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Sample records for 8x6 foot wind

  1. Orion Capsule and Launch Abort System (LAS) installed in the NASA Glenn 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel f

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Orion Capsule and Launch Abort System (LAS) installed in the NASA Glenn 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel for testing. This test is an Aero Acoustic test of the LAS. Pictured is the calibration of the model's angle of attack

  2. Historical Overview and Recent Improvements at the NASA Glenn Research Center 8x6 9x15 Wind Tunnel Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussling, Joseph John

    2015-01-01

    A brief history of the 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) and 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio is presented along with current capabilities and plans for future upgrades within the facility.

  3. Uncertainty Analysis of the NASA Glenn 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Julia; Hubbard, Erin; Walter, Joel; McElroy, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents methods and results of a detailed measurement uncertainty analysis that was performed for the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel located at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The statistical methods and engineering judgments used to estimate elemental uncertainties are described. The Monte Carlo method of propagating uncertainty was selected to determine the uncertainty of calculated variables of interest. A detailed description of the Monte Carlo method as applied for this analysis is provided. Detailed uncertainty results for the uncertainty in average free stream Mach number as well as other variables of interest are provided. All results are presented as random (variation in observed values about a true value), systematic (potential offset between observed and true value), and total (random and systematic combined) uncertainty. The largest sources contributing to uncertainty are determined and potential improvement opportunities for the facility are investigated.

  4. 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel Acoustic Improvements Expanded Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2016-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center was built in 1969 in the return leg of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT). The 8x6 SWT was completed in 1949 and acoustically treated to mitigate community noise issues in 1950. This treatment included the addition of a large muffler downstream of the 8x6 SWT test section and diffuser. The 9x15 LSWT was designed for performance testing of V/STOL aircraft models, but with the addition of the current acoustic treatment in 1986 the tunnel been used principally for acoustic and performance testing of aircraft propulsion systems. The present document describes an anticipated acoustic upgrade to be completed in 2017.

  5. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  6. Drive Motor Improved for 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel/9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    An operational change made recently in the drive motor system for the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT)/9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) complex resulted in dramatic power savings and expanded operating range. The 8x6 SWT/9x15 LSWT complex offers a unique combination of wind tunnel conditions for both high- and low-speed testing. Prior to the work discussed in this article, the 8- by 6-ft test section offered airflows ranging from Mach 0.36 to 2.0. Subsonic testing was done in the 9-ft high, 15-ft wide test area in the return leg of the facility. The air speed in this test section can range from 0 to 175 mph (Mach 0.23). In the past, we varied the air speed by using a combination of the compressor speed and the position of the tunnel flow-control doors. When very slow speeds were required in the 9x15 LSWT, these large tunnel flow control doors might be very nearly full open, bleeding off large quantities of air, even with the drive system operating at its previous minimum speed of about 510 rpm. Power drawn during this mode of operation varied between 15 and 18 MW/hr, but clearly much of this power was not being used to provide air that would be used for testing in the test section. The air exiting these large doors represented wasted power. Early this year, the facility's tunnel drive system was run on one motor instead of three to see if lower drive speeds could be achieved that would, in turn, result in large power savings because unnecessary air would not be blown out of the flow-control doors unnecessarily. In addition, if the drive could be run slower, then slower speeds would also be possible in the 8x6 SWT test section as an added benefit. Results of the first tests performed early last year showed that in fact the drive, when operating on only one motor, actually reached a steady-state speed of only 337 rpm and drew an amazingly small 6 MW/hr of electrical power. During daytime operation of the drive, this meant that it would be

  7. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 8FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. SAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. SAME CAMERA POSITION AS VA-118-B-10 LOOKING IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. Results of the AFRSI detailed-environment test of the 0.035-scale SSV pressure-loads model 84-0 in the Ames 11x11 ft. TWT and the Lewis 8x6 ft. and 10x10 ft. SWT (OA-310A, B, C), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, B. A.; Marroquin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed orbiter aerodynamic and aeroacoustic pressure data were obtained in a three-part experimental investigation (OA-310A, B and C). The tests were conducted in three NASA facilities: OA-310A in the Ames 11x11-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel; OA-310B in the Lewis 8x6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel; and OA-310C in the Lewis 10x10-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Test data were obtained to support analysis of the Space Transportation System (STS)-6 advanced flexible reusable surface insulation (AFRSI) anomaly using the 0.035-scale space shuttle vehicle pressure-loads Model 84-0. Data were obtained in the areas of the orbiter where AFRSI is to be applied to OV-099 and OV-103. Emphasis was placed on acquiring detailed aeroacoustic data and time-averaged pressure distributions on five affected areas: (1) canopy; (2) side of fuselage; (3) upper surface of wing; (4) OMS pods; and (5) vertical tail. Data were obtained at nominal ascent and entry atmospheric flight trajectory conditions between M=0.6 through M-3.5. Sample plotted data are given. aba M.G.

  9. 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel Acoustic Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, David; Stephens, David

    2016-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center was built in 1969 in the return leg of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT). The 8x6 SWT was completed in 1949 and acoustically treated to mitigate community noise issues in 1950. This treatment included the addition of a large muffler downstream of the 8x6 SWT test section and diffuser. The 9x15 LSWT was designed for performance testing of VSTOL aircraft models, but with the addition of the current acoustic treatment in 1986 the tunnel has been used principally for acoustic and performance testing of aircraft propulsions systems. The present document describes an anticipated acoustic upgrade to be completed in 2017.

  10. Overview of 6- X 6-foot wind tunnel aero-optics tests. [transonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buell, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The splitter-plate arrangement used in tests in the 6 x 6 foot wind tunnel and how it was configured to study boundary layers, both heated and unheated, shear layers over a cavity, separated flows behind spoilers, accelerated flows around a turret, and a turret wake are described. The flows are characterized by examples of the steady-state pressure and of velocity profiles through the various types of flow layers.

  11. Wind-Tunnel Testing In The 12-Foot Low - Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Low-speed wind tunnel test were conducted in the 12 - foot Tunnel at NASA Langley Research center to investigate application of various wing devices on the effect of stall departure resistance at high angles of attack.

  12. The 6-foot-4-inch Wind Tunnel at the Washington Navy Yard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmond, G L; Mccrary, J A

    1935-01-01

    The 6-foot-4-inch wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment has proven itself capable of continuous and reliable output of data. The real value of the tunnel will increase as experience is gained in checking the observed tunnel performance against full-scale performance. Such has been the case of the 8- by 8-foot tunnel, and for that reason the comparison in the calibration tests have been presented.

  13. Preliminary Computational Study for Future Tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot' x 7 foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, Jason M.; Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; WInski, Courtney S.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Commercial Supersonics Technology Project seeks to advance tools and techniques to make over-land supersonic flight feasible. In this study, preliminary computational results are presented for future tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to be conducted in early 2016. Shock-plume interactions and their effect on pressure signature are examined for six model geometries. Near- field pressure signatures are assessed using the CFD code USM3D to model the proposed test geometries in free-air. Additionally, results obtained using the commercial grid generation software Pointwise Reigistered Trademark are compared to results using VGRID, the NASA Langley Research Center in-house mesh generation program.

  14. The 7 by 10 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.

  15. Wind tunnel investigation of a 14 foot vertical axis windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. J.; Guillotte, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale wind tunnel investigation was made to determine the performance characteristics of a 14 ft diameter vertical axis windmill. The parameters measured were wind velocity, shaft torque, shaft rotation rate, along with the drag and yawing moment. A velocity survey of the flow field downstream of the windmill was also made. The results of these tests along with some analytically predicted data are presented in the form of generalized data as a function of tip speed ratio.

  16. Wind-Tunnel Tests of 10-foot-diameter Autogiro Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Bioletti, Carlton

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of a series of 10-foot-diameter autogiro rotor models tested in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel. Four of the models differed only in the airfoil sections of the blades, the sections used being the NACA 0012, 0018, 4412, and 4418. Three additional models employing the NACA 0012 section were tested, in which a varying portion of the blade near the hub was replaced by a streamline tube with a chord of about one-fourth the blade chord.

  17. Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom in the 1-foot by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan; Winski, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    The desire to reduce or eliminate the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed by the aircraft. A study has been performed focused on reducing the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Testing was completed in the 1-foot by 1-foot supersonic wind tunnel to study the effects of an exhaust nozzle plume and shock wave interaction. The plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation of a nozzle plume passing through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedgeshaped shock generator. This test entry was the first of two phases to collect schlieren images and off-body static pressure profiles. Three wedge configurations were tested consisting of strut-mounted wedges of 2.5- degrees and 5-degrees. Three propulsion configurations were tested simulating the propulsion pod and aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept, which also provided a trailing edge shock and plume interaction. Findings include how the interaction of the jet plume caused a thickening of the shock generated by the wedge (or aft deck) and demonstrate how the shock location moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio.

  18. NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    The 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at Lewis Research Center is available for use by qualified researchers. This manual contains tunnel performance maps which show the range of total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, dynamic pressure, altitude, Reynolds number, and mass flow as a function of test section Mach number. These maps are applicable for both the aerodynamic and propulsion cycle. The 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is an atmospheric facility with a test section Mach number range from 0.36 to 2.0. General support systems (air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, infrared system, laser system, laser sheet system, and schlieren system are also described as are instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems. Pretest meeting formats are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personal safety requirements are also stated.

  19. Design, fabrication, test, and evaluation of a prototype 150-foot long composite wind turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gewehr, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of a prototype 150 foot long composite wind turbine blade is described. The design approach and material selection, compatible with low cost fabrication methods and objectives, are highlighted. The operating characteristics of the blade during rotating and nonrotating conditions are presented. The tensile, compression, and shear properties of the blade are reported. The blade fabrication, tooling, and quality assurance are discussed.

  20. A Technique for Measuring Rotocraft Dynamic Stability in the 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Bohn, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line technique is described for the measurement of tilt rotor aircraft dynamic stability in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The technique is based on advanced system identification methodology and uses the instrumental variables approach. It is particulary applicable to real time estimation problems with limited amounts of noise-contaminated data. Several simulations are used to evaluate the algorithm. Estimated natural frequencies and damping ratios are compared with simulation values. The algorithm is also applied to wind tunnel data in an off-line mode. The results are used to develop preliminary guidelines for effective use of the algorithm.

  1. Turbulence Intensity at Inlet of 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel Caused by Upwind Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Denise; Yuricich, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In order to estimate the magnitude of turbulence in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel (80 x 120) caused by buildings located upwind from the 80 x 120 inlet, a 150th-scale study was performed that utilized a nominal two-dimensional blockage placed ahead of the inlet. The distance of the blockage ahead of the inlet was varied. This report describes velocity measurements made in the plane of the 80 x 120 model inlet for the case of zero ambient (atmospheric) wind.

  2. Operating manual holographic interferometry system for 2 x 2 foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic interferometer system was installed in a 2X2 foot transonic wind tunnel. The system incorporates a modern, 10 pps, Nd:YAG pulsed laser which provides reliable operation and is easy to align. The spatial filtering requirements of the unstable resonator beam are described as well as the integration of the system into the existing Schieren system. A two plate holographic interferometer is used to reconstruct flow field data. For static wind tunnel models the single exposure holograms are recorded in the usual manner; however, for dynamic models such as oscillating airfoils, synchronous laser hologram recording is used.

  3. Simulation and control engineering studies of NASA-Ames 40 foot by 80 foot/80 foot by 120 foot wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, J. G.; Jones, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The development and use of a digital computer simulation of the proposed wind tunnel facility is described. The feasibility of automatic control of wind tunnel airspeed and other parameters was examined. Specifications and implementation recommendations for a computer based automatic control and monitoring system are presented.

  4. Modernization and Activation of the NASA Ames 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    The Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Automation systems were installed in all three UPWT tunnel legs and the Auxiliaries facility. Major improvements were made to the four control rooms, model support systems, main drive motors, and main drive speed control. Pressure vessel repairs and refurbishment to the electrical distribution system were also completed. Significant changes were made to improve test section flow quality in the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg. After the completion of the construction phase of the project, acceptance and checkout testing was performed to demonstrate the capabilities of the modernized facility. A pneumatic test of the tunnel circuit was performed to verify the structural integrity of the pressure vessel before wind-on operations. Test section turbulence, flow angularity, and acoustic parameters were measured throughout the tunnel envelope to determine the effects of the tunnel flow quality improvements. The new control system processes were thoroughly checked during wind-off and wind-on operations. Manual subsystem modes and automated supervisory modes of tunnel operation were validated. The aerodynamic and structural performance of both the new composite compressor rotor blades and the old aluminum rotor blades was measured. The entire subsonic and supersonic envelope of the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg was defined up to the maximum total pressure.

  5. NASA Glenn 1-by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seablom, Kirk D.; Soeder, Ronald H.; Stark, David E.; Leone, John F. X.; Henry, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    This manual describes the NASA Glenn Research Center's 1 - by 1 -Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel and provides information for customers who wish to conduct experiments in this facility. Tunnel performance envelopes of total pressure, total temperature, and dynamic pressure as a function of test section Mach number are presented. For each Mach number, maps are presented of Reynolds number per foot as a function of the total air temperature at the test section inlet for constant total air pressure at the inlet. General support systems-such as the service air, combustion air, altitude exhaust system, auxiliary bleed system, model hydraulic system, schlieren system, model pressure-sensitive paint, and laser sheet system are discussed. In addition, instrumentation and data processing, acquisition systems are described, pretest meeting formats and schedules are outlined, and customer responsibilities and personnel safety are addressed.

  6. Uncertainty Analysis of NASA Glenn's 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Julia E.; Hubbard, Erin P.; Walter, Joel A.; McElroy, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the measurement uncertainty of the Mach Number of the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper details the analysis process used, including methods for handling limited data and complicated data correlations. Due to the complexity of the equations used, a Monte Carlo Method was utilized for this uncertainty analysis. A summary of the findings are presented as pertains to understanding what the uncertainties are, how they impact various research tests in the facility, and methods of reducing the uncertainties in the future.

  7. The Acoustic Environment of the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel is an acoustic testing facility with a long history of aircraft propulsion noise research. Due to interest in renovating the facility to support future testing of advanced quiet engine designs, a study was conducted to document the background noise level in the facility and investigate the sources of contaminating noise. The anechoic quality of the facility was also investigated using an interrupted noise method. The present report discusses these aspects of the noise environment in this facility.

  8. NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    This manual describes the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this atmospheric facility. Tunnel variables such as pressures, temperatures, available tests section area, and Mach number ranges (0.05 to 0.20) are discussed. In addition, general support systems such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, laser system, flow visualization system, and model support systems are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also discussed.

  9. Propeller propulsion integration, phase 1. [conducted in langley 30 by 60 foot full scale wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, G.; Koenig, K.; Miley, S. J.; Mcwhorter, J.; Wells, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliography was compiled of all readily available sources of propeller analytical and experimental studies conducted during the 1930 through 1960 period. A propeller test stand was developed for the measurement of thrust and torque characteristics of full scale general aviation propellers and installed in the LaRC 30 x 60 foot full scale wind tunnel. A tunnel entry was made during the January through February 1980 period. Several propellers were tested, but unforseen difficulties with the shaft thrust torque balance severely degraded the data quality.

  10. Laser velocimeter measurements of dynamic stall. [conducted in the Ames two foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    Laser velocimeter measurements were made during the study of a two-dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil undergoing conditions of dynamic stall. The measurements, which were obtained in the Ames 2 foot wind tunnel at reduced frequencies of 0.12 and 1.2, show significant flow field hysteresis around the static stall angle. Comparisons were also made with dual-plate interferograms and good agreement was found for the attached flow cases. For separated flow, characteristic vortex shedding caused poor agreement and significantly increased the measured Reynolds shear stresses.

  11. Flow quality studies of the NASA Lewis Research Center 8- by 6-foot supersonic/9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pickett, Mark T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to determine the existing flow quality in the NASA Lewis 8 by 6 Foot Supersonic/9 by 15 Foot Low speed Wind Tunnel. The information gathered from these studies was used to determine the types and designs of flow manipulators which can be installed to improve overall tunnel flow quality and efficiency. Such manipulators include honeycomb flow straighteners, turbulence reduction screens, corner turning vanes, and acoustic treatments. The types of measurements, instrumentation, and results obtained from experiments conducted at several locations throughout the tunnel loop are described.

  12. Airloads Correlation of the UH-60A Rotor Inside the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Norman, Thomas R.; Romander, Ethan A.

    2013-01-01

    The presented research validates the capability of a loosely-coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CRA) code to calculate the flowfield around a rotor and test stand mounted inside a wind tunnel. The CFD/CRA predictions for the full-scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center are compared with the latest measured airloads and performance data. The studied conditions include a speed sweep at constant lift up to an advance ratio of 0.4 and a thrust sweep at constant speed up to and including stall. For the speed sweep, wind tunnel modeling becomes important at advance ratios greater than 0.37 and test stand modeling becomes increasingly important as the advance ratio increases. For the thrust sweep, both the wind tunnel and test stand modeling become important as the rotor approaches stall. Despite the beneficial effects of modeling the wind tunnel and test stand, the new models do not completely resolve the current airload discrepancies between prediction and experiment.

  13. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Ames 9- x 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic retropropulsion was experimentally examined in the Ames Research Center 9x7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 1.8 and 2.4. The experimental model, previously designed for and tested in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach 2.4, 3.5 and 4.6, was a 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a 9.55-in long cylindrical aftbody. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, one on the model centerline and the other three on the half radius spaced 120-deg apart. Surface pressure and flow visualization were the primary measurements, including high-speed data to investigate the dynamics of the interactions between the bow and nozzle shocks. Three blowing configurations were tested with thrust coefficients up to 10 and angles of attack up to 20-deg. Preliminary results and observations from the test are provided

  14. A Summary of the Experimental Results for a Generic Tractor-Trailer in the Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot and 12-Foot Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Satran, Dale R.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental measurements of a generic tractor-trailer were obtained in two wind tunnels at Ames Research Center. After a preliminary study at atmospheric conditions in the 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel, additional testing was conducted at Reynolds numbers corresponding to full-scale highway speeds in the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel. To facilitate computational modeling, the 1:8-scale geometry, designated the Generic Conventional Model, included a simplified underbody and omitted many small-scale details. The measurements included overall and component forces and moments, static and dynamic surface pressures, and three-component particle image velocimetry. This summary report highlights the effects of numerous drag reduction concepts and provides details of the model installation in both wind tunnels. To provide a basis for comparison, the wind-averaged drag coefficient was tabulated for all configurations tested. Relative to the baseline configuration representative of a modern class-8 tractor-trailer, the most effective concepts were the trailer base flaps and trailer belly box providing a drag-coefficient reduction of 0.0855 and 0.0494, respectively. Trailer side skirts were less effective yielding a drag reduction of 0.0260. The database of this experimental effort is publicly available for further analysis.

  15. Sources and levels of background noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    Background noise levels are measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel following installation of a sound-absorbent lining on the test-section walls. Results show that the fan-drive noise dominated the empty test-section background noise at airspeeds below 120 knots. Above 120 knots, the test-section broadband background noise was dominated by wind-induced dipole noise (except at lower harmonics of fan blade-passage tones) most likely generated at the microphone or microphone support strut. Third-octave band and narrow-band spectra are presented for several fan operating conditions and test-section airspeeds. The background noise levels can be reduced by making improvements to the microphone wind screen or support strut. Empirical equations are presented relating variations of fan noise with fan speed or blade-pitch angle. An empirical expression for typical fan noise spectra is also presented. Fan motor electric power consumption is related to the noise generation. Preliminary measurements of sound absorption by the test-section lining indicate that the 152 mm thick lining will adequately absorb test-section model noise at frequencies above 300 Hz.

  16. Fan Blade Shake Test Results for the 40- by 80-/80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Graham, T.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the shake tests performed on the first set of hydulignum fan blades for the 40- by 80-/80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The purpose of the shake test program is described. The test equipment and test procedures are reviewed. Results from each shake test are presented and the overall findings of the shake test program are discussed.

  17. New Model Exhaust System Supports Testing in NASA Lewis' 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeder, James W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    In early 1996, the ability to run NASA Lewis Research Center's Abe Silverstein 10- by 10- Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10) at subsonic test section speeds was reestablished. Taking advantage of this new speed range, a subsonic research test program was scheduled for the 10x10 in the fall of 1996. However, many subsonic aircraft test models require an exhaust source to simulate main engine flow, engine bleed flows, and other phenomena. This was also true of the proposed test model, but at the time the 10x10 did not have a model exhaust capability. So, through an in-house effort over a period of only 5 months, a new model exhaust system was designed, installed, checked out, and made ready in time to support the scheduled test program.

  18. User manual for NASA Lewis 10 by 10 foot supersonic wind tunnel. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1995-01-01

    This manual describes the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this facility. Tunnel performance operating envelopes of altitude, dynamic pressure, Reynolds number, total pressure, and total temperature as a function of test section Mach number are presented. Operating envelopes are shown for both the aerodynamic (closed) cycle and the propulsion (open) cycle. The tunnel test section Mach number range is 2.0 to 3.5. General support systems, such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, fuel system, and Schlieren system, are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also described. Pretest meeting formats and schedules are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personnel safety are also discussed.

  19. Comparison of acoustic data from a 102 mm conic nozzle as measured in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Mckie, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative program between the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), England, and the NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to compare acoustic measurements made in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The acoustic measurements were made in both facilities using the same 102 mm conical nozzle supplied by the RAE. The nozzle was tested by each organization using its respective jet test rig. The mounting hardware and nozzle exit conditions were matched as closely as possible. The data from each wind tunnel were independently analyzed by the respective organization. The results from these tests show good agreement. In both facilities, interference with acoustic measurement is evident at angles in the forward quadrant.

  20. Shake test results of the MDHC test stand in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Benton H.; Peterson, Randall

    1994-01-01

    A shake test was conducted to determine the modal properties of the MDHC (McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company) test stand installed in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The shake test was conducted for three wind-tunnel balance configurations with and without balance dampers, and with the snubber engagement to lock the balance frame. A hydraulic shaker was used to apply random excitation at the rotor hub in the longitudinal and lateral directions. A GenRad 2515 computer-aided test system computed the frequency response functions at the rotor hub and support struts. From these response functions, the modal properties, including the natural frequency, damping ratio, and mode shape were calculated. The critical modes with low damping ratios are identified as the test-stand second longitudinal mode for the dampers-off configuration, the test-stand yaw mode for the dampers-on configuration, and the test stand first longitudinal mode for the balance-frame locked configuration.

  1. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  2. Noise measurements from a large-scale lift fan transport in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Noise data measurements from a large scale lift fan transport model aircraft were made in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The model had two lift fans in deep inlets in the forward fuselage and two lift-cruise fans in pods on the aft fuselage. The noise data measurements are presented as listings and plots of sounds pressure level versus 1/3-octave center frequency.

  3. Wind-tunnel investigation of the thrust augmentor performance of a large-scale swept wing model. [in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. G.; Falarski, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were made in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to determine the forward speed effects on wing-mounted thrust augmentors. The large-scale model was powered by the compressor output of J-85 driven viper compressors. The flap settings used were 15 deg and 30 deg with 0 deg, 15 deg, and 30 deg aileron settings. The maximum duct pressure, and wind tunnel dynamic pressure were 66 cmHg (26 in Hg) and 1190 N/sq m (25 lb/sq ft), respectively. All tests were made at zero sideslip. Test results are presented without analysis.

  4. Calibration of the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1996 and 1997 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen

    2012-01-01

    There were several physical and operational changes made to the NASA Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel during the period of 1992 through 1996. Following each of these changes, a facility calibration was conducted to provide the required information to support the research test programs. Due to several factors (facility research test schedule, facility downtime and continued facility upgrades), a full test section calibration was not conducted until 1996. This calibration test incorporated all test section configurations and covered the existing operating range of the facility. However, near the end of that test entry, two of the vortex generators mounted on the compressor exit tailcone failed causing minor damage to the honeycomb flow straightener. The vortex generators were removed from the facility and calibration testing was terminated. A follow-up test entry was conducted in 1997 in order to fully calibrate the facility without the effects of the vortex generators and to provide a complete calibration of the newly expanded low speed operating range. During the 1997 tunnel entry, all planned test points required for a complete test section calibration were obtained. This data set included detailed in-plane and axial flow field distributions for use in quantifying the test section flow quality.

  5. Acoustical evaluation of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The test section of the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel was acoustically treated to allow the measurement of acoustic sources located within the tunnel test section under simulated free field conditions. The treatment was designed for high sound absorption at frequencies above 250 Hz and to withstand tunnel airflow velocities up to 0.2 Mach. Evaluation tests with no tunnel airflow were conducted in the test section to assess the performance of the installed treatment. This performance would not be significantly affected by low speed airflow. Time delay spectrometry tests showed that interference ripples in the incident signal resulting from reflections occurring within the test section average from 1.7 dB to 3.2 dB wide over a 500 to 5150 Hz frequency range. Late reflections, from upstream and downstream of the test section, were found to be insignificant at the microphone measuring points. For acoustic sources with low directivity characteristics, decay with distance measurements in the test section showed that incident free field behavior can be measured on average with an accuracy of +/- 1.5 dB or better at source frequencies from 400 Hz to 10 kHz. The free field variations are typically much smaller with an omnidirectional source.

  6. Check Calibration of the NASA Glenn 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (2014 Test Entry)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Aaron; Pastor-Barsi, Christine; Arrington, E. Allen

    2016-01-01

    A check calibration of the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) was conducted in May/June 2014 using an array of five supersonic wedge probes to verify the 1999 Calibration. This check calibration was necessary following a control systems upgrade and an integrated systems test (IST). This check calibration was required to verify the tunnel flow quality was unchanged by the control systems upgrade prior to the next test customer beginning their test entry. The previous check calibration of the tunnel occurred in 2007, prior to the Mars Science Laboratory test program. Secondary objectives of this test entry included the validation of the new Cobra data acquisition system (DAS) against the current Escort DAS and the creation of statistical process control (SPC) charts through the collection of series of repeated test points at certain predetermined tunnel parameters. The SPC charts secondary objective was not completed due to schedule constraints. It is hoped that this effort will be readdressed and completed in the near future.

  7. Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) Overview and 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test. [conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCluer, Megan S.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most helicopter data trends cannot be extrapolated to tiltrotors because blade geometry and aerodynamic behavior, as well as rotor and fuselage interactions, are significantly different for tiltrotors. A tiltrotor model has been developed to investigate the aeromechanics of tiltrotors, to develop a comprehensive database for validating tiltrotor analyses, and to provide a research platform for supporting future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (FS TRAM) is a dual-rotor, powered aircraft model with extensive instrumentation for measurement of structural and aerodynamic loads. This paper will present the Full-Span TRAM test capabilities and the first set of data obtained during a 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test conducted in late 2000 at NASA Ames Research Center. The Full-Span TRAM is a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 Osprey aircraft, and a heavily instrumented NASA and U.S. Army wind tunnel test stand. Rotor structural loads are monitored and recorded for safety-of-flight and for information on blade loads and dynamics. Left and right rotor balance and fuselage balance loads are monitored for safety-of-flight and for measurement of vehicle and rotor aerodynamic performance. Static pressure taps on the left wing are used to determine rotor/wing interactional effects and rotor blade dynamic pressures measure blade airloads. All of these measurement capabilities make the FS TRAM test stand a unique and valuable asset for validation of computational codes and to aid in future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span TRAM was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel from October through December 2000. Rotor and vehicle performance measurements were acquired in addition to wing pressures, rotor acoustics, and Laser Light Sheet (LLS) flow visualization data. Hover, forward flight, and airframe (rotors off) aerodynamic runs were performed. Helicopter-mode data were acquired during angle of attack and thrust sweeps for

  8. Air-Loads Prediction of a UH-60A Rotor inside the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Romander, Ethan A.; Potsdam, Mark; Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    2010-01-01

    The presented research extends the capability of a loose coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structure dynamics (CSD) code to calculate the flow-field around a rotor and test stand mounted inside a wind tunnel. Comparison of predicted air-load results for a full-scale UH-60A rotor recently tested inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center and in free-air flight are made for three challenging flight data points from the earlier conducted UH-60A Air-loads Program. Overall results show that the extension of the coupled CFD/CSD code to the wind-tunnel environment is generally successful.

  9. Parametric Inlet Tested in Glenn's 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Davis, David O.; Solano, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The Parametric Inlet is an innovative concept for the inlet of a gas-turbine propulsion system for supersonic aircraft. The concept approaches the performance of past inlet concepts, but with less mechanical complexity, lower weight, and greater aerodynamic stability and safety. Potential applications include supersonic cruise aircraft and missiles. The Parametric Inlet uses tailored surfaces to turn the incoming supersonic flow inward toward an axis of symmetry. The terminal shock spans the opening of the subsonic diffuser leading to the engine. The external cowl area is smaller, which reduces cowl drag. The use of only external supersonic compression avoids inlet unstart--an unsafe shock instability present in previous inlet designs that use internal supersonic compression. This eliminates the need for complex mechanical systems to control unstart, which reduces weight. The conceptual design was conceived by TechLand Research, Inc. (North Olmsted, OH), which received funding through NASA s Small-Business Innovation Research program. The Boeing Company (Seattle, WA) also participated in the conceptual design. The NASA Glenn Research Center became involved starting with the preliminary design of a model for testing in Glenn s 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10 10 SWT). The inlet was sized for a speed of Mach 2.35 while matching requirements of an existing cold pipe used in previous inlet tests. The parametric aspects of the model included interchangeable components for different cowl lip, throat slot, and sidewall leading-edge shapes and different vortex generator configurations. Glenn researchers used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for three-dimensional, turbulent flow analysis to further refine the aerodynamic design.

  10. Comparison of propeller cruise noise data taken in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel with other tunnel and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James

    1989-01-01

    The noise of advanced high speed propeller models measured in the NASA 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel has been compared with model propeller noise measured in another tunnel and with full-scale propeller noise measured in flight. Good agreement was obtained for the noise of a model counterrotation propeller tested in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel and in the acoustically treated test section of the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel. This good agreement indicates the relative validity of taking cruise noise data on a plate in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel compared with the free-field method in the Boeing tunnel. Good agreement was also obtained for both single rotation and counter-rotation model noise comparisons with full-scale propeller noise in flight. The good scale model to full-scale comparisons indicate both the validity of the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel data and the ability to scale to full size. Boundary layer refraction on the plate provides a limitation to the measurement of forward arc noise in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel at the higher harmonics of the blade passing tone. The sue of a validated boundary layer refraction model to adjust the data could remove this limitation.

  11. Comparison of propeller cruise noise data taken in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel with other tunnel and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.

    1989-01-01

    The noise of advanced high speed propeller models measured in the NASA 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel has been compared with model propeller noise measured in another tunnel and with full-scale propeller noise measured in flight. Good agreement was obtained for the noise of a model counterrotation propeller tested in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel and in the acoustically treated test section of the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel. This good agreement indicates the relative validity of taking cruise noise data on a plate in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel compared with the free-field method in the Boeing tunnel. Good agreement was also obtained for both single rotation and counter-rotation model noise comparisons with full-scale propeller noise in flight. The good scale model to full-scale comparisons indicate both the validity of the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel data and the ability to scale to full size. Boundary layer refraction on the plate provides a limitation to the measurement of forward arc noise in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel at the higher harmonics of the blade passing tone. The use of a validated boundary layer refraction model to adjust the data could remove this limitation.

  12. An Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Rotorcraft Airfoils in the NASA Ames Eleven-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemming, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Five full scale rotorcraft airfoils were tested in the NASA Ames Eleven-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel for full scale Reynolds numbers at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.07. The models, which spanned the tunnel from floor to ceiling, included two modern baseline airfoils, the SC1095 and SC1094 R8, which have been previously tested in other facilities. Three advanced transonic airfoils, designated the SSC-A09, SSC-A07, and SSC-B08, were tested to confirm predicted performance and provide confirmation of advanced airfoil design methods. The test showed that the eleven-foot tunnel is suited to two-dimensional airfoil testing. Maximum lift coefficients, drag coefficients, pitching moments, and pressure coefficient distributions are presented. The airfoil analysis codes agreed well with the data, with the Grumman GRUMFOIL code giving the best overall performance correlation.

  13. Revalidation of the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with a Commercial Airplane Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.; Hudgins, M.; Hergert, D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 11-By 11-Foot Transonic leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve tunnel performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Wind tunnel tests to demonstrate the readiness of the tunnel for a return to production operations included an Integrated Systems Test (IST), calibration tests, and airplane validation tests. One of the two validation tests was a 0.037-scale Boeing 777 model that was previously tested in the 11-By 11-Foot tunnel in 1991. The objective of the validation tests was to compare pre-modernization and post-modernization results from the same airplane model in order to substantiate the operational readiness of the facility. Evaluation of within-test, test-to-test, and tunnel-to-tunnel data repeatability were made to study the effects of the tunnel modifications. Tunnel productivity was also evaluated to determine the readiness of the facility for production operations. The operation of the facility, including model installation, tunnel operations, and the performance of tunnel systems, was observed and facility deficiency findings generated. The data repeatability studies and tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons demonstrated outstanding data repeatability and a high overall level of data quality. Despite some operational and facility problems, the validation test was successful in demonstrating the readiness of the facility to perform production airplane wind tunnel%, tests.

  14. Investigation of Diving Moments of a Pursuit Airplane in the Ames 16-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Albert L

    1942-01-01

    A pursuit type airplane encountered severe diving moments in high-speed dives which make recovery difficult. For the purpose of investigating these diving moments and finding means for their reduction, a 1/6-scale model of the airplane was tested in the 16-foot high-speed wind tunnel at Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The test results indicate that up to a Mach number of at least 0.75, the limit of the tests, the dive-recovery difficulties can be alleviated and the longitudinal maneuverability improved by the substitution of a long symmetrical fuselage for the standard fuselage.

  15. A study of the noise radiation from four helicopter rotor blades. [tests in Ames 40 by 20 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A.; Mosher, M.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were taken of a modern helicopter rotor with four blade tip shapes in the NASA Ames 40-by-80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The four tip shapes are: rectangular, swept, trapezoidal, and swept tapered in platform. Acoustic effects due to tip shape changes were studied based on the dBA level, peak noise pressure, and subjective rating. The swept tapered blade was found to be the quietest above an advancing tip Mach number of about 0.9, and the swept blade was the quietest at low speed. The measured high speed impulsive noise was compared with theoretical predictions based on thickness effects; good agreement was found.

  16. The Aerodynamic Drag of Flying-boat Hull Model as Measured in the NACA 20-foot Wind Tunnel I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1935-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic drag were made in the 20-foot wind tunnel on a representative group of 11 flying-boat hull models. Four of the models were modified to investigate the effect of variations in over-all height, contours of deck, depth of step, angle of afterbody keel, and the addition of spray strips and windshields. The results of these tests, which cover a pitch-angle range from -5 to 10 degrees, are presented in a form suitable for use in performance calculations and for design purposes.

  17. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  18. Large-scale V/STOL testing. [conducted in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. G.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.; Falarshi, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several facets of large-scale testing of V/STOL aircraft configurations are discussed with particular emphasis on test experience in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Examples of powered-lift test programs are presented in order to illustrate tradeoffs confronting the planner of V/STOL test programs. Large-scale V/STOL wind-tunnel testing can sometimes compete with small-scale testing in the effort required (overall test time) and program costs because of the possibility of conducting a number of different tests with a single large-scale model where several small-scale models would be required. The benefits of both high- or full-scale Reynolds numbers, more detailed configuration simulation, and number and type of onboard measurements are studied.

  19. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  20. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise. [NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  1. Aero-acoustic experimental verification of optimum configuration of variable-pitch fans for 40 x 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lown, H.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two drive fan configurations (low-speed and high-speed variable pitch design) for a 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel were monitored. A 1/7-scale model was utilized. The necessary aero-acoustic data reduction computer program logic was supplied. Test results were evaluated, and the optimum configuration to be employed in the 40 foot full scale fan was recommended.

  2. Modification of the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel for component acoustic testing for the second generation supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Allmen, J. R.; Soderman, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of a large-scale anechoic test facility where large models of engine/airframe/high-lift systems can be tested for both improved noise reduction and minimum performance degradation is described. The facility development is part of the effort to investigate economically viable methods of reducing second generation high speed civil transport noise during takeoff and climb-out that is now under way in the United States. This new capability will be achieved through acoustic modifications of NASA's second largest subsonic wind tunnel: the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. Three major items are addressed in the design of this large anechoic and quiet wind tunnel: a new deep (42 inch (107 cm)) test section liner, expansion of the wind tunnel drive operating envelope at low rpm to reduce background noise, and other promising methods of improving signal-to-noise levels of inflow microphones. Current testing plans supporting the U.S. high speed civil transport program are also outlined.

  3. Space Launch System Liftoff and Transition Aerodynamic Characterization in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Erickson, Gary E.; Paulson, John W.; Tomek, William G.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.

    2015-01-01

    A 1.75% scale force and moment model of the Space Launch System was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to quantify the aerodynamic forces that will be experienced by the launch vehicle during its liftoff and transition to ascent flight. The test consisted of two parts: the first was dedicated to measuring forces and moments for the entire range of angles of attack (0deg to 90deg) and roll angles (0 deg. to 360 deg.). The second was designed to measure the aerodynamic effects of the liftoff tower on the launch vehicle for ground winds from all azimuthal directions (0 deg. to 360 deg.), and vehicle liftoff height ratios from 0 to 0.94. This wind tunnel model also included a set of 154 surface static pressure ports. Details on the experimental setup, and results from both parts of testing are presented, along with a description of how the wind tunnel data was analyzed and post-processed in order to develop an aerodynamic database. Finally, lessons learned from experiencing significant dynamics in the mid-range angles of attack due to steady asymmetric vortex shedding are presented.

  4. Full-scale S-76 rotor performance and loads at low speeds in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Vol. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinoda, Patrick M.

    1996-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter rotor test was conducted in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel with a four-bladed S-76 rotor system. Rotor performance and loads data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles-of-attack and thrust conditions at tunnel speeds ranging from 0 to 100 kt. The primary objectives of this test were (1) to acquire forward flight rotor performance and loads data for comparison with analytical results; (2) to acquire S-76 forward flight rotor performance data in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel to compare with existing full-scale 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test data that were acquired in 1977; (3) to evaluate the acoustic capability of the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel for acquiring blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise in the low speed range and compare BVI noise with in-flight test data; and (4) to evaluate the capability of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel test section as a hover facility. The secondary objectives were (1) to evaluate rotor inflow and wake effects (variations in tunnel speed, shaft angle, and thrust condition) on wind tunnel test section wall and floor pressures; (2) to establish the criteria for the definition of flow breakdown (condition where wall corrections are no longer valid) for this size rotor and wind tunnel cross-sectional area; and (3) to evaluate the wide-field shadowgraph technique for visualizing full-scale rotor wakes. This data base of rotor performance and loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies for full-scale, four-bladed, fully articulated rotor systems. Rotor performance and structural loads data are presented in this report.

  5. Pratt & Whitney Two Dimensional HSR Nozzle Test in the NASA Lewis 9- By 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel: Aerodynamic Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.; Jones, Christopher W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a test that was conducted jointly by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines and NASA Lewis Research Center. The test was conducted in NASA's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT). The test setup, methods, and aerodynamic results of this test are discussed. Acoustical results are discussed in a separate paper by J. Bridges and J. Marino.

  6. Tests of Round and Flat Spoilers on a Tapered Wing in the NACA 19-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Bowen, John D

    1941-01-01

    Several arrangements of round and flat spanwise spoilers attached to the upper surface of a tapered wing were tested in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel to determine the most effective type, location, and size of spoiler necessary to reduce greatly the lift on the wings of large flying boats when moored. The effect of the various spoilers on the lift, the drag, and the pitching-moment characteristics of the tapered wing was measured over a range of angles of attack from zero to maximum lift. The most effective type of spoiler was found to be the flat type with no space between it and the wing surface. The chordwise location of such a spoiler was not critical within the range investigated, from 5 to 20 percent of the wing chord from the leading edge.

  7. Two-Dimensional Bifurcated Inlet/Engine Tests Completed in 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, John D.

    1999-01-01

    A Two-Dimensional Bifurcated (2DB) Inlet was successfully tested in NASA Lewis Research Center s 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. These tests were the culmination of a collaborative effort between the Boeing Company, General Electric, Pratt & Whitney, and Lewis. Extensive support in-house at Lewis contributed significantly to the progress and accomplishment of this test. The results, which met or exceeded many of the High-Speed Research (HSR) Program goals, were used to revise system studies within the HSR Program. The HSR Program is focused on developing low-noise, low-polluting, high-efficiency supersonic commercial aircraft. A supersonic inlet is an important component of an efficient, low-noise vehicle.

  8. Wind tunnel measurements on a full-scale F/A-18 with a tangentially blowing slot. [conducted in the Ames 80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.

    1994-01-01

    A full-scale F/A-18 was tested in the 80 by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center to measure the effectiveness of a tangentially blowing slot in generating significant yawing moments while minimizing coupling in the pitch and roll axes. Various slot configurations were tested to determine the optimum configuration. The test was conducted for angles of attack from 25 to 50 deg, angles of sideslip from -15 to +15 deg, and freestream velocities from 67 ft/sec to 168 ft/sec. By altering the forebody vortex flow, yaw control was maintained for angles of attack up to 50 deg. Of particular interest was the result that blowing very close to the radome apex was not as effective as blowing slightly farther aft on the radome, that a 16-inch slot was more efficient, and that yawing moments were generated without inducing significant rolling or pitching moments.

  9. Acoustic Quality of the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel Test Section After Installation of a Deep Acoustic Lining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Hayes, Julie A.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2002-01-01

    A recessed, 42-inch deep acoustic lining has been designed and installed in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) test section to greatly improve the acoustic quality of the facility. This report describes the test section acoustic performance as determined by a detailed static calibration-all data were acquired without wind. Global measurements of sound decay from steady noise sources showed that the facility is suitable for acoustic studies of jet noise or similar randomly generated sound. The wall sound absorption, size of the facility, and averaging effects of wide band random noise all tend to minimize interference effects from wall reflections. The decay of white noise with distance was close to free field above 250 Hz. However, tonal sound data from propellers and fans, for example, will have an error band to be described that is caused by the sensitivity of tones to even weak interference. That error band could be minimized by use of directional instruments such as phased microphone arrays. Above 10 kHz, air absorption began to dominate the sound field in the large test section, reflections became weaker, and the test section tended toward an anechoic environment as frequency increased.

  10. Analysis of F/A-18 Tail Buffet Data Acquired in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Kevin D.; Meyn, Larry A.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Tail buffet studies were conducted on a full-scale, production, F/A-18 fighter aircraft in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. Tail buffet data were acquired over an angle-of-attack range of +20 deg to +40 deg, a side-slip range of -16 deg to + 16 deg, and at wind speeds up to 100 knots. The maximum speed corresponds to a Reynolds number of l2.3 x l0(exp 6) based on mean aerodynamic chord and a Mach number of 0. 15. The port, vertical tail fin was instrumented with ninety-six surface-pressure transducers, arranged in six by eight arrays, on each side of the fin. ne aircraft was also equipped with a removable Leading-Edge Extension (LEX) fence whose purpose is to reduce tail-buffet loads. Current analysis methods for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures and loads are described. Only results for the zero side-slip condition are to be presented, both with and without the LEX fence. Results of the time-averaged, power-spectral analysis are presented for the tail fin bending moments which are derived from the integrated pressure field. Local wave velocities on the tail surfaces are calculated from pressure correlations. It was found that the LEX fence significantly reduces the magnitude of the root-mean-square pressures and bending moments. Scaling and repeatability issues are addressed by comparing the present full scale results for pressures at the 60%-span and 45%-chord location with previous full-scale F/A-18 tail-buffet test in the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel, and with several small-scale tests. The comparisons show that the tail buffet frequency scales very well with tail chord and free-stream velocity, and that there is good agreement with the previous full-scale test. Root-mean-square pressures and power spectra do not scale as well as the frequency results. Addition of a LEX fence caused tail-buffet loads to be reduced at all model scales.

  11. Acoustics Reflections of Full-Scale Rotor Noise Measurements in NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha Lydia; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Sim, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of current research is to identify the extent of acoustic time history distortions due to wind tunnel wall reflections. Acoustic measurements from the recent full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor test (Fig. 2) will be used to illustrate the quality of noise measurement in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section. Results will be compared to PSU-WOPWOP predictions obtained with and without adjustments due to sound reflections off wind tunnel walls. Present research assumes a rectangular enclosure as shown in Fig. 3a. The Method of Mirror Images7 is used to account for reflection sources and their acoustic paths by introducing mirror images of the rotor (i.e. acoustic source), at each and every wall surface, to enforce a no-flow boundary condition at the position of the physical walls (Fig. 3b). While conventional approach evaluates the "combined" noise from both the source and image rotor at a single microphone position, an alternative approach is used to simplify implementation of PSU-WOPWOP for this reflection analysis. Here, an "equivalent" microphone position is defined with respect to the source rotor for each mirror image that effectively renders the reflection analysis to be a one rotor, multiple microphones problem. This alternative approach has the advantage of allowing each individual "equivalent" microphone, representing the reflection pulse from the associated wall surface, to be adjusted by the panel absorption coefficient illustrated in Fig. 1a. Note that the presence of parallel wall surfaces requires an infinite number of mirror images (Fig. 3c) to satisfy the no-flow boundary conditions. In the present analysis, up to four mirror images (per wall surface) are accounted to achieve convergence in the predicted time histories

  12. Status and capabilities of the National Full Scale Facility 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mort, K. W.; Engelbert, D. F.; Dusterberry, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The background, requirements, and aerodynamic design of the modified NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel are reviewed, along with the systems integration and systems test results. Advancing vehicle sizes and airspeeds required a larger wind tunnel test section and a capability for 100 and 300 knots airspeed simulation. Acoustic mufflers at the inlet and exit of the nonreturn circuit provide noise suppression. The enlarged test section is intended to accomodate the complex flowfields of wings with high lift coefficients, and the drive system is designed with minimum residual swirl. Features of the fan blades are examined, along with characteristics of the test channels, control vanes and louvers, the exit, circuit losses, temperature rises during operation of the nonreturn circuit, and the facility acoustics. Specific construction problems and solutions for the conversion process are outlined, and it is noted that operational status is expected at the end of 1982.

  13. Current Background Noise Sources and Levels in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen; Soderman, Paul; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Background noise measurements were made of the acoustic environment in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements were acquired subsequent to the 40x80 Aeroacoustic Modernization Project, which was undertaken to improve the anechoic characteristics of the 40x80's closed test section as well as reduce the levels of background noise in the facility. The resulting 40x80 anechoic environment was described by Soderman et. al., and the current paper describes the resulting 40x80 background noise, discusses the sources of the noise, and draws comparisons to previous 40x80 background noise levels measurements. At low wind speeds or low frequencies, the 40x80 background noise is dominated by the fan drive system. To obtain the lowest fan drive noise for a given tunnel condition, it is possible in the 40x80 to reduce the fans' rotational speed and adjust the fans' blade pitch, as described by Schmidtz et. al. This idea is not new, but has now been operationally implemented with modifications for increased power at low rotational speeds. At low to mid-frequencies and at higher wind speeds, the dominant noise mechanism was thought to be caused by the surface interface of the previous test section floor acoustic lining. In order to reduce this noise mechanism, the new test section floor lining was designed to resist the pumping of flow in and out of the space between the grating slats required to support heavy equipment. In addition, the lining/flow interface over the entire test section was designed to be smoother and quieter than the previous design. At high wind speeds or high frequencies, the dominant source of background noise in the 40x80 is believed to be caused by the response of the in-flow microphone probes (required by the nature of the closed test section) to the fluctuations in the freestream flow. The resulting background noise levels are also different for probes of various

  14. Effect of wind and altitude on record performance in foot races, pole vault, and long jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1985-08-01

    Using only elementary physics, one can estimate the effect of wind and altitude on performance in several track and field events. Experiments have shown that the power lost to aerodynamic drag forces is about a tenth of the total power expended in running at sprint speeds. From this observation one can calculate the effect of wind or of air density changes on sprinting speed. In pole vaulting, the sprinter converts his kinetic energy into potential energy to clear the bar. In long jumping, he is a projectile, but he is prevented from reaching his optimum distance expected for his initial velocity by the height which he can attain during his jump. For each of these events, performance in moderate winds of 2.0 m/s or at altitudes comparable to Mexico City differ by several percent from performances at sea level or in still air. In longer running races and in bicycle races, aerodynamic forces play an important role in racing strategy. However, since the athletes perform in groups it is difficult to calculate the effect on individual performances.

  15. Measurements in 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel of hazard posed by lift-generated wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Sacco, J. N.; Askins, P. A.; Bisbee, L. S.; Smith, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    The large, low speed wind tunnel at NASA-Ames has been used to study the characteristics of lift-generated vortices involved in the definition of aircraft-separation criteria, in order to enhance airport capacity without compromising safety. Attention is given to the potential hazard caused by the vortex wake of several configurations of a subsonic transport. Measured downwash distributions in the wake of three different wake-generator configurations are obtained by means of a vortex-lattice method, in order to predict the lift and rolling moment on several models of wake-following aircraft.

  16. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 10-foot-diameter Gyroplane Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Bioletti, Carlton

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests on a model gyroplane rotor 10 feet in diameter. The rotor blades had zero sweepback and zero offset; the hub contained a feathering mechanism that provided control of the rotor rolling moment, but not of the pitching moment. The rotor was tested with 4 blades and with 2 blades. The entire useful range of pitch settings and tip-speed ratios was investigated including the phase of operation in which the rotor turned very slowly, or idled.

  17. Enabling Advanced Wind-Tunnel Research Methods Using the NASA Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busan, Ronald C.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Croom, Mark A.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Grafton, Sue B.; O-Neal, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Design of Experiment (DOE) testing methods were used to gather wind tunnel data characterizing the aerodynamic and propulsion forces and moments acting on a complex vehicle configuration with 10 motor-driven propellers, 9 control surfaces, a tilt wing, and a tilt tail. This paper describes the potential benefits and practical implications of using DOE methods for wind tunnel testing - with an emphasis on describing how it can affect model hardware, facility hardware, and software for control and data acquisition. With up to 23 independent variables (19 model and 2 tunnel) for some vehicle configurations, this recent test also provides an excellent example of using DOE methods to assess critical coupling effects in a reasonable timeframe for complex vehicle configurations. Results for an exploratory test using conventional angle of attack sweeps to assess aerodynamic hysteresis is summarized, and DOE results are presented for an exploratory test used to set the data sampling time for the overall test. DOE results are also shown for one production test characterizing normal force in the Cruise mode for the vehicle.

  18. Aeorodynamic characteristics of an air-exchanger system for the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Schmidt, G. I.; Meyn, L. A.; Ortner, K. R.; Holmes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A 1/50-scale model of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center was used to study various air-exchange configurations. System components were tested throughout a range of parameters, and approximate analytical relationships were derived to explain the observed characteristics. It is found that the efficiency of the air exchanger could be increased (1) by adding a shaped wall to smoothly turn the incoming air downstream, (2) by changing to a contoured door at the inlet to control the flow rate, and (3) by increasing the size of the exhaust opening. The static pressures inside the circuit then remain within the design limits at the higher tunnel speeds if the air-exchange rate is about 5% or more. Since the model is much smaller than the full-scale facility, it is not possible to completely duplicate the tunnel, and it will be necessary to measure such characteristics as flow rate and tunnel pressures during implementation of the remodeled facility. The aerodynamic loads estimated for the inlet door and for nearby walls are also presented.

  19. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  20. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Flack, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. A flow calibration test was conducted in May and June 1987. The goal of the flow calibration test was to determine detailed spatial variations in the 40- by 80-ft test section flow quality throughout the tunnel operational envelope. Data were collected for test section speeds up to 300 knots and for air exchange rates of 0, 5, and 10 percent. The tunnel performance was also calibrated during the detailed mapping of the test section flow field. Experimental results presented indicate that the flow quality in the test section, with the exception of temperature, is relatively insensitive to the level of dynamic pressure and the air exchange rate. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within + or - 0.5 deg at all test section velocities. Cross-stream temperature gradients in the test section caused by the air exchange system were documented, and a correction method was established. Streamwise static pressure variation on the centerline is about 1 percent of test section dynamic pressure over 30 ft of the test section length.

  1. A three-dimensional orthogonal laser velocimeter for the NASA Ames 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Cooper, Donald L.

    1995-01-01

    A three-component dual-beam laser-velocimeter system has been designed, fabricated, and implemented in the 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The instrument utilizes optical access from both sides and the top of the test section, and is configured for uncoupled orthogonal measurements of the three Cartesian coordinates of velocity. Bragg cell optics are used to provide fringe velocity bias. Modular system design provides great flexibility in the location of sending and receiving optics to adapt to specific experimental requirements. Near-focus Schmidt-Cassegrain optic modules may be positioned for collection of forward or backward scattered light over a large solid angle, and may be clustered to further increase collection solid angle. Multimode fiber optics transmit collected light to the photomultiplier tubes for processing. Counters are used to process the photomultiplier signals and transfer the processed data digitally via buffered interface controller to the host MS-DOS computer. Considerable data reduction and graphical display programming permit on-line control of data acquisition and evaluation of the incoming data. This paper describes this system in detail and presents sample data illustrating the system's capability.

  2. Background noise levels measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    The acoustic capability of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel has been significantly improved by reducing the background noise levels measured by in-flow microphones. This was accomplished by incorporating streamlined microphone holders having a profile developed by researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center. These new holders were fabricated for fixed mounting on the tunnel wall and for an axially traversing microphone probe which was mounted to the tunnel floor. Measured in-flow noise levels in the tunnel test section were reduced by about 10 dB with the new microphone holders compared with those measured with the older, less refined microphone holders. Wake interference patterns between fixed wall microphones were measured and resulted in preferred placement patterns for these microphones to minimize these effects. Acoustic data from a model turbofan operating in the tunnel test section showed that results for the fixed and translating microphones were equivalent for common azimuthal angles, suggesting that the translating microphone probe, with its significantly greater angular resolution, is preferred for sideline noise measurements. Fixed microphones can provide a local check on the traversing microphone data quality, and record acoustic performance at other azimuthal angles.

  3. V/STOL Tandem Fan transition section model test. [in the Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkin, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    An approximately 0.25 scale model of the transition section of a tandem fan variable cycle engine nacelle was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel. Two 12-inch, tip-turbine driven fans were used to simulate a tandem fan engine. Three testing modes simulated a V/STOL tandem fan airplane. Parallel mode has two separate propulsion streams for maximum low speed performance. A front inlet, fan, and downward vectorable nozzle forms one stream. An auxilliary top inlet provides air to the aft fan - supplying the core engine and aft vectorable nozzle. Front nozzle and top inlet closure, and removal of a blocker door separating the two streams configures the tandem fan for series mode operations as a typical aircraft propulsion system. Transition mode operation is formed by intermediate settings of the front nozzle, blocker door, and top inlet. Emphasis was on the total pressure recovery and flow distortion at the aft fan face. A range of fan flow rates were tested at tunnel airspeeds from 0 to 240 knots, and angles-of-attack from -10 to 40 deg for all three modes. In addition to the model variables for the three modes, model variants of the top inlet were tested in the parallel mode only. These lip variables were: aft lip boundary layer bleed holes, and Three position turning vane. Also a bellmouth extension of the top inlet side lips was tested in parallel mode.

  4. Direct Validation of the Wall Interference Correction System of the Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert; Boone, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Data from the test of a large semispan model was used to perform a direct validation of a wall interference correction system for a transonic slotted wall wind tunnel. At first, different sets of uncorrected aerodynamic coefficients were generated by physically changing the boundary condition of the test section walls. Then, wall interference corrections were computed and applied to all data points. Finally, an interpolation of the corrected aerodynamic coefficients was performed. This interpolation made sure that the corrected Mach number of a given run would be constant. Overall, the agreement between corresponding interpolated lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficient sets was very good. Buoyancy corrections were also investigated. These studies showed that the accuracy goal of one drag count may only be achieved if reliable estimates of the wall interference induced buoyancy correction are available during a test.

  5. Investigation in the 7-By-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators Within an Airplane Wing, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A.; Recant, Isidore G.

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional flow set-up with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included. It was found that radiators could be mounted in the wing and efficiently pass enough air for cooling with duct outlets located at any point from 0.25c to 0.70c from the wing leading edge on the upper surface. The duct-inlet position was found to be critical and, for maximum efficiency, had to be at the stagnation point of the airfoil and to change with flight attitude. The flow could be efficiently throttled only by a simultaneous variation of duct inlet and outlet sizes and of inlet position. It was desirable to round both inlet and outlet lips. With certain arrangements of duct, the power required for cooling at high speed was a very low percentage of the engine power.

  6. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    After the first attempted ground-tow tests of the M2-F1 in March 1963, the vehicle was taken to the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, for wind-tunnel testing. During these tests, Milt Thompson and others were in the M2-F1 to position the control surfaces for each test. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C

  7. A forward speed effects study on jet noise from several suppressor nozzles in the NASA/Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beulke, M. R.; Clapper, W. S.; Mccann, E. O.; Morozumi, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    A test program was conducted in a 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to evaluate the effect of relative velocity on the jet noise signature of a conical ejector, auxiliary inlet ejector, 32 spokes and 104 tube nozzle with and without an acoustically treated shroud. The freestream velocities in the wind tunnel were varied from 0 to 103.6 m/sec (300 ft/sec) for exhaust jet velocities of 259.1 m/sec (850 ft/sec) to 609.6 m/sec (2000 ft/sec). Reverberation corrections for the wind tunnel were developed and the procedure is explained. In conjunction with wind tunnel testing the nozzles were also evaluated on an outdoor test stand. The wind tunnel microphone arrays were duplicated during the outdoor testing. The data were then extrapolated for comparisons with data measured using a microphone array placed on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) arc. Using these data as a basis, farfield to nearfield arguments are presented with regards to the data measured in the wind tunnel. Finally, comparisons are presented between predictions made using existing methods and the measured data.

  8. Comparison between design and installed acoustic characteristics of NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The test section of the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel was acoustically treated to allow the measurement of sound under simulated free-field conditions. The treatment was designed for high sound absorption at frequencies above 250 Hz and for withstanding the environmental conditions in the test section. In order to achieve the design requirements, a fibrous, bulk-absorber material was packed into removable panel sections. Each section was divided into two equal-depth layers packed with material to different bulk densities. The lower density was next to the facing of the treatment. The facing consisted of a perforated plate and screening material layered together. Sample tests for normal-incidence acoustic absorption were also conducted in an impedance tube to provide data to aid in the treatment design. Tests with no airflow, involving the measurement of the absorptive properties of the treatment installed in the 9- by 15-foot wind tunnel test section, combined the use of time-delay spectrometry with a previously established free-field measurement method. This new application of time-delay spectrometry enabled these free-field measurements to be made in nonanechoic conditions. The results showed that the installed acoustic treatment had absorption coefficients greater than 0.95 over the frequency range 250 Hz to 4 kHz. The measurements in the wind tunnel were in good agreement with both the analytical prediction and the impedance tube test data.

  9. Athlete's Foot

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    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Athlete's Foot KidsHealth > For Kids > Athlete's Foot A A A ... a public shower. Why Is It Called Athlete's Foot? Athlete's foot gets its name because athletes often ...

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    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Athlete's Foot KidsHealth > For Teens > Athlete's Foot A A A ... your skin, hair, and nails. What Is Athlete's Foot? The medical name for athlete's foot is tinea ...

  11. Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing Capability Upgraded in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center supports short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) tests in its 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9 x 15 LSWT). As part of a facility capability upgrade, a dynamic actuation system (DAS) was fabricated to enhance the STOVL testing capabilities. The DAS serves as the mechanical interface between the 9 x 15 LSWT test section structure and the STOVL model to be tested. It provides vertical and horizontal translation of the model in the test section and maintains the model attitude (pitch, yaw, and roll) during translation. It also integrates a piping system to supply the model with exhaust and hot air to simulate the inlet suction and nozzle exhausts, respectively. Hot gas ingestion studies have been performed with the facility ground plane installed. The DAS provides vertical (ascent and descent) translation speeds of up to 48 in./s and horizontal translation speeds of up to 12 in./s. Model pitch variations of +/- 7, roll variations of +/- 5, and yaw variations of 0 to 180 deg can be accommodated and are maintained within 0.25 deg throughout the translation profile. The hot air supply, generated by the facility heaters and regulated by control valves, provides three separate temperature zones to the model for STOVL and hot gas ingestion testing. Channels along the supertube provide instrumentation paths from the model to the facility data system for data collection purposes. The DAS is supported by the 9 x 15 LSWT test section ceiling structure. A carriage that rides on two linear rails provides for horizontal translation of the system along the test section longitudinal axis. A vertical translation assembly, consisting of a cage and supertube, is secured to the carriage. The supertube traverses vertically through the cage on a set of linear rails. Both translation axes are hydraulically actuated and provide position and velocity profile control. The lower flange on the supertube serves as the model interface to the DAS. The

  12. Simulation investigation of the effect of the NASA Ames 80-by 120-foot wind tunnel exhaust flow on light aircraft operating in the Moffett field trafffic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streeter, Barry G.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary study of the exhaust flow from the Ames Research Center 80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel indicated that the flow might pose a hazard to low-flying light aircraft operating in the Moffett Field traffic pattern. A more extensive evaluation of the potential hazard was undertaken using a fixed-base, piloted simulation of a light, twin-engine, general-aviation aircraft. The simulated aircraft was flown through a model of the wind tunnel exhaust by pilots of varying experience levels to develop a data base of aircraft and pilot reactions. It is shown that a light aircraft would be subjected to a severe disturbance which, depending upon entry condition and pilot reaction, could result in a low-altitude stall or cause damage to the aircraft tail structure.

  13. Flow direction measurement criteria and techniques planned for the 40- by 80-/80- x 120-foot wind tunnel integrated systems tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, P. T.; Hoffmann, J.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was performed in order to develop the criteria for the selection of flow direction indicators for use in the Integrated Systems Tests (ISTs) of the 40 by 80/80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel System. The problems, requirements, and limitations of flow direction measurement in the wind tunnel were investigated. The locations and types of flow direction measurements planned in the facility were discussed. A review of current methods of flow direction measurement was made and the most suitable technique for each location was chosen. A flow direction vane for each location was chosen. A flow direction vane that employs a Hall Effect Transducer was then developed and evaluated for application during the ISTs.

  14. Results of the AFRSI rewaterproofing systems screening test in the NASA/Ames Research Center (ARC) 2 x 2-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Kingsland, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 2x2-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel to evaluate two AFRSI rewaterproofing systems and to investigate films as a means of reducing blanket joint distortion. The wind tunnel wall slot configuration influenced on the flow field over the test panel was investigated; primarily using oil flow data, and resulted in a closed slot configuration to provide a satisfactory screening environment flow field for the test. Sixteen AFRSI test panels, configured to represent the test system or film, were subjected to this screening environment (a flow field of separated and reattached flow at a freestream Mach numnber of 0.65 and q = 650 or 900 psf). Each condition was held until damage to the test article was observed or 55 minutes if no damage was incurred. All objectives related to AFRSI rewaterproofing and to the use of films to stiffen the blanket fibers were achieved.

  15. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat transfer data for the 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5, and 5.0 million.

  16. Athlete's foot

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  17. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  18. Charcot Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  19. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  20. The effect of forward speed on J85 engine noise from suppressor nozzles as measured in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect of forward speed on the exhaust noise from a conical ejector nozzle and three suppressor nozzles mounted behind a J85 engine was performed in a 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The nozzles were tested at three engine power settings and at wind tunnel forward speeds up to 91 m/sec (300 ft/sec). In addition, outdoor static tests were conducted to determine (1) the differences between near field and far field measurements, (2) the effect of an airframe on the far field directivity of each nozzle, and (3) the relative suppression of each nozzle with respect to the baseline conical ejector nozzle. It was found that corrections to near field data are necessary to extrapolate to far field data and that the presence of the airframe changed the far field directivity as measured statically. The results show that the effect of forward speed was to reduce the noise from each nozzle more in the area of peak noise, but the change in forward quadrant noise was small or negligible. A comparison of wind tunnel data with available flight test data shows good agreement.

  1. Results of pressure distribution tests of a 0.010-scale space shuttle orbiter model (61-0) in the NASA/ARC 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (test OH38), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.; Polek, T.

    1975-01-01

    Test results are presented of hypersonic pressure distributions at simulated atmospheric entry conditions. Pressure data were obtained at Mach numbers of 7.4 and 10.4 and Reynolds numbers of 3.0 and 6.5 million per foot. Data are presented in both plotted and tabulated data form. Photographs of wind tunnel apparatus and test configurations are provided.

  2. Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle configuration 3 (model 22-OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of hypersonic wind tunnel testing of an 0.0175 scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration are presented. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free-stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million, 3.7 million, 5.0 million, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

  3. Design and Development of a Deep Acoustic Lining for the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Schmitz, Fredric H.; Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Sacco, Joe N.; Mosher, Marianne; Hayes, Julie A.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this report has made effective use of design teams to build a state-of-the-art anechoic wind-tunnel facility. Many potential design solutions were evaluated using engineering analysis, and computational tools. Design alternatives were then evaluated using specially developed testing techniques, Large-scale coupon testing was then performed to develop confidence that the preferred design would meet the acoustic, aerodynamic, and structural objectives of the project. Finally, designs were frozen and the final product was installed in the wind tunnel. The result of this technically ambitious project has been the creation of a unique acoustic wind tunnel. Its large test section (39 ft x 79 ft x SO ft), potentially near-anechoic environment, and medium subsonic speed capability (M = 0.45) will support a full range of aeroacoustic testing-from rotorcraft and other vertical takeoff and landing aircraft to the take-off/landing configurations of both subsonic and supersonic transports.

  4. An analysis of sound absorbing linings for the interior of the NASA Ames 80 x 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; White, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    It is desirable to achieve low frequency sound absorption in the tests section of the NASA Ames 80X120-ft wind tunnel. However, it is difficult to obtain information regarding sound absorption characteristics of potential treatments because of the restrictions placed on the dimensions of the test chambers. In the present case measurements were made in a large enclosure for aircraft ground run-up tests. The normal impedance of the acoustic treatment was measured using two microphones located close to the surface of the treatment. The data showed reasonably good agreement with analytical methods which were then used to design treatments for the wind tunnel test section. A sound-absorbing lining is proposed for the 80X120-ft wind tunnel.

  5. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  6. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  7. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-10-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  8. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-10-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  9. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  10. Real-time computer data system for the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel facility at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambra, J. M.; Tolari, G. P.

    1975-01-01

    The background material and operational concepts of a computer-based system for an operating wind tunnel are described. An on-line real-time computer system was installed in a wind tunnel facility to gather static and dynamic data. The computer system monitored aerodynamic forces and moments of periodic and quasi-periodic functions, and displayed and plotted computed results in real time. The total system is comprised of several off-the-shelf, interconnected subsystems that are linked to a large data processing center. The system includes a central processor unit with 32,000 24-bit words of core memory, a number of standard peripherals, and several special processors; namely, a dynamic analysis subsystem, a 256-channel PCM-data subsystem and ground station, a 60-channel high-speed data acquisition subsystem, a communication link, and static force and pressure subsystems. The role of the test engineer as a vital link in the system is also described.

  11. The Real-Time Wall Interference Correction System of the NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert

    1998-01-01

    An improved version of the Wall Signature Method was developed to compute wall interference effects in three-dimensional subsonic wind tunnel testing of aircraft models in real-time. The method may be applied to a full-span or a semispan model. A simplified singularity representation of the aircraft model is used. Fuselage, support system, propulsion simulator, and separation wake volume blockage effects are represented by point sources and sinks. Lifting effects are represented by semi-infinite line doublets. The singularity representation of the test article is combined with the measurement of wind tunnel test reference conditions, wall pressure, lift force, thrust force, pitching moment, rolling moment, and pre-computed solutions of the subsonic potential equation to determine first order wall interference corrections. Second order wall interference corrections for pitching and rolling moment coefficient are also determined. A new procedure is presented that estimates a rolling moment coefficient correction for wings with non-symmetric lift distribution. Experimental data obtained during the calibration of the Ames Bipod model support system and during tests of two semispan models mounted on an image plane in the NASA Ames 12 ft. Pressure Wind Tunnel are used to demonstrate the application of the wall interference correction method.

  12. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

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  13. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Athlete's foot (tinea pedis) is a fungal infection that usually begins ... closely related to other fungal infections such as ringworm and jock itch. It can be treated with ...

  14. Foot Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  15. Investigations on an 0.030-scale space shuttle vehicle configuration 140A/B orbiter model in the Ames Research Center unitary plan 8 by 7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (0A53C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted of an 0.030 scale model of the space shuttle orbiter in a supersonic wind tunnel. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5. Reynolds numbers ranged from 0.75 million per foot to 4.00 million per foot. The objective of the test was to establish and verify longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics for the configuration 140 A/B SSV Orbiter. Six-component force and moment data, base and cavity pressures, body-flap, elevon, speedbrake, and rudder hinge moments, and vertical tail forces and moments were measured.

  16. Results of flutter test OS6 obtained using the 0.14-scale wing/elevon model (54-0) in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter wing was tested in the Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Dynamics Wind Tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and elevon buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between 0.3 and 1.1 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 54-0 was utilized for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  17. Results of flutter test OS7 obtained using the 0.14-scale space shuttle orbiter fin/rudder model number 55-0 in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter vertical tail was tested in a 16-foot transonic dynamic wind tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and rudder buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between .5 and 1.11 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 55-0 was used for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  18. The design of test-section inserts for higher speed aeroacoustic testing in the Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80- by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal was to find test-section modifications that would allow improved aeroacoustic testing at airspeeds equal to and above the current 100 knots limit. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed drives the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis led to a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open-jet test section, and a 70 x 110 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoustic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 ft test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5-ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test-section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustics studies of large helicopter models, jets and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs.

  19. A two-dimensional adaptive-wall test section with ventilated walls in the Ames 2- by 2-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Lee, George; Mcdevitt, T. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The first tests conducted in the adaptive-wall test section of the Ames Research Center's 2- by 2-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel are described. A procedure was demonstrated for reducing wall interference in transonic flow past a two-dimensional airfoil by actively controlling flow through the slotted walls of the test section. Flow through the walls was controlled by adjusting pressures in compartments of plenums above and below the test section. Wall interference was assessed by measuring (with a laser velocimeter) velocity distributions along a contour surrounding the model, and then checking those measurements for their compatibility with free-air far-field boundary conditions. Plenum pressures for minimum wall interference were determined from empirical influence coefficients. An NACA 0012 airfoil was tested at angles of attach of 0 and 2, and at Mach numbers between 0.70 and 0.85. In all cases the wall-setting procedure greatly reduced wall interference. Wall interference, however, was never completely eliminated, primarily because the effect of plenum pressure changes on the velocities along the contour could not be accurately predicted.

  20. Acoustic Performance of the GEAE UPS Research Fan in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel in 1994. The Universal Propulsion Simulator fan was designed and manufactured by General Electric Aircraft Engines, and included an active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The fan was tested with several rotors featuring unswept, forward-swept and aft-swept designs of both metal and composite construction. Sideline acoustic data were taken with both hard and acoustically treated walls in the flow passages. The fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20, which is representative of aircraft takeoff/approach conditions. All rotors showed similar aerodynamic performance. However, the composite rotors typically showed higher noise levels than did corresponding metal rotors. Aft and forward rotor sweep showed at most modest reductions of transonic multiple pure tone levels. However, rotor sweep often introduced increased rotor-stator interaction tone levels. Broadband noise was typically higher for the composite rotors and also for the aft-swept metal rotor. Transonic MPT generation was reduced with increasing fan axis angle of attack (AOA); however, higher downstream noise levels did increase with AOA resulting in higher overall Effective Perceived Noise Level.

  1. Application of a Two Camera Video Imaging System to Three-Dimensional Vortex Tracking in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Bennett, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    A description is presented of two enhancements for a two-camera, video imaging system that increase the accuracy and efficiency of the system when applied to the determination of three-dimensional locations of points along a continuous line. These enhancements increase the utility of the system when extracting quantitative data from surface and off-body flow visualizations. The first enhancement utilizes epipolar geometry to resolve the stereo "correspondence" problem. This is the problem of determining, unambiguously, corresponding points in the stereo images of objects that do not have visible reference points. The second enhancement, is a method to automatically identify and trace the core of a vortex in a digital image. This is accomplished by means of an adaptive template matching algorithm. The system was used to determine the trajectory of a vortex generated by the Leading-Edge eXtension (LEX) of a full-scale F/A-18 aircraft tested in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The system accuracy for resolving the vortex trajectories is estimated to be +/-2 inches over distance of 60 feet. Stereo images of some of the vortex trajectories are presented. The system was also used to determine the point where the LEX vortex "bursts". The vortex burst point locations are compared with those measured in small-scale tests and in flight and found to be in good agreement.

  2. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  3. Wind tunnel test of the 0.015-scale Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the Ames 6 by 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel. [to determine longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Dziubala, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental investigations were performed in a 6- by 6-Foot Supersonic wind tunnel on a 0.015-scale model of the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle (SSV) 2A orbiter. The purpose of the test was to investigate the longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of the vehicle. In addition, hinge moments were measured on the rudder and elevons. Buffet onset was investigated using wing trailing edge pressures and a strain gauge instrumented panel mounted in the wing. The model was tested through a Mach range from 0.6 to 2.0 at a constant unit Reynolds number of 2.5 million. Pitch runs were made at angles of attack from minus 2 deg to +26 deg with beta = 0 deg and 5 deg; yaw runs were made in the range from minus 5 deg to 10 deg of sideslip at angles of attack of 0 deg and 10 deg. Static pressures were measured at the fuselage base and the trailing edges of the wing and rudder. Boundary layer transition was fixed for some runs using distributed roughness strips.

  4. Aeroacoustic Study of a 26%-Scale Semispan Model of a Boeing 777 Wing in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.; Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Reinero, Bryan R.; James, Kevin D.; Arledge, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    An acoustic and aerodynamic study was made of a 26%-scale unpowered Boeing 777 aircraft semispan model in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for the purpose of identifying and attenuating airframe noise sources. Simulated approach and landing configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.12 and 0.24. Cruise configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.24 and 0.33. The research team used two Ames phased-microphone arrays, a large fixed array and a small traversing array, mounted under the wing to locate and compare various noise sources in the wing high-lift system and landing gear. Numerous model modifications and noise alleviation devices were evaluated. Simultaneous with acoustic measurements, aerodynamic forces were recorded to document aircraft conditions and any performance changes caused by the geometric modifications. Numerous airframe noise sources were identified that might be important factors in the approach and landing noise of the full-scale aircraft. Several noise-control devices were applied to each noise source. The devices were chosen to manipulate and control, if possible, the flow around the various tips and through the various gaps of the high-lift system so as to minimize the noise generation. Fences, fairings, tip extensions, cove fillers, vortex generators, hole coverings, and boundary-layer trips were tested. In many cases, the noise-control devices eliminated noise from some sources at specific frequencies. When scaled to full-scale third-octave bands, typical noise reductions ranged from 1 to 10 dB without significant aerodynamic performance loss.

  5. The design of test-section inserts for higher speed aeroacoustic testing in the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal was to find test-section modifications that would allow improved aeroacoustic testing at airspeeds equal to and above the current 100 knots limit. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed drives the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis led to a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open-jet test section, and a 70 x 110 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoustic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 ft test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5-ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test-section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustics studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers.

  6. 2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SETTLING CHAMBER OF 8FOOT HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SETTLING CHAMBER OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. Jet Lowe, HAER Photographer, December 1995. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  7. Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain begin after intense physical activity?YesNoDid your foot pain or swelling begin with an injury or accident?YesNoIs there swelling or redness on top of your foot?YesNoAre you unable to stand or walk on ...

  8. Reentry aerodynamic characteristics of a space shuttle solid rocket booster (MSFC model 454) at high angles of attack and high Mach number in the NASA/Langley four-foot unitary plan wind tunnel (SA25F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Braddock, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A force test of a 2.112 percent scale Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), MSFC Model 454, was conducted in test section no. 2 of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Sixteen (16) runs (pitch polars) were performed over an angle of attack range from 144 through 179 degrees. Test Mach numbers were 2.30, 2.70, 2.96, 3.48, 4.00 and 4.63. The first three Mach numbers had a test Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot. The remaining three were at 2.0 million per foot. The model was tested in the following configurations: (1) SRB without external protuberances, and (2) SRB with an electrical tunnel and a SRB/ET thrust attachment structure. Schlieren photographs were taken during the testing of the first configuration. The second configuration was tested at roll angles of 45, 90, and 135 degrees.

  9. Results of a FRSI material test under Space Shuttle ascent conditions in the Ames Research Center 9x7 foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS13). Space Shuttle aerothermodynamic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, P. L.; Collette, J. G. R.

    1992-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/ARC 9 x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to verify the integrity of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) material in a panel flutter environment. A FRSI sample panel was subjected to the shocks, pressure gradients, and turbulence characteristics encountered at dynamic pressure 1.5 times the 3(sigma) dispersed trajectory flight conditions of the Space Shuttle. Static and fluctuating pressure data were obtained for Mach numbers ranging from 1.55 to 2.5 with dynamic pressures of 625 to 1250 psf. The FRSI panel suffered no appreciable damage as a result of the test.

  10. Results of a FRSI material test under Space Shuttle ascent conditions in the Ames Research Center 9x7 foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS13). Space Shuttle aerothermodynamic data report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, P. L.; Collette, J. G. R.

    1992-07-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/ARC 9 x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to verify the integrity of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) material in a panel flutter environment. A FRSI sample panel was subjected to the shocks, pressure gradients, and turbulence characteristics encountered at dynamic pressure 1.5 times the 3(sigma) dispersed trajectory flight conditions of the Space Shuttle. Static and fluctuating pressure data were obtained for Mach numbers ranging from 1.55 to 2.5 with dynamic pressures of 625 to 1250 psf. The FRSI panel suffered no appreciable damage as a result of the test.

  11. Hot gas ingestion test results of a two-poster vectored thrust concept with flow visualization in the NASA Lewis 9- x 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Neiner, George; Bencic, Timothy J.; Flood, Joseph D.; Amuedo, Kurt C.; Strock, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    A 9.2 percent scale Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) hot gas ingestion model was designed and built by McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MCAIR) and tested in the Lewis Research Center 9 x 15 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Hot gas ingestion, the entrainment of heated engine exhaust into the inlet flow field, is a key development issure for advanced short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft. Flow visualization from the Phase 1 test program, which evaluated the hot ingestion phenomena and control techniques, is covered. The Phase 2 test program evaluated the hot gas ingestion phenomena at higher temperatures and used a laser sheet to investigate the flow field. Hot gas ingestion levels were measured for the several forward nozzle splay configurations and with flow control/life improvement devices (LIDs) which reduced the hot gas ingestion. The model support system had four degrees of freedom - pitch, roll, yaw, and vertical height variation. The model support system also provided heated high-pressure air for nozzle flow and a suction system exhaust for inlet flow. The test was conducted at full scale nozzle pressure ratios and inlet Mach numbers. Test and data analysis results from Phase 2 and flow visualization from both Phase 1 and 2 are documented. A description of the model and facility modifications is also provided. Headwind velocity was varied from 10 to 23 kn. Results are presented over a range of nozzle pressure ratios at a 10 kn headwind velocity. The Phase 2 program was conducted at exhaust nozzle temperatures up to 1460 R and utilized a sheet laser system for flow visualization of the model flow field in and out of ground effects. The results reported are for nozzle exhaust temperatures up to 1160 R. These results will contain the compressor face pressure and temperature distortions, the total pressure recovery, the inlet temperature rise, and the environmental effects of the hot gas. The environmental effects include the ground plane contours

  12. Large-scale aeroacoustic research feasibility and conceptual design of test-section inserts for the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olsen, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80 by 120 foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The advantages and disadvantages of likely designs were analyzed. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed leads to the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis indicated a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open jet test section, and a 70 x 100 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining, respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoutic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5 ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustic studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. In all designs studied, the existing structure would have to be reinforced. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers. The larger size of the facility would make installation and removal of the insert components difficult. Consequently, scheduling of the existing 80 x 120 aerodynamic test section and scheduling of the open-jet test section would likely be made on an

  13. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... be advised by a podiatrist, depending on your test results or a specific medical condition. Postoperative Care The type of foot surgery performed determines the length and kind of aftercare required ...

  14. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... The fungus most commonly attacks the feet because shoes create a warm, dark, and humid environment which ... sweat mechanism, reaction to dyes or adhesives in shoes, eczema, and psoriasis, may mimic athlete's foot. Causes ...

  15. Aeroheating (pressure) characteristics on a 0.10-scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration (26-OTS) in the Langley Research Center 4-foot wind tunnel (IH4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests, conducted at the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, are presented. The model tested was an 0.010-scale version of the Vehicle 3 Space Shuttle Configuration. Pressure measurements were made on the launch configuration, Orbiter alone, external tank alone, and solid rocket booster alone, to provide heat transfer pressure data. The tests were conducted for a Mach number range from 2.36 to 4.6 and Reynolds number range from 1.2 to 5 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -10 to 20 deg for a sideslip angle range from -5 to +5 deg, and at sideslip angles from -5 to 48 deg for 0 deg angle of attack. Tabulated data are given and photographs of the test configuration are shown.

  16. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  17. Cavus Foot (High-Arched Foot)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  18. Foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Lockard, M A

    1988-12-01

    This review article describes shoe inserts and provides information to assist physical therapists to identify patients who may benefit from foot orthoses. The article discusses goals for and types of shoe inserts, in addition to the materials and methods that can be used in fabricating appliances. Clinical considerations for the use of shoe inserts and application to specific patient populations are presented.

  19. Diabetic Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel a cut, a blister or a sore. Foot injuries such as these can cause ulcers and infections. Serious cases may even lead to amputation. Damage to the blood vessels can also mean that your feet do not get enough blood and oxygen. It ...

  20. Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the best ways to exercise and keep fit. Structure of the Foot Each of your feet contains 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 120 muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. These all work together to support the weight of your body, act as shock ...

  1. 6. VIEW OF FIVEFOOT WIND TUNNEL WITH AIR STRAIGHTENER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF FIVE-FOOT WIND TUNNEL WITH AIR STRAIGHTENER AND OPERATOR STATION IN FOREGROUND (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 19, Five-Foot Wind Tunnel, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Control panel below the test section of the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST). Authorized July 17, 1933, construction of the 8-Foot HST was paid for with funds from the Federal Public Works Administration. Manly Hood and Russell Robinson designed the unusual facility which could produce a 500 mph wind stream across an 8-Foot test section. The concrete shell was not part of the original design. Like most projects funded through New Deal programs, the PWA restricted the amount of money which could be spent on materials. The majority of funds were supposed to be expended on labor. Though originally, Hood and Robinson had planned a welded steel pressure vessel around the test section, PWA officials proposed the idea of concrete. This picture shows the test section inside the igloo-like structure with walls of 1-foot thick reinforced concrete. The thick walls were needed 'because of the Bernoulli effect, [which meant that] the text chamber had to withstand powerful, inwardly directed pressure. Operating personnel located inside the igloo were subjected to pressures equivalent to 10,000-foot altitude and had to wear oxygen masks and enter through airlocks. A heat exchanger removed the large quantities of heat generated by the big fan.'

  3. Ceramic and coating applications in the hostile environment of a high temperature hypersonic wind tunnel. [Langley 8-foot high temperature structures tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.; Karns, J. R.; Vasquez, P.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    A Mach 7, blowdown wind tunnel was used to investigate aerothermal structural phenomena on large to full scale high speed vehicle components. The high energy test medium, which provided a true temperature simulation of hypersonic flow at 24 to 40 km altitude, was generated by the combustion of methane with air at high pressures. Since the wind tunnel, as well as the models, must be protected from thermally induced damage, ceramics and coatings were used extensively. Coatings were used both to protect various wind tunnel components and to improve the quality of the test stream. Planned modifications for the wind tunnel included more extensive use of ceramics in order to minimize the number of active cooling systems and thus minimize the inherent operational unreliability and cost that accompanies such systems. Use of nonintrusive data acquisition techniques, such as infrared radiometry, allowed more widespread use of ceramics for models to be tested in high energy wind tunnels.

  4. Initial Assessment of Acoustic Source Visibility with a 24-Element Microphone Array in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of background noise were recently obtained with a 24-element phased microphone array in the test section of the Arnold Engineering Development Center 80- by120-Foot Wind Tunnel at speeds of 50 to 100 knots (27.5 to 51.4 m/s). The array was mounted in an aerodynamic fairing positioned with array center 1.2m from the floor and 16 m from the tunnel centerline, The array plate was mounted flush with the fairing surface as well as recessed in. (1.27 cm) behind a porous Kevlar screen. Wind-off speaker measurements were also acquired every 15 on a 10 m semicircular arc to assess directional resolution of the array with various processing algorithms, and to estimate minimum detectable source strengths for future wind tunnel aeroacoustic studies. The dominant background noise of the facility is from the six drive fans downstream of the test section and first set of turning vanes. Directional array response and processing methods such as background-noise cross-spectral-matrix subtraction suggest that sources 10-15 dB weaker than the background can be detected.

  5. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Control panel below the test section of the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST). Authorized July 17, 1933, construction of the 8-Foot HST was paid for with funds from the Federal Public Works Administration. Manly Hood and Russell Robinson designed the unusual facility which could produce a 500 mph wind stream across an 8-Foot test section. The concrete shell was not part of the original design. Like most projects funded through New Deal programs, the PWA restricted the amount of money which could be spent on materials. The majority of funds were supposed to be expended on labor. Though originally, Hood and Robinson had planned a welded steel pressure vessel around the test section, PWA officials proposed the idea of concrete. This picture shows the test section inside the igloo-like structure with walls of 1-foot thick reinforced concrete. The thick walls were needed 'because of the Bernoulli effect, [which meant that] the text chamber had to withstand powerful, inwardly directed pressure. Operating personnel located inside the igloo were subjected to pressures equivalent to 10,000-foot altitude and had to wear oxygen masks and enter through airlocks. A heat exchanger removed the large quantities of heat generated by the big fan.'

  6. Development of a laser velocimeter for a large transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greissing, J. P.; Whipple, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    On a 8 x 6 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel a laser velocimeter was utilized in the testing of advanced high speed turbopropellers. The system, using a 15-W argon-ion laser, a 3-beam 2-axis transmitting-receiving optics package, a zoom lens with 1- to 4-m focal lengths, and a 0.4-m corner mirror was initially assembled and tested in the checkout room. During the time the system was located in the checkout area, experience was acquired in the alignment and operation of the system and the data acquisition system and software were developed. By using air jets to simulate tunnel air flow, the system worked quite well. However, problems with beam alignment arose because of reduced atmospheric pressure. Mounting the laser into a vessel maintained at atmospheric pressure with deflectors mounted to the external walls improved operation for about 2 hours before misalignment reoccurred. The system was remounted to the positioning platform in an enclosure that provides both thermal and acoustic isolation.

  7. Results of tests OA63 and IA29 on an 0.015 scale model of the space shuttle configuration 140 A/B in the NASA/ARC 6- by 6-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. H.; Thornton, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA/ARC 6- by 6-foot transonic wind tunnel from September 12 to September 28, 1973 on an 0.015-scale model of the space shuttle configuration 140 A/B. Surface pressure data were obtained for the orbiter for both launch and entry configuration at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.0. The surface pressures were obtained in the vicinity of the cargo bay door hinge and parting lines, the side of the fuselage at the crew compartment and below the OMS pods at the aft compartment. Data were obtained at angles of attack and sideslip consistent with the expected divergencies along the nominal trajectory. These tests were first in a series of tests supporting the orbiter venting analysis. The series will include tests in three facilities covering a total Mach number range from 0.6 to 10.4.

  8. Results of test IA137 in the NASA/ARC 14 foot transonic wind tunnel of the 0.07 scale external tank forebody (model 68-T) to determine auxiliary aerodynamic data system feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a 14 foot transonic wind tunnel to examine the feasibility of the auxiliary aerodynamic data system (AADS) for determining angles of attack and sideslip during boost flight. The model used was a 0.07 scale replica of the external tank forebody consisting of the nose portion and a 60 inch (full scale) cylindrical section of the ogive cylinder tangency point. The model terminated in a blunt base with a 320.0 inch diameter at external tank (ET) station 1120.37. Pressure data were obtained from five pressure orifices (one total and four statics) on the nose probe, and sixteen surface static pressure orifices along the ET forebody.

  9. Investigation of space shuttle vehicle 140C configuration orbiter (model 16-0) wheel well pressure loads in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11 foot wind tunnel (OA143)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a sting mounted .0405-scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter configuration in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11.00 foot low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to define the orbiter wheel well pressure loading and its effects on landing gear thermal insulation and to investigate the pressure environment experienced by both the horizontal flight nose probe and air vent door probes. Steady state and dynamic pressure values were recorded in the orbiter nose gear well, left main landing gear well, horizontal flight nose probe, and both left and right air vent door probe. All steady state pressure levels were measured by Statham differential pressure transducers while dynamic pressure levels were recorded by Kulite high frequency response pressure sensors.

  10. Heat-transfer test results for a .0275-scale space shuttle external tank with a 10 deg/40 deg double cone-ogive nose in the NASA/AMES 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (FH14), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    A .0275 scale forebody model of the new baseline configuration of the space shuttle external tank vent cap configuration was tested to determine the flow field due to the double cone configuration. The tests were conducted in a 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel at alpha = -5 deg, -4.59 deg, 0 deg, 5 deg, and 10 deg; beta = 0 deg, -3 deg, -5.51 deg, -6 deg, -9 deg, and +6 deg; nominal freestream Reynolds numbers per foot of 1.5 x 1 million, 3.0 x 1 million, and 5.0 x 1 million; and a nominal Mach number of 5. Separation and reattached flow from thermocouple data, shadowgraphs, and oil flows indicate that separation begins about 80% from the tip of the 10 deg cone, then reattaches on the vent cap and produces fully turbulent flow over most of the model forebody. The hardware disturbs the flow over a much larger area than present TPS application has assumed. A correction to the flow disturbance was experimentally suggested from the results of an additional test run.

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale semispan model with a swept wing and an augmented jet flap with hypermixing nozzles. [Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.; Falarski, M. D.; Koenin, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the augmentor wing concept with hypermixing primary nozzles were investigated. A large-scale semispan model in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility was used. The trailing edge, augmentor flap system occupied 65% of the span and consisted of two fixed pivot flaps. The nozzle system consisted of hypermixing, lobe primary nozzles, and BLC slot nozzles at the forward inlet, both sides and ends of the throat, and at the aft flap. The entire wing leading edge was fitted with a 10% chord slat and a blowing slot. Outboard of the flap was a blown aileron. The model was tested statically and at forward speed. Primary parameters and their ranges included angle of attack from -12 to 32 degrees, flap angles of 20, 30, 45, 60 and 70 degrees, and deflection and diffuser area ratios from 1.16 to 2.22. Thrust coefficients ranged from 0 to 2.73, while nozzle pressure ratios varied from 1.0 to 2.34. Reynolds number per foot varied from 0 to 1.4 million. Analysis of the data indicated a maximum static, gross augmentation of 1.53 at a flap angle of 45 degrees. Analysis also indicated that the configuration was an efficient powered lift device and that the net thrust was comparable with augmentor wings of similar static performance. Performance at forward speed was best at a diffuser area ratio of 1.37.

  12. Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle: Configuration 3 (model 22 OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    The model tested was an 0.0175-scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster (SRB) alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5, 3.7, 5.0, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

  13. Flight effects on noise by the JT8D engine with inverted primary/fan flow as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strout, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    A JT8D-17R engine with inverted primary and fan flows was tested under static conditions as well as in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel to determine static and flight noise characteristics, and flow profile of a large scale engine. Test and analysis techniques developed by a previous model and JT8D engine test program were used to determine the in-flight noise. The engine with inverted flow was tested with a conical nozzle and with a plug nozzle, 20 lobe nozzle, and an acoustic shield. Wind tunnel results show that forward velocity causes significant reduction in peak PNL suppression relative to uninverted flow. The loss of EPNL suppression is relatively modest. The in-flight peak PNL suppression of the inverter with conical nozzle was 2.5 PNdb relative to a static value of 5.5 PNdb. The corresponding EPNL suppression was 4.0 EPNdb for flight and 5.0 EPNdb for static operation. The highest in-flight EPNL suppression was 7.5 EPNdb obtained by the inverter with 20 lobe nozzle and acoustic shield. When compared with the JT8D engine with internal mixer, the inverted flow configuration provides more EPNL suppression under both static and flight conditions.

  14. Results of tests to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of two potential aeromaneuvering orbit-to-orbit shuttle (AMOOS) vehicle configurations in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketter, F. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An aerodynamic wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC) 3.5-foot hypersonic facility to provide data for use in obtaining experimental force and static stability characteristics of two potential aeromaneuvering orbit-to-orbit shuttle (AMOOS) vehicle configurations. The experimental data were compared with the aerodynamic characteristics estimated using Newtonian theory, thus establishing the usefulness of these predictions. The candidate AMOOS configurations selected for the wind tunnel tests were the AMOOS 5B and HB configurations. Two flap configurations were tested for each candidate - a forward or compression surface flap and an aft or expansion flap. Photographs and sketches of the two configurations with different control surfaces are shown. It was determined that Newtonian theory generally predicted the aerodynamics of the 5B configuration with acceptable accuracy for all expansion flap deflections and for compression flap deflections less than or equal to 10 degrees. Flow separation upstream of large compression flap deflections was detected from the experimental data.

  15. World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA's National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex, which houses two of the world's largest wind tunnels and has been used for testing experimental aircraft since 1944, is presented. This video highlights the structure and instrumentation of the 40 x 80 foot and 80 x 120 foot wind tunnels and documents their use in testing full scale aircraft, NASA's Space Shuttle and the XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft.

  16. Wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of symmetrically deflected ailerons of the F-8C airplane. [conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J.

    1977-01-01

    A .042-scale model of the F-8C airplane was investigated in a transonic wind tunnel at high subsonic Mach numbers and a range of angles of attack between-3 and 20 degrees. The effect of symmetrically deflected ailerons on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics was measured. Some data were also obtained on the lateral control effectiveness of asymmetrically deflected horizontal tail surfaces.

  17. Results of a M = 5.3 heat transfer test of the integrated vehicle using phase-change paint techniques on the 0.0175-scale model 56-OTS in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to obtain supersonic heat-distribution data in areas between the orbiter and external tank using phase-change paint techniques. The tests used Novamide SSV Model 56-OTS in the first and second-stage ascent configurations. Data were obtained at a nominal Mach number of 5.3 and a Reynolds number per foot of 5 x 10 to the 6th power with angles of attack of 0 deg, +/- 5 deg, and sideslip angles of 0 deg and +/- 5 deg.

  18. Investigation of the Flying Mock-Up of Consolidated Vultee XP-92 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, David

    1948-01-01

    This report contains the results of the wind tunnel investigation of the pressure distribution on the flying mock-up of the Consolidated Vultee XP-92 airplane. Data are presented for the pressure distribution over the wing, vertical tail and the fuselage, and for the pressure loss and rate of flow through the ducted fuselage. Data are also presented for the calibration of two airspeed indicators, and for the calibration of angle-of-attack and sideslip-angle indicator vanes.

  19. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow base line and suppressor nozzles. Summary report. [conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to study the near- and far-field jet noise characteristics of six baseline and suppressor nozzles. Static and wind-on noise source locations were determined. A technique for extrapolating near field jet noise measurements into the far field was established. It was determined if flight effects measured in the near field are the same as those in the far field. The flight effects on the jet noise levels of the baseline and suppressor nozzles were determined. Test models included a 15.24-cm round convergent nozzle, an annular nozzle with and without ejector, a 20-lobe nozzle with and without ejector, and a 57-tube nozzle with lined ejector. The static free-field test in the anechoic chamber covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K. The wind tunnel flight effects test repeated these nozzle test conditions with ambient velocities of 0 to 92 m/s.

  20. An Investigation of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Pressure-Distribution Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; James, Harry A.

    1948-01-01

    Pressure measurements were made during wind-tunnel tests of the McDonnell XP-85 parasite fighter. Static-pressure orifices were located over the fuselage nose, over the canopy, along the wing root, and along the upper and lower stabilizer roots. A total-pressure and static-pressure rake was located in the turbojet engine air-intake duct. It was installed at the station where the compressor face would be located. Pressure data were obtained for two airplane conditions, clean and with skyhook extended, through a range of angle of attack and a range of yaw.

  1. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  2. Investigation of airborne foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission during low-wind conditions in the early phase of the UK 2001 epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Alexandersen, S.; Astrup, P.; Champion, H. J.; Donaldson, A. I.; Dunkerley, F. N.; Gloster, J.; Sørensen, J. H.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    2003-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed domesticated and wild animals. The highly contagious nature of FMD is a reflection of the wide range of host species, the enormous quantities of virus liberated by infected animals, the range of excretions and secretions which can be infectious, the stability of the virus in the environment, the multiplicity of routes of infection and the very small doses of the virus that can initiate infection. One of the mechanisms of spread is the carriage of droplets and droplet nuclei exhaled in the breath of infected animals. Such spread can be rapid and extensive, and it is known in certain circumstances to have transmitted disease over a distance of several hundred kilometres. During the 2001 FMD epidemic in the United Kingdom (UK), atmospheric dispersion models were applied in real time in order to assess the potential for atmospheric dispersion of the disease. The operational value of such modelling is primarily to identify premises which may have been exposed so that the human resources for surveillance and disease control purposes are employed most effectively.

    The paper describes the combined modelling techniques and presents the results obtained of detailed analyses performed during the early stages of the UK 2001 epidemic. This paper investigates the potential for disease spread in relation to two outbreaks (Burnside Farm, Heddon-on-the-Wall and Prestwick Hall Farm, Ponteland, Northumberland). A separate paper (Gloster et al., 2002) provides a more detailed analysis of the airborne disease transmission in the vicinity of Burnside Farm.

    The combined results are consistent with airborne transmission of disease to livestock in the Heddon-on-the-Wall area. Local topography may have played a significant role in influencing the pattern of disease spread.

  3. Investigation of airborne foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission during low-wind conditions in the early phase of the UK 2001 epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Alexandersen, S.; Astrup, P.; Champion, H. J.; Donaldson, A. I.; Dunkerley, F. N.; Gloster, J.; Sørensen, J. H.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    2003-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed domesticated and wild animals. The highly contagious nature of FMD is a reflection of the wide range of host species, the enormous quantities of virus liberated by infected animals, the range of excretions and secretions which can be infectious, the stability of the virus in the environment, the multiplicity of routes of infection and the very small doses of the virus that can initiate infection. One of the mechanisms of spread is the carriage of droplets and droplet nuclei exhaled in the breath of infected animals. Such spread can be rapid and extensive, and it is known in certain circumstances to have transmitted disease over a distance of several hundred kilometres. During the 2001 FMD epidemic in the United Kingdom (UK), atmospheric dispersion models were applied in real time in order to assess the potential for atmospheric dispersion of the disease. The operational value of such modelling is primarily to identify premises which may have been exposed so that the human resources for surveillance and disease control purposes are employed most effectively. The paper describes the combined modelling techniques and presents the results obtained of detailed analyses performed during the early stages of the UK 2001 epidemic. This paper investigates the potential for disease spread in relation to two outbreaks (Burnside Farm, Heddon-on-the-Wall and Prestwick Hall Farm, Ponteland, Northumberland). A separate paper (Gloster et al., 2002) provides a more detailed analysis of the airborne disease transmission in the vicinity of Burnside Farm. The combined results are consistent with airborne transmission of disease to livestock in the Heddon-on-the Wall area. Local topography may have played a significant role in influencing the pattern of disease spread.

  4. 14. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  5. 13. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  6. Space Shuttle AFRSI OMS pod environment test using model 81-0 test fixture in the Ames Research Center 9x7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS-314A/B/C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 9x7-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to help resolve an anomaly that developed during the STS-6 orbiter flight wherein sections of the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) covering the OMS pods suffered some damage. A one-third scale two-dimensional shell structure model of an OMS pod cross-section was employed to support the test articles. These consisted of 15 AFRSI blanket panels form-fitted over the shell structures for exposure to simulated flight conditions. Of six baseline blankets, two were treated with special surface coatings. Two other panels were configured with AFRSI sections removed from the OV099 orbiter vehicle after the STS-6 flight. Seven additional specimens incorporated alternative designs and repairs. Following a series of surface pressure calibration runs, the specimens were exposed to simulated ascent and entry dynamic pressure profiles. Entry conditions included the use of a vortex generator to evaluate the effect of shed vortices on the AFRSI located in the area of concern.

  7. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  8. Wind tunnel investigation of an all flush orifice air data system for a large subsonic aircraft. [conducted in a Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Flechner, S. G.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel investigation on an all flush orifice air data system for use on a KC-135A aircraft are presented. The investigation was performed to determine the applicability of fixed all flush orifice air data systems that use only aircraft surfaces for orifices on the nose of the model (in a configuration similar to that of the shuttle entry air data system) provided the measurements required for the determination of stagnation pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. For the measurement of static pressure, additional flush orifices in positions on the sides of the fuselage corresponding to those in a standard pitot-static system were required. An acceptable but less accurate system, consisting of orifices only on the nose of the model, is defined and discussed.

  9. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  10. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... work and the pounding their feet endure from... Foot Injuries in Olympic Athletes and Beyond Foot and ankle ... making them... Athletes Living with Diabetes Face More Foot Injuries Than Athletes Without Foot and ankle injuries are ...

  11. Prevention of foot blisters.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Foot blisters are the most common medical problem faced by Soldiers during foot march operations and, if untreated, they can lead to infection. Foot blisters are caused by boots rubbing on the foot (frictional forces), which separates skin layers and allows fluid to seep in. Blisters can be prevented by wearing properly sized boots, conditioning feet through regular road marching, wearing socks that reduce reduce friction and moisture, and possibly applying antiperspirants to the feet.

  12. Wind tunnel test of the 0.019 (2A configuration) jet plume space shuttle integrated vehicle in the ARC 9- by 7-foot unitary wind tunnel (IA12B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The wind tunnel test of the 0.019 jet plume space shuttle integrated vehicle in the Ames 9 ft by 7 ft unitary wind tunnel was conducted at Mach numbers of 1.55 and 2.0 over a Reynolds number range from 3.5 million to 4.1 million/ft. Data were obtained at angles of attack from minus 8 deg to plus 8 deg at 0 deg sideslip and at angles of sideslip from minus 9 deg to plus 8 deg at 0 deg angle of attack. The basic configuration tested was the 2A vehicle with the orbiter at 0 deg angle of incidence with respect to the external tank. The other deviations to the 2A configuration were the solid rocket motor shrouds, which were designed to vehicle '3' lines, and the tank nose, which consisted of the retro-package being removed and replaced by a 16.5 inch full scale radius nose.

  13. Cavus Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The ... reduce other injuries such as repeated ankle sprains and broken bones. ...

  14. Foot sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... or weeks after your injury: Rest. Stop any physical activity that causes pain, and keep your foot still when possible. Ice your foot for 20 minutes 2 to 3 times a day. DO NOT apply ice directly to your skin. Keep your foot raised to help keep swelling ...

  15. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Semi-automatic readout equipment installed in the 1950s used for data recording and reduction in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST). A 1957 NACA report on wind tunnel facilities at Langley included these comments on the data recording and reduction equipment for the 8-foot HST: 'The data recording and reduction equipment used for handling steady force and pressure information at the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is similar to that described for the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. Very little dynamic data recording equipment, however, is available.' The description of the 16-foot transonic tunnel equipment is as follows: 'A semiautomatic force data readout system provides tabulated raw data and punch card storage of raw data concurrent with the operation of the wind tunnel. Provision is made for 12 automatic channels of strain gage-data output, and eight channels of four-digit manually operated inputs are available for tabulating and punching constants, configuration codes, and other information necessary for data reduction and identification. The data are then processed on electronic computing machines to obtain the desired coefficients. These coefficients and their proper identification are then machine tabulated to provide a printed record of the results. The punched cards may also be fed into an automatic plotting device for the preparation of plots necessary for data analysis.'

  16. [Foot reflex zone massage].

    PubMed

    Kesselring, A

    1994-01-01

    Foot reflexology is defined as massage of zones on the feet which correspond to different parts of the body. A medline-search yielded no literature in the field of foot reflexology. Indications for and results of foot reflexology have been extrapolated from case-descriptions and two pilot studies with small samples. One study (Lafuente et al.) found foot reflexology to be as helpful to patients with headaches as medication (flunarizine), yet foot reflexology was fraught with less side-effects than medication. In a second study (Eichelberger et al.) foot reflexology was used postoperatively on gynecological patients. The intervention group showed a lesser need for medication to enhance bladder tonus than did the control group. The literature describes foot reflexology as enhancing urination, bowel movements and relaxation.

  17. SKITTER foot design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Gene; Jones, David L.; Morris, James; Parham, Martin; Stephens, Jim; Yancey, Gregg

    1987-01-01

    A mechanical design team was formed to design a foot for the lunar utility vehicle SKITTER. The primary design was constrained to be a ski pole design compatible with the existing femur-tibia design legs. The lunar environment had several important effects on the foot design. Three materials were investigated for the SKITTER foot: aluminum alloys, cold worked stainless steel alloys, and titanium alloys. Thin film coatings were investigated as a method of wear reduction for the foot. The performance of the foot is dependent on the action of the legs. The range of motion for the legs was determined to be vertical to 15 degrees above horizontal. An impact analysis was performed for the foot movement, but the results were determined to be inconclusive due to unknown soil parameters. The initial foot design configuration consisted of an annulus attached to the pointed pole. The annulus was designed to prevent excess sinkage. Later designs call for a conical shaped foot with a disk at the point of the tibia attachment. The conical design was analyzed for strength and deflection by two different approaches. A deformable body analysis was performed for the foot under crane load in crane position, and also under actuator load in the vertical position. In both cases, the deflection of the foot was insignificant and the stresses well below the strength of the titanium alloy.

  18. Airloads investigation of an 0.030-scale model of the space shuttle vehicle 140A/B launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the arc 11-foot unitary plan wind tunnel for Mach range 0.6 to 1.4 (IA14A), Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on an 0.030-scale launch configuration model of the space shuttle vehicle 140A/B in the NASA/ARC 11-foot unitary plan wind tunnel are presented. Aerodynamic loads data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Surface pressure distributions were obtained simultaneously with six-component stability and control force data on the complete launch configuration. The configuration consisted of the orbiter, an external tank, two solid rocket boosters, and associated intercomponent attach hardware. Angles of attack and sideslip from -10 degrees to +10 degrees were investigated.

  19. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  20. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  1. Foot Push-Up Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  2. 6. CLOSEUP VIEW OF TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. Construction of Foundation for 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Completed foundation for the outer housing for the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000.

  4. Chronic laminitis: foot management.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Scott

    2010-08-01

    Laminitis is a disease of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx, which can advance to the chronic stage with varying degrees of structural failure. Because the disease may ultimately lead to mechanical failure of the digit, a foot management plan is required to effectively and mechanically treat these cases. Many laminitis cases can be successfully rehabilitated back to athletic soundness, light use, breeding, or pasture soundness, whereas others suffer from permanent instability and never enjoy an acceptable level of comfort. To understand how to minimize damage in the acute laminitic foot or rehabilitate the chronic laminitic foot, the veterinarian should have an understanding of the normal supporting structures of the digit, the biomechanical forces acting on the foot, and the structural failure that results when these otherwise normal forces act on a diseased, damaged foot.

  5. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  6. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat-transfer data for the 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 3 are presented, and interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of the orbiter. The test program was conducted at Mach 5.3 for nominal free-stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1,500,000 and 5,000,000.

  7. Foot amputation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foot. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... of amputations. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  8. Foot pain causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 58. LeCursi N. Sports shoes and orthoses. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... Ligamentous Injuries of the Foot and Ankle. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  9. The Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the principles of good foot care. If time for teaching is limited, this task must be delegated to a podiatrist or a diabetes nurse educator in a diabetes day centre. It is the physician's responsibility to confirm foot care by personal inspection of the feet of all diabetic patients at every visit. PMID:21234002

  10. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographic (English) Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies) Diabetic Kidney Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems Diabetic ... time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy , that can cause tingling and pain, and can ...

  11. The UMass wind furnace blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromack, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description of the wind furnace concept is presented along with some preliminary performance data. Particular emphasis is placed on the design, construction, and manufacturing procedure for the 32.5 foot diameter GRP blades.

  12. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Interior view of the slotted throat test section installed in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) in 1950. The slotted region is about 160 inches in length. In this photograph, the sting-type model support is seen straight on. In a NASA report, the test section is described as follows: 'The test section of the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is dodecagonal in cross section and has a cross-sectional area of about 43 square feet. Longitudinal slots are located between each of the 12 wall panels to allow continuous operation through the transonic speed range. The slots contain about 11 percent of the total periphery of the test section. Six of the twelve panels have windows in them to allow for schlieren observations. The entire test section is enclosed in a hemispherical shaped chamber.' John Becker noted that the tunnel's 'final achievement was the development and use in routine operations of the first transonic slotted throat. The investigations of wing-body shapes in this tunnel led to Whitcomb's discovery of the transonic area rule.' James Hansen described the origins of the the slotted throat as follows: 'In 1946 Langley physicist Ray H. Wright conceived a way to do transonic research effectively in a wind tunnel by placing slots in the throat of the test section. The concept for what became known as the slotted-throat or slotted-wall tunnel came to Wright not as a solution to the chronic transonic problem, but as a way to get rid of wall interference (i.e., the mutual effect of two or more meeting waves or vibrations of any kind caused by solid boundaries) at subsonic speeds. For most of the year before Wright came up with this idea, he had been trying to develop a theoretical understanding of wall interference in the 8-Foot HST, which was then being repowered for Mach 1 capability.' When Wright presented these ideas to John Stack, the response was enthusiastic but neither Wright nor Stack thought of slotted-throats as a solution to the transonic problem, only

  13. 4. PACK TRAIN WAITING TO BE UNLOADED AT FOOT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PACK TRAIN WAITING TO BE UNLOADED AT FOOT OF YAKI TRAIL. APPROXIMATELY TWO-AND-ONE-HALF TONS OF STEEL ON ANIMALS SHOWN. NOTE COIL OF 1-1/2' WIND CABLE IN FOREGROUND. - Kaibab Trail Suspension Bridge, Spanning Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  14. Terminal area energy management regime investigations utilizing an 0.030-scale model (47-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B/C/R in the Ames Research Center 11 x 11 foot transonic wind tunnel (0A148), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained in wind tunnel tests are presented. The objectives of the tests were to: (1) obtain pressure distributions, forces and moments over the vehicle 5 Orbiter in the terminal area energy management (TAEM) and approach phases of flight; (2) obtain elevon and rudder hinge moments in the TAEM and approach phases of flight; (3) obtain body flap and elevon loads for verification of loads balancing with integrated pressure distributions; and (4) obtain pressure distributions near the short OMS pods in the high subsonic, transonic and low supersonic Mach number regimes. Testing was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.4 with Reynolds number variations from 4.57 million to 2.74 million per foot. Model angle-of-attack was varied from -4 to 16 degrees and angles of side slip ranged from -8 to 8 degrees.

  15. Terminal area energy management regime investigations utilizing an 0.030-scale model (47-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B/C/R in the Ames Research Center 11 x 11 foot transonic wind tunnel (OH/48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained in a wind tunnel test were examined to: (1) obtain pressure distributions, forces and moments over the vehicle 5 Orbiter in the terminal area energy management (TAEM) and approach phases of flight; (2) obtain elevon and rudder hinge moments in the TAEM and approach phases of flight; (3) obtain body flap and elevon loads for verification of loads balancing with integrated pressure distributions; and (4) obtain pressure distributions near the short OMS pods in the high subsonic, transonic and low supersonic Mach number regimes. Testing was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.4 with Reynolds number variations from 7.57 x 1 million to 2.74 x 1 million per foot. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 to 16 degrees and angles of sideslip ranged from -8 to 8 degrees.

  16. Results of an aerodynamic investigation of a space shuttle orbiter/747 carrier flight test configuration to determine separation characteristics utilizing 0.0125-scale models (48-0/AX1318I-1) in the LTV 4 x 4 foot high speed wind tunnel (CA26), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on a 0.0125-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and a 0.0125-scale model of the 747 CAM configuration in a 4 x 4-foot High Speed Wind Tunnel were presented. Force and moment data were obtained for each vehicle separately at a Mach number of 0.6 and for each vehicle in proximity to the other at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7. The proximity effects of each vehicle on the other at separation distances (from the mated configuration) ranging from 1.5 feet to 75 feet were presented; 747 Carrier angles of attack from 0 deg to 6 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg and -5 deg were tested. Model variables included orbiter elevon, aileron and body flap deflections, orbiter tailcone on and off, and 747 stabilizer and rudder deflections.

  17. [The hyperostotic foot].

    PubMed

    Claustre, J; Simon, L

    1982-01-01

    Clinical and radiological examination of the foot in 25 cases of ankylosing verteral hyperostosis revealed signs of the disease in 16 cases: eleven patients had painful symptoms (predominantly pain in the heel, 9 cases) and and five had radiological changes in the feet which led to the discovery of the characteristic vertebral involvement. As for other extra-vertebral sites of vertebral hyperostosis, the foot warrants careful examination. The radiological lesions consist of osteophytic proliferations of the calcaneum (sometimes pathognomonic), scattered ossifications in the ligaments of the inferior and posterior aspects of this bone, the neck of the talus, the dorsum of the mid-foot, the internal aspect of the tarsal scaphoid or the external face of the styloid apophysis of the 5th metatarsal, and a bony proliferation enlarging the base of the distal phalanx of the big toe.

  18. [The diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Stirnemann, P; Z'Brun, A; Brunner, D

    1998-10-01

    Problems of the diabetic foot are frequent. The magnitude of the clinical picture and morbidity mirrors the severity and complexity of the underlying pathobiology. The three pathogenetic mechanism involved are ischemia, neuropathy and infection. Seldom do these mechanisms work in isolation, rather most foot problems result from a complex interplay among all three. The clinical picture of the diabetic foot reaches from the neuropathic deformity with diminished or absent sensation of pain to limited gangrene or superficial ulcer. The polymicrobial infection leads to extensive tissue destruction (plantarphlegmone) with osteomyelitis. The patients often notes no pain and may become aware of the infection only through the presence of drainage or a foul odor. These infections are usually more extensive than would be predicted by clinical signs and symptoms. These lesions must be debrided and drained promptly and completely. This often requires amputations of one or more toes, combined with an incision along the entire course of the infected track on the plantar or dorsal aspect of the foot. Cultures should be taken from the depth of the wound. Initial treatment should be with broad-spectrum antibiotics, with subsequent adjustment based on culture results. The diabetic foot is a clinical problem that can be solved with a high degree of success when the approached by an interdisciplinary team (specialists in infectious and vascular disease, podiatry and diabetology). Arterial reconstruction should be designed to restore maximum perfusion to the foot. The most effective result can be obtained with infra-inguinal vein bypass with distal anastomosis to the most proximal artery with direct continuity to the ischemic territory. The single most important factor in the achievement of the reduction of amputation is the autologous vein bypass. The overall outcome in the diabetic patient in terms of graft patency and limb salvage is equal to that in the nondiabetic.

  19. Broken Ankle/Broken Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... not warming up and stretching, also can cause foot and ankle injuries. Work in certain occupations. Certain work environments, such ... too little light may lead to falls and foot and ankle injuries. Have certain conditions. Having fragile bones (osteoporosis) or ...

  20. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot What Is a Sesamoid? A sesamoid is a ... also be a contributing factor. Types of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of sesamoid injuries in ...

  1. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection ...

  2. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand, foot, and mouth disease is common in infants ...

  3. Test of Two Custer Channel Wings Having a Diameter of 37.2 Inches and Lengths of 43 and 17.5 Inches (Five-Foot Wind Tunnel Test Number 545)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    8.11 8.2 .856 2494 50 9.4 .37 25.4 .039 950 18.5 1.09 17.0 .115 1313 26.7 2.02 12.7 .224 1605 5568 -21 - TABLE NW. 11 CUSTER CHANNEL WING FIVE-FOOT...resultant force* "The second group of conditions, 7, 5, 9, 10 and 11 , plotted on graphs 5, 6, 7 and S shows the effect of a simple auxiliary wing mounted aft...of the channel at various positions and angles of incidence. 5568 -9- The third group of conditions, 13, 14, 15 and 16, plotted on graphs 9, 10, 11

  4. Results of heat transfer tests of a 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 5 model (60-OTS) in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (test IH48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.; Lockman, W. K.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer data are presented for a .0175-scale model of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle 5. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic interference heating data on the external tank in the tank alone, second-, and first-stage configurations. Data were also obtained on the Orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Nominal Mach Nos. of 5.2 and 5.3 at nominal freestream unit Reynolds numbers of 1.5 and 5.0 million per foot, respectively, were investigated. Photographs of the tested configurations and test equipment are shown.

  5. Adult cavovarus foot.

    PubMed

    Younger, Alastair S E; Hansen, Sigvard T

    2005-09-01

    Cavovarus foot deformity, which often results from an imbalance of muscle forces, is commonly caused by hereditary motor sensory neuropathies. Other causes are cerebral palsy, cerebral injury (stroke), anterior horn cell disease (spinal root injury), talar neck injury, and residual clubfoot. In cavovarus foot deformity, the relatively strong peroneus longus and tibialis posterior muscles cause a hindfoot varus and forefoot valgus (pronated) position. Hindfoot varus causes overload of the lateral border of the foot, resulting in ankle instability, peroneal tendinitis, and stress fracture. Degenerative arthritic changes can develop in overloaded joints. Gait examination allows appropriate planning of tendon transfers to correct stance and swing-phase deficits. Inspection of the forefoot and hindfoot positions determines the need for soft-tissue release and osteotomy. The Coleman block test is invaluable for assessing the cause of hindfoot varus. Prolonged use of orthoses or supportive footwear can result in muscle imbalance, causing increasing deformity and irreversible damage to tendons and joints. Rebalancing tendons is an early priority to prevent unsalvageable deterioration of the foot. Muscle imbalance can be corrected by tendon transfer, corrective osteotomy, and fusion. Fixed bony deformity can be addressed by fusion and osteotomy.

  6. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-06-10

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations.

  7. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations. PMID:27294922

  10. Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (model 49-O) in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (OA36)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Gillins, R. L.; Cleary, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of the 140A/B configuration components are reported for the fuselage, canopy, elevons, bodyflaps, pods, engine nozzles, rudder, vertical tail, and wing. The test facility, and data reduction procedures are described. Test results for each component are graphed, and tabulated source data are included.

  11. The foot of Homo naledi

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt-Smith, W. E. H.; Throckmorton, Z.; Congdon, K. A.; Zipfel, B.; Deane, A. S.; Drapeau, M. S. M.; Churchill, S. E.; Berger, L. R.; DeSilva, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo. PMID:26439101

  12. The foot of Homo naledi.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Smith, W E H; Throckmorton, Z; Congdon, K A; Zipfel, B; Deane, A S; Drapeau, M S M; Churchill, S E; Berger, L R; DeSilva, J M

    2015-10-06

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo.

  13. Results of transonic wind tunnel tests on an 0.010-scale space shuttle mated vehicle model 72-OTS in the LaRC 8-foot TPT (IA43)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in NASA/Langley 8-Foot transonic pressure tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of 104A/B configuration of the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle. Component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over an angle of attack range of -10 deg to +10 deg at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.8, 0.9, 0.98, 1.13, and 1.2. Selected configurations were tested at sideslip angles from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbit, wing bending and torsion were measured on the right wing. Inboard elevon setting of 0 deg, +4 deg and +8 deg and outboard settings of 0 deg, +4 deg and +8 deg were tested.

  14. The athlete's foot.

    PubMed

    Resnik, S S; Lewis, L A; Cohen, B H

    1977-09-01

    In general, painful feet can affect the performance of an athlete in any sport. To prevent skin diseases of the feet, the "Athlete's Foot" should be kept clean and dry with toenails trimmed. Properly fitting athletic shoes should be worn to avoid the formation of blisters. Wearing of sandals in locker and shower rooms, which prevents intimate contact with infecting organisms, can alleviate many of the problems that affect the feet.

  15. [Foot specific orthotic devices].

    PubMed

    Goldcher, Alain

    2010-03-20

    For each foot pathology, whatever its nature and aetiology, there is an orthesis, the best mechanical treatment. For toe pathologies due to or worsened by the footwear, we must recommend wearing other shoes and sometimes an orthoplasty which is not covered by health insurance. Sole orthesis are quite effective for most pathologies causing pain when walking, and involving the foot sole or starting in the foot. Realised by an approved splint technician, they are covered by health insurance for a lump sum, but patients are telling us their cost is becoming more and more difficult to bear Mass-produced shoes, therapeutic or not, deserve a special place in the therapeutic arsenal of podiatry. Temporary used shoes improve post-operation situation and some specifically located discharges. More and more shoes are available for longer use, most of them not approved but better looking, and at least as effective as and not costlier than the few models covered by health insurance.They can provide footwear that are not standard and can't be helped by bespoke shoes reserved for precise medical indications.

  16. Diabetic neuropathy and foot complications.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Andrew J M

    2014-01-01

    Foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) are well recognized and documented late sequelae of diabetic peripheral, somatic, and sympathetic autonomic neuropathy. The neuropathic foot, however, does not ulcerate spontaneously: it is a combination of loss of sensation due to neuropathy together with other factors such as foot deformity and external trauma that results in ulceration and indeed CN. The commonest trauma leading to foot ulcers in the neuropathic foot in Western countries is from inappropriate footwear. Much of the management of the insensate foot in diabetes has been learned from leprosy which similarly gives rise to insensitive foot ulceration. No expensive equipment is required to identify the high risk foot and recently developed tests such as the Ipswich Touch Test and the Vibratip have been shown to be useful in identifying the high risk foot. A comprehensive screening program, together with education of high risk patients, should help to reduce the all too high incidence of ulceration in diabetes. More recently another very high risk group has been identified, namely patients on dialysis, who are at extremely high risk of developing foot ulceration; this should be preventable. The most important feature in management of neuropathic foot ulceration is offloading as patients can easily walk on active foot ulcers due to the loss of pain sensation. Infection should be treated aggressively and if there is any evidence of peripheral vascular disease, arteriography and appropriate surgical management is also indicated. CN often presents with a unilateral hot, swollen foot and any patient presenting with these features known to have neuropathy should be treated as a Charcot until this is proven otherwise. Most important in the management of acute CN is offloading, often in a total contact cast.

  17. Effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on a full-scale, low-wing general aviation airplane: Wind-tunnel investigation of high-angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics. [conducted in Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, W. A., Jr.; Satran, D. R.; Johnson, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Wing-leading-edge modifications included leading-edge droop and slat configurations having full-span, partial-span, or segmented arrangements. Other devices included wing-chord extensions, fences, and leading-edge stall strips. Good correlation was apparent between the results of wind-tunnel data and the results of flight tests, on the basis of autorotational stability criterion, for a wide range of wing-leading-edge modifications.

  18. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  19. 3. VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  20. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  1. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  3. Tests of a Triangular Wing of Aspect Ratio 2 in the Ames 12-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel III : the Effectiveness and Hinge Moments of a Skewed Wing-tip Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbe, Carl D; Tinling, Bruce E

    1948-01-01

    Results of wind-tunnel tests of a semispan model of a triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 with a skewed wing-tip flap are presented. Lift, drag, pitching-moment, and hinge-moment data are included for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.95. The flap showed extremely high hinge moments and low effectiveness as a longitudinal control. Although less affected by compressibility, this flap is indicated to be inferior to a constant-chord flap when applied to this triangular wing.

  4. [The diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Hartemann-Heurtier, Agnès; Ha Van, Georges

    2003-05-15

    Diabetic patients are concerned with foot complications when a peripheral neuropathy is present. Screening of predisposed patients may be annually assessed using monofilament testing. Peripheral arterial disease, when associated, increases amputation risk. Ideal treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach with a first-line medical treatment including an optimal off-loading of the diabetic ulcer, ulcer dertersion, glycemic control, and if necessary antibiotic therapy. In case of associated osteomyelitis, a limited surgical resection of the infected bone may be performed. In case of associated arterial disease, a revascularization procedure precede bone resection.

  5. Gone with the Wind? Integrity and Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Frances; Katz, Brit

    2011-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina slammed into 80 miles of Mississippi shoreline on August 29, 2005. It was the nation's worst natural disaster, a perfect storm. One hundred sixty miles-per-hour winds sent 55-foot-tall waves and a 30-foot wall of water across the shore and miles inland. It displaced 400,000 residents along the coast of the Mississippi, and…

  6. [Neurogenic foot deformities].

    PubMed

    Senst, S

    2010-01-01

    There is a multitude of neurological diseases which may lead to neuro-orthopaedic problems and subsequently to neurogenic foot deformities. For this reason the diagnostician will be consistently surprised that there is a great multitude of different foot abnormalities and that not only the typical spastic talipes equines dominates. Of particular significance here is that these deformities almost always develop progressively, whereas most diseases persist per se, cerebral palsy being a typical case in point. However, in MMC (myelomeningocele) patients, there is also the danger of a worsening of the basic problem in the case of tethered cord syndrome. Unlike congenital talipes equinovarus, neuro-orthopaedic talipes equinovarus often shows over- or undercorrection postoperatively due to a shift in muscle imbalance. It is important, therefore, that the basis of conservative therapy include regular physiotherapy and orthoses during the day and, if necessary, at night. Botulinum toxin has been established as an additional measure for spasticity; however, this cannot always prevent surgical intervention, but is able to delay this to a better point in the development of the child/patient. The present article describes the diversity of neurological deformities and presents conservative as well as surgical therapeutic approaches.

  7. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    A researcher is launching a model into the tunnel airstream of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NASA TR No. 557: 'After the observations have been made, the model is lowered into a net held in the air stream by one of the operators or into a large bowl-shaped net at the bottom of the test section. When lowered into the large net, the model is retrieved with a long- handled clamp.' (p. 267) 'The models used are generally 1/10 to 1/16 scale. The size of the models is limited by the wing span and the wing loading. The maximum allowable span is about 36 inches; the maximum wing loading is about 1.3 pounds per square foot.' (p. 266) 'Balsa wood is the usual structural material because of its low density. It is necessary to hollow out the after portion of the fuselage and to cut out a large portion of the wood in the wings to permit proper mass distribution. The wing cut-outs are covered with silk tissue paper. The leading and trailing edges and tips of the wings are fitted with strips of spruce, pattern pine, or bamboo inset into the edge of the balsa to prevent disfigurement from accidental blows or from striking the safety netting. Lead is used for ballast.' (p. 266)

  8. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Interior view of model in 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NASA TR No. 557: 'After the observations have been made, the model is lowered into a net held in the air stream by one of the operators or into a large bowl-shaped net at the bottom of the test section. When lowered into the large net, the model is retrieved with a long-handled clamp.' (p. 267) 'The models mused are generally 1/10 to 1/16 scale. The size of the models is limited by the wing span and the wing loading. The maximum allowable span is about 36 inches; the maximum wing loading is about 1.3 pounds per square foot.' (p. 266) 'Balsa wood is the usual structural material because of its low density. It is necessary to hollow out the after portion of the fuselage and to cut out a large portion of the wood in the wings to permit proper mass distribution. The wing cut-outs are covered with silk tissue paper. The leading and trailing edges and tips of the wings are fitted with strips of spruce, pattern pine, or bamboo inset into the edge of the balsa to prevent disfigurement from accidental blows or from striking the safety netting. Lead is used for ballast.' (p. 266)

  9. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristic of semispan commercial transport model with wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller operating in reverse thrust. [conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Gile, Brenda E.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1994-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of the reverse-thrust flow field of a wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan subsonic high-lift transport model. The advanced ducted propeller (ADP) model was mounted separately in position alongside the wing so that only the aerodynamic interference of the propeller and nacelle affected the aerodynamic performance of the transport model. Mach numbers ranged from 0.14 to 0.26; corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 x 10(exp 6). The reverse-thrust flow field of the ADP shielded a portion of the wing from the free-stream airflow and reduced both lift and drag. The reduction in lift and drag was a function of ADP rotational speed and free-stream velocity. Test results included ground effects data for the transport model and ADP configuration. The ground plane caused a beneficial increase in drag and an undesirable slight increase in lift. The ADP and transport model performance in ground effect was similar to performance trends observed for out of ground effect. The test results form a comprehensive data set that supports the application of the ADP engine and airplane concept on the next generation of advanced subsonic transports. Before this investigation, the engine application was predicted to have detrimental ground effect characteristics. Ground effect test measurements indicated no critical problems and were the first step in proving the viability of this engine and airplane configuration.

  10. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  11. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  12. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  13. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  14. Results of transonic wind tunnel tests on an 0.015-scale space shuttle mated vehicle model (67-ots) in the LaRC 8 foot TPT (IA41)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R.; Burrows, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to obtain aerodynamic force data for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20. Data were obtained for an alpha range of -10 deg to +10 deg (beta = 0 deg beta = 5 deg) and beta range of -10 deg to +10 deg (alpha = 0 deg). Longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control data were obtained for tank alone, tank plus SRB's, tank plus Orbiter, and mated configuration of tank + Orbiter + SRB's. Also, single-component rudder hinge moment data were obtained at rudder deflections of 0 and -20 deg for each Mach number tested. Plots of aerodynamic coefficients vs. Mach number are presented, using data from both test IA41 and tests LRC-UPWT-1056, 1073 (IA42A/B) for Mach numbers of 1.60 to 4.63. The model tested in IA42A/B was the same model as tested in IA41.

  15. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Data is given in graphical and tabular form.

  16. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Additional information is given in tabular form.

  17. Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale model (49-0) of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle orbiter in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (0A98)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Dzuibala, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test are presented; the model used for this test was 0.015-scale 140 A/B hybrid configuration of the space shuttle orbiter. The primary test objectives were to obtain incremental data on the effects of a sting mount on base pressures and force and moment data. The increments obtained included the addition of MPS nozzles as well as the deletion of the simulated sting mount. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from 12 to 42 degrees at 0 and 5 degrees angles of sideslip. The testing was accomplished at Mach 5.3 and Mach 10.3. The effects of various elevon, body flap, and speed brake settings were investigated, and static pressures were measured at the fuselage base for use in force-data reduction.

  18. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  19. Results of an experimental investigation to determine separation characteristics for the Orbiter/747 using a 0.0125-scale model (48-0 AX1318I-1 747) in the Ames Research Center 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic separation data obtained from a wind tunnel test of an 0.0125-scale SSV Orbiter model of a VC70-000002 Configuration and a 0.0125-scale 747 model was presented. Separation data was obtained at a Mach number of 0.6 and three incidence angles of 4, 6, and 8 degrees. The orbiter angle of attack was varied from 0 to 14 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and normal separation increments were obtained for fixed 747 angles of attack of 0, 2, and 4 degrees while varying the orbiter angle of attack. Control surface settings on the 747 carrier included rudder deflections of 0 and 10 degrees and horizontal stabilizer deflections of -1 and +5 degrees.

  20. Design, fabrication, and test of a composite material wind turbine rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffee, D. G., Jr.; Gustafson, R. E.; More, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic design, structural design, fabrication, and structural testing is described for a 60 foot long filament wound, fiberglass/epoxy resin matrix wind turbine rotor blade for a 125 foot diameter, 100 kW wind energy conversion system. One blade was fabricated which met all aerodynamic shape requirements and was structurally capable of operating under all specified design conditions. The feasibility of filament winding large rotor blades was demonstrated.

  1. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  2. An Investigation of the Low-speed Stability and Control Characteristics of Swept-forward and Swept-back Wing in the Ames 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Gerald M; Stevens, Victor I , Jr

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been made at large scale of the characteristics of highly swept wings. Data were obtained at several angles of sideslip on wings having angles of sweep of plus or minus 45 degrees, plus or minus 30 degrees, and 0 degrees. The airfoil sections of the wings varied from approximately NACA 0015 at the root to NACA 23009 at the tip. Each wing was investigated with flaps under flection, partial-span split flaps deflected 60 degrees, full-span split flaps defected 60 degrees and split-flap-type ailerons deflected plus or minus 15 degrees. Values of maximum lift were obtained at Reynolds numbers raging from 5.7 to 9.2 times 10 to the 6th power. In this report the summarized results are compared with the predictions made by use of the simplified theory for the effect of sweep and with existing small-scale data. The basic wind-tunnel results from which these summary data were taken are included in an appendix. The primary problems accompanying the use of weep as revealed by this investigation are the loss in maximum lift, the high effective dihedral, and the sharp reduction in lateral-control effectiveness. In general, simple theory enables good predictions to be made of the gross effects of sweep but further refinements are necessary to obtain the accuracy required for design purposes. In cases where comparisons can be made, the indications are that, as sweep increases, scale effects diminish and large-scale results approach small-scale results.

  3. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.312 Footings. (a) Materials approved... (incorporated by reference, see § 3285.4). (3) ABS footing pads. (i) ABS footing pads are permitted, provided... use in the soil classification at the site. (ii) ABS footing pads must be listed or labeled for...

  4. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.312 Footings. (a) Materials approved... (incorporated by reference, see § 3285.4). (3) ABS footing pads. (i) ABS footing pads are permitted, provided... use in the soil classification at the site. (ii) ABS footing pads must be listed or labeled for...

  5. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  6. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  7. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  8. Freeing the foot: integrating the foot core system into rehabilitation for lower extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Fourchet, François

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic muscles of the foot play a critical role in the regulation of absorption and propulsion during dynamic activities. Dysfunction of these may lead to an increased demand on the remaining components within the foot core system to maintain dynamic foot control, leading to a more rapid breakdown of these contributors and those proximal to the foot. Training the intrinsic foot muscles through a systematic progression of isolation via the short foot exercise offers the opportunity to reincorporate their contribution into the foot core system. This article discusses the function of the intrinsic foot muscles, their contributions to dynamic foot control, and a progressive training paradigm.

  9. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  10. Mouth in Foot Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, Daniel C; Agee, Willie A; Pires, Valerie L; Yim, Duke G; Ngauy, Viseth

    2015-01-01

    Toothpicks are commonly used household items that rarely cause serious injury or infection. Toothpick-related injuries often occur due to ingestion with subsequent trauma/infection at distal sites within the gastrointestinal tract; however, cardiovascular, pleural, and soft tissue infections have been reported. Eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus found in oral flora associated with bite wound infections. A few case reports describe E. corrodens osteomyelitis from toothpick puncture wounds. We report a case of foot cellulitis and abscess in an elderly diabetic after toothpick puncture injury that was unresponsive to empiric antibiotics. Wound cultures grew E. corrodens and rare Peptostreptococcus species. E. corrodens is resistant to first-generation cephalosporins, macrolides, aminoglycosides, clindamycin, and metronidazole. This case highlights the insidious nature of E. corrodens infections and the need to tailor empiric antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections based on the mechanism of injury. In addition, this case stresses the importance of protective footwear in diabetics and serves as a cautionary tale regarding the use of seemingly innocuous toothpicks. PMID:26793413

  11. Homosexual foot fetishism.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M S; Williams, C J; Calhan, C

    1994-12-01

    262 respondents from an organization for homosexual foot fetishists provide information from a broader sample than clinical cases and allow examination of the effects of sexual preference on fetishism. Data show a wide range of feet/footwear objects to be arousing. Such interests were often associated with particular types of men, yet interests were subject to change over time. Fetishistic arousal rested on both sensual and symbolic aspects of the fetish. Symbolically, it was the theme of "masculinity" that made male feet/footwear arousing, showing parallels to "femininity" evoked by female feet/footwear for male heterosexual fetishists. For many of the respondents, fetishism did not seem to be a substitute for living persons. Respondents had intimate relationships and were able to incorporate their fetish interests into stable relationships and less intimate ones. Considerable involvement in sadomasochistic practices was also found as was involvement in the gay world. Finally, nothing about a fetishistic interest seemed to preclude the development of subcultural forms around the practice.

  12. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  13. Wind Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Howard Andrew

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  14. Transonic stability and control characteristics of a 0.015-scale (remotely controlled elevon) model 44-0 of the space shuttle orbiter tested in the NASA/LaRC 8 foot TPT (LA62). [wind tunnel stability tests in transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.; Parrell, H.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the test was to generate a detailed aerodynamic data base which can be used to substantiate the aerodynamic design data book for the current shuttle orbiter configuration. Special attention was directed to definition of nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics by taking data at small increments in Mach number, angle of attack, and elevon position. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment and elevon position data were recorded over an angle-of-attack range from -4 deg to 20 deg, at angles of sideslip of 0 deg and 2 deg. The test Mach numbers were from 0.35 to 1.20. The Reynolds number for most of the test was held at a constant 3.5 million per foot.

  15. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions.

    PubMed

    Yoga, R; Khairul, A; Sunita, K; Suresh, C

    2006-02-01

    Infection plays a pivotal role in enhancing a diabetic foot at risk toward amputation. Effective antibiotic therapy against the offending pathogens is an important component of treatment of diabetic foot infections. Recognition of the pathogen is always difficult as the representative deep tissue sample for culture is surrounded by ulcer surface harbouring colonies of organisms frequently labelled as skin commensals. The emergent of resistant strains represents a compounding problem standing against efforts to prevent amputation. This study was undertaken to identify the pathogens associated with diabetic foot infection in terms of their frequency and sensitivity against certain commonly used antibiotics. Forty-four consecutive patients with open diabetic foot infections had wound swab taken for culture and sensitivity testing. Cultures positive were observed in 89% of the cases with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa encountered in 20%, 14% and 14% of cases respectively. Mixed growths were isolated in 6% of cultures. All Staphylcoccus aureus isolates were resistant to Penicillin but 80% were sensitive to Erythromycin and Co-trimoxazole. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were sensitive to Methicillin and Gentamycin in 80% and 60% of cases respectively, and resistant to Ampicillin and Ceftazidime in 83% and 50% respectively. All Pseudomonas aeroginosa isolates were sensitive to Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin but 50% were resistant to Gentamycin. There was no single antibiotic possessing good coverage for all common organisms isolated from diabetic foot lesions. Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant cause of diabetic foot infections followed by Klebsiela pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most infections are monomicrobial. The emergence of multiresistant organisms is a worrying feature in diabetic foot infections.

  16. Generation, saturation, and convection of electrostatic waves in Jupiter's shock foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, S. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, a model is developed for the analysis of the electrostatic waves produced in the shock foot at Jupiter. It is shown that an ion beam instability involving the ions reflected at the shock ramp and the incoming solar-wind electrons produces waves at the observed frequencies and that saturation via orbit diffusion limits the waves to amplitudes near to what is observed. Results from a two-dimensional model of the reflected beam in the foot indicate that the waves propagate against the solar wind away from the shock ramp and are amplified up to their saturation amplitudes. The saturation results, combined with the electron temperature profile due to wave-particle interactions predicted by quasi-linear theory, reproduce a wave amplitude profile for the shock foot that is in reasonable agreement with the observations.

  17. 75 FR 60102 - South Dakota PrairieWinds Project (DOE/EIS-0418)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... capacity wind- powered energy generation facility that would feature 101 wind turbine generators... feature 101 wind turbine generators; 6,000 square-foot operations and maintenance building and fence... facilities around the United States. Bat mortality from collisions with turbines would likely occur....

  18. Calibration of the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, B. W., Jr.; Runckel, J. F.; Igoe, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal (plenum suction) was calibrated to a Mach number of 1.3. The results of the calibration, including the effects of slot shape modifications, test section wall divergence, and water vapor condensation, are presented. A complete description of the wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment is included.

  19. Erosion: Wind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion refers to the detachment, transport and deposition of sediment by wind. It is a dynamic, physical process where loose, dry, bare soils are transported by strong winds. Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that affects over 500 million ha of land worldwide and creates between 500 an...

  20. Meteorology (Wind)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    Wind speed at 50 m (m/s) The average and percent difference minimum and ... are given.   Percent of time for ranges of wind speed at 50 m (percent) Percentage [frequency] of time that wind ... be adjusted to heights from 10 to 300 meters using the Gipe power law. Wind speeds may be adjusted for different terrain by selecting from ...

  1. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  2. [Operative treatment of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B

    1999-07-08

    The majority of diabetic foot ulcers are the results of repetitive pressure that exceeds the threshold of soft-tissue tolerance, leading to mechanical destruction of the tissue. Progression of plantar ulcers can rapidly lead to osteomyelitis that may result in loss of the foot through amputation. In order to prevent such a disaster, surgical treatment should be taken into consideration when conservative treatment remains without success. The goal of surgical treatment of an infected ulcer is debridement of the soft-tissue and removal of the underlying pressure by careful bone resection or correction of a deformity by arthrodesis. Various authors have recently reported successful surgical reconstruction of neuroarthropathic foot deformity and instability. Apparently arthrodesis is a viable alternative to amputation for patients with unstable deformity or recurrent ulceration. Proper preoperative evaluation is mandatory. The indications are not well defined yet.

  3. Foot Comfort for the Fashionable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Modellista Footwear's new shoe line uses Tempur(TM) material, which conforms to each wearer's unique foot shape to absorb shock and cushion the foot. The foam's properties allow the shoe to change with the wearer's foot as it shrinks and swells throughout the day. Scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center originally developed temper foam in the early 1970s to relieve the intense pressure of G-forces experienced by astronauts during rocket launches. Tempur-Pedic, Inc., further developed the foam and granted Modellista a license to use it in footwear. The Modellista collection is the first shoe design and construction to be certified by the Space Awareness Alliance. The shoes, with designs ranging from traditional clog shapes to sling backs and open-toe sandals, are currently available nationwide at select specialty shoe stores and through catalogs. Tempur(TM) is a registered trademark of Tempur-Pedic, Inc.

  4. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  5. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Treatments Injections and other Procedures Treatments of the ... completed a four-year program in Osteopathic Medicine. Diabetic foot - Diabetes affects the feet in a profound way ...

  6. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Foot URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  7. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  8. American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week @ ACFAS Poll Results Arthroscopy e-Book The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery Read some of the latest research from the official peer-reviewed scientific journal of ACFAS, The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery ( ...

  9. Wind tunnel pressurization and recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pejack, Edwin R.; Meick, Joseph; Ahmad, Adnan; Lateh, Nordin; Sadeq, Omar

    1988-01-01

    The high density, low toxicity characteristics of refrigerant-12 (dichlorofluoromethane) make it an ideal gas for wind tunnel testing. Present limitations on R-12 emissions, set to slow the rate of ozone deterioration, pose a difficult problem in recovery and handling of large quantities of R-12. This preliminary design is a possible solution to the problem of R-12 handling in wind tunnel testing. The design incorporates cold temperature condensation with secondary purification of the R-12/air mixture by adsorption. Also discussed is the use of Freon-22 as a suitable refrigerant for the 12 foot wind tunnel.

  10. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  11. Large-Scale Wind Turbine Testing in the NASA 24.4m (80) by 36.6m(120) Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Imprexia, Cliff (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center in California provides a unique capability to test large-scale wind turbines under controlled conditions. This special capability is now available for domestic and foreign entities wishing to test large-scale wind turbines. The presentation will focus on facility capabilities to perform wind turbine tests and typical research objectives for this type of testing.

  12. Estimation of stature from radiographic measurement of foot dimensions: Truncated foot length may be more reliable than full foot length.

    PubMed

    Gwani, Abdullahi Suleiman; Salihu, Abubakar Tijjani; Garba, Isa Sa'idu; Rufa'i, Adamu Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Foot length has been shown to be a reliable dimension for estimation of stature. However, phalanges of the foot are very small bones and their length may not be proportional to person's stature. Thus, we hypothesized that foot length measured excluding the phalanges, the truncated foot length, may be more reliable in stature estimation than full foot length. This study, therefore, aimed at comparing the accuracy of the regression equations derived from the truncated foot length and the full foot length. The study recruited a sample of 32 young adults (16 males and 16 females) aged from 20 to 35 years. Lateral radiographs of the right feet were obtained for each subject in a bilateral standing position while maintaining equal weight on both feet. Standing height of the participants was measured with a stadiometer. Truncated foot length and full foot length were measured on the lateral radiographs of the foot. Independent t-test was used to check for mean differences in the dimensions between genders. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the equations for stature estimation. Intra and inter-observer reliability were calculated from four precision estimates: absolute technical error of measurement (aTEM), relative technical error of measurement (rTEM), coefficient of reliability (Rr) and coefficient of variation (Cv). All the dimensions measured were significantly larger in males than females. Linear regression equations were derived for estimation of stature using both the truncated foot length and full foot length. The regression equations derived from truncated foot length have larger correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, adjusted coefficient of determination as well as smaller standard error of estimation than those derived from full foot length. All the precision estimates showed that the measurement errors are within acceptable limits. This study suggests that even if the full foot length is available, excluding the phalanges may

  13. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    PubMed

    Racz, Roger S; Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Puncture wounds are common injuries of the foot. Although most puncture wounds are benign, devastating complications are possible without adequate treatment. These injuries can occur in all age groups and in various circumstances. Early diagnosis and appropriate medical and surgical management is paramount in achieving successful outcomes.

  14. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  15. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a)...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a)...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156...

  1. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reinforcing steel in cast-in-place concrete footings. (2) Pressure-treated wood. (i) Pressure-treated wood footings must consist of a minimum of two layers of nominal 2-inch thick pressure-treated wood, a single... values listed have been reduced by the dead load of the concrete footing. 4. Concrete block piers...

  2. Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? Print A A A Jenna had been ... pins and needles." But why would your foot fall asleep? Many people say this is because you' ...

  3. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  5. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  6. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  8. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  9. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  11. Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? A A A Jenna had been ... while you might have lost feeling in your foot, it might have felt heavy, or you might ...

  12. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  17. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  18. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  19. A user's guide to the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel complex. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The operational characteristics and equipment associated with the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel complex which is located in buildings 1146 and 1234 at the Langley Research Center are described in detail. This complex consists of the 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, the static test facility, and the 16- by 24-inch water tunnel research facilities. The 16-foot transonic tunnel is a single-return atmospheric wind tunnel with a 15.5 foot diameter test section and a Mach number capability from 0.20 to 1.30. The emphasis for research conducted in this research complex is on the integration of the propulsion system into advanced aircraft concepts. In the past, the primary focus has been on the integration of nozzles and empennage into the afterbody of fighter aircraft. During the last several years this experimental research has been expanded to include developing the fundamental data base necessary to verify new theoretical concepts, inlet integration into fighter aircraft, nozzle integration for supersonic and hypersonic transports, nacelle/pylon/wing integration for subsonic transport configurations, and the study of vortical flows (in the 16- by 24-inch water tunnel). The purpose here is to provide a comprehensive description of the operational characteristics of the research facilities of the 16-foot transonic tunnel complex and their associated systems and equipments.

  20. Space Shuttle Model In The 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    What may appear at first glance to be a swimming shark is a wind tunnel model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, being tested at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton,VA. The Orbiter model is 5.5 feet long (1/20th of the real Orbiter's length) and has remotely operated control surfaces. Inside Langley's 16 foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, the model simulated Orbiter re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, when it must fly through the transonic speed range (the range that crosses the sound barrier). Information on Orbiter stability and control, collected and analyzed during the tests, were integrated with other data to become part of computerized flight simulation programs.

  1. Migratory routes and at-sea threats to Pink-footed Shearwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Josh; Felis, Jonathan J.; Hodum, Peter; Colodro, Valentina; Carle, Ryan; López, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    The Pink-footed Shearwater (Ardenna creatopus) is a seabird with a breeding range restricted to three islands in Chile and an estimated world population of approximately 56,000 breeding individuals (Muñoz 2011, Oikonos unpublished data). Due to multiple threats on breeding colonies and at-sea, Pink-footed Shearwaters are listed as Endangered by the government of Chile (Reglamento de Clasificación de Especies, 2011), Threatened by the government of Canada (Environment Canada 2008), and are listed under Appendix 1 of the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP 2013). A principal conservation concern for the species is mortality from fisheries bycatch during the breeding and non-breeding seasons; thus, identification of areas of overlap between at-sea use by Pink-footed Shearwaters and fisheries is a high priority conservation objective (Hinojosa Sáez and Hodum 1997, Mangel et al. 2013, ACAP 2013). During the non-breeding period, Pink-footed Shearwaters range as far north as Canada, although little was known until recently about migration routes and important wintering areas where fisheries bycatch could be a risk. Additionally, Pink-footed Shearwaters face at-sea threats during the non-breeding season off the west coast of North America. Recently, areas used by wintering Pink-footed Shearwaters have been identified as areas of interest for developing alternative energy offshore in North America (e.g., floating wind generators; Trident Winds 2016). The goal of our study was to track Pink-footed Shearwater post-breeding movements with satellite tags to identify timing and routes of migration, locate important non-breeding foraging habitats, and determine population distribution among different wintering regions.

  2. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  3. Strength of Footing with Punching Shear Preventers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Sup; Moon, Jiho; Park, Keum-Sung; Bae, Kyu-Woong

    2014-01-01

    The punching shear failure often governs the strength of the footing-to-column connection. The punching shear failure is an undesirable failure mode, since it results in a brittle failure of the footing. In this study, a new method to increase the strength and ductility of the footing was proposed by inserting the punching shear preventers (PSPs) into the footing. The validation and effectiveness of PSP were verified through a series of experimental studies. The nonlinear finite element analysis was then performed to demonstrate the failure mechanism of the footing with PSPs in depth and to investigate the key parameters that affect the behavior of the footing with PSPs. Finally, the design recommendations for the footing with PSPs were suggested. PMID:25401141

  4. Complex trauma of the foot.

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Dahlen, C; Randt, T; Gavlik, J M

    1997-12-01

    Following complex foot injuries (incidence up to 52 %) in the multiply-injured patient the ultimate goal remains the same as for all significant foot injuries: the restoration of a painless, stable and plantigrade foot to avoid corrective procedures with moderate results. In the case of a complex trauma of the foot (5 point-score) - e. g. a crush injury - primary amputation in the multiply-injured patient (PTS 3-4) is indicated. Limb salvage (PTS 1-2) depends on the intraoperative aspect during the second look (within 24-48 hours after injury): the debridement has to be radical, the selection of amputation level should be at the most distal point compatible with tissue viability and wound healing. A free tissue transfer should be done early if necessary. Single lesions presenting with a compartment syndrome need an immediate dorsal fasciotomy, in the case of a multiply-injured patient as soon as possible. Open fractures are reduced following radical debridement and temporarily stabilized with K-wires and/or tibiotarsal transfixation with an external fixateur until the definitive ORIF. Dislocation-fractures of the talus type 3 and 4 according to Hawkins' classification need open reduction and internal fixation by screws (titan). Open fractures of the calcaneus are stabilized temporarily by a medial external fixateur after debridement until the definitive treatment. If there is a compartment syndrome an immediate dermatofasciotomy is essential. Like closed, calcanear fractures in multiply-injured patients dislocation-fractures of the Chopart's joint need immediate open reduction only if it is an open fracture or associated with a compartment syndrome. The incidence of a compartment syndrome in the case of dislocation fractures of the Lisfranc's joint is high and therefore a dorsal dermatofasciotomy without delay is critical. Open reduction and internal fixation are achieved either by 1.8 mm K-wires or 3.5 mm cortical screws. To avoid further soft tissue damage a

  5. [Complex trauma of the foot].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Dahlen, C; Randt, T; Gavlik, J M

    1997-12-01

    Following complex foot injuries (incidence up to 52%) in the multiply-injured patient the ultimate goal remains the same as for all significant foot injuries: the restoration of a painless, stable and plantigrade foot to avoid corrective procedures with moderate results. In the case of a complex trauma of the foot (5 point-score)--e.g. a crush injury--primary amputation in the multiply-injured patient (PTS 3-4) is indicated. Limb salvage (PTS 1-2) depends on the intraoperative aspect during the second look (within 24-48 hours after injury): the debridement has to be radical, the selection of amputation level should be at the most distal point compatible with tissue viability and wound healing. A free tissue transfer should be done early if necessary. Single lesions presenting with a compartment syndrome need an immediate dorsal fasciotomy, in the case of a multiply-injured patient as soon as possible. Open fractures are reduced following radical debridement and temporarily stabilized with K-wires and/or tibiotarsal transfixation with an external fixateur until the definitive ORIF. Dislocation-fractures of the talus type 3 and 4 according to Hawkins' classification need open reduction and internal fixation by screws (titan). Open fractures of the calcaneus are stabilized temporarily by a medial external fixateur after debridement until the definitive treatment. If there is a compartment syndrome an immediate dermatofasciotomy is essential. Like closed, calcanear fractures in multiply-injured patients dislocation-fractures of the Chopart's joint need immediate open reduction only if it is an open fracture or associated with a compartment syndrome. The incidence of a compartment syndrome in the case of dislocation fractures of the Lisfranc's joint is high and therefore a dorsal dermatofasciotomy without delay is critical. Open reduction and internal fixation are achieved either by 1.8 mm K-wires or 3.5 mm cortical screws. To avoid further soft tissue damage a delayed

  6. The foot core system: a new paradigm for understanding intrinsic foot muscle function.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Hertel, Jay; Bramble, Dennis; Davis, Irene

    2015-03-01

    The foot is a complex structure with many articulations and multiple degrees of freedom that play an important role in static posture and dynamic activities. The evolutionary development of the arch of the foot was coincident with the greater demands placed on the foot as humans began to run. The movement and stability of the arch is controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. However, the intrinsic muscles are largely ignored by clinicians and researchers. As such, these muscles are seldom addressed in rehabilitation programmes. Interventions for foot-related problems are more often directed at externally supporting the foot rather than training these muscles to function as they are designed. In this paper, we propose a novel paradigm for understanding the function of the foot. We begin with an overview of the evolution of the human foot with a focus on the development of the arch. This is followed by a description of the foot intrinsic muscles and their relationship to the extrinsic muscles. We draw the parallels between the small muscles of the trunk region that make up the lumbopelvic core and the intrinsic foot muscles, introducing the concept of the foot core. We then integrate the concept of the foot core into the assessment and treatment of the foot. Finally, we call for an increased awareness of the importance of the foot core stability to normal foot and lower extremity function.

  7. Obese older adults suffer foot pain and foot-related functional limitation.

    PubMed

    Mickle, Karen J; Steele, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest being overweight or obese places adults at greater risk of developing foot complications such as osteoarthritis, tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. However, no research has comprehensively examined the effects of overweight or obesity on the feet of individuals older than 60 years of age. Therefore we investigated whether foot pain, foot structure, and/or foot function is affected by obesity in older adults. Three hundred and twelve Australian men and women, aged over 60 years, completed validated questionnaires to establish the presence of foot pain and health related quality of life. Foot structure (anthropometrics and soft tissue thickness) and foot function (ankle dorsiflexion strength and flexibility, toe flexor strength, plantar pressures and spatiotemporal gait parameters) were also measured. Obese participants (BMI >30) were compared to those who were overweight (BMI=25-30) and not overweight (BMI <25). Obese participants were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of foot pain and scored significantly lower on the SF-36. Obesity was also associated with foot-related functional limitation whereby ankle dorsiflexion strength, hallux and lesser toe strength, stride/step length and walking speed were significantly reduced in obese participants compared to their leaner counterparts. Therefore, disabling foot pain and altered foot structure and foot function are consequences of obesity for older adults, and impact upon their quality of life. Interventions designed to reduce excess fat mass may relieve loading of the foot structures and, in turn, improve foot pain and quality of life for older obese individuals.

  8. Neuropathic ulcers of the foot.

    PubMed

    Lang-Stevenson, A I; Sharrard, W J; Betts, R P; Duckworth, T

    1985-05-01

    We report a prospective study of the causes and treatment of 26 long-standing neuropathic ulcers of the foot in 21 patients. The most important causal factor, well illustrated by pressure studies, was the presence of a dynamic or static deformity leading to local areas of peak pressure on insensitive skin. All but one of the 26 ulcers had healed after an average of 10 weeks of treatment in a light, skin-tight plaster cast, with the prohibition of weight-bearing. Recurrent ulceration was prevented in all but one foot by early operation to correct the causative deformity; this was performed after the ulcer had healed and before allowing weight-bearing on the limb. Pressure studies after operation confirmed that pressure points had been relieved.

  9. Weigh-in-motion scale with foot alignment features

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert Knox; Richardson, Gregory David; Scudiere, Matthew Bligh

    2013-03-05

    A pad is disclosed for use in a weighing system for weighing a load. The pad includes a weighing platform, load cells, and foot members. Improvements to the pad reduce or substantially eliminate rotation of one or more of the corner foot members. A flexible foot strap disposed between the corner foot members reduces rotation of the respective foot members about vertical axes through the corner foot members and couples the corner foot members such that rotation of one corner foot member results in substantially the same amount of rotation of the other corner foot member. In a strapless variant one or more fasteners prevents substantially all rotation of a foot member. In a diagonal variant, a foot strap extends between a corner foot member and the weighing platform to reduce rotation of the foot member about a vertical axis through the corner foot member.

  10. [Diabetic foot infections: microbiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Noviello, Silvana; Esposito, Isabella; Pascale, Renato; Esposito, Silvano; Zeppa, Pio

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of wound infection is based on clinical signs and local and/or systemic inflammation. Therefore, the examination has a major role in the diagnosis of infected lesions of the foot. Once the clinical diagnosis of infection is made, the next step is to determine the etiology with the aim to undertake a rational and appropriate treatment. The most reliable method for assessing microbiological etiology is the specimen of material from infected lesion to perform a bacterioscopic examination and culture. The microorganisms involved in the etiology of diabetic foot depends on the type of injury and on specific patient features (antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalization). The most frequently detected pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus. Mild infections are mostly caused by Gram positive cocci, with a prevalence of S. aureus. Moderate infections are mostly supported by pyogenic Gram positive cocci, but also Gram-negative bacteria can be involved. In severe infections the etiology is polymicrobial. As regards the involvement of fungi in diabetic foot infections data are few and mostly conflicting.

  11. Improved Speed Control System for the 87,000 HP Wind Tunnel Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becks, Edward A.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Blumenthal, Philip Z.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, installation, and integrated systems tests for a new drive motor speed control system which was part of a recent rehab project for the NASA Lewis 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The tunnel drive consists of three mechanically-coupled 29,000 HP wound rotor induction motors driving an axial flow compressor. Liquid rheostats are used to vary the impedance of the rotor circuits, thus varying the speed of the drive system. The new design utilizes a distributed digital control system with a dual touch screen CRT operator console to provide alarm monitoring, logging, and trending. The liquid rheostats are driven by brushtype servomotor systems with magnetostrictive linear displacement transducers used for position feedback. The new system achieved all goals for speed variations with load, motor load balance, and control of total power.

  12. Wind sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Laue, E. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sensing the temperature, velocity, and direction of the wind, including four temperature-dependent crystal oscillators spaced about an axis, a heater centered on the axis, and a screen through which the wind blows to pass over the crystals. In one method of operation, the frequency of the oscillators is taken when the heater is not energized, to obtain the temperature of the wind, and the frequencies of the oscillators are taken after the heater is energized to determine the direction and velocity of the wind. When the heater is energized, the wind causes the downwind crystals to achieve a higher temperature than the upwind crystals, and with the magnitude of the difference indicating the velocity of the wind.

  13. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Zayegh, Aladin; Begg, Rezaul K.; Wahab, Yufridin

    2012-01-01

    Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis. PMID:23012576

  14. Narrative review: Diabetic foot and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Contreras, D.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; Gonzalez-Bernal, J.

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic foot is one of the major complications experienced by diabetic patients. An early identification and appropriate treatment of diabetic foot problems can prevent devastating consequences such as limb amputation. Several studies have demonstrated that temperature variations in the plantar region can be related to diabetic foot problems. Infrared thermography has been successfully used to detect complication related to diabetic foot, mainly because it is presented as a rapid, non-contact and non-invasive technique to visualize the temperature distribution of the feet. In this review, an overview of studies that relate foot temperature with diabetic foot problems through infrared thermography is presented. Through this research, it can be appreciated the potential of infrared thermography and the benefits that this technique present in this application. This paper also presents the different methods for thermogram analysis and the advantages and disadvantages of each one, being the asymmetric analysis the method most used so far.

  15. Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, Jason; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2016-03-15

    Wind energy is a variable and uncertain renewable resource that has long been used to produce mechanical work, and has developed into a large producer of global electricity needs. As renewable sources of energy and feedstocks become more important globally to produce sustainable products, many different processes have started adopting wind power as an energy source. Many times this is through a conversion to hydrogen through electrolysis that allows for a more continuous process input. Other important pathways include methanol and ammonia. As the demand for sustainable products and production pathways increases, and wind power capital costs decrease, the role of wind power in chemical and energy production seems poised to increase significantly.

  16. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  17. Priorities in offloading the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2012-02-01

    Biomechanical factors play an important role in diabetic foot disease. Reducing high foot pressures (i.e. offloading) is one of the main goals in healing and preventing foot ulceration. Evidence-based guidelines show the strong association between the efficacy to offload the foot and clinical outcome. However, several aspects related to offloading are underexposed. First, in the management of foot complications, offloading is mostly studied as a single entity, whereas it should be analysed in a broader perspective of contributing factors to better predict clinical outcome. This includes assessment of patient behavioural factors such as type and intensity of daily physical activity and adherence to prescribed treatment. Second, a large gap exists between evidence-based recommendations and clinical practice in the use of offloading for ulcer treatment, and this gap needs to be bridged. Possible ways to achieve this are discussed in this article. Third, our knowledge about the efficacy and role of offloading in treating complicated and non-plantar neuropathic foot ulcers needs to be expanded because these ulcers currently dominate presentation in multidisciplinary foot practice. Finally, foot ulcer prevention is underexposed when compared with ulcer treatment. Prevention requires a larger focus, in particular regarding the efficacy of therapeutic footwear and its relative role in comparison with other preventative strategies. These priorities need the attention of clinicians, scientists and professional societies to improve our understanding of offloading and to improve clinical outcome in the management of the diabetic foot.

  18. Complications of Pediatric Foot and Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime R

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures account for 5% and foot fractures account for approximately 8% of fractures in children. Some complications are evident early in the treatment or natural history of foot and ankle fractures. Other complications do not become apparent until weeks, months, or years after the original fracture. The incidence of long-term sequelae like posttraumatic arthritis from childhood foot and ankle fractures is poorly studied because decades or lifelong follow-up has frequently not been accomplished. This article discusses a variety of complications associated with foot and ankle fractures in children or the treatment of these injuries.

  19. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (P<0.05), decreased contact surface on the hindfoot (P<0.03). While results indicated the important role of foot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions.

  20. Full Scale Wind Tunnel and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction progress, Full Scale entrance cone looking north, exit cone looking south, wind vanes north end, wind vanes north end of east return passage, wind vanes south end of west exit cone looking north east, wind vanes at south end of east exit cone looking north west, entrance cone looking south from north end. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) entrance cone under construction. Smith DeFrance describes the entrance cone in NACA TR 459 as follows: 'The entrance cone is 75 feet in length and in this distance the cross section changes from a rectangle 72 by 110 feet to a 30 by 60 foot elliptic section. The area reduction in the entrance cone is slightly less than 5:1. The shape of the entrance cone was chosen to give as fas as possible a constant acceleration to the air stream and to retain a 9-foot length of nozzle for directing the flow.' (p. 293)

  1. Foot Pain and Pronated Foot Type are Associated with Self-Reported Mobility Limitations in Older Adults: the Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Menz, Hylton B.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Katz, Patricia; Hannan, Marian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The foot plays an important role in supporting the body when undertaking weight bearing activities. Aging is associated with an increased prevalence of foot pain and a lowering of the arch of the foot, both of which may impair mobility. Objective To examine the associations of foot pain, foot posture and dynamic foot function with self-reported mobility limitations in community-dwelling older adults. Methods Foot examinations were conducted on 1,860 members of the Framingham Study in 2002–2005. Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus or cavus using static pressure measurements, and foot function was categorized as normal, pronated or supinated using dynamic pressure measurements. Participants were asked whether they had foot pain and any difficulty performing a list of nine weight bearing tasks. Multivariate logistic regression and linear regression models were used to examine the associations of foot pain, posture, function and ability to perform these activities. Results After adjusting for age, sex, height and weight, foot pain was significantly associated with difficulty performing all nine weight bearing activities. Compared to those with normal foot posture and function, participants with planus foot posture were more likely to report difficulty remaining balanced (odds ratio [OR] = 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 1.85; p=0.018) and individuals with pronated foot function were more likely to report difficulty walking across a small room (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 4.22; p=0.045). Foot pain and planus foot posture were associated with an overall mobility limitation score combining performances on each measure. Conclusion Foot pain, planus foot posture and pronated foot function are associated with self-reported difficulty undertaking common weight bearing tasks. Interventions to reduce foot pain and improve foot posture and function may therefore have a role in improving mobility in older adults. PMID:26645379

  2. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  3. A new ankle foot orthosis for running.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David; Moore, Allan; Chandrashekar, Naveen

    2009-09-01

    Traumatic knee injuries in automobile accidents and sports often lead to damage of the peroneal nerve. A lack of control of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve due to this damage, results in the inability to dorsiflex and evert the foot and to extend the toes. This condition is commonly known as foot drop. Foot drop reduces the stability in the body while walking and running and may also cause injury due to lack of foot clearance during the swing phase of the gait. Traditionally, an ankle foot orthosis (AFO), comprised of a moulded sheet of plastic that conforms around the posterior calf and distally contains all or part of the calcaneous as well as the plantar foot, is used to treat foot drop. The intent of this orthosis is to dorsiflex the foot to provide clearance during the swing phase of walking and running. Traditional AFO results in increased pressures due to a decrease in dorsiflexion range of motion at the ankle and make the orthosis increasingly uncomfortable to wear. Several other existing designs of foot drop AFO suffer from similar inadequacies. To address these issues, a new AFO was developed. The device was successfully used by one person with foot drop without issues for more than one year. This new design conforms to the lower anterior shin and dorsum of the foot using dorsiassist Tamarack ankle joints to allow for greater plantar and dorsiflexion range of motion. While still limiting ankle inversion it does allow for more ankle eversion. This orthosis can be discretely worn inside shoes due to its smaller size, and can be worn for a longer period of time without discomfort.

  4. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented.

  5. A 2025+ View of the Art of Wind Tunnel Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Department of Defense [DoD] or National Aeronautics and Space Administration [ NASA ]). The GTTC considered wind tunnel testing a foundational activity...requirement for wind tunnel hours, this workload is highly variable because of the cycles of major national programs. NASA recently reported in the Newport...Tunnel 16S (inactive); the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure (closed and probably to be demolished), Low Turbulence Pressure (closed), 30 3 60

  6. The madura foot: looking deep.

    PubMed

    Venkatswami, Sandhya; Sankarasubramanian, Anandan; Subramanyam, Shobana

    2012-03-01

    "Mycetoma" means a fungal tumor. Mycetoma is a chronic, granulomatous, subcutaneous tissue infection caused by both bacteria (actinomycetoma) and fungi (eumycetoma). This chronic infection was termed Madura foot and eventually mycetoma, owing to its etiology. Inoculation commonly follows minor trauma, predominantly to the foot and hence is seen more among the barefoot-walking populations, common among adult males aged 20 to 50 years. The hallmark triad of the disease includes tumefaction, fistulization of the abscess, and extrusion of colored grains. The color of these extruded grains in the active phase of the disease offers a clue to diagnosis. Radiology, ultrasonology, cytology, histology, immunodiagnosis, and culture are tools used in diagnosis. Recently, DNA sequencing has also been used successfully. Though both infections manifest with similar clinical findings, Actinomycetoma has a rapid course and can lead to amputation or death secondary to systemic spread. However, actinomycetomas are more responsive to antibiotics, whereas eumycetomas require surgical excision in addition to antifungals. Complications include secondary bacterial infections that can progress to full-blown bacteremia or septicemia, resulting in death. With extremely disfiguring sequelae, following the breakdown of the nodules and formation of discharging sinuses, it poses a therapeutic challenge.

  7. Classification of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Game, Frances

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the relative importance of factors involved in the development of diabetic foot problems can vary in both their presence and severity between patients and lesions. This may be one of the reasons why outcomes seem to vary centre to centre and why some treatments may seem more effective in some people than others. There is a need therefore to classify and describe lesions of the foot in patients with diabetes in a manner that is agreed across all communities but is simple to use in clinical practice. No single system is currently in widespread use, although a number have been published. Not all are well validated outside the system from which they were derived, and it has not always been made clear the clinical purposes to which such classifications should be put to use, whether that be for research, clinical description in routine clinical care or audit. Here the currently published classification systems, their validation in clinical practice, whether they were designed for research, audit or clinical care, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are explored.

  8. Data reduction formulas for the 16-foot transonic tunnel: NASA Langley Research Center, revision 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Charles E.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Capone, Francis J.; Grayston, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    The equations used by the 16-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel in the data reduction programs are presented in nine modules. Each module consists of equations necessary to achieve a specific purpose. These modules are categorized in the following groups: (1) tunnel parameters; (2) jet exhaust measurements; (3) skin friction drag; (4) balance loads and model attitudes calculations; (5) internal drag (or exit-flow distribution); (6) pressure coefficients and integrated forces; (7) thrust removal options; (8) turboprop options; and (9) inlet distortion.

  9. Langley 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel test engineer's data acquisition and reduction manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinto, P. Frank; Orie, Nettie M.

    1994-01-01

    The Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel is used to test a large variety of aircraft and nonaircraft models. To support these investigations, a data acquisition system has been developed that has both static and dynamic capabilities. The static data acquisition and reduction system is described; the hardware and software of this system are explained. The theory and equations used to reduce the data obtained in the wind tunnel are presented; the computer code is not included.

  10. 13. 64 foot truss oblique view of the 64 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 64 foot truss - oblique view of the 64 foot pony truss showing its general configuration. The 80 foot pony trusses are similar. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  11. Cold-Weather Foot Care Key for Diabetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163022.html Cold-Weather Foot Care Key for Diabetics It's important to ... potentially serious foot problems, especially during the cold weather, a foot and ankle specialist warns. "When it ...

  12. Diabetic Foot and Risk: How to Prevent Losing Your Leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... closely for any of the above-mentioned changes. Foot injuries that occur without the person's knowledge can be ...

  13. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  14. Back to School Foot Pain (Flip-Flops)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  15. Robust Foot Clearance Estimation Based on the Integration of Foot-Mounted IMU Acceleration Data.

    PubMed

    Benoussaad, Mourad; Sijobert, Benoît; Mombaur, Katja; Coste, Christine Azevedo

    2015-12-23

    This paper introduces a method for the robust estimation of foot clearance during walking, using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the subject's foot. The proposed solution is based on double integration and drift cancellation of foot acceleration signals. The method is insensitive to misalignment of IMU axes with respect to foot axes. Details are provided regarding calibration and signal processing procedures. Experimental validation was performed on 10 healthy subjects under three walking conditions: normal, fast and with obstacles. Foot clearance estimation results were compared to measurements from an optical motion capture system. The mean error between them is significantly less than 15 % under the various walking conditions.

  16. Foot Swelling during Air Travel: A Concern?

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Edema What causes leg and foot swelling during air travel? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Leg and foot ... 191. Sterns RH. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of edema in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ...

  17. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... density. A footing must support every pier. Footings are to be either: (1) Concrete. (i) Four inch nominal precast concrete pads meeting or exceeding ASTM C 90-02a, Standard Specification for Loadbearing Concrete... compressive strength of 1,200 pounds per square inch (psi); or (ii) Six inch minimum poured-in-place...

  18. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... density. A footing must support every pier. Footings are to be either: (1) Concrete. (i) Four inch nominal precast concrete pads meeting or exceeding ASTM C 90-02a, Standard Specification for Loadbearing Concrete... compressive strength of 1,200 pounds per square inch (psi); or (ii) Six inch minimum poured-in-place...

  19. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... protection equipment when potential foot injury may result from impact, falling or flying objects, electrical... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or objects... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104...

  1. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except when... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33...

  2. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except when... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33...

  3. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... protection equipment when potential foot injury may result from impact, falling or flying objects, electrical... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115...

  4. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or objects... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104...

  5. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  6. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115 Foot protection. (a) The railroad or railroad contractor shall require railroad bridge workers to wear...

  7. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115 Foot protection. (a) The railroad or railroad contractor shall require railroad bridge workers to wear...

  8. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115 Foot protection. (a) The railroad or railroad contractor shall require railroad bridge workers to wear...

  9. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  10. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  11. Is the foot elevation the optimal position for wound healing of a diabetic foot?

    PubMed

    Park, D J; Han, S K; Kim, W K

    2010-03-01

    In managing diabetic foot ulcers, foot elevation has generally been recommended to reduce oedema and prevent other sequential problems. However, foot elevation may decrease tissue oxygenation of the foot more than the dependent position since the dependent position is known to increase blood flow within the arterial system. In addition, diabetic foot ulcers, which have peripheral vascular insufficiency, generally have less oedema than other wounds. Therefore, we argue that foot elevation may not be helpful for healing of vascularly compromised diabetic foot ulcers since adequate tissue oxygenation is an essential factor in diabetic wound healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of foot height on tissue oxygenation and to determine the optimal foot position to accelerate wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers. This study included 122 cases (73 males and 47 females; two males had bilateral disease) of diabetic foot ulcer patients aged 40-93 years. Trans-cutaneous partial oxygen tension (TcpO(2)) values of diabetic feet were measured before and after foot elevation (n=21). Elevation was achieved by placing a foot over four cushions. We also measured foot TcpO(2) values before and after lowering the feet (n=122). Feet were lowered to the patient's tibial height, approximately 30-35 cm, beside a bed handrail. Due to the large number of lowering measurements, we divided them into five sub-groups according to initial TcpO(2.) Tissue oxygenation values were compared. Foot-elevation-lowered TcpO(2) values before and after elevation were 32.5+/-22.2 and 23.8+/-23.1 mmHg (p<0.01), respectively. Foot-lowering-augmented TcpO(2) values before and after lowering were 44.6+/-23.8 and 58.0+/-25.9 mmHg (p<0.01), respectively. The lower the initial TcpO(2) level, the more the TcpO(2) level increased. The foot lowering, rather than elevation, significantly augments TcpO(2) and may stimulate healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

  12. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel...

  13. Foot roll-over evaluation based on 3D dynamic foot scan.

    PubMed

    Samson, William; Van Hamme, Angèle; Sanchez, Stéphane; Chèze, Laurence; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Feipel, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Foot roll-over is commonly analyzed to evaluate gait pathologies. The current study utilized a dynamic foot scanner (DFS) to analyze foot roll-over. The right feet of ten healthy subjects were assessed during gait trials with a DFS system integrated into a walkway. A foot sole picture was computed by vertically projecting points from the 3D foot shape which were lower than a threshold height of 15 mm. A 'height' value of these projected points was determined; corresponding to the initial vertical coordinates prior to projection. Similar to pedobarographic analysis, the foot sole picture was segmented into anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) to process mean height (average of height data by ROI) and projected surface (area of the projected foot sole by ROI). Results showed that these variables evolved differently to plantar pressure data previously reported in the literature, mainly due to the specificity of each physical quantity (millimeters vs Pascals). Compared to plantar pressure data arising from surface contact by the foot, the current method takes into account the whole plantar aspect of the foot, including the parts that do not make contact with the support surface. The current approach using height data could contribute to a better understanding of specific aspects of foot motion during walking, such as plantar arch height and the windlass mechanism. Results of this study show the underlying method is reliable. Further investigation is required to validate the DFS measurements within a clinical context, prior to implementation into clinical practice.

  14. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  15. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  16. Ultrasound evaluation of foot deformities in infants.

    PubMed

    Miron, Marie-Claude; Grimard, Guy

    2016-02-01

    Foot deformity in infants is the most common congenital musculoskeletal condition. A precise diagnosis can sometimes be impossible to establish clinically. Radiologic imaging plays a major role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal abnormalities. However conventional imaging techniques, such as plain radiographs of the foot, are of very little help in this age group because of the lack of ossification of the tarsal bones. US presents a significant advantage because it permits the visualization of cartilaginous structures. This leads to the detailed assessment of foot deformities in infants. Furthermore, US can also be used as a dynamic imaging modality. Different scanning views are beneficial to evaluate the complete anatomy of the foot; depending on the suspected clinical diagnosis, some planes are more informative to display the pathological features of a specific deformity. We describe the US findings of five of the most common foot deformities referred to our pediatric orthopedic clinic (clubfoot, simple metatarsus adductus, skewfoot, and oblique and vertical talus). For each deformity we propose a specific imaging protocol based on US to provide an accurate diagnosis. US is a complementary tool to the clinical examination for determining the diagnosis and the severity of the deformity and also for monitoring the efficacy of treatment. Radiologists investigating foot deformities in infants should consider using US for the detailed assessment of the foot in this age group.

  17. Surgical treatment of the Charcot foot.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    With the increased number of diabetics worldwide and the increased incidence of morbid obesity in more prosperous cultures, there has become an increased awareness of Charcot arthropathy of the foot and ankle. Outcome studies would suggest that patients with deformity associated with Charcot Foot arthropathy have impaired health related quality of life. This awareness has led reconstructive-minded foot and ankle surgeons to develop surgical strategies to treat these acquired deformities. This article outlines the current clinical approach to this disabling medical condition.

  18. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  19. 77 FR 29633 - Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC, Alta Wind XIII, LLC, Alta Wind XIV, LLC, Alta Wind XV, LLC, Alta Windpower Development, LLC, TGP Development... 385.207, Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind...

  20. Effects of water temperature on cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation during foot immersion (foot bath)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, M.; Ono, K.; Onodera, S.

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to make clear the effects of water temperature during foot immersion (foot bath) on heart rate, blood pressure, rectal temperature and autonomic nervous system modulation. The subjects performed foot immersion at 25, 35, 41 and 45 degrees Celsius at random, during different days, but always at the same time. Cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation was estimated with the power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability by using the Fast Fourier Transformation. The two frequency components of HRV was measured by integrate low frequency (LF; 0.04- 0.15 Hz) and high frequency (HF; 0.15- 0.40 Hz). HF was used as an indicator of cardiac vagal modulation and was showed logarithmically (LogHF). LogHF during foot immersion at 35 and 41 degrees Celsius was significantly increased. These data indicate that cardiac vagal activity was affected by water temperature during foot immersion (foot bath).

  1. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... all ages. They perform reconstructive procedures, treat sports injuries, and manage and treat trauma of the foot and ankle. Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons work ...

  2. Foot Progression Angle Walking Test

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Gaudiani, Michael A.; Slullitel, Pablo A.; Satalich, James; Rebolledo, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Determining an accurate clinical diagnosis for nonarthritic hip pain may be challenging, as symptoms related to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip instability can be difficult to elucidate with current testing methods. In addition, commonly utilized physical examination maneuvers are static and do not include a dynamic or weightbearing assessment to reproduce activity-related symptoms. Therefore, implementing a dynamic assessment for FAI and hip instability could help to improve diagnostic accuracy for routine clinical examinations of patients with nonarthritic hip pain. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a novel diagnostic foot progression angle walking (FPAW) test for identifying hip pathology related to FAI or hip instability. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This prospective study included 199 consecutive patients who were evaluated for unilateral hip pain and who underwent FPAW testing along with standard physical examination testing. Demographic data, including age, sex and hip laterality, were collected from each patient. FPAW testing was performed with directed internal and external foot progression angles from their baseline measurements, with a positive test reproducing pain and/or discomfort. Comparisons were then made with flexion adduction internal rotation (FADIR) and flexion abduction external rotation (FABER) tests as the designated diagnostic standard examinations for FAI and hip instability, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, along with the McNemar chi-square test for group comparison, were used to generate summary statistics. In addition, areas under the combined receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) of test performance were calculated for both FPAW and the designated standard examination tests (FADIR, FABER). Radiographic imaging was used subsequently to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The average age of the study cohort was 35.4 ± 11.8 years, with 114 patients being

  3. Shoes, orthoses, and prostheses for partial foot amputation and diabetic foot infection.

    PubMed

    Janisse, Dennis J; Janisse, Erick J

    2010-09-01

    Amputations in patients with diabetes, while often preventable, are unfortunately a far too common outcome. The roles of the certified or licensed pedorthist, certified orthotist, and the certified prosthetist should not be undervalued in the prevention of diabetic foot complications (eg, amputations, revisions, and foot infections secondary to skin ulcerations) and in returning the patient a normal, active, and productive lifestyle in the event of an amputation. This article highlights the roles these specialists play in treating patients with partial foot amputation.

  4. Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  5. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Hobizal, Kimberlee B.; Wukich, Dane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage. PMID:22577496

  6. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing... injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing the sole, or when the use of...

  7. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy J

    2006-11-01

    Although dancers develop overuse injuries common in other athletes, they are also susceptible to unique injuries. This article reviews common foot and ankle problems seen in dancers and provides some basic diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  8. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the United States. However, in some countries in Asia, outbreaks are large and occur often. Thousands of ... learn more about outbreaks occurring in countries in Asia, visit the World Health Organization . Podcast: Hand, Foot, ...

  9. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist.

  10. Functional anatomy and imaging of the foot.

    PubMed

    Ridola, C; Palma, A

    2001-01-01

    The foot is constituted from a series of small bones making a segmented structure with multiple joints, likened to a dome, in contact with the ground in three points: posteriorly the calcanear tuberosity; anteriorly and medially the head of 1st metatarsum, and anteriorly and laterally the head of 5th metatarsum. In fact, each foot presents a semi-arch whose base is represented by the lateral border and the summit by the medial border of the foot. The foot has been likened to a half-dome, so that when the medial borders of the two feet are placed together, a complete dome is formed. In the foot are present two longitudinal arches: the medial consists of the calcaneus, the talus, the navicular, the three cuneiform bones and the first three metatarsal bones. It is more arcuated and elastic then the lateral, that consist of the calcaneus, the cuboid and the 4th and 5th metatarsus. This is flattened and in contact with the ground. We can identify two transverse arches between longitudinal arches, extending from the medial to the lateral borders of the foot: the first is a lancet dome, between midfoot and forefoot, at the tarsometatarsal joint level; it consists of the bases of the metatarsal bones and the cuboid and the three cuneiform bones; the second is at flat dome, in correspondence of forefoot, at the metatarsophalangeal joint level; it consists of the bases of the proximal phalanges of the fingers and the head of five metatarsal bones. Longitudinal and transversal arches are supported from: the shape of stones of the structure (foot bones); the long and short plantar ligaments, larger and stronger than the dorsal ligaments, tie together the lower edges of the bones; a beam (the plantar aponeurosis and the plantar muscles and tendons) connecting the ends of the bridge effectively prevents separation of the pillars and consequent sagging of the arch; the maintenance of the arch depends on multiple support (ligaments, tendons of extrinsic muscles of the foot

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  12. Care of the pediatric foot in myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Noonan, K J; Didelot, W P; Lindseth, R E

    2000-06-01

    Foot deformity is present in almost all patients paralyzed by myelomeningocele. This article outlines the pertinent pathoanatomy resulting in differing foot deformities and their effects on normal gait. Treatment of these deformities is discussed, and the most common deformities present for the different levels of paralysis are outlined. Emphasis is placed on surgical and orthotic treatments, which result in functional improvements for the pediatric patient with spina bifida.

  13. Neuropathic foot ulceration in patients with myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Maynard, M J; Weiner, L S; Burke, S W

    1992-01-01

    To determine if a significant relationship existed between type of operation and eventual development of pedal skin breakdown in a spina bifida patient population, 72 feet in 36 ambulatory patients with low lumbar or sacral myelomeningocele were followed for an average of 14 years 5 months. Using a clinical classification for foot suppleness and position, we determined that foot rigidity, nonplantigrade position, and performance of surgical arthrodesis were clinical indicators that had a strong statistical relationship with eventual development of neuropathic skin changes.

  14. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  15. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  16. Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, Marvin J.; Baxt, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. The disease was initially described in the 16th century and was the first animal pathogen identified as a virus. Recent FMD outbreaks in developed countries and their significant economic impact have increased the concern of governments worldwide. This review describes the reemergence of FMD in developed countries that had been disease free for many years and the effect that this has had on disease control strategies. The etiologic agent, FMD virus (FMDV), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is examined in detail at the genetic, structural, and biochemical levels and in terms of its antigenic diversity. The virus replication cycle, including virus-receptor interactions as well as unique aspects of virus translation and shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis, is discussed. This information has been the basis for the development of improved protocols to rapidly identify disease outbreaks, to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, and to begin to identify and test novel vaccine candidates. Furthermore, this knowledge, coupled with the ability to manipulate FMDV genomes at the molecular level, has provided the framework for examination of disease pathogenesis and the development of a more complete understanding of the virus and host factors involved. PMID:15084510

  17. [Charcot arthropathy and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    López-Gavito, E; Parra-Téllez, P; Vázquez-Escamilla, J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major chronic degenerative disease, which currently is taking on alarming proportions in the population of our country. Neuropathic arthropathy is one of the most interesting degenerative joint disorders and increasingly common within the orthopedic pathology. It is defined as a progressive degenerative arthropathy, chronic and affecting one or more peripheral joints, and develops as a result of the lack of sensory perception normal in the innervation of joints. As a result the joints of the feet are subjected to trauma and repetitive injury causing a neurotraumatic effect with progressive damage to the joints of the hindfoot, midfoot and forefoot. Diagnosis includes a proper medical history, careful examination of the affected limb, conventional X-ray, scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in some cases. Conservative treatment includes: drugs, rest of the affected limb, and the use of appliances like total-contact cast, orthotics or special shoes. Surgical treatment depends on the stage of the disease, and may require one or more surgical procedures, in order to achieve a full foot plantar support to prevent ulcers. One of the surgeries performed most often is the fusion of damaged joints. Surgery must be performed only in the coalescence phase of the disease, using internal, or external fixation or both.

  18. The Charcot foot: pathophysiology, diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Trieb, K

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic changes in the foot are common with a prevalence of approximately 1%. The diagnosis of neuropathic arthropathy is often delayed in diabetic patients with harmful consequences including amputation. The appropriate diagnosis and treatment can avoid an extensive programme of treatment with significant morbidity for the patient, high costs and delayed surgery. The pathogenesis of a Charcot foot involves repetitive micro-trauma in a foot with impaired sensation and neurovascular changes caused by pathological innervation of the blood vessels. In most cases, changes are due to a combination of both pathophysiological factors. The Charcot foot is triggered by a combination of mechanical, vascular and biological factors which can lead to late diagnosis and incorrect treatment and eventually to destruction of the foot. This review aims to raise awareness of the diagnosis of the Charcot foot (diabetic neuropathic osteoarthropathy and the differential diagnosis, erysipelas, peripheral arterial occlusive disease) and describe the ways in which the diagnosis may be made. The clinical diagnostic pathways based on different classifications are presented. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1155-9.

  19. 20. 80 foot pony truss an upper chord pin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. 80 foot pony truss - an upper chord pin connection at a vertical post other than at the end post. Common to the five 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot truss, there are two pairs per 80 foot truss and one pair on the 64 foot truss for a total of 22. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  20. Remote Sensing Wind and Wind Shear System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Remote sensing of wind shear and the theory and development of acoustic doppler; Wind studies; A comparison of methods for the remote detection of winds in the airport environment; Acoustic doppler system development; System calibration; Airport operational tests.

  1. Blade design and operating experience on the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    Two 60 foot long aluminum wind turbine blades were operated for over 3000 hours on the MOD-OA wind turbine. The first signs of blade structural damage were observed after 400 hours of operation. Details of the blade design, loads, cost, structural damage, and repair are discussed.

  2. Wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion on wind energy systems involved with the DOE wind energy program is presented. Some of the problems associated with wind energy systems are discussed. The cost, efficiency, and structural design of wind energy systems are analyzed.

  3. Laser velocimeter data acquisition system for the Langley 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel. Software reference guide version 3.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, Judith K.

    1994-01-01

    The Laser Velocimeter Data Acquisition System (LVDAS) in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Tunnel is controlled by a comprehensive software package. The software package was designed to control the data acquisition process during wind tunnel tests which employ a laser velocimeter measurement system. This report provides detailed explanations on how to configure and operate the LVDAS system to acquire laser velocimeter and static wind tunnel data.

  4. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the

  5. Verification analysis of the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform wind energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Robert E.

    1988-09-01

    A unique wind energy system, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) is studied. The TARP system places the rotors in pairs on either side of a torus-shaped platform, so that the wind is forced to flow into the rotors. As the wind is forced around the form, it picks up velocity and turns the rotors faster, generating more power. By concentrating the wind's power, the TARP system can be constructed in modules using 10 foot diameter rotor blades. Mounted on a track suspension system, the rotors are able to yaw with the wind to take advantage of breezes from any direction. The basic TARP design was tested and modified in a wind tunnel. The system was then analyzed for its integration into a farm silo and as a multistacked wind power needle. It was determined that the TARP technology would be feasible for application involving sites with high wind velocities, including some sites in New York State.

  6. Robust Foot Clearance Estimation Based on the Integration of Foot-Mounted IMU Acceleration Data

    PubMed Central

    Benoussaad, Mourad; Sijobert, Benoît; Mombaur, Katja; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for the robust estimation of foot clearance during walking, using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the subject’s foot. The proposed solution is based on double integration and drift cancellation of foot acceleration signals. The method is insensitive to misalignment of IMU axes with respect to foot axes. Details are provided regarding calibration and signal processing procedures. Experimental validation was performed on 10 healthy subjects under three walking conditions: normal, fast and with obstacles. Foot clearance estimation results were compared to measurements from an optical motion capture system. The mean error between them is significantly less than 15% under the various walking conditions. PMID:26703622

  7. Diagnostic considerations of lateral column foot pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Traister, Eric; Simons, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Foot maladies are often classified descriptively by general foot locations, i.e., forefoot, midfoot, and rearfoot. However, common vernacular verbiage, implicating a common biomechanical purpose, also applies pathology to the medial or lateral foot column. Although imprecisely defined, lateral column injuries to the foot encompass conditions that affect any of the lateral side of the foot from the calcaneus to the toes. The lateral column of the foot includes the calcaneus, the cuboid, the fourth and fifth metatarsals as well as the calcaneocuboid, cuboido-metatarsal, and intermetatarsal joints. It may be helpful to think in a "lateral column" fashion when evaluating and treating certain lateral foot injuries, load patterns, and biomechanical or anatomical faults. Misdiagnosed injuries in this area of the foot can be a source of great morbidity to the athlete. It is important for the clinician to be aware of common conditions presenting as pain to the lateral side of the foot.

  8. 11 Foot Unitary Plan Tunnel Facility Optical Improvement Large Window Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, Veronica M.

    2015-01-01

    The test section of the 11 by 11-foot Unitary Plan Transonic Wind Tunnel (11-foot UPWT) may receive an upgrade of larger optical windows on both the North and South sides. These new larger windows will provide better access for optical imaging of test article flow phenomena including surface and off body flow characteristics. The installation of these new larger windows will likely produce a change to the aerodynamic characteristics of the flow in the Test Section. In an effort understand the effect of this change, a computational model was employed to predict the flows through the slotted walls, in the test section and around the model before and after the tunnel modification. This report documents the solid CAD model that was created and the inviscid computational analysis that was completed as a preliminary estimate of the effect of the changes.

  9. Wind sensitivity studies of a non-return wind tunnel with a 216- by 432-mm (8.5- by 17.0-inches) test section, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.; Piazza, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The refinement of inlet and exit treatments were studied which would minimize the effect of external wind on the test-section flow quality of a nonreturn wind tunnel. The investigation was conducted in the Ames Research Center 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel which served as the wind source. Several inlets and two exits were tested at wind directions ranging from 0 to 180 degrees and at wind-to-test-section velocity ratios from zero to somewhat greater than one. For the best inlet configuration the flow quality was good, with a velocity deviation in each of the three component directions generally less. The loss in total pressure due to the inlet treatment was low: about 0.035 of the test-section dynamic pressure for the no-wind case.

  10. Wind sensitivity studies of a non-return wind tunnel, with a 216- by 432-mm (8.5- by 17.0-inch) test section, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.; Piazza, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The study to develop inlet and exit treatments which would minimize the effect of external wind on the test-section flow quality of a nonreturn wind tunnel is reported. The investigation was conducted in the Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel which served as the wind source. Several inlets and two exits were tested at wind directions ranging from 0 to 180 degrees and at wind-to-test-section velocity ratios between zero and one. For the best inlet configuration the flow quality was good, with a velocity deviation in each of the three directions generally less than 1/2 knot (0.26 m/sec) for wind velocities of 15 knots (7.7 m/sec) or less. The loss in total pressure due to the inlet treatment was low: about 0.03 of the test-section dynamic pressure.

  11. Nursing care of the aging foot.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Feet are not necessarily the most attractive part of the body as it ages, and given the choice, most older adults would rather ignore them. In fact, many older adults cannot even see them, reach them, or care for them properly. And when they ache or look misshapen and oddly colored; well, that's just part of growing old, isn't it? The feet are important for weight bearing, balance, and mobility. Over an average life span, the feet are subject to considerable stress and trauma. Age-related changes of the foot predispose the older adult to discomfort if not pain, fungal infection, reduced range of motion, and itchy dry skin. More than three fourths of older adults (i.e., those age over 65 years) complain of foot pain that is associated with a significant foot problem and have evidence of arthritic changes on x-ray. Impaired ambulation can make the difference between independence versus dependency on others, engagement versus isolation. Assisted living is about choices. Being unable to get where one wants to go or do what one wants to do because of foot problems is a barrier to full enjoyment of the opportunities in assisted living communities. This article describes foot problems associated with aging, diabetes, nursing assessment of the feet, and nursing interventions in the service of accessing and optimizing choices for quality of life.

  12. How visual perceptual grouping influences foot placement

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, John; Goodwin, Charlotte; Burn, Jeremy F.; Leonards, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Everybody would agree that vision guides locomotion; but how does vision influence choice when there are different solutions for possible foot placement? We addressed this question by investigating the impact of perceptual grouping on foot placement in humans. Participants performed a stepping stone task in which pathways consisted of target stones in a spatially regular path of foot falls and visual distractor stones in their proximity. Target and distractor stones differed in shape and colour so that each subset of stones could be easily grouped perceptually. In half of the trials, one target stone swapped shape and colour with a distractor in its close proximity. We show that in these ‘swapped’ conditions, participants chose the perceptually groupable, instead of the spatially regular, stepping location in over 40% of trials, even if the distance between perceptually groupable steps was substantially larger than normal step width/length. This reveals that the existence of a pathway that could be traversed without spatial disruption to periodic stepping is not sufficient to guarantee participants will select it and suggests competition between different types of visual input when choosing foot placement. We propose that a bias in foot placement choice in favour of visual grouping exists as, in nature, sudden changes in visual characteristics of the ground increase the uncertainty for stability. PMID:26587273

  13. Rear-foot, mid-foot and fore-foot motion during the stance phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Leardini, A; Benedetti, M G; Berti, L; Bettinelli, D; Nativo, R; Giannini, S

    2007-03-01

    This paper proposes a new protocol designed to track a large number of foot segments during the stance phase of gait with the smallest possible number of markers, with particular clinical focus on coronal plane alignment of the rear-foot, transverse and sagittal plane alignment of the metatarsal bones, and changes at the medial longitudinal arch. The shank, calcaneus, mid-foot and metatarsus were assumed to be 3D rigid bodies. The longitudinal axis of the first, second and fifth metatarsal bones and the proximal phalanx of the hallux were also tracked independently. Skin markers were mounted on bony prominences or joint lines, avoiding the course of main tendons. Trajectories of the 14 markers were collected by an eight-camera motion capture system at 100 Hz on a population of 10 young volunteers. Three-dimensional joint rotations and planar angles were calculated according to anatomically based reference frames. The marker set was well visible throughout the stance phase of gait, even in a camera configuration typical of gait analysis of the full body. The time-histories of the joint rotations and planar angles were well repeatable among subjects and consistent with clinical and biomechanical knowledge. Several dynamic measurements were originally taken, such as elevation/drop of the medial longitudinal arch and of three metatarsal bones, rear-foot to fore-foot rotation and transverse plane deformation of the metatarsus. The information obtained from this protocol, consistent with previous clinical knowledge, enhanced our understanding of the dynamics of the human foot during stance.

  14. Outpatient assessment and management of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy are at risk for foot deformities and mechanical imbalance of the lower extremity. Peripheral neuropathy leads to an insensate foot that puts the patient at risk for injury. When combined with deformity due to neuropathic arthropathy, or Charcot foot, the risks of impending ulceration, infection, and amputation are significant to the diabetic patient. Education of proper foot care and shoe wear cannot be overemphasized. For those with significant malalignment or deformity of the foot and ankle, referral should be made immediately to an orthopedic foot and ankle specialist.

  15. Wind tunnel and analytical investigation of over-the-wing propulsion/air frame interferences for a short-haul aircraft at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.78. [conducted in the Lewis 8 by 6 foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, O. D.; Lopez, M. L.; Welge, H. R.; Henne, P. A.; Sewell, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of analytical calculations and wind tunnel tests at cruise speeds of a representative four engine short haul aircraft employing upper surface blowing (USB) with a supercritical wing are discussed. Wind tunnel tests covered a range of Mach number M from 0.6 to 0.78. Tests explored the use of three USB nozzle configurations. Results are shown for the isolated wing body and for each of the three nozzle types installed. Experimental results indicate that a low angle nacelle and streamline contoured nacelle yielded the same interference drag at the design Mach number. A high angle powered lift nacelle had higher interference drag primarily because of nacelle boattail low pressures and flow separation. Results of varying the spacing between the nacelles and the use of trailing edge flap deflections, wing upper surface contouring, and a convergent-divergent nozzle to reduce potential adverse jet effects were also discussed. Analytical comparisons with experimental data, made for selected cases, indicate favorable agreement.

  16. Radiologic evaluation of chronic foot pain.

    PubMed

    Joong, Mo Ahn; El-Khoury, Georges Y

    2007-10-01

    Chronic foot pain is a common and often disabling clinical complaint that can interfere with a patient's routine activities. Despite careful and detailed clinical history and physical examination, providing an accurate diagnosis is often difficult because chronic foot pain has a broad spectrum of potential causes. Therefore, imaging studies play a key role in diagnosis and management. Initial assessment is typically done by plain radiography; however, magnetic resonance imaging has superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar capability, which makes it important in the early diagnosis of ambiguous or clinically equivocal cases when initial radiographic findings are inconclusive. Computed tomography displays bony detail in stress fractures, as well as in arthritides and tarsal coalition. Bone scanning and ultrasonography also are useful tools for diagnosing specific conditions that produce chronic foot pain.

  17. [Mycetoma of the foot: a case report].

    PubMed

    Iniesta, A; Baptista, C; Guinard, D; Legré, R; Gay, A

    2015-04-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous and subcutaneous pathology caused by either a fongic (eumycetoma) or bacterial (actinomycetoma) infection, which lead to a granulomatous tumefaction with multiple sinuses. When localized in the foot this infection is named "Madura foot". This infection is endemic to tropical and subtropical regions and rarely occurs in western countries. A historical case in Europe of a foot mycetoma evolving since 20 years without any treatment is presented. A histopathologic diagnosis of actinomycetoma has been done in 1987. The patient presented a severe Staphylococcus aureus chronic osteitis leading to a trans-tibial amputation. This case allows to present this infection which, even if rarely presented in France, can be meet especially among a migrant's population.

  18. Approach to managing diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, John A. A.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Of an estimated 1.7 to 2 million Canadians with diabetes, approximately 10% will present each year to their family doctors with plantar ulcers. Nearly 3500 will require major lower extremity amputations. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Most of the recommendations outlined in this paper are based on level I evidence from excellent bench research and epidemiologic studies. MAIN MESSAGE: Both insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetics develop foot infections. These patients are on average 60 years old and have had diabetes for more than 10 years. Physicians who insist on excellent blood sugar control, provide ongoing patient education on diabetic foot care, prescribe appropriate shoes, and practise an aggressive multidisciplinary approach to wound care can reduce the rate of lower extremity amputations by more than 50%. CONCLUSION: Foot problems remain one of the main challenges associated with diabetes, but family physicians can manage them successfully. PMID:15116801

  19. A 100-kW wind turbine blade dynamics analysis, weight-balance, and structural test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The results of dynamic analyses, weight and balance tests, static stiffness tests, and structural vibration tests on the 60-foot-long metal blades for the ERDA-NASA 100-kW wind turbine are presented. The metal blades are shown to be free from structural or dynamic resonance at the wind turbine design speed. Aeroelastic instabilities are unlikely to occur within the normal operating range of the wind turbine.

  20. Comparison of Avian Responses to UV-Light-Reflective Paint on Wind Turbines: Subcontract Report, July 1999--December 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D. P., Jr.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Good, R. E.; Sernka, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the numbers of avian collisions with wind turbines, several measures have been employed with various levels of success. One hypothesis is that painting turbine blades to increase their visibility may reduce avian fatalities. This study examined the effects of painting wind turbine blades with UV-reflective paint on bird use and mortality at the Foote Creek Rim Wind Plant in Carbon County, Wyoming.

  1. Experiment and analysis on the flow process dynamics of the NASA-Langley eight foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, P.

    1977-01-01

    A dynamic response test performed in a eight foot transonic pressure tunnel is described. The dynamics of the flow process of the wind tunnel at transonic conditions were obtained. Descriptions of the test conditions, instrumentation, presentation of raw data, analysis of data, and finally, based on experimental evidences, an attempt to construct an input output relationship of the flow process from the viewpoints of control engineering are included.

  2. Foot Conditions among Homeless Persons: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    To, Matthew J.; Brothers, Thomas D.; Van Zoost, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot problems are common among homeless persons, but are often overlooked. The objectives of this systematic review are to summarize what is known about foot conditions and associated interventions among homeless persons. Methods A literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (1966–2016), EMBASE (1947–2016), and CINAHL (1982–2016) and complemented by manual searches of reference lists. Articles that described foot conditions in homeless persons or associated interventions were included. Data were independently extracted on: general study characteristics; participants; foot assessment methods; foot conditions and associated interventions; study findings; quality score assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Results Of 333 articles screened, 17 articles met criteria and were included in the study. Prevalence of any foot problem ranged from 9% to 65% across study populations. Common foot-related concerns were corns and calluses, nail pathologies, and infections. Foot pathologies related to chronic diseases such as diabetes were identified. Compared to housed individuals across studies, homeless individuals were more likely to have foot problems including tinea pedis, foot pain, functional limitations with walking, and improperly-fitting shoes. Discussion Foot conditions were highly prevalent among homeless individuals with up to two thirds reporting a foot health concern, approximately one quarter of individuals visiting a health professional, and one fifth of individuals requiring further follow-up due to the severity of their condition. Homeless individuals often had inadequate foot hygiene practices and improperly-fitting shoes. These findings have service provision and public health implications, highlighting the need for evidence-based interventions to improve foot health in this population. An effective interventional approach could include optimization of foot hygiene and footwear, provision of comprehensive medical treatment, and

  3. Assessing foot care knowledge in a rural population with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Neil, Janice A

    2002-01-01

    In people with insensate extremities, such as those with diabetes mellitus, daily foot care and inspection can prevent the development of foot ulcers and the subsequent complications that may lead to amputation--one of the biggest threats to adults with diabetes. Preventive behaviors focus on not going barefoot, performing/receiving proper foot care, and wearing properly fitting shoes. This descriptive study of footcare practices involved a convenience sample of 61 adult men and women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, 24 with existing foot ulcers and 37 without foot ulcers, who resided in a rural area of a southeastern state. The questionnaire was divided into four categories: foot inspection, foot cleaning, nail care, and use of footwear. Out of a possible score of 20, those with foot ulcers scored an average of 13.88 and those without ulcers averaged 13.57. These results reveal that those without foot ulcers have similar foot care practices to those with foot ulcers. This instrument is useful in assessing current foot care practices on a point-in-time basis. Preventive practices must be stressed and reinforced so those without foot ulcers do not develop ulcers.

  4. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  5. Development of a Composite Antenna Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnes, Lionel

    2012-07-01

    MECANO ID develops and produces composite parts using RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) and LRI (Liquid Resin Infusion) processes. In collaboration with THALES ALENIA SPACE and ONERA, this project aims at replacing titanium antenna feet, which interface the Earth deck antenna of a telecommunication satellite to its support panel, with composite feet. The objectives of the presentation are to detail: - The methodology applied to develop the composite antenna foot - The experimental validation of the foot sizing This project was granted by the French state and the region Midi-Pyrénées.

  6. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  7. Foot and ankle injuries in theatrical dancers.

    PubMed

    Hardaker, W T; Margello, S; Goldner, J L

    1985-10-01

    The theatrical dancer is a unique combination of athlete and artist. The physical demands of dance class, rehearsal, and performance can lead to injury, particularly to the foot and ankle. Ankle sprains are the most common acute injury. Chronic injuries predominate and relate primarily to the repeated impact loading of the foot and ankle on the dance floor. Contributing factors include anatomic variation, improper technique, and fatigue. Early and aggressive conservative management is usually successful and surgery is rarely indicated. Orthotics play a limited but potentially useful role in treatment. Following treatment, a structured rehabilitation program is fundamental to the successful return to dance.

  8. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part II. Management.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers can be optimized by using an interdisciplinary team approach addressing the correctable risk factors (ie, poor vascular supply, infection control and treatment, and plantar pressure redistribution) along with optimizing local wound care. Dermatologists can initiate diabetic foot care. The first step is recognizing that a loss of skin integrity (ie, a callus, blister, or ulcer) considerably increases the risk of preventable amputations. A holistic approach to wound assessment is required. Early detection and effective management of these ulcers can reduce complications, including preventable amputations and possible mortality.

  9. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  10. The NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel: Historical Overview, Facility Description, Calibration, Flow Characteristics, and Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Bangert, Linda S.; Asbury, Scott C.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Bare, E. Ann

    1995-01-01

    The Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel is a closed-circuit single-return atmospheric wind tunnel that has a slotted octagonal test section with continuous air exchange. The wind tunnel speed can be varied continuously over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 1.3. Test-section plenum suction is used for speeds above a Mach number of 1.05. Over a period of some 40 years, the wind tunnel has undergone many modifications. During the modifications completed in 1990, a new model support system that increased blockage, new fan blades, a catcher screen for the first set of turning vanes, and process controllers for tunnel speed, model attitude, and jet flow for powered models were installed. This report presents a complete description of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and auxiliary equipment, the calibration procedures, and the results of the 1977 and the 1990 wind tunnel calibration with test section air removal. Comparisons with previous calibrations showed that the modifications made to the wind tunnel had little or no effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of the tunnel. Information required for planning experimental investigations and the use of test hardware and model support systems is also provided.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hand-foot-genital syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encyclopedia: Hypospadias Encyclopedia: Urinary Tract Infection Health Topic: Foot Injuries and Disorders Health Topic: Hand Injuries and Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hand foot uterus syndrome Educational Resources (5 links) American Society ...

  12. 1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR A GENERATOR PAD - Fort Cronkhite, Anti-Aircraft Battery No. 1, Concrete Footing-Generator Pad, Wolf Road, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  13. 20. LOCK GATES, 3 FOOT WALKWAY, ADJUSTMENT AT GUDGEON PIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. LOCK GATES, 3 FOOT WALKWAY, ADJUSTMENT AT GUDGEON PIN AND QUOIN SHOE. May 1933 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  14. APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Ku Tree Reservoir, Valve Tower Foot Bridge, Kalakoa Stream, East Range, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    APPROACH BRIDGE PORTION OF VALVE TOWER FOOT BRIDGE, AS SEEN FROM BELOW, SHOWING VALVE TOWER TO RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTH - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Ku Tree Reservoir, Valve Tower Foot Bridge, Kalakoa Stream, East Range, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. [The gold standard in diabetic foot treatment: total contact cast].

    PubMed

    Lozano-Platonoff, Adriana; Florida Mejía-Mendoza, Melissa Desireé; Ibáñez-Doria, Mónica; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, foot complications remain one of the main health issues, with ulcers representing one of the most common. These ulcerations originate from repetitive trauma on a foot with neuropathy. Inadequate care of the diabetic foot may lead to one of the gravest complications of the diabetic foot: amputation. The key to the treatment of the diabetic foot is the control of comorbidities (glucose levels and vascular disease), debridement, exudate control with the available modern dressings, treatment of infection, and offloading the affected foot. A common error in this basic treatment is the method used for offloading, leading to delayed healing as a result, and maybe even amputation. For this purpose we propose the total contact cast considered the "gold standard" in diabetic foot offloading. The objective of the present review is to present the existing evidence in the medical literature on the effectiveness of its use for healing diabetic foot ulcers and hence preventing amputations.

  17. Real-time data reduction capabilities at the Langley 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel performs a wide range of tests employing a variety of model installation methods. To support the reduction of static data from this facility, a generalized wind tunnel data reduction program had been developed for use on the Langley central computer complex. The capabilities of a version of this generalized program adapted for real time use on a dedicated on-site computer are discussed. The input specifications, instructions for the console operator, and full descriptions of the algorithms are included.

  18. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon

  19. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  20. Careers in Wind Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liming, Drew; Hamilton, James

    2011-01-01

    As a common form of renewable energy, wind power is generating more than just electricity. It is increasingly generating jobs for workers in many different occupations. Many workers are employed on wind farms: areas where groups of wind turbines produce electricity from wind power. Wind farms are frequently located in the midwestern, western, and…

  1. Prospecting for Wind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swapp, Andy; Schreuders, Paul; Reeve, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Many people use wind to help meet their needs. Over the years, people have been able to harness or capture the wind in many different ways. More recently, people have seen the rebirth of electricity-generating wind turbines. Thus, the age-old argument about technology being either good or bad can also be applied to the wind. The wind can be a…

  2. Safety Pedal for Foot-Operated Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    Ninged structure prevents inadvertent use. Forward motion of foot on yoke plate necessary to operate brake pedal. Downward force on yoke plate turns locking/releasing laver, which then pushes locking pin into indexing hole. New pedal improves both productivity and safety of power brakes and such other machines as metal shearers and punch presses.

  3. Animal health: foot-and-mouth disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  4. Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia of the foot.

    PubMed

    Cisco, R W; McCormac, R M

    1994-01-01

    Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia is a rare benign reactive lesion usually found in thrombosed subcutaneous blood vessels. The lesion resembles malignant angiosarcoma clinically and histopathologically, and must be diagnosed correctly to avoid inappropriate treatment. The following is a case presentation involving the foot.

  5. Malignant melanoma of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    John, K J; Hayes, D W; Green, D R; Dickerson, J

    2000-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is a serious and devastating skin disease that podiatrists may be called upon to treat. It is pertinent that delays in diagnosis and treatment of malignant melanoma be avoided. Some of the topics discussed in this article are causes, clinical features, classification, and treatment of malignant melanoma, focusing on the foot and ankle.

  6. Gas Gangrene of the Diabetic Foot.

    PubMed

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L; Kuy, SreyReath

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year old man presented with a painful left foot and a putrid odor. His past medical history was significant for poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and peripheral vascular disease. His surgical history included a prior right below-knee amputation for a diabetic foot infection three years prior, and a left third toe amputation for osteomyelitis one month ago. He was an active smoker. His laboratory data revealed a white blood count of 22 k/uL and a blood glucose of 381 mg/dL. Physical exam demonstrated an erythematous and edematous left foot with subcutaneous crepitus along the plantar surface. Plain film x-rays of the left foot demonstrated gas pockets in the soft tissue and acute osteomyelitis (Figure 1). The patient was diagnosed with gas gangrene and was taken emergently to the operating room. In order to obtain source control of this life threatening infection, a left below-knee amputation was performed and broad spectrum empiric antibiotics were initiated immediately with vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam. Cultures were not obtained at the time of surgery and the organisms causing this infection are unknown. The patient survived and was discharged to a rehabilitation facility.

  7. Lightweight, Economical Device Alleviates Drop Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Corrective apparatus alleviates difficulties in walking for victims of drop foot. Elastic line attached to legband provides flexible support to toe of shoe. Device used with flat (heelless) shoes, sneakers, crepe-soled shoes, canvas shoes, and many other types of shoes not usable with short leg brace.

  8. Rare presentation of foot postaxial polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Atif; Arshad, Ambreen; Abu-Zaid, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Polydactyly is a prevalent birth anomaly observed in the foot, and a number of classification systems have been suggested for this condition. Postaxial (fifth or little toe) polydactyly is the most common type. We encountered an exceedingly rare presentation of foot postaxial polydactyly that, to our inspection, had neither been previously classified nor described in published studies. In the present report, we have described an otherwise healthy 2-year-old female who had presented to our clinic with an isolated, extra little toe on her left foot. Foot radiographs revealed the presence of all 5 metatarsals; however, the fifth metatarsal was blocked and did not give rise to the fifth toe. Instead, the fifth (medial normal) and sixth (lateral extra) toes had originated from a single, separate accessory bud from the fourth metatarsal, and the main fourth metatarsal had given rise to the normal fourth toe. The lateral sixth toe was excised, and a periosteal sleeve of the excised extra toe was used for reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament. We propose that this heretofore unmentioned presentation of postaxial polydactyly be added to the existing systems of classification of pedal polydactyly. A review of the published data pertaining to pedal polydactyly has also been presented.

  9. Work-up of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Morrison, William B; Ledermann, Hans Peter

    2002-09-01

    Diabetes is a common disease with potentially devastating complications affecting the foot and ankle. A combination of vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, and immunopathy results in a cascade of conditions including ischemia and infarction, tendinopathy, atrophy, edema, deformity, neuropathic osteoarthropathy, callus, ulceration, and infection. MRI is useful for evaluation of these complications, and assists the clinician in medical or surgical planning.

  10. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  11. The foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Bernhard; DeSilva, Jeremy M; Kidd, Robert S; Carlson, Kristian J; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2011-09-09

    A well-preserved and articulated partial foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba, including an associated complete adult distal tibia, talus, and calcaneus, have been discovered at the Malapa site, South Africa, and reported in direct association with the female paratype Malapa Hominin 2. These fossils reveal a mosaic of primitive and derived features that are distinct from those seen in other hominins. The ankle (talocrural) joint is mostly humanlike in form and inferred function, and there is some evidence for a humanlike arch and Achilles tendon. However, Au. sediba is apelike in possessing a more gracile calcaneal body and a more robust medial malleolus than expected. These observations suggest, if present models of foot function are correct, that Au. sediba may have practiced a unique form of bipedalism and some degree of arboreality. Given the combination of features in the Au. sediba foot, as well as comparisons between Au. sediba and older hominins, homoplasy is implied in the acquisition of bipedal adaptations in the hominin foot.

  12. Foot deformation during walking: differences between static and dynamic 3D foot morphology in developing feet.

    PubMed

    Barisch-Fritz, Bettina; Schmeltzpfenning, Timo; Plank, Clemens; Grau, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The complex functions of feet require a specific composition, which is progressively achieved by developmental processes. This development should take place without being affected by footwear. The aim of this study is to evaluate differences between static and dynamic foot morphology in developing feet. Feet of 2554 participants (6-16 years) were recorded using a new scanner system (DynaScan4D). Each foot was recorded in static half and full weight-bearing and during walking. Several foot measures corresponding to those used in last construction were calculated. The differences were identified by one-way ANOVA and paired Student's t-test. Static and dynamic values of each foot measure must be considered to improve the fit of footwear. In particular, footwear must account for the increase of forefoot width and the decrease of midfoot girth. Furthermore, the toe box should have a more rounded shape. The findings are important for the construction of footwear for developing feet.

  13. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... often fit poorly and irritate your skin. Buy shoes that fit properly. Buy comfortable shoes that provide support and cushioning for the heel, arch and ball of the foot. Avoid tightfitting shoes and high heels or narrow shoes that crowd ...

  14. The Athletic Foot and Its Import to Performance during Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Richard

    In this paper, problems and conditions of the foot, including flat feet, achilles tendon problems, heel spur syndrome, digital problems, shin splints, and leg stress fractures, are examined. Ways to examine the athlete's foot and leg are described, including the one-foot test and the off weight-bearing examination. (CJ)

  15. The Diabetic Foot: The Importance of Coordinated Care

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dean Y.; Wilkins, C. Jason; Evans, David R.; Ammar, Thoraya; Deane, Colin; Vas, Prashanth R.; Rashid, Hisham; Sidhu, Paul S.; Edmonds, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the severe morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes, diabetic foot care is an essential component of a peripheral vascular service. The goal of this article is to describe the vascular diabetic foot care pathway and how the coordinated foot care service for diabetic patients is delivered at King's College Hospital, London. PMID:25435655

  16. Tendon Transfers Around the Foot: When and Where.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ken N; Wu, Kuan-Wen; Krzak, Joseph J; Smith, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Tendon transfers are invaluable in the treatment of severe children's foot deformities. They are often preferable to simple releases, lengthening, or fusion in surgical treatment because they provide an active motor function for deformity correction and, when properly selected, the procedures stabilize the foot against progressive deformity. The authors describe 4 commonly used tendon transfer procedures that are useful in children's foot deformity surgeries.

  17. Terminal area energy management regime investigations utilizing an 0.030-scale model (47-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B/C/R in the Ames Research Center 11 x 11 foot transonic wind tunnel (OA148), volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained in wind tunnel test OA148 are presented. The objectives of the test series were to: (1) obtain pressure distributions, forces and moments over the vehicle 5 orbiter in the thermal area energy management (TAEM) and approach phases of flight; (2) obtain elevon and rudder hinge moments in the TAEM and approach phases of flight; (3) obtain body flap and elevon loads for verification of loads balancing with integrated pressure distributions; and (4) obtain pressure distributions near the short OMS pods in the high subsonic, transonic and low supersonic Mach number regimes.

  18. 75 FR 23263 - Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC; Alta Wind VI, LLC; Alta Wind VII, LLC; Alta Wind VIII, LLC; Alta Windpower... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 285.207 (2009), Alta Wind I, LLC, Alta Wind...

  19. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon II, E. H.

    1985-10-15

    A wind turbine, having at least one pair of sail means, each said sail means having upper and lower portions hingedly connected together to permit said portions to move away from and towards each other to thus open and close, respectively, said sail means being in the shape of an airfoil; a vertical shaft; a support; means mounting said vertical shaft in said support for rotation about the vertical axis of said shaft; and means mounting said sail means to said shaft, said sail means being disposed to move under the action of the wind in a plane about said vertical axis; said mounting means for said sail means including means for opening and closing one sail means of each pair of sail means while the other sail means of said pair is closed and opened, respectively, as said sail means moves about said vertical axis in said plane, said mounting means for said sail means being operable to dispose said plane at a predetermined angle to the horizontal and being adjustable to change said angle as desired.

  20. Wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Biscomb, L. I.

    1985-07-09

    A spider-like carrier having at least three generally horizontal arms has a hub mounted to the vertical, rotary-axis input shaft of a load. Each arm has at least one horizontal cross-arm secured to it near its radially outer end, which is supported from the ground by a low-friction support device such as a wheel or set of wheels. Mounted on each arm at the cross-arm or cross-arms is at least one sail, vane, airfoil or similar working member which is erected or spread generally normally to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be blown downwind and is feathered or headed to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be driven upwind. Horizontal axis and vertical axis journalling options for the working members and various sail shapes are shown, including a concave/convex sail and motor-oriented airfoil shape which provides lift when being driven upwind are shown.

  1. Comparison of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Similar Models in Two Size Wind Tunnels at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Anthony M.

    1998-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of two similar models of a lifting body configuration were run in two transonic wind tunnels, one a 16 foot the other a 14-inch and are compared. The 16 foot test used a 2% model while the 14-inch test used a 0.7% scale model. The wind tunnel model configurations varied only in vertical tail size and an aft sting shroud. The results from these two tests compare the effect of tunnel size, Reynolds number, dynamic pressure and blockage on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The data accuracy and uncertainty are also presented. It was concluded from these tests that the data resultant from a small wind tunnel compares very well to that of a much larger wind tunnel in relation to total vehicle aerodynamic characteristics.

  2. Normative values for the Foot Posture Index

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Anthony C; Crane, Yvonne Z; Menz, Hylton B

    2008-01-01

    Background The Foot Posture Index (FPI) is a validated method for quantifying standing foot posture, and is being used in a variety of clinical settings. There have however, been no normative data available to date for comparison and reference. This study aimed to establish normative FPI reference values. Methods Studies reporting FPI data were identified by searching online databases. Nine authors contributed anonymised versions of their original datasets comprising 1648 individual observations. The datasets included information relating to centre, age, gender, pathology (if relevant), FPI scores and body mass index (BMI) where available. FPI total scores were transformed to interval logit scores as per the Rasch model and normal ranges were defined. Comparisons between groups employed t-tests or ANOVA models as appropriate and data were explored descriptively and graphically. Results The main analysis based on a normal healthy population (n = 619) confirmed that a slightly pronated foot posture is the normal position at rest (mean back transformed FPI raw score = +4). A 'U' shaped relationship existed for age, with minors and older adults exhibiting significantly higher FPI scores than the general adult population (F = 51.07, p < 0.001). There was no difference between the FPI scores of males and females (2.3 versus 2.5; t = -1.44, p = 0.149). No relationship was found between the FPI and BMI. Systematic differences from the adult normals were confirmed in patients with neurogenic and idiopathic cavus (F = 216.981, p < 0.001), indicating some sensitivity of the instrument to detect a posturally pathological population. Conclusion A set of population norms for children, adults and older people have been derived from a large sample. Foot posture is related to age and the presence of pathology, but not influenced by gender or BMI. The normative values identified may assist in classifying foot type for the purpose of research and clinical decision making. PMID

  3. Foot Syndactyly: A Clinical and Demographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ho; Kim, Byung Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Syndactyly of the foot is the second most common congenital foot anomaly. In East Asia, however, no large case study has been reported regarding the clinical features of isolated foot syndactyly. In this study, we report a review of 118 patients during the last 25 years. Methods We conducted a chart review of patients who underwent surgical correction for foot syndactyly between January 1990 and December 2014. Operations were performed with a dorsal triangular flap and a full-thickness skin graft. The demographics of included patients and their clinical features were evaluated. Surgical outcomes and complications were analyzed. Results Among 118 patients with 194 webs (155 feet), 111 patients showed nonsyndromic cases and 7 patients showed syndromic cases. In 80 unilateral cases (72.1%), the second web was the most frequently involved (37.5%), followed by the fourth (30%), the first (15%), the third (15%), the first and second in combination (1.3%), and the second and third in combination (1.3%). Among 31 bilateral cases, 2 cases were asymmetric. Among the remaining 29 symmetric bilateral cases, the second web was the most frequently involved (45.2%), followed by the first (22.6%), and the fourth (6.5%). No specific postoperative complications were observed, except in the case of 1 patient (0.51%) who required a secondary operation to correct web creep. Conclusions This retrospective clinical study of 118 patients with both unilateral and bilateral foot syndactyly revealed that the second web was the most frequently involved. In addition, complete division and tension-free wound closure with a full-thickness skin graft of sufficient size showed good postoperative results. PMID:27896188

  4. Concordance in diabetic foot ulcer infection

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, E Andrea; Backhouse, Michael Ross; Bhogal, Moninder S; Wright-Hughes, Alexandra; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Nixon, Jane; Brown, Sarah; Gray, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Accurate identification of pathogens, rather than colonising bacteria, is a prerequisite for targeted antibiotic therapy to ensure optimal patient outcome in wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers. Wound swabs are the easiest and most commonly used sampling technique but most published guidelines recommend instead removal of a tissue sample from the wound bed, which is a more complex process. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between culture results from wound swabs and tissue samples in patients with suspected diabetic foot infection. Methods and analysis Patients with a diabetic foot ulcer that is thought to be infected are being recruited from 25 sites across England in a cross-sectional study. The coprimary endpoints for the study are agreement between the two sampling techniques for three microbiological parameters: reported presence of likely isolates identified by the UK Health Protection Agency; resistance of isolates to usual antibiotic agents; and, the number of isolates reported per specimen. Secondary endpoints include appropriateness of the empiric antibiotic therapy prescribed and adverse events. Enrolling 400 patients will provide 80% power to detect a difference of 3% in the reported presence of an organism, assuming organism prevalence of 10%, discordance of 5% and a two-sided test at the 5% level of significance. Assumed overall prevalence is based on relatively uncommon organisms such as Pseudomonas. We will define acceptable agreement as κ>0.6. Ethics and dissemination Concordance in diabetic foot ulcer infection (CODIFI) will produce robust data to evaluate the two most commonly used sampling techniques employed for patients with a diabetic foot infection. This will help determine whether or not it is important that clinicians take tissue samples rather than swabs in infected ulcers. This study has been approved by the Sheffield NRES Committee (Ref: 11/YH/0078) and all sites have obtained local approvals prior

  5. Quiet Supersonic Wind Tunnel Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Lyndell S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The ability to control the extent of laminar flow on swept wings at supersonic speeds may be a critical element in developing the enabling technology for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Laminar boundary layers are less resistive to forward flight than their turbulent counterparts, thus the farther downstream that transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the wing boundary layer is extended can be of significant economic impact. Due to the complex processes involved experimental studies of boundary layer stability and transition are needed, and these are performed in "quiet" wind tunnels capable of simulating the low-disturbance environment of free flight. At Ames, a wind tunnel has been built to operate at flow conditions which match those of the HSCT laminar flow flight demonstration 'aircraft, the F-16XL, i.e. at a Mach number of 1.6 and a Reynolds number range of 1 to 3 million per foot. This will allow detailed studies of the attachment line and crossflow on the leading edge area of the highly swept wing. Also, use of suction as a means of control of transition due to crossflow and attachment line instabilities can be studied. Topics covered include: test operating conditions required; design requirements to efficiently make use of the existing infrastructure; development of an injector drive system using a small pilot facility; plenum chamber design; use of computational tools for tunnel and model design; and early operational results.

  6. Factors influencing accuracy and reproducibility of body resistance measurements by foot-to-foot impedancemeters.

    PubMed

    Bousbiat, Sana; Jaffrin, Michel; Assadi, Imen

    2015-01-01

    The electronics of a BodySignal V2 (Tefal, France) foot-to-foot impedancemeter (FFI) was modified to display the foot-to-foot resistance instead of body fat. This device was connected to electrodes of different sizes mounted on a podoscope permitting photographs of subjects feet soles and electrodes in order to calculate the contact area between feet and electrodes. The foot-to-foot resistance was found to decrease when the contact area of feet with current and voltage electrodes increased. It was also sensitive to feet displacement and a backward move of 5 cm increased the mean resistance by 37 Ω. The resistance reproducibility was tested by asking the subject to repeat measurements 10-times by stepping up and down from the podoscope. The mean SD of these tests was 0.88% of mean resistance, but it fell to 0.47% when feet position was guided and to 0.29% with transverse voltage electrodes. For good reproducibility, it is important that voltage electrodes be small and that the scale design facilitates a correct position of heels on these electrodes.

  7. An Automatic Speed Control for Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1928-01-01

    Described here is an automatic control that has been used in several forms in wind tunnels at the Washington Navy Yard. The form now in use with the 8-foot tunnel at the Navy Yard is considered here. Details of the design and operation of the automatic control system are given. Leads from a Pitot tube are joined to an inverted cup manometer located above a rheostat. When the sliding weight of this instrument is set to a given notch, say for 40 m.p.h, the beam tip vibrates between two electric contacts that feed the little motor. Thus, when the wind is too strong or too weak, the motor automatically throws the rheostat slide forward and backward. If it failed to function well, the operator would notice the effect on his meniscus, and would operate the hand control by merely pressing the switch.

  8. The Relationship with Balance, Foot Posture, and Foot Size in School of Physical Education and Sports Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of foot posture and foot size with balance. A hundred and thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited from undergraduate students (Male = 74, Female = 37, age range 18-22). The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6), anthropometric measurements, dynamic balance and static balance measurements were done…

  9. The Hampshire epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease, 1967.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R F; Forman, A J

    1973-03-01

    An analysis was made of the spread of foot-and-mouth disease during the epidemic in Hampshire in January and February 1967. To explain the pattern of spread, it had to be postulated that virus was present seven days before the first outbreak was reported. It is suggested that the disease occurred initially in pigs fed on infected meat and that the virus was subsequently disseminated from the local abattoir, where the pigs were killed, to four farms by movement of animals, slaughterhouse waste, people or vehicles, and to fifteen by the airborne route. Subsequent spread from these farms was by movement in two instances and by the airborne route in five. The source and route of infection of the last farm in the outbreak were not determined.The risk of spread through movement was associated more with carriage of infected slaughterhouse waste, movement of animals, people or vehicles carrying animals than through collection of milk, artificial insemination or movement of other types of vehicles. Outbreaks of disease among pigs gave rise to more secondary spread than outbreaks in cattle. Secondary outbreaks attributed to airborne spread occurred only in ruminants. Most airborne spread was into areas of high livestock density and cattle in the larger herds became infected. Airborne spread could be correlated with wind direction and speed but not with rain. The reduction in the number of outbreaks at the end of the epidemic could be attributed to the elimination of the largest sources of virus, the control of movements and the fact that in all instances except two the wind was blowing virus over towns and out to sea, to areas of low stock density and to areas where animals had been killed.

  10. Wind resources of Somalia

    SciTech Connect

    Pallabazzer, R. ); Gabow, A.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The results of wind energy research in Somalia are presented. The wind resource appears to be suitable for power production on 85% of the country, very intense on 10% and uniform on 70%, being regular throughout. Two areas of different wind regimes have been identified and characterized; the wind-distribution characteristics of 11 sites are presented and discussed, together with the territorial maps of the wind intensity and of the wind energy.

  11. 18. 80 foot pony truss detail of the lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. 80 foot pony truss - detail of the lower cord pin connection, typical of the 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot truss, where the vertical lace post joins the upper and lower chords. There are two pair of each 80 foot truss and a single pair on the 64 foot truss for a total of 22. The view also shows the chord eye bar and eye rod along with the diagonal bar and rod members. The rod hanging diagonally to the left is a broken lateral member. A four inch conduit is also in view. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  12. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  13. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  14. Calibration of Instruments for Measuring Wind Velocity and Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogler, Raymond D.; Pilny, Miroslav J.

    1950-01-01

    Signal Corps wind equipment AN/GMQ-1 consisting of a 3-cup anemometer and wind vane was calibrated for wind velocities from 1 to 200 miles per hour. Cup-shaft failure prevented calibration at higher wind velocities. The action of the wind vane was checked and found to have very poor directional accuracy below a velocity of 8 miles per hour. After shaft failure was reported to the Signal Corps, the cup rotors were redesigned by strengthening the shafts for better operation at high velocities. The anemometer with the redesigned cup rotors was recalibrated, but cup-shaft failure occurred again at a wind velocity of approximately 220 miles per hour. In the course of this calibration two standard generators were checked for signal output variation, and a wind-speed meter was calibrated for use with each of the redesigned cup rotors. The variation of pressure coefficient with air-flow direction at four orifices on a disk-shaped pitot head was obtained for wind velocities of 37.79 53.6, and 98.9 miles per hour. A pitot-static tube mounted in the nose of a vane was calibrated up to a dynamic pressure of 155 pounds per square foot, or approximately 256 miles per hour,

  15. Model in the 5-Foot Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    Model mounted in the 5-Foot Free-Flight Tunnel. This wind tunnel was used to study the dynamic stability and control characteristics of aircraft in flight. The test section of the tunnel could be tilted to permit the model to fly without restraint when sufficient lift was produced by its wings. During free-flight tests, the tunnel test technique required two engineers. One engineer stood at the side of the test section and controlled the tunnel airspeed and tilt angle while attempting to maintain the airstream relative to the model. The second engineer controlled the airplane model remotely via small wires attached to control surface actuators. The pilot stood behind the tunnel propeller and viewed the rear of the model in flight and assessed its stability and control characteristics for various test conditions. His control box can be seen at the bottom of the picture. The tunnel was authorized in 1936 and was operational in April 1937. Construction cost was $120,000. This exploratory facility was superseded by a larger 12-ft free-flight tunnel in 1939.

  16. The NASA Langley 8-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Reagon, Patricia G.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel is a continuous-flow, variable-pressure wind tunnel with control capability to independently vary Mach number, stagnation pressure, stagnation temperature, and humidity. The top and bottom walls of the test section are axially slotted to permit continuous variation of the test section Mach number from 0.2 to 1.2, the slot-width contour provides a gradient-free test section 50 in. long for Mach numbers equal to or greater than 1.0 and 100 in. long for Mach numbers less than 1.0. The stagnation pressure may be varied from 0.25 to 2.0 atm. The tunnel test section has been recalibrated to determine the relationship between the free-stream Mach number and the test chamber reference Mach number. The hardware was the same as that of an earlier calibration in 1972 but the pressure measurement instrumentation available for the recalibration was about an order of magnitude more precise. The principal result of the recalibration was a slightly different schedule of reentry flap settings for Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.05 than that determined during the 1972 calibration. Detailed tunnel contraction geometry, test section geometry, and limited test section wall boundary layer data are presented.

  17. Acute bilateral isolated foot drop: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kertmen, H.; Gürer, B.; Yimaz, E. R.; Sekerci, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop is defined as the weakness of the foot and ankle dorsiflexion. Acute unilateral foot drop is a well-documented entity, whereas bilateral foot drop is rarely documented. Slowly progressing bilateral foot drop may occur with various metabolic causes, parasagittal intracranial pathologies, and cauda equina syndrome. Acute onset of bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation is extremely rare. Here we present two cases of acute bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation. The first patient was a 45-year-old man presented with acute bilateral foot drop, without any sign of the cauda equina syndrome. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging of the patient revealed L4-5 disc herniation. To our knowledge, this is the first presented case of acute bilateral foot drop without any signs of cauda equina syndrome caused by L4-5 disc herniation. The second patient was a 50-year-old man who was also presented with acute bilateral foot drop, and had T12-L1 disc herniation with intradural extension. Also this is the first presented case of T12-L1 disc herniation with intradural extension causing acute bilateral foot drop. We performed emergent decompressive laminectomy to both of the patients and extrude disc materials were excised. Both of the patients were recovered with favorable outcome. PMID:25972945

  18. Foot Disorders Associated with Over-Pronated and Over-Supinated Foot Function:The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Golightly, Yvonne M.; Hannan, Marian T.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of musculoskeletal foot disorders differs by race and obesity, and these disorders may be related to pronated (low arch) or supinated (high arch) foot function. This cross-sectional analysis examined relationships of foot disorders and foot function by race and obesity in a community-based observational study of adults 50+ years old with and without osteoarthritis. Methods Members of a prospective cohort study in North Carolina were included in this analysis (N=1466, 67.2% women, 29.5% African American, mean age 68.5 years). Foot disorders were identified with a validated assessment tool, and each foot was categorized as over-pronated, over-supinated, and referent using the center of pressure excursion index from foot pressure scans during normal-paced walking. Logistic regression models estimated associations between foot function and each foot disorder with age, body mass index (BMI), gender, and race as covariates. Results Compared to referent, an over-pronated foot was associated with hallux valgus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.65) and overlapping toes (aOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.12-1.64), especially in the obese. An over-supinated foot was inversely associated with hallux valgus (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74-0.97). An over-supinated foot was less likely to be associated with Tailor’s bunions among the obese and was more likely to be associated with plantar fasciitis in Caucasians. Conclusion Foot function was related to hallux valgus and overlapping toes, especially among the obese. In clinical patients as well as in the community of older adults, treatments for both the foot disorder and the pronated/supinated foot are needed. Level of Evidence Level II-2: Evidence obtained from well-designed cohort study. PMID:25037712

  19. Foot placement during error and pedal applications in naturalistic driving.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqing; Boyle, Linda Ng; McGehee, Daniel; Roe, Cheryl A; Ebe, Kazutoshi; Foley, James

    2017-02-01

    Data from a naturalistic driving study was used to examine foot placement during routine foot pedal movements and possible pedal misapplications. The study included four weeks of observations from 30 drivers, where pedal responses were recorded and categorized. The foot movements associated with pedal misapplications and errors were the focus of the analyses. A random forest algorithm was used to predict the pedal application types based the video observations, foot placements, drivers' characteristics, drivers' cognitive function levels and anthropometric measurements. A repeated multinomial logit model was then used to estimate the likelihood of the foot placement given various driver characteristics and driving scenarios. The findings showed that prior foot location, the drivers' seat position, and the drive sequence were all associated with incorrect foot placement during an event. The study showed that there is a potential to develop a driver assistance system that can reduce the likelihood of a pedal error.

  20. Current wind tunnel capability and planned improvements at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowditch, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    As the propulsion and power generation center of NASA, Lewis has designed its wind tunnels for propulsion research. Therefore, the 8 by 6 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel and the 10 by 10 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel provide the capability to test operating propulsion systems from Mach 0.4 to 3.5. The 9 by 15 Foot Wind Tunnel can investigate propulsion installation problems at the lower takeoff and landing speeds and provides an excellent anechoic environment to measure propeller and fan noise. The Lewis Central Air System provides steady air supplies to 450 psi, and exhaust to 3 in. of mercury absolute, which are available to the wind tunnels for simulation of jets and engine induced flows. The Lewis Icing Research Tunnel is the largest in the free world that can produce icing conditions throughout the year. Rehabilitation of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at Lewis would allow testing of propulsion systems in the upper left hand corner which would be a unique capability. Also, in a mothballed state at Lewis, the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility could provide the best simulation of nonvitiated Mach 5-7 test conditions available. Studies are currently being made of the Lewis facilities to identify enhancements of their research potential for the 1990's and beyond.

  1. Behaviors predicting foot lesions in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Suico, J G; Marriott, D J; Vinicor, F; Litzelman, D K

    1998-07-01

    Associations between specific foot-care behaviors and foot lesions in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were prospectively investigated. Data from a randomized controlled trial for preventing diabetic foot lesions were analyzed as a prospective cohort using logistic regression. Independent variables included foot-care behaviors, patient self-foot examination, going barefoot, availability of foot-care assistance, and visits to health-care providers. The dependent variable was a foot wound on each foot at follow-up. In the final multivariate model, patients who rarely lubricated their feet had an increased risk of foot lesions. Increasing patient use of emollients may be key to preventing foot lesions.

  2. Numerical Study of the High-Speed Leg of a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayani, Sudheer; Sellers, William L., III; Brynildsen, Scott E.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical study of the high-speed leg of the NASA Langley 14 by 22-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The high-speed leg consists of the Settling Chamber, Contraction, Test Section, and First Diffuser. Results are shown comparing two different exit boundary conditions and two different methods of determining the surface geometry.

  3. Innovations in diabetic foot reconstruction using supermicrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hyun Suk; Oh, Tae Suk; Hong, Joon Pio

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic foot ulceration is complex with multiple factors involved, and it may often lead to limb amputation. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach is warranted to cover the spectrum of treatment for diabetic foot, but in complex wounds, surgical treatment is inevitable. Surgery may involve the decision to preserve the limb by reconstruction or to amputate it. Reconstruction involves preserving the limb with secure coverage. Local flaps usually are able to provide sufficient coverage for small or moderate sized wound, but for larger wounds, soft tissue coverage involves flaps that are distantly located from the wound. Reconstruction of distant flap usually involves microsurgery, and now, further innovative methods such as supermicrosurgery have further given complex wounds a better chance to be reconstructed and limbs salvaged. This article reviews the microsurgery involved in reconstruction and introduces the new method of supermicrosurgery.

  4. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Treg D; Micheli, Lyle J

    2004-06-01

    This review focuses on many of the foot and ankle injuries commonly seen among dancers. These unique athletes place extreme demands on their musculoskeletal system and thereby face a variety of acute and overuse injuries. Conservative treatment is successful in the majority of cases, but these patients often continue to dance while healing--commonly prolonging and at times complicating treatment. When surgery is being contemplated, the dancer's performance level and expectations about returning to dance after surgery should be thoroughly explored. Foot and ankle surgeries that routinely yield good to excellent results in the general population can prematurely end a dancer's otherwise promising career. The physician must consider all these factors when designing an appropriate treatment plan for a dancer.

  5. The foot as a shock absorber.

    PubMed

    Salathé, E P; Arangio, G A; Salathé, E P

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of the deformation of the foot is developed to determine the role that stretch of ligaments and tendons plays in absorbing shock following impact. Our analysis is based on an anatomical biomechanical model that includes each of the bones of the foot. We calculate the time course of the deflection of the joints and the elongation of the ligaments and tendons and determine the ground reaction force acting on the heel. Quasi-linear viscoelastic theory is used for soft tissue constitutive relationships. With biomechanical data selected from the literature, we obtain a vertical force impact peak of 8000 N, occurring at 16 ms following heel strike. This is of higher magnitude and shorter duration than is found experimentally, as is to be expected, since we did not include the heel pad in our model and we assumed that the impact surface was ideally rigid.

  6. Location of foot arteries using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Martín Osmany Falcón, Antonio; Benítez Ferro, Jesús Francisco Guillemo; Córdova Fraga, Teodoro

    2014-11-01

    In this work are presented the results of localization of foot arteries, in a young group of participants by using infrared thermal images, these are the dorsal, posterior tibial and anterior tibial arteries. No inclusion criteria were considered, that causes that no strong statistical data about the influence of the age in the arterial localization. It was achieved to solve the confusion when veins present a heat distribution similar to the artery and in the position of this. it contributes to enhance the rate of location of arteries. In general it is possible to say that the use of infrared thermal images is a good technique to find the foot arteries and can be applied in its characterization in a future. The procedure proposed is a non-invasive technique, and in certain fashion does not requires specialized personnel to achieve locate the arteries. It is portable, safe, and relatively economical.

  7. Underground coal miners' foot and boot problems.

    PubMed

    Wood, G; Marr, S; Berry, G; Nubé, V; Cole, J

    1999-11-01

    The New South Wales (NSW) Joint Coal Board Health and Safety Trust funded an investigation into foot problems reported by 400 randomly selected underground coal miners from 15 mines in NSW. Miners were interviewed and their responses were entered directly into laptop computers. Digital cameras were also used to take pictures of skin conditions and miners' posture. Observations of the skin results indicate that miners find gumboots to be hot, sweaty and uncomfortable. Skin breakdown and tinea, is frequent and disabling and responsible for absences from the workforce that are costly for both miner and employer. A more comfortable and better designed boot is needed, fabricated in waterproof leather together with socks that 'wick' the moisture away from the foot. Socks worn were of varying components and washed at irregular intervals, indicating a need for regular changes of socks and improved hygiene.

  8. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  9. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  10. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  11. Foot Marching, Load Carriage, and Injury Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    marches,” “loaded marches,” and “road marches.” Other operational and training -related lifting activities may also be included. During these... training .1-4 Soldiers’ exposures to foot marching and load-carriage activities, therefore, include both training and deployment scenarios...be a factor of load weight or speed. Variations to these factors depend on mission; unit training ; and fitness levels, equipment, and terrain

  12. Diabetic foot infection treatment and care.

    PubMed

    Cigna, Emanuele; Fino, Pasquale; Onesti, Maria G; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-04-01

    Foot infections in diabetic patients are a common, complex and costly problem. They are potentially adverse with progression to deeper spaces and tissues and are associated with severe complications. The management of diabetic foot infection (DFI) requires a prompt and systematic approach to achieve more successful outcomes and to ultimately avoid amputations. This study reviews a multi-step treatment for DFIs. Between September 2010 and September 2012, a total of about 37 patients were consulted for DFI. The treatment algorithm included four steps, that is, several types of debridement according to the type of wound, the application of negative pressure therapy (NPT), other advanced dressings, a targeted antibiotic therapy local or systemic as the case may, and, if necessary, reconstructive surgery. This treatment protocol showed excellent outcomes, allowing us to avoid amputation in most difficult cases. Only about 8% of patients require amputation. This treatment protocol and a multidisciplinary approach with a specialised team produced excellent results in the treatment of DFI and in the management of diabetic foot in general, allowing us to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients and also to ensure cost savings.

  13. Computed tomographic anatomy of the equine foot.

    PubMed

    Claerhoudt, S; Bergman, E H J; Saunders, J H

    2014-10-01

    This study describes a detailed computed tomographic reference of the normal equine foot. Ten forefeet of five adult cadavers, without evidence of orthopaedic disease, were used. Computed tomography (CT) was performed on all feet. Two-millimetre thick transverse slices were obtained, and sagittal and dorsal planes were reformatted. The CT images were matched with the corresponding anatomic slices. The phalanges and the distal sesamoid bone showed excellent detail. The extensor and flexor tendons (including their attachments) could be clearly evaluated. The collateral (sesamoidean) ligaments could be readily located, but were difficult to delineate at their proximal attachment. The distal digital annular ligament could only be distinguished from the deep digital flexor tendon proximal to the distal sesamoid bone, and its proximal attachment could be identified, but not its distal insertion. Small ligaments (impar ligament, chondrosesamoidean, chondrocoronal and chondrocompedal ligaments, axial and abaxial palmar ligaments of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint) were seen with difficulty and not at all slices. The joint capsules could not be delineated from the surrounding soft tissue structures. The lateral and medial proprius palmar digital artery and vein could be visualized occasionally on some slices. The ungular cartilages, corium and hoof wall layering were seen. The nerves, the articular and fibrocartilage of the distal sesamoid bone and the chondroungular ligament could not be assessed. Computed tomography of the equine foot can be of great value when results of radiography and ultrasonography are inconclusive. Images obtained in this study may serve as reference for CT of the equine foot.

  14. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  15. Diabetic Foot Biomechanics and Gait Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, James S.; Najafi, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot complications represent significant morbidity and precede most of the lower extremity amputations performed. Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes shown to affect gait. Glycosylation of soft tissues can also affect gait. The purpose of this review article is to highlight the changes in gait for persons with diabetes and highlight the effects of glycosylation on soft tissues at the foot–ground interface. Methods PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EBSCOhost® on-line databases were searched for articles pertaining to diabetes and gait. Bibliographies from relevant manuscripts were also searched. Findings Patients with diabetes frequently exhibit a conservative gait strategy where there is slower walking speed, wider base of gait, and prolonged double support time. Glycosylation affects are observed in the lower extremities. Initially, skin thickness decreases and skin hardness increases; tendons thicken; muscles atrophy and exhibit activation delays; bones become less dense; joints have limited mobility; and fat pads are less thick, demonstrate fibrotic atrophy, migrate distally, and may be stiffer. Interpretation In conclusion, there do appear to be gait changes in patients with diabetes. These changes, coupled with local soft tissue changes from advanced glycosylated end products, also alter a patient’s gait, putting them at risk of foot ulceration. Better elucidation of these changes throughout the entire spectrum of diabetes disease can help design better treatments and potentially reduce the unnecessarily high prevalence of foot ulcers and amputation. PMID:20663446

  16. Improving Hohlraums for High Foot Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Ma, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Doeppner, T.; Goyon, C. S.; Izumi, N.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Nagel, S. R.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of High Foot implosions show that performance has been limited by the radiation drive environment, i.e., the hohlraum. Demonstrated here is that improvements in the radiation environment result in an enhancement in implosion performance. This is accomplished by using a longer, larger case-to-capsule ratio hohlraum at lower gas fill density. At fixed laser energy, High Foot implosions driven with this hohlraum have achieved a 1.4 x increase in stagnation pressure, with an accompanying relative increase in fusion yield of 50%. Low mode asymmetries are still present, however, and are most likely a consequence of poor inner beam propagation through the hohlraum to the wall. Presented here are results from these High Foot implosions, as well as analyses of inner beam propagation, and additional hohlraum improvements that further ameliorate the implosion. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Foot posture is associated with kinematics of the foot during gait: A comparison of normal, planus and cavus feet.

    PubMed

    Buldt, Andrew K; Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Menz, Hylton B; Nester, Christopher J; Landorf, Karl B

    2015-06-01

    Variations in foot posture are associated with the development of some lower limb injuries. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. The objective of this study was to compare foot kinematics between normal, pes cavus and pes planus foot posture groups using a multi-segment foot model. Ninety-seven healthy adults, aged 18-47 were classified as either normal (n=37), pes cavus (n=30) or pes planus (n=30) based on normative data for the Foot Posture Index, Arch Index and normalised navicular height. A five segment foot model was used to measure tri-planar motion of the rearfoot, midfoot, medial forefoot, lateral forefoot and hallux during barefoot walking at a self-selected speed. Angle at heel contact, peak angle, time to peak angle and range of motion was measured for each segment. One way ANOVAs with post-hoc analyses of mean differences were used to compare foot posture groups. The pes cavus group demonstrated a distinctive pattern of motion compared to the normal and pes planus foot posture groups. Effect sizes of significant mean differences were large and comparable to similar studies. Three key differences in overall foot function were observed between the groups: (i) altered frontal and transverse plane angles of the rearfoot in the pes cavus foot; (ii) Less midfoot motion in the pes cavus foot during initial contact and midstance; and (iii) reduced midfoot frontal plane ROM in the pes planus foot during pre-swing. These findings indicate that foot posture does influence motion of the foot.

  18. Global Wind Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes a new global wind-power map that has quantified global wind power and may help planners place turbines in locations that can maximize power from the winds and provide widely available low-cost energy. The researchers report that their study can assist in locating wind farms in regions known for strong and consistent…

  19. Emergency wind erosion control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  20. Effects of El Niño-driven changes in wind patterns on North Pacific albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Thorne, L H; Conners, M G; Hazen, E L; Bograd, S J; Antolos, M; Costa, D P; Shaffer, S A

    2016-06-01

    Changes to patterns of wind and ocean currents are tightly linked to climate change and have important implications for cost of travel and energy budgets in marine vertebrates. We evaluated how El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven wind patterns affected breeding Laysan and black-footed albatross across a decade of study. Owing to latitudinal variation in wind patterns, wind speed differed between habitat used during incubation and brooding; during La Niña conditions, wind speeds were lower in incubating Laysan (though not black-footed) albatross habitat, but higher in habitats used by brooding albatrosses. Incubating Laysan albatrosses benefited from increased wind speeds during El Niño conditions, showing increased travel speeds and mass gained during foraging trips. However, brooding albatrosses did not benefit from stronger winds during La Niña conditions, instead experiencing stronger cumulative headwinds and a smaller proportion of trips in tailwinds. Increased travel costs during brooding may contribute to the lower reproductive success observed in La Niña conditions. Furthermore, benefits of stronger winds in incubating habitat may explain the higher reproductive success of Laysan albatross during El Niño conditions. Our findings highlight the importance of considering habitat accessibility and cost of travel when evaluating the impacts of climate-driven habitat change on marine predators.

  1. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-01-01

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  2. Wind power. [electricity generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savino, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A historical background on windmill use, the nature of wind, wind conversion system technology and requirements, the economics of wind power and comparisons with alternative systems, data needs, technology development needs, and an implementation plan for wind energy are presented. Considerable progress took place during the 1950's. Most of the modern windmills feature a wind turbine electricity generator located directly at the top of their rotor towers.

  3. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  4. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  5. Correlating seabird movements with ocean winds: linking satellite telemetry with ocean scatterometry.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Josh; Flora, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Satellite telemetry studies of the movements of seabirds are now common and have revealed impressive flight capabilities and extensive distributions among individuals and species at sea. Linking seabird movements with environmental conditions over vast expanses of the world's open ocean, however, remains difficult. Seabirds of the order Procellariiformes (e.g., petrels, albatrosses, and shearwaters) depend largely on wind and wave energy for efficient flight. We present a new method for quantifying the movements of far-ranging seabirds in relation to ocean winds measured by the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard the QuikSCAT satellite. We apply vector correlation (as defined by Crosby et al. in J Atm Ocean Tech 10:355-367, 1993) to evaluate how the trajectories (ground speed and direction) for five procellariiform seabirds outfitted with satellite transmitters are related to ocean winds. Individual seabirds (Sooty Shearwater, Pink-footed Shearwater, Hawaiian Petrel, Grey-faced Petrel, and Black-footed Albatross) all traveled predominantly with oblique, isotropic crossing to quartering tail-winds (i.e., 105-165 degrees in relation to birds' trajectory). For all five seabirds, entire track line trajectories were significantly correlated with co-located winds. Greatest correlations along 8-day path segments were related to wind patterns during birds' directed, long-range migration (Sooty Shearwater) as well as movements associated with mega-scale meteorological phenomena, including Pacific Basin anticyclones (Hawaiian Petrel, Grey-faced Petrel) and eastward-propagating north Pacific cyclones (Black-footed Albatross). Wind strength and direction are important factors related to the overall movements that delineate the distribution of petrels at sea. We suggest that vector correlation can be used to quantify movements for any marine vertebrate when tracking and environmental data (winds or currents) are of sufficient quality and sample size. Vector correlation coefficients

  6. An Icelandic wind atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  7. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the "foot at risk" to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-04-10

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities.

  8. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  9. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  10. Nano-ADEPT Aeroloads Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brandon; Yount, Bryan; Kruger, Carl; Brivkalns, Chad; Makino, Alberto; Cassell, Alan; Zarchi, Kerry; McDaniel, Ryan; Ross, James; Wercinski, Paul; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Swanson, Gregory; Gold, Nili

    2016-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) was conducted in April 2015 at the US Army's 7 by10 Foot Wind Tunnel located at NASA Ames Research Center. Key geometric features of the fabric test article were a 0.7 meter deployed base diameter, a 70 degree half-angle forebody cone angle, eight ribs, and a nose-to-base radius ratio of 0.7. The primary objective of this wind tunnel test was to obtain static deflected shape and pressure distributions while varying pretension at dynamic pressures and angles of attack relevant to entry conditions at Earth, Mars, and Venus. Other objectives included obtaining aerodynamic force and moment data and determining the presence and magnitude of any dynamic aeroelastic behavior (buzz/flutter) in the fabric trailing edge. All instrumentation systems worked as planned and a rich data set was obtained. This paper describes the test articles, instrumentation systems, data products, and test results. Four notable conclusions are drawn. First, test data support adopting a pre-tension lower bound of 10 foot pounds per inch for Nano-ADEPT mission applications in order to minimize the impact of static deflection. Second, test results indicate that the fabric conditioning process needs to be reevaluated. Third, no flutter/buzz of the fabric was observed for any test condition and should also not occur at hypersonic speeds. Fourth, translating one of the gores caused ADEPT to generate lift without the need for a center of gravity offset. At hypersonic speeds, the lift generated by actuating ADEPT gores could be used for vehicle control.

  11. 19. 80 foot pony truss view of upper chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 80 foot pony truss - view of upper chord pin connection at the end post, typical of the five 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot tress. There are two pair per pony truss for a total of 24. Shown are the vertical lace post, end post, top chord member, and a diagonal member. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  12. Impact of Foot Type on Cost of Lower Extremity Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-25

    were at higher risk for injury. Additionally, researchers have found relationships between chronic heel pain and osteoarthritis of the knee and hip...study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord, 2007. 8: p. 41. 48. Reilly, K., et al., The role of foot and ankle assessment of patients with lower limb osteoarthritis ... Physiotherapy , 2009. 95(3): p. 164-9. 49. Redmond, A.C., Y.Z. Crane, and H.B. Menz, Normative values for the Foot Posture Index. J Foot Ankle Res

  13. Outcomes of a Nurse-Managed Diabetes Foot Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Managed Diabetes Foot Clinic 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-04-1-TS10 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER N04-017...measured outcomes of a nurse-managed diabetes foot clinic on foot wound rates, health care costs, and changes in health status in adults with... diabetes . Design: This study reflects results of a two-group randomized, controlled trial. Sample: Participants were 126 adults with diabetes for more

  14. Wind speed forecasting for wind energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    With more wind energy being integrated into our grid systems, forecasting wind energy has become a necessity for all market participants. Recognizing the market demands, a physical approach to site-specific hub-height wind speed forecasting system has been developed. This system is driven by the outputs from the Canadian Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model. A simple interpolation approach benchmarks the forecasting accuracy inherited from GEM. Local, site specific winds are affected on a local scale by a variety of factors including representation of the land surface and local boundary-layer process over heterogeneous terrain which have been a continuing challenge in NWP models like GEM with typical horizontal resolution of order 15-km. In order to resolve these small scale effects, a wind energy industry standard model, WAsP, is coupled with GEM to improve the forecast. Coupling the WAsP model with GEM improves the overall forecasts, but remains unsatisfactory for forecasting winds with abrupt surface condition changes. Subsequently in this study, a new coupler that uses a 2-D RANS model of boundary-layer flow over surface condition changes with improved physics has been developed to further improve the forecasts when winds coming from a water surface to land experience abrupt changes in surface conditions. It has been demonstrated that using vertically averaged wind speeds to represent geostrophic winds for input into the micro-scale models could reduce forecast errors. The hub-height wind speed forecasts could be further improved using a linear MOS approach. The forecasting system has been evaluated, using a wind energy standard evaluation matrix, against data from an 80-m mast located near the north shore of Lake Erie. Coupling with GEM-LAM and a power conversion model using a theoretical power curve have also been investigated. For hub-height wind speeds GEM appears to perform better with a 15-Ian grid than the high resolution GEM-2.5Ian version at the

  15. Role of industries in the care of diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, A; Lakshmi, S; Arun, Nanditha; Samith Shetty, A; Snehalatha, C

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot disease is a dreaded complication causing severe economic and social burden, mental and physical agony, and severe morbidity and mortality. This complication is largely preventable if the risk factors such as peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are detected early and appropriate measures are taken to control glycemia, foot pressure, and chances of foot injury. In the case of ulceration, proper microbial control, pressure offloading by debridement, and use of appropriate footwear are mandatory to save the foot. This article focuses on the need for preventive care for diabetic complications demonstrating potentially helpful roles for industry in India.

  16. 16. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL (NORTHWEST LOWER FOOT OF CRANE), LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL (NORTHWEST LOWER FOOT OF CRANE), LOOKING NORTHWEST - Cabot Station Electric Generating Plant, Gantry Crane, Montague City Road, Turners Falls vicinity, Montague, Franklin County, MA

  17. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  18. Evaluation of flow quality in two large NASA wind tunnels at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Stainback, P. C.; Owen, F. K.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel testing of low drag airfoils and basic transition studies at transonic speeds are designed to provide high quality aerodynamic data at high Reynolds numbers. This requires that the flow quality in facilities used for such research be excellent. To obtain a better understanding of the characteristics of facility disturbances and identification of their sources for possible facility modification, detailed flow quality measurements were made in two prospective NASA wind tunnels. Experimental results are presented of an extensive and systematic flow quality study of the settling chamber, test section, and diffuser in the Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel and the Ames 12 foot pressure wind tunnel. Results indicate that the free stream velocity and pressure fluctuation levels in both facilities are low at subsonic speeds and are so high as to make it difficult to conduct meaningful boundary layer control and transition studies at transonic speeds.

  19. The reliability and validity of the Korean version of the foot function index for patients with foot complaints.

    PubMed

    In, Tae-Sung; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Kim, Keunjo; Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the Foot Function Index translated into Korean for use in patients with plantar fasciitis and foot/ankle fracture. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects with foot complaints, 14 males and 22 females, participated in the study. Reliability was determined by using the intra-class correlation coefficient and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency. Validity was examined by correlating Foot Function Index scores with the Short Form-36 and the Visual Analog Scale scores. [Results] Test-retest reliability was 0.90 for the pain subscale, and 0.94 and 0.91 for the disability and activity limitation subscales, respectively. The criterion-related validity was established by comparison with the Korean version of the Short Form-36 and Visual Analog Scale. [Conclusion] The Korean version of the Foot Function Index was shown to be a reliable and valid instrument for assessing foot complaints.

  20. [Experience of treatment of diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pertsov, V I; Ponomarenko, O V

    2014-07-01

    In The Clinic of Cathedra of The Catastrophes Medicine, Military Medicine, Anesthesiology and Reanimatology in 2010 - 2013 yrs 53 patients, ageing 23-65 yrs, were treated for diabetic foot syndrome (DFS) of neuropathic and mixed forms. Diagnostic-treatment algorithm was proposed for determination of level and degree of a circulation and neuropathic disorders, introduction of which have promoted optimization of surgical and local treatment, improvement of the complex treatment results in patients, suffering DFS. A new method of treatment application, using combined preparation of hyaluronic acid with the sodium succinic, have permitted to achieve a complete healing of the ulcer defect.