Science.gov

Sample records for 9-11 micron region

  1. Atmospheric solar absorption measurements in the 9-11 micron region using a diode laser heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable diode laser heterodyne radiometer was developed for ground based measurements of atmospheric solar absorption spectra in the 9 to 12 micron spectral range. The performance and operating characteristics of this tunable infrared heterodyne radiometer (TIHR) is discussed along with recently measured heterodyne solar absorption spectra in the 10 to 11 micron spectral region.

  2. Tunable diode laser measurements of formaldehyde foreign-gas broadening parameters and line strengths in the 9-11-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Shachar; Reuter, Dennis C.; Daunt, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to determine pressure broadening coefficients due to collision with the foreign gases air, H2, O2, and N2 in the nu4 and nu6 bands of H2CO between 9 and 11 microns. Absolute line strengths for twenty-eight transitions have also been determined. The broadening coefficients are very similar to theoretical literature values in the cases of air, N2, and O2. The H2-H2CO values are in good agreement with earlier experimental millimeter-wave results.

  3. Boundary Layer Aerosol Composition over Sierra Nevada Mountains using 9.11- and 10.59-micron CW Lidars and Modeled Backscatter from Size Distribution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An inversion technique has been developed to determine volume fractions of an atmospheric aerosol composed primarily of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate and water combined with fixed concentration of elemental and organic carbon. It is based on measured aerosol backscatter obtained with 9.11 - and 10.59-micron wavelength continuous wave CO2 lidars and modeled backscatter from aerosol size distribution data. The technique is demonstrated during a flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft over the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, California on 19 September, 1995. Volume fraction of each component and effective complex refractive index of the composite particle were determined assuming an internally mixed composite aerosol model. The volume fractions were also used to re-compute aerosol backscatter, providing good agreement with the lidar-measured data. The robustness of the technique for determining volume fractions was extended with a comparison of calculated 2.1,-micron backscatter from size distribution data with the measured lidar data converted to 2.1,-micron backscatter using an earlier derived algorithm, verifying the algorithm as well as the backscatter calculations.

  4. Regionalizing Food Security? Imperatives, Intersections and Contestations in a Post-9/11 World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichs, C. Clare

    2013-01-01

    In the early 21st century, food security has become an urgent public concern, arguably more entangled with social, political and environmental problems at multiple scales now than in the past. This paper examines approaches to food system change emphasizing regionalization, rather than either localization or globalization, to consider framings of…

  5. Observations of asteroids in the 3- to 4-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, N.; Green, S. F.; Mccheyne, R. S.; Meadows, A. J.; Veeder, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of eleven asteroids (1, 2, 8, 10, 15, 16, 22, 83, 386, 433, 471) have been obtained in the 3- to 4-micron region. Of these, only 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas have previously been observed in this wavelength region. Spectra of the S- and M-type asteroids are generally featureless, but 8 Flora may be an exception. None of the three new C-type spectra show significant absorption.

  6. A series of low-altitude aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18, and 25 at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, D.P.

    1999-12-01

    A series of low-altitude, aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18,and 25 of the Nevada Test Site was conducted from December 1996 through June 1999. The surveys were conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The flights were conducted at a nominal altitude of 15 meters above ground level along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 23 meters apart. The purpose of these low-altitude surveys was to measure, map, and define the areas of americium-241 activity. The americium contamination will be used to determine the areas of plutonium contamination. Americium-241 activity was detected within 8 of the 11 regions. The three regions where americium-241 was not detected were in the inactive Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex in Area 25, which encompassed the Test Cell A and Test Cell C reactor test stands and the Reactor Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly facility.

  7. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium limb radiance from O3 and CO2 in the 9-11 micrometer spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David P.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of mesospheric and thermospheric O3 abundance in the terrestrial atmosphere often uses 9-11 micrometer thermal emission. In this paper, we apply a line-by-line non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiance model to this spectral region and investigate the conditions of LTE breakdown and the effect that this has on the limb radiance measured by an i.r. sounder. Monochromatic and band-integrated radiance calculations have been performed for limb view tangent heights between 55 and 105 km under daytime and nighttime conditions. Non-LTE emission from both O3 and CO2 are shown to be important with the divergence of radiance from LTE values and the diurnal variation being band dependent. We have shown that the contribution of the CO2 bands to the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere O3 channel is significant for daytime conditions at tangent heights above about 60 km. A study has been made to choose O3 sounding channel spectral passbands for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder. High resolution calculations are required to determine those spectral intervals that will filter radiance from selected bands and characterize their non-LTE behavior. This will allow for improved O3 retrievals above 70 km and non-LTE studies.

  8. Fourier-transform spectroscopy of O3 in the 3-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, C. P.; Malathy Devi, V.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1989-01-01

    Fourier transform spectra of ozone have been recorded in the 2-5-micron region at a resolution of 0.01/cm. Absorption lines belonging to numerous vibration-rotation transitions have been observed in these spectra, and a detailed analysis of the band system centered at 3.6 microns has been completed.

  9. 9/11, Act II: a fine-grained analysis of regional variations in traffic fatalities in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    Terrorists can strike twice--first, by directly killing people, and second, through dangerous behaviors induced by fear in people's minds. Previous research identified a substantial increase in U.S. traffic fatalities subsequent to the September 11 terrorist attacks, which were accounted for as due to a substitution of driving for flying, induced by fear of dread risks. Here, we show that this increase in fatalities varied widely by region, a fact that was best explained by regional variations in increased driving. Two factors, in turn, explained these variations in increased driving. The weaker factor was proximity to New York City, where stress reactions to the attacks were previously shown to be greatest. The stronger factor was driving opportunity, which was operationalized both as number of highway miles and as number of car registrations per inhabitant. Thus, terrorists' second strike exploited both fear of dread risks and, paradoxically, an environmental structure conducive to generating increased driving, which ultimately increased fatalities. PMID:23160203

  10. 42 CFR 9.11 - Animal transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Animal transport. 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Health... CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.11 Animal transport. The transportation of... and Regulations and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Live Animal Regulations...

  11. 15 CFR 9.11 - Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Annual report. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.11 Annual report....

  12. 15 CFR 9.11 - Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual report. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.11 Annual report....

  13. 15 CFR 9.11 - Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Annual report. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.11 Annual report....

  14. 15 CFR 9.11 - Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual report. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.11 Annual report....

  15. 15 CFR 9.11 - Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual report. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.11 Annual report....

  16. 42 CFR 9.11 - Animal transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Animal transport. 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Health... CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.11 Animal transport. The transportation of chimpanzees by surface or air must be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Animal Welfare...

  17. 42 CFR 9.11 - Animal transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Animal transport. 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Health... CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.11 Animal transport. The transportation of chimpanzees by surface or air must be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Animal Welfare...

  18. 42 CFR 9.11 - Animal transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Animal transport. 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Health... CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.11 Animal transport. The transportation of chimpanzees by surface or air must be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Animal Welfare...

  19. 42 CFR 9.11 - Animal transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Animal transport. 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Health... CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.11 Animal transport. The transportation of chimpanzees by surface or air must be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Animal Welfare...

  20. 36 CFR 9.11 - Reclamation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reclamation requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.11 Reclamation requirements. (a) As contemporaneously...

  1. 32 CFR 9.11 - Amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amendment. 9.11 Section 9.11 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.11...

  2. 36 CFR 9.11 - Reclamation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reclamation requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.11 Reclamation requirements. (a) As contemporaneously...

  3. 32 CFR 9.11 - Amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amendment. 9.11 Section 9.11 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.11...

  4. 36 CFR 9.11 - Reclamation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reclamation requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.11 Reclamation requirements. (a) As contemporaneously...

  5. 32 CFR 9.11 - Amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amendment. 9.11 Section 9.11 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.11...

  6. 32 CFR 9.11 - Amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amendment. 9.11 Section 9.11 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.11 Amendment. The Secretary of Defense may amend...

  7. 36 CFR 9.11 - Reclamation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reclamation requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.11 Reclamation requirements. (a) As contemporaneously...

  8. 32 CFR 9.11 - Amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amendment. 9.11 Section 9.11 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.11...

  9. 36 CFR 9.11 - Reclamation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reclamation requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.11 Reclamation requirements. (a) As contemporaneously...

  10. Line parameters for ozone hot bands in the 4.8-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camy-Peyret, Claude; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy

    1990-01-01

    Line positions, intensities, and lower-state energies have been calculated for nine hot bands of (O-16)3 in the 4.8-micron spectral region using improved spectroscopic parameters deduced in recent high-resolution laboratory studies. The good quality of the hot-band parameters has been verified through comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.005/cm-resolution laboratory spectra of ozone. The present work and the line parameters calculated for the main bands by Pickett et al. (1988) provide a complete update of ozone spectroscopic parameters in the 4.8 micron region.

  11. Spectral Anomalies in the 11 and 12 micron Region From the Mariner Mars 7 Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.

    2000-01-01

    Two hundred-forty infrared spectra acquired by the 1969 Mariner Mars 7 Infrared Spectrometer (IRS), spanning the wavelength region 1.8-14.4 micron (5550-690/cm), have recently been recovered and calibrated in both wavelength and intensity. An examination of these IRS spectra has revealed absorptions at 11.25 and 12.5 micron that have not previously been reported for Mars. A search of the literature and spectral data bases shows that materials that exhibit a doublet at 11.25 and 12.5 micron are rare. In this paper we examine potential causes for these features and include a detailed discussion of carbonates, goethite, CO2 ice, and water ice. CO2 ice and water ice measured in transmission do not exhibit bands that match those recorded at 11.25 and 12.5 micron for Mars, which indicates that CO2 or water ice clouds are not the source of these features. Since these bands show no clear correlation with atmospheric path length, they are most likely caused by a surface material. In the IRS database they appear to be exceptionally intense in the western part of the Hellas basin. Goethite exhibits bands that are a good spectral match, but confirming whether goethite causes the features will require additional studies of the 20-50 micron region. These studies will require laboratory measurements of weathering coatings and an examination of spectra recorded of Mars by the 1971 Mariner Mars Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS; 5-50 micron 2000200/cm) and the 1996 Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES; 6-50 micron 1667-200/cm).

  12. Hubble Space Telescope observations of the galactic center region at 1.02 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, T.; Becklin, E. E.; Henry, J. P.; Simons, D.

    1993-01-01

    We present HST observations of the galactic center region using the Planetary Camera with the F1042M filter at an effective wavelength of 1.02 micron. We detect several infrared sources seen at this wavelength before but with angular resolution better than previous observations. Our data reveal the source GZ A which was first seen by Rosa et al. (1992) at 1 micron. However, our astrometry identifies this source as IRS 16C, not Sgr A*. We marginally detect an object at 2- to 3-sigma, coincident with the position of Sgr A* to within 0.2 arcsec. This object has unphysical continuum colors which are bluer than an infinite temperature blackbody. If the source is real and associated with Sgr A*, 1 micron line emission is a possible explanation. The possibility of this object being a foreground star or an HST artifact cannot be ruled out.

  13. The 51.8 micron (0 3) line emission observed in four galactic H 2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.

    1978-01-01

    The (0 III) 51.8 microns line from four H II regions, M42, M17, W51 and NGC 6375A was detected. Respective line strengths are 7 x 10 to the minus 15 power, 1.0 x 10 to the minus 14 power, 2.1 x 10 to the minus 15 power and 2.6 x 10 to the minus 15 power watt cm/2. Observations are consistent with previously reported line position and place the line at 51.80 + or 0.05 micron. When combined with the 88.35 microns (0 III) reported earlier, clumping seems to be an important factor in NGC 6375A and M42 and to a lesser extent in W51 and M17. The combined data also suggest an (0 III) abundance of approximately 3 x 0.0001 sub n e' a factor of 2 greater than previously assumed.

  14. 51.8 micron forbidden O III line emission observed in four galatic H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    The 51.8-micron forbidden O III line has been detected in four H II regions: M42, M17, W51, and NGC 6357A. The respective line strengths are 7 x 10 to the -15th, 1.0 x 10 to the -14th, 2.1 x 10 to the -15th, and 2.6 x 10 to the -15th W/sq cm. The observations are consistent with a previously reported line position and place the line at 51.80 + or - 0.05-micron. When combined with the 88.35-micron forbidden O III observations reported earlier, clumpiness is found to be an important factor in NGC 6357A and M42 and nonnegligible in W51 and M17. The combined data also suggest an O III abundance of about 0.0003 times the electron density, which is a factor of 2 greater than a number of investigators have reported.

  15. Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds in the Infrared (8-13 microns) Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Gao, Bo-Cai; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Winker, Dave M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric radiation in the infrared (IR) 8-13 microns spectral region contains a wealth of information that is very useful for the retrieval of ice cloud properties from aircraft or space-borne measurements. To provide the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals that are fundamental to the IR retrieval implementation, we use the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method to solve for the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter of the phase function for ice crystals smaller than 40 microns. For particles larger than this size, the improved geometric optics method (IGOM) can be employed to calculate the asymmetry parameter with an acceptable accuracy, provided that we properly account for the inhomogeneity of the refracted wave due to strong absorption inside the ice particle. A combination of the results computed from the two methods provides the asymmetry parameter for the entire practical range of particle sizes between 1 micron and 10000 microns over wavelengths ranging from 8 microns to 13 microns. For the extinction and absorption efficiency calculations, several methods including the IGOM, Mie solution for equivalent spheres (MSFES), and the anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) can lead to a substantial discontinuity in comparison with the FDTD solutions for particle sizes on the order of 40 microns. To overcome this difficulty, we have developed a novel approach called the stretched scattering potential method (SSPM). For the IR 8-13 microns spectral region, we show that SSPM is a more accurate approximation than ADT, MSFES, and IGOM. The SSPM solution can be further refined numerically. Through a combination of the FDTD and SSPM, we have computed the extinction and absorption efficiency for hexagonal ice crystals with sizes ranging from 1 to 10000 microns at 12 wavelengths between 8 and 13 microns Calculations of the cirrus bulk scattering and absorption properties are performed for 30 size

  16. The Post 9/11 English Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    An English teacher offers his thoughts on what they could learn about their role in the post 9/11-world and suggests reflecting on the events of the incident as professionals. The 9/11 Commission Report defines an important role for education and recommends US funding to improve public education, vocational education, and halving adult illiteracy…

  17. Infrared absorption by acetylene in the 12-14 micron region at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Giver, L. P.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral transmittance measurements have been performed on N2-broadened lines of (C-12)2H2 and (C-12)(C-13)H2 in the 13.7 micron region at 153, 200, and 296 K. From line-by-line comparison of observed and computed spectral transmittance, line strengths, half-widths, and their dependence on temperature have been deduced for conditions relevant to the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, and earth.

  18. Improved line parameters for ozone bands in the 10-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaud, Jean-Marie; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, Malathy V.

    1990-01-01

    A complete update of spectroscopic line parameters for the 10-micron bands of ozone is reported. The listing contains calculated positions, intensities, lower state energies, and air- and self-broadened halfwidths of more than 53,000 lines. The results have been generated using improved spectroscopic parameters obtained in a number of recent high resolution laboratory studies. A total of eighteen bands of (O-16)3 (sixteen hot bands plus the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals) are included along with the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals of both (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16). As shown by comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.003/cm resolution balloon-borne stratospheric solar spectra, the new parameters greatly improve the accuracy of atmospheric calculations in the 10-micron region, especially for the isotopic (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16) lines.

  19. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  20. Commemorating 9/11 in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National September 11 Memorial & Museum will be officially dedicated this September on the 10th anniversary of the attacks of 2001. It provides educational resources that explore the ongoing impact of the September 11th attacks and the ways that volunteerism and art aid in healing, recovery, and rebuilding. The 9/11 Memorial Museum, to be…

  1. Postdisaster Psychological Intervention since 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Patricia J.; Brymer, Melissa J.; Bonanno, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A wealth of research and experience after 9/11 has led to the development of evidence-based and evidence-informed guidelines and strategies to support the design and implementation of public mental health programs after terrorism and disaster. This article reviews advances that have been made in a variety of areas, including development of…

  2. The Post-9/11 Risk Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Ann H.

    2002-01-01

    Seeks to place the post-9/11 risk agenda for colleges and universities in historical perspective by offering a refresher on some of the most serious perennial risks for U.S. higher education. Offers an eight-point road map of how to enhance boards' risk management efforts. (EV)

  3. First spectra of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in the 1.8- to 4.0-micron region.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, C. J.; Paul, E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Use of liquid-nitrogen-cooled lead sulfide detectors to extend observations of the first spectra of the halogens in the infrared region as far as 4.0 microns. Descriptions, comprising wavelengths, wave numbers, intensities, and classifications, are presented that serve to close the gap between the upper wavelength limit of the detailed published analyses of these spectra at about 2.5 microns and the groups of recently classified lines near 4 microns, and also to report newly observed lines in the 1.8- to 2.5-micron region made accessible by detectors of improved response characteristics. Listed wavelengths of observed and identified lines are calculated from established values of the energy levels. The descriptions should facilitate the identification of halogen lines in mixed spectra excited in electrodeless tubes containing halogen compounds.

  4. Spectral signatures for RDX-based explosives in the 3 micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Reeve, Scott W.; Burns, William

    2008-04-01

    Explosive compounds such as RDX, and HMX present significant challenges to optically based sensors. This difficulty is due in part to the low vapor pressures these compounds possess. One approach for sensing explosives that circumvents the low explosive vapor pressure problem, involves focusing on the trace amounts of relatively high vapor pressure impurities that will be present in the vapor signature. In order to effectively detect these volatile impurities, the spectral signature databases must be readily available. One of our goals therefore, is the generation of a database of high resolution spectral signatures for these volatile organic impurities. Some rather formidable spectroscopic measurement challenges have been encountered while working to extend the spectral signature effort to the 3 micron region. Here we will outline progress to date, with a focus on the volatile organic compounds formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, nitromethane, acetone, isobutene, and cyclohexanone.

  5. New emission features in the 11-13 micron region and their relationship to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Witteborn, F C; Sandford, S A; Bregman, J D; Allamandola, L J; Cohen, M; Wooden, D H; Graps, A L

    1989-06-01

    If the "11.3 microns" emission feature seen in the spectra of many planetary nebulae, H II regions, and reflection nebulae is due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), then additional features should be present between 11.3 and 13.0 microns (885 and 770 cm-1). Moderate-resolution spectra of NGC 7027, HD 44179, IRAS 21282+5050, and BD + 30 degrees 3639 are presented which show that the "11.3 microns" feature actually peaks at 11.22 microns (891 cm-1). The spectra also show evidence of new emission features near 11.9 and 12.7 microns (840 and 787 cm-1). These are consistent with an origin from PAHs and can be used to constrain the molecular structure of the family of PAHs responsible for the infrared features. The observed asymmetry of the "11.3 microns" band is consistent with the slight anharmonicity expected in the C--H out-of-plane bending mode in PAHs. Laboratory experiments show that the intensity of this mode relative to the higher frequency modes depends on the extent of molecular "clustering." The observed strengths of the "11.3 microns" interstellar bands relative to the higher frequency bands are most consistent with the features originating from free molecular PAHs. The intensity and profile of the underlying broad structure, however, may well arise from PAH clusters and amorphous carbon particles. Analysis of the 11-13 microns (910-770 cm-1) emission suggests that the molecular structures of the most intensity emitting free PAHs vary somewhat between the high-excitation environment in NGC 7027 and the low-excitation but high-flux environment close to HD 44179. Finally, a previously undetected series of regularly spaced features between 10 and 11 microns (1000 and 910 cm-1) in the spectrum of HD 44179 suggests that a simple polyatomic hydride is present in the gas phase in this object. PMID:11542169

  6. Postdisaster psychological intervention since 9/11.

    PubMed

    Watson, Patricia J; Brymer, Melissa J; Bonanno, George A

    2011-09-01

    A wealth of research and experience after 9/11 has led to the development of evidence-based and evidence-informed guidelines and strategies to support the design and implementation of public mental health programs after terrorism and disaster. This article reviews advances that have been made in a variety of areas, including development of improved metrics and methodologies for conducting needs assessment, screening, surveillance, and program evaluation; clarification of risk and resilience factors as these relate to varying outcome trajectories for survivors and inform interventions; development and implementation of evidence-based and evidence-informed early, midterm, and late interventions for children, adults, and families; adaptation of interventions for cultural, ethnic, and minority groups; improvement in strategies to expand access to postdisaster mental health services; and enhancement of training methods and platforms for workforce development among psychologists, paraprofessionals, and other disaster responders. Continuing improvement of psychologists' national capacity to respond to catastrophic events will require more systematic research to strengthen the evidence base for postdisaster screening and interventions and effective methods and platforms for training. Policy decisions are clearly needed that enhance federal funding to increase availability and access to services, especially for longer term care. Traumatic bereavement represents a critical area for future research, as much needs to be done to clarify issues related to reactions and adaptation to a traumatic death. PMID:21823776

  7. Infrared emissions of H3(+) in the atmosphere of Jupiter in the 2. 1 and 4. 0 micron region

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.; Tennyson, J.; Joseph, R.D. Hawaii Univ., Honolulu )

    1990-09-01

    Infrared spectra of the Jovian atmosphere around 2.1 and 4.0 microns, measured using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, are presented. The observations were made between February 6 and 8, 1990. In both spectral regions, features attributable to H3(+) were visible. The intensity ratio of lines in the 2 and 4 microns regions measured from the northern auroral hot spot during the same night leads to a rovibrational temperature of 1100 + or - 100 K for this molecular ion, close to a previous measurement of the rotational temperature of 1099 + or - 100 K. This indicates that the upper energy levels are being populated by purely thermal processes, rather than by resonant energy exchange. The para-H3(+) fractional abundance of 0.58 determined by previous workers is found to be consistent with this study. The time dependency of the H3(+) emission phenomena is confirmed. 9 refs.

  8. 9/11 in the Curriculum: A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Diana; Stoddard, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This article uses a curricular analysis study to examine how the events of 9/11 and their aftermath are presented to secondary students in supplemental curriculum and social studies textbooks published from 2002-2010. Shortly after 9/11, many political leaders and social studies educators advocated teaching about 9/11 and its aftermath because…

  9. 46 CFR 9.11 - Proration of charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proration of charges. 9.11 Section 9.11 Shipping COAST... OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.11 Proration of charges. If services are performed for two or more applicants during one continuous tour of overtime duty, the charge for the extra compensation earned shall be...

  10. 12 CFR 9.11 - Investment of fiduciary funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment of fiduciary funds. 9.11 Section 9.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES OF NATIONAL BANKS Regulations § 9.11 Investment of fiduciary funds. A national bank shall invest funds of...

  11. 12 CFR 9.11 - Investment of fiduciary funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Investment of fiduciary funds. 9.11 Section 9.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES OF NATIONAL BANKS Regulations § 9.11 Investment of fiduciary funds. A national bank shall invest funds of...

  12. 12 CFR 9.11 - Investment of fiduciary funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Investment of fiduciary funds. 9.11 Section 9.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES OF NATIONAL BANKS Regulations § 9.11 Investment of fiduciary funds. A national bank shall invest funds of...

  13. 12 CFR 9.11 - Investment of fiduciary funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Investment of fiduciary funds. 9.11 Section 9.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES OF NATIONAL BANKS Regulations § 9.11 Investment of fiduciary funds. A national bank shall invest funds of...

  14. 12 CFR 9.11 - Investment of fiduciary funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Investment of fiduciary funds. 9.11 Section 9.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES OF NATIONAL BANKS Regulations § 9.11 Investment of fiduciary funds. A national bank shall invest funds of...

  15. 6 CFR 9.11 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 9.11 Section 9.11 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 9.11 Agency and legislative liaison. (a) The prohibition on the...

  16. 46 CFR 9.11 - Proration of charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Proration of charges. 9.11 Section 9.11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.11 Proration of charges. If services are performed for two or more applicants...

  17. 6 CFR 9.11 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 9.11 Section 9.11 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 9.11 Agency and legislative liaison. (a) The prohibition on the...

  18. 27 CFR 9.11 - Submission of AVA petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... petitions. 9.11 Section 9.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS AVA Petitions § 9.11 Submission of AVA... specified in § 9.12. The person submitting the petition is also responsible for providing timely...

  19. 29 CFR 9.11 - Contracting agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Contracting agency requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Labor... Requirements § 9.11 Contracting agency requirements. (a) Contract Clause. The contract clause set forth in... § 9.12(e) of this part to the successor contractor and, on request, to employees or...

  20. 27 CFR 9.11 - Meaning of terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Meaning of terms. 9.11 Section 9.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Definitions § 9.11 Meaning of terms. As used...

  1. 27 CFR 9.11 - Submission of AVA petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... petitions. 9.11 Section 9.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS AVA Petitions § 9.11 Submission of AVA... specified in § 9.12. The person submitting the petition is also responsible for providing timely...

  2. 10 CFR 9.11 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 9.11 Section 9.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.11 Scope of subpart. This subpart prescribes procedures for making NRC agency records available to the public for inspection...

  3. 46 CFR 9.11 - Proration of charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proration of charges. 9.11 Section 9.11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.11 Proration of charges. If services are performed for two or more applicants...

  4. 10 CFR 9.11 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 9.11 Section 9.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.11 Scope of subpart. This subpart prescribes procedures for making NRC agency records available to the public for inspection...

  5. 10 CFR 9.11 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 9.11 Section 9.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.11 Scope of subpart. This subpart prescribes procedures for making NRC agency records available to the public for inspection...

  6. 6 CFR 9.11 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 9.11 Section 9.11 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 9.11 Agency and legislative liaison. (a) The prohibition on the...

  7. 10 CFR 9.11 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 9.11 Section 9.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.11 Scope of subpart. This subpart prescribes procedures for making NRC agency records available to the public for inspection...

  8. 27 CFR 9.11 - Submission of AVA petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... petitions. 9.11 Section 9.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS AVA Petitions § 9.11 Submission of AVA... specified in § 9.12. The person submitting the petition is also responsible for providing timely...

  9. 29 CFR 9.11 - Contracting agency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contracting agency requirements. 9.11 Section 9.11 Labor... Requirements § 9.11 Contracting agency requirements. (a) Contract Clause. The contract clause set forth in... § 9.12(e) of this part to the successor contractor and, on request, to employees or...

  10. 27 CFR 9.11 - Submission of AVA petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... petitions. 9.11 Section 9.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS AVA Petitions § 9.11 Submission of AVA... specified in § 9.12. The person submitting the petition is also responsible for providing timely...

  11. 10 CFR 9.11 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 9.11 Section 9.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.11 Scope of subpart. This subpart prescribes procedures for making NRC agency records available to the public for inspection...

  12. 46 CFR 9.11 - Proration of charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proration of charges. 9.11 Section 9.11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.11 Proration of charges. If services are performed for two or more applicants...

  13. 6 CFR 9.11 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 9.11 Section 9.11 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 9.11 Agency and legislative liaison. (a) The prohibition on the...

  14. 46 CFR 9.11 - Proration of charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Proration of charges. 9.11 Section 9.11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.11 Proration of charges. If services are performed for two or more applicants...

  15. 6 CFR 9.11 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 9.11 Section 9.11 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 9.11 Agency and legislative liaison. (a) The prohibition on the...

  16. Single mode, short cavity, Pb-salt diode lasers operating in the 5, 10, and 30-microns spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Pb-salt diode lasers are being used as frequency-tunable infrared sources in high resolution spectroscopy and heterodyne detection applications. Recent advances in short cavity, stripe-geometry laser configurations have led to significant increases in maximum CW operating temperature, single mode operation, and increased single mode tuning range. This paper describes short cavity, stripe geometry lasers operating in the 5, 10, and 30-microns spectral regions, with single mode tuning ranges of over 6/cm.

  17. Development of a unique laboratory standard indium gallium arsenide detector for the 500 to 1700 micron spectral region, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, Vladimir S.; Olsen, Gregory H.

    1990-01-01

    In the course of this work, 5 mm diameter InGaAs pin detectors were produced which met or exceeded all of the goals of the program. The best results achieved were: shunt resistance of over 300 K ohms; rise time of less than 300 ns; contact resistance of less than 20 ohms; quantum efficiency of over 50 percent in the 0.5 to 1.7 micron range; and devices were maintained and operated at 125 C without deterioration for over 100 hours. In order to achieve the goals of this program, several major technological advances were realized, among them: successful design, construction and operation of a hydride VPE reactor capable of growing epitaxial layers on 2 inch diameter InP substrates with a capacity of over 8 wafers per day; wafer processing was upgraded to handle 2 inch wafers; a double layer Si3N4/SiO2 antireflection coating which enhances response over the 0.5 to 1.7 micron range was developed; a method for anisotropic, precisely controlled CH4/H2 plasma etching for enhancement of response at short wavelengths was developed; and electronic and optical testing methods were developed to allow full characterization of detectors with size and spectral response characteristics. On the basis of the work and results achieved in this program, it is concluded that large size, high shunt resistance, high quantum efficiency InGaAs pin detectors are not only feasible but also manufacturable on industrial scale. This device spans a significant portion of visible and near infrared spectral range and it will allow a single detector to be used for the 0.5 to 1.7 micron spectral region, rather than the presently used silicon (for 0.5 to 1.1 microns) and germanium (0.8 to 1.7 microns).

  18. Saturn's Regional and Global Cloud Properties from Cassini/VIMS 4.5-5.1 Micron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, K. H.; Momary, T. W.; Orton, G. S.; Roos-Serote, M.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2009-09-01

    Exploiting a region of Saturn's thermal-IR spectrum between 4.5-5.1 microns where there is a dearth of opacity sources, Cassini/VIMS has revealed a wealth of dynamical phenomena in the 1-4 bar region that are transforming our understanding of the gas giant. Narrow dark lanes and discrete cloud features are observed in silhouette against the 5-micron background thermal glow of Saturn's deep atmosphere. The NEMESIS optimal-estimation retrieval algorithm (Irwin et al., JSQRT, 2008) is used to model the 4.5-5.1 micron region using the correlated-k approximation. We determine (a) the sensitivity and correlations associated with determinations of cloud properties and gaseous composition from the Cassini/VIMS dataset; (b) the meridional variation in opacity sources (a multi-layer cloud model, the abundances of phosphine and arsine); (c) the contribution of the thermal and reflected components to VIMS spectra and (d) the spatial variability of opacity sources associated with Saturn's string of pearls and ribbon wave features in the northern hemisphere. The meridional gradients in composition are compared to the Cassini/CIRS derivations of phosphine at higher altitudes (pressures less than 1 bar; Fletcher et al., Icarus, 2009). The seasonal origin of the north-south asymmetry in 5-micron opacity (Baines et al., BAAS, 2006) and the dynamical motions associated with Saturn's complex zonal wave activity will be discussed. The vertical distribution of cloud opacity demonstrates the necessity for aerosols at the 2-3 bar level to successfully replicate the VIMS data. Finally, we search Cassini/CIRS mapping observations at 15.0 cm-1 resolution for mid-IR counterparts (0.1-0.5 bar) to the zonal wave activity in the deeper troposphere (1-4 bars) to investigate the vertical coupling in Saturn's troposphere.

  19. Irradiance measurement in the 0.8 to 13 micron spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, S. P.

    The paper describes a spectroradiometer along with an Apple IIe computer for data acquisition, storage, and spectral scanning in the range 0.8-13 microns. The evaluation of the conversion factor for the spectroradiometer and the calibration of the detector with respect to a variable temperature microprocessor controlled blackbody source are discussed. The experimentally determined spectral irradiance value of a heated ceramic rod and estimates of probable uncertainties in measurement are reported.

  20. Oxidation of basaltic tephras: Influence on reflectance in the 1 micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, William H.; Singer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a ongoing study into the products of hydrovolcanism, tuffs were examined from the Cerro Colorado and Pavant Butte tuff cones. The former resides in the northeastern corner of the Pinacate Volcanic Field in Sonara, Mexico and the latter is in the Black Rock Desert of southern Utah. Numerous samples were collected and many of these had their Vis/IR reflectance measured. It seems likely that in the palagonite tuffs there is a combination of nanocrystalline ferric oxide phases contributing to the UV absorption edge, but not to the 1 micron band, plus more crystalline ferric oxides which do contribute to that band as well as ferrous iron within unaltered sideromelane which is skewing the band center to longer wavelengths. This work has implications for the study of Mars. The present work indicates that when ferrous and ferric iron phases are both present, their combined spectral contribution is a single band in the vicinity of 1 micron. The center, depth, and width of that feature has potential to be used to gauge the relative proportions of ferrous and ferric iron phases.

  1. Spectral characterization of igneous rocks in the 8- to 12-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S.; Salisbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper investigates the crystal-chemistry basis for the variation in spectral behavior of ingneous rocks, with the purpose of developing relationships useful for applications in the lithologic characterization of terrestrial and extraterrestrial surfaces. A new parameter is proposed for characterizing general rock and mineral type. The parameter, SCFM, defined as the ratio SiO2/(SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO), reflects the degree of depolymerization of the silica tetrahedra in both fine-grained and coarse-grained igneous rocks, and is a good descriptor of the composition of these rocks. Using spectra obtained in the laboratory on coarse-particulate mineral and solid-rock samples, the SCFM parameter was used to assess the effects of variations in the rock composition on the location, number, and width of spectral bands. A regression analysis of bands varying in width from 0.2 micron to 1.4 microns versus the SCFM value resulted in correlation coefficients ranging from 0.88 to 0.97.

  2. Development of a (Hg, Cd)Te photodiode detector, Phase 2. [for 10.6 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    High speed sensitive (Hg,Cd)Te photodiode detectors operating in the 77 to 90 K temperature range have been developed for the 10.6 micron spectral region. P-N junctions formed by impurity (gold) diffusion in p-type (Hg, Cd) Te have been investigated. It is shown that the bandwidth and quantum efficiency of a diode are a constant for a fixed ratio of mobility/lifetime ratio of minority carriers. The minority carrier mobility and lifetime uniquely determine the bandwidth and quantum efficiency and indicate the shallow n on p (Hg,Cd) Te diodes are preferable as high performance, high frequency devices.

  3. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  4. 44 CFR 9.11 - Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 CFR § 60.6(b) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(b)), or the community has granted a variance which the Regional Administrator determines is consistent with 44 CFR 60.6(a) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(a)). In a... (d)(3)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this section, after compliance with the standards of 44 CFR 60.6(a)....

  5. 44 CFR 9.11 - Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 CFR § 60.6(b) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(b)), or the community has granted a variance which the Regional Administrator determines is consistent with 44 CFR 60.6(a) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(a)). In a... (d)(3)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this section, after compliance with the standards of 44 CFR 60.6(a)....

  6. 44 CFR 9.11 - Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 CFR § 60.6(b) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(b)), or the community has granted a variance which the Regional Administrator determines is consistent with 44 CFR 60.6(a) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(a)). In a... (d)(3)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this section, after compliance with the standards of 44 CFR 60.6(a)....

  7. 44 CFR 9.11 - Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 CFR § 60.6(b) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(b)), or the community has granted a variance which the Regional Administrator determines is consistent with 44 CFR 60.6(a) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(a)). In a... (d)(3)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this section, after compliance with the standards of 44 CFR 60.6(a)....

  8. 44 CFR 9.11 - Mitigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 CFR § 60.6(b) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(b)), or the community has granted a variance which the Regional Administrator determines is consistent with 44 CFR 60.6(a) (formerly 24 CFR 1910.6(a)). In a... (d)(3)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this section, after compliance with the standards of 44 CFR 60.6(a)....

  9. Estimates of absolute flux and radiance factor of localized regions on Mars in the 2-4 micron wavelength region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Roush, Eileen A.; Singer, Robert B.; Lucey, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    IRTF spectrophotometric observations of Mars obtained during the 1986 opposition are the bases for the present estimates of 2.0-4.15 micron absolute flux and radiance factor values. The bright/dark ratios obtained show a wavelength dependence similar to that observed by Bell and Crisp (1991) in 1990, but the spectral contrast for 1986 is lower than in those observations; this difference could be due to changes in the location, sample are size, and/or suspended atmospheric dust.

  10. 9/11: Maintaining Relevance for the Classroom Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Rickey, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The experience of 9/11 prompted a transformation in one secondary teacher's approach to teaching controversial subjects based on the relevance to today's students. Soon after that fateful day, this teacher found a purpose and rationale for developing a very demanding curriculum on 9/11, and relates how his teaching unit has evolved by expanding…

  11. 22 CFR 9.11 - Systematic declassification review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 9.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS § 9.11 Systematic declassification review. The Information and Privacy Coordinator shall be responsible for... Information and Privacy Coordinator shall prioritize such review on the basis of researcher interest and...

  12. 22 CFR 9.11 - Systematic declassification review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 9.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS § 9.11 Systematic declassification review. The Information and Privacy Coordinator shall be responsible for... Information and Privacy Coordinator shall prioritize such review on the basis of researcher interest and...

  13. 22 CFR 9.11 - Systematic declassification review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 9.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS § 9.11 Systematic declassification review. The Information and Privacy Coordinator shall be responsible for... Information and Privacy Coordinator shall prioritize such review on the basis of researcher interest and...

  14. 22 CFR 9.11 - Systematic declassification review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 9.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS § 9.11 Systematic declassification review. The Information and Privacy Coordinator shall be responsible for... Information and Privacy Coordinator shall prioritize such review on the basis of researcher interest and...

  15. 22 CFR 9.11 - Systematic declassification review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 9.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS § 9.11 Systematic declassification review. The Information and Privacy Coordinator shall be responsible for... Information and Privacy Coordinator shall prioritize such review on the basis of researcher interest and...

  16. Spectral reflectance and discrimination of plutonic rocks in the 0.45- to 2.45-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R. G.; Abrams, M. J.; Adams, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared field spectral reflectance measurements of plutonic rocks were acquired in the 0.45- to 2.45-micron region with a portable field reflectance spectrometer. These spectra were used to determine spectral signatures for the various rock types and to evaluate the separability of these rocks based on their spectral characteristics. A total of 135 samples were divided into 11 groups based on their mineralogy. These 11 groups approximately correspond to traditional rock classifications and include five granitic groups, three gabbroic groups, and three ultramafic groups. The positions, intensity, and presence of iron, CO3(-2), and Al-OH and Mg-OH absorption bands varied among the 11 groups. Each rock group also had a range of albedos characteristic of the group. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis was performed on the spectral data to determine the separability of the 11 groups. Classification accuracy for 30 equally spaced wavelength bands between 0.45 and 2.45 microns was 78% with 10% serious misclassifications. The same analysis was repeated, limiting the spectral data to the wavelength regions corresponding to the proposed Landsat D thematic mapper scanner.

  17. Interstellar PAH Emission in the 11-14 micron Region: New Insights and a Tracer of Ionized PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Ames infrared spectral database of isolated, neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) shows that aromatic CH out-of-plane bending frequencies are significantly shifted upon ionization. For non-adjacent and doubly-adjacent CH groups, the shift is pronounced and consistently toward higher frequencies. The non-adjacent modes are blueshifted by an average of 27 per cm and the doubly-adjacent modes by an average of 17 per cm. For triply- and quadruply-adjacent CH out-of-plane modes the ionization shifts are more erratic and typically more modest. As a result of these ionization shifts, both the non-adjacent and doubly-adjacent CH out-of-plane modes move out of the regions classically associated with their respective vibrations in neutral PAHs. The doubly-adjacent modes of ionized PAHs tend to fall into the frequency range traditionally associated with the non-adjacent modes, while the non-adjacent modes are shifted to frequencies above those normally attributed to out-of-plane bending vibrations. Consequently, the origin of the interstellar infrared emission feature near 11.2 microns, traditionally attributed to the out-of-plane bending of non-adjacent CH groups on PAHs is rendered ambiguous. Instead, this feature likely reflects contributions from both non-adjacent CH units in neutral PAHs and doubly-adjacent CH units in PAH cations, the dominant charge state in the most energetic emission regions. This greatly relieves the structural constraints placed on the interstellar PAH population by the dominance of the 11.2 micron band in this region and eliminates the necessity to invoke extensive dehydrogenation of the emitting species. Furthermore, these results indicate that the emission between 926 and 904 per cm (10.8 and 11.1 microns) observed in many sources can be unambiguously attributed to the non-adjacent CH out-of-plane bending modes of moderately-sized (fewer than 50 carbon atom) PAH cations making this emission an unequivocal tracer of

  18. Critical Exchanges in Postcolonial Studies, Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Anna

    2008-01-01

    September 11, 2001 generated diverse responses from around the world, but for many subjects located in "the West," an enduring perception surfaced in the aftermath of the attacks: that 9/11 revealed the fragility of the "Western Self" as a secure identity. In a move towards self-scrutiny post 9/11, it is not only the presence of the Other that has…

  19. Analysis of pressure-broadened ozone spectra in the 3 micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochaska, Eleanor S.

    1991-01-01

    This work involves the analysis of a series of McMath Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of ozone broadened by mixing with air (four different pressures), nitrogen (three pressures), or oxygen (three pressures). Each spectrum covers the region from 2396 to 4057 cm(-1). This study focused on the 3 sub nu sub 3 band in t 3000 to 3060 cm(-1). The band is analyzed by first dividing its region into small intervals containing a few well isolated absorption lines of reasonable intensity. Each of these small intervals is fit by multiple iterations of the nonlinear least squares program until residuals (the difference between calculated and observed spectrum, as a percent of the strongest intensity in the interval) are minimized to a reasonable value which corresponds to the noise level of the measured spectrum. Position, intensity, and half-width are recorded for later analysis. From the measured half-widths, a pressure broadening coefficient was determined for each absorption line. Pressure shifts were determined by comparing observed line positions in the spectra of the diluted ozone samples to tabulated line positions determined from spectra of pure gas samples. Comparisons to other work on ozone indicate that the broadening and shift coefficients determined in this study are consistent with those determined in other spectral regions.

  20. Development of lead salt semiconductor lasers for the 9-17 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.; Butler, J. F.; Nill, K. W.; Reeder, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Improved diode lasers of Pb sub 1-x Sn sub x Se operating in the 9-17 micrometers spectral region were developed. The performance characteristics of the best lasers exceeded the contract goals of 500 microW/mode at T 30K in the 9-12 micrometers region and 200 microW/mode at T 18K in the 16-17 micrometers region. Increased reliability and device yields resulted from processing improvements which evolved from a series of diagnostic studies. By means of Auger electron spectroscopy, laser shelf storage degradation was shown to be characterized by the presence of In metal on the semiconductor crystal surfaces. Studies of various metal barrier layers between the crystals and the In metal led to the development of an improved metallurgical contacting technology which has resulted in devices with performance stability values exceeding the contract goal of a one year shelf life. Lasers cycled over 500 times between 300K and 77K were also shown to be stable. Studies on improved methods of fabricating striped geometry lasers indicated that good spectral mode characteristics resulted from lasers which stripe widths of 12 and 25 micrometers.

  1. Temperature dependence of HNO3 absorption in the 11.3-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Bonomo, F. S.; Valero, F. P. J.; Goorvitch, D.; Boese, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory spectra have been obtained for HNO3 with a Michelson-type Fourier transform interferometer using absorption cells with path lengths of 10.3, 25.5, and 49.8 cm at temperatures of 240, 248, 283, and 294 K. The measurements lead to a total band intensity value of 642 plus or minus 5% per sq cm amagat, which is a temperature independent value after the gas density correction has been made. However, the temperature dependence of the spectral absorption coefficients is apparent in the 885 kayser region.

  2. Regional and Global Atmospheric CO2 Measurements Using 1.57 Micron IM-CW Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Harrison, F. Wallace; Dobler, Jeremy; Campbell, Joel; Kooi, Susan; Meadows, Byron; Fan, Tai-Fang; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is a critical forcing for the Earth's climate, and knowledge of its distribution and variations influences predictions of the Earth's future climate. Accurate observations of atmospheric CO2 are also crucial to improving our understanding of CO2 sources, sinks and transports. To meet these science needs, NASA is developing technologies for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, which is aimed at global CO2 observations. Meanwhile an airborne investigation of atmospheric CO2 distributions as part of the NASA Suborbital Atmospheric Carbon and Transport â€" America (ACT-America) mission will be conducted with lidar and in situ instrumentation over the central and eastern United States during all four seasons and under a wide range of meteorological conditions. In preparing for the ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center and Exelis Inc./Harris Corp. have jointly developed and demonstrated the capability of atmospheric CO2 column measurements with an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar. Since 2005, a total of 14 flight campaigns have been conducted. A measurement precision of approx.0.3 ppmv for a 10-s average over desert and vegetated surfaces has been achieved, and the lidar CO2 measurements also agree well with in-situ observations. Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales have been observed during these campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200A-300 sq km over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Results from recent flight campaigns are presented in this paper. The ability to achieve the science objectives of the ASCENDS mission with an IM-CW lidar is also discussed in this paper, along with the plans for the ACT-America aircraft investigation that begins in the winter of 2016.

  3. Multimodal imaging for the detection of sub-micron particles in the gas-exchange region of the mammalian lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberthür, David; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Takenaka, Shinji; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Stampanoni, Marco; Tsuda, Akira; Schittny, Johannes C.

    2009-09-01

    The deposition sites of inhaled aerosols in the gas-exchange region of the lung represent one of the key parameters needed for the understanding of the interaction between these particles and lung tissue. In order to develop a method for three-dimensional imaging of sub-micron particles in lung tissue we applied gold particles (200 and 700 nm) to rat lungs by intratracheal instillation. The samples were scanned at TOMCAT, the beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs at the Swiss Light Source. The 200 nm particles were slightly below the detection capabilities of TOMCAT. Therefore, their localization was obtained only by electron microscopy. At a voxel size of 350 nm we observed single and clustered gold particles (700 nm) in alveoli, alveolar ducts, and small bronchioli. The locations of the gold particles were verified by transmission electron microscopical serial sections. We observed a very high correlation between these two imaging modalities. We conclude that a combination of x-ray tomographic microscopy and electron microscopy allows the full unrestricted 3D localization of particles smaller than the resolution of x-ray tomographic microscopy. We are planning to use this method for the verification of the simulation of particle deposition in the airway tree.

  4. Academic Freedom in America after 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John K.

    2005-01-01

    College campuses around the country reacted to the September 11, 2001, terrorist acts with rallies, vigils, discussions, and a wide range of debates about the causes and cures for terrorism. Yet the story told about academia in the media was often quite different. Conservatives claimed that the reaction to 9/11 in academia was another example of…

  5. Muslim Students in Post-9/11 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jandali, Ameena K.

    2012-01-01

    "Terrorist," "son of bin Laden," "camel jockey," "raghead," "towel-head"--variations of the same epithets resurface in each generation with the same painful impact. While Muslim students in public schools were objects of derision and harassment long before 9/11, the situation in the past decade has become markedly worse. Bullying and harassment…

  6. 38 CFR 9.11 - Criteria for reinsurers and converters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.11 Criteria for... companies: (a) The company must be a legal reserve life insurance company as classified by the insurance... company must have been in the life insurance business for a continuous period of 5 years prior to...

  7. 38 CFR 9.11 - Criteria for reinsurers and converters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.11 Criteria for... companies: (a) The company must be a legal reserve life insurance company as classified by the insurance... company must have been in the life insurance business for a continuous period of 5 years prior to...

  8. 38 CFR 9.11 - Criteria for reinsurers and converters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.11 Criteria for... companies: (a) The company must be a legal reserve life insurance company as classified by the insurance... company must have been in the life insurance business for a continuous period of 5 years prior to...

  9. 38 CFR 9.11 - Criteria for reinsurers and converters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.11 Criteria for... companies: (a) The company must be a legal reserve life insurance company as classified by the insurance... company must have been in the life insurance business for a continuous period of 5 years prior to...

  10. 38 CFR 9.11 - Criteria for reinsurers and converters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.11 Criteria for... companies: (a) The company must be a legal reserve life insurance company as classified by the insurance... company must have been in the life insurance business for a continuous period of 5 years prior to...

  11. Religious Education in England after 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In the ten years following 9/11 there was unprecedented interest in, and commitment to, religious education in the school curriculum in England. Politicians, academics, and professionals all argued that learning about religion could foster "social cohesion" and even prevent terrorism. Accordingly there were a number of national and international…

  12. Memories Slipping Away: The Tenth Anniversary of 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevin, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Historical memories are often weak, and must be kept alive by media, schools, and government. The disaster of 9/11 is one of those unusual and unsettling events that call for recognition. But memories are already fading in people's minds after just ten years. Unpleasant, contested events require commemoration but we tend to honor more upbeat…

  13. Parenting and temperament prior to September 11, 2001, and parenting specific to 9/11 as predictors of children's posttraumatic stress symptoms following 9/11.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anna C; Lengua, Liliana J; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Smith, Kimberly A

    2010-01-01

    Parenting is related to children's adjustment, but little research has examined the role of parenting in children's responses to disasters. This study describes parenting responses specific to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and examines pre-9/11 parenting, child temperament, and 9/11-specific parenting as predictors of children's posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms among children geographically distant from the attack locations. A community sample of children and parents (n = 137, ages 9-13 years) participating in an ongoing study were interviewed 1 month following 9/11. Parents reported engaging in a number of parenting responses following 9/11. Pre-9/11 acceptance and 9/11-specific, self-focused parental responses predicted PTS symptoms. Pre-9/11 parenting and temperament interacted to predict PTS symptoms, suggesting that parenting and temperament are important prospective predictors of children's responses to indirect exposure to disasters. PMID:20589557

  14. Parenting and Temperament Prior to September 11, 2001, and Parenting Specific to 9/11 as Predictors of Children's Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Following 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anna C.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Smith, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Parenting is related to children's adjustment, but little research has examined the role of parenting in children's responses to disasters. This study describes parenting responses specific to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and examines pre-9/11 parenting, child temperament, and 9/11-specific parenting as predictors of children's posttraumatic stress…

  15. Driving deaths and injuries post-9/11

    PubMed Central

    Deonandan, Raywat; Backwell, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In the days immediately following the terror attacks of 9/11, thousands of Americans chose to drive rather than to fly. We analyzed highway accident data to determine whether or not the number of fatalities and injuries following 9/11 differed from those in the same time period in 2000 and 2002. Methods Motor crash data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System were analyzed to determine the numbers and rates of fatalities and injuries nationally and in selected states for the 20 days after September 11, in each of 2000, 2001, and 2002. Results While the fatality rate did not change appreciably, the number of less severe injuries was statistically higher in 2001 than in 2000, both nationally and in New York State. Conclusions The fear of terror attacks may have compelled Americans to drive instead of fly. They were thus exposed to the heightened risk of injury and death posed by driving. The need for public health to manage risk perception and communication is thus heightened in an era of global fear and terrorism. PMID:22162936

  16. Predicting travel attitudes among university faculty after 9/11.

    PubMed

    Staats, Sara; Panek, Paul E; Cosmar, David

    2006-03-01

    The authors interviewed a random sample of 306 university faculty as part of an annual university poll. Items focused on air travel concerns following 9/11, positive aspects of travel, and future travel intentions. Demographic factors were not significant predictors for men or women faculty. Faculty expressed positive attitudes toward travel, for example agreeing that travel allows them to demonstrate competency. Concerns about missing connections and delays elicited a larger percent of negative reactions than concerns about hijackings or security. Gender differences were not observed on individual items, but in regression analyses a composite of self-reported travel risk factors was more predictive of future travel plans for women than for men, although women expected to travel as much in the future as men. The results are consistent with positive psychology and speak to applied aspects of travel and tourism. PMID:16770939

  17. Dilemmas in military medical ethics since 9/11.

    PubMed

    Howe, Edmund G

    2003-06-01

    The attack on the United States by terrorists on 9/11 and the war with Iraq have raised new ethical questions for the military and for military physicians (Herman 2002; Elshtain 2003). How and when attacks may occur now is less predictable. Planes have been hijacked, and persons dressed as civilians may carry bombs to blow themselves and others up. These dangers pose an increased threat, and, thus, there is a need for new defensive measures. How far these measures should go is, however, greatly open to debate. One of the most difficult ethical question raised for the military and military doctors by these developments is what interrogation methods are permissable when questioning captured terrorists. The licitness of different interrogation practices is, however, only one of the ethical problems potentially encountered by military physicians now having to treat terrorists and POWs. The following discussion presents the major concerns regarding this and other issues. PMID:14570019

  18. Interstellar PAH emission in the 11-14 micron region: new insights from laboratory data and a tracer of ionized PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames infrared spectral database of isolated, neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) shows that aromatic CH out-of-plane bending frequencies are significantly shifted upon ionization. For solo- and duet-CH groups, the shift is pronounced and consistently toward higher frequencies. The solo-CH modes are blueshifted by an average of 27 cm-1 and the duet-CH modes by an average of 17 cm-1. For trio- and quartet-CH groups, the ionization shifts of the out-of-plane modes are more erratic and typically more modest. As a result of these ionization shifts, the solo-CH out-of-plane modes move out of the region classically associated with these vibrations in neutral PAHS, falling instead at frequencies well above those normally attributed to out-of-plane bending, vibrations of any type. In addition, for the compact PAHs studied, the duet-CH out-of-plane modes are shifted into the frequency range traditionally associated with the solo-CH modes. These results refine our understanding of the origin of the dominant interstellar infrared emission feature near 11.2 microns, whose envelope has traditionally been attributed only to the out-of-plane bending of solo-CH groups on PAHS, and provide a natural explanation for the puzzling emission feature near 11.0 microns within the framework of the PAH model. Specifically, the prevalent but variable long-wavelength wing or shoulder that is often observed near 11.4 microns likely reflects the contributions of duet-CH units in PAH cations. Also, these results indicate that the emission between 926 and 904 cm-1 (10.8 and 11.1 microns) observed in many sources can be unambiguously attributed to the out-of-plane wagging, of solo-CH units in moderately sized (fewer than 50 carbon atom) PAH cations, making this emission an unequivocal tracer of ionized interstellar PAHS.

  19. Network resilience to real-world disasters: Eyjafjallajökull and 9/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Olivia; Thiemann, Christian; Grady, Daniel; Brockmann, Dirk

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the resilience of the the world-wide air transportation network (WAN) to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the recent eruption of the volcano Eyjafjallajökull. Although both disasters caused wide-spread disruption, the number of airports that were closed and the volume of interrupted traffic were well below the percolation threshold predicted by the classical theory. In order to quantify and visualize network deformation before breakdown, we introduce a framework based on the increase in shortest-path distance and homogenization of shortest-path structure. These real-world disasters are a new type of disruption because the removal of all vertices (airports) is geographically compact. Our framework incorporates the dual perspective of individual airports and geopolitical regions to capture how the impact interacts with the sub-network structure.We find that real-world events have an impact signature which is qualitatively different from that of random or high-centrality attacks. Furthermore, we find that the network is more resilient to the 9/11 disaster, although it removed more airports and traffic than the volcanic ash-cloud. This is due to the network roles of Europe and North America. We discuss how regional roles influence resilience to a region's removal.

  20. Integrating 9/11 throughout the Study of American History and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of continuing study of the events surrounding 9/11. She also provides ideas on how the 9/11 Education Trust's curriculum can be implemented in a variety of classroom settings.

  1. 43 CFR 9.11 - What are the Secretary's obligations in interstate situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... interstate situations? 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 9.11 What are the Secretary's... select the Department's program or activity; (4) Responding pursuant to § 9.10 of this part if...

  2. 43 CFR 9.11 - What are the Secretary's obligations in interstate situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... interstate situations? 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 9.11 What are the Secretary's... select the Department's program or activity; (4) Responding pursuant to § 9.10 of this part if...

  3. 43 CFR 9.11 - What are the Secretary's obligations in interstate situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... interstate situations? 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 9.11 What are the Secretary's... select the Department's program or activity; (4) Responding pursuant to § 9.10 of this part if...

  4. Dare We Not Teach 9/11 yet Advocate Citizenship Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Haas, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The authors advocate for systematic teaching of 9/11 within the social studies curriculum (K-16). The examination of the issues and impact of 9/11 illustrate the power of civic education in a democracy. Illustrated are the key concepts and associated issues and values of 9/11 with the National Council for the Social Studies curriculum standards.…

  5. 43 CFR 9.11 - What are the Secretary's obligations in interstate situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interstate situations? 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 9.11 What are the Secretary's... select the Department's program or activity; (4) Responding pursuant to § 9.10 of this part if...

  6. 43 CFR 9.11 - What are the Secretary's obligations in interstate situations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... interstate situations? 9.11 Section 9.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 9.11 What are the Secretary's... select the Department's program or activity; (4) Responding pursuant to § 9.10 of this part if...

  7. 49 CFR 9.11 - Legal proceedings between private litigants: Demands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Legal proceedings between private litigants: Demands. 9.11 Section 9.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TESTIMONY OF EMPLOYEES OF THE DEPARTMENT AND PRODUCTION OF RECORDS IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 9.11 Legal proceedings between private litigants: Demands. (a) If an...

  8. Satellite remote sensing of H2SO4 aerosol using the 8- to 12-microns window region: Application to Mount Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Strabala, Kathleen I.

    1994-01-01

    Monitoring stratospheric aerosols containing H2SO4 using the brightness temperature (BT) difference between 11 and 8.3 microns (BT(sub 8)-BT(sub 11)) spectral channels is demonstrated using theoretical calculations and satellite observations. Assuming an aqueous solution of 50% and 75% sulfuric acid, radiative transfer calculations indicate that over oceans an increase in the optical depth of the stratospheric aerosol results in an increase in BT(sub 8)-BT(sub 11). Theoretical simulations suggest that the technique is sensitive to visible optical depths greater than approximately 0.15. The simulations also demonstrate a lack of sensitivity to the particle size distribution. Changes in pre- and post-Pinatubo observations by the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder 2 (HIRS2) on board the NOAA 10 are consistent with observed optical depth measurements and confirm the sensitivity of these channels to the presence of the aerosol. The technique is also applied to cold tropical convective clouds and desert regions where the signal, though evident, is less conclusive. Time series analysis is applied to the NOAA 10 and NOAA 12 combined BT(sub 8-BT(sub 11) observations to detect the periodicity of the spread of the volcanic aerosol. Over a region of the southern Pacific a 18- to 26-day period is present. Model simulations were conducted to demonstrate a trispectral with observations near 8, 11, and 12 microns. The trispectral approach has high potential in that the spectral signature of cirrus, water vapor, and H2SO4 aerosols are different. Observations from NOAA 10 and NOAA 11 are combined to demonstrate the capabilities of these infrared wavelengths of detecting the aerosol. The signal is clearly evident when a region of the South Atlantic is compared for pre- and post-Pinatubo conditions.

  9. Negotiating Muslim Youth Identity in a Post-9/11 World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindongan, Cynthia White

    2011-01-01

    The post-9/11 era is poignant for a number of populations and groups in the United States. Each of those communities wrestles with the abject impact of the events of 9/11 in its own way marshaling strengths and excavating pre-9/11 identities toward a new way of being members of those communities and participants in U.S. society. Muslims and…

  10. A spectral atlas of the nu(sub 12) fundamental of (13)C(12)CH6 in the 12 micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Mark; Reuter, Dennis C.; Sirota, J. Marcos; Blass, William E.; Hillman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery of the minor isotopomer of ethane, (13)C(12)CH6, in the planetary atmospheres of Jupiter and Neptune, added ethane to the molecules which can be used to determine isotopic (12)C(12)C ratios for the jovian planets. The increased spectral resolution and coverage of the IR and far-IR instruments to be carried on the Cassini mission to Saturn and Titan may enable the detection of the minor isotopomer. Accurate frequency and cross-section measurements of the nu(sub 12) fundamental under controlled laboratory condition are important to interpret current and future planetary spectra. High resolution spectra of the minor isotopomer (13)C(12)CH6 have been recorded in the 12.2 micron region using the Kitt Peak Fourier Transform (FTS) and the Goddard Tunable Diode Laser spectrometer (TDL). In a global fit to 19 molecular constants in a symmetric top Hamiltonian, transition frequencies of the nu(sub 12) fundamental ranging up to J=35 and K=20 have been determined with a standard deviation of less than 0.0005 cm(exp -1). From selected line intensity measurements, a vibrational dipole moment for the nu(sub 12) fundamental has been derived. Observed and calculated spectra covering the region from 740 cm(exp -1) and to 910 cm(exp -1) are presented. A compilation of transition frequencies, line intensities, and lower state energies are included for general use in the astronomical community.

  11. Update on the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Report 09-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Mallory

    2009-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008, or Post-9/11 GI Bill, becomes effective August 1, 2009. The bill covers in-state graduate and undergraduate fees and vocational and technical training for veterans who served after September 10, 2001. Benefits are available for up to 36 months--equivalent to four academic years--and…

  12. Notes on Teaching 9/11. Footnotes. Volume 16, Number 09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luxenberg, Alan

    2011-01-01

    As today's high school students ranged in age from four to eight that fateful Tuesday morning, for many of them 9/11 is ancient history even though they live with the consequences of 9/11--namely, two wars (Afghanistan, Iraq), at least two low-level wars using special forces or drones (Yemen, Somalia), smaller-scale terrorist incidents (Fort…

  13. My Closing Reflection on 9/11 as Event and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the personal and pedagogical contexts for the development of a 9/11 curriculum. The author relates his own experiences learning of the event and teaching it soon afterwards and the subsequent development of a nationally distributed 9/11 curriculum.

  14. The impact of 9/11 on the association of ambient air pollution with daily respiratory hospital admissions in a Canada-US border city, Windsor, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Luginaah, Isaac; Fung, Karen Y; Gorey, Kevin M; Khan, Shahedul

    2006-08-01

    The 11 September 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks in the United States resulted in long lines of trucks at the border crossing in Windsor, Ontario. Public concern about the potential impact of these trucks spewing toxic pollutants into the air drew attention to the need to investigate the impact of 9/11 on the daily levels of air pollutants and respiratory hospitalization. In this study, significant increases in respiratory admissions were found one month and 6 months post-9/11. Mean daily respiratory admission was also significantly higher than the same period one year earlier and one year later. SO(2) and CO concentration levels were found to be generally higher after 9/11 than one year before and immediately before. Relative risk estimates of respiratory hospitalization after 9/11 showed that SO(2) (RR̂ = 1.15 for two-day, RR̂ = 1.18 for three-day, and RR̂ = 1.21 for five-day averages), NO(2) (RR̂ = 1.10 for current day), and COH (RR̂ = 1.09 for current day, RR̂ = 1.10 for two-day average) had the most significant effects after 9/11. These results suggest the need for more stringent regulatory efforts in air quality in the region in response to the changing transportation dynamics at this Canada-US border crossing. PMID:21234298

  15. PIALA 2000: Libraries and Archives--Where Information and Language Literacy Begin [and] Engaged Readers and Writers in Multicultural Island Communities. Selected Papers from the 10th Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives Conference Joint with the 13th Annual Regional Language Arts Conference (Tumon, Guam, November 9-11, 2000)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlene, Ed.; Quan, Clarisa G., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This proceedings combines presentations from the jointly held 10th Annual PIALA 2000 Conference and the 13th Annual Regional Language Arts Conference. The volume begins with the welcoming remarks of Mary L. Silk, Christine Ku Scott-Smith, Antonio R. Umpingco, Delia Munoz Rosal, Lawrence Kasperbauer, Rosie Tainatongo, Richard S. Tom, Mary L.…

  16. Childhood maltreatment, 9/11 exposure, and latent dimensions of psychopathology: A test of stress sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Krueger, Robert; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    On September 11, 2001, a terrorist attack occurred in the U.S. (9/11). Research on 9/11 and psychiatric outcomes has focused on individual disorders rather than the broader internalizing (INT) and externalizing (EXT) domains of psychopathology, leaving unknown whether direct and indirect 9/11 exposure differentially impacted these domains rather than individual disorders. Further, whether such effects were exacerbated by earlier childhood maltreatment (i.e. stress sensitization) is unknown. 18,713 participants from a U.S. national sample with no history of psychiatric disorders prior to 9/11 were assessed using a structured in-person interview. Structural equation modeling conducted in a sample who endorsed no psychiatric history prior to 9/11, indicated that indirect exposure to 9/11 (i.e. media, friends/family) was related to both EXT (alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis dependence, and antisocial personality disorder) and INT (major depression, generalized anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)) dimensions of psychopathology (EXT: β = 0.10, p < 0.001; INT: β = 0.11, p < 0.001) whereas direct exposure was associated with the INT dimension only (β = 0.11, p < 0.001). For individuals who had experienced childhood maltreatment, the risk for EXT and INT dimensions associated with 9/11 was exacerbated (Interactions: β = 0.06, p < 0.01; β = 0.07, p < 0.001, respectively). These findings indicate that 9/11 impacted latent liability to broad domains of psychopathology in the US general population rather than specific disorders with the exception of PTSD, which had independent effects beyond INT (as indicated by a significant (p < 0.05) improvement in modification indices). Findings also indicated that childhood maltreatment increases the risk associated with adult trauma exposure, providing further evidence for the concept of stress sensitization. PMID:26037889

  17. Childhood maltreatment, 9/11 exposure, and latent dimensions of psychopathology: A test of stress sensitization.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Lowe, Sarah R; Eaton, Nicholas R; Krueger, Robert; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-09-01

    On September 11, 2001, a terrorist attack occurred in the U.S. (9/11). Research on 9/11 and psychiatric outcomes has focused on individual disorders rather than the broader internalizing (INT) and externalizing (EXT) domains of psychopathology, leaving unknown whether direct and indirect 9/11 exposure differentially impacted these domains rather than individual disorders. Further, whether such effects were exacerbated by earlier childhood maltreatment (i.e. stress sensitization) is unknown. 18,713 participants from a U.S. national sample with no history of psychiatric disorders prior to 9/11 were assessed using a structured in-person interview. Structural equation modeling conducted in a sample who endorsed no psychiatric history prior to 9/11, indicated that indirect exposure to 9/11 (i.e. media, friends/family) was related to both EXT (alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis dependence, and antisocial personality disorder) and INT (major depression, generalized anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)) dimensions of psychopathology (EXT: β = 0.10, p < 0.001; INT: β = 0.11, p < 0.001) whereas direct exposure was associated with the INT dimension only (β = 0.11, p < 0.001). For individuals who had experienced childhood maltreatment, the risk for EXT and INT dimensions associated with 9/11 was exacerbated (Interactions: β = 0.06, p < 0.01; β = 0.07, p < 0.001, respectively). These findings indicate that 9/11 impacted latent liability to broad domains of psychopathology in the US general population rather than specific disorders with the exception of PTSD, which had independent effects beyond INT (as indicated by a significant (p < 0.05) improvement in modification indices). Findings also indicated that childhood maltreatment increases the risk associated with adult trauma exposure, providing further evidence for the concept of stress sensitization. PMID:26037889

  18. A Gift to America after 9/11: A Lesson for Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Haas, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The tragedy of 9/11 is perhaps the most significant event so far in the 21st century. Ten years later, the vast majority of elementary school students have no personal connection with the original events, yet all live in a world that has been and continues to be affected by 9/11. How can teachers introduce young students to the events of that…

  19. The Terror Attacks of 9/11 and Suicides in Germany: A Time Series Analysis.

    PubMed

    Medenwald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Data on the effect of the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terror attacks on suicide rates remain inconclusive. Reportedly, even people located far from the attack site have considerable potential for personalizing the events that occurred on 9/11. Durkheim's theory states that suicides decrease during wartime; thus, a decline in suicides might have been expected after 9/11. We conducted a time series analysis of 164,136 officially recorded suicides in Germany between 1995 and 2009 using the algorithm introduced by Box and Jenkins. Compared with the average death rate, we observed no relevant change in the suicide rate of either sex after 9/11. Our estimates of an excess of suicides approached the null effect value on and within a 7-day period after 9/11, which also held when subsamples of deaths in urban or rural settings were examined. No evidence of Durkheim's theory attributable to the 9/11attacks was found in this sample. PMID:27082561

  20. The Terror Attacks of 9/11 and Suicides in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Medenwald, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on the effect of the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terror attacks on suicide rates remain inconclusive. Reportedly, even people located far from the attack site have considerable potential for personalizing the events that occurred on 9/11. Durkheim's theory states that suicides decrease during wartime; thus, a decline in suicides might have been expected after 9/11. We conducted a time series analysis of 164,136 officially recorded suicides in Germany between 1995 and 2009 using the algorithm introduced by Box and Jenkins. Compared with the average death rate, we observed no relevant change in the suicide rate of either sex after 9/11. Our estimates of an excess of suicides approached the null effect value on and within a 7-day period after 9/11, which also held when subsamples of deaths in urban or rural settings were examined. No evidence of Durkheim's theory attributable to the 9/11attacks was found in this sample. PMID:27082561

  1. Children's Fears: A Pre-9/11 and Post-9/11 Comparison Using the American Fear Survey Schedule for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Joy J.

    2007-01-01

    Children are influenced by the salient events surrounding them (e.g., 9/11 terrorist attacks, Hurricane Katrina, massacre at Virginia Tech). In this study, the author examined fears of children and adolescents in Grades 2-12 in a pre-and post-September 11, 2001, comparison using the American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; J. J.…

  2. Short-term and medium-term health effects of 9/11.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Sharon E; Friedman, Stephen; Galea, Sandro; Nair, Hemanth P; Eros-Sarnyai, Monika; Stellman, Steven D; Hon, Jeffrey; Greene, Carolyn M

    2011-09-01

    The New York City terrorist attacks on Sept 11, 2001 (9/11), killed nearly 2800 people and thousands more had subsequent health problems. In this Review of health effects in the short and medium terms, strong evidence is provided for associations between experiencing or witnessing events related to 9/11 and post-traumatic stress disorder and respiratory illness, with a correlation between prolonged, intense exposure and increased overall illness and disability. Rescue and recovery workers, especially those who arrived early at the World Trade Center site or worked for longer periods, were more likely to develop respiratory illness than were other exposed groups. Risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder included proximity to the site on 9/11, living or working in lower Manhattan, rescue or recovery work at the World Trade Center site, event-related loss of spouse, and low social support. Investigators note associations between 9/11 exposures and additional disorders, such as depression and substance use; however, for some health problems association with exposures related to 9/11 is unclear. PMID:21890057

  3. Education as a Tool for Peace? The King Abdullah Scholarship Program and Perceptions of Saudi Arabia and UAE Post 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilal, Kholoud T.; Denman, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Since 9/11, Saudi Arabia has made significant attempts to change its public image because of its alleged association with global terrorism. Given its charitable interests in promoting education as a tool for peace within the Arab region, it has established the King Abdullah Scholarship Program (KASP), considered to be the most heavily endowed…

  4. Health effects following 9/11: implications for occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Pak, Victoria M; O'Hara, MaryEllen; McCauley, Linda A

    2008-04-01

    The attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001 resulted in hazardous environmental exposures of enormous magnitude, bringing about persistent respiratory and psychological problems among survivors. Approximately 40,000 men and women worked at Ground Zero, the former site of the World Trade Center in New York City, and at the Staten Island landfill, the main wreckage depository, in the days, weeks, and months following 9/11. First responders such as firefighters and police, construction workers, and utility and public sector workers were involved. These individuals were at high risk for injury, respiratory complications, and psychological distress from the traumatic event. This article highlights the controversy surrounding 9/11 research and reports, identifies populations at high risk for exposure, and examines the health effects. Occupational health nurses should not only be empowered to provide the best care for workers affiliated with 9/11, but also contribute to research to protect worker health in future disaster responses. PMID:18444404

  5. Coping with the 10th anniversary of 9/11: Muslim Americans' sadness, fear, and anger.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Mosquera, Patricia M; Khan, Tasmiha; Selya, Arielle

    2013-01-01

    The events of 9/11 marked an increase in prejudice, discrimination, and other forms of unfair treatment toward Muslim Americans. We present a study that examined the emotions of Muslim Americans in the days preceding the ten-year 9/11 anniversary. We measured the antecedents (concerns) and consequences (coping) of sadness, fear, and anger. The 9/11 anniversary precipitated intense concerns with loss and discrimination, and intense feelings of sadness, fear, and anger. We measured three coping responses: rumination, avoidance of public places, and religious coping. Participants engaged in all three coping responses, with seeking solace in one's religion being the most frequent response. Moreover, emotions mediated the relationship between concerns and coping responses. Sadness accounted for the association between concern with loss and rumination. Fear explained the association between concern with discrimination and avoidance. Anger accounted for the association between concern with discrimination and religious coping. PMID:23237357

  6. Religious and Spiritual Responses to 9/11: Evidence from the Add Health Study*

    PubMed Central

    Uecker, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a great deal of public discourse concerning the effect of the September 11th attacks on Americans’ religious and spiritual lives, social scientists know very little about the nature, size, and duration of this effect. Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study analyzes the influence of 9/11 on the religious and spiritual lives of American young adults. The results suggest that the 9/11 attacks exerted only modest and short-lived effects on various aspects of young adults’ religiosity and spirituality, and these effects were variable across different groups. These findings suggest that no remarkable religious revival occurred among young adults after September 11th, and researchers interested in analyzing religious development across the life course or religious change over time need not worry about sea changes in religiosity and spirituality brought on by 9/11. PMID:21698068

  7. 17 CFR 9.11 - Form, contents and delivery of notice of disciplinary or access denial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... notice of disciplinary or access denial action. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... OTHER ADVERSE ACTIONS Notice and Effective Date of Disciplinary Action or Access Denial Action § 9.11... effective by the exchange except as provided in § 9.12. (b) Contents of notice. For purposes of this...

  8. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - For what POV emergency or temporary storage expenses will my agency pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or temporary storage expenses will my agency pay? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public Contracts and... PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY OR TEMPORARY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules § 302-9.11 For what POV emergency or temporary storage expenses will my agency pay?...

  9. 77 FR 39344 - Agency Information (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey)] Agency Information (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans.... Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey) in...

  10. 17 CFR 9.11 - Form, contents and delivery of notice of disciplinary or access denial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... notice of disciplinary or access denial action. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... OTHER ADVERSE ACTIONS Notice and Effective Date of Disciplinary Action or Access Denial Action § 9.11... effective by the exchange except as provided in § 9.12. (b) Contents of notice. For purposes of this...

  11. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - For what POV emergency or temporary storage expenses will my agency pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... temporary storage expenses will my agency pay? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9... § 302-9.11 For what POV emergency or temporary storage expenses will my agency pay? Your agency will...

  12. 17 CFR 9.11 - Form, contents and delivery of notice of disciplinary or access denial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... notice of disciplinary or access denial action. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... OTHER ADVERSE ACTIONS Notice and Effective Date of Disciplinary Action or Access Denial Action § 9.11... effective by the exchange except as provided in § 9.12. (b) Contents of notice. For purposes of this...

  13. 17 CFR 9.11 - Form, contents and delivery of notice of disciplinary or access denial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... notice of disciplinary or access denial action. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... OTHER ADVERSE ACTIONS Notice and Effective Date of Disciplinary Action or Access Denial Action § 9.11... effective by the exchange except as provided in § 9.12. (b) Contents of notice. For purposes of this...

  14. 17 CFR 9.11 - Form, contents and delivery of notice of disciplinary or access denial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... notice of disciplinary or access denial action. 9.11 Section 9.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... OTHER ADVERSE ACTIONS Notice and Effective Date of Disciplinary Action or Access Denial Action § 9.11... effective by the exchange except as provided in § 9.12. (b) Contents of notice. For purposes of this...

  15. The expulsion from Disneyland: the social psychological impact of 9/11.

    PubMed

    Morgan, G Scott; Wisneski, Daniel C; Skitka, Linda J

    2011-09-01

    People expressed many different reactions to the events of September 11th, 2001. Some of these reactions were clearly negative, such as political intolerance, discrimination, and hate crimes directed toward targets that some, if not many, people associated with the attackers. Other reactions were more positive. For example, people responded by donating blood, increasing contributions of time and money to charity, and flying the American flag. The goal of this article is to review some of Americans' negative and positive reactions to 9/11. We also describe two frameworks, value protection and terror management theory, that provide insights into Americans' various reactions to the tragedy of 9/11. PMID:21823778

  16. The Effect of 9/11 on the Heritability of Political Trust1

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Following the attacks of September 11, 2001, a rally effect led to a precipitous rise in political trust. However, the increase in political trust concealed a simultaneous decline among a smaller portion of the population. This paper examines the psychological mechanisms underlying these heterogeneous attitudes towards government and shows that a biosocial model best explains the observed patterns of response. The interplay of genetic and environmental factors of political trust reveals the stable but dynamic nature of heritability: genetic influences of political trust increased immediately following 9/11 but quickly decayed to pre-9/11 levels. PMID:26843705

  17. "Do You Remember": Confronting Post-9/11 Censorship through Critical Questioning and Poetic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Jeanine M.

    2008-01-01

    Jeanine M. Staples led a group of students, ages fourteen to eighteen, in developing a critical stance about words and images found in 9/11 media. Through questions, comments, and declarations toward these texts, the students labeled as "disengaged" actively participated in constructing a collaborative poem to confront repressive thinking.…

  18. Academic Freedom in the Post-9/11 Era. Education, Politics and Public Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Edward J., Ed.; Downing, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Academic freedom has been a principle that undergirds the university since 1915. Beyond this, it also protects a spirit of free inquiry essential to a democratic society. But in the post-9/11 present, the basic principles of academic freedom have been deeply challenged. There have been many startling instances where the rhetoric of national…

  19. Parents, Children, and Trauma: Parent Role Perceptions and Behaviors Related to the 9/11 Tragedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowder, Barbara A.; Guttman, Michelle; Rubinson, Florence; Sossin, K. Mark

    2006-01-01

    The trauma associated with 9/11 affected and continues to influence children, families, and other groups of people. While research is cataloging the various coping difficulties experienced, few studies specifically address issues related to parenting perceptions and related activities or behaviors. We examined individuals employed in close…

  20. Social Justice Issues and Music Education in the Post 9/11 United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold: first, to examine the impact of historical sociopolitical events on music education, particularly post 9/11 with the intent of establishing a context for social justice issues; and second, how we might examine the broad implications to further music education research focusing on social justice. Issues of…

  1. Teaching 9/11 and the War on Terrorism. Footnotes. Volume 11, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy

    2006-01-01

    On October 15-16, 2005, FPRI's Marvin Wachman Fund for International Education hosted 45 teachers from 14 states across the country for a weekend of lectures and discussion on Teaching 9/11 and the War on Terrorism. Sessions included: (1) Presidential Leadership in Times of Crisis (David Eisenhower); (2) Terrorism in Historical and Comparative…

  2. Engagement in Trauma-Specific CBT for Youth Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, James; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Gopalan, Geetha; Olin, Serene; McKay, Mary M.; Marcus, Sue M.; Radigan, Marleen; Chung, Michelle; Legerski, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Treatment participation was examined among youth enrolled in an evaluation of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for trauma following the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster. Staff at nine agencies serving a predominantly low-income, ethnically diverse population were trained to deliver CBT and structured engagement strategies. A total of 445 youth…

  3. The Post-9/11 University and the Project of Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Susan Searls

    2002-01-01

    Challenges attacks against the university in the wake of the terrorist atrocities of September 2001. Discusses teaching the post-9/11 university. Argues that the prevailing campus McCarthyism is a symptom of the crisis of political democracy itself. Offers a series of principles that should be an essential part of university education in the…

  4. Ambiguous Loss Research, Theory, and Practice: Reflections after 9-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Pauline

    2004-01-01

    This article contains an overview of three decades of research, theory development, and clinical application about ambiguous loss. Although the work includes both physical and psychological types of ambiguous loss, the focus is the aftermath of 9-11 (September 11, 2001) when the World Trade Center collapsed following terrorist attacks. On the…

  5. Attitudes toward International Careers among Male and Female Canadian Business Students after 9-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Bruce C. Y.; Bu, Nailin

    2004-01-01

    Career aspirations of 145 senior undergraduate business students in Canada were analyzed. An overwhelming majority desired an overseas assignment at some point in their career, and they were not adversely affected by the 9-11 terrorist attack. While 60 percent of the students considered pursuing a global career with multiple international…

  6. 9/11 to the Iraq War: Using Books to Help Children Understand Troubled Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rycik, Mary Taylor

    2006-01-01

    Four years after the 9/11 attack on the United States, the country continues to be in considerable turmoil. Children have lived through the devastation of the September 11th attacks, the panic over the anthrax mailings, the hunt for terrorists in Afghanistan, elevated homeland security threat levels, the war in Iraq, the tsunami disaster, and…

  7. Mapping Gravitational and Magnetic Fields with Children 9-11: Relevance, Difficulties and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradamante, F.; Viennot, L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation centered on a guided conceptual path concerning magnetic and gravitational fields, proposed for children aged 9-11. The goal is to appreciate to what extent the idea of "mapping" two fields of interaction is accessible and fruitful for children of that age. The conceptual target is to link magnetic and…

  8. Growing up in the Shadow of Terrorism: Youth in America after 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Research conducted in the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attacks (9/11) suggests that, except for those who directly witnessed or suffered loss from the attacks, for most children the emotional impact was relatively transitory. We review this literature as well as consider other ways in which the attacks may have played a role in the…

  9. Teacher to Teacher: What Texts Effectively Raise Issues Related to 9/11 for Secondary Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with texts that effectively raise issues related to 9/11 for secondary students, as discussed by several teachers. Kevin J. Collins from St. Thomas Aquinas High School says, "Elephant," Gus Van Sant's exploration of a Columbine-like tragedy, underscores the current generation's attempt to define the meaning of events in…

  10. 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary Report: Denver, Colorado - August 9-11, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's Summer 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting. This meeting was held on August 9-11, 2011, in Denver, Colorado, and brought together more than 290 professionals representing organizations with a vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

  11. A Lifespan Perspective on Terrorism: Age Differences in Trajectories of Response to 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Stacey B.; Poulin, Michael J.; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2013-01-01

    A terrorist attack is an adverse event characterized by both an event-specific stressor and concern about future threats. Little is known about age differences in responses to terrorism. This longitudinal study examined generalized distress, posttraumatic stress responses, and fear of future attacks following the September 11, 2001 (9/11)…

  12. Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans. Testimony. CT-428

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Miller, Laura L.; Buryk, Peter; Wenger, Jennie W.

    2015-01-01

    This testimony was presented before the House Veterans' Affairs Committee, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity on March 17, 2015. To inform the Subcommittee hearing on the Department of Veterans Affairs' administration of its education programs, and the educational and training needs of post-9/11 veterans, the presenters offered the statement in…

  13. Engaging "Apolitical" Adolescents: Analyzing the Popularity and Educational Potential of Dystopian Literature Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Although dystopian novels have been prevalent under the young adult banner for decades, their abundance and popularity post-9/11 is noteworthy. The 21st century has found academics and laypersons alike discussing the supposed political apathy of young adults and teenagers of the Millennial Generation. However, despite this common complaint--and…

  14. Teachers Tiptoe into Delicate Topics of 9/11 and Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a problem teachers encounter relating to how to teach the delicate topics of 9/11 and Iraq war. Five years after the September 11 terrorist attacks, and in the midst of intensifying debate over the nation's approach to battling terrorism, teachers around the country are trying to determine how, and when, to teach about…

  15. Displaced Islamic Identities: Language, Time and Space in Post 9/11 America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadlbauer, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines how women in the Muslim Student Association (MSA) at the University of Colorado at Boulder respond to the negative stereotypes of Islam and Muslims that have proliferated since 9/11. The media's positioning of Muslim women as "backwards" and "un-American" compels MSA women to construct an…

  16. 9,11-Secosteroids with cytotoxic activity from the South China Sea gorgonian coral Subergorgia suberosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ling-Li; Zhong, Ba-Lian; Liao, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Shi-Hai

    2015-06-01

    Nine new 9,11-secosterols (1-9), containing the same 3β,6α,11-trihydroxy-9,11-seco-5α-cholest-7-en-9-one steroidal nucleus, whereas possessing an array of structurally diverse side chains, along with fourteen known 9,11-secosterol compounds (10-23), were isolated from the South China Sea gorgonian coral Subergorgia suberosa, of which 3/4, 5/6, 7/8, and the known compounds 11/12, 20/21 were five pairs of inseparable C-24 epimers. Their structures were established by the extensive analyses of 1D and 2D NMR spectra, high-resolution chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HRCIMS), and by the comparison with literature data. Cytotoxic effect of these metabolites against the growth of HeLa cell lines was evaluated. The result showed that the inhibitory effect of compounds 1-23 varied considerably depending on the nature of the side chain in spite of sharing the same steroidal nucleus. Compound 19, featuring both the absence of hydroxyl group and the presence of double bond in the stigmasterol side chain, exhibited the most potent cytotoxicity with IC50 being 15.1 μM. The preliminary structure activity relationship studies identified some important structural features considerably influencing the biological effect deserved, providing valuable information for chemists and pharmacologists to design and synthesize more effective antitumor agents bearing the 9,11-secosteroid framework. PMID:25796549

  17. Linking Marxism, Globalization, and Citizenship Education: Toward a Comparative and Critical Pedagogy Post 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Awad

    2007-01-01

    In a post-9/11 world, where the politics of "us" versus "them" has reemerged under the umbrella of terrorism, especially in the United States, can we still envision an "education sans frontires": a globalized and critical praxis of citizenship education in which there are no borders? If it is possible to conceive it, what might it look like? In…

  18. Contextualizing trauma: using evidence-based treatments in a multicultural community after 9/11.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Randall D; Suh, Eun Jung

    2003-01-01

    The mental health community was caught unaware after 9/11 with respect to treatment of survivors of terrorist attacks. Because this form of trauma was quite rare in the U.S., few trauma specialists had extensive experience, or taught regularly on this subject. Since the primary objective of terrorism is the creation of demoralization, fear, and uncertainty in the general population, a focus on mental health from therapeutic and public health perspectives is critically important to successful resolution of the crisis. Surveys after 9/11 showed unequivocally that symptomatology related to the attacks were found in hundreds of thousands of people, most of whom were not escapees or the families of the deceased. Soon after 9/11, our center formed a collaboration with other academic sites in Manhattan to rapidly increase capacity for providing state-of-the-art training and treatment for trauma-related psychiatric problems. Our experience suggests that evidence-based treatments such as Prolonged Exposure Therapy have proven successful in treating 9/11-related PTSD. However, special clinical issues have arisen, such as the influence of culture on clinical presentation and treatment expectations in a multiethnic community; the need to focus on more subtle aspects of relative risk appraisal in examining trauma-related avoidance; the range of changes in daily life that constitute adaptation to ongoing threat; the difficulties in working as a therapist who is also a member of the traumatized community; and grappling with multiple secondary consequences of 9/11 such as unemployment, work relocation, grief, and apocalyptic fears leading to a dramatically foreshortened vision of the future. PMID:14686462

  19. A study of atmospheric optical scattering parameters at 1.5 and 2 micron region for solid state Doppler lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Eli; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Benoist, Rodney; Dubinsky, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The increasing interest in the development of an eye-safe, solid state, Doppler lidar for avionic applications has created the need for a quantitative evaluation of atmospheric effects on performance. Theoretical calculations were completed for optical scattering parameters to be compared with the field measurements. Computer codes were developed for the required calculations and designed to be interactive and user friendly in order to support comparison with experimental results and, thus, provide the basis for evaluation of eye-safe Doppler lidar over a wide range of atmospheric conditions and geographical locations. A holmium Doppler lidar operating at 2.09 microns was constructed for atmospheric backscattering, attenuation, and wind velocity measurements. Theoretical calculations and field studies were performed for backscatter coefficients. The selected wavelengths correspond to Er:glass, Tm:YAG, and Tm,Ho:YAG solid state lasers that are suitable for use in an eye-safe Doppler lidar system.

  20. Risk and resilience in canine search and rescue handlers after 9/11.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Melissa

    2005-10-01

    Research has suggested that rescue workers are at increased risk for psychological distress. To determine whether 9/11 deployment was a significant risk factor for canine search and rescue handlers, 82 deployed handlers were compared to 32 nondeployed handlers on measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, acute stress, and clinical diagnoses. Deployed handlers reported more PTSD and general psychological distress 6 months after 9/11. Among deployed handlers, prior diagnoses and peritraumatic reactions were associated with psychological distress whereas social support and training were protective. Results suggest that more extensive screening and prophylactic interventions for individuals with a history of mental illness could be beneficial. Future research should examine identified risk/resilience factors prospectively, and training and intervention should be designed accordingly. PMID:16281248

  1. Structure of the spatial periphery of the isotopes {sup 9,11}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Galanina, L. I. Zelenskaya, N. S.

    2015-07-15

    The cross sections for the (t, p) reactions on the lithium isotopes {sup 9,11}Li were calculated within a theoretical approach based on employing integral equations of the four-body problem in the Alt—Grassberger-Sandhas formalism and the multiparticle shell model. This made it possible to determine the wave functions for the relative motion of various clusters and the nuclear core and to calculate, on their basis, the root-mean-square radii of nuclei of the isotopes {sup 9,11}Li and the spatial structure of their neutron periphery. It is shown that the {sup 9}Li nucleus has virtually no neutron halo. The {sup 11}Li nucleus is a Borromean halo nucleus. The two-neutron periphery of this nucleus manifests itself in both spatial configurations, a dineutron and a cigar one, the respective root-mean-square radii being large (about 6.5 to 6.9 fm)

  2. Panethnicity revisited: contested group boundaries in the post-9/11 era

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgmehr, Mehdi; Ong, Paul; Tosh, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Existing theories of panethnicity in the USA concentrate on Asian Americans and Latinos, two umbrella groups that originally coalesced during the 1960s civil rights era. Although the role played by the state is recognized as central to panethnic development, we argue that the influence of this pivotal variable is contingent on historical context. Through a case study of emerging minority groups (Middle Eastern and South Asian Americans in the post-9/11 era), we re-examine the existing conceptualization of panethnicity at a time when the state plays a more punitive than compensatory role. Using a methodology that draws on a range of novel sources, we document the way that pre-existing ethnic, religious and national-origin labels have been reinforced instead of panethnic labels for the populations under study. Accordingly, we develop an updated conceptualization of group formation that incorporates historical context and the role of the state in the post-9/11 era. PMID:27182093

  3. Structure of the spatial periphery of the isotopes 9,11Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanina, L. I.; Zelenskaya, N. S.

    2015-07-01

    The cross sections for the ( t, p) reactions on the lithium isotopes 9,11Li were calculated within a theoretical approach based on employing integral equations of the four-body problem in the Alt—Grassberger-Sandhas formalism and the multiparticle shell model. This made it possible to determine the wave functions for the relative motion of various clusters and the nuclear core and to calculate, on their basis, the root-mean-square radii of nuclei of the isotopes 9,11Li and the spatial structure of their neutron periphery. It is shown that the 9Li nucleus has virtually no neutron halo. The 11Li nucleus is a Borromean halo nucleus. The two-neutron periphery of this nucleus manifests itself in both spatial configurations, a dineutron and a cigar one, the respective root-mean-square radii being large (about 6.5 to 6.9 fm).

  4. Reevaluating nuclear safety and security in a post 9/11 era.

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Paul M.; Brown, Lisa M.

    2005-07-01

    This report has the following topics: (1) Changing perspectives on nuclear safety and security; (2) Evolving needs in a post-9/11 era; (3) Nuclear Weapons--An attractive terrorist target; (4) The case for increased safety; (5) Evolution of current nuclear weapons safety and security; (6) Integrated surety; (7) The role of safety and security in enabling responsiveness; (8) Advances in surety technologies; and (9) Reevaluating safety.

  5. Pinnisterols A–C, New 9,11-Secosterols from a Gorgonian Pinnigorgia sp.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chia; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yeh, Jessica; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Fang, Lee-Shing; Wu, Yang-Chang; Lin, Chan-Shing; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Sung, Ping-Jyun

    2016-01-01

    Three new 9,11-secosterols, pinnisterols A–C (1–3), were isolated from a gorgonian coral Pinnigorgia sp., collected off the waters of Taiwan. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The new sterols 1 and 3 displayed significant inhibitory effects on the generation of superoxide anions and the release of elastase by human neutrophils, and sterol 1 was found to show moderate cytotoxicity in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). PMID:26751457

  6. Stratospheric HNO3 measurements from 0.002/cm resolution solar occultation spectra and improved spectroscopic line parameters in the 5.8-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1992-01-01

    Very-high-resolution FWHM solar-occultation spectra are investigated with a balloon-borne interferometer using revised spectroscopic line parameters for HNO3, O3, and H2O. The O3 and H2O data are evaluated to determine their capacity for interference in the HNO3 line which is studied in the nu sub 2 band at 5.8 microns. The line parameters developed with the stratospheric data are compared to data based on a HITRAN compilation as well as laboratory spectra with a 0.002/cm resolution. The line list is calculated and shown to include J and Ka transitions which improve the line parameters for HNO3 by accounting for the weaker absorption features in the stratospheric spectra. The stratospheric HNO3 profile developed analytically is compared to those based on reported measurements, and the one developed with the stratospheric solar spectra is found to be consistent with the measurements and confirm inherent measurement biases.

  7. Stratospheric HNO3 measurements from 0.002/cm resolution solar occultation spectra and improved spectroscopic line parameters in the 5.8-micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1992-02-01

    Very-high-resolution FWHM solar-occultation spectra are investigated with a balloon-borne interferometer using revised spectroscopic line parameters for HNO3, O3, and H2O. The O3 and H2O data are evaluated to determine their capacity for interference in the HNO3 line which is studied in the nu sub 2 band at 5.8 microns. The line parameters developed with the stratospheric data are compared to data based on a HITRAN compilation as well as laboratory spectra with a 0.002/cm resolution. The line list is calculated and shown to include J and Ka transitions which improve the line parameters for HNO3 by accounting for the weaker absorption features in the stratospheric spectra. The stratospheric HNO3 profile developed analytically is compared to those based on reported measurements, and the one developed with the stratospheric solar spectra is found to be consistent with the measurements and confirm inherent measurement biases.

  8. Micron Scale Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, W. A.; Tamura, N.; Celestre, R. S.; Padmore, H. A.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    Although x-ray diffraction has been used for nearly a century as the mineralogist's definitive tool in determining crystalline structures, it has proved impossible to use this technique to spatially resolve the highly heterogeneous nature of many minerals at the mesoscopic level. Due to recent revolutions in the brightness of x-ray sources and in our ability to focus x-rays, we can now carry out conventional monochromatic rotation crystallography as well as Laue diffraction with sub-micron spatial resolution and produce maps of orientation, strain, mineral type, and even chemical speciation over tens of microns in a short amount of time. We have pioneered the development of these techniques at the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source (Advanced Light Source) in Berkeley, and will describe their application to understanding the structure of a quartz-geode. Our results show the manner in which grain structure and texture change as a function of distance from the cavity wall and are compared with models of crystal growth in such systems. This example highlights the great utility of a synchrotron based x-ray micro-diffraction beamline and the possibilities it opens to the mineralogist.

  9. From 9/11 to 8/29: Post-Disaster Recovery and Rebuilding in New York and New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotham, Kevin Fox; Greenberg, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the process of post-disaster recovery and rebuilding in New York City since 9/11 and in New Orleans since the Hurricane Katrina disaster (8/29). As destabilizing events, 9/11 and 8/29 forced a rethinking of the major categories, concepts and theories that long dominated disaster research. We analyze the form, trajectory and…

  10. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  15. Post-9/11 Arab and Muslim American Community College Students: Ethno-Religious Enclaves and Perceived Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shammas, Diane S.

    2009-01-01

    Apart from the widescale media attention that Arabs and Muslims have received in the United States and abroad since 9/11, these two target populations have been largely unexamined at both the two-year and four-year college levels. This study represents a pioneering effort in investigating whether the post-9/11 backlash against Arabs and Muslims…

  16. Training Post-9/11 Police Officers with a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training Model: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative holistic multiple-case study was to identify the optimal theoretical approach for a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training (CTRBT) model to train post-9/11 police officers to perform effectively in their counter-terrorism assignments. Post-9/11 police officers assigned to counter-terrorism duties are not trained…

  17. Americans Respond Politically to 9/11: Understanding the Impact of the Terrorist Attacks and Their Aftermath

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddy, Leonie; Feldman, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    The 9/11 terrorist attacks have had profound effect on U.S. domestic and foreign security policy, leading to several expensive wars and the erosion of civil liberties (under the USA PATRIOT Act). We review evidence on political reactions to the 9/11 attacks and conclude that subjective reactions to terrorism played an important role in shaping…

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after Hurricane Sandy among Persons Exposed to the 9/11 Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Caramanica, Kimberly; Brackbill, Robert M.; Stellman, Steven D.; Farfel, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic exposure during a hurricane is associated with adverse mental health conditions post-event. The World Trade Center Health Registry provided a sampling pool for a rapid survey of persons directly affected by Hurricane Sandy in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area in late October 2012. This study evaluated the relationship between Sandy experiences and Sandy-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals previously exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) disaster. Methods A total of 4,558 surveys were completed from April 10-November 7, 2013. After exclusions for missing data, the final sample included 2,214 (53.5%) respondents from FEMA-defined inundation zones and 1,923 (46.5%) from non-inundation zones. Sandy exposures included witnessing terrible events, Sandy-related injury, fearing for own life or safety of others, evacuation, living in a home that was flooded or damaged, property loss, and financial loss. Sandy-related PTSD was defined as a score of ≥44 on a Sandy-specific PTSD Checklist. Results PTSD prevalence was higher in the inundation zones (11.3%) and lower in the non-inundation zones (4.4%). The highest prevalence of Sandy-related PTSD was among individuals in the inundation zone who sustained an injury (31.2%), reported a history of 9/11-related PTSD (28.8%), or had low social support prior to the event (28.6%). In the inundation zones, significantly elevated adjusted odds of Sandy-related PTSD were observed among persons with a prior history of 9/11-related PTSD, low social support, and those who experienced a greater number of Sandy traumatic events. Conclusions Sandy-related stress symptoms indicative of PTSD affected a significant proportion of persons who lived in flooded areas of the NYC metropolitan area. Prior 9/11-related PTSD increased the likelihood of Sandy-related PTSD, while social support was protective. Public health preparation for events similar to Sandy should incorporate outreach and

  19. Airborne Astronomy with a 150 microns - 400 microns Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-753 awarded to the University of Colorado. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micron line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micron transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of CO-12 and CO-13 between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron and 163 micron rotational lines of OH, the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+), and the 63 micron fine structure line of neutral atomic oxygen. All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6) thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  20. Sub-micron filter

    DOEpatents

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2009-10-13

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  1. Constructing peace: helping youth cope in the aftermath of 9/11.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cordero, Lourdes J; Fullilove, Mindy Thompson

    2008-03-01

    The 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York City represented a new strain on already fractured communities with low collective efficacy. Like the majority of citizens in the greater metropolitan area, researchers at the Community Research Group of Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health wanted to "do" something to help in the aftermath of the attacks. The group proposed to promote collective recovery, that is, rebuilding social connections in the city as the foundation for individual and group recovery. After several months of organizing, New York City RECOVERS (NYCR)--a network of organizations formed to promote trauma recovery post 9/11--in conjunction with the New York University's International Trauma Studies Program, persuaded the New York City Department of Health and Mental Health and the FEMA-funded Project Liberty to sponsor a conference on collective recovery, with a focus on the first anniversary of the tragedy. Utilizing participant observation, the research team documented the outreach and dissemination efforts of NYCR, the partners' organizational engagement in collective recovery, and the recovery activities they pursued. This paper describes the work of the conference and the specific efforts for youth violence prevention that followed. In this circumstance, engaging community partners helped shift the research agenda from one driven by funders and researchers to one co-driven by the organizations and populations they aimed to influence. PMID:18267197

  2. Cortisol and PTSD symptoms among male and female high-exposure 9/11 survivors.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Sharon; Ein-Dor, Tsachi; Gordon, Kathleen M; Rosen, Jeffrey B; Bonanno, George A

    2013-10-01

    Only a few studies have examined cortisol response to trauma-related stressors in relation to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We followed a sample of high-exposure survivors of the attacks on September 11, 2001 (9/11; 32 men and 29 women) and examined their cortisol response after recalling the escape from the attack, 7 and 18 months post-9/11. PTSD symptoms and saliva cortisol levels were assessed before and after trauma recollection. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that PTSD symptoms and male sex predicted increased cortisol response following recollections. For men, elevated cortisol was associated with greater severity of reexperiencing symptoms (p < .001) and lower severity of avoidance symptoms (p < .001). For women, recall-induced cortisol was minimal and unrelated to PTSD symptoms (p = .164 and p = .331, respectively). These findings suggest that augmented cortisol response to trauma-related stressors may be evident in men reporting symptoms of PTSD. Thus, as cortisol abnormalities related to PTSD symptoms appear sex-specific, future research on mechanisms of sex differences in response to trauma is warranted. PMID:24030869

  3. A lifespan perspective on terrorism: age differences in trajectories of response to 9/11.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stacey B; Poulin, Michael J; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2013-05-01

    A terrorist attack is an adverse event characterized by both an event-specific stressor and concern about future threats. Little is known about age differences in responses to terrorism. This longitudinal study examined generalized distress, posttraumatic stress responses, and fear of future attacks following the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks among a large U.S. national sample of adults (N = 2,240) aged 18-101 years. Individuals completed Web-based surveys up to 6 times over 3 years post 9/11. Multilevel models revealed different age-related patterns for distress, posttraumatic stress, and ongoing fear of future attacks. Specifically, older age was associated with lower overall levels of general distress, a steeper decline in posttraumatic stress over time, and less change in fear of future terrorist attacks over the 3 years. Understanding age differences in response to the stress of terrorism adds to the growing body of work on age differences in reactions to adversity. PMID:22709132

  4. Pastoral care use among post-9/11 veterans who screen positive for mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Nieuwsma, Jason A; Fortune-Greeley, Alice K; Jackson, George L; Meador, Keith G; Beckham, Jean C; Elbogen, Eric B

    2014-08-01

    As a result of their military experience, veterans with mental health problems may have unique motivations for seeking help from clergy. Patterns and correlates of seeking pastoral care were examined using a nationwide representative survey that was conducted among veterans of post-9/11 conflicts (adjusted N = 1,068; 56% response rate). Separate multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine veteran characteristics associated with seeking pastoral care and seeking mental health services. Among post-9/11 veterans with a probable mental disorder (n = 461)-defined as a positive screen for posttraumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, or alcohol misuse-20.2% reported talking to a "pastoral counselor" in the preceding year, 44.7% reported talking to a mental health professional, and 46.6% reported talking to neither. In a multivariate analysis for veterans with a probable mental disorder, seeing a pastoral counselor was associated with an increased likelihood of seeing a mental health professional in the past year (OR: 2.16; 95% CI: [1.28, 3.65]). In a separate bivariate analysis, pastoral counselors were more likely to be seen by veterans who indicated concerns about stigma or distrust of mental health care. These results suggest that pastoral and mental health care services may complement one another and underscore the importance of enhancing understanding and collaboration between these disciplines so as to meet the needs of the veterans they serve. PMID:24933105

  5. Observations of the infrared fine-structure lines of S III at 18.71 and 33.47 microns in four H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herter, T.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.; Gull, G. E.; Shure, M. A.; Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared fine-structure lines provide a particularly useful probe of ionized nebulae. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of the forbidden S III lines at 18.71 and 33.47 micrometers for four H II regions, S158A, S158G, G75.84+0.4, and W3 IRS 1. These lines are used to estimate densities, and comparisons are made with rms densities determined from radio observations to evaluate the importance of clumping. For the case of the optical H II region S158A, comparisons are made with both optical and forbidden O III line determinations of the density. The reported observations were made using a dual-grating, liquid-helium-cooled spectrometer containing a three-element Si:Sb detector array and a three-element Ge:Ga detector array. It is found that clumping is important in the cases of G75.84+0.4, W3 IRS 1, and M42. These three H II regions have filling factors of 0.024, 0.09, and 0.03, respectively.

  6. Mapping of aldose reductase gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, and 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.B.; Kojis, T. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S.; Klisak, I.; Diep, A. ); Carper, D. ); Nishimura, Chihiro ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.21) (AR) catalyzes the reduction of several aldehydes, including that of glucose, to the corresponding sugar alcohol. Using a complementary DNA clone encoding human AR, the authors mapped the gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 18 by somatic cell hybridization. By in situ hybridization analysis, sequences were localized to human chromosomes 1q32-q43, 3p12, 7q31-q35, 9q22, 11p14-p15, and 13q14-q21. As a putative functional AR gene has been mapped to chromosome 7 and a putative pseudogene to chromosome 3, the sequences on the other seven chromosomes may represent other active genes, non-aldose reductase homologous sequences, or pseudogenes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Disaster in context: the effects of 9/11 on youth distant from the attacks.

    PubMed

    Mijanovich, Tod; Weitzman, Beth C

    2010-12-01

    Although an increasing amount of community mental health research has investigated the deleterious effects of disasters and the targeting and efficacy of treatment in their aftermath, little research has sought to identify preexisting characteristics of the social environment that are predictive of post-disaster distress. A national US telephone survey fielded before and after September 11, 2001, was used to investigate the psychological distress among American adolescents related to the attacks, and to identify environmental and other characteristics that predisposed youth to experience higher or lower levels of post-disaster distress. The study found that widespread characteristics of children's school environments-school disorder and physical threats-were at least as strongly associated with a proxy for psychological distress as exposure to the events of 9/11. Further, children exposed to physical threats at school appeared to be more vulnerable to the psychological effects of disasters than children in safer school environments. PMID:19757041

  8. Left in the dust: negotiating environmental illness in the aftermath of 9/11.

    PubMed

    Vanderlinden, Lisa K

    2011-01-01

    The unprecedented toxic release in lower Manhattan on September 11, 2001 created one of the worst environmental disasters in US history, followed by a contentious and ongoing battle over the existence, etiology, and legitimation of World Trade Center-related illness. In this paper, I explore the enactment of epistemic authority by a complex array of stakeholders--government officials, scientists, physicians, environmentalists, advocates, journalists, and politicians--who have woven medical-scientific knowledge into their competing agendas and platforms. Despite the scientific validation of environmental dangers, the clinical documentation of illness and the epidemiological substantiation of links between environmental exposure and illness onset, the political-economic interests of federal, state, and local bodies have often been privileged over the protection of public health. 9/11 illness is a "contested illness" enmeshed in politically charged disputes regarding the relationship of environmental toxins to disease. PMID:21218355

  9. Flood of July 9-11, 1993, in the Raccoon River basin, west-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, D.A.; Koppensteiner, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water-surface-elevation profiles and peak discharges for the flood of July 9-11, 1993, in the Raccoon River Basin, west-central Iowa, are presented in this report. The profiles illustrate the 1993 flood along the Raccoon, North Raccoon, South Raccoon, and Middle Raccoon Rivers and along Brushy and Storm Creeks in the west-central Iowa counties of Carroll, Dallas, Greene, Guthrie, and Polk. Water-surface-elevation profiles for the floods of June 1947, March 1979, and June 29- July 1, 1986, in the Raccoon River Basin also are included in the report for comparative purposes. The July 9-11, 1993, flood is the largest known peak discharge at gaging stations Brushy Creek near Templeton (station number 05483318) 19,000 cubic feet per second, Middle Raccoon River near Bayard (station number 05483450) 27,500 cubic feet per second, Middle Raccoon River at Panora (station number 05483600) 22,400 cubic feet per second, South Raccoon River at Redfield (station number 05484000) 44,000 cubic feet per second, and Raccoon River at Van Meter (station number 05484500) 70,100 cubic feet per second. The peak discharges were, respectively, 1.5, 1.3, 1.1,1.2, and 1.3 times larger than calculated 100-year recurrence-interval discharges. The report provides information on flood stages and discharges and floodflow frequencies for streamflow-gaging stations in the Raccoon River Basin using flood information collected through 1996. A flood history summarizes rainfall conditions and damages for floods that occurred during 1947, 1958, 1979, 1986, 1990, and 1993. Information on temporary bench marks and reference points established in the Raccoon River Basin during 1976-79 and 1995-97 also is included in the report.

  10. Implementing the Post-9/11 GI Bill: Lessons Learned and Emerging Issues. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    On August 1, 2009, the most generous veterans education benefit program since the original post-World War II GI Bill went into effect. The Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act, popularly known as the Post-9/11 GI Bill, pays for up to 100 percent of a veteran's tuition/required fees at a state college/university depending on the veteran's…

  11. Palmitoylethanolamide: problems regarding micronization, ultra-micronization and additives.

    PubMed

    Kriek, Rutger

    2014-06-01

    It can be established that at least two of the writers of the article published in 'Inflammopharmacology', title: 'Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a naturally occurring disease-modifying agent in neuropathic pain' have a direct connection to the companies Epitech and Innovet. These companies produce micronized and ultra-micronized PEA. Therefore it is of eminent importance to determine whether the statements in this paper have also taken into consideration the European guidelines for Good Clinical Practice and the codes of good scientific practices. This is very questionable. A minimum condition in clinical studies for proving the claim that PEA in its micronized and ultra-micronized formulations works better than in its pure form or in other formulations is that a comparison be made between: PEA in pure form or in other formulations, on the one hand; PEA in the micronized and ultra-micronized formulations, on the other hand. This minimum condition is not complied with. Based on additional studies discussed in this commentary and in view of the effects of ultra-micronization on the parameters discussed, as well as the potential side-effects of additives such as excipients and herbal extracts added to the products cited in the article, the preference should be for the time being to treat patients with pure PEA without any of these additives. PMID:24647619

  12. 8- to 13-micron spectra of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. F.; Eaton, N.; Aitken, D. K.; Roche, P. F.; Meadows, A. J.

    1985-05-01

    It is pointed out that thermal emission from asteroids reaches a maximum in the 10- to 20-micron region. In connection with the present investigation, a uniform set of spectra was obtained in the 8- to 13-micron region for 12 asteroids (together with additional observations of 19 Fortuna). These spectra provide a potentially valuable data set for future use (e.g., with IRAS data). The main conclusion from the obtained results is that diagnostic emission features of the type observed by Feierberg et al. (1983) are not common in C- and M-type asteroids. Optical studies of 19 Fortuna do not reveal any unusual properties which distinguish it from other C-type asteroids observed.

  13. The role of neutron based inspection techniques in the post 9/11/01 era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    2004-01-01

    Non-intrusive inspection of objects of all sizes, from luggage to shipping containers and from postal parcels to trucks is a vital component of any national security from aviation to the control of all land and sea ports of entries. The paramount importance of these inspections is more obvious now, in the post 9/11 era, as the spectrum of threats is wider and the probability of occurrence more real. The urgent need for reliable inspection underscores the key attributes they must possess: High specificity High sensitivity Provide automatic decision The technologies being currently employed in the field, such as standard X-ray, X-ray based computed tomography, and trace detection (for luggage), and X-ray or γ-ray based radiography (for containers) are inherently deficient for lacking some or all of these attributes. The neutron based technologies, on the other hand, possess all three. They provide therefore accurate, rapid and automatic detection of a wide array of threats: explosives, chemical agents, nuclear materials and devices, other hazardous materials, drugs, etc. The nuclear based techniques achieve this feat through the production of characteristic elemental gamma rays by nuclear reactions, primarily (n,γ) with thermal neutrons and (n,n 'γ) with fast neutrons. The principles and status of neutron based inspection techniques are reviewed below.

  14. Alcohol use in Polish 9/11 responders: implications for cross-cultural treatment.

    PubMed

    Katz, Craig L; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Kiliman, Marta; Pilatowicz, Iwona; Akerele, Evaristo; Marrone, Kathryn; Ozbay, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    More than 35,000 individuals are estimated to have responded to the World Trade Center (WTC) site following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The federally funded WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program (WTCMMTP) provides medical monitoring and occupational medicine treatment as well as counseling regarding entitlements and benefits to the workers and volunteers who participated in the WTC response. A major component of the WTCMMTP is the WTC Mental Health Program (WTCMHP), which offers annual mental health assessments and ongoing treatment for those found to have 9/11 associated mental health problems. In the program's 9.5 years of evaluating and treating mental health problems in thousands of Ground Zero responders, diversity in multiple domains (e.g., gender, family, profession and employment status, state of physical health, cultural identity, and immigration status) has been a hallmark of the population served by the program. To illustrate the types of issues that arise in treating this diverse patient population, the authors first present a representative case involving a Polish asbestos worker with an alcohol use disorder. They then discuss how accepted alcohol treatment modalities can and often must be modified in providing psychiatric treatment to Polish responders, in particular, and to foreign-born patients in general. Treatment modalities discussed include cognitive and behavioral therapy, relapse prevention strategies, psychodynamic therapy, motivational approaches, family therapy, group peer support, and pharmacotherapy. Implications for the practice of addiction psychiatry, cultural psychiatry, and disaster psychiatry are discussed. PMID:22261985

  15. Social integration buffers stress in New York police after the 9/11 terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Ralf; Bowler, Rosemarie M; Cone, James E

    2014-01-01

    Being socially integrated is regarded as a protective factor enabling people to cope with adversity. The stress-buffering effect reflects an interaction between stress and a social coping resource factor on subsequent outcomes. This study, based on 2943 police officers, examines mental health outcomes among officers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. The Wave 1 data collection took place between September 2003 and November 2004 with a follow-up study (Wave 2) conducted from November 2006 through December 2007. A moderated mediation model was specified that uses event exposure as a distal predictor, earlier stress response as a mediator, and later stress response as an outcome, and social integration as a moderator of this relationship. The mediation hypothesis was confirmed, and moderation occurred at two stages. First, there was a multiplicative relationship between exposure levels and social integration: The higher the exposure level, the more stress responses occur, but this effect was buffered by a high level of social integration. Second, Wave 1 stress interacted with social integration on Wave 2 stress: The more the police officers were socially integrated, the lower the Wave 2 stress, which happened in a synergistic manner. The findings contribute to the understanding of mediating and moderating mechanisms that result in health outcomes such as posttraumatic stress disorder or resilience. PMID:23768128

  16. Americans respond politically to 9/11: understanding the impact of the terrorist attacks and their aftermath.

    PubMed

    Huddy, Leonie; Feldman, Stanley

    2011-09-01

    The 9/11 terrorist attacks have had profound effect on U.S. domestic and foreign security policy, leading to several expensive wars and the erosion of civil liberties (under the USA PATRIOT Act). We review evidence on political reactions to the 9/11 attacks and conclude that subjective reactions to terrorism played an important role in shaping support for national security policy in the wake of 9/11. Support for a strong national security policy was most pronounced among Americans who perceived the nation as at threat from terrorism and felt angry at terrorists. In contrast, Americans who were personally affected by the attacks were more likely to feel anxious about terrorism, and this anxiety translated into less support for overseas military action. In addition, Americans who felt insecure after the 9/11 attacks and perceived a high future threat of terrorism were more likely than others to support strong foreign and domestic national security policies. Overall, research on American political reactions to 9/11 suggests that support for a strong government response to terrorism is most likely when members of a population perceive a high risk of future terrorism and feel angry at terrorists. PMID:21823777

  17. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public... General Rules § 302-9.11 May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my... storage of your POV. Effective Date Note: By FTR Amdt. 2011-01, 76 FR 18342, Apr. 1, 2011, § 302-9.11...

  18. Impulse oscillometry and respiratory symptoms in World Trade Center responders, 6 years post-9/11.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Matthew P; Cummings, Karen R

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated whether impulse oscillometry (IOS) testing revealed signs of respiratory disease in New York State (NYS) World Trade Center (WTC) responders in comparison with unexposed NYS employees. It also compared self-reported respiratory symptoms between the two groups, 6 years post-9/11. For this evaluation participants completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding respiratory symptoms. IOS testing included measures of resistance and reactance to assess for peripheral versus central airway effects. Two hundred forty-eight subjects (99 exposed and 149 unexposed) were included in the final analysis. Since September 11, 2001, NYS responders were more likely to report new or worsening cough in the absence of a respiratory infection, cough consistent with chronic bronchitis, current respiratory symptoms, or lower respiratory symptoms in the last 12 months. Significant associations were found between IOS indices and gender, smoking history, and obesity. When comparing exposed and unexposed participants, there were no significant differences in the geometric means of the IOS indices. Responders who used a respirator with canister demonstrated significantly lower respiratory resistance at 5 and 20 Hz (R5 and R20). While this study has provided no evidence of an association between WTC exposure and peripheral airways disease in this cohort of responders, results do suggest that use of a respirator with canister may be protective for central airways in responders exposed to dust and smoke. This emphasizes the importance of stressing proper respirator use in planning responses to future disasters. Our control data also provide useful reference values for future IOS research. PMID:20012641

  19. Long-term course of probable PTSD after the 9/11 attacks: a study in urban primary care.

    PubMed

    Neria, Yuval; Olfson, Mark; Gameroff, Marc J; DiGrande, Laura; Wickramaratne, Priya; Gross, Raz; Pilowsky, Daniel J; Neugebaur, Richard; Manetti-Cusa, Julián; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Lantigua, Rafael; Shea, Steven; Weissman, Myrna M

    2010-08-01

    Although the short- and midterm psychological effects of the attacks on September 11, 2001 (9/11) have been well described, less is known about the long-term effects. This study examines the course of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), its predictors and clinical consequences in a cohort of 455 primary care patients in New York City, interviewed approximately 1 and 4 years after 9/11. The rate of PTSD decreased from 9.6% to 4.1%. Pre-9/11 major depressive disorder emerged as the strongest predictor of PTSD, particularly late-PTSD. At follow-up, late-PTSD was associated with major depressive and anxiety disorders, and PTSD regardless of timing was associated with impaired functioning. Findings highlight the importance of ongoing evaluation of mental health needs in primary care settings in the aftermath of disasters. PMID:20690169

  20. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules § 302-9.11 May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of...

  1. Crisis-induced depression, physical activity and dietary intake among young adults: evidence from the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Muzhe

    2013-03-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we provide evidence that young adults respond to crisis-induced depression by exercising less and having breakfast less often. Exogenous variation in the crisis-induced depression is obtained through a unique event in our sample period - the 9/11 terrorist attacks. We compare those who were interviewed just before and just after 9/11 and find a significant and sharp increase in the symptoms of depression. We also provide evidence that this increase is not a September effect, but an effect of the external traumatic event. PMID:22959863

  2. On the possible bipolar nature of 21 micron IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Kwok, S.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of another IRAS source (22574 + 6609) showing the unidentified 21-micron emission feature is reported. Its overall energy distribution is similar to the well-known edge-on bipolar nebulae AFGL 2688 and AFGL 618. Ground-based optical and infrared observations of this object and two other 21-micron sources show that while all three have very similar infrared properties, they differ greatly in the visual region. All three of these 21-micron sources are intrinsically similar bipolar nebulae, viewed at different orientations.

  3. Astrophysical masers; Proceedings of the Conference, Arlington, VA, Mar. 9-11, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, Andrew W. (Editor); Nedoluha, Gerald E. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on astrophysical masers are presented. The general topics addressed include: theory, maser surveys, extragalactic masers, masers in star-forming regions (general), OH masers in star-forming regions, water masers in star-forming regions, methanol masers in star-forming regions, proper motions, scattering, variability, circumstellar masers (general), circumstellar OH masers, circumstellar water masers, circumstellar SiO masers, and solar system masers.

  4. Recent versus Remote: Flashbulb Memory for 9/11 and Self-Selected Events from the Reminiscence Bump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver, Jenny Y.; Lane, Sean M.; Cherry, Katie E.

    2010-01-01

    In two related studies, we examined flashbulb memories acquired from different points in the lifespan in younger and older adults. When asked to remember flashbulb memories from their lives, older adults were most likely to recall events from the reminiscence bump (Study 1A). In Study 1B, younger and older adults recalled 9/11 and a personal…

  5. Comparing Children's Fears in Alabama: An Investigation Using Post-9/11 and Post-Invasion of Iraq Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Joy J.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the fears of children and adolescents in Alabama in the aftermath of 9/11 and after the initial invasion of Iraq in 2003. The American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; Burnham, 1995, 2005) was utilized to measure the fears of youth in Grades 2-12. (Contains 4 tables.)

  6. Responses to the AAR-Teagle White Paper: "The Religious Studies Major in a Post-9/11 World"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jane S.; Buckley, James J.; Jensen, Tim; Floyd-Thomas, Stacey

    2011-01-01

    In October 2008 The American Academy of Religion published the findings of an eighteen month study (conducted with funding from the Teagle Foundation) on "The Religious Studies Major in a Post-9/11 World: New Challenges, New Opportunities." Re-published here, this AAR-Teagle White Paper provides the opportunity for four respondents to raise issues…

  7. Pre-Attack Stress-Load, Appraisals, and Coping in Children's Responses to the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengua, Liliana J.; Long, Anna C.; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Appraisal and coping following a disaster are important factors in children's post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms. However, little is known about predictors of disaster coping responses. This study examined stress-load, appraisals and coping styles measured prior to the September 11 terrorist attacks as predictors of 9/11-specific…

  8. 76 FR 12360 - Request for Information on Implementation of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Register (76 FR 7862) on February 11, 2011 to accept oral comments from the public. Public Comment Period... the James Zadroga 9/ 11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-347) AGENCY: National... Compensation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111- 347). A copy of the Act is posted on the Internet at...

  9. Upper School Maths: Lesson Plans and Activities for Ages 9-11 Years. Series of Caribbean Volunteer Publications, No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voluntary Services Overseas, Castries (St. Lucia).

    This collection of lesson plans and activities for students aged 9-11 years is based on a science curriculum developed by a group of Caribbean nations. The activities pertain to topics such as place value, prime and composite numbers, the sieve of Eratosthenes, square numbers, factors and multiples, sequences, averages, geometry, symmetry,…

  10. Effect of Ball Mass on Dribble, Pass, and Pass Reception in 9-11-Year-Old Boys' Basketball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arias, Jose L.; Argudo, Francisco M.; Alonso, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of ball mass on dribble, pass, and pass reception in real game situations in 9-11-year-old boys' basketball. Participants were 54 boys identified from six federated teams. The independent variable was ball mass, and dependent variables were number of dribbles, passes, and pass receptions. Three…

  11. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible. PMID:17530533

  12. Risk Factors, Resilience, and Psychological Distress among Holocaust and Nonholocaust Survivors in the Post-9/11 Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamet, Ann; Szuchman, Lenore; Perkel, Linda; Walsh, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Many older adults have experienced or witnessed devastating life events including wars, hurricanes, and explosions. This study examined retraumatization and the relationship between certain risk factors, resilience, and psychological distress in the post-9/11 environment among 120 community-dwelling older adults. Results indicate that Holocaust…

  13. 9/11 and the War on Terror in Curricula and in State Standards Documents. CIRCLE Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Jeremy; Hess, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This Fact Sheet reports findings from an ongoing study of the representation of 9/11 and terrorism in curricula, textbooks, and state standards documents. The study was conducted in three stages. The first two stages focused on how supplemental curricula and best-selling social studies textbooks published between 2002-2010 present the events of…

  14. Expectations and Levels of Understanding When Using Mobile Phones among 9-11-Year Olds in Wales, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Joanne; Baker, Sally-Ann; Lewis, Christopher Alan

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in examining the use of mobile technology among children. The present study extended this literature among a sample of 9-11-year olds in Wales, UK in three ways. First, to examine the level of mobile phone ownership; second, to consider how mobile phones are used, investigate timescales and expectations when communicating…

  15. The Post-9/11 GI Bill: Insights from Veterans Using Department of Veterans Affairs Educational Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Geri L.; Boland, Elizabeth A.; Dudgeon, Brian; Johnson, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Because the Post-9/11 GI Bill was implemented in August of 2009, increasing numbers of veterans returning from the Global War on Terror (GWT) have drawn on Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits. Based on the findings of a mixed-methods study, quantitative and qualitative survey responses from veterans enrolled at a major…

  16. 77 FR 22068 - Proposed Information Collection (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ...: Submit written comments on the collection of information through the Federal Docket Management System... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. This... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey)] Proposed...

  17. Predictors of Meeting Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable Recommendations in 9-11-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Jimikaye; De Witt, Peter; McNally, Janise; Siegfried, Scott; Hill, James O; Stroebele-Benschop, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Childhood obesity represents a significant public health problem. This study examined physical activity and nutrition behaviours and attitudes of 9-11-year-olds, and factors influencing these behaviours. Design: Study participants recorded pedometer steps for 7 days and completed physical activity enjoyment, food attitudes and food…

  18. 77 FR 76169 - Increase in Maximum Tuition and Fee Amounts Payable under the Post-9/11 GI Bill

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ..., certification, or national test for the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 academic years. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: For the 2011-2012 academic year, the Post-9/ 11 GI Bill allowed VA to pay the actual... fee and entitlement charge amounts each academic year (beginning August 1) based on the most...

  19. Three-micron spectroscopy of highly reddened field stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, Mauricio; Persi, P.; Roth, M.; Ferrari-Toniolo, M.

    1989-01-01

    Broad absorption features centered at 3.45 microns and at 3.0-3.0 microns towards a number of late-type supergiants in the vicinity of the galactic center were repeatedly reported. Here, 2.0 to 2.5 and 3.0 to 4.0 micron spectra are presented for field late-type highly reddened (A sub V is approximately 17-27) stars located in different regions of the galactic plane more than 20 deg away from the galactic center direction. The observations, made with the 3.6, 2.2, and 1.0 m ESO telescopes at La Silla, Chile, consists of CVF spectra with resolution lambda/delta lambda is approximately or equal to 100 and IRSPEC spectra with resolution lambda/delta lambda is approximately or equal to 700. In the direction of the most highly reddened stars, definitive detections of the 3.45 and the 3.0 to 3.1 micron absorption features are reported. The 3.45 micron feature was attributed to absorption arising in a vibrational transition resulting from the C-H stretching in organic compounds, while the 3.0 to 3.1 micron broader feature are tentatively attributed to O-H bonds. The observations strongly support that the agent producing the 3.45 micron feature, presumably organic molecules, is an important component of the diffuse interstellar medium and is not characteristic only of the galactic center environment.

  20. Crystallinity and interface of 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile thin films between organic and transparent conductive oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Hwi; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo; Kim, Hyo Jung

    2015-05-01

    The crystallinity, preferential ordering, and interfacial stability of 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HATCN) thin films interconnected with organic/inorganic multilayers have been investigated. In the region close to the organic-organic interface, HATCN formed a low crystalline order with a substantial amorphous phase. As film growth continued, HATCN stacked to the high crystalline ordered phase. After the sputtering deposition of the indium zinc oxide (IZO) layer on top, the volume fraction of the preferentially ordered region of HATCN increased without any structural deterioration. In addition, the HATCN surface was kept quite stable by preserving the sharp interface between the HATCN and sputtering-deposited IZO layers.

  1. Cloning a balanced t(9;11)(p24;q23.1) chromosomal translocation breakpoint segregating with bipolar affective disorder in a small pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, D.J.; Baysal, B.E.; Gollin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    A small multigenerational pedigree was previously identified in which a balanced 9;11 chromosomal translocation was cosegregating with bipolar affective disorder. We hypothesize that genes or gene regulatory sequences disrupted by the translocation are contributing to bipolar affective disorder in a dominant fashion. The general strategy involves (1) using somatic cell hybrids containing the derivative 9 or 11 chromosomes to identify the closest chromosome 9 and 11 flanking markers, (2) using the nearest markers as PCR and hybridization probes to isolate both normal DNA (YAC) and patient DNA (cosmid) adjacent to and incorporating the translocation breakpoint, and (3) identifying expressed sequences in the genomic DNA that may be disrupted by the translocation. From a fusion of the translocation patient cell line and a recipient hamster cell line, somatic cell hybrids were isolated which contain either the human derivative 9 or derivative 11 chromosome. Using PCR-based STS assays with these hybrids, the location of the translocation breakpoint was localized to an estimated 500 kb region at chromosome 11 band q23.1 and a 1 cM region in 9 band p24 (more telomeric than originally reported). From a large set of CEPH and Roswell Park yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), six chromosome 11 YACs spanning the 11q23.1 breakpoint have now been identified. A combination of pulsed field gel eletrophoresis and YAC mapping has narrowed the chromosome 11 region to less than 430 kb. Current efforts are focused on generating new chromosome 11 probes within the flanking markers, mapping these probes back to the der(9) and der(11) containing hybrids and the chromosome 11 YAC mapping panel. As the region is physically narrowed, we will identify candidate genes whose expression may be altered by this t(9:11) translocation.

  2. Workplace response of companies exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center attack: a focus-group study.

    PubMed

    North, Carol S; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Hong, Barry A; Gordon, Mollie R; Kim, You-Seung; Lind, Lisa; Pollio, David E

    2013-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 (9/11) left workplaces in pressing need of a mental health response capability. Unaddressed emotional sequelae may be devastating to the productivity and economic stability of a company's workforce. In the second year after the attacks, 85 employees of five highly affected agencies participated in 12 focus groups to discuss workplace mental health issues. Managers felt ill prepared to manage the magnitude and the intensity of employees' emotional responses. Rapid return to work, provision of workplace mental health services, and peer support were viewed as contributory to emotional recovery. Formal mental health services provided were perceived as insufficient. Drawing on their post-9/11 workplace experience, members of these groups identified practical measures that they found helpful in promoting healing outside of professional mental health services. These measures, consistent with many principles of psychological first aid, may be applied by workplace leaders who are not mental health professionals. PMID:23066661

  3. Workplace response of companies exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center attack: a focus-group study

    PubMed Central

    North, Carol S.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Hong, Barry A.; Gordon, Mollie R.; Kim, You-Seung; Lind, Lisa; Pollio, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 (9/11) left workplaces in pressing need of a mental health response capability. Unaddressed emotional sequelae may be devastating to the productivity and economic stability of a company’s workforce. In the second year after the attacks, 85 employees of five highly affected agencies participated in 12 focus groups to discuss workplace mental health issues. Managers felt ill prepared to manage the magnitude and the intensity of employees’ emotional responses. Rapid return to work, provision of workplace mental health services, and peer support were viewed as contributory to emotional recovery. Formal mental health services provided were perceived as insufficient. Drawing on their post-9/11 workplace experience, members of these groups identified practical measures that they found helpful in promoting healing outside of professional mental health services. These measures, consistent with many principles of psychological first aid, may be applied by workplace leaders who are not mental health professionals. PMID:23066661

  4. A Focus Group Study of the Impact of Trauma Exposure in the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks

    PubMed Central

    North, Carol S.; Barney, Carissa J.; Pollio, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Much of the mental health research that has emerged from the September 11 (9/11) attacks has been focused on posttraumatic stress disorder and its symptoms. To better understand the broader experience of individuals following a disaster, focus groups were conducted with individuals from affected companies both at Ground Zero and elsewhere. Methods Twenty-one focus groups with a total of 140 participants were conducted in the second post-9/11 year. Areas of identified concern were coded into the following themes: Disaster Experience, Emotional Responses, Workplace Issues, Coping, and Issues of Public Concern. Results Discussions of focus groups included material represented in all five themes in companies both at Ground Zero and elsewhere. The emphasis and the content within these themes varied between the Ground Zero and other companies. Content suggesting symptoms of PTSD represented only a minority of the material, especially in the company groups not at Ground Zero. Conclusions This study’s findings revealed an array of psychosocial concerns following the 9/11 attacks among employees of companies in New York City that extended far beyond PTSD. This study’s results provide further evidence that trauma exposure is central to individuals’ post-disaster experience and focus, and to individuals’ adjustment and experience after disaster. PMID:25319111

  5. Mental and physical health consequences of the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks in primary care: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Neria, Yuval; Wickramaratne, Priya; Olfson, Mark; Gameroff, Marc J; Pilowsky, Daniel J; Lantigua, Rafael; Shea, Steven; Weissman, Myrna M

    2013-02-01

    The magnitude of the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks was without precedent in the United States, but long-term longitudinal research on its health consequences for primary care patients is limited. We assessed the prevalence and exposure-related determinants of mental disorders, functioning, general medical conditions, and service utilization, 1 and 4 years after the 9/11 attacks, in an urban primary care cohort (N = 444) in Manhattan. Although the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and levels of functional impairment declined over time, a substantial increase in suicidal ideation and missed work was observed. Most medical outcomes and service utilization indicators demonstrated a short-term increase after the 9/11 attacks (mean change of +20.3%), followed by a minor decrease in the subsequent year (mean change of -3.2%). Loss of a close person was associated with the highest risk for poor mental health and functional status over time. These findings highlight the importance of longitudinal assessments of mental, functional, and medical outcomes in urban populations exposed to mass trauma and terrorism. PMID:23319335

  6. Lower respiratory symptoms among residents living near the World Trade Center, two and four years after 9/11.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Morse, Dale; Hwang, Syni-An

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether residents living near the World Trade Center (WTC) continued to experience respiratory problems several years after September 11, 2001 (9/11). Residents living within one mile of the WTC surveyed after 9/11 responded two and four years later to follow-up surveys that asked about lower respiratory symptoms (LRS), medical history, psychological stress, and indoor environmental characteristics. There were declines in the proportion of residents reporting LRS, new lower respiratory diagnoses, unplanned medical visits, and asthma medication use. However, the proportion of residents reporting any LRS in the affected area at follow-up remained higher than the original proportion in the control area; residents with multiple sources of potential 9/11-related exposures were at greatest risk for LRS at follow-up. Psychological stress, dust/odors, and moisture were significantly associated with LRS at follow-up. These data demonstrate that LRS continue to burden residents living in the areas affected by the WTC disaster. PMID:20166318

  7. Micronized-Coal Burner Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calfo, F. D.; Lupton, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Micronized-coal (coal-in-oil mix) burner facility developed to fulfill need to generate erosion/corrosion data on series of superalloy specimens. In order to successfully operate gas turbine using COM, two primary conditions must be met. First, there must be adequate atomization of COM and second, minimization of coking of burner. Meeting these conditions will be achieved only by clean burning and flame stability.

  8. Waste Management in Universities and Colleges. Workshop Proceedings (Madison, Wisconsin, July 9-11, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    In response to a request from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Region V of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a workshop on waste management in universities and colleges. It consisted of four sessions: (1) managing general university waste and regulatory concerns; (2) chemical waste management; (3)…

  9. High Energy 2-micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows the development of 2-micron solid state lasers. The topics covered include: 1) Overview 2-micron solid state lasers; 2) Modeling and population inversion measurement; 3) Side pump oscillator; and 4) One Joule 2-m Laser.

  10. After 9/11: priority focus areas for bioterrorism preparedness in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jenifer K

    2004-01-01

    Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, bioterrorism preparedness was a priority in hospitals, but it did not remain a priority. As a result, hospitals are still unprepared to deal with the effects of a bioterrorist attack. The government has provided initial funding to state and local governments for bioterrorism preparedness; however, much of this money has yet to reach hospitals. With the inadequate funding available to hospitals, four initial measures must be focused on. These focus areas are community involvement, hospital staff education, information technology and disease surveillance improvement, and additional equipment and staff acquisition. Hospitals should also make bioterrorism-preparedness planning a regional effort. PMID:15328657

  11. Visibility related to backscatter at 1.54 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T. L.; Larson, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The lidar process was shown to have the necessary potential to fulfill the need for a remote measurement of visibility. Visibility can be inferred from a lidar return optical extinction. The wavelength 1.54 micron was chosen, being near the visible wavelength region and having a high eye safety threshol, 200,000 times higher than 1.06 micron; 1.54 is the erbium laser wavelength. This research utilized 105 measured height profiles of natural droplet size distributions data, taken in clouds, fog, and haze. These profiles were examined to determine the completeness of the droplet counting data. It was found that the particle spectrometer data were incomplete in the very light ford and haze so this portion of the data was eliminated. Utilizing the Mie theory, these droplet size distribution profiles were converted to backscatter at 1.54 micron and extinction in the visible region, 0.55 micron. Using Koschmeider's relationship, the extinction profiles were converted to visibility. The visibility and backscatter profiles were compared to develop a relationship between visibility and backscatter at 1.54 micron.

  12. Veterans' Education Benefits: Enhanced Guidance and Collaboration Could Improve Administration of the Post-9/11 GI Bill Program. GAO-11-356R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, George A.

    2011-01-01

    With the passage of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 (Post- 9/11 GI Bill), Congress created a comprehensive education benefit program for veterans, service members, and their dependents pursuing postsecondary education. Since implementation, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has provided just over $5.7 billion for…

  13. 76 FR 7862 - Implementation of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-347)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-347) SUMMARY: The National Institute for Occupational... implementing the provisions of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-347... attacks. A full copy of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-347)...

  14. Supporting Student Veteran Success: Institutional Responses to the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Influx of Student Veterans. WISCAPE Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Bo, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008, commonly known as the Post-9/11 GI Bill, represents the largest investment in veterans' education since the original GI Bill of 1944. The bill pays tuition for a student veteran up to a cap based on public in-state undergraduate tuition and provides a monthly housing stipend, as well as…

  15. Developmental pathways of language and social communication problems in 9-11 year olds: unpicking the heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Roy, P; Chiat, S

    2014-10-01

    This paper addressed relations between language, social communication and behaviour, and their trajectories, in a sample of 9-11-year-olds (n=91) who had been referred to clinical services with concerns about language as pre-schoolers. Children were first assessed at 2½-4 years, and again 18 months later. Results revealed increasing differentiation of profiles across time. By 9-11 years, 11% of the sample had social communication deficits, 27% language impairment, 20% both, and 42% neither. The size of group differences on key language and social communication measures was striking (2-3 standard deviations). Social communication deficits included autistic mannerisms and were associated with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBDs); in contrast, language impairment was associated with hyperactivity only. Children with both language and social communication problems had the most severe difficulties on all measures. These distinct school-age profiles emerged gradually. Investigation of developmental trajectories revealed that the three impaired groups did not differ significantly on language or SEBD measures when the children were first seen. Only low performance on the Early Sociocognitive Battery, a new measure of social responsiveness, joint attention and symbolic understanding, differentiated the children with and without social communication problems at 9-11 years. These findings suggest that some children who first present with language delay or difficulties have undetected Autism Spectrum Disorders which may or may not be accompanied by language impairment in the longer term. This new evidence of developmental trajectories starting in the preschool years throws further light on the nature of social communication and language problems in school-age children, relations between language impairment and SEBDs, and on the nature of early language development. PMID:25005063

  16. An Overview of 9/11 Experiences and Respiratory and Mental Health Conditions among World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    DiGrande, Laura; Brackbill, Robert; Prann, Angela; Cone, James; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J.; Pezeshki, Grant; Thomas, Pauline; Galea, Sandro; Williamson, David; Frieden, Thomas R.; Thorpe, Lorna

    2008-01-01

    To date, health effects of exposure to the September 11, 2001 disaster in New York City have been studied in specific groups, but no studies have estimated its impact across the different exposed populations. This report provides an overview of the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) enrollees, their exposures, and their respiratory and mental health outcomes 2–3 years post-9/11. Results are extrapolated to the estimated universe of people eligible to enroll in the WTCHR to determine magnitude of impact. Building occupants, persons on the street or in transit in lower Manhattan on 9/11, local residents, rescue and recovery workers/volunteers, and area school children and staff were interviewed and enrolled in the WTCHR between September 2003 and November 2004. A total of 71,437 people enrolled in the WTCHR, for 17.4% coverage of the estimated eligible exposed population (nearly 410,000); 30% were recruited from lists, and 70% were self-identified. Many reported being in the dust cloud from the collapsing WTC Towers (51%), witnessing traumatic events (70%), or sustaining an injury (13%). After 9/11, 67% of adult enrollees reported new or worsening respiratory symptoms, 3% reported newly diagnosed asthma, 16% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 8% for serious psychological distress (SPD). Newly diagnosed asthma was most common among rescue and recovery workers who worked on the debris pile (4.1%). PTSD was higher among those who reported Hispanic ethnicity (30%), household income <$25,000 (31%), or being injured (35%). Using previously published estimates of the total number of exposed people per WTCHR eligibility criteria, we estimate between 3,800 and 12,600 adults experienced newly diagnosed asthma and 34,600–70,200 adults experienced PTSD following the attacks, suggesting extensive adverse health impacts beyond the immediate deaths and injuries from the acute event. PMID:18785012

  17. An overview of 9/11 experiences and respiratory and mental health conditions among World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Mark; DiGrande, Laura; Brackbill, Robert; Prann, Angela; Cone, James; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J; Pezeshki, Grant; Thomas, Pauline; Galea, Sandro; Williamson, David; Frieden, Thomas R; Thorpe, Lorna

    2008-11-01

    To date, health effects of exposure to the September 11, 2001 disaster in New York City have been studied in specific groups, but no studies have estimated its impact across the different exposed populations. This report provides an overview of the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) enrollees, their exposures, and their respiratory and mental health outcomes 2-3 years post-9/11. Results are extrapolated to the estimated universe of people eligible to enroll in the WTCHR to determine magnitude of impact. Building occupants, persons on the street or in transit in lower Manhattan on 9/11, local residents, rescue and recovery workers/volunteers, and area school children and staff were interviewed and enrolled in the WTCHR between September 2003 and November 2004. A total of 71,437 people enrolled in the WTCHR, for 17.4% coverage of the estimated eligible exposed population (nearly 410,000); 30% were recruited from lists, and 70% were self-identified. Many reported being in the dust cloud from the collapsing WTC Towers (51%), witnessing traumatic events (70%), or sustaining an injury (13%). After 9/11, 67% of adult enrollees reported new or worsening respiratory symptoms, 3% reported newly diagnosed asthma, 16% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 8% for serious psychological distress (SPD). Newly diagnosed asthma was most common among rescue and recovery workers who worked on the debris pile (4.1%). PTSD was higher among those who reported Hispanic ethnicity (30%), household income < $25,000 (31%), or being injured (35%). Using previously published estimates of the total number of exposed people per WTCHR eligibility criteria, we estimate between 3,800 and 12,600 adults experienced newly diagnosed asthma and 34,600-70,200 adults experienced PTSD following the attacks, suggesting extensive adverse health impacts beyond the immediate deaths and injuries from the acute event. PMID:18785012

  18. Mass loss rates from protostars and OI(63 micron) shock luminosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.

    1985-01-01

    The high-velocity ejection of material from protostars results in a wind shock which may be observable in OI(63 micron) emission. It is shown that for a wide range of conditions, the OI(63 micron) luminosity is proportional to the mass loss rate from the protostar. Application is made to shock OI(63 micron) emission observed around IRc2 in the BN-KL region of Orion.

  19. The 100 micron detector development program. [gallium doped germanium photoconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to optimize gallium-doped germanium photoconductors (Ge:Ga) for use in space for sensitive detection of far infrared radiation in the 100 micron region is described as well as the development of cryogenic apparatus capable of calibrating detectors under low background conditions.

  20. Discovery of new 2 micron sources in Rho Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsony, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Burton, Michael G.; Russell, A. P. G.; Garden, R.

    1989-01-01

    A 144-sq-arcmin region of the Rho Oph star-forming cloud core was surveyed at 2.2 microns, complete to mK = 14. A total of 61 sources are detected, 26 of which have been previously reported, accounting for a total of 35 new sources with mK = 12-14. There is no turnover in the 2-micron luminosity function of the Rho Oph cloud core to a limiting sensitivity of mK = 14. Two of the newly discovered sources are binary companions to previously cataloged objects.

  1. MSX Observations of the Eclipsed Moon at 4 Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. W.; Little, S. J.; Murdock, T. L.

    1997-07-01

    The lunar eclipse of September 27, 1996 presented the opportunity to observe the 4 micron emission from the moon during totality. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite made observations three times during the totality phase of the eclipse. These observations in Bands B1 (4.22 - 4.36 microns) and B2 (4.24 - 4.45 microns) were used to construct images of the eclipsed moon. The images have been analyzed for temperature and location of thermal anomalies on the moon as well as for temperatures of extended maria and highland areas. Maps of the moon to illustrate the location and brightness of thermal anomalies first seen by Saari and Shorthill (1965) and temperature comparisons with microwave measurements of selected regions on the moon (Sandor and Clancy, 1995) will be made. References: Saari, J. M., and R. W. Shorthill, 1965, Nature, 205, p. 964. Sandor, Brad J., and R. Todd Clancy, 1995, Icarus, 115, p. 387.

  2. Spectral structure near the 11.3 micron emission feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, Fred C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Cohen, M.; Wooden, Diane

    1989-01-01

    If the 11.3 micron emission feature seen in the spectra of many planetary nebulae, H II regions, and reflection nebulae is attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), then additional features should be present between 11.3 and 13.0 microns. Moderate resolution spectra of NGC 7027, HD 44179, BD+30 deg 3639, and IRAS 21282+5050 are presented which show evidence for new emission features centered near 12.0 and 12.7 microns. These are consistent with an origin from PAHs and can be used to constrain the molecular structure of the family of PAHs responsible for the infrared features. There is an indication that coronene-like PAHs contribute far more to the emission from NGC 7027 than to the emission from HD 44179. The observed asymmetric profile of the 11.3 micron band in all the spectra is consistent with the slight anharmonicity expected in the C-H out-of-plane bending mode in PAHs. A series of repeating features between 10 and 11 microns in the spectrum of HD 44179 suggests a simple hydride larger than 2 atoms is present in the gas phase in this object.

  3. Mapping and spectroscopy of the 3.3 microns feature in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Nakada, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The results of spectroscopy of the 3.3 microns feature, H2 emission, and Br alpha, obtained in a spatial cut across the Orion ionization front are presented. The spatial distribution of the 3.3 microns feature peaks between the ionization front and the H2 peak are observed. The shape of the 3.3 microns feature observed at high spectral resolution shows no changes in regions of varying ultraviolet flux and density. The results are discussed in terms of current models for the 3.3 microns emission feature.

  4. Spatial variations of the 3-micron emission features within Orion's Bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1988-01-01

    3-micron spectra of the Orion Bar region have been obtained at three positions corresponding to different distances from the exciting source. The recently discovered unidentified features at 3.46, 3.51, and 3.57 microns are clearly visible. The spectra show that the 3.4 and 3.51-micron emission features increase in intensity relative to the strong 3.3-micron feature as the distance from the exciting source increases. The implications for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and recent ideas concerning their ultraviolet excitation and spatial evolution are discussed.

  5. High-resolution spectra of the 3.29 micron interstellar emission feature - A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Sellgren, K.; Smith, R. G.; Nagata, T.; Sakata, A.; Nakada, Y.

    1991-01-01

    High spectral resolution observations of the 3.29-micron interstellar emission feature show two types of profiles. Type 1 has a central wavelength of 3.289-micron and is observed in extended objects such as planetary nebulae and H II regions. Type 2 has a central wavelength of 3.296 microns and is observed around a small number of stellar sources. Type 2 has a full width at half-maximum of 0.020 micron; Type 1 has a broader FWHM, perhaps as much as 0.042 micron, but this is uncertain because of contamination by Pf(delta) emission. These profiles are tabulated for comparison to laboratory data. It is found that no proposed identification for the 3.29-micron emission feature definitely matches the observational spectra, although amorphous aromatic materials and heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons tend to fit the best.

  6. Titan's 5-micron spectrum: VLT/ISAAC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, E.; Coustenis, A.; Sebag, B.; Cuby, J.-G.; Crovisier, J.; Maillard, J. P.

    2001-11-01

    Earlier observations by Noll and Knacke (Icarus, 101, 272, 1993) and Noll et al. (Icarus, 124, 625, 1996) have shown that the 5 micron region of Titan's spectrum is a methane window probing Titan's lower atmosphere and surface. In particular, Noll et al. found that the 4.8-4.95 micron radiation is dominated by absorption in the (1-0) vibrational band of CO in Titan's troposphere, and that the 4.95-5.2 micron flux is reflected at the surface. They inferred a 10 ppm tropospheric CO mixing ratio, but this value was uncertain because of limited S/N of their data, which in particular did not show the individual rovibrational lines of CO. On November 16, 2000, we observed Titan near Eastern Elongation with the 8-m UT1 (Antu) of the Very Large Telescope, equipped with the Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (ISAAC). The insrument was used in long slit spectroscopy mode. The 4.75-5.1 micron range was covered, at a mean resolution of about 2000. Standard reduction included flat-fielding, correction for horizontal distortion and slit curvature, spectrum extraction, correction for telluric absorption, and wavelength and flux calibration. Preliminary results indicate that (i) the continuum flux at 5.0 micron is about 100 mJy (indicating a geometric albedo of 0.055), consistent with Noll et al. 1996 (ii) the albedo tends to decrease longward of 5.0 micron (iii) residual flux is detected at 4.75-4.83 micron (iv) several rovibrational lines of CO are seen in absorption (P10 to P19 of 13CO) at 4.85-4.95 micron. We will present the analysis of these data and infer a new measurement of the CO abundance in Titan's troposphere, contributing to the long-standing problem of the abundance, vertical distribution and origin of carbon monoxide on Titan. In addition, the spectrum seems to show emission features at 4.75-4.83 micron coinciding with the position of some CO(1-0) lines; however stratospheric thermal emission and solar induced fluorescence seem to be unable to explain

  7. Bordetella parapertussis outbreak in Bisham, Pakistan in 2009-2010: fallout of the 9/11 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Javed, S; Said, F; Eqani, S A M A S; Bokhari, H

    2015-09-01

    Pertussis or whooping cough is a highly contagious community disease mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis. We report a minor outbreak of whooping cough (2009-2010) in symptomatic subjects from Bisham, near Swat, Khyber Pukhtoonkhawa province, Pakistan. Interestingly, our results show that all the culture-positive isolates (n = 21) collected from children (average age 3·46 years), were identified as B. parapertussis after routine identification tests and PCR IS481, IS1001 and IS1002. Furthermore, in the affected patients, none had received immunization with diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DTPw) vaccine. Therefore, the possibility of the re-emergence of the disease due to limitation of basic health services as a result of the political unrest due to the 9/11 situation is also examined. Moreover, we discuss the importance of vaccinating both adults and children with DTPwPaw vaccine containing both organisms for better protection. PMID:25583126

  8. 9,11-Secosteroids and polyhydroxylated steroids from two South China Sea soft corals Sarcophyton trocheliophorum and Sinularia flexibilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ting; Liu, Hai-Li; Yao, Li-Gong; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2014-12-01

    A new 9,11-secosteroid, 25(26)-dehydrosarcomilasterol (1), two new polyhydroxylated steroids, 7α-hydroxy-crassarosterol A (2) and 11-acetoxy-7α-hydroxy-crassarosterol A (3), together with three known related ones (4-6), were isolated from the South China Sea soft corals Sarcophyton trocheliophorum and Sinularia flexibilis, respectively. The structures of the new steroids were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses, comparison with the literature data and chemical correlation. Compound 2 exhibited a moderate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 33.05μM. Compounds 1-3 showed weak in vitro cytotoxicities against the tumor cell lines K562 and HL-60. PMID:25262997

  9. The impact of 9/11 on New York City's substance abuse treatment programs: a study of program administrators.

    PubMed

    Frank, Blanche; Dewart, Tracey; Schmeidler, James; Demirjian, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    Given the far-reaching effects of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, a study was conducted under the supervision of the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services to assess the impact on New York City's substance abuse treatment programs. A stratified, random sample of 15 treatment programs was selected to represent the system's major modalities. Administrators representing these programs were interviewed face-to- face using a structured interview schedule. The questions mainly probed the problems experienced on 9/11 and afterwards, patient issues and the lessons learned. The findings show major concerns for the mental health of both staff members and patients, the failure of the telephone communication system, the particular sensitivity of drug-free outpatient clinics, the challenges experienced by methadone programs, and the need to update disaster planning. A host of problems came to the fore now requiring another level of thinking. PMID:16597568

  10. Variability of Jupiter's Five-Micron Hot Spot Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Orton, G. S.; Wakefield, L.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Boydstun, K.

    2012-01-01

    Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. We track the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-micron hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5degN (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images. Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-microns thermal radiance. Ortiz et al. (1998, GRL, 103) characterized the latitude and drift rates of the hot spots, including the descent of the Galileo probe at the southern edge of a 5-micron hot spot, as the superposition of equatorial Rossby waves, with phase speeds between 99 - 103m/s, relative to System III. We note that the high 5-micron radiances correlate well but not perfectly with high 8.57-micron radiances. Because the latter are modulated primarily by changes in the upper ammonia (NH3) ice cloud opacity, this correlation implies that changes in the ammonia ice cloud field may be responsible for the variability seen in the 5-m maps. During the NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were absent, an atmospheric state not seen in decades. The ongoing NEB revival indicates nascent 5-m hot spots as early as April 2012, with corresponding visible dark spots. Their continuing growth through July 2012 indicates the possit.le re-establishment of Rossby waves. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) and NEB revivals began similarly with an instability that developed into a major outbreak, and many similarities in the observed propagation of clear regions.

  11. Modeling cloth at micron resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Kavita

    2014-02-01

    Fabric is one of the most common materials in our everyday lives, and accurately simulating the appearance of cloth is a critical problem in graphics, design, and virtual prototyping. But modeling and rendering fabric is very challenging because fabrics have a very complex structure, and this structure plays an important role in their visual appearance—cloth is made of fibers that are twisted into yarns which are woven into patterns. Light interacting with this complex structure produce the characteristic visual appearance that humans recognize as silk, cotton, or wool. In this paper we present an end-to-end pipeline to model and render fabrics: we introduce a novel modality to create volume models of fabric at micron resolution using CT technology coupled with photographs; a new technique to synthesize models of user-specified designs from such CT scans; and finally, an efficient algorithm to render these complex volumetric models for practical applications. This pipeline produces the most realistic images of virtual cloth to date, and opens the way to bridging the gap between real and virtual fabric appearance.

  12. Proposed Legislative Changes to the Post-9/11 GI Bill: Potential Implications for Veterans and Colleges. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    As the Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act (popularly known as the Post-9/11 GI Bill or Chapter 33) begins its second academic year of operation, changes loom on the horizon. While this is no surprise to those who know the history of the original GI Bill, some of the changes will have considerable impact not only on veteran students, but…

  13. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  14. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  15. Thermal Evolution and Composition of the July 2009 Jupiter Impact Site from 7-25 Micron Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L. N.; Orton, G. S.; Mousis, O.; de Pater, I.; Hammel, H. B.; Golisch, W.; Edwards, M.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Fisher, B.; Greene, Z.; Lai, S.; Otto, E.; Reshetnikov, N.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.

    2009-12-01

    We present analysis of thermal-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the impact site near the south polar region of Jupiter (see Orton et al., AGU 2009). Enhanced thermal emission was first detected on July 20 2009 in 7-25 micron imaging from the MIRSI instrument on NASA’s IRTF. These observations, just two rotations after the impact, indicated the localised, high-temperature thermal signature of the ejecta field, coincident with the location of high-altitude particulate debris observed in the near-IR and visible. The impact feature was most visible in the 9-11 micron range, suggestive of enhanced emission from hydrocarbons and ammonia gas in the lower stratosphere. Subsequent thermal imaging of the impact region reveals the radiative cooling of the impact site and the changing morphology due to the redistribution of material by Jupiter’s zonal and meridional wind field. We acquired Gemini-N/Michelle imaging on July 22, Gemini-S/TReCS imaging on July 24 and August 5 and 9, and an extensive campaign of VLT/VISIR imaging on July 24, 26 and August 5, 10, 15, 16, at which point (4 weeks after the impact) the thermal signature could no longer be reliably distinguished, even with sub-arcsecond diffraction-limited angular resolution. Tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures and aerosol opacity are derived via optimal estimation retrievals (Fletcher et al. 2009, Icarus, 200, p154). Enhancement of hydrocarbons and gaseous ammonia are determined via iterative forward modelling, aided by spectral observations obtained with the slit aligned east-west through the impact feature from Gemini-S/TReCS (July 24) and VLT/VISIR (July 26, August 12-13). Low-resolution N-band (8-13 microns) Gemini-S/TReCS spectra confirm the enhanced emission over a broad range of wavelengths; Q-band (17-25 micron) spectra are used to study upper tropospheric temperatures in the aftermath of the collision and the rate of radiative cooling. VLT/VISIR spectra provide higher spectral resolutions in

  16. A high resolution atlas of the galactic plane at 12 microns and 25 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Stephan D.; Korte, Rose M.; Sample, Rebecca S.; Kennealy, John P.; Gonsalves, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution images of the 12 micron and 25 micron IRAS survey data from each HCON crossing the Galactic Plane are being created for those regions that the original IRAS processing labeled as confused. This encompasses the area within 100 deg longitude of the Galactic Center and within 3 deg to 10 deg of the Plane. The procedures used to create the images preserve the spatial resolution inherent in the IRAS instrument. The images are separated into diffuse and point source components and candidate sources are extracted from the point source image after non-linear spatial sharpening. Fluxes are estimated by convolving the candidate sources with the point response function and cross-correlating with the original point source image. A source is considered real if it is seen on at least two HCON's with a rather generous flux match but a stringent position criterion. A number of fields spanning a range of source densities from low to high have been examined. Initial analysis indicates that the imaging and extraction works quite well up to a source density of about 100 sources per square degree or down to roughly 0.8 Janskys.

  17. Quantitative-Trait Loci on Chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18 Control Variation in Levels of T and B Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. A.; Norman, P. J.; Thiel, B.; Tiwari, H.; Peiffer, A.; Vaughan, R. W.; Prescott, S.; Leppert, M.; Schork, N. J.; Lanchbury, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulation levels are used for prognosis and monitoring of a variety of human diseases, especially those with an infectious etiology. As a primary step to defining the major gene variation underlying these phenotypes, we conducted the first whole-genome screen for quantitative variation in lymphocyte count, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, B cell, and natural killer cell numbers, as well as CD4:CD8 ratio. The screen was performed in 15 of the CEPH families that form the main human genome genetic project mapping resource. Quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) that account for significant proportions of the phenotypic variance of lymphocyte subpopulations were detected on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18. The most significant QTL found was for CD4 levels on chromosome 8 (empirical P=.00005). Two regions of chromosome 4 showed significant linkage to CD4:CD8 ratio (empirical P=.00007 and P=.003). A QTL for the highly correlated measures of CD4 and CD19 levels colocalized at 18q21 (both P=.003). Similarly, a shared region of chromosome 1 was linked to CD8 and CD19 levels (P=.0001 and P=.002, respectively). Several of the identified chromosome regions are likely to harbor polymorphic candidate genes responsible for these important human phenotypes. Their discovery has important implications for understanding the generation of the immune repertoire and understanding immune-system homeostasis. More generally, these data show the power of an integrated human gene–mapping approach for heritable molecular phenotypes, using large pedigrees that have been extensively genotyped. PMID:11951176

  18. Mercury: First Spectra from 8 to 25 Microns Using MIRSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, K. L. Donaldson; Sprague, A. L.; Kozlowski, R. W. H.

    2005-01-01

    Spectral measurements from 8 to 25 microns of Mercury's surface were taken using MIRSI (Mid-InfraRed Spectrometer and Imager) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii [1]. Few spectral observations of Mercury have been made between 8 and 14 m and these are the first to be made between 17 and 25 m. The goal for these observations is to measure the emission from Mercury in the Restrahllen Bands in the 8 to 25 micron region in an effort to identify spectral features that may give clues to Mercury s composition. These observations will be compared to previous observations [2] [3] [4], and future observations made with instrumentation on Messenger at other spectral regions [5]. Spectra from the Moon were also obtained with the same instrumentation and telescope during the same observing periods.

  19. Frequent binge drinking five to six years after exposure to 9/11: Findings from the World Trade Center Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Alice E.; Caramanica, Kimberly; Maslow, Carey B.; Cone, James E.; Farfel, Mark R.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Stellman, Steven D.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to 9/11 may have considerable long-term impact on health behaviors, including increased alcohol consumption. We examined the association between frequent binge drinking, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and number of 9/11-specific experiences among World Trade Center Health Registry (Registry) enrollees five-to-six years after 9/11. Methods Participants included 41,284 lower Manhattan residents, workers, passers-by, and rescue/recovery workers aged 18 or older without a pre-9/11 PTSD diagnosis who completed Wave 1 (2003–2004) and Wave 2 (2006–2007) interviews. Frequent binge drinking was defined as consuming five or more drinks on five or more occasions in the prior 30 days at Wave 2. Probable PTSD was defined as scoring 44 or greater on the PTSD Checklist. 9/11 exposure was measured as the sum of 12 experiences and grouped as none/low (0–1), medium (2–3), high (4–5) and very high (6+). Results Frequent binge drinking was significantly associated with increasing 9/11 exposure and PTSD. Those with very high and high exposures had a higher prevalence of frequent binge drinking (13.7% and 9.8%, respectively) than those with medium and low exposures (7.5% and 4.4%, respectively). Upon stratification, very high and high exposures were associated with frequent binge drinking in both the PTSD and no PTSD subgroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 9/11 exposure had an impact on frequent binge drinking five-to-six years later among Registry enrollees. Understanding the effects of traumatic exposure on alcohol use is important to identify risk factors for post-disaster alcohol misuse, inform policy, and improve post-disaster psychological and alcohol screening and counseling. PMID:24831753

  20. Sub-micron particle sampler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.; McMillan, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar.RTM. and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis.

  1. Method for sampling sub-micron particles

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.; McMillan, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar.RTM. and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis.

  2. (7E,11E)-3,5,9,11-Tetramethyltridecadienal: Sex Pheromone of the Strepsipteran Xenos peckii.

    PubMed

    Hrabar, Michael; Zhai, Huimin; Gries, Regine; Schaefer, Paul W; Draper, Jason; Britton, Robert; Gries, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Xenos peckii is a strepsipteran parasitoid of the common North American paper wasp, Polistes fuscatus. Mate-seeking X. peckii males respond to a long-range sex pheromone emitted by the female, which remains permanently embedded within the abdomen of a mobile host wasp. During peak pheromone signalling, we excised the female from her host, severed the cephalothorax containing the pheromone gland, extracted it in hexane, and analyzed aliquots of combined extracts by coupled gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD). These analyses revealed a candidate pheromone component (CPC) that consistently elicited strong responses from male antennae. We identified the CPC as (7E,11E)-3,5,9,11-tetramethyltridecadienal based on its retention indices (RI) on three GC-columns, RI inter-column differentials, mass and NMR spectra, and synthesis of an authentic standard that matched the GC-retention and spectrometric characteristics of the CPC. For a field experiment, we prepared (7E,11E)-3,5,9R,11-tetramethyltridecadienal and (7E,11E)-3,5,9S,11-tetramethyltridecadienal. Xenos peckii males were caught in traps baited with either compound singly or a 1:1 mixture of the two but not in unbaited control traps. The sex pheromone of X. peckii resembles that reported for the strepsipterans Stylops mellittae and S. muelleri, (R,R,R)-3,5,9-trimethyldodecanal, suggesting a common biosynthetic pathway across taxonomic genera. PMID:26271674

  3. Proceedings of the Federal Interagency Sediment Monitoring Instrument and Analysis Research Workshop, September 9-11, 2003, Flagstaff, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Water Information's Subcommittee on Sedimentation sponsored the Federal Interagency Sediment Monitoring Instrument and Analysis Research Workshop on September 9-11, 2003, at the U.S. Geological Survey Flagstaff Field Center, Arizona. The workshop brought together a diverse group representing most Federal agencies whose mission includes fluvial-sediment issues; academia; the private sector; and others with interests and expertise in fluvial-sediment monitoring ? suspended sediment, bedload, bed material, and bed topography ? and associated data-analysis techniques. The workshop emphasized technological and theoretical advances related to measurements of suspended sediment, bedload, bed material and bed topography, and data analyses. This workshop followed and expanded upon part of the 2002 Federal Interagency Workshop on Turbidity and Other Sediment Surrogates (http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/circ/2003/circ1250/), which initiated a process to provide national standards for measurement and use of turbidity and other sediment-surrogate data. This report provides a description of the salient attributes of the workshop and related information, major deliberations and findings, and principal recommendations. This information is available for evaluation by the Subcommittee on Sedimentation, which may opt to develop an action plan based on the recommendations that it endorses for consideration by the Advisory Committee on Water Information.

  4. A model for the CI (609 micron) emission of Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hollenbach, D.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical model energy balance and chemical equilibrium in the photodissociation regions at the edge of molecular clouds is presented. The model is used to calculate the emergent intensities of the following fine-structure lines: OI (at 63, 145 microns); CI (at 609, 370 microns); C II (at 158 microns); and the low-lying rotational transitions of CO. It is shown that column densities in the range 2 x 10 to the 17th to 2 x 10 to the 18th per sq cm can be obtained for the C(+)/C/CO transition region at the edges of molecular clouds. The difference in the column densities is attributed to changes in the charge exchange reactions of C(+) with SiO and S, and to the process of carbon self-healing. It is found that the calculations are in good agreement with the observed conditions in the photodissociation regions behind Orion (1) C Ori, and near the surface of OMC 1.

  5. Comorbidity of 9/11-related PTSD and depression in the World Trade Center Health Registry 10-11 years postdisaster.

    PubMed

    Caramanica, Kimberly; Brackbill, Robert M; Liao, Tim; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Many studies report elevated prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among persons exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) disaster compared to those unexposed; few have evaluated long-term PTSD with comorbid depression. We examined prevalence and risk factors for probable PTSD, probable depression, and both conditions 10-11 years post-9/11 among 29,486 World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees who completed surveys at Wave 1 (2003-2004), Wave 2 (2006-2007), and Wave 3 (2011-2012). Enrollees reporting physician diagnosed pre-9/11 PTSD or depression were excluded. PTSD was defined as scoring ≥ 44 on the PTSD Checklist and depression as scoring ≥ 10 on the 8-item Patient Health Questionnaire. We examined 4 groups: comorbid PTSD and depression, PTSD only, depression only, and neither. Among enrollees, 15.2% reported symptoms indicative of PTSD at Wave 3, 14.9% of depression, and 10.1% of both. Comorbid PTSD and depression was associated with high 9/11 exposures, low social integration, health-related unemployment, and experiencing ≥ 1 traumatic life event post-9/11. Comorbid persons experienced poorer outcomes on all PTSD-related impairment measures, life satisfaction, overall health, and unmet mental health care need compared to those with only a single condition. These findings highlight the importance of ongoing screening and treatment for both conditions, particularly among those at risk for mental health comorbidity. PMID:25470556

  6. Saturn's Deep Cloud Structure Derived From 5-Micron Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoraker, G. L.; Chanover, N. J.; Glenar, D. A.; Hewagama, T.

    2007-12-01

    The CSHELL and SpeX spectrometers on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility were used to observe Saturn between 4.5 and 5.4 microns on several occasions from 2004-2007 at the same time as Cassini/VIMS and CIRS were mapping the planet. At these wavelengths thermal radiation originates from the deep atmosphere (5 bars) and it is attenuated by two cloud layers considered in equilibrium models to be composed of NH4SH and condensed NH3. In addition, there is a component of sunlight reflected from the upper (NH3) cloud that varies spatially on Saturn. CSHELL can spectrally resolve profiles of absorption lines of ammonia (NH3) and phosphine (PH3) on Saturn at selected wavelengths. These lines are very broad due to collisions with 3 to 5 bars of hydrogen. The Saturn spectrum exhibits numerous strong NH3 and PH3 lines, as well as Fraunhofer lines due to CO in the Sun. SpeX observations cover the entire 5-micron window sampling both thermal emission and reflected sunlight. Image cubes were obtained by stepping the slit across the planet. The best contrast in reconstructed images occurs at 5.05 microns, which coincides with the wavelength where VIMS sees spectacular structure on Saturn. The spatial variation of Saturn's 5-micron spectrum is dominated by the variable opacity of its deep cloud structure. Superimposed on this are smaller variations in the mixing ratios of NH3 and PH3. The abundances of these gases can be retrieved reliably in relatively cloud-free regions between 50 South and 65 South, which are analogous to Jupiter's belts and 5-micron hot spots. Elsewhere, it is more difficult to separate changes in cloud opacity from gas abundances. We use near-simultaneous CIRS observations which sound the ~500-mbar level to provide an upper boundary condition to PH3. The 5-micron spectrum of Saturn's Equatorial Zone (10 South) is significantly different from a region near 60 South. The NH3 and PH3 lines are weaker and narrower in the EQZ, while the Fraunhofer lines are stronger

  7. The 16-39 micron spectroscopy of oxygen-rich stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, W. J.; Mccarthy, W. J.; Houck, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne observations of the 16-39 microns spectra of ten oxygen-rich stars with excess emission in the infrared was obtained. The stars show excess emission attributed to circumstellar dust grains in the 16-39 microns region in the form of a broad hump peaking near 18 microns and falling smoothly to longer wavelengths. The emission is similar in character to the emission from the Trapezium region of the Orion nebula indicating the grain materials are quite similar in these objects. The existence of a feature in the 20 microns region is consistent with the 0-Si-0 bending resonance expected for silicate material. The lack of any sharp structure in the spectra indicates the silicate is in an amorphous, disordered form. A simple model of small grains of carbonaceous chondrite silicate material in a diffuse circumstellar envelope is shown to give a good qualitative fit to the observed 8-39 microns circumstellar spectra. Comparison of the observed spectra with the model spectra indicates the grain emissivity falls as 1/lambda squared from 20 microns to 40 microns.

  8. Observations of the 145.5 micron (OI) emission line in the Orion nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Smyers, S. D.; Kurtz, N. T.; Harwit, M.

    1982-01-01

    A first set of observations of the (OI) 3P to 3P1 (145.5 micron) transition was obtained. The line was observed both in a beam centered on the Trapezium, and in a 7 times wider beam encompassing most of the Orion Nebula. A wide beam map of the region was constructed which shows that most of the emission is confined to the central regions of the nebula. These observations may be compared with reported measurement of the 3P1 to 3P2 (63.2 micron) transition in Orion and are consistent with optically thin emission in the 145.5 micron line and self-adsorbed 63.2 micron emission lines. Mechanisms are discussed for the excitation of neutral oxygen. It is included that much of the observed emission originates in the thin, radio-recombination-line-emitting CII/HI envelope bordering on the HII region.

  9. The 10 micron spectral structure in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Campins, Humberto

    1989-01-01

    The 10 micron spectra of comets Halley (1982i), Wilson (1986l), Kohoutek (1973f) and Bradfield (1987s) are presented and compared. The silicate emission profiles of Halley and Bradfield are seen to be remarkably similar in that both contain a sharp break in the spectrum at 11.3 microns. Comet Bradfield does not show the same double peak structure seen in olivine and reported in Comet Halley be Campins and Ryan (1988) and Bregman, et al. (1987). The authors interpret the 11.3 micron signature as being due to olivine-type dust grains with at least some degree of crystallinity. Olivine alone is not enough to reproduce the shape of the 10 micron structure. However, in view of the authors' past success in fitting interstellar dust features with the emissivity profile obtained from amorphous grains produced by laser-vaporizing olivine, this is a very appealing identification. They note that there are significant variations in olivine spectra due to compositional differences, grain size distribution and related grain temperature variations to make the olivine identification tentative. They further tentatively identify the 9.8 micron feature in Halley as being due to either amorphorous olivine or a phyllosilicate (layer lattice). Neither the spectra of Halley, Kohoutek, nor Bradfield exhibited the 12.2 micron feature seen in Comet Wilson, which may prove diagnostic of the composition or thermal history differences between these comets. IR spectra of various mineral samples are discussed in terms of their match to cometary spectra.

  10. Deliver us from evil: the effects of mortality salience and reminders of 9/11 on support for President George W. Bush.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark J; Solomon, Sheldon; Greenberg, Jeff; Cohen, Florette; Pyszczynski, Tom; Arndt, Jamie; Miller, Claude H; Ogilvie, Daniel M; Cook, Alison

    2004-09-01

    According to terror management theory, heightened concerns about mortality should intensify the appeal of charismatic leaders. To assess this idea, we investigated how thoughts about death and the 9/11 terrorist attacks influence Americans' attitudes toward current U.S. President George W. Bush. Study 1 found that reminding people of their own mortality (mortality salience) increased support for Bush and his counterterrorism policies. Study 2 demonstrated that subliminal exposure to 9/11-related stimuli brought death-related thoughts closer to consciousness. Study 3 showed that reminders of both mortality and 9/11 increased support for Bush. In Study 4, mortality salience led participants to become more favorable toward Bush and voting for him in the upcoming election but less favorable toward Presidential candidate John Kerry and voting for him. Discussion focused on the role of terror management processes in allegiance to charismatic leaders and political decision making. PMID:15359017

  11. The impact of 9/11 on HIV/AIDS care in Africa and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

    PubMed

    Ssemakula, John Kiwanuka

    2002-01-01

    The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States sent shock waves throughout the world. The World Bank said the events of 9/11 were likely to have mid- to long-term negative effects in some countries, and donor assistance to Africa could be affected. The terrorist attacks also had the effect of bringing up the issue of security and the potential threat the HIV/AIDS epidemic poses to international security, especially in Africa. This article examines some of the effects of the 9/11 attacks on the fight against HIV/AIDS in Africa, and their implications. PMID:12369390

  12. Infrared reflectance spectra (4-12 micron) of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here are infrared reflectance spectra of a typical set of Apollo samples to illustrate spectral character in the mid-infrared (4 to 12 microns) of lunar materials and how the spectra varies among three main forms: soil, breccia, and igneous rocks. Reflectance data, to a close approximation, are the inverse of emission spectra; thus, for a given material the spectral reflectance (R) at any given wavelength is related to emission (E) by 1 - R equals E. Therefore, one can use reflectance spectra of lunar samples to predict how emission spectra of material on the lunar surface will appear to spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft or earthbound telescopes. Spectra were measured in the lab in dry air using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer. Shown here is only the key portion (4 to 12 microns) of each spectrum relating to the principal spectral emission region for sunlit lunar materials and to where the most diagnostic spectral features occur.

  13. Sub-micron structuring of silicon using femtosecond laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.; Serra, R.; Oliveira, J. C.; Polushkin, N. I.; Conde, O.

    2013-12-01

    We report the fabrication of planar sub-micron gratings in silicon with a period of 720 nm using a modified Michelson interferometer and femtosecond laser radiation. The gratings consist of alternated stripes of laser ablated and unmodified material. Ablated stripes are bordered by parallel ridges which protrude above the unmodified material. In the regions where ridges are formed, the laser radiation intensity is not sufficient to cause ablation. Nevertheless, melting and a significant temperature increase are expected, and ridges may be formed due to expansion of silicon during resolidification or silicon oxidation. These conclusions are consistent with the evolution of the stripes morphology as a function of the distance from the center of the grating. Sub-micron gratings were created in silicon using femtosecond laser radiation. A modified Michelson interferometer was used. The gratings consist of alternated stripes of ablated and unmodified material. Ablated stripes are surrounded by ridges which protrude above unmodified surface.

  14. Spatial variations of the 3 micron emission features within UV-excited nebulae - Photochemical evolution of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geballe, T. R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra at 3 microns have been obtained at several positions in the Orion Bar region and in the nebula surrounding HD 44179. Weak emission features at 3.40, 3.46, 3.51, and 3.57 microns are prominent in the Orion Bar region. The 3.40- and 3.51-micron features increase in intensity relative to the dominant 3.29-micron feature. The spectrum obtained in the Red Rectangle region 5 arcsecs north of HD 44179 are similar to those in the Orion Bar, with a weak, broad 3.40-micron feature at the position of HD 44179. The spatial behavior of the weak emission features is explained in terms of hot bands of the CH stretch and overtones, and combination bands of other fundamental vibrations in simple PAHs. Based on the susceptibility of PAHs to destruction by the far UV fields in both regions, PAH sizes are estimated at 20-50 carbon atoms.

  15. What Happened on 9/11? Nine Years of Polling College Undergraduates: "It Was Always Just a Fact That It happened."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkana, Linda Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Over nine years earlier, on September 11, 2001, the author was concerned about how young people would come to understand what came to be called "9/11." The particular history class she was teaching then and for the nine years following is a Critical thinking history class that stresses the facts and evidence that historians use, and emphasizes the…

  16. Early Predictors of Language and Social Communication Impairments at Ages 9-11 Years: A Follow-up Study of Early-Referred Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to evaluate hypotheses that early sociocognition will predict later social communication and early phonology will predict later morphosyntax in clinically referred preschoolers. Method: Participants were 108 children ages 9-11 years who had been referred to clinical services with concerns about language at…

  17. "Fahrenheit 9-11," Need for Closure and the Priming of Affective Ambivalence: An Assessment of Intra-Affective Structures by Party Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbert, R. Lance; Hansen, Glenn J.

    2006-01-01

    This study extends priming research in political communication by focusing on an alternative political information source (i.e., Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9-11), affect rather than cognitions, and the existence of intra-affective ambivalence. In addition, two moderator variables are analyzed: political party identification and need for closure.…

  18. 9/11-Related Experiences and Tasks of Landfill and Barge Workers: Qualitative Analysis from the World Trade Center Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have documented the experiences of individuals who participated in the recovery and cleanup efforts at the World Trade Center Recovery Operation at Fresh Kills Landfill, on debris loading piers, and on transport barges after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of workers and volunteers from the World Trade Center Health Registry. Qualitative methods were used to analyze the narratives. Results Twenty workers and volunteers were interviewed. They described the transport of debris to the Landfill via barges, the tasks and responsibilities associated with their post-9/11 work at the Landfill, and their reflections on their post-9/11 experiences. Tasks included sorting through debris, recovering human remains, searching for evidence from the terrorist attacks, and providing food and counseling services. Exposures mentioned included dust, fumes, and odors. Eight years after the World Trade Center disaster, workers expressed frustration about poor risk communication during recovery and cleanup work. Though proud of their contributions in the months after 9/11, some participants were concerned about long-term health outcomes. Conclusions This qualitative study provided unique insight into the experiences, exposures, and concerns of understudied groups of 9/11 recovery and cleanup workers. The findings are being used to inform the development of subsequent World Trade Center Health Registry exposure and health assessments. PMID:21575237

  19. 9/11: Looking Back, Moving Forward with 16 Lesson Plans To Help Children Cope and Contribute in Times of Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backon, Lois; Galinsky, Ellen; Brownfield, Erin; Sakai, Kelly

    This book provides tools for educators to help children respond to traumatic events with resiliency and hope. Created as an extension of the "9/11 As History" initiative, the book provides an overview of 16 unique lesson plans created for children from pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade. It also contains selections from the writings of…

  20. The Urgency of Visual Media Literacy in Our Post-9/11 World: Reading Images of Muslim Women in the Print News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Diane Patricia

    2012-01-01

    A decade after the 9/11 attacks, educators concerned with social justice issues are faced with the question of how media representations powerfully constitute the subjectivities of teachers and students. The roles of Muslim women in society are often narrowly construed and projected via media cultures--an unofficial curriculum of the everyday much…

  1. Derivation of midinfrared (5-25 microns) optical constants of some silicates and palagonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, T.; Pollack, J.; Orenberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The 5-25 micron real and imaginary refraction indices are presented for palagonite and the silicates pyrophyllite, kaolinite, serpentine, montmorillonite, saponite, and orthopyroxene. Optical constants in the region of the H2O-bending fundamental near 6 microns are obtained for saponite, montmorillonite, and palagonite. It is established that, if a pellet of pure material can be polished to a mirror finish, the optical constants of such noncohesive materials as clays are easily derivable.

  2. A functional polymorphism in a serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) interacts with 9/11 to predict gun-carrying behavior.

    PubMed

    Barnes, J C; Beaver, Kevin M; Boutwell, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    On September 11, 2001, one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in US history took place on American soil and people around the world were impacted in myriad ways. Building on prior literature which suggests individuals are more likely to purchase a gun for self-protection if they are fearful of being victimized, the authors hypothesized that the terrorist attacks of 9/11 would lead to an increase in gun carrying among US residents. At the same time, a line of research has shown that a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene (i.e., 5-HTTLPR) interacts with environmental stressors to predict a range of psychopathologies and behaviors. Thus, it was hypothesized that 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR would interact to predict gun carrying. The results supported both hypotheses by revealing a positive association between 9/11 and gun carrying (b = .426, odds ratio = 1.531, standard error for b = .194, z = 2.196, p = .028) in the full sample of respondents (n = 15,052) and a statistically significant interaction between 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR in the prediction of gun carrying (b = -1.519, odds ratio = .219, standard error for b = .703, z = -2.161, p = .031) in the genetic subsample of respondents (n = 2,350). This is one of the first studies to find an association between 9/11 and gun carrying and, more importantly, is the first study to report a gene-environment interaction (GxE) between a measured gene and a terrorist attack. PMID:24015179

  3. A Functional Polymorphism in a Serotonin Transporter Gene (5-HTTLPR) Interacts with 9/11 to Predict Gun-Carrying Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. C.; Beaver, Kevin M.; Boutwell, Brian B.

    2013-01-01

    On September 11, 2001, one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in US history took place on American soil and people around the world were impacted in myriad ways. Building on prior literature which suggests individuals are more likely to purchase a gun for self-protection if they are fearful of being victimized, the authors hypothesized that the terrorist attacks of 9/11 would lead to an increase in gun carrying among US residents. At the same time, a line of research has shown that a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene (i.e., 5-HTTLPR) interacts with environmental stressors to predict a range of psychopathologies and behaviors. Thus, it was hypothesized that 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR would interact to predict gun carrying. The results supported both hypotheses by revealing a positive association between 9/11 and gun carrying (b = .426, odds ratio = 1.531, standard error for b = .194, z = 2.196, p = .028) in the full sample of respondents (n = 15,052) and a statistically significant interaction between 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR in the prediction of gun carrying (b = −1.519, odds ratio = .219, standard error for b = .703, z = −2.161, p = .031) in the genetic subsample of respondents (n = 2,350). This is one of the first studies to find an association between 9/11 and gun carrying and, more importantly, is the first study to report a gene-environment interaction (GxE) between a measured gene and a terrorist attack. PMID:24015179

  4. Development of sub-micron patterned carbon electrodes for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Dontha, N; Nowall, W B; Kuhr, W G

    1999-02-01

    Sub-micron sized domains of a carbon surface are derivatized with antibodies using biotin/avidin technology. These sites are spatially-segregated from, and directly adjacent to, electron transfer sites on the same electrode surface. The distance between these electron transfer sites and enzyme-loaded domains are kept to a minimum (e.g. less than a micron) to maintain the high sensitivity required for the measurement of enzyme-linked cofactors in an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). This is accomplished through the use of photolithographic attachment of photobiotin using an interference pattern from a UV laser generated at the electrode surface. This allows the construction of microscopic arrays of active ELISA sites on a carbon substrate while leaving other sites underivatized to facilitate electron transfer reactions of redox mediators; thus maximizing sensitivity and detection of the enzyme mediator. The carbon electrode surface is characterized with respect to its chemical structure and electron transfer properties following each step of the antibody immobilization process. The characterization of specific modifications of micron regions of the carbon surface requires analytical methodology that has both high spatial resolution and sensitivity. We have used fluorescence microscopy with a cooled CCD imaging system to visualize the spatial distribution of enzyme immobilization sites (indicated by fluorescence from Texas-Red labeled antibody) across the carbon surface. The viability of the enzyme attached to the surface in this manner was demonstrated by imaging the distribution of an insoluble, fluorescent product. PMID:10698570

  5. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, Linda J.

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when “Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity” and design-led considerations for “Connecting People and Technologies” to discussions on “Engineering Biology for New Materials,” “Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment,” and “New Directions for Energy and Sustainability.” The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset

  6. Exploratory 5-micron spectrum of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, G.S.; Kaminski, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The intensity peak at 4.8 microns characterizing the spectrum observed for the disk of Uranus near 5 microns, in June 1987, exhibits steep declines at shorter and longer wavelength. An exploratory discussion is presented of various models in view of these data; it is noted that some component of the radiation must originate near the 140 K atmospheric irrespective of the radiation's origin in sunlight or thermal emission; physical considerations dictate that it be at least partly thermal in origin. One model consistent with the data requires the presence of a cloud top at the 8-bar level. 30 references.

  7. A Search for Structure in PAH Emission in Extended Sources at 3.3 and 3.4 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Temi, P.; Rank, D. M.; Sloan, G. C.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have observed three extended sources of the infrared emission features associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), using a 128x128 InSb array mounted on the 1.5 m NASA/Steward telescope on Mt. Lemmon. We used a CVF (1.5% bandpass) to isolate the emission from the 3.29 and 3.40 microns PAH features in NGC 1333 #3, Sharpless 106, and the Orion Bar. In all three sources, the 3.29 and 3.40 microns emission features arise from the same regions, but show decidedly different structure. We are analyzing the images to determine the relationship of the 3.40 microns feature to the main feature at 3.29 microns. The 3.40 microns feature may be a vibrational overtone of the 3.29 microns feature, or it may arise from attached molecular sidegroups.

  8. Development program for 1.93-micron lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longeway, P.; Zamerowski, T.; Martinelli, R.; Stolzenberger, R.; Digiuseppe, N.

    1988-01-01

    For the first time lasers operating at 1.93 microns were demonstrated. The lasers were fabricated by Vapor Phase Epitaxial (VPE) growth techniques currently used for the fabrication of high power lasers at 1.3 microns. The structure of these laser diodes consisted of compositionally graded, sulfur-doped InAsP, grown on an InP substrate; a constant-composition n+InAs(0.27)P(0.73) layer, which is the first cladding layer; an In(0.66)Ga(0.34)As layer, which is the active region, and a second InAs(0.27)P(0.73) layer. The devices were oxide-stripe DH lasers (gain-guided only). The best devices had 80 K lasing thresholds in the range of from 80 to 150 mA, and T sub o (below 220 K) in the range of 60 to 90 K. The highest observed temperature of oscillation was 15.5 C. The highest observed power output at 80 K was in the range of 3 to 5 mW. The calculated delta I/delta T was 4.4 A/K. As a part of the materials development, PIN homojunction detectors having the band edge near 1.93 were also fabricated. The best devices (100 micron diameter, mesa structure) exhibited room temperature dark currents in the range of from 20 to 50 nA and had QE at 1.93 microns in the range of 35 to 40 percent. In addition to the device results, the InGaAs-InAsP materials system was extensively investigated and low defect density layers can now be grown allowing for significant device performance improvement.

  9. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  10. Efavirenz Dissolution Enhancement I: Co-Micronization

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Maíra Assis; Seiceira, Rafael Cardoso; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Hoffmeister, Cristiane Rodrigues Drago; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius Antunes

    2012-01-01

    AIDS constitutes one of the most serious infectious diseases, representing a major public health priority. Efavirenz (EFV), one of the most widely used drugs for this pathology, belongs to the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System for drugs with very poor water solubility. To improve EFV’s dissolution profile, changes can be made to the physical properties of the drug that do not lead to any accompanying molecular modifications. Therefore, the study objective was to develop and characterize systems with efavirenz able to improve its dissolution, which were co-processed with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The technique used was co-micronization. Three different drug:excipient ratios were tested for each of the two carriers. The drug dispersion dissolution results showed significant improvement for all the co-processed samples in comparison to non-processed material and corresponding physical mixtures. The dissolution profiles obtained for dispersion with co-micronized SLS samples proved superior to those of co-micronized PVP, with the proportion (1:0.25) proving the optimal mixture. The improvements may be explained by the hypothesis that formation of a hydrophilic layer on the surface of the micronized drug increases the wettability of the system formed, corroborated by characterization results indicating no loss of crystallinity and an absence of interaction at the molecular level. PMID:24300394

  11. Sub-micron particle sampler apparatus and method for sampling sub-micron particles

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.; McMillan, W.G.

    1984-04-12

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however, the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis. 6 figures.

  12. The 11 Micron Emissions of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-08-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, α: C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11+ microns emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11+ microns emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 microns features, is found and attributed to α:C-H. SiC and α:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing C/O resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely α: C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede α: C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 microns PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 microns emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp3, hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp2, if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this 11.9 microns emission

  13. The 11 Micron Emissions of Cabon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing CIO resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  14. The 11 Micron Emissions of Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing C/O resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  15. The brightest high-latitude 12-micron IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacking, P.; Beichman, C.; Chester, T.; Neugebauer, G.; Emerson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source catalog was searched for sources brighter than 28 Jy (0 mag) at 12 microns with absolute galactic latitude greater than 30 deg excluding the Large Magellanic Cloud. The search resulted in 269 sources, two of which are the galaxies NGC 1068 and M82. The remaining 267 sources are identified with, or have infrared color indices consistent with late-type stars some of which show evidence of circumstellar dust shells. Seven sources are previously uncataloged stars. K and M stars without circumstellar dust shells, M stars with circumstellar dust shells, and carbon stars occupy well-defined regions of infrared color-color diagrams.

  16. A two micron polarization survey of T Tauri stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, M.; Sato, S. Massachusetts Univ., Amherst National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka )

    1989-10-01

    Results are presented of a K-band (2.2 microns) polarization survey of 39 T Tauri stars (TTSs) and, in addition, of eight other young stellar objects and 11 background field stars in the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. It was found that about 60 percent of the TTSs are linearly polarized, but with relatively small degrees of polarization up to about 3 percent. A comparison of the results of this survey with those of the IR polarization survey of the low-luminosity IRAS sources in the same region suggests an evolutionary sequence in the IR polarization of young stellar objects. 79 refs.

  17. Rapid magma production rates, underplating and remelting in the Andes: isotopic evidence from northern-central Peru (9 11 °S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.; Atherton, M. P.; Halliday, A. N.

    1996-03-01

    Combined strontium and neodymium isotope data on the Miocene-Pliocene Cordillera Blanca batholith (9-11 °S) are compared with acid plutonic and volcanic rocks of similar age and composition from the central Andes (ca. 16-23 °S). Although intruded through 50-60 km of continental crust the batholith rocks, which range in composition from quartz diorite to high silica leucogranodiorite, show little sign of contamination by mature continental basement. Initial {87Sr }/{86Sr } ratios define a range of 0.7041 to 0.7057, with average ɛNd values close to bulk earth (-0.5), over a relatively large range in SiO 2. It is difficult to reconcile the isotopic composition of the batholith rocks with simple AFC models involving fractionation of either clinopyroxene (deep-level) or plagioclase (high-level) dominated assemblages, and the isotopic variation in these rocks is instead considered to be inherited from a primary subcontinental lithosphere source through a two-stage process of crustal underplating and subsequent partial melting. Estimated (mantle) magma production rates during underplating are 0.1-0.3 km 3 yr -1. Comparisons with Miocene plutonic rocks from the western and eastern Cordillera at 11 °S show no clear trends in isotopic compositions in time or space. Furthermore, the isotopic compositions of Nd and Sr in the batholith rocks contrast strongly with basaltic to high silica volcanic and plutonic rocks of similar age exposed in the central Andes, where {143Nd }/{144Nd }and{87Sr }/{86Sr } are thought to reflect contamination of mantle-derived magmas and/or tectonic reworking of old basement material during crustal thickening. The lack of significant involvement of basement material in the petrogenesis of the batholith magmas may be due to differences in the mechanism of crustal thickening along the Andean chain during the Late Miocene, with thickening in the central Andes being caused predominantly by tectonic shortening, while in northern-central Peru

  18. Dust emission features in 3-micron spectra of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, T. Y.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Strom, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to low- and medium-resolution spectra in the 3-micron region of 24 Herbig Ae/Be stars obtained in a search for organic features from the dust around young stars. The 3.29-micron emission feature from aromatic hydrocarbons was detected in three objects: Lk H-alpha 25, XY Per, and AS 310. Two other stars, HD 245185 and HK Ori, may have weak features. About 20 percent of the Herbig Ae/Be surveyed to date have firmly detected 3.29-micron features. The available data indicate that the 3.29-micron feature is more extended around Herbig Ae/Be stars of earlier spectral type, possibly due to dehydrogenization or destruction of the aromatics near these stars. It is suggested that the total number of aromatics excited by the stars is also greater around the earlier-type objects.

  19. Observations of the 51.8 micron forbidden O III emission line in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.; Ward, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    This letter reports observations of the 51.8-micron fine-structure transition p2: 3P(2) - 3P(1) for doubly ionized oxygen. The observed line strength in the Orion Nebula is (5 + or - 3) by 10 to the -15th power W/sq cm, in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of Simpson (1975). The observations are also consistent with the predicted line position, 51.8 microns. The line lies close to an atmospheric water-vapor feature at 51.7 microns but is sufficiently distant so that corrections for this feature are straightforward. Observations of the 51.8-micron forbidden O III line are particularly important, since the previously discovered 88-micron line from the same ion also is strong. This pair of lines should therefore yield new data about densities in observed H II regions; or else, if density data already are available from radio or other observations, the lines can be used to determine the differential dust absorption between 52 and 88 microns in front of heavily obscured regions.

  20. Alcohol use disorders and drinking among survivors of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City.

    PubMed

    North, Carol S; Adinoff, Bryon; Pollio, David E; Kinge, Sagar; Downs, Dana L; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2013-10-01

    Research on the relationship of alcohol and disasters has yielded mixed conclusions. Some studies investigate alcohol consumption but others examine alcohol use disorders in relation to disaster. Alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders have not be studied concurrently in relation to specific disaster trauma exposures. A volunteer sample of 379 individuals from New York City agencies affected by the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks on World Trade Center were assessed approximately 3years postdisaster for alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders relative to specific disaster exposures. Increases in alcohol consumption were relatively small, eventually returning to pre-9/11 levels, with few cases of new alcohol use disorders or alcohol relapse. The findings suggest that postdisaster alcohol use has negligible clinical relevance for most of the population. Scarce disaster resources should be focused on those at identified risk of excessive alcohol use, that is, those with pre-existing alcohol or other psychiatric disorders. PMID:23642636

  1. Searching for and Finding Meaning in Collective Trauma: Results From a National Longitudinal Study of the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Updegraff, John A.; Silver, Roxane Cohen; Holman, E. Alison

    2008-01-01

    The ability to make sense of events in one’s life has held a central role in theories of adaptation to adversity. However, there are few rigorous studies on the role of meaning in adjustment, and those that have been conducted have focused predominantly on direct personal trauma. The authors examined the predictors and long-term consequences of Americans’ searching for and finding meaning in a widespread cultural upheaval—the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001—among a national probability sample of U.S. adults (N = 931). Searching for meaning at 2 months post-9/11 was predicted by demographics and high acute stress response. In contrast, finding meaning was predicted primarily by demographics and specific early coping strategies. Whereas searching for meaning predicted greater posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms across the following 2 years, finding meaning predicted lower PTS symptoms, even after controlling for pre-9/11 mental health, exposure to 9/11, and acute stress response. Mediation analyses suggest that finding meaning supported adjustment by reducing fears of future terrorism. Results highlight the role of meaning in adjustment following collective traumas that shatter people’s fundamental assumptions about security and invulnerability. PMID:18729704

  2. Supersonic Flows in Micron-Sized Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayt, Robert; Breuer, Kenneth

    1998-11-01

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of flows in micromachined converging-diverging nozzles are presented. The nozzles are fabricated using deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) and are typically 20-30 microns at the throat with expansion ratios ranging from 5 to 20. The flow channels are 300 microns deep, resulting in a 10:1 or better aspect ratio at the throat. Experimental measurements of mass flow and thrust vs. pressure ratio are presented demonstrating the presence of choked and supersonic flow in the micron-scale gemoetries. Mass flow and thrust efficiencies are also presented and compared with results from two-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations. It is found that, while the efficiencies are reasonably large (much better than one might expect, considering the small dimension of the nozzles), the boundary layers have a considerable effect, particularly on the thrust efficiency of the device, due to the relatively large displacement thickness which reduces the effective expansion ratio. The boundary layers at the top and bottom of the nozzles also affect the performance, particularly at low Reynolds numbers. Additional experimental and numerical results are also discussed.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of a pulsed 2.15-micron laser system for fiberoptic endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Reynolds, R D; DeFilippi, V J; Andrew, J; Liu, J Y; Cohen, M G

    1988-01-01

    There is a need for lasers that are compatible with fiberoptic endoscopes and that provide greater cutting precision than currently can be produced by the widely used Nd:YAG (1.06 micron) laser. Recently available lasers that operate in the 2-micron region fill this need. This laser light energy can be transmitted by low OH- silica fibers and has much less tissue penetration than radiation at 1.06 micron. We have been evaluating a prototype solid state laser system that produces pulses of 2.15 microns light that is delivered by a silica based fiberoptic delivery system with negligible transmission losses. This system is based on a thulium-holmium-chromium doped YAG (Tm-Ho-Cr: YAG) rod that lases at 2.15 micron. The laser does not require cryogenic cooling, toxic gases, or custom utilities and should be practical in a clinical environment. In vivo animal testing of this laser confirms that it provides greater ablating precision than does the Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 micron. PMID:2839746

  4. Observations of 433 Eros from 1.25 to 3.35 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Clark, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    We have spectrophotometrically observed 433 Eros, the target of the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)-Shoemaker spacecraft, on 1995 December 4 from 1.25 to 3.35 microns. As expected, Eros shows no evidence of an absorption feature over 5% in the 3-micron region, and is interpreted to have an anhydrous surface within observational uncertainties. Our observations in the JHK region agree with previous work by Chapman and Morrison and Murchic and Pieters, but differ from the near-infrared spectrometer spectra reported by Clark et al. Our calculations indicate that thermal flux from Eros is not responsible for this mismatch.

  5. Multifrequency observations of blazars. I. The shape of the 1 micron to 2 millimeter continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, W.K.; Robson, E.I.; Brown, L.M.J.; Ade, P.A.R.; Griffin, M.J.; Smith, M.G.; Nolt, I.G.; Radostitz, J.V.; Veeder, G.; Lebofsky, L.

    1985-04-01

    Near-simultaneous measurements in 11 wavebands between 1 micron and 2 mm of a sample of 13 blazars are presented. These measurements represent the first comprehensive attempt to determine the infrared-to-millimeter-wave properties of this class of object, which emit the bulk of their luminosity in the far-infrared region. Most of the sources have very flat millimeter/submillimeter spectra up to the highest observed frequency. However, 3C 279 and 3C 446 show evidence of turnovers in their submillimeter spectra. The 1-4 micron spectra can be characterized by simple power laws, all steeper than -0.9; several sources, however, show evidence of spectral beaks in the 10-20 micron region, suggestive of energy losses. It is shown that the spectral properties are consistent with synchrotron emission from relativistic jets aligned close to the line of sight and the observations are discussed in relation to such models. 54 references.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10005 - 2-Butenoic acid, 4,4′-[(dibutylstannylene)bis(oxy)]bis [4-oxo-, (2Z,2′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-oxo-, (2Z,2′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl esters, C10-rich. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl esters, C10-rich (PMN P-98-1182) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10005 - 2-Butenoic acid, 4,4′-[(dibutylstannylene)bis(oxy)]bis [4-oxo-, (2Z,2′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-oxo-, (2Z,2′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl esters, C10-rich. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl esters, C10-rich (PMN P-98-1182) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10005 - 2-Butenoic acid, 4,4′-[(dibutylstannylene)bis(oxy)]bis [4-oxo-, (2Z,2′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-oxo-, (2Z,2′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl esters, C10-rich. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...′Z)-, di-C9-11-isoalkyl esters, C10-rich (PMN P-98-1182) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. Eyjafjallajökull and 9/11: The Impact of Large-Scale Disasters on Worldwide Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Grady, Daniel; Thiemann, Christian; Bagrow, James P.; Brockmann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale disasters that interfere with globalized socio-technical infrastructure, such as mobility and transportation networks, trigger high socio-economic costs. Although the origin of such events is often geographically confined, their impact reverberates through entire networks in ways that are poorly understood, difficult to assess, and even more difficult to predict. We investigate how the eruption of volcano Eyjafjallajökull, the September 11th terrorist attacks, and geographical disruptions in general interfere with worldwide mobility. To do this we track changes in effective distance in the worldwide air transportation network from the perspective of individual airports. We find that universal features exist across these events: airport susceptibilities to regional disruptions follow similar, strongly heterogeneous distributions that lack a scale. On the other hand, airports are more uniformly susceptible to attacks that target the most important hubs in the network, exhibiting a well-defined scale. The statistical behavior of susceptibility can be characterized by a single scaling exponent. Using scaling arguments that capture the interplay between individual airport characteristics and the structural properties of routes we can recover the exponent for all types of disruption. We find that the same mechanisms responsible for efficient passenger flow may also keep the system in a vulnerable state. Our approach can be applied to understand the impact of large, correlated disruptions in financial systems, ecosystems and other systems with a complex interaction structure between heterogeneous components. PMID:23950904

  10. Eyjafjallajökull and 9/11: the impact of large-scale disasters on worldwide mobility.

    PubMed

    Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Grady, Daniel; Thiemann, Christian; Bagrow, James P; Brockmann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale disasters that interfere with globalized socio-technical infrastructure, such as mobility and transportation networks, trigger high socio-economic costs. Although the origin of such events is often geographically confined, their impact reverberates through entire networks in ways that are poorly understood, difficult to assess, and even more difficult to predict. We investigate how the eruption of volcano Eyjafjallajökull, the September 11th terrorist attacks, and geographical disruptions in general interfere with worldwide mobility. To do this we track changes in effective distance in the worldwide air transportation network from the perspective of individual airports. We find that universal features exist across these events: airport susceptibilities to regional disruptions follow similar, strongly heterogeneous distributions that lack a scale. On the other hand, airports are more uniformly susceptible to attacks that target the most important hubs in the network, exhibiting a well-defined scale. The statistical behavior of susceptibility can be characterized by a single scaling exponent. Using scaling arguments that capture the interplay between individual airport characteristics and the structural properties of routes we can recover the exponent for all types of disruption. We find that the same mechanisms responsible for efficient passenger flow may also keep the system in a vulnerable state. Our approach can be applied to understand the impact of large, correlated disruptions in financial systems, ecosystems and other systems with a complex interaction structure between heterogeneous components. PMID:23950904

  11. The Brightest Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn: Securing the Largest Samples of z=9-11 galaxies for JWST by leveraging the HST archive with Spitzer/IRAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwens, Rychard; Trenti, Michele; Calvi, Valentina; Bernard, Stephanie; Labbe, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Coe, Dan; Holwerda, Benne; Bradley, Larry; Mason, Charlotte; Schmidt, Kasper; Illingworth, Garth

    2015-10-01

    Hubble's WFC3 has been a game changer for studying early galaxy formation in the first 700 Myr after the Big Bang. Reliable samples of sources up to z~10, which can be discovered only from space, are now constraining the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function into the epoch of reionization. Despite these efforts, the size of the highest redshift galaxy samples (z >9 and especially z > 10) is still very small, particularly at high luminosities (L > L*). To deliver transformational results, much larger numbers of bright z > 9 galaxies are needed both to map out the bright end of the luminosity/mass function and for spectroscopic follow-up (with JWST and otherwise). One especially efficient way of expanding current samples is (1) to leverage the huge amounts of pure-parallel data available with HST to identify large numbers of candidate z ~ 9 - 11 galaxies and (2) to follow up each candidate with shallow Spitzer/IRAC observations to distinguish the bona- fide z ~ 9 - 11 galaxies from z ~ 2 old, dusty galaxies. For this program we are requesting shallow Spitzer/IRAC follow-up of 20 candidate z ~ 9 - 11 galaxies we have identified from 130 WFC3/IR pointings obtained from more than 4 separate HST programs with no existing IRAC coverage. Based on our previous CANDELS/GOODS searches, we expect to confirm 5 to 10 sources as L > L* galaxies at z >= 9. Our results will be used to constrain the bright end of the LF at z >= 9, to provide targets for Keck spectroscopy to constrain the ionization state of the z > 8 universe, and to furnish JWST with bright targets for spectroscopic follow-up studies.

  12. Genes within the Idd5 and Idd9/11 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci affect the Pathogenic Activity of B-cells in NOD mice1

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Pablo A.; Chapman, Harold D.; Stolp, Jessica; Johnson, Ellis; Cox, S. Lewis; Hunter, Kara; Wicker, Linda S.; Serreze, David V.

    2010-01-01

    Autoreactive T-cells clearly mediate the pancreatic β cell destruction causing Type 1 diabetes (T1D)2. However, studies in NOD mice indicate that B-cells also contribute to pathogenesis since their ablation by introduction of an Igμnull mutation elicits T1D resistance. T1D susceptibility is restored in NOD.Igμnull mice that are irradiated and reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow (SBM) plus NOD B-cells, but not SBM alone. Thus, we hypothesized some non-MHC T1D susceptibility (Idd) genes contribute to disease by allowing development of pathogenic B-cells. Supporting this hypothesis was the finding, that unlike those from NOD donors, engraftment with B-cells from H2g7 MHC matched, but T1D-resistant, NOR mice failed to restore full disease susceptibility in NOD.Igμnull recipients. T1D resistance in NOR mice is mainly encoded within the Idd13, Idd5.2 and Idd9/11 loci. B-cells from NOD congenic stocks containing Idd9/11 or Idd5.1/5.2 resistance loci respectively derived from the NOR or C57BL/10 strains were characterized by suppressed diabetogenic activity. Immature autoreactive B-cells in NOD mice have an impaired ability to be rendered anergic upon antigen engagement. Interestingly, both Idd5.1/5.2 and Idd9/11 resistance loci were found to normalize this B-cell tolerogenic process, which may represent a mechanism contributing to the inhibition of T1D. PMID:17082619

  13. Consequences of 9/11 and the war on terror on children's and young adult's mental health: a systematic review of the past 10 years.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Cecile; Jamil, Uzma; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Boudjarane, Meriem

    2015-04-01

    This mixed method systematic review appraises the individual, familial and systemic effect of 9/11 and the war on terror for majority and minority children and youth in North America. The results highlight the broad social consequences of the socio-political transformations associated with the terror context, which cannot be understood only through a trauma focus analysis. The social stereotypes transformed youth experiences of belonging and exclusion. The difference between the consequences for majority and minority youth suggests the need for a broader appraisal of this societal context to support the development of prevention and intervention intersectorial programs. PMID:24068751

  14. Building capacity for quality and safety in critical care: A roundtable discussion from the second international patient safety conference in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Yaseen M.; Taher, Saadi; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Alamry, Ahmed; Hijazi, Ra’ed; Alatassi, Abdulaleem; Marini, Abdellatif M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion from the Second International Patient Safety Conference held in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to: (1) review the conceptual framework for building capacity in quality and safety in critical care. (2) examine examples of leading international experiences in building capacity. (3) review the experience in Saudi Arabia in this area. (4) discuss the role of building capacity in simulation for patient safety in critical care and (5) review the experience in building capacity in an ongoing improvement project for severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:24250730

  15. Searching for New Physics from 20 microns to a micron and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Andrew; Smullin, Sylvia; Weld, David; Kapitulnik, Aharon; Dimopoulos, Savas

    2004-05-01

    Several recent theoretical ideas suggest that new physics related to gravity may appear at short length scales. For example, light moduli or particles in "large" extra dimensions could mediate macroscopic forces of (super)gravitational strength at length scales below a millimeter. At the 20 microns level, I will discuss the Stanford cantilever experiment (J. Chiaverini, S. J. Smullin, A. A. Geraci, D. M. Weld, A. Kapitulnik, Phys.Rev.Lett. 90, 151101 (2003).), including an improvement involving a magnetic analog which allows force calibration and precision alignment to reduce systematics. I will also discuss some experimental challenges at length scales below a few microns including the Casimir/Van der Waals background, and will describe an experimental prospect to search for new (sub)-micron forces using arrays of trapped Bose-Einstein condensed atoms (Savas Dimopoulos and Andrew A. Geraci, Phys. Rev. D 68, 124021 (2003). ).

  16. Observations of the 51.8 micron (O III) emission line in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.; Ward, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    The 51.8 micron fine structure transition P2:3P2 3P1 for doubly ionized oxygen was observed in the Orion nebula. The observed line strength is of 5 plus or minus 3 times 10 to the minus 15th power watt/sq cm is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Observations are consistent with the newly predicted 51.8 micron line position. The line lies close to an atmospheric water vapor feature at 51.7 micron, but is sufficiently distant so that corrections for this feature are straightforward. Observations of the 51.8 (O III) line are particularly important since the previously discovered 88 micron line from the same ion also is strong. This pair of lines should, therefore, yield new data about densities in observed H II regions; or else, if density data already are available from radio or other observations, the lines can be used to determine the differential dust absorption between 52 and 88 micron in front of heavily obscured regions.

  17. The rings of Saturn - New near-infrared reflectance measurements and a 0. 326-4. 08 micron summary

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.

    1980-01-01

    A new high-photometric-precision reflectance spectrum of Saturn's rings covering the spectral region 0.65 to 2.5 microns is presented and three previously unreported absorption features at 1.25, 0.85, and probably 1.04 microns are identified. The 1.25- and 1.04 micron absorptions are due to water ice. The 0.85 microns feature may be due to a combination of 0.81- and 0.90 micron ice absorptions but this feature appears too strong relative to the 1.04 micron band to be completely explained by water ice. Another possibility is that the 0.85 micron band is due to Fe(3+)-bearing minerals in an ice-mineral mixture. This explanation could also account for the drop in the visible and ultraviolet reflectance and the rise in reflectance around 3.6 microns. Finally, a composite spectrum from 0.325 to 4.08 is presented which will be useful for future analysis and laboratory studies.

  18. Novel Tests of Gravity Below Fifty Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Gabriela; Johnson, Jeremy; Guerrero, Ian; Hoyle, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    Due to inconsistencies between General Relativity and the Standard Model, tests of gravity remain at the forefront of experimental physics. At Humboldt State University, undergraduates and faculty are designing an experiment sensitive enough to detect gravitational interactions below the 50 micron scale. The experiment measures the twist of a torsion pendulum as an attractor mass is oscillated nearby in a parallel plate configuration, providing time varying gravitational torque on the pendulum. The size and distance dependence of the torque variation will provide a means to determine any deviation from current models of gravity on untested scales. Supported by NSF Grants 1065697 and 1306783.

  19. Optical isolators for 2-micron fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Gary; Legg, Thomas H.; Shardlow, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development and testing of optical isolators for use in 2-micron fiber laser systems. A variety of potential Faraday rotator materials were characterised to identify the most suitable materials for use in the 1700-2100nm wavelength range. Isolators based on the three best performing materials were then developed and packaged as fiber-in, fiber-out and fiber-in, beam-out devices. The isolators were then tested in CW, pulsed and ultrafast laser systems. The three different designs produced different performance characteristics, but all designs demonstrated isolation >25dB and insertion losses of <1.2 dB.

  20. The Two Micron All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinmann, S. G.; Lysaght, M. G.; Pughe, W. L.; Schneider, S. E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Weinberg, M. D.; Price, S. D.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Huchra, J. P.

    1994-07-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) will provide a uniform survey of the entire sky at three near-infrared wavebands: J(lambdaeff = 1.25 micrometers), H(lambdaeff = 1.65 micrometers), and Ks(lambdaeff = 2.16 micrometers). A major goal of the survey is to probe large scale structures in the Milky Way and in the Local Universe, exploiting the relatively high transparency of the interstellar medium in the near-infrared, and the high near-infrared luminosities of evolved low- and intermediate-mass stars. A sensitive overview of the near-infrared sky is also an essential next step to maximize the gains achievable with infrared array technology. Our assessment of the astrophysical questions that might be addressed with these new arrays is currently limited by the very bright flux limit of the only preceding large scale near-infrared sky survey, the Two Micron Sky Survey carried out at Caltech in the late 1960's. Near-infrared instruments based on the new array technology have already obtained spectra of objects 1 million times fainter than the limit of the TMSS] This paper summarizes the essential parameters of the 2MASS project and the rationale behind those choices, and gives an overview of results obtained with a prototype camera that has been in operation since May 1992. We conclude with a list of expected data products and a statement of the data release policy.

  1. Digital mammography: tradeoffs between 50- and 100-micron pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Matthew T.; Steller Artz, Dorothy E.; Jafroudi, Hamid; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Zuurbier, Rebecca A.; Katial, Raj; Hayes, Wendelin S.; Wu, Chris Y.; Lin, Jyh-Shyan; Steinman, Richard M.; Tohme, Walid G.; Mun, Seong K.

    1995-05-01

    Improvements in mammography equipment related to a decrease in pixel size of digital mammography detectors raise questions of the possible effects of these new detectors. Mathematical modeling suggested that the benefits of moving from 100 to 50 micron detectors were slight and might not justify the cost of these new units. Experiments comparing screen film mammography, a storage phosphor 100 micron digital detector, a 50 micron digital breast spot device, 100 micron film digitization and 50 micron film digitization suggests that object conspicuity should be better for digital compared to conventional systems, but that there seemed to be minimal advantage to going from 100 to 50 microns. The 50 micron pixel system appears to provide a slight advantage in object contrast and perhaps in shape definition, but did not allow smaller objects to be detected.

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms following media exposure to tragic events: impact of 9/11 on children at risk for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael W; Henin, Aude; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R; Pollack, Mark H; Biederman, Joseph; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F

    2007-01-01

    With the extensive media coverage on September 11, 2001, adults and children indirectly witnessed the terrorist attacks leading to the deaths of almost 3,000 people. An ongoing longitudinal study provided the opportunity to examine pre-event characteristics and the impact of this media exposure. We assessed symptoms of PTSD in 166 children and 84 mothers who had no direct exposure to the 9/11 attacks. The sample included children who had parents with or without anxiety and mood disorders, and who had been assessed for the presence or absence of temperamental behavioral inhibition (BI). We found a 5.4 percent rate of symptomatic PTSD in response to 9/11 in children and 1.2 percent in their mothers. Children's identification with victims of the attack, and for younger children, the amount of television viewing predicted increased risk of PTSD symptoms. Parental depression was associated with higher symptoms, and pre-event levels of family support was associated with a lower risk for PTSD symptoms. BI in children was also linked to lower rates of PTSD symptoms, suggesting that a cautious and fearful approach to novelty may offer protection against exposure to media-based traumatic images. Media viewing of tragic events is sufficient to produce PTSD symptoms in vulnerable populations such as children. Given the links between PTSD symptoms and viewing habits, parental monitoring of media exposure may be important for younger children. PMID:17276653

  3. The distinct roles of spirituality and religiosity in physical and mental health after collective trauma: a national longitudinal study of responses to the 9/11 attacks.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Daniel N; Poulin, Michael J; Silver, Roxane Cohen; Holman, E Alison

    2011-12-01

    Researchers have identified health implications of religiosity and spirituality but have rarely addressed differences between these dimensions. The associations of religiosity and spirituality with physical and mental health were examined in a national sample (N = 890) after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks (9/11). Health information was collected before 9/11 and health, religiosity, and spirituality were assessed longitudinally during six waves of data collection over the next 3 years. Religiosity (i.e., participation in religious social structures) predicted higher positive affect (β = .12), fewer cognitive intrusions (β = -.07), and lower odds of new onset mental (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = .88) and musculoskeletal (IRR = .94) ailments. Spirituality (i.e., subjective commitment to spiritual or religious beliefs) predicted higher positive affect (β = .09), lower odds of new onset infectious ailments (IRR = 0.83), more intrusions (β = .10) and a more rapid decline in intrusions over time (β = -.10). Religiosity and spirituality independently predict health after a collective trauma, controlling for pre-event health status; they are not interchangeable indices of religion. PMID:21344318

  4. Examining the Factor Structure of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) in a Post 9/11 U.S Military Veteran Sample

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kimberly T.; Hayward, Laura C.; Williams, Ann M.; Dennis, Paul A.; Bryan, Brandon C.; Taber, Katherine H.; Davidson, Jonathan R.T.; Beckham, Jean C.; Calhoun, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the structural validity of the 25-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) in a large sample of U.S. veterans with military service since 9/11/2001. Participants (n=1981) completed the 25-item CD-RISC, a structured clinical interview and a self-report questionnaire assessing psychiatric symptoms. The study sample was randomly divided into two sub-samples, an initial sample [Sample 1: n = 990] and a replication sample [Sample 2: n = 991]. Findings derived from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) did not support the five-factor analytic structure as initially suggested in Connor and Davidson’s (2003) instrument validation study. Although Parallel Analyses (PA) indicated a two-factor structural model, we tested one to six factor solutions for best model fit using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results supported a two-factor model of resilience, comprised of adaptability (8-item) and self-efficacy (6-item) themed items however, only the adaptability themed factor was found to be consistent with our view of resilience —a factor of protection against the development of psychopathology following trauma exposure. The adaptability themed factor may be a useful measure of resilience for post 9/11 U.S. military veterans. PMID:24586090

  5. Meaning of 9/11 for two Pakistani communities: from external intruders to the internalisation of a negative self-image.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Cécile; Jamil, Uzma

    2008-12-01

    Since September 11, the increase in international tensions and the subsequent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have created turmoil and fears in immigrant communities, fanned by the media in the context of the war against terrorism. This paper aims to compare the meaning systems evoked around 9/11 within two Pakistani groups-an immigrant community in Montreal and a group in Karachi. It also intends to examine the representation of themselves and of the 'Other' within these two groups. Results suggest that both Karachi and Montreal Pakistani respondents favour a conspiracy scenario which protects the Muslim community from the responsibility of 9/11 events. They refer to an argumentation process based on 'proofs', thus mirroring the political rhetoric used by the US government and its allies to justify the military intervention in Iraq. In the Montreal group, the pervasive feeling of fear and the bleak image that the community has of itself support the hypothesis of an immigrant internalisation of the negative representations of Muslim and South Asian identities in the North American context. The negative self-image observed in these minority groups indicates that more effort than ever should be dedicated to understanding the impact of the present international context on minority-majority relations in multi-ethnic societies. It is as if America is sitting right here in the living room with us … We have to ask them permission to breathe. (Parveen, Karachi). PMID:27269421

  6. The 4 micron spectra of compact infrared sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, R.; Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution 5 arcsec spectra in the 4 micron region are presented of the central 5 arcsec of the compact near infrared sources K3-50, W51-IRS2 East, and G333.6-0.2. From measured Br-alpha/Pf-beta line ratios and previously published infrared and radio maps, it is concluded that standard recombination theory fails to explain our observations in at least two cases. It is demonstrated that the data are consistent with thermal excitation of the hydrogen lines in strong stellar winds. The Pf-beta Hu-epsilon line ratio, which is completely insensitive to differential extinction, confirms the need for the stellar wind model for the core of G333.6-0.2. From the (K III) line it is estimated that the potassium abundance in G333.6-0.2 is at least equal to the solar value, and possibly enhanced by a factor up to 10.

  7. A simple method to incorporate water vapor absorption in the 15 microns remote temperature sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallu, G.; Prabhakara, C.; Conhath, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The water vapor absorption in the 15 micron CO2 band, which can affect the remotely sensed temperatures near the surface, are estimated with the help of an empirical method. This method is based on the differential absorption properties of the water vapor in the 11-13 micron window region and does not require a detailed knowledge of the water vapor profile. With this approach Nimbus 4 IRIS radiance measurements are inverted to obtain temperature profiles. These calculated profiles agree with radiosonde data within about 2 C.

  8. New MBE buffer for micron- and quarter-micron-gateGaAs MESFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A new buffer layer has been developed that eliminates backgating in GaAs MESFETs and substantially reduces short-channel effects in GaAs MESFETs with 0.27-micron-long gates. The new buffer is grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at a substrate temperature of 200 C using Ga and As sub 4 beam fluxes. The buffer is crystalline, highly resistive, optically inactive, and can be overgrown with high quality GaAs. GaAs MESFETs with a gate length of 0.27 microns that incorporate the new buffer show improved dc and RF properties in comparison with a similar MESFET with a thin undoped GaAs buffer. To demonstrate the backgating performance improvement afforded by the new buffer, MESFETs were fabricated using a number of different buffer layers and structures. A schematic cross section of the MESFET structure used in this study is shown. The measured gate length, gate width, and source-drain spacing of this device are 2,98, and 5.5 microns, respectively. An ohmic contact, isolated from the MESFET by mesa etching, served as the sidegate. The MESFETs were fabricated in MBE n-GaAs layers grown on the new buffer and also in MBE n-GaAs layers grown on buffer layers of undoped GaAs, AlGaAs, and GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices. All the buffer layers were grown by MBE and are 2 microns thick. The active layer is doped to approximately 2 x 10 to the 17th/cu cm with silicon and is 0.3 microns thick.

  9. Detection of the N II 122 and 205 micron lines - Densities in G333.6-0.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, Sean W. J.; Haas, Michael R.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Rubin, Robert H.; Simpson, Janet P.; Russell, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the G333.6-0.2 H II region which include the first detection of the N II 122 micron forbidden line in an astronomical force and the first measurement of the N II 205 micron forbidden line in a discrete source are presented. Also considered are fine structure lines of forbidden S III, forbidden Fe III, forbidden Si II, forbidden Ne III, forbidden O III, forbidden N III, forbidden O I, and forbidden C II from 19 to 206 microns. It is concluded that the N II 122 and 205 microns forbidden line pair in a discrete astronomical source was detected for the first time. The emission in transitions is produced largely by low-ioninzation, low-density material not easily probed by other lines. Other FIR line pairs generally originate in higher density regions closer to the exciting force.

  10. Progress of 2-micron Detectors for Application to Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb heterojunction phototransistors were developed at Astropower, Inc under Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) for operation in the 2-micron region. These phototransistors were optimized for 2-micron detection and have high quantum efficiency (>60%), high gain (>10(exp 3)) and low noise-equivalent- power (<5x10(exp -14) W/Hz), while operating at low bias voltage. One of these phototransistors was tested in lidar mode using the 2-micron CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system currently under development under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) at NASA Langley. Lidar measurements included detecting atmospheric structures consisting of thin clouds in the mid-altitude and near-field boundary layer. These test results are very promising for the application of phototransistors for the two-micron lidar remote sensing. In addition, HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes (APD) acquired from Raytheon were used in atmospheric testing at 2-microns. A discussion of these measurements is also presented in this paper.

  11. High-performance hybrid buffer layer using 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylenehexacarbonitrile/molybdenum oxide in inverted top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Hwee; Lee, Hyun Jun; Hwang, Ju Hyun; Kim, Kyu Nyun; Shim, Yong Sub; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Park, Chan Hyuk; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2015-03-25

    A high-performance 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylenehexacarbonitrile (HATCN)/molybdenum oxide (MoO3) hybrid buffer layer with high hole-injection efficiency and superior plasma resistance under the sputtering process was developed. The HATCN enhances the hole-injection efficiency, and the MoO3 effectively protects the underlying organic layers from plasma damage during deposition by sputtering. This improves the characteristics of inverted top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes using a top transparent conductive oxide electrode. The device using the hybrid buffer layer showed the highest electroluminescence characteristics among devices with other buffer layers. The high hole-injection efficiency of HATCN was shown by the J-F curve of hole-only devices, and the plasma protection performance of MoO3 was shown by atomic force microscope surface morphology images of the buffer layer film after O2 plasma treatment. PMID:25761363

  12. Service and science in times of crisis: developing, planning, and implementing a clinical research program for children traumatically bereaved after 9/11.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Robin F; Brown, Elissa J

    2008-01-01

    September 11, 2001 was a tragedy unparalleled in the United States, resulting in the largest number of parentally bereaved children from a single terrorist incident. The event necessitated swift and sensitive development of programs to meet the needs of bereaved children and their families, and it offered a rare opportunity to investigate the symptoms of, and intervention for, traumatic bereavement. Progress is being made in evaluating assessment and treatment services for traumatically bereaved children and their caregivers. However, attention must be paid to how programs are created in order to carry out the work. This article reports on the methods used to develop and deliver a clinical research program in the aftermath of 9/11. The specific challenges following a crisis, the decision-making process and lessons learned are highlighted, and future program development recommendations are presented. PMID:18693386

  13. The role of authoritarianism, perceived threat, and need for closure or structure in predicting post-9/11 attitudes and beliefs.

    PubMed

    Crowson, H Michael; Debacker, Teresa K; Thoma, Stephen J

    2006-12-01

    The authors examined relationships among authoritarianism, personal need for closure or structure, perceived threat, and post-9/11 attitudes and beliefs. Participants were 159 undergraduate students in the Southeastern United States. The authors collected data 1 week before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation were significant predictors of support for restricting human rights during the U.S.-led War on Terror, support for U.S. President George W. Bush, and support for U.S. military involvement in Iraq. Right-wing authoritarianism and perceived threat emerged as the strongest predictors of the belief that Saddam Hussein supported terrorism. PMID:17172148

  14. Exposure to 9/11 among youth and their mothers in New York City: enduring associations with mental health and sociopolitical attitudes.

    PubMed

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Aber, J Lawrence; Ware, Angelica; Kotler, Jennifer A

    2010-01-01

    The enduring impact of exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on mental health and sociopolitical attitudes was examined in a sample of 427 adolescents (M = 16.20 years) and their mothers residing in New York City. Direct exposure to the terrorist attack was associated with youth depression symptoms and with mothers' posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. There was no evidence of reciprocal effects of mother exposure on youth or of youth exposure on mothers. Although mothers reported engaging in more emotional processing coping assistance with their children, coping assistance was not associated with youth's symptomatology. Media exposure was found to be a strong predictor of youth's and mothers' sociopolitical attitudes about issues such as prejudice toward immigrants, social mistrust, and current events. PMID:20636687

  15. Meaning reconstruction in the face of terror: An examination of recovery and posttraumatic growth among victims of the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between meaning reconstruction with posttraumatic growth and depreciation in the aftermath of terrorist trauma and loss. A group of individuals (n=118) who were personally affected by the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks were surveyed about their experiences and administered the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and Impact of Event scales. Subjects were volunteer docents at the Tribute World Trade Center Visitor Center. Results revealed that ability to make sense of one's 9/11 experience was related to recovery but not to posttraumatic growth, whereas ability to find some benefit in the experience was related to growth. In addition, location in downtown Manhattan on September 11, 2001 was related to higher levels of posttraumatic depreciation. Findings suggest that two aspects of meaning reconstruction are differentially related to recovery and posttraumatic growth. PMID:26150367

  16. Factors associated with poor control of 9/11-related asthma 10–11 years after the 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Hannah T.; Stellman, Steven D.; Reibman, Joan; Farfel, Mark R.; Brackbill, Robert M.; Friedman, Stephen M.; Li, Jiehui; Cone, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify key factors associated with poor asthma control among adults in the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry, a longitudinal study of rescue/recovery workers and community members who were directly exposed to the 2001 WTC terrorist attacks and their aftermath. Methods: We studied incident asthma diagnosed by a physician from 12 September 2001 through 31 December 2003 among participants aged ≥18 on 11 September 2001, as reported on an enrollment (2003–2004) or follow-up questionnaire. Based on modified National Asthma Education and Prevention Program criteria, asthma was considered controlled, poorly-controlled, or very poorly-controlled at the time of a 2011–2012 follow-up questionnaire. Probable post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and generalized anxiety disorder were defined using validated scales. Self-reported gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were obtained from questionnaire responses. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with poor or very poor asthma control. Results: Among 2445 participants, 33.7% had poorly-controlled symptoms and 34.6% had very poorly-controlled symptoms in 2011–2012. Accounting for factors including age, education, body mass index, and smoking, there was a dose–response relationship between the number of mental health conditions and poorer asthma control. Participants with three mental health conditions had five times the odds of poor control and 13 times the odds of very poor control compared to participants without mental health comorbidities. GERS and OSA were significantly associated with poor or very poor control. Conclusions: Rates of poor asthma control were very high in this group with post-9/11 diagnosed asthma. Comprehensive care of 9/11-related asthma should include management of mental and physical health comorbidities. PMID:25539137

  17. 3 micron spectrophotometry of Comet Halley - Evidence for water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Witteborn, Fred C.; Rank, David M.; Wooden, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Structure has been observed in the 3-3.6 micron preperihelion spectrum of Comet Halley consistent with either an absorption band near 3.1 microns or emission near 3.3 microns. The results suggest that a large fraction of the water molecules lost by the comet are initially ejected in the form of small ice particles rather than in the gas phase.

  18. Thermal emission spectra of Mars (5.4-10.5 microns) - Evidence for sulfates, carbonates, and hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Roush, Ted; Witteborn, Fred; Bregman, Jesse; Wooden, Diane; Stoker, Carol; Toon, Owen B.

    1990-01-01

    Spectra of the Martian thermal emission in the 5.4-10.5 micron region are reported. Emission features at 7.8 and 9.7 microns are attributed to surface silicates, and an emission feature at 6.1 micron is attributed to a molecular water component of the surface material. An absorption band at 8.7 micron and a possible one at 9.8 microns is attributed to sulfate or bisulfate anions probably located at a distorted crystalline site, and an absorption band at 6.7 microns is attributed to carbonate or bicarbonate anions located in a distorted crystalline site. Spectral simulations indicate that the sulfate- and carbonate-bearing minerals are contained in the same particles of airborne dust as the dominant silicate minerals, that the dust optical depth is about 0.6 at a reference wavelength of 0.3 micron over the area of the observed spots, and that sulfates and carbonates constitute 10-15 percent and 1-3 percent by volume of the airborne dust, respectively.

  19. Near 16 micron CO.sub.2 laser system

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Method and apparatus for inducing laser action in CO.sub.2 at a wavelength of 16 microns involving the transition between the 02.sup.0 0 and 01.sup.1 0 states. The population inversion between these two states is achieved by pumping to the 00.sup.0 1 level, suppressing the usual 10.6 micron transition to the 10.sup.0 0 level and encouraging the 9.6 micron transition, thereby populating the 02.sup.0 0 level, as the principal prerequisite for 16 micron laser action between the 02.sup.0 0 and 01.sup.1 0 levels.

  20. The 11 micron Silicon Carbide Feature in Carbon Star Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speck, A. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Skinner, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is known to form in circumstellar shells around carbon stars. SiC can come in two basic types - hexagonal alpha-SiC or cubic beta-SiC. Laboratory studies have shown that both types of SiC exhibit an emission feature in the 11-11.5 micron region, the size and shape of the feature varying with type, size and shape of the SiC grains. Such a feature can be seen in the spectra of carbon stars. Silicon carbide grains have also been found in meteorites. The aim of the current work is to identity the type(s) of SiC found in circumstellar shells and how they might relate to meteoritic SiC samples. We have used the CGS3 spectrometer at the 3.8 m UKIRT to obtain 7.5-13.5 micron spectra of 31 definite or proposed carbon stars. After flux-calibration, each spectrum was fitted using a chi(exp 2)-minimisation routine equipped with the published laboratory optical constants of six different samples of small SiC particles, together with the ability to fit the underlying continuum using a range of grain emissivity laws. It was found that the majority of observed SiC emission features could only be fitted by alpha-SiC grains. The lack of beta-SiC is surprising, as this is the form most commonly found in meteorites. Included in the sample were four sources, all of which have been proposed to be carbon stars, that appear to show the SiC feature in absorption.

  1. Roles of the 2 microns gene products in stable maintenance of the 2 microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A E; Murray, A W; Szostak, J W

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the replication and segregation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 microns circle. The amplification of the plasmid at low copy numbers requires site-specific recombination between the 2 microns inverted repeat sequences catalyzed by the plasmid-encoded FLP gene. No other 2 microns gene products are required. The overexpression of FLP in a strain carrying endogenous 2 microns leads to uncontrolled plasmid replication, longer cell cycles, and cell death. Two different assays show that the level of Flp activity decreases with increasing 2 microns copy number. This regulation requires the products of the REP1 and REP2 genes. These gene products also act together to ensure that 2 microns molecules are randomly segregated between mother and daughter cells at cell division. Images PMID:3316982

  2. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  3. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  4. The sixteen to forty micron spectroscopy from the NASA Lear jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two cryogenically cooled infrared grating spectrometers were designed, fabricated and used on the NASA Lear Jet Observatory. The first spectrometer was used to measure continuum sources such as dust in H II regions, the galactic center and the thermal emission from Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus over the 16 to 40 micron spectral range. The second spectrometer had higher resolution and was used to measure ionic spectral lines in H II regions (S III at 18.7 microns). It was later used extensively on NASA C-141 Observatory to make observations of numerous objects including H II regions, planetary nebulae, stars with circumstellar shells, the galactic center and extragalactic objects. The spectrometers are described including the major innovations and a list of the scientific contributions.

  5. The spatial extent and nature of the 3-micron emission features in HD 97048 and CPD-56 deg 8032

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, P. F.; Allen, D. A.; Bailey, J. A.

    1986-05-01

    Speckle observations at the peaks of narrow dust emission features at 3.3 and 3.5 microns in the low-excitation planetary nebula CPD-56 deg 8032 and the peculiar emission-line star HD 97048 are presented. In CPD-56 deg 8032 the emission in the 3.28-micron band is extended on a scale of approximately 1.3 arcsec, and this is probably the same as the extent of the ionized nebula. By contrast, the emission in the 3.53-micron band in HD 97048 is spatially unresolved and arises from a region less than 0.1 arcsec across. Dust grains within 0.05 arcsec of the star have temperatures not less than 1000 K, so that the proposed identification of the species emitting the strong 3.43-and 3.53-micron features with formaldehyde ice is untenable, and the materials responsible for the band emission remain unidentified.

  6. Spatially resolved infrared observations of Saturn. III - 10- and 20-micron disk scans at B prime = -11.8 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Caldwell, J.; Gillett, F. C.; Nolt, I. G.

    1979-01-01

    Disk scans of Saturn at 10 and 20 microns were obtained when the Saturnicentric solar declination B prime was -11.8 deg. The scans show little change from scans obtained when B prime was -16.3 deg. This could result from the long radiative time constant of the Saturnian atmosphere. The observations at 20 microns, in the H2 continuum, show positively that the temperature inversion at the south pole has a higher temperature than at any other point on the disk. In addition, the 12.1- and 20-micron scans indicate that the temperature of the inversion region is higher at the equator compared to the temperate zone. The data also suggest that enhanced 20-micron emission is correlated with the strength of the ultraviolet absorption.

  7. Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4–5 µm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors. We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces. PMID:24019504

  8. Extinction and scattering by several types of silicate sphere of radius 0.05-1.0 micron, for the wavelength range 0.21-50 microns.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromage, G. E.; Nandy, K.; Khare, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    The exact calculation of scattering and absorption by various sub-micron sized silicate spheres is presented here, using accurately determined optical constants in the wavelength range from 50 to 0.21 microns. The extinction features near 10 and 20 microns for various samples are discussed. It is found that the ratio of peak extinction at 20 microns to that at 10 microns is constant for small particles up to 0.4-micron radius, but is less for particles of 1-micron radius. The ratio of maximum extinction in the ultraviolet to that at 10 microns decreases with increasing particle size.

  9. Association between body mass index and body fat in 9-11-year-old children from countries spanning a range of human development.

    PubMed

    Katzmarzyk, P T; Barreira, T V; Broyles, S T; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Church, T S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose was to assess associations between body mass index (BMI) and body fat in a multinational sample of 9-11-year-old children. The sample included 7265 children from countries ranging in human development. Total body fat (TBF) and percentage body fat (PBF) were measured with a Tanita SC-240 scale and BMI z-scores (BMIz) and percentiles were computed using reference data from the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, respectively. Mean PBF at BMIz values of -1, 0 and +1 were estimated using multilevel models. Correlations between BMI and TBF were >0.90 in all countries, and correlations between BMI and PBF ranged from 0.76 to 0.96. Boys from India had higher PBF than boys from several other countries at all levels of BMIz. Kenyan girls had lower levels of PBF than girls from several other countries at all levels of BMIz. Boys and girls from Colombia had higher values of PBF at BMIz=-1, whereas Colombian boys at BMIz 0 and +1 also had higher values of PBF than boys in other countries. Our results show a consistently high correlation between BMI and adiposity in children from countries representing a wide range of human development. PMID:27152184

  10. Examining the factor structure of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) in a post-9/11 U.S. military veteran sample.

    PubMed

    Green, Kimberly T; Hayward, Laura C; Williams, Ann M; Dennis, Paul A; Bryan, Brandon C; Taber, Katherine H; Davidson, Jonathan R T; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2014-08-01

    The present study examined the structural validity of the 25-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) in a large sample of U.S. veterans with military service since September 11, 2001. Participants (N = 1,981) completed the 25-item CD-RISC, a structured clinical interview and a self-report questionnaire assessing psychiatric symptoms. The study sample was randomly divided into two subsamples: an initial sample (Sample 1: n = 990) and a replication sample (Sample 2: n = 991). Findings derived from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) did not support the five-factor analytic structure as initially suggested in Connor and Davidson's instrument validation study. Although parallel analyses indicated a two-factor structural model, we tested one to six factor solutions for best model fit using confirmatory factor analysis. Results supported a two-factor model of resilience, composed of adaptability- (8 items) and self-efficacy-themed (6 items) items; however, only the adaptability-themed factor was found to be consistent with our view of resilience-a factor of protection against the development of psychopathology following trauma exposure. The adaptability-themed factor may be a useful measure of resilience for post-9/11 U.S. military veterans. PMID:24586090

  11. The 9/11 attacks inside and outside the US: testing four models of flashbulb memory formation across groups and the specific effects of social identity.

    PubMed

    Luminet, Olivier; Curci, Antonietta

    2009-10-01

    Flashbulb memories (FBMs) are consistent recollections of specific details of the reception context of events. Four theoretical models accounting for FBM formation (Brown & Kulik, 1977; Conway et al., 1994; Er, 2003; Finkenauer et al., 1998) were tested on average 21 and 524 days after the 9/11 attacks in the US in 2001 in two groups of participants (US, N=112; non-US, N=727). Structural equation modelling revealed that (1) a revision of Finkenauer et al.'s (1998) model provided the best fit indices in both the US and non-US groups, (2) several relations among latent variables that were predicted by the three other models (Brown & Kulik, 1977; Conway et al., 1994; Er, 2003) were not significant, (3) with respect to Finkenauer et al's model, the "direct path" (from novelty/surprise to FBMs) was found to be significant only for the US group, while the "indirect path" (from emotional states, rehearsal and event-memory to FBMs) was only significant for the non-US group. It is suggested that the specific activation of social identity in the US group can explain these differences. PMID:19711222

  12. High-intensity interval training improves VO(2peak), maximal lactate accumulation, time trial and competition performance in 9-11-year-old swimmers.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Zinner, Christoph; Heilemann, Ilka; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Mester, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Training volume in swimming is usually very high when compared to the relatively short competition time. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a 5-week HIIT versus high-volume training (HVT) in 9-11-year-old swimmers on competition performance, 100 and 2,000 m time (T(100 m) and T(2,000 m)), VO(2peak) and rate of maximal lactate accumulation (Lac(max)). In a 5-week crossover study, 26 competitive swimmers with a mean (SD) age of 11.5 ± 1.4 years performed a training period of HIIT and HVT. Competition (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.48) and T(2,000 m) (P = 0.04; effect size = 0.21) performance increased following HIIT. No changes were found in T(100 m) (P = 0.20). Lac(max) increased following HIIT (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.43) and decreased after HVT (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.51). VO(2peak) increased following both interventions (P < 0.05; effect sizes = 0.46-0.57). The increases in competition performance, T(2,000 m), Lac(max) and VO(2peak) following HIIT were achieved in significantly less training time (~2 h/week). PMID:20683609

  13. Cloud area determination from AVIRIS data using water vapor channels near 1 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Gai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1991-01-01

    Fractional cloud area is derived from spectral images collected by the Airborne Visible-IR Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The derivation is made by ratioing radiances near the 0.94- and the 1.14-microns water vapor band centers against those in the intermediate atmospheric window regions. The derivation makes use of the facts that (1) the reflectances of most ground targets vary approximately linearly with wavelength in the 0.94- and the 1.14-micron water vapor band absorption regions, and (2) the peak absorptions of the water vapor band over cloudy areas are smaller than those over nearby clear surface areas because of the rapidly decreasing atmospheric water vapor concentration with height. The band ratioing technique effectively discriminates among clouds and surface areas having similar reflectance values.

  14. Substitution of Micron by Nanometer Scale Powders in Magnetorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Wang, G.; Wereley, N. M.; Tasovksi, Vasil; Radhakrishnan, R.

    The effects of substitution of micron size powder by nanometer size powder in magnetorheological (MR) fluids are investigated in this study. Three MR fluid samples containing iron powder with 45% weight fraction in a carrier fluid were made by Materials Modification Inc. The difference among these three fluids is size of the magnetic particles. The first MR fluid sample contained only micron size iron powder with 10μm particle size. In the second sample, 5% micron iron was substituted with nano powders having 30~40nm mean diameter, while the third sample had 37.5% micron powder and 7.5% nano powder. Rheological tests were conducted on the three samples using a parallel disk rheometer. Highest yield stress was observed in the second MR fluid sample containing 40% micron and 5% nano iron powder. By replacing only 5% micron iron powder with nanoparticles, we achieved substantial increment in yield stress. However, when nano powder content is increased to 7.5%, the yield stress decreases and is lower than that in the all micron MR fluid. Thus, by doping a reasonable percent of nano iron powder in the MR fluid, a substantial change in the rheological characteristics is obtainable. Further investigations of effects of nano iron powder in MR fluids for higher weight fraction MR fluids will be carried out in future.

  15. Reflectance spectra of mafic silicates and phyllosilicates from .6 to 4.6 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Singer, Robert B.; Mccord, Thomas B.

    1987-01-01

    The results of spectral measurements for mafic silicates are given. The study provided valuable spectral reflectance information about mafic silicates and phyllosilicates in the 2.5 to 4.6 micron wavelength region. It was shown that the reflectance of these materials is strongly affected by the presence of H2O and OH. Therefore, the identification of these absorbing species is greatly enhanced.

  16. Evidence for human thromboxane receptor heterogeneity using a novel series of 9,11-cyclic carbonate derivatives of prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, A. H.; Woodward, D. F.; Gibson, L. L.; Protzman, C. E.; Williams, L. S.; Burk, R. M.; Gac, T. S.; Roof, M. B.; Abbas, F.; Marshall, K.; Senior, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The pharmacological activity of a novel series of 9,11-cyclic carbonate derivatives of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was investigated in various isolated smooth muscle preparations possessing different prostanoid receptor subtypes as well as in human platelets. Since subdivision of thromboxane (TP-) receptors into vascular/smooth muscle and platelet subtypes is a controversial subject, our studies included a human smooth muscle preparation (myometrium) in addition to the widely used rat aorta and human platelets as TP-receptor preparations. 2. Two members of that series, AGN191976 and AGN192093 were found to be highly potent and selective thromboxane-mimetics. AGN191976 and AGN192093 contracted isolated tissues of the rat thoracic aorta with EC50 values of 0.32 +/- 0.08 and 1.30 +/- 0.53 nM, respectively. Both agonists were at least 10 times more potent than the benchmark TP-agonist, U-46619, in this preparation, whilst being at least 500 times less potent at other prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP3, FP, IP) in vitro. 3. In human myometrial strips from pregnant and non-pregnant donors, both AGN191976 and AGN192093 were potent contractile agonists. The rank order of potency in myometrium of AGN191976 > AGN192093 > U-46619 correlated well with that in the rat aorta. In human platelet-rich plasma (PRP), however, AGN191976 had potent proaggregatory activity (EC50 = 16.3 +/- 1.4 nM), which is a TP-receptor-mediated event, whereas AGN192093 was a much weaker agonist (EC50 = 37.9 +/- 2.0 microM). AGN192093 did not behave as an antagonist in the platelets, since it did not antagonize platelet aggregation induced by ADP, arachidonic acid, U-46619 or AGN191976. In human washed platelets, the activity profile of AGN191976 (EC50 = 4.15 +/- 0.52 nM) and AGN192093 (no aggregation up to 10 microM) was similar to that obtained in PRP. 4. The involvement of TP-receptors was verified with the potent TP-antagonist, SQ29548. SQ29548 (0.1 microM in myometrium; 1 microM in

  17. Association of recent exposure to ambient metals on fractional exhaled nitric oxide in 9-11 year old inner-city children.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria José; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Divjan, Adnan; Chillrud, Steven N; Hoepner, Lori; Zhang, Hanjie; Ridder, Robert; Perera, Frederica P; Miller, Rachel L

    2014-08-31

    Exposure to ambient metals in urban environments has been associated with wheeze, and emergency room visits and hospitalizations due to respiratory illness. However, the effect of ambient metals exposure on airway inflammation, and how these associations may be modified by seroatopy, has not been determined. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a reliable proxy marker of airway inflammation. We hypothesized that recent ambient concentrations of Ni, V, Zn and Fe would be associated differentially with proximal and distal fractions of exhaled NO, and that these associations would be modified by seroatopy. As part of the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) birth cohort study, 9-11 year old children (n=192) were evaluated. Ambient measures of Ni, V, Zn and Fe were obtained from a local central monitoring site and averaged over 9 days based on three 24h measures every third day. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) samples were obtained at constant flows of 50 (FENO50), 83 and 100mL/s, and used to determine surrogate measures for proximal (JNO) and alveolar (Calv) inflammation. Seroatopy was determined by specific IgE at age 7. Data were analyzed using multivariable linear regression. Ambient V and Fe concentrations were associated positively with FENO50 (p=0.018, p=0.027). Ambient Fe was associated positively with JNO (p=0.017). Ambient Ni and V concentrations were associated positively with Calv (p=0.004, p=0.018, respectively). A stronger association of Ni concentrations with Calv was observed among the children with seroatopy. These results suggest that ambient metals are associated differentially with different fractions of FENO production, and this relationship may be modified by seroatopy. PMID:24878380

  18. CDDO-9,11-dihydro-trifluoroethyl amide (CDDO-dhTFEA) induces hepatic cytoprotective genes and increases bile flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Scott A; Ward, Keith W; Klaassen, Curtis D; Meyer, Colin J

    2013-07-01

    1. The transcription factor Nrf2 is important for hepatoprotection against oxidative stress, as it regulates many cytoprotective genes, including several important for glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. In addition to being an important endogenous antioxidant, GSH is also critical for the maintenance of bile acid-independent bile flow. While it has been well-established that synthetic oleanane triterpenoids pharmacologically activate Nrf2, their effects on bile flow and hepatic cytoprotective capacity have not been fully explored. 2. The present studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of a compound in this class, CDDO-9,11-dihydro-trifluoroethyl amide (CDDO-dhTFEA), on these parameters. CDDO-dhTFEA at 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg was orally administered to bile duct-cannulated rats once daily for 7 days, with bile collected 5 h after each dose for 1 h. Livers were harvested after the final bile collection for the evaluation of histology and Nrf2 targets. 3. CDDO-dhTFEA did not affect liver histology. CDDO-dhTFEA markedly and dose-dependently increased bile flow, as well as the biliary excretion of GSH, cholesterol and phospholipids without affecting biliary excretion of bile acids. This was accompanied by dose-dependent increases in mRNA expression and/or enzyme activity of a broad panel of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd), sulfiredoxin 1(Srxn1), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and modifier subunits (Gclc and Gclm), glutathione reductase (Gsr), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (Ggt1), heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1) and epoxide hydrolase-1 (Eh-1). 4. These data further demonstrate the important hepatobiliary attributes of oleanane synthetic triterpenoids and support their continued investigation for liver diseases. PMID:23244591

  19. Viewing Seasonality in 8 Megacities at 4 Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewska, M. A.; Kovalskyy, V.; Small, C.; Henebry, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    The middle infrared (MIR) spectral region, between 3 and 5 microns, offers a different perspective on cities. The MIR is the mixing zone of both emitted terrestrial radiation and reflected solar radiation. The relatively long wavelengths enable views of surfaces often obscured by anthropogenic haze. Green vegetation appears very dark in the MIR due to high absorption by leaf water. In contrast, building, roofing, and paving materials reflect much MIR and exposed soils and dried vegetation reflect even more. Thus, physics dictates a strong expression of seasonality in the MIR. But is there sufficient signal in the MIR to merit it as a complementary approach for characterizing urbanized areas and monitoring their dynamics? We have explored this question in a research effort that links two NASA Interdisciplinary Science projects on the effect of cities on the environment. We focused on 8 global megacities: Beijing, Cairo, Istanbul, Mexico, Moscow, Nairobi, New Delhi, and São Paulo. We used Level 1B calibrated radiance data from band 23 (~4 microns) of the Aqua MODIS during ascending passes in 2010. These 1 km data were processed to reduce cloud cover using monthly maximum value compositing into four sensor view zenith angle (VZA) classes: 030°). SNR was higher in the summer

  20. Two-micron solid state master oscillator and fiber power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Suhui; Guan, Junna; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhao, Changming

    2009-07-01

    Development of 2 micron solid-state lasers has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years, because 2 micron lasers have many potential applications in various fields, such as remote sensing, medical application, laser radar, and optical communication in space. The MOPA system is an effective way to obtain high energy and good frequency and beam qualities which are required in coherent lidars. The traditional MOPA systems use injection seeding technology to obtain narrow linewidth and high power/energy laser output at the same time. Feedback control makes systems of injection seeding MOPA more complicated in applications. Thanks to the fast development of fiber fabrication technology, various fibers working in 2 micron region are commercially available. Two micron fiber MOPA systems are more attractive for researchers due to their compactness, good thermal dissipation and high efficiency. A 2 micron master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA) system was built. The seed oscillator was a plano-concave straight cavity. YAP Laser crystals with 4% and 5% thulium-doped concentration were used in our experiments. 1.5% and 3% output couplers were used. 442mW output power at 1.99μm was obtained with the 4% thulium-doped Tm:YAP crystal when the launched pumping power is 2.7W. The seed oscillator is coupled into a 4.5-meter-long double-cladding LMA Tm3+ and Al3+ co-doped fiber. The fiber diameter is 25 μm and NA is 0.1. 6.13W CW amplified output signal power was obtained when the launched pumping power was 60W.

  1. A 128 x 128 InGaAs detector array for 1.0 - 1.7 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G.; Joshi, A.; Lange, M.; Woodruff, K.; Mykietyn, E.; Gay, D.; Ackley, D.; Erickson, G.; Ban, V.; Staller, C.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional 128 x 128 detector array for the 1.0 - 1.7 micron spectral region has been demonstrated with indium gallium arsenide. The 30 micron square pixels had 60 micron spacing in both directions and were designed to be compatible with a 2D Reticon multiplexer. Dark currents below 100 pA, capacitance near 0.1 pF, and quantum efficiencies above 80 percent were measured. Probe maps of dark current and quantum efficiency are presented along with pixel dropout data and wafer yield which was as high as 99.89 percent (7 dropouts) in an area of 6528 pixels and 99.37 percent (103 dropouts) over an entire 128 x 128 pixel region.

  2. Spatial variations of the 3 micron emission features within UV-excited nebulae: photochemical evolution of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R; Tielens, A G; Allamandola, L J; Moorhouse, A; Brand, P W

    1989-06-01

    We have obtained 3 microns spectra at several positions in the Orion Bar region and in the "Red Rectangle," the nebula surrounding HD 44179. The recently discovered weak emission features at 3.40, 3.46, 3.51, and 3.57 microns (2940, 2890, 2850, and 2800 cm-1) are prominent in the Orion Bar region. The 3.40 microns and 3.51 microns features increases in intensity relative to the dominant 3.29 microns (3040 cm-1) feature when going from the ionized to the neutral zone across the Orion Bar. However, only a weak and rather broad 3.40 microns feature is present at the position of HD 44179. These spectra demonstrate that some of the 3 microns emission components vary independently of each other and in a systematic way within UV-excited nebulae. This spatial variation is discussed in terms of the UV excitation and photochemical evolution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related molecular structures. The spatial behavior of the weak emission features can be understood qualitatively in terms of hot bands of the CH stretch and overtones and combination bands of other fundamental vibrations in simple PAHs. An explanation in terms of emission by molecular sidegroups attached to the PAHs is less straightforward, particularly in the case of the Red Rectangle and other evolved mass-losing objects. We estimate PAH sizes of 20-50 carbon atoms based on the susceptibility of PAHs to destruction by the far ultraviolet fields present in the Orion Bar and the Red Rectangle; the size range is similar to independent estimates made previously. PMID:11542168

  3. Injection Seeded/Phase-Conjugated 2-micron Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros,M.; Petzar, Paul; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.; Leyva, V.; Shkunov, V.; Rockwell, D.; Betin, A.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, beam quality improvement of 2 micron laser using a fiber based phase conjugation mirror has been demonstrated. Single frequency operation is necessary to lower threshold. The reflectivity of PCM is approx. 50%.

  4. Apparatus for handling micron size range particulate material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Roy, N. L. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    An apparatus for handling, transporting, or size classifying comminuted material was described in detail. Electrostatic acceleration techniques for classifying particles as to size in the particle range from 0.1 to about 100 microns diameter were employed.

  5. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about possible human or environmental exposure. Two common pathways ...

  6. Improved Fabrication of Lithium Films Having Micron Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay

    2006-01-01

    An improved method has been devised for fabricating micron-dimension Li features. This approach is intended for application in the fabrication of lithium-based microelectrochemical devices -- particularly solid-state thin-film lithium microbatteries.

  7. Laser materials for the 0.67-microns to 2.5-microns range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Minoru; Zamerowski, Thomas J.; Ladany, Ivan; Martinelli, Ramon U.

    1987-01-01

    Basic requirements for obtaining injection laser action in III-V semiconductors are discussed briefly. A detailed review is presented of materials suitable for lasers emitting at 0.67, 1.44, 1.93, and 2.5 microns. A general approach to the problem is presented, based on curves of materials properties published by Sasaki et al. It is also shown that these curves, although useful, may need correction in certain ranges. It is deduced that certain materials combinations, either proposed in the literature or actually tried, are not appropriate for double heterostructure lasers, because the refractive index of the cladding material is higher than the index of the active material, thus resulting in no waveguiding, and high threshold currents. Recommendations are made about the most promising approach to the achievement of laser action in the four wavelengths mentioned above.

  8. High-resolution maps of Jupiter at five microns.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, C. S. L.; Low, F. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Minton, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution of 5-micron radiation, emitted from a large number of discrete sources from Jupiter, was observed during the 1972 apparition. These sources are less bright than those observed by Westphal (1969). At least 50 discrete sources having brightness temperatures exceeding 227 K were revealed which were mainly located within three narrow-latitude bands. Strong correlation exists between the 5-micron brightness temperatures of Jovian features and their colors as recorded photographically.

  9. Micron Accuracy Deployment Experiment (MADE), phase A. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Lee D.; Lake, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a Phase A In-STEP flight experiment development effort. The objective of the experiment is to deploy a portion of a segmented reflector on the Shuttle and study its micron-level mechanics. Ground test data are presented which projects that the on-orbit precision of the test article should be approximately 5 microns. Extensive hardware configuration development information is also provided.

  10. wssa_utils: WSSA 12 micron dust map utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-02-01

    wssa_utils contains utilities for accessing the full-sky, high-resolution maps of the WSSA 12 micron data release. Implementations in both Python and IDL are included. The code allows users to sample values at (longitude, latitude) coordinates of interest with ease, transparently mapping coordinates to WSSA tiles and performing interpolation. The wssa_utils software also serves to define a unique WSSA 12 micron flux at every location on the sky.

  11. A rare case of a three way complex variant positive Philadelphia translocation involving chromosome (9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11) in chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation is present in 90–95% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Variant complex translocations have been observed in 5–8% of CML patients, in which a third chromosome other than (9;22) is involved. Imatinib mesylate is the first line breakpoint cluster region-Abelson gene (BCR/ABL)-targeted oral therapy for CML, and may produce a complete response in 70–80% of CML patients in the chronic phase. In the present study, a bone marrow sample was used for conventional cytogenetic analysis, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test was used for BCR/ABL gene detection. A hematological analysis was also performed to determine the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, packed and mean cell volumes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and platelet values of the patient. The hematological analysis of the patient indicated the increased WBC of 186.5×103 cells/µl, and decreased hemoglobin levels of 11.1 g/dl. The FISH test revealed that 67% cells demonstrated BCR/ABL gene translocation. The patient was treated with 400 mg imatinib mesylate daily, and was monitored at various intervals over a 6-month period. The present study reports the rare case of a patient that demonstrates a three-way Philadelphia chromosome-positive translocation involving 46XY,t(9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11)[10], alongside CML in the chronic phase. The translocation was analyzed using cytogenetic and FISH tests. PMID:27602125

  12. Laser damage tests on InSb photodiodes at 1.064 micron and 0.532 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, G. H.; Staller, C.; Mahoney, C.

    1992-01-01

    InSb photodiodes were examined for performance degradation after pulsed laser illumination at 0.532 micron and 1.064 micron. Incident laser powers ranged from 6 x 10 exp-18 micron-watts to 16 micron-watts in a 50 pm diameter spot. Dark current and spectral response were both measured before and after illumination. Dark current measurements were taken with the diode blanked off and viewing only 77 K surfaces. Long term stability tests demonstrated that the blackbody did not exhibit long term drifts. Other tests showed that room temperature variations did not affect the diode signal chain or the digitization electronics used in data acquisition. Results of the experiment show that the diodes did not exhibit changes in dark current or spectral response performance as a result of the laser illumination. A typical change in diode spectral response (before/after laser exposure) was about 0.2 percent +/- 0.2 percent.

  13. Infrared (8-14 microns) remote sensing of soil particle size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; D'Aria, Dana M.

    1992-01-01

    Particle size of soils plays a significant role in erosion potential and other mechanical properties. Most soils are dominated by the residual mineral quartz, which displays prominent reststrahlen bands in the 8-14 microns atmospheric window. The Earth Observing System will likely provide world-wide multispectral imagery in the 8-14 microns region via the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. The ratio of ASTER bands 10/14 can be used to estimate particle size in soils, if other ASTER bands are used to minimize the confusion factors provided by soil moisture, vegetation cover, soil organic content, and the presence of abundant minerals other than quartz. Use of band ratios minimizes the effects of poor surface temperature estimates, but maximizes the need for high signal-to-noise data.

  14. Absolute line intensities in CO2 bands near 4.8 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute intensities for 726 unblended lines in 20 bands of C-12(O-16)2, C-13(O-16)2, O-16C-12O-18, and O-16C-12O-17 in the 4.8-micron spectral region have been determined using a natural sample of ultrahigh-purity CO2. Spectral data were recorded at low pressure (less than 10 torr) and room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex on Kitt Peak. Derived vibrational band intensities and coefficients of the F factor for each band were compared to values of the 1982 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory line parameters compilation. The present work fills out the CO2 lines in the 5-micron band systems. Lines in the strongest of these measured bands are being used to infer atmospheric pressure from high-resolution stratospheric spectra recorded during the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy experiment.

  15. Observations of the 63 micron forbidden OI emission line in the Orion and Omega Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of 63-micron neutral oxygen emission from the Orion and Omega Nebulae are reported which were carried out from the NASA Lear Jet flying at an altitude of approximately 13.7 km. The best estimate for the 3 P 1 - 3 P 2 transition wavelength is shown to be 63.2 microns, and the detected fluxes are found to be extraordinarily high (amounting to approximately 600 suns in M42 at 0.5 kpc and to about 2900 suns in the line in M17 at 2 kpc). Attempts are made to estimate the minimum temperature and other parameters of the emitting region in Orion. It is concluded that conditions not too different from those permitted by some current models appear to provide fluxes that agree in order of magnitude with those observed.

  16. The profile of upwelling 11-micron radiance through the atmospheric boundary layer overlying the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Denise E.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the gradient of 11-micron radiance from the ocean surface were made with spaceborne AVHRR and with radiometers carried on research vessels in California and east Florida waters. The results obtained for the radiance gradient at a variety of atmospheric conditions are in good agreement with radiative transfer calculations, suggesting that there was no significant error in the water vapor absorption parameters used in the calculations. The results confirm earlier predictions that, for a typical viewing factor (i.e., zenith angle 60 deg) and for mid-latitude standard water vapor conditions, the 11-micron radiant flux measured by a spaceborne sensor will be dominated by the atmospheric contribution to the total outgoing radiation in this 'window' region.

  17. Multiwavelength Energy Distributions and Bolometric Luminosities of the 12 Micron Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Malkan, Matthew A.; Rush, Brian; Carrasco, Luis; Recillas-Cruz, Elsa

    1995-11-01

    Aperture photometry from our own observations and the literature is presented for the 12 microns galaxies in the near-infrared J, H, and K bands and, in some cases, in the L band. These data are corrected to "total" near-infrared magnitudes (with a typical uncertainty of 0.3 mag) for a direct comparison with our IRAS fluxes which apply to the entire galaxy. The corrected data are used to derive integrated total near-infrared and far-infrared luminosities. We then combine these with blue photometry and an estimate of the flux contribution from cold dust at wavelengths longward of 100 microns to derive the first bolometric luminosities for a large sample of galaxies. The presence of nonstellar radiation at 2-3 microns correlates very well with nonstellar IRAS colors. This enables us to identify a universal Seyfert nuclear continuum from near- to far-infrared wavelengths. Thus, there is a sequence of infrared colors which runs from a pure "normal galaxy" to a pure Seyfert/quasar nucleus. Seyfert 2 galaxies fall close to this same sequence, although only a few extreme narrow-line Seyfert galaxies have quasar-like colors, and these show strong evidence of harboring an obscured broad-line region. A corollary is that the host galaxies of Seyfert nuclei have normal near- to far-infrared spectra on average. Starburst galaxies lie significantly off the sequence, having a relative excess of 60 microns emission probably as a result of stochastically heated dust grains. We use these correlations to identify several combinations of infrared colors which discriminate between Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies, LINERs, and ultraluminous starbursts. In the infrared, Seyfert 2 galaxies are much more like Seyfert 1s than they are like starbursts, presumably because both kinds of Seyferts are heated by a single central source, rather than a distributed region of star formation. Moreover, combining the [25-2.2 mum] color with the [60-12 mum] color, it appears that Seyfert 1 galaxies are

  18. Development of long wavelength semiconductor diode lasers near 28 microns for use in infrared heterodyne spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of tunable diode lasers operating in the 28 micrometers spectral region for use in infrared heterodyne spectrometers is reported. A process capable of yielding lasers emitting 500 micron W of multimode power, 112 micron W in a true single mode and true single mode operation at laser currents of up to 35% above threshold was developed. Results were obtained from narrow mesastripe (20 micrometer wide) short cavity (120 micrometer length) laser configurations. Six stripe geometry lasers, with a variety of cavity widths and lengths were delivered. The techniques to fabricate such devices was obtained and the long term reliability of such lasers by reproducible electrical and optical output characteristics fabrication from lasers are demonstrated.

  19. Spectroscopy of the 3. 4 micron emission feature in comet Halley

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, F.; Geballe, T.R.; Walther, D.M.

    1986-12-01

    Infrared spectra in the 3-5 micron region have been obtained of Comet Halley after perihelion, at heliocentric distances of 1.6 and 2.0 AU. A broad emission feature, peaking near 3.4 microns and containing some spectral substructure, was observed, while at longer wavelengths only a featureless blackbody emission spectrum was seen. The emission feature probably arises from UV-pumped infrared fluorescence of organic molecules which are either in the gas phase or are embedded in very small grains. In the former interpretation the molecules must be quite large. These results lend support to the idea that comets formed out of interstellar grains whose molecular ice mantles largely consist of nonvolatile complex organic molecules. 21 references.

  20. Temperatures of the Jovian auroral zone inferred from 2-micron H2 quadrupole line observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Drossart, P.; Caldwell, J.; Maillard, J. Paris Observatoire, Meudon York Univ., North York CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of the observed intensities of the S1(0), S1(1), and S1(2) 2-micron H2 quadrupole lines in the southern auroral zone of Jupiter, a rotational temperature of 730 (+ 490/-200) K in the 0.01-1.0 microbar range is derived which is judged to represent the local neutral kinetic temperature. Although the dominance of nonthermal emission is indicated for these lines by the factor-of-500 predominance of the H2(nu = 1) auroral zone population over the normal Boltzmann population, a calculation of both thermal and nonthermal intensities of the pure H2 rotational quadrupole lines yields the opposite results in the greater-than-5 micron wavelength region. 21 refs.

  1. Two micron spectroscopy of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Haro 2

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T.J.; Maillard, J.P. CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris )

    1990-03-01

    This paper discusses the results of 2-micron spectroscopic observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy (BCDG) Haro 2, obtained with the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The spectrum contains emission lines of H I, He I, Fe II, and H2 and strong absorption originating from Delta-v = 2 transitions of CO. The strengths of the various features are discussed and the extinction in the 2-micron region is estimated. The spectrum of Haro 2 is compared with those of other BCDGs and the starburst galaxies NGC 253 and M82. It is found that, in many respects, Haro 2 is a typical starburst galaxy and that its blue near-IR colors are not necessarily a sign of youth. 35 refs.

  2. The 2.4 micron spectrum of Comet Halley - A search for H2 emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.; Wolstencroft, R. D.; Lutz, B. L.

    1989-02-01

    A 2.4-micron spectrum of Comet Halley was obtained on April 1, 1986 with the UKIRT scanning Fabry-Perot-CVF equipped with an InSb detector. From the ratio of the measured flux from comet Halley to Zeta Her in the 8.8 x 10 to the -4th micron bandwidth, Comet Halley produced a detected flux of about 1.3 x 10 to the 5th photons/sec with a 1-sigma variance of 385 photons. The flux detected in the same spectral region by Maillard et al. (1986) agrees with the measurements reported here to within a factor of two. The data obtained are examined from the standpoint of the possible mechanisms of H2 production.

  3. The 2.4 micron spectrum of Comet Halley - A search for H2 emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Hayden; Wolstencroft, Ramon D.; Lutz, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    A 2.4-micron spectrum of Comet Halley was obtained on April 1, 1986 with the UKIRT scanning Fabry-Perot-CVF equipped with an InSb detector. From the ratio of the measured flux from comet Halley to Zeta Her in the 8.8 x 10 to the -4th micron bandwidth, Comet Halley produced a detected flux of about 1.3 x 10 to the 5th photons/sec with a 1-sigma variance of 385 photons. The flux detected in the same spectral region by Maillard et al. (1986) agrees with the measurements reported here to within a factor of two. The data obtained are examined from the standpoint of the possible mechanisms of H2 production.

  4. Prescribed 3-D Direct Writing of Suspended Micron/Sub-micron Scale Fiber Structures via a Robotic Dispensing System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hanwen; Cambron, Scott D.; Keynton, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    A 3-axis dispensing system is utilized to control the initiating and terminating fiber positions and trajectory via the dispensing software. The polymer fiber length and orientation is defined by the spatial positioning of the dispensing system 3-axis stages. The fiber diameter is defined by the prescribed dispense time of the dispensing system valve, the feed rate (the speed at which the stage traverses from an initiating to a terminating position), the gauge diameter of the dispensing tip, the viscosity and surface tension of the polymer solution, and the programmed drawing length. The stage feed rate affects the polymer solution’s evaporation rate and capillary breakup of the filaments. The dispensing system consists of a pneumatic valve controller, a droplet-dispensing valve and a dispensing tip. Characterization of the direct write process to determine the optimum combination of factors leads to repeatedly acquiring the desired range of fiber diameters. The advantage of this robotic dispensing system is the ease of obtaining a precise range of micron/sub-micron fibers onto a desired, programmed location via automated process control. Here, the discussed self-assembled micron/sub-micron scale 3D structures have been employed to fabricate suspended structures to create micron/sub-micron fluidic devices and bioengineered scaffolds. PMID:26132732

  5. Probing the Depths of Jupiter and Saturn at Five-Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Gutierrez, Sara M.; Payne, Anna; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James

    2015-11-01

    Both Jupiter and Saturn exhibit dramatic and dynamic changes at all levels of their atmospheres, as probed at various wavelengths, from the cloud tops to the deeper atmosphere and through their stratospheric changes. One common thread that is evident is that many changes observed in the clouds seem to be initiated in the deep atmospheres, via the five micron spectral window on both planets, based on the data acquired from the NASA/InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF). Jupiter exhibits traditional 5-micron hot spots; however their inventory varies with time. Similar features at other latitudes (e.g., SEB) may indicate a similar mechanism at play. Another region that underwent global change is recent fade of the northern component of the North Equatorial Belt (NEBn). It was characterized by visible brown barges along its northern boundary that are partially clear, but not as cloudless as 5-micron hot spots. On Saturn, long-term studies of thermal emission from its atmospheric window between 5.1 and 5.2 microns, revealed a detailed cloud structure representing variations of cloud opacity around Saturn’s 2-3 bar pressure region that we have tracked since 1995. Since that time, the zonal-mean narrow, dark bands have remained constant and are correlated with variations of zonal jets. We have identified long-term variations in the cloud opacity that do appear to be correlated with seasonal changes, with a decrease of zonal-mean cloud opacity strongly correlated with seasonal changes in insolation. Substantial perturbations to the atmosphere in the northern hemisphere from the great storm of 2010-2011 have led to significant perturbations of the deep cloud field detected at 5.1 microns. The clouding over of the central storm track during early 2011 was followed by a central clearing and clouding over of regions to its north and south, making the storm latitude the clearest atmospheric region ever detected. We will discuss these trends and others over time, in particular

  6. Laboratory simulation of infrared astrophysical features. [Terrestrial silicate, meteoritic and lunar soil 10-micron spectral comparisons with comets Bennet and Kohoutek

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory infrared emission and absorption spectra have been taken of terrestrial silicates, meteorites, and lunar soils in the form of micrometer and submicrometer grains. The emission spectra were taken in a way that imitates telescopic observations. The purpose was to see which materials best simulate the 10-micron astrophysical feature. The emission spectra of dunite, fayalite, and Allende give a good fit to the 10-micron broadband emission feature of comets Bennett and Kohoutek. A study of the effect of grain size on the presence of the 10-micron emission feature of dunite shows that for particles larger than 37 microns no feature is seen. The emission spectrum of the Murray meteorite, a Type 2 carbonaceous chrondrite, is quite similar to the intermediate-resolution spectrum of comet Kohoutek in the 10-micron region. Hydrous silicates or amorphous magnesium silicates in combination with high-temperature condensates, such as olivine or anorthite, would yield spectra that match the intermediate-resolution spectrum of comet Kohoutek in the 10-micron region. Glassy olivine and glassy anorthite in approximately equal proportions would also give a spectrum that is a good fit to the cometary 10-micron feature.

  7. Separation of cirrus cloud from clear surface from AVIRIS data using the 1.38 micron water vapor band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1992-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in climate systems because of their large area coverage, persistence, and radiative effects. Thin cirrus clouds are difficult to detect in visible images and infrared images in the 10-12 micron atmospheric window region, particularly over land, because these clouds are partially transparent. Ackerman recently developed a method for detecting cirrus clouds using three narrow channels centered near 8, 11, and 12 microns, respectively, based on the analysis of IR emission spectra measured with a high spectral resolution interferometer. Barton also described a method for estimating cirrus cloud height and amount from measurements with two narrow channel radiometers of the Selective Chopper Radiometer on Nimbus 5. Both channels are located within the strong 2.7 micron water vapor band absorption region. One of the channels includes additional carbon dioxide absorption. A differential absorption technique with sets of empirical coefficients was used in the estimation of cirrus cloud heights and amounts. A technique using narrow channels in the strong 1.38 micron water vapor band absorption region for detecting cirrus clouds from spectral imaging data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) on 5 Dec. 1991 during the FIRE (The First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment) Phase 2 Field Experiment is described.

  8. The Futures of Adult Educator(s): Agency, Identity and Ethos. Joint Conference Proceedings of the 2nd ESREA/ReNAdET Meeting and the 4th TQF Seminar (Tallinn, Estonia, November 9-11, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Anja, Ed.; Jogi, Larissa, Ed.; Jutte, Wolfgang, Ed.; Zarifis, Georgios K., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This edited volume contains the papers presented in the 2nd ESREA|ReNAdet meeting that was jointly organised with the VET & CULTURE Network in the University of Tallinn (Estonia), 9-11 November 2011. The papers that appear in the volume discuss the future (or the futures) of adult educators in respect to issues of developing their identities and…

  9. Novel estrogens and their radical scavenging effects, iron-chelating, and total antioxidative activities: 17 alpha-substituted analogs of delta 9(11)-dehydro-17 beta-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Römer, W; Oettel, M; Menzenbach, B; Droescher, P; Schwarz, S

    1997-11-01

    Antioxidant effects of N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, p-cresol, and p-(hydroxy)thioanisol 17 alpha-substituted analogs of 17 beta-estradiol and their delta 9(11)-dehydro homologs were investigated using four different in vitro models: rat synaptosomal lipid peroxidation induced by Fenton's reagent, Fe(II)-chelating activities, the formation of superoxide anion radicals, and total antioxidative activity. Whereas the classical estrogen 17 beta-estradiol as well as selected phenolic compounds was only moderately inhibiting iron-dependent lipid peroxidation and stimulating total antioxidative activity, besides delta 9(11)-dehydro-17 beta-estradiol (J 1213), novel estrogens such as C-17-oriented side chain analogs of 17 beta-estradiol (J 843, J 872, and J 897) and delta 9(11)-dehydro homologs (J 844, J 864, and J 898) directly altered the iron redox chemistry and diminished the formation of superoxide anion radicals generated by a xanthine/xanthine oxidase-dependent luminescence reaction to a great extent. These results suggest that definite modifications in the chemical structure of 17 beta-estradiol, e.g., the introduction of a delta 9(11)-double bond and/or p-cresol as well as p-(hydroxy)thioanisol C-17 substitution, may result in substantial changes in their antioxidant behavior. These compounds may be drug candidates for treating pathologies related to free radical formation. PMID:9366006

  10. Broadband 7 microns OPCPA pumped by a 2 microns picosecond Ho:YLF CPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Daniel; Hemmer, Michael; Baudisch, Matthias; Biegert, Jens; Chalus, Olivier; Simon-Boisson, Christophe; Zawilski, Kevin; Schunemann, Peter G.; Smirnov, Vadim; Hoogland, Heinar

    2016-03-01

    The development of coherent light sources with emission in the mid-IR is currently undergoing a remarkable revolution. The mid-IR spectral range has always been of tremendous interest, mainly to spectroscopists, due to the ability of mid-IR light to access rotational and vibrational resonances of molecules which give rise to superb sensitivity upon optical probing [1-3]. Previously, high energy resolution was achieved with narrowband lasers or parametric sources, but the advent of frequency comb sources has revolutionized spectroscopy by providing high energy resolution within the frequency comb structure of the spectrum and at the same time broadband coverage and short pulse duration [4-6]. Such carrier to envelope phase (CEP) controlled light waveforms, when achieved at ultrahigh intensity, give rise to extreme effects such as the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in the vacuum to extreme ultraviolet range (XUV) [7]. Motivated largely by the vast potential of attosecond science, the development of ultraintense few-cycle and CEP stable sources has intensified [8], and it was recognized that coherent soft X-ray radiation could be generated when driving high harmonic generation (HHG) with long wavelength sources [9-11]. Recently, based on this concept, the highest waveform controlled soft X-ray flux [12] and isolated attosecond pulse emission at 300 eV [13] was demonstrated via HHG from a 1850 nm, sub-2-cycle source [14]. Within strong field physics, long wavelength scaling may lead to further interesting physics such as the direct reshaping of the carrier field [15], scaling of quantum path dynamics [16], the breakdown of the dipole approximation [17] or direct laser acceleration [18]. The experimental development of long wavelength light sources therefore holds great promise in many fields of science and will lead to numerous applications beyond strong field physics and attosecond science. In this paper, we present the first mid-IR optical parametric

  11. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Shukla, R A; Dugad, S R; Garde, C S; Gopal, A V; Gupta, S K; Prabhu, S S

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 - σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper. PMID:24593348

  12. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R. Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.; Garde, C. S.

    2014-02-15

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  13. FDA's expanding postmarket authority to monitor and publicize food and consumer health product risks: the need for procedural safeguards to reduce "transparency" policy harms in the post-9/11 regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Roller, Sarah Taylor; Pippins, Raqiyyah R; Ngai, Jennifer W

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the expansion of FDA's discretionary authority in the post-9/11 period, particularly with respect to FDA's authority to monitor and publicize potential health risks linked to food, dietary supplements, nonprescription drugs, and other consumer health products. In addition, this article evaluates the need for FDA to establish procedural safeguards to reduce the significant risks of unintended and undue harm to people and regulated companies that can result from adverse publicity in the more "transparent" post 9/11 FDA regulatory environment. Specifically, Part I summarizes the amendments to the FDCA enacted during the post-9/11 period that have expanded FDA's postmarket authority to monitor, evaluate, and publicize potential health risks linked to food, dietary supplements, nonprescription drugs and other consumer health products marketed in the United States, in conjunction with FDA's Sentinel Initiative, Reportable Food Registry, and other adverse event reporting requirements. Part II discusses the convergence of FDA's expanded postmarket authority to publicize product-related risks with President Obama's transparency initiative aimed at fostering "open government" through increased public access to government information. In addition, Part II considers the nature of the procedural safeguards needed in the post-9/11 FDA regulatory environment, in view of FDA's historical record and illustrative cases that help expose how adverse "transparency" surrounding FDA warning letters, recalls and safety alerts concerning products in the marketplace can have undue and unintended prejudicial and harmful effects for the people and companies that are legally responsible for such products. Finally, based on these analysis, this article concludes with some observations concerning the nature of the procedural safeguards needed to reduce the significant risks of "transparency" policy harms in the pos-9/11 regulatory environment. PMID:19999646

  14. Bright galaxies at z=9-11 from pure-parallel HST observations: Building a unique sample for JWST with Spitzer/IRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Stephanie; Trenti, Michele; Bouwens, Rychard

    2016-08-01

    The combination of observations taken by Hubble and Spitzer revealed the unexpected presence of sources as bright as our own Milky Way as early as 400 Myr after the Big Bang, potentially highlighting a new highly efficient regime for star formation in L>L* galaxies at very early times. Yet, the sample of high-quality z>8 galaxies that have both HST and Spitzer/IRAC imaging is still very small, particularly at high luminosities. We propose here to remedy this situation and efficiently follow-up with Spitzer/IRAC the most promising z>8 sources from our Hubble Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which covers a footprint on the sky similar to CANDELS, provides a deeper search than ground-based surveys like UltraVISTA, and is robust against cosmic variance because of its 180 independent lines of sight. The proposed new 3.6 micron observations will continue the Spitzer cycle 12 BORG911 program and target 15 additional fields, leveraging over 300 new HST orbits (350 sqarcmin) to identify a final sample of about 5 to 10 bright galaxies at z >= 8.5. For optimal time use (just over 22 hours), our goal is to readily discriminate between z>8 sources (undetected or marginally detected in IRAC) and z~2 interlopers (strongly detected in IRAC) with just 1-2 hours per pointing. The high-quality candidates that we will identify with IRAC will be ideal targets for further studies to investigate the reionization state of the inter-galactic medium through near-IR Keck/VLT spectroscopy. They will also be uniquely suited to measurement of the redshift and stellar population properties through JWST/NIRSPEC observations, with the potential to elucidate how the first generations of stars are assembled in the earliest stages of the epoch of reionization.

  15. Metallization technology for tenth-micron range integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.A.; Harper, M.E.

    1996-11-27

    A critical step in the fabrication of integrated circuits is the deposition of metal layers which interconnect the various circuit elements that have been formed in earlier process steps. In particular, columns of copper several times higher than the characteristic dimension of the circuit elements was needed. Features with a diameter of a few tenths of a micron and a height of about one micron need to be filled at rates in the half to one micron per minute range. With the successful development of a copper deposition technology meeting these requirements, integrated circuits with simpler designs and higher performance could be economically manufactured. Several technologies for depositing copper were under development. No single approach had an optimum combination of performance (feature characteristics), cost (deposition rates), and manufacturability (integration with other processes and tool reliability). Chemical vapor deposition, plating, sputtering and ionized-physical vapor deposition (I-PVD) were all candidate technologies. Within this project, the focus was on I-PVD.

  16. The Beauty and Limitations of 10 Micron Heterodyne Interferometry (ISI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.

    2003-01-01

    Until recently, heterodyne interferometry at 10 microns has been the only successful technique for stellar interferometry in the very difficult atmospheric window from 9-12 microns. For most of its operational lifetime the U.C. Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer was a single-baseline two telescope (1.65 m aperture) system using CO2 lasers as local oscillators. This instrument was designed and constructed from 1983-1988, and first fringes were obtained at Mt. Wilson in June 1988. During the past few years, a third telescope was constructed and just recently the first closure phases were obtained at 11.15 microns. We discuss the history, physics and technology of heterodyne interferometry in the mid-infrared, and some key astronomical results that have come from this unique instrument.

  17. Hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a factor affecting the cosmic 6.2 micron emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Harrison, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    While many of the characteristics of the cosmic unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands observed for interstellar and circumstellar sources within the Milky Way and other galaxies, can be best attributed to vibrational modes of the variants of the molecular family known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), there are open questions that need to be resolved. Among them is the observed strength of the 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) band relative to other strong bands, and the generally low strength for measurements in the laboratory of the 1600 cm(-1) skeletal vibration band of many specific neutral PAH molecules. Also, experiments involving laser excitation of some gas phase neutral PAH species while producing long lifetime state emission in the 3.3 micron (3000 cm(-1)) spectral region, do not result in significant 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) emission. A potentially important variant of the neutral PAH species, namely hydrogenated-PAH (H(N)-PAH) which exhibit intriguing spectral correlation with interstellar and circumstellar infrared emission and the 2175 A extinction feature, may be a factor affecting the strength of 6.2 micron emission. These species are hybrids of aromatic and cycloalkane structures. Laboratory infrared absorption spectroscopy augmented by density function theory (DFT) computations of selected partially hydrogenated-PAH molecules, demonstrates enhanced 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) region skeletal vibration mode strength for these molecules relative to the normal PAH form. This along with other factors such as ionization or the incorporation of nitrogen or oxygen atoms could be a reason for the strength of the cosmic 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) feature.

  18. Deposition and retention patterns for 3-, 9-, and 15-micron latex microspheres inhaled by rats and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, M.B.; Olson, T.R.; Yeh, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the deposition patterns and fate of large particles inhaled by two species of small laboratory animals during nose breathing. Rats and guinea pigs inhaled 3-, 9-, or 15 micron polystyrene latex microspheres labeled with /sup 46/Sc. Approximately 1.4% and 0.55% of the initial internally deposited body burden of 3-micron microspheres was in the alveolar region of the respiratory tract of rats and guinea pigs, respectively. None of the 9- or 15-micron microspheres were detected in the alveolar regions of the rats or guinea pigs. Ninety-five to 99% of the deposited microspheres cleared from these animals with biological half-times of 0.5-1.0 day. Most of the cleared radioactivity was in the feces. Approximations for long-term biological half-times for alveolar retention of the 3-micron microspheres were 63 days for rats and 83 days for guinea pigs. About 1% of the initial lung burden of 3-micron microspheres was translocated from lung to lung-associated lymph nodes in both species; none of the 9- or 15-micron microspheres were detected in those lymph nodes. Small fractions of the microspheres initially deposited in the airways of the head were retained with biological clearance half-times ranging from 9 to 350 days. Results from this study do not allow projections for deposition and retention patterns for similar particles inhaled by humans. Such projections must come from studies with humans, or from studies with animal species having deposition patterns for inhaled materials more comparable to those of humans.

  19. Observation of the 63 micron (0 1) emission line in the Orion and Omega Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.

    1978-01-01

    The 63 micron fine structure transition P4 : 3Pl yields 3P2 for neutral atomic oxygen was obtained during a series of flights at an altitude of approximately 13.7 km. In the Orion Nebula (M42), the observed line strength was 8 x 10 to the minus 15 power watt cm/2 which is estimated to be approximately 0.3 o/o of the energy radiated at all wavelengths. For the Omega Nebulae (M17), the line strength was 2.4 x 10 to the minus 15 power watt cm/2, and the fraction of the total radiated power was slightly higher. These figures refer to a 4' x 6' field of view centered on the peak for infrared emission from each source. The uncertainty in the line strength is approximately 50% and is caused by variable water vapor absorption along the flight path of the airplane. The line position estimate is 63.2 micron (+0.1, -0.2) micron. The prime uncertainty is due to the uncertain position of the (0 I) emitting regions in the field of view.

  20. 2--14 microns Spectroscopy of Vega-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Knacke, R. F.; Hackwell, J. A.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Hanner, M. S.

    1994-12-01

    We present intermediate-resolution (lambda /Delta lambda ~ 50) infrared (2--14 microns) spectroscopy of four early-type main-sequence stars, conducted with the Aerospace Corp. Infrared Spectrograph. We observed beta UMa (A1 V), alpha Aql (A7 V), and beta Leo (A3 V) at the 1.3-m KPNO telescope in May 1993, and zeta Lep (A2 V) at the 3.0-m IRTF telescope in Nov. 1993. The Vega-type stars beta UMa and zeta Lep showed weak but definite excess flux at ~ 10 microns in previous groundbased photometric surveys (Fajardo-Acosta, Telesco & Knacke 1994, in preparation; Aumann & Probst 1991, ApJ, 368, 264). We observed alpha Aql and beta Leo to confirm that their ~ 10 microns spectra do not show any excess. The weak ~ 10 microns excess features in our spectra of beta UMa and zeta Lep are probably indicative of large grains and/or a small quantity of dust around these stars. Their weak features contrast with the prominent silicate emission feature previously seen in beta Pic and 51 Oph. The grains are hotter in zeta Lep than in beta UMa, as indicated by an excess already present at short wavelengths ( ~ 8.5 microns) in the spectrum of the former, as opposed to the 10--11 microns excess of the latter. Dust around these two stars could be an assemblage of amorphous minerals, probably of a variety of sizes, as suggested by their broad features. We compared the excess spectra of zeta Lep and beta UMa with those of comets (reviewed by Hanner, Lynch, & Russell 1994, ApJ, 425, 274) and found they resemble those of dust-poor comets such as Austin 1990 V and Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko 1989 XIX.

  1. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings at 380 microns

    SciTech Connect

    Roellig, T.L.; Werner, M.W.; Becklin, E.E.

    1988-03-01

    Two different techniques have been used to derive the Saturn disk's ring brightness temperatures from 380-micron observations: (1) comparisons of these wide-beam observation disk-ring system results with those obtained for an earlier epoch, when the rings were edge-on, then differencing the two measurements to obtain a value for the rings' contribution; and (2) ring contribution resolution during scanning along the disk-ring plane, to yield a B-ring brightness temperature of 39 + or - 8 K at 380 microns. The results obtained indicate a gradual decrease of observed ring brightness temperature from the IR to the radio wavelength range. 24 references.

  2. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings at 380 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.; Werner, Michael W.; Becklin, Eric E.

    1988-01-01

    Two different techniques have been used to derive the Saturn disk's ring brightness temperatures from 380-micron observations: (1) comparisons of these wide-beam observation disk-ring system results with those obtained for an earlier epoch, when the rings were edge-on, then differencing the two measurements to obtain a value for the rings' contribution; and (2) ring contribution resolution during scanning along the disk-ring plane, to yield a B-ring brightness temperature of 39 + or - 8 K at 380 microns. The results obtained indicate a gradual decrease of observed ring brightness temperature from the IR to the radio wavelength range.

  3. Imaging antenna array at 119 microns. [for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neikirk, N. P.; Tong, P. P.; Putledge, D. B.; Park, H.; Young, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    A focal-plane imaging antenna array has been demonstrated at 119 microns. The array is a line of evaporated silver bow-tie antennas with bismuth microbolometer detectors on a silicon substrate. Radiation is coupled into the array by a lens placed on the back of the substrate. The bolometers are thermally isolated from the silicon substrate with a half-micron layer of polyimide. The array performance is demonstrated by coherent imaging of a series of holes at half the diffraction-limited cut-off frequency.

  4. Planetary observations at a wavelength of 355 microns

    SciTech Connect

    De pater, I.; Ulich, B.L.; Kreysa, E.; Chini, R.; Kaman Aerospace Corp., Tucson, AZ; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn )

    1989-05-01

    Brightness temperature measurements have been conducted for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, as well as the Galilean satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, and the asteroid Ceres, at 355 microns. The precise shape of the spectra of these bodies can be used to obtain information on their composition and the state of compactness of their surface/subsurface layers. The temperatures obtained for the giant planets agree with both previous measurements and model atmosphere calculations; the present result for Jupiter is noted to be consistent with a model atmosphere spectrum lacking a CH3-ice cloud, or perhaps with one having small (10-micron) particles. 12 refs.

  5. Quantitative determination of micronization-induced changes in the solid state of lactose.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, A; Müller, M; Soldati, L; Elviri, L; Bettini, R

    2016-05-30

    Lactose, in particular α-lactose monohydrate, is the most used carrier for inhalation. Its surface and solid-state properties play a key role in determining Dry Powder Inhalers (DPIs) performance. Techniques such as X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), which are commonly used for the characterization of lactose, are not always capable of explaining the solid-state changes induced by processing, such as micronization. In the present work, the evaluation of the effect of the micronization process on the solid-state properties of lactose was carried out by XRPD and DSC and a satisfactory, although not unequivocal, interpretation of the thermal behaviour of lactose was obtained. Thus, a new gravimetric method correlating in a quantitative manner the weight change in specific sections of the Dynamic Vapour Sorption (DVS) profile and the amount of different forms of α-lactose (hygroscopic anhydrous, stable anhydrous and amorphous) simultaneously present in a given sample was developed and validated. The method is very simple and provides acceptable accuracy in phase quantitation (LOD=1.6, 2.4 and 2.7%, LOQ=5.4, 8.0 and 8.9% for hygroscopic anhydrous, stable anhydrous and amorphous α-lactose, respectively). The application of this method to a sample of micronized lactose led to results in agreement with those obtained by DSC and evidenced that hygroscopic anhydrous α-lactose, rather than amorphous lactose, can be generated in the micronization process. The proposed method may find a more general application for the quantification of polymorphs of compounds different than lactose, provided that the various solid phases afford different weight variations in specific regions of the DVS profile. PMID:27090154

  6. The interstellar dust model of comet dust constrained by 3.4 micron and 10 micron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenburg, J. M.; Zhao, N. S.; Hage, J. I.

    The morphological structure and chemical composition of submicron-sized interstellar dust grains which have undergone cold aggregation in the presolar nebular are studied to derived the bulk and microstructure of comet nuclei. The density, size distribution, and chemical composition of comet dust are deduced from observations at 3.4 and 10 microns. It is found that the 10-micron emission of Comet Halley is produced by predominantly interstellar amorphous silicates with a small admixture of crystalline silicates. In addition, it is shown that the number of small comet particles with masses less than 10 to the -9th g must be substantially larger than has generally been assumed.

  7. Advancement in 17-micron pixel pitch uncooled focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George; Howard, Christopher; Clarke, Elwood; Han, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    This paper provides an update of 17 micron pixel pitch uncooled microbolometer development at DRS. Since the introduction of 17 micron pitch 640x480 focal plane arrays (FPAs) in 2006, significant progress has been made in sensor performance and manufacturing processes. The FPAs are now in initial production with an FPA noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), detector thermal time constant, and pixel operability equivalent or better than that of the current 25 micron pixel pitch production FPAs. NETD improvement was achieved without compromising detector thermal response or thermal time constant by simultaneous reduction in bolometer heat capacity and thermal conductance. In addition, the DRS unique "umbrella" microbolometer cavities were optically tuned to optimize detector radiation absorption for specific spectral band applications. The 17 micron pixel pitch FPAs are currently being considered for the next generation soldier systems such as thermal weapon sights (TWS), vehicle driver vision enhancers (DVE), digitally fused enhanced night vision goggles (DENVG) and unmanned air vehicle (UAV) surveillance sensors, because of overall thermal imaging system size, weight and power advantages.

  8. Validar: A Testbed for Advanced 2-Micron Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy 2-microns lasers have been incorporated in a breadboard coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Sample data is presented on wind profiling and CO2 concentration measurements.

  9. Micron-gap thermophotovoltaic systems enhanced by nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmoosa, Mohammad Sajjad; Simovski, Constantin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce new micron-gap thermophotovoltaic systems enhanced by tungsten nanowires. We theoretically show that these systems allow the frequency-selective super-Planckian spectrum of radiative heat transfer that promises a very efficient generation of electricity. Our system analysis covers practical aspects such as output power per unit area and efficiency of the tap water cooling.

  10. Improved whisker pointing technique for micron-size diode contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Green, G.

    1982-01-01

    Pointed phosphor-bronze whiskers are commonly used to contact micron-size Schottky barrier diodes. A process is presented which allows pointing such wire and achieving the desired cone angle and tip diameter without the use of highly undesirable chemical reagents.

  11. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about the exposure of humans as well as the environment to the parti...

  12. Biogeography of a human oral microbiome at the micron scale

    PubMed Central

    Mark Welch, Jessica L.; Rossetti, Blair J.; Rieken, Christopher W.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Borisy, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization of complex natural microbiomes is critical to understanding the interactions of the individual taxa that comprise a community. Although the revolution in DNA sequencing has provided an abundance of genomic-level information, the biogeography of microbiomes is almost entirely uncharted at the micron scale. Using spectral imaging fluorescence in situ hybridization as guided by metagenomic sequence analysis, we have discovered a distinctive, multigenus consortium in the microbiome of supragingival dental plaque. The consortium consists of a radially arranged, nine-taxon structure organized around cells of filamentous corynebacteria. The consortium ranges in size from a few tens to a few hundreds of microns in radius and is spatially differentiated. Within the structure, individual taxa are localized at the micron scale in ways suggestive of their functional niche in the consortium. For example, anaerobic taxa tend to be in the interior, whereas facultative or obligate aerobes tend to be at the periphery of the consortium. Consumers and producers of certain metabolites, such as lactate, tend to be near each other. Based on our observations and the literature, we propose a model for plaque microbiome development and maintenance consistent with known metabolic, adherence, and environmental considerations. The consortium illustrates how complex structural organization can emerge from the micron-scale interactions of its constituent organisms. The understanding that plaque community organization is an emergent phenomenon offers a perspective that is general in nature and applicable to other microbiomes. PMID:26811460

  13. The NASA - Arc 10/20 micron camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Cooper, R.; Deutsch, L. K.; Mccreight, C.; Mckelvey, M.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Witteborn, F. C.; Yuen, L.; Mcmahon, T.; Werner, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new infrared camera (AIR Camera) has been developed at NASA - Ames Research Center for observations from ground-based telescopes. The heart of the camera is a Hughes 58 x 62 pixel Arsenic-doped Silicon detector array that has the spectral sensitivity range to allow observations in both the 10 and 20 micron atmospheric windows.

  14. Temperature dependence of intensities of the 8-12 micron bands of CFCl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanes, R.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute intensities of the 8-12 micron bands from Freon 11 (CFCl3) were measured at temperatures of 294 and 216 K. Intensities of the bands centered at 798, 847, 934, and 1082 per cm are all observed to depend on temperature. The temperature dependence for the 847 and 1082 per cm fundamental regions is attributed to underlying hot bands; for the nu2 + nu5 combination band (934 per cm), the observed temperature dependence is in close agreement with theoretical prediction. The implication of these results on atmospheric IR remote-sensing is briefly discussed.

  15. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  16. PROPERTIES OF LARGE-AMPLITUDE VARIABLE STARS DETECTED WITH TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY PUBLIC IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzuma, Shinjirou; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2009-11-15

    We present a catalog of variable stars in the near-infrared wavelength detected with overlapping regions of the Two Micron All Sky Survey public images, and discuss their properties. The investigated region is in the direction of the Galactic center (-30 deg. {approx}< l {approx}< 20 deg., |b| {approx}< 20 deg.), which covers the entire bulge. We have detected 136 variable stars, of which six are already known and 118 are distributed in the |b| {<=} 5 deg. region. Additionally, 84 variable stars have optical counterparts in Digitized Sky Survey images. The three diagrams (color-magnitude, light variance, and color-color diagrams) indicate that most of the detected variable stars should be large-amplitude and long-period variables such as Mira variables or OH/IR stars. The number density distribution of the detected variable stars implies that they trace the bar structure of the Galactic bulge.

  17. Hydrogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and the 2940 and 2850 Wavenumber (3.40 and 3.51 micron) Infrared Emission Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamadola, Louis J.

    1996-01-01

    The 3150-2700/cm (3.17-3.70 micron) range of the spectra of a number of Ar-matrix-isolated PAHs containing excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHS) are presented. This region covers features produced by aromatic and aliphatic C-H stretching vibrations as well as overtone and combination bands involving lower lying fundamentals. The aliphatic C-H stretches in molecules of this type having low to modest excess H coverage provide excellent fits to a number of the weak emission features superposed on the plateau between 3080 and 2700/cm (3.25 and 3.7 micron) in the spectra of many planetary nebulae, reflection nebulae, and H II regions. Higher H coverage is implied for a few objects. We compare these results in context with the other suggested identifications of the emission features in the 2950-2700/cm (3.39-3.70 micron) region and briefly discuss their astrophysical implications.

  18. A reevaluation of the 20-micron magnitude system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    The 20-micron infrared magnitude system is reexamined by observing primary infrared standards and seven A V stars. The purpose is to determine whether Alpha Lyr has colors consistent with the average of A0 stars and to determine the relative magnitude of the primary standards to that of Alpha Lyr. The data presented are consistent with the interpretation that the spectrum of Alpha Lyr is a blackbody and that it is a viable flux standard at 10 and 20 microns. The absolute flux density scale, the physical quantity of interest, is found to be consistent with an extrapolation of the Alpha Lyr spectrum from the near infrared on the basis of the comparison of stars to Mars and asteroids. Adoption of a 0.0 magnitude for Alpha Lyr requires that the magnitudes given by Morrison and Simon (1973) and by Simon et al. (1972) be revised downward by 0.14 mag.

  19. Photometric variability of Charon at 2.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosh, A. S.; Young, L. A.; Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Baron, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Pluto-Charon images obtained on each of four nights at 2.2, 1.2, and 1.7 microns are presently fitted by a two-source image model in which the position of Charon and the ratio of its signal to that of Pluto are free parameters. At 2.2 microns, Charon is fainter than Pluto by magnitudes which, when combined with Pluto-Charon system photometry, yield apparent magnitudes of 15.01 + or - 0.08 for Charon at 0.06 lightcurve phase and 15.46 + or - 0.05 at lightcurve phase 0.42. In view of these results, Charon is variable in this filter bypass due to geometric albedo changes as a function of longitude.

  20. Tunable diode lasers for 3-30 micron infrared operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tunable diode laser is now widely used in high resolution infrared spectroscopy studies, taking into account laboratory and industrial applications. The present investigation is concerned with advances related to laser performance and reliability. The advances are the result of improvements in materials and device technologies. Reliability data for broad-area Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se lasers are considered along with performance improvements in stripe-geometry lasers, laser performance at wavelengths above 25 microns, and laser performance at wavelengths below 4 microns. Attention is given to tunable Pb-salt infrared diode lasers, mesa-stripe geometry lasers of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se and PbS(1-x)Se(x), and long wavelength diode laser emission observed in both Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te and Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se.

  1. Infrared spectrum of Io, 2.8-5.2 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1980-02-01

    The reflectance spectrum of Io is presented from 2.8 to 5.2 microns demonstrating the full extent of the broad and deep spectral absorption between 3.5 and 4.8 microns. Laboratory spectra of nitrates and carbonates diluted with sulfur do not satisfactorily reproduce the Io spectrum, but new information based on recently discovered volcanic activity on the satellite lead to consideration of other classes of compounds reported by Fanale et al. (1979). It is concluded that the variability of the supply of condensible SO2 gas to the surface of Io, its removal by sublimination, and the temporal variations in the strength of the SO2 band may provide an index of volcanic activity on Io that can be monitored from the earth.

  2. Radiation Hard 0.13 Micron CMOS Library at IHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdhold, U.

    2013-08-01

    To support space applications we have developed an 0.13 micron CMOS library which should be radiation hard up to 200 krad. The article describes the concept to come to a radiation hard digital circuit and was introduces in 2010 [1]. By introducing new radiation hard design rules we will minimize IC-level leakage and single event latch-up (SEL). To reduce single event upset (SEU) we add two p-MOS transistors to all flip flops. For reliability reasons we use double contacts in all library elements. The additional rules and the library elements are integrated in our Cadence mixed signal design kit, “Virtuoso” IC6.1 [2]. A test chip is produced with our in house 0.13 micron BiCMOS technology, see Ref. [3]. As next step we will doing radiation tests according the european space agency (ESA) specifications, see Ref. [4], [5].

  3. 60 micron luminosity evolution of rich clusters of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.M.; Rieke, G.H. )

    1990-10-01

    The average 60-micron flux has been determined for a collection of optically selected galaxy clusters at redshifts ranging from 0.30 to 0.92. The result, 26 mJy per cluster, represents the faintest flux determination known of using the IRAS data base. The flux from this set of clusters has been compared to the 60-micron flux from a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. It is found that the far-infrared luminosity evolution in cluster galaxies can be no more than a factor of 1.7 from z = 0.4 to the present epoch. This upper limit is close to the evolution predicted for simple aging of the stellar populations. Additional processes such as mergers, cannibalism, or enhanced rates of starbursts appear to occur at a low enough level that they have little influence on the far-infrared emission from clusters over this redshift range. 38 refs.

  4. 60 micron luminosity evolution of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Douglas M.; Rieke, George H.

    1990-01-01

    The average 60-micron flux has been determined for a collection of optically selected galaxy clusters at redshifts ranging from 0.30 to 0.92. The result, 26 mJy per cluster, represents the faintest flux determination known of using the IRAS data base. The flux from this set of clusters has been compared to the 60-micron flux from a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. It is found that the far-infrared luminosity evolution in cluster galaxies can be no more than a factor of 1.7 from z = 0.4 to the present epoch. This upper limit is close to the evolution predicted for simple aging of the stellar populations. Additional processes such as mergers, cannibalism, or enhanced rates of starbursts appear to occur at a low enough level that they have little influence on the far-infrared emission from clusters over this redshift range.

  5. Correlation of infrared reflectance ratios at 2.3 microns/1.6 micron and 1.1 micron/1.6 micron with delta O-18 values delineating fossil hydrothermal systems in the Idaho batholith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Criss, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance ratios from laboratory spectra and airborne multispectral images are found to be strongly correlated with delta O-18 values of granite rocks in the Idaho batholith. The correlation is largely a result of interactions between hot water and rock, which lowered the delta O-18 values of the rocks and produced secondary hydrous material. Maps of the ratio of reflectivities at 2.3 and 1.6 microns should delineate fossil hydrothermal systems and provide estimates of alteration intensity. However, hydrous minerals produced during deuteric alteration or weathering cannot be unambiguously distinguished in remotely sensed images from the products of propylitic alteration without the use of narrow-band scanners. The reflectivity at 1.6 micron is strongly correlated with rock density and may be useful in distinguishing rock types in granitic terranes.

  6. The brightness distribution of IRC +10216 at 11 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, E. C.; Betz, A. L.; Storey, J. W. V.; Spears, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The brightness distribution of IRC +10216 at a wavelength of 11 microns was measured in detail using a spatial interferometer. This brightness distribution appears to have azimuthal symmetry; an upper limit of 1.1 may be set to the ellipticity at 11 microns if the object has a major axis oriented either along or perpendicular to the major axis of the optical image. The radial distribution shows both compact and extended emission. The extended component, which is due to thermal emission from circumstellar dust, contributes 91% of the total flux and has a 1/e diameter of 0.90 minutes. The tapered shape of this component is consistent with a l/r squared dust density dependence. The compact component is unresolved (less than 0.2 minutes in diameter) and represents emission from the central star seen through the circumstellar envelope.

  7. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron-Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Witherow, W. K.; West, E. A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2- to 6.82-micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam widths of approximately 175- 400 microns at ambient pressures particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of SiO2 and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  8. Improvement of the Database on the 1.13-microns Band of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Schwenke, David W.; Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Varanasi, Prasad; Freedman, Richard S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Corrections have recently been reported (Giver et al.) on the short-wave (visible and near-infrared) line intensities of water vapor that were catalogued in the spectroscopic database known as HITRAN. These updates have been posted on www.hitran.com, and are being used to reanalyze the polar stratospheric absorption in the 0.94 microns band as observed in POAM. We are currently investigating additional improvement in the 1.13 microns band using data obtained by us with an absorption path length of 1.107 km and 4 torr of water vapor and the ab initio line list of Partridge and Schwenke (needs ref). We are proposing the following four types of improvement of the HITRAN database in this region: 1) HITRAN has nearly 200 lines in this region without proper assignments of rotational quantum levels. Nearly all of them can now be assigned. 2) We have measured positions of the observable H2O-17 and H2O-18 lines. These lines in HITRAN currently have approximate positions based upon rather aged computations. 3) Some additional lines are observed and assigned which should be included in the database. 4) Corrections are necessary for the lower state energies E" for the HITRAN lines of the 121-010 "hot" band.

  9. Batch Production of Micron-scale Backlighter Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, G.

    2016-04-01

    The fabrication of micron-scale backlighter targets is described. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. The processes described herein allow batch production with numbers in the 1000s. In addition, the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) fabrication techniques used allow much finer tolerances and more accurate placement of the various components relative to each other.

  10. Two micron pore size MCP-based image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, John; Estrera, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Image intensifiers (I2) have many advantages as detectors. They offer single photon sensitivity in an imaging format, they're light in weight and analog I2 systems can operate for hours on a single AA battery. Their light output is such as to exploit the peak in color sensitivity of the human eye. Until recent developments in CMOS sensors, they also were one of the highest resolution sensors available. The closest all solid state solution, the Texas Instruments Impactron chip, comes in a 1 megapixel format. Depending on the level of integration, an Impactron based system can consume 20 to 40 watts in a system configuration. In further investing in I2 technology, L-3 EOS determined that increasing I2 resolution merited a high priority. Increased I2 resolution offers the system user two desirable options: 1) increased detection and identification ranges while maintaining field-of-view (FOV) or 2) increasing FOV while maintaining the original system resolution. One of the areas where an investment in resolution is being made is in the microchannel plate (MCP). Incorporation of a 2 micron MCP into an image tube has the potential of increasing the system resolution of currently fielded systems. Both inverting and non-inverting configurations are being evaluated. Inverting tubes are being characterized in night vision goggle (NVG) and sights. The non-inverting 2 micron tube is being characterized for high resolution I2CMOS camera applications. Preliminary measurements show an increase in the MTF over a standard 5 micron pore size, 6 micron pitch plate. Current results will be presented.

  11. A 100-micron polarimeter for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D.P.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Platt, S.R.

    1989-02-01

    Consideration is given to the design and performance of the 100-micron polarimeter proposed for use on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The polarimeter specifications are listed. The polarimeter design and data reduction techniques are based on the work of Hildebrand et al. (1984) and Dragovan (1986). The polarimeter has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and systematic measurement errors below 0.2 percent. 20 refs.

  12. A 100-micron polarimeter for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D. P.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Platt, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the design and performance of the 100-micron polarimeter proposed for use on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The polarimeter specifications are listed. The polarimeter design and data reduction techniques are based on the work of Hildebrand et al. (1984) and Dragovan (1986). The polarimeter has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and systematic measurement errors below 0.2 percent.

  13. Mix-and-match lithography for half-micron technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.; Dameron, David H.

    1991-08-01

    Half-micron lithography for a production environment is not considered realistic with currently available lithography tools. While optical steppers have high wafer throughputs, they do not have sufficient process latitude at half-micron geometries. In contrast, advanced technologies with sufficient capabilities for half-micron processing such as direct-write e-beam and x-ray lithography are extremely expensive and have low effective throughputs. A mix-and- match lithography approach can take advantage of the best features of both types of systems by sing an optical stepper for noncritical levels and an advanced lithography system for critical levels. In order to facilitate processing of a triple level metal half-micron CMOS technology, a mix-and-match scheme has been developed between a Hitachi HL-700 D e-beam direct write system and an Ultratech 1500 wide-field 1x stepper. The Hitachi is used to pattern an accurate zero or registration level. All critical levels are exposed on the Hitachi and aligned back to this zero level. The Ultratech is used to align all other process levels which do not have critical targets that are placed on subsequent process levels. The mix-and-match approach is discussed, and optical to e-beam as well as e-beam to optical alignment results from seven production lots are presented. The linear alignment error components X translation, Y translation, rotation and magnification are extracted and analyzed to determine their source. It was found that a simple adjustment improved the registration capabilities of these two lithography tools by reducing the X translation, Y translation and rotation standard deviations by a factor of two or more, while greatly reducing the magnification errors between the two tools.

  14. Effect of humidity on aerosolization of micronized drugs.

    PubMed

    Young, Paul M; Price, Robert; Tobyn, Michael J; Buttrum, Mark; Dey, Fiona

    2003-10-01

    The variation of aerosolization with humidity for three micronized drugs used in the treatment of asthma was evaluated by using in vitro methods. Micronized samples of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), salbutamol sulphate, and triamcinolone acetonide (TAA) were stored for 12hr at 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75% relative humidity (RH). A suitable "reservoir" dry powder inhaler was loaded and tested by using a twin-stage impinger at each specific humidity. The aerosolization efficiency of all three micronized drugs was affected by variations in humidity. The percentage of the delivered dose and the fine particle fraction of the loaded dose (FPFLD) for both DSCG and salbutamol sulphate decreased with increasing humidity; with the largest decrease in FPFLD occurring between 45% and 60% RH for DSCG and 60% to 75% RH for salbutamol sulphate. These observations suggest that the adhesion properties for both DSCG and salbutamol sulphate, which govern the aerosolization efficiency, are predominately influenced by capillary interactions. In contrast, the FPFLD for TAA significantly increased as the humidity increased over the range 15% to 75% RH, suggesting that triboelectric forces predominate particle-particle interactions. These variations in drug particulate behavior highlight the importance of an individual formulation approach when developing dry powder inhalation systems. PMID:14606660

  15. Measuring micron size beams in the SLC final focus

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; DeBarger, S.

    1994-10-01

    A pair of high resolution wire scanners have been built and installed in the SLC final focus. The final focus optics uses a set of de-magnifying telescopes, and an ideal location for a beam size monitor is at one of the magnified image points of the interaction point. The image point chosen for these scanners is in the middle of a large bend magnet. The design beam spots here are about 2 microns in the vertical and 20 microns in the horizontal plane. The scanners presented a number of design challenges. In this paper we discuss the mechanical design of the scanner, and fabrication techniques of its ceramic wire support card which holds many 4 and 7 um carbon wires. Accurate motion of the wire during a scan is critical. In this paper we describe tests of stepper motors, gear combinations, and radiation hardened encoders needed to produce the required motion with a step resolution of 80 nanometers. Also presented here are the results of scattered radiation detector placement studies carried out to optimize the signal from the 4 micron wires. Finally, we present measurements from the scanner.

  16. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P.D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; Witherow, W. K.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2 micron to 6.82 micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam-widths of approx. 175-400 micron, at ambient pressures approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -4) torr. The downward displacement of the particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of silica and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  17. Water frost and ice - The near-infrared spectral reflectance 0.65-2.5 microns. [observed on natural satellites and other solar system objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of water frost and frost on ice as a function of temperature and grain size is presented with 1-1/2% spectral resolution in the 0.65- to 2.5-micron wavelength region. The well-known 2.0-, 1.65-, and 1.5-micron solid water absorption bands are precisely defined along with the little studied 1.25-micron band and the previously unidentified (in reflectance) 1.04-, 0.90-, and 0.81-micron absorption bands. The 1.5-microns band complex is quantitatively analyzed using a nonlinear least squares algorithm to resolve the band into four Gaussian components as a function of grain size and temperature. It is found that the 1.65-micron component, which was thought to be a good temperature sensor, is highly grain-size dependent and poorly suited to temperature sensing. Another Gaussian component appears to show a dependence of width on grain size while being independent of temperature. The relative apparent band depths are different for frost layers on ice than for thick layers of frost and may explain the apparent band depths seen in many planetary reflectance spectra.

  18. A study of (OI) 63.2 and 145.5 micron emission from M17 and SGR A from the Lear jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G. G.

    1986-01-01

    The Lear Jet Observatory was used to observe the 157.7 micron (C II) line from the galactic H II regions W3 and W51. These measurements established a lower limit in the 157.7 micron line for solar luminosity of 360 from W3, assuming adistance of 2 kpc, and a solar luminosity of 4100 from W51, assuming a distance of 7 kpc. The data indicated that the CII/far infrared continuum ratio for both W3 and W51 were within the range found for other galactic H II regions.

  19. Balloon observations of interstellar CII (158 microns) and OI (63 microns) forbidden lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibai, H.; Okuda, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Maihara, T.; Mizutani, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Hiromoto, N.; Low, F. J.; Nishimura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar CII and OI forbidden lines were observed by the Balloon-Borne Infrared Telescope (BIRT) with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. Two balloon flights were successfully made. With a method of 'frequency switching', diffuse CII forbidden-line emission was efficiently detected and mapped in extended regions around HII/molecular cloud complexes and in a wide area of the Galactic plane. It has been shown that the CII forbidden-line emission is very strong and ubiquitously distributed in interstellar space in the Galaxy.

  20. Interstellar dust spectra between 2.5 and 3.3 microns - A search for hydrated silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Mccorkle, S.; Puetter, R. C.; Erickson, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra in the 2.5-3.3 micron wavelength region of VI Cyg 12, AFGL 2205, and AFGL 2885 were obtained in a search for bound water, hydroxyl groups, and hydrated minerals in interstellar dust. No new absorption bands were found. Comparison of expected strengths of bands of serpentine and chlorite-like minerals with the data suggests that less than 25 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the silicate in the grains is composed of these materials.

  1. Modeling of InGaAsSb-Based Avalanche Photodetectors for 2-Micron Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Ravindra P.; Abedin, M. Nurul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The main focus of this research is to study and evaluate the potential of InGaAsSb-AlGaAsSb based 2 micron avalanche photo-detectors. The photodetector contains a separate absorption and multiplication region (SAM) structure. The analysis has mainly been done to understand the electrical response characteristics of the devices existing at NASA, and to evaluate alternate structures proposed. Calculating the current flow for the existing detector structure, on the basis of its energy band diagram, is important. This analysis also helps to find shortcomings in the existing detector structure. It is shown that, unfortunately, the existing structure cannot lead to strong multiplication or voltage dependent gain. Two alternate structures are suggested, that could overcome the inherent flaws, and help achieve improved performance. These devices are obtained through modifications of the original structure, which include varying the doping levels, and changing the thicknesses of detector sub-regions. The results of our study are presented and discussed.

  2. Detection of forbidden line O I 63 micron emission from the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.; Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of the 63 micron line of forbidden line O I is reported for three positions in the H II region complex Sgr A at the galactic center. Velocity resolution of the line indicates that the emitting material has both rotational and radial motion of magnitude similar to that of the ionized gas in the core, and that a substantial amount of the emitting material lies within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy. A model in which forbidden line O I is collisionally excited by neutral hydrogen, either from the warm region ahead of an ionization front or behind a shock, is proposed and gives a total mass of hot, neutral gas within the central 3 pc of the Galaxy of between 10 and 1000 solar mass. A limit on the flux of this line has been set for Sgr B2.

  3. Detection of [O I] 63 Micron Emission from the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.; Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, Dan M.; Townes, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of the 63 microns line of [O I] is reported for three positions in the H II region complex Sgr A at the galactic center. Velocity resolution of the line indicates that the emitting material has both rotational and radial motion of magnitude similar to that of the ionized gas in the core and that a substantial amount of the emitting material lies within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy. A model in which [O I] is collisionally excited by neutral hydrogen, either from the warm region ahead of an ionization front or behind a shock, is proposed and gives a total mass of hot, neutral gas within the central 3 pc of the Galaxy of between 10 and 10(exp 3) solar mass. A limit on the flux of this line has been set for Sgr B2.

  4. Triterpenoide. XX. 3beta-acetoxy-12-oxo-18beta-olean- und 3beta-acetoxy-12,19-dioxo-9(11), 13(18)-oleandien-28-saure-methylester

    PubMed

    Gzella

    2000-08-01

    The structures of methyl 3beta-acetoxy-12-oxo-18beta-olean-28-oate [C(33)H(52)O(5), (I)] and methyl 3beta-acetoxy-12, 19-dioxoolean-9(11),13(18)-dien-28-oate [C(33)H(46)O(6), (II)] are described. In (I), all rings are in the chair conformation, rings D and E are cis and the other rings trans-fused. In compound (II), only rings A and E are in the chair conformation, ring B has a distorted chair conformation, ring C a distorted half-boat and ring D an insignificantly distorted half-chair conformation. PMID:10944297

  5. Fiber laser at 2 micron region using double-clad thulium/ytterbium co-doped yttria-alumino-silicate fiber Fiber laser at 2 micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, S. W.; Saidin, N.; Damanhuri, S. S. A.; Ahmad, H.; Halder, A.; Paul, M. C.; Das, S.; Pal, M.; Bhadra, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    A lasing action from a newly developed double-clad Tm3+/Yb3+ co-doped yttria-alumino-silicate fiber (TYDF) is demonstrated based on cladding pumping technique. The TYDF used was drawn from D-shape preform, which was fabricated using a modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process in conjunction with a solution doping technique. The Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions concentrations in this fiber are 5.55×1019 and 15.52×1019 ions/cc, respectively. The fiber laser operates at wavelength of 1948.4 and 1947.2 nm with pump power thresholds of 0.6 and 1.0 W for 915 and 940 nm pumping, respectively. The maximum output power of 10.5 mW was achieved with the 915 nm pumping at the maximum pump power of 1.5 W. It is found that the laser is more efficient with 915 nm pumping compared to 940 nm pumping.

  6. 2.2-micron field stars at the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of the 2.2-micron field stars seen near the North Galactic Pole by the Two Micron Sky Survey and by surveys at higher sensitivity are discussed. All the 2.2-micron sources found in these surveys can be identified with stars with known spectral types. The distribution of the 2.2-micron field stars appears to be well-understood.

  7. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  8. DS1 MICAS Full-Disk-Rotation Spectra of Mars (1.2-2.8 microns)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, L. A.

    2000-10-01

    During November 1999 new global reflectance spectra of Mars for two full rotations were acquired with the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) channel of the MICAS (Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer) aboard DS1 (New Millennium Deep Space 1 S/C). Earlier spectra, acquired in May 1999, had shown very tentative new absorption features between 1.5-1.9 microns, possibly related to surface mineralogy (Soderblom, 2000, LPSC abstract). During the November 1999 sequence Mars was at a much closer range (55 versus 115 million km). The conditions for the November observations were as follows: phase angle 53 deg., heliocentric longitude (Ls) 240 deg. (northern Autumn), sub-S/C latitude 18.1 S, and sub-solar latitude 21.8 S. This is an opportune geometry because most of the surface contrast among surface materials likely to show mineralogical variance is in the belt from the equator to about 40 S (c.f. Viking global color mosaics). The south annual CO2 cap was near its full extent ( 60 S). MICAS acquired 48 spectra in with the SWIR keyhole (16 groups of three on 3-hour centers) covering roughly two full rotations of Mars. Because Mars' sidereal day is about 24h and 40m, the two rotations are shifted about 9 degrees relative to each other; all spectra that were within +/- 5 degrees of each other were averaged to provide longitude coverage every 45 degrees. The data were calibrated using a new MICAS SWIR spectral response file derived Arcturus observations. The new calibration allows extension of the useful spectral range out to 2.7 microns. The highest quality (highest SNR) spectral region is from 1.6 to 2.0 microns bounded on both sides by atmospheric CO2 bands. A series of spectral features are recognized in this band appear to be related to surface mineralogy because their strength is modulated by rotation of the planet. The features were tentatively identified at 1.74 and 1.87 microns in the May data (Soderblom, 2000) are far more clearly visible in the November data

  9. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  10. analysis of data from upgraded 2.33 micron TIMS: Example of GEO-CAPE application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Roche, A. E.; Chatfield, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS) were originally developed with support from the NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator program (IIP). These were developed to operate in the spectral regions of the CO overtone and fundamental bands at about 2.33 and 4.67 microns, respectively. In the IIP it was shown these could provide measurements of CO vertical structure, with area coverage rate and spatial resolution that would satisfy GEO-CAPE requirements as laid out in the NRC Decadal Survey report. Since completion of the IIP there has been further internal supported development including but not limited to; (a) deployment of the 2.33 unit on an airship that further developed the case for GEO-CAPE application(see HISE 2011 reference below), and (B) a recent upgrade in the 2.33 micron TIMS performance. In this presentation we describe the upgrade and preliminary data (improved spectral resolution). We describe a retrieval procedure that starts with a trial model that is considerably different than the "truth" atmosphere for which the data were acquired, and modifies the trial model to produce a best fit to the data. The result is a best estimate retrieval of the CO, CH4 and H2O columns. Differences in the trial model temperature vs the truth are accounted for. HISE 2011 reference, click on http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=HISE-2011-HTuD2 and then click on "View Full Text" .

  11. The use of MTDSC to assess the amorphous phase content of a micronized drug substance.

    PubMed

    Guinot, S; Leveiller, F

    1999-12-01

    Mechanical treatments such as grinding, milling or micronization applied to crystalline drug substances may induce changes such as the occurrence of crystal defects and/or amorphous regions. These changes are likely to affect the chemical and physical properties of the material as well as the corresponding drug product performances. Various analytical techniques such as standard differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal and solution microcalorimetry as well as dynamic vapour sorption can be used to characterise and possibly quantify the amorphous phase content of these materials. These techniques have been applied for the development of analytical methods based on temperature- or solvent-induced (including water) recrystallization of the amorphous phase in semi-crystalline drug substances and excipients and have sometimes allowed for detecting low amounts of amorphous phase. We have developed an alternative MTDSC method for the quantitation of the amorphous content in samples of a micronized drug substance co-crystal (form A), an antibiotic drug substance which does not recrystallize even when exposed to temperature or solvent vapours. This is performed through measurement of the heat capacity jump associated with the amorphous phase glass transition. The MTDSC parameters and experimental conditions were optimised for this system. The amorphous content calibration curve was established using pure crystalline and amorphous drug substance samples and their known mixtures. Limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 and 3.0% (w/w) respectively were obtained for specimen mass less than 5 mg. PMID:10572200

  12. Phobos - Spectrophotometry between 0.3 and 0.6 micron and IR-radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksanfomality, L.; Murchie, S.; Britt, D.; Fisher, P.; Duxbury, T.

    1991-01-01

    A 0.3 - 0.6 micron UV-visible spectrophotometer and a 5 - 50 micron radiometer in the KRFM experiment on Phobos 2 measured two groundtracks in the equatorial region of Phobos. Preliminary results indicate that three surface units can be recognized on the basis of differing UV-visible spectral reflectance properties. One of the units is most comparable spectrally to optically darkened mafic material, and a second is comparable either to anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite or to blackened mafic material. Spectral properties of the third unit do not resemble those of known meteorite types. Brightness temperatures measured by the radiometer are consistent with a typical surface thermal inertia of 1 - 3 x 10 to the -3 cal/(sq cm deg s exp 1/2), as suggested by previous investigations, implying a lunar-like regolith texture. At least one area of possibly higher thermal inertia has been tentatively identified, where a large degraded crater is crossed by several grooves. These results indicate significant lateral heterogeneity in the optical and textural properties of Phobos' surface.

  13. Spectra of Uranus and Neptune at 8-14 and 17-23 microns

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, G.S.; Aitken, D.K.; Smith, C.; Roche, P.F.; Caldwell, J.

    1987-04-01

    The 3-m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility was used to observe the disks of Uranus and Neptune between May 30 and June 1, 1985 in the 7-14 and 17-23 micron spectral regions. Maximum stratospheric mixing ratios of 9 x 10 to the -9th for C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, and of 2 x 10 to the -8th for C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, are found for Uranus, and the spectrum is otherwise smooth, consistent with the opacity provided by H/sub 2/ collision-induced absorption and spectrally continuous stratospheric emission. Strong emission features of CH/sub 4/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 6/ are found in the short-wavelength spectrum of Neptune, and the spectrum near 13.5 microns is consistent with C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ emission in local saturation equilibrium with a maximum mixing ratio of 9 x 10 to the -7th. 27 references.

  14. A Two Micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-micron coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument measures atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) from a ground platform. It allows the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop. Keywords: Differential Absorption Lidar, Near Infrared Laser,

  15. Liquid crystal alignment induced by micron-scale patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willman, E; Seddon, L; Osman, M; Bulak, A; James, R; Day, S E; Fernandez, F A

    2014-05-01

    Induced bulk orientation of nematic liquid crystal in contact with micron-scale patterned surfaces is investigated using the Landau-de Gennes theory by means of three-dimensional simulations. The effect of the size and spacing of square cross-sectional well and post patterns is investigated and shown to influence the orientation of the liquid crystal bulk, far removed from the surface. Additionally, the effective anchoring strength of the induced alignment is estimated using a modified version of the torque balance method. Both azimuthal and zenithal multistability are shown to exist within unique ranges of feature sizes. PMID:25353809

  16. Fabrication of Micron Scale Retroreflectors for Novel Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Tim

    Many bioanalytical and diagnostic methods detect the presence of secondary labels, such as colored particles, fluorescent molecules, nanoparticles, and enzyme reaction product, when they accumulate in the presence of the target biomolecules (i.e., bacteria, viruses, etc.) at predetermined locations. In this dissertation, we describe the development of a new class of labels consisting of micro-fabricated retroreflectors that are easy to image, compatible with machine vision automation, and can be detected in solution or within microfluidic channels. The retroreflecting structures are designed to return incident light directly back to its source over a large range of angles, making them extremely detectable using low cost, low numerical aperture objectives, as is evidenced by their common use as lane markers and in safety signs. This work describes two different biosensing systems using these labels. In the first, retroreflectors are fabricated at fixed locations at the base of microfluidic channels and their brightness is attenuated by the biologically-driven accumulation of magnetic particles, thus forming a readout strategy that well-suited for automation and multiplexing. The work demonstrates that single, micron-scale magnetic beads can be rapidly detected over very large areas (square millimeters). The second approach uses suspended corner cube retroreflectors, five microns on a side, as ultra bright labels that are bound to magnetic sample preparation beads in the presence of an analyte. The magnetic particles can then be moved to an imaging site within the sample where the cubes are readily detected. The fabrication of these micron-scale retroreflectors required the development of new lithography, thin film disposition, and reactive ion etching tools and the integration of chip-based structures with microfluidic systems. The dissertation also describes the experimental validation of a Fourier optics model that accounts for diffraction inherent to the micron

  17. Advanced composite applications for sub-micron biologically derived microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnur, J. M.; Price, R. R.; Schoen, P. E.; Bonanventura, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A major thrust of advanced material development is in the area of self-assembled ultra-fine particulate based composites (micro-composites). The application of biologically derived, self-assembled microstructures to form advanced composite materials is discussed. Hollow 0.5 micron diameter cylindrical shaped microcylinders self-assemble from diacetylenic lipids. These microstructures have a multiplicity of potential applications in the material sciences. Exploratory development is proceeding in application areas such as controlled release for drug delivery, wound repair, and biofouling as well as composites for electronic and magnetic applications, and high power microwave cathodes.

  18. WISE 3.4 micron Detection of PTF10acbp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Hoffman, D.; Masci, F.; Conrow, T.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Helou, G.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Surace, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010 AJ 140, 1868) scanned the position of PTF10acbp (ATEL #3094), the luminous red nova in the spiral galaxy UGC 11973, 23 times between 2010 June 17 and June 23, and again 30 times between 2010 December 12 and December 16, just five days after the transient's discovery. The June observations were made during the WISE cryogenic survey yielding images at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns.

  19. Sub-micron texturing of silicon wafer with fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi, Hamid; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Hong Yu; Li, Zhongli

    2011-03-01

    Laser texturing is extensively investigated for modifying surface properties. A continuous wave (CW) fiber laser (λ= 1090nm) was used to pattern a silicon wafer surface in ambient and O2 atmosphere respectively. The O2 gas stream was delivered through a coaxial nozzle to the laser spot. Characterization of the patterned features was carried out by surface profiling, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS or EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Formation of laser-induced silicon oxide sub-micron bumps was observed, which were analyzed and shown to cause changes in surface wetability and reflectivity.

  20. Micron-scale lens array having diffracting structures

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2013-10-29

    A novel micron-scale lens, a microlens, is engineered to concentrate light efficiently onto an area of interest, such as a small, light-sensitive detector element in an integrated electronic device. Existing microlens designs imitate the form of large-scale lenses and are less effective at small sizes. The microlenses described herein have been designed to accommodate diffraction effects, which dominate the behavior of light at small length scales. Thus a new class of light-concentrating optical elements with much higher relative performance has been created. Furthermore, the new designs are much easier to fabricate than previous designs.

  1. What Can AMF Observations Tell Us about Super-micron Particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Pekour, M. S.; Flynn, C. J.; Berg, L. K.; Beranek, J.; Zelenyuk, A.; Barnard, J.; Hallar, A. G.; McComiskey, A. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    While numerous studies have demonstrated a significant contribution of super-micron particles to the total aerosol mass for many regions with large aerosol loading, comparatively little is known about the importance of these particles in relatively clean areas common to much of the globe. To investigate their potential importance, we take advantage of datasets collected from ground-based observations during recent field campaigns supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Programs. These campaigns were designed to provide a comprehensive dataset that can be used to investigate important climate science questions, including those related to aerosols, for many regions around the world using the unique capabilities of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF; http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf). The AMF datasets integrate observations from numerous instruments for sampling aerosol and cloud and radiative properties, including the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), a three-wavelength nephelometer, and a Single Particle Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT II). The latter was used to characterize the size, composition, and density of individual particles in the size range from 50 to 3,000 nm. We analyze column and near-surface data from these instruments to explore the possible importance of super-micron particles to aerosol microphysical and optical properties. We find that their contribution to the climate-relevant total scattering and absorption can be quite large (50% and 30%, for scattering and absorption, respectively). These large contributions occur even in areas with low-to-moderate aerosol loading (total scattering < 50 Mm-1) located far from major sources. We discuss the expected implications from our results to the evaluation and improvement of regional and global climate models.

  2. Transmittance and reflectance of crystalline quartz and highand low-water content fused silica from 2 microns to 1 mm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, J. B.; Stewart, K. P.; Hass, G.

    1983-01-01

    The transmittances and reflectances of cultured crystalline quartz, Suprasil, Suprasil W, and Infrasil were compared over the wavelength region from 2 to 1000 microns. The high-water content of Suprasil and the low-water content of cultured crystalline quartz, Suprasil W, and Infrasil were determined by their transmittances measured at 2.73 microns where water content causes high absorption in optical materials. The fact that the fused silicas, both with high- and low-water content, had identical far-IR transmittances and that their transmittances were greatly inferior to that of crystalline quartz led to the conclusion that their inferior transmittance is due to their amorphous structure and not to their water content.

  3. 2.4 Micron Cutoff AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb Phototransistors for Shortwave IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Swaminathan, Krishna; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Shortwave infrared detectors are critical for several applications including remote sensing and optical communications. Several detectors are commercially available for this wavelength range, but they lack sufficient gain, which limits their detectivity. The characterization results of an AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistor for shortwave IR application are reported. The phototransistor is grown using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Spectral response measurements showed a uniform responsivity between 1.2 and 2.4 micron region with a mean value of 1000 A/W. A maximum detectivity of 3.4 X 10(exp 11) cmHz1/2/W was obtained at 2 micron at -20 C and 1.3 V.

  4. Efficient CW diode-pumped Tm, Ho:YLF laser with tunability near 2.067 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguckin, B. T.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1992-01-01

    A conversion efficiency of 42 percent and slope efficiency of approximately 60 percent relative to absorbed pump power are reported from a continuous wave diode-pumped Tm, Ho:YLF laser at 2 microns with output power of 84 mW at sub-ambient temperatures. The emission spectrum is etalon tunable over a range of 16/cm centered on 2.067 microns, with fine tuning capability of the transition frequency with crystal temperature at a measured rate of about -0.03/cm-K. The effective emission cross section is measured to be 5 x 10 exp -21 sq cm. These and other aspects of the laser performance are discussed in the context of calculated atmospheric absorption characteristics in this spectral region and potential use in remote sensing applications.

  5. 4.6 micron absorption features due to solid phase CO and cyano group molecules toward compact infrared sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Baas, F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Van De Bult, C. E. P.; Persson, S. E.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Geballe, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra obtained at a resolving power of 840, for seven protostellar sources in the region of the 4.67-micron fundamental vibrational band of CO, indicate that the deep absorption feature in W33A near 4.61 microns consists of three features which are seen in other sources, but with varying relative strength. UV-irradiation laboratory experiments with 'dirty ice' temperature cycling allow the identification of two of the features cited with solid CO and CO complexed to other molecules. Cyano group-containing molecules have a lower vapor pressure than CO, and can therefore survive in much warmer environments. The formation and location of the CO- and CN-bearing grain mantles and sources of UV irradiation in cold molecular clouds are discussed. Plausible UV light sources can produce the observed cyano group features, but only under conditions in which local heat sources do not cause evaporation of the CO molecules prior to their photoprocessing.

  6. Sub-micron resolution high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography in quality inspection for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fält, P.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.; Cense, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in quality inspection for printed electronics. The device used in the study is based on a supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer and high-speed spectrometer. The spectrometer in the presented spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup (SD-OCT) is centered at 600 nm and covers a 400 nm wide spectral region ranging from 400 nm to 800 nm. Spectra were acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function obtained from a Parylene C sample was 0:98 m. In addition to Parylene C layers, the applicability of sub-micron SD-OCT in printed electronics was studied using PET and epoxy covered solar cell, a printed RFID antenna and a screen-printed battery electrode. A commercial SD-OCT system was used for reference measurements.

  7. Micron: an Actively Stabilized Handheld Tool for Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Becker, Brian C.; Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; Podnar, Gregg W.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hand-held actively stabilized tool to increase accuracy in micro-surgery or other precision manipulation. It removes involuntary motion such as tremor by actuating the tip to counteract the effect of the undesired handle motion. The key components are a three-degree-of-freedom piezoelectric manipulator that has 400 μm range of motion, 1 N force capability, and bandwidth over 100 Hz, and an optical position measurement subsystem that acquires the tool pose with 4 μm resolution at 2000 samples/s. A control system using these components attenuates hand motion by at least 15 dB (a fivefold reduction). By considering the effect of the frequency response of Micron on the human visual feedback loop, we have developed a filter that reduces unintentional motion, yet preserves intuitive eye-hand coordination. We evaluated the effectiveness of Micron by measuring the accuracy of the human/machine system in three simple manipulation tasks. Handheld testing by three eye surgeons and three non-surgeons showed a reduction in position error of between 32% and 52%, depending on the error metric. PMID:23028266

  8. VTT's micron-scale silicon rib+strip waveguide platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Cherchi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Silicon rib waveguides enable single-mode (SM) operation even with the combination of multi-micron core dimensions and high refractive index contrast. In such large waveguides the optical mode field is almost completely confined inside the Si core, which leads to small propagation losses and small polarization dependency. The unique SM condition of the rib waveguide also enables the use of an ultra-wide wavelength range, for example from 1.2 to <1.7 μm, without sacrificing either SM operation or low propagation loss. This makes micron-scale Si waveguides particularly well-suited for spectroscopy and extensive wavelength division multiplexing. However, rib waveguides require large bending radii, which lead to large circuit sizes. There are two solutions for this. So-called Euler bends in Si strip waveguides enable low-loss bends down to 1 μm bending radius with less than 0.1 dB/90° loss for both polarizations. Another alternative is a total-internal reflection mirror that can have loss as low as 0.1 dB for both polarizations in either strip or rib waveguides. The excitation of higher order modes in large strip waveguides is avoided by using adiabatic rib-strip converters and low-loss components. With rib and strip waveguides it is possible to reach a unique combination of low loss, extremely small footprint, small polarization dependency, ultra-wide bandwidth and tolerance to high optical powers.

  9. Influence of micronization on improving phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghui; Wu, Qinyan; Chen, Hongzhou; Zhuang, Yiqing

    2015-01-01

    The influence of micronization on improving the phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran was studied. Wheat bran samples were prepared by ball milling, and an animal experiment was carried out by feeding 8-month-old female rats wheat bran. The effect of wheat bran samples on serum estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) levels of female 8-month-old rats was investigated. The wheat bran with a median diameter of 392.1 μm was micronized to 91.1 and 9.7 μm in median diameter by dry milling and wet milling for 5 hours, respectively. Microscopic observation and X-ray diffraction revealed more potential damage from wet milling than dry milling on the crystal structure of wheat bran granules. Almost all particles were dissolved and there was no obvious crystal peak in the 5-hour wet-milled wheat bran. The serum E2 and P levels of the 8-month-old rats fed wet-milled bran were increased significantly, 2.2 times higher than that of the same aged control group. The experimental results indicated that wet milling could destroy the crystal structure of wheat bran granules and improve the phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran. PMID:25757396

  10. THUMPER - A 200-Micron Camera for the JCMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rhodri; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Ade, Peter; Gear, Walter; Griffin, Matt; Leeks, Sarah; Walker, Richard

    We are building a Two HUndred Micron PhotometER (THUMPER) for the 15-m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii. Taking advantage of a narrow atmospheric window that opens up at this wavelength on high, dry sites, THUMPER will make continuum observations at 200-microns from the ground with unprecedented 7-arcsecond angular resolution. The focal plane comprises a hexagonal close-packed array of seven stressed Ge:Ga photoconductors fed by individual Winston cones and operating at 3.7K. The detectors are read out by TIA amplifiers using cold JFET pairs. THUMPER is being designed to work in parallel with SCUBA using a dichroic beam-splitter. The data will be handled by the SCUBA data acquisition system, enabling all SCUBA users to see the THUMPER instrument as an additional shortwavelength sub-mm array. The instrument is planned to be in operation by early 2003. The predicted NEFD under good conditions (0.5mm of pwv) is around 20 Jy/Hz1/2.

  11. Chip-on-flex with 5-micron features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    A new module packaging method is proposed for electronic systems comprising a motherboard and integrated circuit (IC) chips. Pitches of 10 microns for conductive traces, and 100 microns for bonding pads are achievable. The enabling technology is glass panel manufacture, using equipment and techniques similar to those employed for fabricating liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. Flexible circuits are produced on a glass carrier using a release layer, and the carrier is removed after most of the processing is complete. IC chips are stud bumped and flip chip bonded to wells filled with solder, provided on the flexible circuit. The fabrication density achievable with wafer level packaging (WLP) using silicon wafers is substantially more than is needed for module packaging, as described herein. It is possible to provide WLP performance on glass at a much lower cost. The conductor features on glass are fine enough for the most demanding packaging and assembly techniques. The lowered cost of glass applies to the interconnection circuit plus assembly, test and rework. A test method called Tester-On-Board (TOB) is proposed, employing special-purpose test chips that are directly mounted in the system and mimic the capabilities of external testers. Methods for hermetic sealing, electromagnetic screening, and high-density off-board connections are also proposed.

  12. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  13. Comparative investigations of the effects of the neodymium:YAG laser at 1. 06 microns and 1. 32 microns on tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, F.; Beck, O.J.; Hessel, S.; Keiditsch, E.

    1987-01-01

    The beneficial deep homogeneous coagulation of neodymium (Nd):YAG laser radiation at 1.06 microns owing to low absorption and high scattering in tissue has been documented widely. For another Nd:YAG laser wavelength at 1.32 microns the absorption coefficient of water and saline is approximately ten times higher than at 1.06 microns. This results in more efficient energy conversion into heat in tissue at 1.32 microns. The extinction coefficient in blood at 1.32 microns is only one-third of that at 1.06 microns. We would expect this to result in less heat dissipation by blood and deeper penetration in tissue at 1.32 microns. Nevertheless, at this wavelength scattering also contributes to an effective, uniform distribution of the laser light in the tissue. Animal experiments have been done to examine the effect of wavelength, irradiation time, and beam geometry on tissue damage and to assess its possible clinical uses. The results imply that the 1.32 microns wavelength will produce further indications for the use of the Nd:YAG laser in surgery.

  14. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  15. Nonlinear optical processes for the mid-IR region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schepler, K. L.; Barnes, N. P.

    1989-01-01

    The 2 - 5 micron (mid-IR) region is of interest for a number of applications. Efficient up-conversion and down-conversion techniques are being developed to obtain optical sources at mid-IR wavelengths. These techniques are reviewed and recent results using AgGaSe2 are reported. Gain in AgGaSe2 as high as 13 has been observed with a pump wavelength of 1.73 microns and a signal wavelength of 3.39 microns. Optical parametric oscillation in the 2.9 - 6.8 micron region has also been demonstrated.

  16. Fallen Heroes of 9/11 Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Shuster, Bill [R-PA-9

    2011-09-07

    10/04/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3421, which became Public Law 112-76 on 12/23/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Fallen Heroes of 9/11 Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2011-06-21

    09/12/2011 Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3421, which became Public Law 112-76 on 12/23/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Intelligence Gathering Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2011-01-01

    The gathering of information for intelligence purposes often comes from interviewing a variety of individuals. Some, like suspects and captured prisoners, are individuals for whom the stakes are especially high and who might not be particularly cooperative. But information is also gathered from myriad individuals who have relevant facts to…

  19. Crisis communication. Lessons from 9/11.

    PubMed

    Argenti, Paul

    2002-12-01

    The sheer enormity of last year's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon gave new meaning to the term "crisis management." Suddenly, companies near Ground Zero, as well as those more than a thousand miles away, needed a plan. Because the disasters disrupted established channels not only between businesses and customers but between businesses and employees, internal crisis-communications strategies that could be quickly implemented became a key responsibility of top management. Without these strategies, employees' trauma and confusion might have immobilized their firms and set their customers adrift. In this article, executives from a range of industries talk about how their companies, including Morgan Stanley, Oppenheimer Funds, American Airlines, Verizon, the New York Times, Dell, and Starbucks, went about restoring operations and morale. From his interviews with these individuals, author and management professor Paul Argenti was able to distill a number of lessons, each of which, he says, may "serve as guideposts for any company facing a crisis that undermines its employees' composure, confidence, or concentration." His advice to senior executives includes: Maintain high levels of visibility, so that employees are certain of top management's command of the situation and concern; establish contingency communication channels and work sites; strive to keep employees focused on the business itself, because a sense of usefulness enhances morale and good morale enhances usefulness; and ensure that employees have absorbed the firm's values, which will guide them as they cope with the unpredictable. The most forward-thinking leaders realize that managing a crisis-communications program requires the same dedication and resources they give to other dimensions of their business. More important, they realize that their employees always come first. PMID:12510542

  20. Visual Literacy after 9/11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Alison

    2003-01-01

    Describes an instructor's analysis of students' responses to an assignment to describe the events of September 11, 2001 for a visual and media literacy course. Discusses the impact of media reports on students' perceptions of those events, and the inability of most students to critically analyze the situation because of the absence of personal…