their scientific knowledge to their design of technology. The study was conducted at an urban school in Philadelphia where a sample of 36 eighth grade students were taught a science unit, Energy, Machines, and Motion, and engaged in a technology design task that was chosen based on the scientific content of the unit. Two approaches of relating teaching science to technological design were observed and described. Through the first approach, the students were given technology lessons in addition to their science lessons. This was to provide them with the technological knowledge that they needed in designing technology such as learning about the design process, selection of appropriate materials, and selection of appropriate tools and how to use them. Also, the students were taught the social skills that will enable them to develop an effective collaborative relationship with their peers such as conflict-management and brainstorming. Through the second approach, the students were taught the science unit and then at the end of the unit the students were given the design task as an assessment of their scientific knowledge. The students' experience of designing technology for each approach was described. The study was conducted using multiple tools and instruments such as observation, videotaping, interviews, and testing. The students were also given the survey PATT-USA to measure their attitude toward technology. The study showed that the students' learning of science was impacted by their weak prerequisite knowledge in science, their poor verbal and written communication skills and their style as dependent learners. Also, the study showed the great impact of the school and classroom cultures on the participation of the students in a Design and Technology activity. The students in this study showed great resistant to participating in a Design and Technology activity. The study linked that to the culture of the classroom where the technology period was considered by the students a period of "free time" to be spent mainly on the computer, playing educational games or engaged in short term, non-demanding projects.

  17. Review of the novelties from the 31st ECTRIMS Congress, 2015, presented at the 8th Post-ECTRIMS meeting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, O; Rodriguez-Antiguedad, A; Olascoaga, J; Oreja-Guevara, C; Prieto, J M; Mendibe-Bilbao, M M; Garcia-Merino, J A; Ramio-Torrenta, Ll; Ginestal, R; Meca-Lallana, J E; Romero-Pinel, L; Munoz, D; Saiz, A; Calles-Hernandez, M C; Izquierdo, G; Villar, L M; Oliva-Nacarino, P; Arnal-Garcia, C; Comabella, M; Brieva, Ll; Arroyo, R; Montalban, X

    2016-06-16

    Renowned national specialists in multiple sclerosis (MS) met, for the eighth year in a row, to give details of the latest novelties presented at the last ECTRIMS Congress 2015, which are included in this review. One of the highlights at this Congress was the new classification of the phenotypes of MS. Both the diagnostic criteria of the neuromyelitis optica spectrum and the problems involved in the differential diagnosis derived from the lack of definition of the radiological spectrum were reviewed. The microbiota comes to the fore as a possible factor determining the disease, together with extrinsic factors such as tobacco, salt ingestion or vitamin D deficiency. Advances made in immunomodulation are driving the progress being made in the treatment of MS. Ocrelizumab is the first treatment with positive results in the primarily progressive forms and tocilizumab, a drug product for rheumatoid arthritis, stands out as a potential candidate for the treatment of neuromyelitis optica. Certain antibiotics and vitamins could also play a role in the treatment of MS. In this edition of the Congress special attention was paid to personalised therapy. To date, 11 drugs have been approved for use in Europe. There is a need for therapeutic algorithms that help us to choose the best treatment for each patient. Likewise, we need to be able to identify, in the early stages of the disease, the risk of developing disability, so as to be able to design therapeutic strategies. To do so, molecular biomarkers and other predictive tools are required. The problems that still exist in software technology in magnetic resonance hinder its application in daily clinical practice.

  18. The carbon-14 spike in the 8th century was not caused by a cometary impact on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2015-11-01

    A mysterious increase of radiocarbon 14 C ca. 775 AD in the Earth's atmosphere has been recently found by Miyake et al. (Miyake, F., Nagaya, K., Masuda, K., Nakamura, T. [2012]. Nature, 486, 240). A possible source of this event has been discussed widely, the most likely being an extreme solar energetic particle event. A new exotic hypothesis has been presented recently by Liu et al. (Liu, Y. [2014]. Sci. Rep., 4, 3728) who proposed that the event was caused by a cometary impact on Earth bringing additional 14 C to the atmosphere. Here we calculated a realistic mass and size of such a comet to show that it would have been huge (≈100 km across and 1017-1020 g of mass) and would have produced a disastrous geological/biological impact on Earth. The absence of an evidence for such a dramatic event makes this hypothesis invalid.

  19. Highlights of the 8th International Conference on Vaccines for Enteric Diseases: the Scottish Encounter To Defeat Diarrheal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Steele, A. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and of mortality; the burden of disease affects individuals of all ages but particularly young children, especially those living in poor regions where the disease is endemic. It is also a health concern for international travelers to these areas. Experts on vaccines and enteric infections and advocates for global health improvement gathered in Scotland from 8 to 10 July 2015 to discuss recent advances in the assessment and understanding of the burden of enteric diseases and progress in the development and implementation of strategies to prevent these infections. Highlights of the meeting included description of advances in molecular assays to estimate pathogen-specific prevalence, methods to model epidemiologic trends, novel approaches to generate broad-spectrum vaccines, new initiatives to evaluate vaccine performance where they are most needed, renewed interest in human challenge models, immunological readouts as predictors of vaccine efficacy, maternal immunization to prevent enteric infections, and the impact of maternal immunity on the vaccine take of infants. A follow-up scientific gathering to advance Shigella and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine efforts will be held from 28 to 30 June 2016 in Washington, DC. PMID:26936100

  20. Stress-Induced Phenomena in Metallization 8th International Workshop on Stress-Induced Phenomena in Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschech, Ehrenfried; Maex, Karen; Ho, Paul S.; Kawasaki, Hisao; Nakamura, Tomoji

    All papers were peer reviewed. This proceedings presents current research on issues related to stress-induced phenomena in on-chip metal interconnects and solder joints. Stresses arising in on-chip metal interconnects and surrounding dielectric materials due to thermal mismatch, electromigration, microstructure changes or process integration can lead to degradation and failure of microelectronic products. The implementation of low dielectric constant materials into the inlaid copper backend-of-line process has brought new challenges for process integration and reliability.