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Sample records for 9-item patient health

  1. The 9-item Bergen Burnout Inventory: factorial validity across organizations and measurements of longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Taru; Rantanen, Johanna; Hyvönen, Katriina; Mäkikangas, Anne; Huhtala, Mari; Pihlajasaari, Pia; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the factorial validity of the 9-item Bergen Burnout Inventory (BBI-9). The BBI-9 is comprised of three core dimensions: (1) exhaustion at work; (2) cynicism toward the meaning of work; and (3) sense of inadequacy at work. The study further investigated whether the three-factor structure of the BBI-9 remains the same across different organizations (group invariance) and measurement time points (time invariance). The factorial group invariance was tested using a cross-sectional design with data pertaining to managers (n=742), and employees working in a bank (n=162), an engineering office (n=236), a public sector organization divided into three service areas: administration (n=102), education and culture (n=581), and social affairs and health (n=1,505). Factorial time invariance was tested using longitudinal data pertaining to managers, with three measurements over a four-year follow-up period. The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the three-factor structure of the BBI-9 was invariant across cross-sectional samples. The factorial invariance was also supported across measurement times. To conclude, the factorial structure of the BBI-9 was found to remain the same regardless of the sample properties and measurement times.

  2. The 9-item Bergen Burnout Inventory: Factorial Validity Across Organizations and Measurements of Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    Feldt, Taru; RANTANEN, Johanna; HYVÖNEN, Katriina; MÄKIKANGAS, Anne; HUHTALA, Mari; PIHLAJASAARI, Pia; KINNUNEN, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested the factorial validity of the 9-item Bergen Burnout Inventory (BBI-9)1). The BBI-9 is comprised of three core dimensions: (1) exhaustion at work; (2) cynicism toward the meaning of work; and (3) sense of inadequacy at work. The study further investigated whether the three-factor structure of the BBI-9 remains the same across different organizations (group invariance) and measurement time points (time invariance). The factorial group invariance was tested using a cross-sectional design with data pertaining to managers (n=742), and employees working in a bank (n=162), an engineering office (n=236), a public sector organization divided into three service areas: administration (n=102), education and culture (n=581), and social affairs and health (n=1,505). Factorial time invariance was tested using longitudinal data pertaining to managers, with three measurements over a four-year follow-up period. The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the three-factor structure of the BBI-9 was invariant across cross-sectional samples. The factorial invariance was also supported across measurement times. To conclude, the factorial structure of the BBI-9 was found to remain the same regardless of the sample properties and measurement times. PMID:24366535

  3. Depression in patients with chronic pain attending a specialised pain treatment centre: prevalence and impact on health care costs

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Lauren; Hotopf, Matthew; Petkova, Hristina; Matcham, Faith; Simpson, Anna; McCracken, Lance M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence and impact of depression on health care costs in patients with complex chronic pain. The sample included 1204 patients attending a tertiary pain management service for people with chronic disabling pain, unresponsive to medical treatment. As part of routine care, patients completed a web-based questionnaire assessing mental and physical health, functioning, and service use in the preceding 3 months. Depression was assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Self-report health care utilisation was measured across 4 domains: general practitioner contacts, contacts with secondary/tertiary care doctors, accident and emergency department visits, and days hospitalised. The participation rate was 89%. Seven hundred and thirty-two patients (60.8%; 95% CI 58.0-63.6) met criteria for probable depression, and 407 (33.8%) met the threshold for severe depression. Patients with depression were more likely to be unable to work because of ill health and reported greater work absence, greater pain-related interference with functioning, lower pain acceptance, and more generalised pain. Mean total health care costs per 3-month period were £731 (95% CI £646-£817) for patients with depression, compared with £448 (95% CI £366-£530) for patients without depression. A positive association between severe depression and total health care costs persisted after controlling for key demographic, functional, and clinical covariates using multiple linear regression models. These findings reveal the extent, severity, and impact of depression in patients with chronic pain and make evident a need for action. Effective treatment of depression may improve patient health and functioning and reduce the burden of chronic pain on health care services. PMID:26963849

  4. Depression in patients with chronic pain attending a specialised pain treatment centre: prevalence and impact on health care costs.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Lauren; Hotopf, Matthew; Petkova, Hristina; Matcham, Faith; Simpson, Anna; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence and impact of depression on health care costs in patients with complex chronic pain. The sample included 1204 patients attending a tertiary pain management service for people with chronic disabling pain, unresponsive to medical treatment. As part of routine care, patients completed a web-based questionnaire assessing mental and physical health, functioning, and service use in the preceding 3 months. Depression was assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Self-report health care utilisation was measured across 4 domains: general practitioner contacts, contacts with secondary/tertiary care doctors, accident and emergency department visits, and days hospitalised. The participation rate was 89%. Seven hundred and thirty-two patients (60.8%; 95% CI 58.0-63.6) met criteria for probable depression, and 407 (33.8%) met the threshold for severe depression. Patients with depression were more likely to be unable to work because of ill health and reported greater work absence, greater pain-related interference with functioning, lower pain acceptance, and more generalised pain. Mean total health care costs per 3-month period were £731 (95% CI £646-£817) for patients with depression, compared with £448 (95% CI £366-£530) for patients without depression. A positive association between severe depression and total health care costs persisted after controlling for key demographic, functional, and clinical covariates using multiple linear regression models. These findings reveal the extent, severity, and impact of depression in patients with chronic pain and make evident a need for action. Effective treatment of depression may improve patient health and functioning and reduce the burden of chronic pain on health care services.

  5. Patient moderator interaction in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients' visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients' information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care.

  6. [Patient-Proposed Health Services].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The Patient-Proposed Health Services(PPHS)was launched in April 2016. PPHS was proposed by the Council for Regulatory Reform, which was established in January 2013 under the Second Abe Administration. After discussion within the council, PPHS was published in the Japan Revitalization Strategy(2014 revised edition), which was endorsed by the Cabinet on June 24, 2014. PPHS was proposed therein as a new mechanism within the mixed billing system to apply for a combination of treatment not covered by the public health insurance with treatment covered by the insurance. Subsequently, PPHS was submitted for diet deliberations in April and May 2015 and inserted into article 63 of the health insurance act in accordance with "a law for making partial amendments to the National Health Insurance Act, etc., in order to create a sustainable medical insurance system", which was promulgated on May 29, 2015. In this paper I will review the background of the birth of PPHS and discuss its overview. PMID:27306801

  7. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom. PMID:26755901

  8. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom.

  9. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  10. Infertility Patients' Mental Health Problems Often Unaddressed

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160382.html Infertility Patients' Mental Health Problems Often Unaddressed 'We're ... California, San Francisco. Many studies have found that infertility patients often feel distressed. And, Pasch said, professional ...

  11. Promoting health literacy with orofacial myofunctional patients.

    PubMed

    Reed, Hope C

    2007-11-01

    The definition of health literacy is provided along with information substantiating its importance. Focused initiatives, the consequences of poor health literacy, and at-risk populations are briefly discussed. The focus of this article is the application of health literacy principles to the discipline of orofacial myology and how the promotion of health literacy facilitates positive growth for patients, orfacial myologists, and the professions. The article concludes with a vision for a health literate society. PMID:18942479

  12. Moving towards health oriented patient education (HOPE).

    PubMed

    Glanville, I K

    2000-01-01

    The economics of prevention supports reimbursement of nurse practitioners for patient education. The role has undergone historical change, shifting from imparting disease-oriented health education (DOPE) toward empowering patients to use their own resources to the fullest to attain health. Nurse practitioners are well suited to provide care that facilitates behavior change and health-oriented patient education (HOPE). Essentials for effective patient education include use of an open communication style, written instructions, and the address of barriers. Adult literacy and reader-friendliness must be considered when assembling written materials. PMID:12119971

  13. Patient's sexual health: do we care enough?

    PubMed

    Ho, Tai Mooi; Fernández, M

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that sexual problems often accompany chronic health conditions, for example: chronic renal failure, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. One of the responsibilities of a nurse is to provide patients with information concerning their health and treatment to achieve optimum outcomes, thus enhancing patients' quality of life. However, the authors observed that the nursing clinical pathways in their practice seldom reflect the attention given to patient's sexuality. This paper aims to confirm the hypothesis that health professionals do not give sufficient care to patient's sexual health and to define the causes. A descriptive study consisted of close-ended questionnaire was employed. The medical and nursing staff of a Nephrology Department were included in the study (92.6% response rate). Professionals' opinions on the importance of patient's sexual health, difficulty in addressing this issue and attitude were explored. Staff's opinion on the importance of patient's sexual health is moderately high. However, 86% admit that they do not give sufficient attention and 92% never initiate to address sexual issues to patients. The results reveal the impediment being in relation to awkwardness and deficient sex education in dealing with this subject. Some staff have expressed other deterring factors. This study confirms that professionals do not render sufficient care to patient's sexual health due to their conservative attitude and lack of skill in addressing sexuality. The authors therefore suggest some ways in helping to bridge this gap. PMID:17345975

  14. Patient satisfaction with transgender health services.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W; Robinson, B; Benner, A; Scheltema, K

    2004-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction (i.e., patients' subjective evaluation of health care services received) is increasingly important in assessing health care outcomes because of the current emphasis on greater partnership between providers (therapist, doctor, staff) and consumers (patients) in health care. In care of transgender persons, achieving good patient satisfaction is particularly challenging given the primary role mental health professionals play as arbiters of who has access to sex reassignment and when such candidates are ready. Dependence on a mental health professional in this "gate-keeping" role is perceived by some members of the transgender community as unnecessarily pathologizing. This study compared satisfaction ratings of 180 transgender and 837 other sexual health patients with psychotherapeutic, psychiatric, and sexual medicine services provided at a university-based sexual health clinic. Five consecutive surveys conducted during 1993-2002 showed high patient satisfaction. We found few significant differences between transgender and other sexual health patients, except that in 1995, transgender patients had higher satisfaction on their perceived ability to handle the problems that originally had led them to therapy. Survey results helped target areas in need of improvement (e.g., friendliness and courtesy of staff, handling of phone calls), and efforts by the providers to improve services resulted in significant increases in patient satisfaction. These findings put individual complaints in perspective and showed that despite the challenges inherent in providing transgender care good satisfaction can be achieved. We encourage providers to implement quality assurance and improvement procedures to give patients the opportunity to provide feedback and have a voice in shaping their own health care. PMID:15205065

  15. Patient satisfaction with transgender health services.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W; Robinson, B; Benner, A; Scheltema, K

    2004-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction (i.e., patients' subjective evaluation of health care services received) is increasingly important in assessing health care outcomes because of the current emphasis on greater partnership between providers (therapist, doctor, staff) and consumers (patients) in health care. In care of transgender persons, achieving good patient satisfaction is particularly challenging given the primary role mental health professionals play as arbiters of who has access to sex reassignment and when such candidates are ready. Dependence on a mental health professional in this "gate-keeping" role is perceived by some members of the transgender community as unnecessarily pathologizing. This study compared satisfaction ratings of 180 transgender and 837 other sexual health patients with psychotherapeutic, psychiatric, and sexual medicine services provided at a university-based sexual health clinic. Five consecutive surveys conducted during 1993-2002 showed high patient satisfaction. We found few significant differences between transgender and other sexual health patients, except that in 1995, transgender patients had higher satisfaction on their perceived ability to handle the problems that originally had led them to therapy. Survey results helped target areas in need of improvement (e.g., friendliness and courtesy of staff, handling of phone calls), and efforts by the providers to improve services resulted in significant increases in patient satisfaction. These findings put individual complaints in perspective and showed that despite the challenges inherent in providing transgender care good satisfaction can be achieved. We encourage providers to implement quality assurance and improvement procedures to give patients the opportunity to provide feedback and have a voice in shaping their own health care.

  16. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  17. Health literacy and ophthalmic patient education.

    PubMed

    Muir, Kelly W; Lee, Paul P

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, Ebrahimzadeh, Davalos, and Lee wrote in this journal that only 32% of the ophthalmic patient educational materials reviewed were written at or below the recommended eighth-grade reading level. Since that time, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that more than one-third of adult Americans possess only basic or below basic health literacy skills, defined as the ability to understand written information in a healthcare setting. Subsequently, investigators have shown that poor health literacy skills are associated with poor prescription medication adherence, increased hospital admissions, and increased mortality. We review the readability of currently available ophthalmic educational materials, with particular attention to the health literacy status of the patient population for which the materials are intended. Examples of prose at various readability levels are provided. Optimizing patient education and improving clinical outcomes requires understanding the attributes that the patient brings to the patient-physician relationship, including health literacy.

  18. Designing online health services for patients.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Bradley H; Slack, Warner V

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly interacting with their healthcare system through online health services, such as patient portals and telehealth programs. Recently, Shabrabani and Mizrachi provided data outlining factors that are most important for users or potential users of these online services. The authors conclude convincingly that while online health services have great potential to be helpful to their users, they could be better designed. As patients and their families play an increasingly active role in their health care, online health services should be made easier for them to use and better suited to their health-related needs. Further, the online services should be more welcoming to people of all literacy levels and from all socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:27307985

  19. Monitoring fluid intake in mental health patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel

    2016-08-17

    During my second year of nurse training, I had a clinical placement on an acute male psychiatric ward with around 20 male patients. They had a variety of mental health conditions, including depression, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia. PMID:27533410

  20. Monitoring fluid intake in mental health patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel

    2016-08-17

    During my second year of nurse training, I had a clinical placement on an acute male psychiatric ward with around 20 male patients. They had a variety of mental health conditions, including depression, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia.

  1. Electronic health record and electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    This article considers the government plans for the development of electronic health and patient records as set out in the NHS Plan and the progress and problems which have been encountered in their realization. PMID:16116372

  2. Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients Updated:Dec 3,2015 If you have ... angiograms . This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters • Understand Your ...

  3. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  4. Patient Activation: Public Libraries and Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malachowski, Margot

    2011-01-01

    Patient activation is a new term for a perennial problem. People know what they need to do for their health: exercise, eat right, and get enough rest--but how are they motivated to actually do these things? This is what patient activation is. From this author's vantage point as a medical librarian, public libraries are well-placed to be part of…

  5. Health Care Communication with Low Literate Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Christine A.

    Low literate patients face difficulties when they read health care information. The complex process of reading can be summarized in five steps: input, decoding, encoding, output, and feedback. Each occurs automatically for the fluent reader; the low literate reader might encounter stumbling blocks in one or more of the steps. Once the patient has…

  6. Mental Health Issues and Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Clark, David B

    2016-07-01

    Mental illness is a major health issue in the world today, yet often remains misunderstood, unrecognized, and undertreated. Patients suffering from severe psychiatric disorders generally display poor oral health, often as a consequence of both lifestyle and avoidant-type behaviors that become exacerbated by their illness. Individuals with severe mental illness display a greater incidence of oral disease compared with a similar demographic not dealing with these particular disorders. Efforts to enhance the oral health of these vulnerable patients will play a significant role in the overall rebuilding of their self-esteem and contribute positively to their journey toward stability and recovery. PMID:27264850

  7. Mental Health Issues and Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Clark, David B

    2016-07-01

    Mental illness is a major health issue in the world today, yet often remains misunderstood, unrecognized, and undertreated. Patients suffering from severe psychiatric disorders generally display poor oral health, often as a consequence of both lifestyle and avoidant-type behaviors that become exacerbated by their illness. Individuals with severe mental illness display a greater incidence of oral disease compared with a similar demographic not dealing with these particular disorders. Efforts to enhance the oral health of these vulnerable patients will play a significant role in the overall rebuilding of their self-esteem and contribute positively to their journey toward stability and recovery.

  8. Smartphone Applications for Patients' Health and Fitness.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare providers are often looking for ways to objectively monitor and improve their patients' health and fitness, especially in between patient visits. Some insurance companies are using applications data as incentives to improve health and lower premiums. As more and more people start to use smartphones, they may provide a tool to help improve a patient's health and fitness. Specifically, fitness applications or "apps" on smartphones are programs that use data collected from a smartphone's inbuilt tools, such as the Global Positioning System, accelerometer, microphone, speaker, and camera, to measure health and fitness parameters. The apps then analyze these data and summarize them, as well as devise individualized plans based on users' goals, provide frequent feedback, personalized coaching, and additional motivation by allowing milestones to be shared on social media. This article introduces evidence that apps can better help patients reach their health and fitness goals. It then discusses what features to look for in an app, followed by an overview of popular health and fitness apps. Last, patient scenarios with app recommendations, limitations of apps, and future research are discussed. PMID:26091764

  9. Smartphone Applications for Patients' Health and Fitness.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare providers are often looking for ways to objectively monitor and improve their patients' health and fitness, especially in between patient visits. Some insurance companies are using applications data as incentives to improve health and lower premiums. As more and more people start to use smartphones, they may provide a tool to help improve a patient's health and fitness. Specifically, fitness applications or "apps" on smartphones are programs that use data collected from a smartphone's inbuilt tools, such as the Global Positioning System, accelerometer, microphone, speaker, and camera, to measure health and fitness parameters. The apps then analyze these data and summarize them, as well as devise individualized plans based on users' goals, provide frequent feedback, personalized coaching, and additional motivation by allowing milestones to be shared on social media. This article introduces evidence that apps can better help patients reach their health and fitness goals. It then discusses what features to look for in an app, followed by an overview of popular health and fitness apps. Last, patient scenarios with app recommendations, limitations of apps, and future research are discussed.

  10. Health Literacy: An Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Jay, Melanie; Maness, Leslie; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina

    2015-09-01

    We have previously proposed that by identifying a set of Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcomes (ESPOs), medical education outcomes research becomes more feasible and likely to provide meaningful guidance for medical education policy and practice. ESPOs are proximal outcomes that are sensitive to provider education, measurable, and linked to more distal health outcomes. Our previous model included Patient Activation and Clinical Microsystem Activation as ESPOs. In this paper, we discuss how Health Literacy, defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," is another important ESPO. Between one-third and one-half of all US adults have limited health literacy skills. Providers can be trained to adopt a "universal precautions approach" to addressing patient health literacy, through the acquisition of specific skills (e.g., teachback, "chunking" information, use of plain language written materials) and by learning how to take action to improve the "health literacy environment." While there are several ways to measure health literacy, identifying which measurement tools are most sensitive to provider education is important, but challenging and complex. Further research is needed to test this model and identify additional ESPOs. PMID:26173523

  11. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource

    PubMed Central

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care. PMID:26557411

  12. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource.

    PubMed

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care.

  13. Patients' empowerment of their personal health record requires strong traceability to guarantee patients health care security.

    PubMed

    Allaert, François André; Quantin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Giving patients power over their personal health record is an unavoidable evolution in all industrialized countries which will reflect their active participation in the management of their own health. This would lead to patients sharing management with health professionals, which would need traceability of the data provider to maintain trust and transparency. The systematic use of electronic signatures by medical practitioners will be essential to provide sufficient guarantees and to clearly determine who has added what in the PEHR.

  14. Patient health record on a smart card.

    PubMed

    Naszlady, A; Naszlady, J

    1998-02-01

    A validated health questionnaire has been used for the documentation of a patient's history (826 items) and of the findings from physical examination (591 items) in our clinical ward for 25 years. This computerized patient record has been completed in EUCLIDES code (CEN TC/251) for laboratory tests and an ATC and EAN code listing for the names of the drugs permanently required by the patient. In addition, emergency data were also included on an EEPROM chipcard with a 24 kb capacity. The program is written in FOX-PRO language. A group of 5000 chronically ill in-patients received these cards which contain their health data. For security reasons the contents of the smart card is only accessible by a doctor's PIN coded key card. The personalization of each card was carried out in our health center and the depersonalized alphanumeric data were collected for further statistical evaluation. This information served as a basis for a real need assessment of health care and for the calculation of its cost. Code-combined with an optical card, a completely paperless electronic patient record system has been developed containing all three information carriers in medicine: Texts, Curves and Pictures.

  15. Health innovation for patient safety improvement.

    PubMed

    Sellappans, Renukha; Chua, Siew Siang; Tajuddin, Nur Amani Ahmad; Mei Lai, Pauline Siew

    2013-01-01

    Medication error has been identified as a major factor affecting patient safety. Many innovative efforts such as Computerised Physician Order Entry (CPOE), a Pharmacy Information System, automated dispensing machines and Point of Administration Systems have been carried out with the aim of improving medication safety. However, areas remain that require urgent attention. One main area will be the lack of continuity of care due to the breakdown of communication between multiple healthcare providers. Solutions may include consideration of "health smart cards" that carry vital patient medical information in the form of a "credit card" or use of the Malaysian identification card. However, costs and technical aspects associated with the implementation of this health smart card will be a significant barrier. Security and confidentiality, on the other hand, are expected to be of primary concern to patients. Challenges associated with the implementation of a health smart card might include physician buy-in for use in his or her everyday practice. Training and technical support should also be available to ensure the smooth implementation of this system. Despite these challenges, implementation of a health smart card moves us closer to seamless care in our country, thereby increasing the productivity and quality of healthcare.

  16. Health innovation for patient safety improvement.

    PubMed

    Sellappans, Renukha; Chua, Siew Siang; Tajuddin, Nur Amani Ahmad; Mei Lai, Pauline Siew

    2013-01-01

    Medication error has been identified as a major factor affecting patient safety. Many innovative efforts such as Computerised Physician Order Entry (CPOE), a Pharmacy Information System, automated dispensing machines and Point of Administration Systems have been carried out with the aim of improving medication safety. However, areas remain that require urgent attention. One main area will be the lack of continuity of care due to the breakdown of communication between multiple healthcare providers. Solutions may include consideration of "health smart cards" that carry vital patient medical information in the form of a "credit card" or use of the Malaysian identification card. However, costs and technical aspects associated with the implementation of this health smart card will be a significant barrier. Security and confidentiality, on the other hand, are expected to be of primary concern to patients. Challenges associated with the implementation of a health smart card might include physician buy-in for use in his or her everyday practice. Training and technical support should also be available to ensure the smooth implementation of this system. Despite these challenges, implementation of a health smart card moves us closer to seamless care in our country, thereby increasing the productivity and quality of healthcare. PMID:23423150

  17. Secure e-Health: managing risks to patient health data.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Eike-Henner W

    2007-01-01

    e-Health, as an inter-jurisdictional enterprise, presents risks to patient health data that involve not only technology and professional protocols but also laws, regulations and professional security cultures. The USA Patriot Act is one example of how national laws can shape these concerns. Secure e-Health therefore requires not only national standardization of professional education and protocols but also global interoperability of regulations and laws. Some progress in this regard has been made in the European context; however, even here developments are incomplete, and nothing similar has been accomplished on a global scale. Professional health information organizations must take the lead in developing appropriate high-level principles for professional certification and security protocols and in harmonizing these on a global basis, so that they can provide a firm and consistent foundation for international treaties. Such developments should occur in concert with other health professions, so that coordinated requirements are integrated into revisions of the relevant codes of ethics. This presentation identifies and addresses some of the ethical and legal issues and proposes a series of recommendations.

  18. Lifestyle Assessment: Helping Patients Change Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ciliska, Donna; Wilson, Douglas M. C.

    1984-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of six on lifestyle assessment and behavior change. The first article presented an assessment tool called FANTASTIC, which has been tested for reliability and is currently in wide use. After assessment, family physicians must help patients decide to change—and give them guidance on how to change—unhealthy behaviors. This article explains how the family physician can use educational, behavioral and relaxation strategies to increase patients' motivation, maintain their commitment and teach them the skills needed to effect changes in health behavior.

  19. E-Patient Reputation in Health Forums.

    PubMed

    Abdaoui, Amine; Azé, Jérôme; Bringay, Sandra; Poncelet, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Online health forums are increasingly used by patients to get information and help related to their health. However, information reliability in these forums is unfortunately not always guaranteed. Obviously, consequences of self-diagnosis may be severe on the patient's health if measures are taken without consulting a doctor. Many works on trust issues related to social media have been proposed, but most of them mainly focus only on the structure part of the social network (number of posts, number of likes, etc.). In the case of online health forums, a lot of trust and distrust is expressed inside the posted messages and cannot be inferred by only considering the structure. In this study, we rather suggest inferring the user's trustworthiness from the replies he receives in the forum. The proposed method is divided into three main steps: First, the recipient(s) of each post must be identified. Next, the trust or distrust expressed in these posts is evaluated. Finally, the user's reputation is computed by aggregating all the posts he received. Conducted experiments using a manually annotated corpus are encouraging. PMID:26262026

  20. Shared decision making in psychiatric practice and the primary care setting is unique, as measured using a 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9)

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Background To measure and compare the extent to which shared a decision making (SDM) process is implemented both in psychiatric outpatient clinical encounters and in the primary care setting from the patient’s perspective. Methods A total of 1,477 patients recruited from the Canary Islands Health Service mental health and primary care departments were invited to complete the nine-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) immediately after their consultation. MANCOVA, Student’s t-test, and Pearson correlations were used to assess the relationship and differences between SDM-Q-9 scores in patient samples. Results No differences were found in SDM-Q-9 total scores between the two patient samples, but there were relevant differences when item by item analysis was applied; differences were observed according to the different steps of the SDM process. SDM is present to a very limited extent in the routine psychiatric setting compared to primary care. Patients’ age, education, type of appointment, and treatment decision all play a specific role in predicting SDM. Conclusion The study provides evidence that SDM is a complex process that needs to be analyzed according to its different steps. SDM patterns were different in the primary care and psychiatric outpatient care settings and reflect quite a different perspective of the decision making process. PMID:23950646

  1. Giving health care to minority patients.

    PubMed

    White, E H

    1977-03-01

    Health care is usually thought of as a basic right of each individual. This so-called basic right is denied to many mainly because of their economic situation and the color of their skin. There is a need for more blacks, Indians, Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Asians in the health care field. The numbers are low and the training process slow. Time is needed to prepare ethnic people of color. Since most of the deliveries of health care are white, these white workers must become sensitive to the traditions, values and attitudes of the ethnic groups of color. Schools of nursing are beginning to include cultural differences in nursing curriculums, but the majority of the nurses who practice are not aware of and are not sensitive to the needs of nonwhite patients. Nursing must help solve problems of the ethnic groups of color. Nurses must become personally involved in the injustices of health care. As Marie Branch states, there must be "personal reeducation." When this occurs, health care to the minority client will improve.

  2. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  3. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  4. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  5. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  6. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  7. Health information for patients: The hospital library's role.

    PubMed

    Roth, B G

    1978-01-01

    Libraries today, including most hospital-based patients' libraries, are involved only peripherally in providing patient health science information. Hospital libraries should collaborate with health professionals in getting health information to patients--along with the library's more traditional roles of providing recreational reading for patients and serving the informational needs of the physician and medical staff. The library should act as the center for educational materials and programs within the hospital. Many health agencies, health educators, physicians, and librarians have been discussing the need for patient health education, but there are few effectively organized or established education centers. This paper discusses an overview of patient health education and intellectural freedom, proposes a new role for the existing hospital library in patient health education, and suggests guidelines for establishing a patient education center. PMID:626792

  8. Patient Education and Health Promotion: Clinical Health Promotion--The Conceptual Link.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraher, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Presents a model linking health promotion, health education, and patient education. The bases for distinctions between health education, patient education, and clinical health promotion are examined. The linking elements of the model are patient role, relationships adopted, and focus of the encounter; i.e., disease process vs. disease management.…

  9. The new subjective medicine: taking the patient's point of view on health care and health.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Mark

    2003-04-01

    Calls to respect patient autonomy and produce patient-centered outcomes have recently brought the patient's point of view back into the center of clinical medicine. Bioethics has argued that patient values must be respected in health care decisions. But it has generally not questioned medicine's goals, including its definition of health. For bioethics, health has remained an objective biological fact. However, pressures to improve the cost-effectiveness of medical care have increased interest in the subjective health and quality of life of patients. Perceived health, health-related quality of life, and health-state utilities bring health assessment progressively closer to the patient's perspective. Now even death's harm to patients is qualified by the value patients place on their health state. Medicine's epidemiological transition from acute to chronic disease is thus prompting an epistemological transition from primarily objective to primarily subjective evidence of health and health care effectiveness. Now some of the most important patient outcomes, like patient choices before them, are valid because they are subjective. Pathophysiology is appropriately becoming a means to produce health as it is defined from the patient's point of view. The physicians' job description will be changed to focus on patients' lives rather than patients' bodies. Definitive evaluations of medical effectiveness will occur within patients' lives rather than within doctors' hospitals. This further incorporation of patient subjectivity should carry us well beyond informed consent and the other protections for patient autonomy bequeathed to us by bioethics.

  10. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Joshua G.; Diaz, Rafael; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2016-01-01

    The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. Objectives: First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data Source: Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678). Study Design: Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Findings: Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05–2.15) to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56–11.69) to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32–2.65) and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39–3.50), associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Conclusion: Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma patients are

  11. Dental health in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Ortiz, María Luisa; Micó-Llorens, José María; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Baliellas-Comellas, Carmen; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2005-01-01

    Since the first liver transplantation in Spain was carried out in 1984, advances in surgical technique and immunosuppressive drugs have facilitated an increase in the number of transplants performed. The present study evaluates buccodental health in liver transplant patients. A cross-sectional descriptive study was made of a sample of patients subjected to liver transplantation in Príncipes de España Hospital (Bellvitge University Health Care Complex, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona--Spain). Information was collected relating to demographic characteristics, general clinical history, buccodental history and intraoral exploratory findings. A total of 53 individuals were evaluated (28 males and 25 females, with a mean age of 57.6 years). The mean time elapsed from transplantation was 3 years and 9 months. The most frequent indication for liver transplantation was liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (49.1% of the global series). The most widely used immunosuppressors were cyclosporine and tacrolimus. The CAOD index of the series was 11.2. In relation to periodontal disease, 22% of the dentate patients showed gingival overgrowth, while half of those with teeth had gingival recessions, and 34% presented some type of dental mobility. The examination of the oral mucosa showed fissured tongue to be the most common disorder (39.6%), followed by saburral tongue (28.3%) and xerostomia (18.9%). Buccodental pathology in these patients is related to the use of immunosuppressor medication and other factors such as a lack of preventive measures. The findings of the present study point to the need for preventive treatments in this population group.

  12. Transforming Health Care Delivery Through Consumer Engagement, Health Data Transparency, and Patient-Generated Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Wald, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Methods Literature review. Results Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Conclusions Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions. PMID:25123739

  13. Poor physical health and mortality in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pack, Steven

    Schizophrenia, its treatment and the lifestyle of patients contribute to high rates of mortality. Patients often have poorer diets, lower rates of physical activity and smoke more than the general population. Such lifestyle choices predispose them to physical health problems and disease. This article explores the impact of poor physical health on mortality in patients with schizophrenia. Suggestions are made for patient education and promotion of a healthy lifestyle to improve the quality of life for patients with the illness.

  14. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C. Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and…

  15. Ethical Justification for Conducting Public Health Surveillance Without Patient Consent

    PubMed Central

    Heilig, Charles M.; White, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Public health surveillance by necessity occurs without explicit patient consent. There is strong legal and scientific support for maintaining name-based reporting of infectious diseases and other types of public health surveillance. We present conditions under which surveillance without explicit patient consent is ethically justifiable using principles of contemporary clinical and public health ethics. Overriding individual autonomy must be justified in terms of the obligation of public health to improve population health, reduce inequities, attend to the health of vulnerable and systematically disadvantaged persons, and prevent harm. In addition, data elements collected without consent must represent the minimal necessary interference, lead to effective public health action, and be maintained securely. PMID:22095338

  16. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service.

  17. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service. PMID:27559474

  18. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service. PMID:27559474

  19. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and self-determination for their own health and health care. We propose a patient-centered, multilevel activation and empowerment framework (individual-, health care professional-, community-, and health care delivery system-level) to inform the development of culturally informed personalized patient activation and empowerment (P-PAE) interventions to improve population health and reduce racial and ethnic disparities. We discuss relevant Affordable Care Act payment and delivery policy reforms and how they affect patient activation and empowerment. Such policies include Accountable Care Organizations and value-based purchasing, patient-centered medical homes, and the community health benefit. Challenges and possible solutions to implementing the P-PAE are discussed. Comprehensive and longitudinal data sets with consistent P-PAE measures are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness analyses to evaluate the optimal P-PAE model. We believe the P-PAE model is timely and sustainable and will be critical to engaging patients in their treatment, developing patients' abilities to manage their health, helping patients express concerns and preferences regarding treatment, empowering patients to ask questions about treatment options, and building up strategic patient-provider partnerships through shared decision making.

  20. Sexual health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: experiences, needs and communication with health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Kristina Areskoug; Gard, Gunvor

    2012-06-01

    Pain, fatigue and decreased joint mobility caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often decrease sexual health in RA patients. Regular physiotherapy interventions in patients with RA are often aimed at improving those factors. The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences and views of patients concerning the impact of RA on their sexual health, the possible impact of physiotherapy interventions, and communication in clinical situations. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to patients with RA at two rehabilitation clinics in Sweden. The questionnaire included questions concerning the impact of RA on intimate relationships and sexual function, as well as experiences of physiotherapy and sexual health communication with health professionals. The questionnaire was answered by 63 patients. The majority of the patients thought that pain, stiffness, fatigue and physical capacity were related to sexual health. Communication between health professionals and patients about sexual health was less common, even if the desire for communication about sexual health was higher in this study than in other studies. The authors concluded that physiotherapists need to be aware that pain, fatigue, decreased joint mobility and physical capacity can affect sexual health and that physiotherapy can make a difference in sexual health in patients with RA. The impact of RA on sexual health is rarely discussed by health professionals and RA patients, and needs greater attention.

  1. Complementary and alternative therapies and health literacy in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dişsiz, Gülçin; Yilmaz, Medine

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to determine health literacy and the use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) in patients with cancer and to investigate the relationship between CAT usage and health literacy. The study cohort consisted of 250 oncology patients. The Patient Interview Form and the Adult Literacy in Medicine Scale were used for collecting data. The use of at least one CAT was reported by 24% of the patients surveyed. Herbal therapies (32.6%) constituted the most popular method, and the most popular herbal therapy was Nigella sativa (54.6%). A total of 29.8% of the patients using CATs reported using herbal therapies for an enhanced immune system. Illiterate patients and those who live in rural areas/towns displayed low levels of health literacy. Healthcare professionals should investigate patients' use of complementary and alternative approaches, and health literacy should be improved so that patients can be informed regarding the possible benefits and disadvantages of CATs.

  2. Patient portals - An online tool for your health

    MedlinePlus

    If your health care provider offers a patient portal, you will need a computer and internet connection to use it. Follow the instructions to register for an account. Once you are in your patient portal, you can ...

  3. Complementary and alternative therapies and health literacy in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dişsiz, Gülçin; Yilmaz, Medine

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to determine health literacy and the use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) in patients with cancer and to investigate the relationship between CAT usage and health literacy. The study cohort consisted of 250 oncology patients. The Patient Interview Form and the Adult Literacy in Medicine Scale were used for collecting data. The use of at least one CAT was reported by 24% of the patients surveyed. Herbal therapies (32.6%) constituted the most popular method, and the most popular herbal therapy was Nigella sativa (54.6%). A total of 29.8% of the patients using CATs reported using herbal therapies for an enhanced immune system. Illiterate patients and those who live in rural areas/towns displayed low levels of health literacy. Healthcare professionals should investigate patients' use of complementary and alternative approaches, and health literacy should be improved so that patients can be informed regarding the possible benefits and disadvantages of CATs. PMID:27157956

  4. Health, function and disability in stroke patients in the community

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Pinto, Bárbara P. B.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Stroke patients commonly have impairments associated with reduction in functionality. Among these impairments, the motor impairments are the most prevalent. The functional profile of these patients living in the community who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil has not yet been established Objective To describe the functional profile of stroke patients who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil, looking at one health-care unit in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Method From medical records and home visits, data were collected regarding health status, assistance received following the stroke, personal and environmental contextual factors, function and disability, organized according to the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Test and instruments commonly applied in the assessment of stroke patients were used. Results Demographic data from all stroke patients who were users of the health-care unit (n=44, age: 69.23±13.12 years and 67±66.52 months since the stroke) participated of this study. Most subjects presented with disabilities, as changes in emotional function, muscle strength, and mobility, risks of falling during functional activities, negative self-perception of quality of life, and perception of the environment factors were perceived as obstacles. The majority of the patients used the health-care unit to renew drug prescriptions, and did not receive any information on stroke from health professionals, even though patients believed it was important for patients to receive information and to provide clarifications. Conclusion Stroke patients who used primary health-care services in Brazil have chronic disabilities and health needs that require continuous health attention from rehabilitation professionals. All of these health needs should be considered by health professionals to provide better management as part of the integral care

  5. 76 FR 71345 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Child Health Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Child Health Patient Safety Organization, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... relinquishment from Child Health Patient Safety Organization, Inc. of its status as a Patient Safety...

  6. 77 FR 11120 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From UAB Health System Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From UAB Health System Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... relinquishment from the UAB Health System Patient Safety Organization of its status as a Patient...

  7. Promoting Health Literacy in the Nonsurgical Cosmetic Patient.

    PubMed

    Warren, Hermine

    2016-01-01

    Significant numbers of adults, when presented with basic health care information, have been shown to struggle with their abilities to comprehend and integrate materials presented to them. This lack of perception underscores the essence of health literacy. Even though health literacy is a newer concept, its impact is gathering momentum, as politicians, health care providers, researchers, and the media become more aware of the extent this disparity is seen within the health care system and how it affects patient care. This article explores how nursing philosophy and knowledge development have the capacity to provide a solid infrastructure that may promote increased health literacy among patients within the nonsurgical cosmetic arena.

  8. Community health workers for patients with medical and behavioral health needs - Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Laderman, Mara; Mate, Kedar

    2016-09-01

    Behavioral health integration efforts often focus on the formal health care infrastructure. We performed a non-systematic literature review and expert interviews to identify community-based interventions for patients with medical and behavioral health needs. Community Health Workers (CHWs) are the dominant intervention to support patients outside of the clinic. These interventions do not always optimally meet patients' needs. Organizations should consider the challenges and benefits of CHWs for patients with medical and behavioral health needs. We outline two challenges to successful CHW programs for this population, propose two design considerations for community-based integration, and suggest how quality improvement methods might help with both challenges. PMID:27637818

  9. Teaching Death Management Skills: Health Professionals Confront Patient Avoidance Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanham, Raymond; And Others

    Health professionals tend to view dying patients with two intertwined attitudes. On one hand the patient possesses an irreversible pathological condition and the doctor is obliged to help that patient embrace death with as much dignity as possible. On the other hand, the patient's imminent death is daily testimony to the limits of the doctor's…

  10. Computer Self-Efficacy of Patients in Urban Health Centers for Web-Based Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Margaret P.

    2014-01-01

    Internet-based health information has become increasingly important for ensuring health equity for all populations. The lack of studies reporting on Internet use among patients of public health clinics has obscured the needs of diverse patient groups. Guided by social cognitive theory, this quantitative cross-sectional study used a 30-question…

  11. Modeling Patients' Acceptance of Provider-delivered E-health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, E. Vance; Lankton, Nancy K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Health care providers are beginning to deliver a range of Internet-based services to patients; however, it is not clear which of these e-health services patients need or desire. The authors propose that patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health can be modeled in advance of application development by measuring the effects of several key antecedents to e-health use and applying models of acceptance developed in the information technology (IT) field. Design: This study tested three theoretical models of IT acceptance among patients who had recently registered for access to provider-delivered e-health. Measurements: An online questionnaire administered items measuring perceptual constructs from the IT acceptance models (intrinsic motivation, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness/extrinsic motivation, and behavioral intention to use e-health) and five hypothesized antecedents (satisfaction with medical care, health care knowledge, Internet dependence, information-seeking preference, and health care need). Responses were collected and stored in a central database. Results: All tested IT acceptance models performed well in predicting patients' behavioral intention to use e-health. Antecedent factors of satisfaction with provider, information-seeking preference, and Internet dependence uniquely predicted constructs in the models. Conclusion: Information technology acceptance models provide a means to understand which aspects of e-health are valued by patients and how this may affect future use. In addition, antecedents to the models can be used to predict e-health acceptance in advance of system development. PMID:15064290

  12. The Role of Patient Navigators in Eliminating Health Disparities*

    PubMed Central

    Natale-Pereira, Ana; Enard, Kimberly R.; Nevarez, Lucinda; Jones, Lovell A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite many important efforts to increase equity in the US health care system, not all Americans have equal access to health care—or similar health outcomes. With the goal of lowering costs and increasing accessibility to health care, the nation’s new health care reform legislation includes certain provisions that expand health insurance coverage to uninsured and underinsured populations, promote medical homes, and support coordination of care. These provisions may help narrow existing health care disparities. Many of the most vulnerable patients, however, may continue to have difficulty accessing and navigating the complex US health care delivery system. This article explores the unique role that patient navigation can play in improving health outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities, as well as other underserved populations, in the context of a changing healthcare environment. Patient navigators can not only facilitate improved health care access and quality for underserved populations through advocacy and care coordination, but they can also address deep-rooted issues related to distrust in providers and the health system that often lead to avoidance of health problems and non-compliance with treatment recommendations. By addressing many of the disparities associated with language and cultural differences and barriers, patient navigators can foster trust and empowerment within the communities they serve. Specific patient navigator activities are discussed, and metrics to evaluate program efforts are presented. PMID:21780089

  13. The role of patient navigators in eliminating health disparities.

    PubMed

    Natale-Pereira, Ana; Enard, Kimberly R; Nevarez, Lucinda; Jones, Lovell A

    2011-08-01

    Despite many important efforts to increase equity in the US health care system, not all Americans have equal access to health care-or similar health outcomes. With the goal of lowering costs and increasing accessibility to health care, the nation's new health care reform legislation includes certain provisions that expand health insurance coverage to uninsured and underinsured populations, promote medical homes, and support coordination of care. These provisions may help narrow existing health care disparities. Many of the most vulnerable patients, however, may continue to have difficulty accessing and navigating the complex US health care delivery system. This article explores the unique role that patient navigation can play in improving health outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities, as well as other underserved populations, in the context of a changing healthcare environment. Patient navigators can not only facilitate improved health care access and quality for underserved populations through advocacy and care coordination, but they can also address deep-rooted issues related to distrust in providers and the health system that often lead to avoidance of health problems and non-compliance with treatment recommendations. By addressing many of the disparities associated with language and cultural differences and barriers, patient navigators can foster trust and empowerment within the communities they serve. Specific patient navigator activities are discussed, and metrics to evaluate program efforts are presented.

  14. Characteristics of Health Educators Desired by Inner-City Health Clinic Patients: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James; Sidani, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    A group (n = 170) of inner-city, predominantly African American, health clinic patients were asked to identify the characteristics they desired in a new clinic health educator. A plurality (44%) of the patients perceived a bachelor's degree would be a sufficient level of education. The vast majority of patients claimed the sex of the health…

  15. Navigating to health: Evaluation of a community health center patient navigation program.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monica L; Gallivan, Leah; Lemon, Stephenie C; Borg, Amy; Ramirez, Jose; Figueroa, Brenda; McGuire, Antonia; Rosal, Milagros C

    2015-01-01

    Patient Navigators are trained, lay health care workers who guide patients in overcoming barriers to health care access and utilization. Little evidence exists regarding reach and impact of Patient Navigators for chronic disease management. This study evaluated a Patient Navigator program aimed at optimizing health care utilization among ethnically diverse patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a community health center (CHC). Trained Patient Navigators contacted eligible patients who had not seen a primary care provider (PCP) for ≥ 6 months. Outcomes included number of patients reached by Patient Navigators and seen by PCPs after Patient Navigator contact. Distributions and frequencies of outcomes pre- and post-call were compared. A total of 215 patients had ≥ 1 call attempt from Patient Navigators. Of these, 74 were additionally contacted via mailed letters or at the time of a CHC visit. Among the 45 patients reached, 77.8% scheduled an appointment through the Patient Navigator. These patients had higher rates of PCP visits 6 months post-call (90%) than those not reached (42.2%) (p < 0.0001). Findings emphasize the value of direct telephone contact in patient health care re-engagement and may inform the development of future Patient Navigator programs to improve reach and effectiveness. PMID:26844134

  16. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  17. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams.

  18. Enabling patient-centered care through health information technology.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Knight, Amy; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Gibbons, M Christopher; Berger, Zackary; Aboumatar, Hanan; Wilson, Renee F; Lau, Brandyn D; Sharma, Ritu; Bass, Eric B

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The main objective of the report is to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) that supports patient-centered care (PCC) on: health care processes; clinical outcomes; intermediate outcomes (patient or provider satisfaction, health knowledge and behavior, and cost); responsiveness to needs and preferences of patients; shared decisionmaking and patient-clinician communication; and access to information. Additional objectives were to identify barriers and facilitators for using health IT to deliver PCC, and to identify gaps in evidence and information needed by patients, providers, payers, and policymakers. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, INSPEC, and Compendex databases through July 31, 2010. METHODS Paired members of our team reviewed citations to identify randomized controlled trials of PCC-related health IT interventions and studies that addressed barriers and facilitators for health IT for delivery of PCC. Independent assessors rated studies for quality. Paired reviewers abstracted data. RESULTS The search identified 327 eligible articles, including 184 articles on the impact of health IT applications implemented to support PCC and 206 articles addressing barriers or facilitators for such health IT applications. Sixty-three articles addressed both questions. The study results suggested positive effects of PCC-related health IT interventions on health care process outcomes, disease-specific clinical outcomes (for diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions), intermediate outcomes, responsiveness to the needs and preferences of patients, shared decisionmaking, patient-clinician communication, and access to medical information. Studies reported a number of barriers and facilitators for using health IT applications to enable PCC. Barriers included: lack of usability; problems with access to the health IT

  19. Group Health Education in Inpatient Rehabilitation: Patients' Role Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schöpf, Andrea C.; Ullrich, Antje; Nagl, Michaela; Farin, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Group health education is an important aspect of medical rehabilitation. While interaction and active involvement are important characteristics of group health education, little is known about patients' understanding of their role in this form of education. This study explored patients' understanding of their role in group health…

  20. Health 2.0-Lessons Learned: Social Networking With Patients for Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suparna; Kilian, Reena; Leung, Fok-Han

    2014-07-01

    The advent of social networking as a major platform for human interaction has introduced a new dimension into the physician-patient relationship, known as Health 2.0. The concept of Health 2.0 is young and evolving; so far, it has meant the use of social media by health professionals and patients to personalize health care and promote health education. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter offer promising platforms for health care providers to engage patients. Despite the vast potential of Health 2.0, usage by health providers remains relatively low. Using a pilot study as an example, this commentary reviews the ways in which physicians can effectively harness the power of social networking to meaningfully engage their patients in primary prevention. PMID:24522931

  1. Health 2.0-Lessons Learned: Social Networking With Patients for Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suparna; Kilian, Reena; Leung, Fok-Han

    2014-07-01

    The advent of social networking as a major platform for human interaction has introduced a new dimension into the physician-patient relationship, known as Health 2.0. The concept of Health 2.0 is young and evolving; so far, it has meant the use of social media by health professionals and patients to personalize health care and promote health education. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter offer promising platforms for health care providers to engage patients. Despite the vast potential of Health 2.0, usage by health providers remains relatively low. Using a pilot study as an example, this commentary reviews the ways in which physicians can effectively harness the power of social networking to meaningfully engage their patients in primary prevention.

  2. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  3. Contributions of public health to patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Rimer, B K; Glanz, K; Lerman, C

    1991-08-01

    This paper discusses the contributions of public health to compliance in five areas: clinical trials, smoking cessation, dietary compliance, breast cancer screening and hypertension control. Public health programs have been based on a number of theoretical foundations, most notably, social learning theory and the health belief model. Social marketing, community organization, and, more recently, consumer information processing models also are important. The strongest public health programs embody an ecological approach, with interventions directed not only at individuals, but also at groups, communities and changing institutional norms. Among the most important contributions of public health interventions are: multiple levels of intervention and evaluation, tailoring to target audiences, use of social support and community organization for behavior change. Together, community health and clinical compliance-enhancing strategies can exert a synergistic impact on health behavior change. PMID:1918439

  4. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A. Lorris

    2016-01-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient’s perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system’s ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  5. Patient experiences and health system responsiveness in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Peltzer, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients' views are being given more and more importance in policy-making. Understanding populations' perceptions of quality of care is critical to developing measures to increase the utilization of primary health care services. Using the data from the South African World Health Survey (WHS), the current study aims to evaluate the degree of health care service responsiveness (both out-patient and in-patient) and comparing experiences of individuals who used public and private services in South Africa. Methods A population-based survey of 2352 participants (1116 men and 1236 women) was conducted in South Africa in 2003, the WHS – as part of a World Health Organization (WHO) project focused on health system performance assessment in member countries. Results Health care utilization was among those who attended in-patient care 72.2% attended a public and 24.3% a private facility, and of those who attended out-patient care 58.7% attended a public and 35.7% a private facility. Major components identified for out-patient care responsiveness in this survey were highly correlated with health care access, communication and autonomy, secondarily to dignity, confidentiality and quality of basic amenities, and thirdly to health problem solution. The degree of responsiveness with publicly provided care was in this study significantly lower than in private health care. Overall patient non-responsiveness for the public out-patient service was 16.8% and 3.2% for private care. Discrimination was also one of the principal reasons for non-responsiveness in all aspects of provided health care. Conclusion Health care access, communication, autonomy, and discriminatory experiences were identified as priority areas for actions to improve responsiveness of health care services in South Africa. PMID:19602290

  6. Patients' satisfaction evaluation with the health center of elis province.

    PubMed

    Karavida, Angeliki; Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction related to the provided health services is a key indicator of the quality of the health sector. The SERVQUAL model was employed as a way of measuring the level of patient satisfaction with the services of the Health Center of Elis Province. Although certain aspects such as "Assurance" and "Empathy" meet the users' needs, improvements like a detailed medical record and an overhaul of the equipment need to be introduced. PMID:25000072

  7. Patients' satisfaction evaluation with the health center of elis province.

    PubMed

    Karavida, Angeliki; Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction related to the provided health services is a key indicator of the quality of the health sector. The SERVQUAL model was employed as a way of measuring the level of patient satisfaction with the services of the Health Center of Elis Province. Although certain aspects such as "Assurance" and "Empathy" meet the users' needs, improvements like a detailed medical record and an overhaul of the equipment need to be introduced.

  8. Interventions to Improve Care for Patients with Limited Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L.; Schillinger, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objective To propose a framework and describe best practices for improving care for patients with limited health literacy (LHL). Methods Review of the literature. Results Approximately half of the U.S. adult population has LHL. Because LHL is associated with poor health outcomes and contributes to health disparities, the adoption of evidence-based best practices is imperative. Feasible interventions at the clinician-patient level (eg, patient-centered communication, clear communication techniques, teach-to-goal methods, and reinforcement), at the system-patient level (eg, clear health education materials, visual aids, clear medication labeling, self-management support programs, and shame-free clinical environments), and at the community-patient level (eg, adult education referrals, lay health educators, and harnessing the mass media) can improve health outcomes for patients with LHL. Conclusion Because LHL is prevalent, and because the recommended communication strategies can benefit patients of all literacy levels, clinicians, health system planners, and health policy leaders should promote the uptake of these strategies into routine care. PMID:20046798

  9. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  10. Seeking health information: what sources do your patients use?

    PubMed

    Cutilli, Carolyn Crane

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare professionals believe that it is important for patients to be educated about health for optimal outcomes. For education to occur, healthcare professionals need to know where patients seek information. The concept of health information-seeking behavior (HISB) focuses on how patients obtain information (strategies/actions). Theories/ models are presented to describe how patients obtain information and what they do with information that is available. The most recent HISB research has examined the use of the Internet for health information. Although the Internet is utilized by many individuals, studies show that the most common and trusted source of information is healthcare professionals. Individuals use other sources of health information (e.g., TV, radio, newspaper, magazines, Internet, and family/friends/coworkers) to supplement information provided by healthcare professionals. When and how individuals use supplemental information varies and is associated with many factors such as race, education, income, health literacy, and health status. Utilizing health information also depends on an individual's health orientation. As nurses, we need to utilize knowledge about HISB to assist patients in obtaining health information to optimize health outcomes.

  11. Psychiatric nurse-patient interaction facilitating mental health.

    PubMed

    Poggenpoel, M

    1994-02-01

    A description is given of research involving the formulation of the "Psychiatric Nurse-Patient Interaction Facilitating Mental Health" psychiatric nursing model. Major concepts are identified, defined and propositional statements formulated. A description is given of the structure and process depicted in this model which views psychiatric nursing as a scientifically based interaction between a psychiatric nurse and a patient with the purpose of facilitating a patient's quest for mental health as integral part of health (wholeness). The patient can be an individual, family or community. The goal of psychiatric nursing is assisting the patient in mobilizing his resources to promote, maintain and restore health. The focus of psychiatric nursing assessment and diagnosis is the patient's mental processes as these influence his patterns of interaction with his internal and external environment. The patient's patterns of interaction with his environment determine his health status. The desired patient outcome that is worked for in psychiatric nursing is mental health as integral part of health (spiritual, mental and physical wholeness). Continued refinement of concepts, research and application in practice is necessary to validate this model. PMID:8044874

  12. Patient neglect in 21st century health-care institutions: a community health psychology perspective.

    PubMed

    Reader, Tom W; Gillespie, Alex; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological and organisational advances of 21st century health-care systems, care scandals and burgeoning complaints from patients have raised concerns about patient neglect in hospitals. This article reviews the concept of patient neglect and the role of community health psychology in understanding its occurrence. Patient neglect has previously been conceptualised as a problem associated with hospital staff attitudes and behaviours, with regulation and training cited as solutions. Yet, a community health psychology perspective shows that the wider symbolic, material and relational aspects of care are crucial for understanding why patient neglect occurs and for outlining new solutions to augment existing interventions.

  13. Do patient preferences for health information vary by health literacy or numeracy? A qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Bridget; Glasgow, Russell E; Bull, Sheana S

    2012-01-01

    Seeking health information can be a complicated process for a patient. Patients must know the topic of interest, where to look or ask, how to assess and comprehend, and how to evaluate the credibility and trustworthiness of the sources. In this study, the authors describe preferences of patients with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease with varying health literacy and numeracy abilities for receiving health information. Participants were recruited from 2 health care systems. Health literacy and numeracy were assessed and participants completed an orally administered survey consisting of open-ended questions about obtaining health information and preferences for health information. In-depth interviews were conducted with a subset of participants. A diverse sample of 150 individuals (11.3% Latino, 37.3% African American, 44.7% with income less than $15,000/year) participated. Most participants had adequate functional health literacy, while 65% had low numeracy skills. Regardless of health literacy or numeracy ability, participants overwhelmingly preferred to receive health information during a face-to-face conversation with their health care provider. While individuals with adequate functional health literacy identified a variety of health information sources, actions are needed to ensure multiple modalities are available and are in plain, clear language that reinforces patients' understanding and application of information to health behavior.

  14. Communication and Information Barriers to Health Assistance for Deaf Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Patricia Cristina Andrade; Fortes, Paulo Antonio de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil, recent regulations require changes in private and public health systems to make special services available to deaf patients. In the present article, the researchers analyze the perceptions of 25 sign language-using patients regarding this assistance. The researchers found communication difficulties between these patients and health…

  15. [Contribution of family doctors to health promotion among their patients].

    PubMed

    Marcinowicz, Ludmiła

    2005-01-01

    Health promotion is a major task of family doctors. Doctors contribute to health promotion by e.g. providing information to their patients on health promoting as well as harmful behaviours. The aim of the study is to find out how frequently family doctors undertake health promoting actions among their patients and to determine a likely difference in these actions between public and non-public health care institutions. The investigations were carried out among patients of two basic health care institutions, public and non-public, in Białystok. Of all patients aged 18 and over being under care of family doctors, 1000 people were drawn (500 from each institution). Mail questionnaire technique was employed. Of 579 returned questionnaires, 560 were used for analysis. The analysis included situations the patients encountered at the family doctor's. Responding to the question whether during a visit the family doctor referred to tobacco smoking, mode of nutrition, physical activity, harmful effects of alcohol abuse and the way of coping with stress, the patients declared that a given situation occurred "always", "frequently", seldom" and "never". Family doctors most frequently discussed the problem of nutrition and physical activity, while alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking were most seldom touched upon. No significant difference was found in the frequency of health promoting actions between family doctors in public and non-public institutions of health care.

  16. The new role of patients in future health settings.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Blobel, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Health is wide concept covering a person's physical, mental and social well-being. Traditionally, regulated healthcare has been the main source for curative and preventive service offered to patients. Healthcare is in transition, however. Paradigms such as patient empowerment and patient in the centre as well as in-home care service are changing processes and locations healthcare services are offered. Parallel to healthcare, new service models such as pHealth, ubiquitous healthcare, and digital medicine are developing. In the near future, technology enables the creation of a personal digital health dossier (e.g. digital patient and virtual patient model) for any individual. This dossier is stored and used in the unsecure information space. This all means that the traditional paternalistic patient model where patient is a passive object for regulated healthcare services will not work in future pHealth and digital health anymore. Instead, the new patient role (e.g. pHealth user or health consumer role) is dynamic, context-aware and participatory. The pHealth user can also have many roles at the same time, such as the role of informed chooser, decision maker, and personal health coordinator. This requires that the pHealth user can make information-based meaningful decisions before starting to use health services, and that he or she can trust on service providers by having evidence-based and reliable information about the quality and health impact of the services offered. A big challenge is that pHealth and digital health take place in unsecure information space where current healthcare specific laws, regulations, and medical ethics are insufficient to guarantee users' autonomy and privacy as well as the application of fair information and ethical principles when processing personal health information. A new ethical, legal and technical framework is needed. One of the prerequisites successful pHealth and digital health has to meet is the possibility to create

  17. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  18. Access to health records: the rights of the patient.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2010-07-01

    From time to time patients will ask to see or request a copy of the records made about them and the treatment they received from district nurses and other health professionals. While district nurses can informally allow a patient to see the content of the records they use, a request to view or have a copy of the wider health record requires a formal request for access under the Data Protection Act 1998. This article considers the requirements for requesting and granting access to a patient to view and obtain a copy of their health record.

  19. Development of the Patient Activation Measure for mental health.

    PubMed

    Green, Carla A; Perrin, Nancy A; Polen, Michael R; Leo, Michael C; Hibbard, Judith H; Tusler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to adapt the physical health Patient Activation Measure (PAM) for use among people with mental health conditions (PAM-MH). Data came from three studies among people with chronic mental health conditions and were combined in Rasch analyses. The PAM-MH's psychometric properties equal those of the original 13-item PAM. Test-retest reliability and concurrent validity were good, and the PAM-MH showed sensitivity to change. The PAM-MH appears to be a reliable and valid measure of patient activation among individuals with mental health problems. It appears to have potential for use in assessing change in activation. PMID:19728074

  20. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  1. Ensuring optimal health care for LGBT patients.

    PubMed

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-07-14

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses a Royal College of Nursing policy that highlights the complexities of providing high-quality and non-discriminatory health care. PMID:27409790

  2. Perceptions of mental health nurses and patients about health promotion in mental health care: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, N; De Maeseneer, J; Maes, L; Van Heeringen, C; Annemans, L

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the perceptions of patients with mental disorders and mental health nurses of health promotion targeting physical activity and eating habits in mental health care. An electronic search strategy was conducted. Furthermore, references were searched by hand-searching the reference lists of the retrieved articles from the electronic databases. The literature on perceptions of health promotion and lifestyle interventions in mental health care principally consist of qualitative studies using interviews and focus groups. Positive perceptions of both mental health nurses and patients towards health promotion targeting physical activity and eating habits in mental health care were identified. Contrary, several barriers for integrating healthy lifestyles into the daily life of patients were described. Patients usually want to learn more about healthy lifestyles, but see the ability to change their physical health as beyond their control. In this sense, support from mental health nurses is considered as important. Despite the awareness of the importance of health promotion in mental health care, it appears that visions and attitudes towards the potential of health promotion are in need of change.

  3. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  4. Mental Health Nursing, Mechanical Restraint Measures and Patients' Legal Rights.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Soren; Gildberg, Frederik A

    2016-01-01

    Coercive mechanical restraint (MR) in psychiatry constitutes the perhaps most extensive exception from the common health law requirement for involving patients in health care decisions and achieving their informed consent prior to treatment. Coercive measures and particularly MR seriously collide with patient autonomy principles, pose a particular challenge to psychiatric patients' legal rights, and put intensified demands on health professional performance. Legal rights principles require rationale for coercive measure use be thoroughly considered and rigorously documented. This article presents an in-principle Danish Psychiatric Complaint Board decision concerning MR use initiated by untrained staff. The case illustrates that, judicially, weight must be put on the patient perspective on course of happenings and especially when health professional documentation is scant, patients' rights call for taking notice of patient evaluations. Consequently, if it comes out that psychiatric staff failed to pay appropriate consideration for the patient's mental state, perspective, and expressions, patient response deviations are to be judicially interpreted in this light potentially rendering MR use illegitimated. While specification of law criteria might possibly improve law use and promote patients' rights, education of psychiatry professionals must address the need for, as far as possible, paying due regard to meeting patient perspectives and participation principles as well as formal law and documentation requirements. PMID:27123152

  5. Measurement of cancer health literacy and identification of patients with limited cancer health literacy.

    PubMed

    Dumenci, Levent; Matsuyama, Robin; Riddle, Daniel L; Cartwright, Laura A; Perera, Robert A; Chung, Harold; Siminoff, Laura A

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy is related to a broad range of health outcomes. This study was designed to develop a psychometrically sound instrument designed to measure cancer health literacy along a continuum (CHLT-30), to develop another instrument designed to determine whether a patient has limited cancer health literacy (CHLT-6), and to estimate the prevalence of limited cancer health literacy. The Cancer Health Literacy Study involving 1,306 Black and White cancer patients was conducted between April 2011 and April 2013 in the Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and surrounding oncology clinics. A continuous latent variable modeling framework was adopted to dimensionally represent cancer health literacy, whereas discrete latent variable modeling was used to estimate the prevalence rates of limited cancer health literacy. Self confidence about engaging in health decisions was used as the primary outcome in external validation of new instruments. Results from a comprehensive analysis strongly supported the construct validity and reliability of the CHLT-30 and CHLT-6. For both instruments, measurement invariance tests ruled out item/test bias to explain gender and race/ethnicity differences in test scores. The limited cancer health literacy rate was 18%, a subpopulation consisting of overrepresented Black, undereducated, and low-income cancer patients. Overall, the results supported the conclusion that the CHLT-30 accurately measures cancer health literacy along a continuum and that the CHLT-6 efficiently identifies patients with limited cancer health literacy with high accuracy. PMID:25315594

  6. Health workers’ attitudes toward immigrant patients: a cross-sectional survey in primary health care services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health workers’ attitudes toward immigrant patients influence behaviour, medical decisions, quality of care and health outcomes. Despite the increasing number of immigrant patients in health services and the potential influence of health workers’ attitudes, there is little research in this area. This study aimed to examine attitudes of different health workers’ groups toward immigrant patients and to identify the associated factors. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with a random sample of 400 health workers from primary health care services in the Lisbon region, Portugal. Among those, 320 completed a structured questionnaire. Descriptive analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for the evaluation of data. Results Most participants did not agree that immigrant patients tend to behave like victims, but about half considered that some are aggressive and dangerous. Doctors and nurses showed more positive attitudes than office workers. Among doctors, the older ones reported less positive attitudes compared to the younger ones. Health workers who have less daily contact with immigrants revealed more positive attitudes. Most participants evaluated their knowledge and competencies to work with immigrants as moderate or low. Conclusions Although health workers reveal positive attitudes, this study reinforces the need to develop strategies that prevent negative attitudes and stereotyping in health services. Efforts should be made to improve workers’ competencies to deal with culturally diverse populations, in order to promote quality of health care and obtain positive health outcomes among immigrant populations. PMID:22776316

  7. Using eHealth to improve health literacy among the patient population.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kathryn E

    2015-01-01

    There is no denying the global influence of eHealth, in its various forms, on the health care system in the 21st Century. Health care professionals are often familiar with technological tools used to enhance health outcomes by assisting clinicians in meeting the needs of the patient population. In an age of social media, web-based information, and material available literally in an instant, it is crucial for nurses to use and proactively share their knowledge regarding accessing and finding credible sources of online health information with the patient population. By improving health literacy among consumers, self-sufficiency and competence can be developed and promoted to improve health outcomes, placing the patient in a participatory starring role of managing and improving his or her overall well-being. PMID:25842526

  8. Using eHealth to improve health literacy among the patient population.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kathryn E

    2015-01-01

    There is no denying the global influence of eHealth, in its various forms, on the health care system in the 21st Century. Health care professionals are often familiar with technological tools used to enhance health outcomes by assisting clinicians in meeting the needs of the patient population. In an age of social media, web-based information, and material available literally in an instant, it is crucial for nurses to use and proactively share their knowledge regarding accessing and finding credible sources of online health information with the patient population. By improving health literacy among consumers, self-sufficiency and competence can be developed and promoted to improve health outcomes, placing the patient in a participatory starring role of managing and improving his or her overall well-being.

  9. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  10. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  11. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  12. The health mediators-qualified interpreters contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriel; Gramma, Rodica; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-11-01

    In order to assure optimal care of patients with chronic illnesses, it is necessary to take into account the cultural factors that may influence health-related behaviors, health practices, and health-seeking behavior. Despite the increasing number of Romanian Roma, research regarding their beliefs and practices related to healthcare is rather poor. The aim of this paper is to present empirical evidence of specificities in the practice of healthcare among Romanian Roma patients and their caregivers. Using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design, this study is based on data gathered through three focus groups with 30 health mediators in the counties of Iasi and Cluj (Romania). We identified various barriers to access to healthcare for Roma patients: lack of financial resources and health insurance coverage, lack of cognitive resources or lack of personal hygiene, but also important cultural issues, such as the shame of being ill, family function, disclosure of disease-related information, patient's autonomy, attitudes towards illness and health practices, that should be considered in order to create a culturally sensitive environment in Romanian medical facilities:… The role of the health mediators within the context of cultural diversity is also discussed, as cultural brokers contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients Bridging cultural differences may improve patient-healthcare provider relationships, but may have limited impact in reducing ethnic disparities, unless coupled with efforts of Roma communities to get involved in creating and implementing health policies.

  13. The mental patients' rights movement and mental health institutional change.

    PubMed

    Brown, P

    1981-01-01

    The mental patients' rights movement has added to the widespread critique of institutional psychiatry and provided leadership in opposing treatment methods such as electroshock, psychosurgery, and overdrugging, which are dangerous and regressive not only to patients, but to the expanded population of non-institutionalized persons as well. The movement has had some success in court cases for democratic rights, such as the right to treatment, the right to refuse treatment, patient labor, and commitment law. At the same time patients' rights demands have been partly coopted by mental health administrators. In a number to cases, mental health officials supported patients' rights litigation because it enabled them to speed up their deinstitutionalization programs. Overall, the conjuncture of the movement with economic impetus toward deinstitutionalization has allowed mental health planners to use the patients' rights issues to justify their essentially fiscal policy. Providers and administrators have set up advocacy offices, posted patients' bills of rights, and incorporated ex-patient representatives on advisory boards. Yet mental health administrators are generally opposed to a broad application of patients' rights. PMID:7333723

  14. Meanings of Health for Iranian Diabetic Patients: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Moridi, Golrokh; Valiee, Sina; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Nasab, Golnaz Esmaeil; Khaledi, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health is an exclusive and subjective phenomenon, and one of the most important situations with regard to perception of health, arises when patients suffer from a chronic disease. This study was conducted within the qualitative research framework and aimed to explore the meanings of health as perceived by a group of Iranian diabetic patients. Methods A descriptive qualitative analysis design was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants among diabetic patients, who were admitted to the diabetes care centre of Tohid Hospital of the Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran during a ten-month period in 2014. Interviews were transcribed and analysed through conventional content analysis. Results Based on the findings of the study, three major health-related themes emerged: 1) the syndrome of the healthy body and the happy heart (physical well-being vivacity, satisfaction, and calmness of the mind), 2) life without compulsory limitations (lack of dietary limitations, No activity limitations, lack of social limitations), and 3) exalted spirituality (satisfying self and others, trusting God, remembering God). Conclusion Health care providers should consider the meaning of health in special groups, chiefly in patients with chronic diseases. It facilitates the development of appropriate programmes to improve desirable health levels among diabetic patients. PMID:27790342

  15. eHealth for Patient Engagement: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Barello, Serena; Triberti, Stefano; Graffigna, Guendalina; Libreri, Chiara; Serino, Silvia; Hibbard, Judith; Riva, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    eHealth interventions are recognized to have a tremendous potential to promote patient engagement. To date, the majority of studies examine the efficacy of eHealth in enhancing clinical outcomes without focusing on patient engagement in its specificity. This paper aimed at reviewing findings from the literature about the use of eHealth in engaging patients in their own care process. We undertook a comprehensive literature search within the peer-reviewed international literature. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. eHealth interventions reviewed were mainly devoted to foster only partial dimensions of patient engagement (i.e., alternatively cognitive, emotional or behavioral domains related to healthcare management), thus failing to consider the complexity of such an experience. This also led to a great heterogeneity of technologies, assessed variables and achieved outcomes. This systematic review underlines the need for a more holistic view of patient needs to actually engage them in eHealth interventions and obtaining positive outcomes. In this sense, patient engagement constitute a new frontiers for healthcare models where eHealth could maximize its potentialities. PMID:26779108

  16. Involving citizens and patients in health research.

    PubMed

    Venuta, Rosa; Graham, Ian D

    2010-01-01

    The Canadian Institutes of Health Research's (CIHR), Canada's premier health research funding agency, is moving forward in realizing a more systematic, ongoing integration of citizens' input in priority setting, governance and funding programs and tools. In 2008, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) developed a Framework for Citizen Engagement. This Framework establishes guidelines for implementing a more systematic approach to consulting and engaging citizens, such as in assessing the merit and relevance of research applications, developing strategic plans, setting research priorities and for strengthening their role on CIHR's governance committees. This paper describes the current context for public consultation in Canada's federal health care system, the new CIHR citizen engagement framework and discusses citizen engagement activities and efforts undertaken by CIHR institutes and branches. It reviews the methods used by CIHR to engage citizens in four key focus areas: 1. Representation on CIHR's Boards and Committees; 2. Corporate and Institute strategic plans, priorities, policies, and guidelines; 3. Research priority setting and integrated knowledge translation; 4. Knowledge dissemination and public outreach. In discussing CIHR's experiences, the paper identifies some of the challenges and benefits of engaging citizens in CIHR's research processes, including participating in decision making and informing strategic priorities. PMID:20539148

  17. Mitigating HIV Health Disparities: The Promise of Mobile Health for a Patient-Initiated Solution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Disha; Patel, Sajani; Street, Richard L.; Giordano, Thomas Peter; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2014-01-01

    The HIV epidemic is an ongoing public health problem fueled, in part, by undertesting for HIV. When HIV-infected people learn their status, many of them decrease risky behaviors and begin therapy to decrease viral load, both of which prevent ongoing spread of HIV in the community. Some physicians face barriers to testing their patients for HIV and would rather their patients ask them for the HIV test. A campaign prompting patients to ask their physicians about HIV testing could increase testing. A mobile health (mHealth) campaign would be a low-cost, accessible solution to activate patients to take greater control of their health, especially populations at risk for HIV. This campaign could achieve Healthy People 2020 objectives: improve patient–physician communication, improve HIV testing, and increase use of mHealth. PMID:25322292

  18. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  19. How health information is received by diabetic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Lalazaryan, Anasik; Rahimi, Alireza; Zadeh, Akbar Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of correct information-seeking behavior by the patients can provide health specialists and health information specialists with valuable information in improving health care. This study aimed to investigate the passive receipt and active seeking of health information by diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A survey method was used in this research on 6426 diabetic patients of whom 362 patients were selected by a no percentage stratified random sampling. The Longo information-seeking behavior questionnaire was used to collect data and they were analyzed by SPSS 20 software. Results: The most common information source by diabetic patients was practitioners (3.12). The minimum usage among the information sources were from charity organizations and emergency phone lines with a usage of close to zero. The amount of health information gained passively from each source has the lowest average of 4.18 and usage of this information in making health decision has the highest average score of 5.83. Analysis of the data related to active seeking of information showed that knowledge of available medical information from each source has the lowest average score of 3.95 and ability in using the acquired information for making medical decisions has the highest average score of 5.28. The paired t-test showed that differences between passive information receipt (41.68) and active information seeking (39.20) considered as statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Because diabetic patients are more passive information receivers than active information seekers, the health information must be distributed by passive means to these patients. In addition, information-seeking behavior during different time periods should be investigated; to identify more effective distribution of health information. PMID:26261828

  20. Health Care Professionals' Views about Supporting Patients' Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Irma; Hynynen, Marja-Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative…

  1. Community health insurance schemes & patient satisfaction - evidence from India

    PubMed Central

    Devadasan, N.; Criel, Bart; Damme, Wim Van; Lefevre, Pierre; Manoharan, S.; der Stuyft, Patrick Van

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Quality of care is an important determinant for utilizing health services. In India, the quality of care in most health services is poor. The government recognizes this and has been working on both supply and demand aspects. In particular, it is promoting community health insurance (CHI) schemes, so that patients can access quality services. This observational study was undertaken to measure the level of satisfaction among insured and uninsured patients in two CHI schemes in India. Methods: Patient satisfaction was measured, which is an outcome of good quality care. Two CHI schemes, Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development (ACCORD) and Kadamalai Kalanjiam Vattara Sangam (KKVS), were chosen. Randomly selected, insured and uninsured households were interviewed. The household where a patient was admitted to a hospital was interviewed in depth about the health seeking behaviour, the cost of treatment and the satisfaction levels. Results: It was found that at both ACCORD and KKVS, there was no significant difference in the levels of satisfaction between the insured and uninsured patients. The main reasons for satisfaction were the availability of doctors and medicines and the recovery by the patient. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that insured hospitalized patients did not have significantly higher levels of satisfaction compared to uninsured hospitalized patients. If CHI schemes want to improve the quality of care for their clients, so that they adhere to the scheme, the scheme managers need to negotiate actively for better quality of care with empanelled providers. PMID:21321418

  2. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  3. Designing patient-centered personal health records (PHRs): health care professionals' perspective on patient-generated data.

    PubMed

    Huba, Nicholas; Zhang, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Currently, patients not only want access to various medical records their health care providers keep about them, but they also are willing to become active participants in managing their own health information and the health information of the ones they care for. Personal health records were developed to help fulfill this need. Health care professionals are instrumental in the successful adoption of PHRs. Nevertheless, a full understanding of different health care practitioners' views of PHRs, including how PHRs could fit into the existing health care system, is lacking. The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate PHRs from the perspective of health care professionals. Twenty-one practitioners with 10 different specialties were interviewed. The results suggest that although PHRs were still a novel concept to the study participants, a majority of them did value information provided by patients and would recommend that patients keep such records. Participants with different specialties tended to look for different types of information to be included in PHRs, and wished the information to be presented in ways that supported their work, as well as supported knowledge discovery. The participants also expressed a need to share patient information, but had various concerns about sharing. The implications of the results of the study in regard to the design of future PHR systems are discussed.

  4. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management.

  5. Issues in health care of Middle Eastern patients.

    PubMed

    Lipson, J G; Meleis, A I

    1983-12-01

    Relationships between Middle Eastern patients and Western health care professionals are often troubled by mutual misunderstanding of culturally influenced values and communication styles. Although Middle Easterners vary ethnically, they do share a core of common values and behavior that include the importance of affiliation and family, time and space orientations, interactional style and attitudes toward health and illness. Problems in providing health care involve obtaining adequate information, "demanding behavior" by a patient's family, conflicting beliefs about planning ahead and differing patterns of communicating grave diagnoses or "bad news." There are guidelines that will provide an understanding of the cultural characteristics of Middle Easterners and, therefore, will improve rather than impede their health care. A personal approach and continuity of care by the same health care professional help to bridge the gap between Middle Eastern cultures and Western medical culture. In addition, periodic use of cultural interpreters helps ameliorate the intensity of some cultural issues. PMID:6364575

  6. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  7. Parental health literacy and its impact on patient care.

    PubMed

    Scotten, Mitzi

    2015-03-01

    The process of navigating through the modern American health care system is becoming progressively challenging. The range of tasks being asked of patients in the digital age is vast and complex and includes completing intricate insurance applications, signing complex consent forms, and translating medical data and prescription medication directions. Nearly 9 out of 10 adults have difficulty using the everyday health information that is routinely offered by medical providers. Mounting evidence now supports a growing awareness that general health literacy is the greatest individual factor affecting a person's health status. PMID:25634701

  8. Parental health literacy and its impact on patient care.

    PubMed

    Scotten, Mitzi

    2015-03-01

    The process of navigating through the modern American health care system is becoming progressively challenging. The range of tasks being asked of patients in the digital age is vast and complex and includes completing intricate insurance applications, signing complex consent forms, and translating medical data and prescription medication directions. Nearly 9 out of 10 adults have difficulty using the everyday health information that is routinely offered by medical providers. Mounting evidence now supports a growing awareness that general health literacy is the greatest individual factor affecting a person's health status.

  9. Patient and health system delay among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Beira city, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TB control is based on the rapid identification of cases and their effective treatment. However, many studies have shown that there are important delays in diagnosis and treatment of patients with TB. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of and identify risk factors associated with patient delay and health system delay among newly diagnosed patients with pulmonary TB. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out in Beira city, Mozambique between September 2009 and February 2010. Patients in the first month of treatment were consecutively selected to this study if they had a diagnosis of pulmonary TB, had no history of previous TB treatment, and were 18 years or older and provided informed consent. Data was obtained through a questionnaire administered to the patients and from patients’ files. Results Among the 622 patients included in the study the median age was 32 years (interquartile range, 26–40) and 272 (43.7%) were females. The median total delay, patient delay and health system delay was 150 days (interquartile range, 91–240), 61 days (28–113) and 62 days (37–120), respectively. The contribution of patient delay and health system delay to total delay was similar. Farming, visiting first a traditional healer, low TB knowledge and coexistence of a chronic disease were associated with increased patient delay. More than two visits to a health facility, farming and coexistence of a chronic disease were associated with increased health system delay. Conclusions This study revealed a long total delay with a similar contribution of patient delay and health system delay. To reduce the total delay in this setting we need a combination of interventions to encourage patients to seek appropriate health care earlier and to expedite TB diagnosis within the health care system. PMID:24499197

  10. LEGAL BASES FOR DISCLOSING CONFIDENTIAL PATIENT INFORMATION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH IMPROVEMENT.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The disclosure of confidential patient data without an individual's explicit consent should be for purposes that persons have reason to both expect and accept. We do not currently have the required level of clarity or consistency in understanding regarding the disclosure of confidential patient information for public health purposes to support effective public dialogue. The Health Service (Control of Patient Information) Regulations 2002 establish a legal basis in England and Wales for data to be disclosed for public health purposes without patient consent. Under the Regulations, there is more than one potential route towards lawful processing: Data may be processed for public health purposes under both Regulations 3 and 5. The alternatives have different safeguards and conditions attached, and their respective applicability to processing for purposes of public health improvement is currently unclear and subject to review. Beyond the need for clarity regarding the safeguards applicable to processing for particular public health purposes, there are reasons to prefer recognition that Regulation 5 is the most appropriate legal basis for disclosure when the purpose is public health improvement rather than public health protection. Where health improvement, rather than protection, is the aim, there is no justification for discarding the additional safeguards associated with processing under Regulation 5.

  11. LEGAL BASES FOR DISCLOSING CONFIDENTIAL PATIENT INFORMATION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH IMPROVEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    The disclosure of confidential patient data without an individual's explicit consent should be for purposes that persons have reason to both expect and accept. We do not currently have the required level of clarity or consistency in understanding regarding the disclosure of confidential patient information for public health purposes to support effective public dialogue. The Health Service (Control of Patient Information) Regulations 2002 establish a legal basis in England and Wales for data to be disclosed for public health purposes without patient consent. Under the Regulations, there is more than one potential route towards lawful processing: Data may be processed for public health purposes under both Regulations 3 and 5. The alternatives have different safeguards and conditions attached, and their respective applicability to processing for purposes of public health improvement is currently unclear and subject to review. Beyond the need for clarity regarding the safeguards applicable to processing for particular public health purposes, there are reasons to prefer recognition that Regulation 5 is the most appropriate legal basis for disclosure when the purpose is public health improvement rather than public health protection. Where health improvement, rather than protection, is the aim, there is no justification for discarding the additional safeguards associated with processing under Regulation 5. PMID:25995294

  12. Effect of Health Information Technology Expenditure on Patient Level Cost

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigate the effect of health information technology (IT) expenditure on individual patient-level cost using California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) data obtained from 2000 to 2007. Methods We used a traditional cost function and applied hospital fixed effect and clustered error within hospitals. Results We found that a quadratic function of IT expenditure best fit the data. The quadratic function in IT expenditure predicts a decrease in cost of up to US$1,550 of IT labor per bed, US$27,909 of IT capital per bed, and US$28,695 of all IT expenditure per bed. Moreover, we found that IT expenditure reduced costs more quickly in medical conditions than surgical diseases. Conclusions Interest in health IT is increasing more than ever before. Many studies examined the effect of health IT on hospital level cost. However, there have been few studies to examine the relationship between health IT expenditure and individual patient-level cost. We found that IT expenditure was associated with patient cost. In particular, we found a quadratic relationship between IT expenditure and patient-level cost. In other word, patient-level cost is non-linearly (or a polynomial of second-order degree) related to IT expenditure. PMID:24175120

  13. Mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD and depression

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Thomas; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Kohler, Michaela; Carraro, Giovanni E.; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, mental health professionals’ attitudes toward posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression, have rarely been studied. Objective We assessed mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD compared to patients suffering from depression. Method Case vignettes of a patient with either PTSD or depression were presented to two samples of mental health professionals: attendees of a conference on posttraumatic stress (N=226) or of a lecture for psychiatry residents (N=112). Participants subsequently completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude reactions to the presented case. Results Participants showed similarly positive attitudes toward depression and PTSD. PTSD elicited a more favorable attitude with regard to prosocial reactions, estimated dependency, attributed responsibility, and interest in the case, particularly in mental health professionals specializing in psychotraumatology. Across diagnoses, higher age and longer professional experience were associated with more positive attitudes toward patients. Conclusions Mental health professionals’ positive attitudes toward patients with depression and PTSD correlate with their specific knowledge about the disorder, their level of professional training, and their years of professional experience. Limitations The instruments used, although based on established theoretical concepts in attitude research, were not validated in their present versions. PMID:26507340

  14. Lack of health maintenance examinations and risk in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Gleason, Charise; Faiman, Beth; Doss, Deborah; Catamero, Donna; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Katz, Mike; Kurtin, Sandra; Moran, Diane; Lonial, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    Health maintenance (HM) practices are essential to prevent illness, promote well-being, and maximize health. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cancers, yet, research on HM practices and preventative care of MM survivors has limited report. The study comprised a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional online survey design. Survey of patients with MM was carried out through the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) and the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR) e-mail list services. The members of the IMF and ACOR e-mail list services were surveyed, of which 237 patients responded. The modified Medical Expenditure Preventive Survey-Preventive Care questionnaire was used; it included items that ask patients regarding their healthcare practices that relate to dental care, cancer prevention, addiction, lifestyles, sensory screening, immunizations, cardiovascular, endocrine, psychosocial, and bone health. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-square, and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient were obtained. In this study, men had statistically significant inferior global health maintenance scores than women (P = 0.002). Being employed (P = 0.054) and married or partnered (P = 0.017) were significantly correlated with better health maintenance patterns among male respondents. In contrast, no statistically significant correlations between sociodemographic factors and health maintenance patterns were found in women. Patients with MM, particularly men, require continued education and close monitoring of health maintenance practices. These findings are consistent with publications looking at gender disparities in healthcare utilization in the United States. Studies show that men, in general, are less likely to seek preventative healthcare screenings. Healthcare providers must incorporate health maintenance promotion during clinic visits.

  15. Lack of health maintenance examinations and risk in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Gleason, Charise; Faiman, Beth; Doss, Deborah; Catamero, Donna; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Katz, Mike; Kurtin, Sandra; Moran, Diane; Lonial, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    Health maintenance (HM) practices are essential to prevent illness, promote well-being, and maximize health. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cancers, yet, research on HM practices and preventative care of MM survivors has limited report. The study comprised a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional online survey design. Survey of patients with MM was carried out through the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) and the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR) e-mail list services. The members of the IMF and ACOR e-mail list services were surveyed, of which 237 patients responded. The modified Medical Expenditure Preventive Survey-Preventive Care questionnaire was used; it included items that ask patients regarding their healthcare practices that relate to dental care, cancer prevention, addiction, lifestyles, sensory screening, immunizations, cardiovascular, endocrine, psychosocial, and bone health. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-square, and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient were obtained. In this study, men had statistically significant inferior global health maintenance scores than women (P = 0.002). Being employed (P = 0.054) and married or partnered (P = 0.017) were significantly correlated with better health maintenance patterns among male respondents. In contrast, no statistically significant correlations between sociodemographic factors and health maintenance patterns were found in women. Patients with MM, particularly men, require continued education and close monitoring of health maintenance practices. These findings are consistent with publications looking at gender disparities in healthcare utilization in the United States. Studies show that men, in general, are less likely to seek preventative healthcare screenings. Healthcare providers must incorporate health maintenance promotion during clinic visits. PMID:27119422

  16. Identity Theft in Community Mental Health Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klopp, Jonathon; Konrad, Shane; Yanofski, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Identity theft is a serious problem in the United States, and persons with enduring mental illnesses may be particularly vulnerable to becoming victims of this crime. Victims of identity theft experience a variety of consequences that include financial loss and serious emotional distress. Little is known about the impact of identity theft on individuals with mental illnesses. The two cases from a community mental health center presented in this article demonstrate many of the facets that may be associated with an increased risk for becoming the victim of identity theft. A summary of preventive steps as well as steps involved in resolving the crime once one has become a victim are presented. PMID:20806029

  17. Managing patients with high-deductible health plans and health savings accounts.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Catherine M

    2009-01-01

    High-deductible health plans and health savings accounts have many patients and providers mutually mystified. It is very important for providers and their staff to understand and manage these emerging products. If the current growth rate of enrollment in these plans continues, 25% of your patients will be presenting with this coverage in fewer than six years. Mishandling these products can cause unnecessary cash flow issues, but a little proactivity, education, and training now, will go a long way.

  18. Allied health team management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J R; Brandt, K D

    1984-09-01

    The use of a coordinated team of allied health professionals (AHPs) to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis assigned to experimental groups (EG) and comparison groups (CG) was assessed. The EG patients were evaluated regularly by each AHP team member, whereas CG patients were seen by AHPs only upon referral. Of the 10 EG and 13 CG patients who remained in the study for 2 years, the EG patients initially exhibited somewhat greater disease activity than CG (as reflected by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and duration of morning stiffness). After 2 years, EG patients demonstrated less disease activity than at the outset, whereas CG patients either showed little change in these parameters or deteriorated during the study. Grip strength, which was initially similar in the two groups, improved in EG patients but decreased in CG patients, so that after 2 years a significant difference was noted between the two groups (p less than .05). Tendency to lose hand range of motion was also greater in CG than in EG patients. Some EG patients showed improvement in finger flexion deformities during the study. Furthermore, EG patients showed a greater tendency to acquire positive attitudes regarding themselves and family relationships. These results suggest that ongoing "team care" may be more efficacious than episodic use of AHPs in management of patients with mild rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care: Trend or Major Thrust in Health Care Delivery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Cheryl M.

    2007-01-01

    In this reaction article to the Major Contribution, the merits and challenges of implementing patient-centered culturally sensitive health care, or cultural competence plus, are explicated. Three themes are addressed: separate but equal?, factoring in mental health, and sharing the load. The need to refine the conceptualization of the two…

  20. The UNICANCER Patient Expectations Observatory: A new role for patients in health care institutions.

    PubMed

    Espérou, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the role played by patients in their own management, UNICANCER set up in November 2011 a unique initiative in France: the Patient Expectations Observatory. This was designed to reorient and improve the quality of care provided by comprehensive cancer centres in the UNICANCER group based on a better knowledge and understanding of patient perceptions and preferences. An innovative internet-based consultation process enabled us to record and prioritize patient expectations. Patient management improvement actions for cancer centres were then used to equitably satisfy the identified patient expectations. By using patients' own expectations of their health care, cancer centres can therefore provide an example of the new modalities of patient participation in health care institutions, in line with the changes proposed by public authorities.

  1. [UNICANCER patient expectations observatory: a new role for patients in health care institutions].

    PubMed

    Espérou, Hélène; Emery, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    UNICANCER, recognizing the role played by patients in their own management, set up a unique initiative in France in November 2011: the patient expectations observatory, which is designed to reorient and improve the quality of care provided by comprehensive cancer centers of the UNICANCER group based on a better knowledge and understanding of patient perceptions and preferences. An innovative internet-based participative consultation recorded and prioritized patient expectations. Patient management improvement actions in cancer centres were then generalized to equitably satisfy the identified patient expectations. By using patient expectations concerning organization of health care, cancer cancers therefore provide an example of the new modalities of patient participation in health care institutions, in line with the changes proposed by public authorities.

  2. Health literacy in patients dealing with gout: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    van Onna, Marloes; Hinsenveld, Elke; de Vries, Hein; Boonen, Annelies

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the health literacy of patients dealing with gout and to understand perceptions that might account for non-adherence to urate-lowering therapy (ULT). Semi-structured interviews involving patients with gout were conducted. The transcripts of the interviews were scored by two readers and a coding system to categorize the data was developed. Fifteen patients (14 men, mean age 63 years, mean disease duration 11 years) were interviewed; ten patients were recruited from secondary care and five from primary care. Six patients had gout tophi and 12 patients used ULT. Less than half of the patients were sufficiently aware of the pathophysiological processes that cause gout. Twelve patients indicated that treatment of gout only encompasses treatment of the acute attack. Patients were unaware of long-term treatment goals. Six patients admitted medication non-adherence at some point in time. Several reasons for non-adherence, such as healthcare professionals providing conflicting messages about medication, can be considered preventable. Half of the patients expressed that they, especially at the time of diagnosis, wanted to know more about the cause of gout, treatment goals and long-term consequences. In conclusion, the health literacy of patients dealing with gout was low in our study, especially with regard to medication. Yet, patients often recognized these knowledge gaps. Our data suggest that improving knowledge and addressing common misperceptions in training programmes, may ultimately contribute to adherence to ULT and an optimized outcome in patients with gout. This hypothesis needs to be confirmed in future research.

  3. Using health psychology to help patients: theories of behaviour change.

    PubMed

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Behaviour change theories and related research evidence highlight the complexity of making and sticking to health-related behaviour changes. These theories make explicit factors that influence behaviour change, such as health beliefs, past behaviour, intention, social influences, perceived control and the context of the behaviour. Nurses can use this information to understand why a particular patient may find making recommended health behaviour changes difficult and to determine factors that may help them. This article outlines five well-established theories of behaviour change: the health belief model, the theory of planned behaviour, the stages of change model, self-determination theory, and temporal self-regulation theory. The evidence for interventions that are informed by these theories is then explored and appraised. The extent and quality of evidence varies depending on the type of behaviour and patients targeted, but evidence from randomised controlled trials indicates that interventions informed by theory can result in behaviour change.

  4. Using health psychology to help patients: theories of behaviour change.

    PubMed

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Behaviour change theories and related research evidence highlight the complexity of making and sticking to health-related behaviour changes. These theories make explicit factors that influence behaviour change, such as health beliefs, past behaviour, intention, social influences, perceived control and the context of the behaviour. Nurses can use this information to understand why a particular patient may find making recommended health behaviour changes difficult and to determine factors that may help them. This article outlines five well-established theories of behaviour change: the health belief model, the theory of planned behaviour, the stages of change model, self-determination theory, and temporal self-regulation theory. The evidence for interventions that are informed by these theories is then explored and appraised. The extent and quality of evidence varies depending on the type of behaviour and patients targeted, but evidence from randomised controlled trials indicates that interventions informed by theory can result in behaviour change. PMID:27615529

  5. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  6. Diet needs of patients referred to home health.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, J T; Singer, G R

    1985-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the dietary needs of patients referred to home health care. The charts of 812 patients taken for care by the Visiting Nurse Association of Chicago (VNA) were reviewed for the physician's diet order, number of restrictions, diagnoses, age, height, weight, and fee source. More than half of the patients had therapeutic diets ordered by their physicians. A quarter of the patients with therapeutic diets had two or more dietary modifications. An audit process was developed as a reliability check of the authors' determination of the appropriateness of the diet. Review of the charts by registered dietitians (R.D.s) showed that three-fourths of the patients appeared to need therapeutic diets. Forty-seven percent might have benefited from a different diet. More than half of the patients for whom the R.D.s recommended a special diet needed two or more modifications. This emphasizes the need for the R.D. to develop a system for monitoring the dietary requirements of all patients referred to home health care. It further underscores the need for collaboration between physician and dietitian. The registered dietitian who works in home health care agencies serving diverse age groups needs to be a generalist prepared to develop a plan for the total nutrition treatment of persons throughout the life cycle.

  7. Prevention better than cure? Health consumer and patients' organisations and public health.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Rob; Jones, Kathryn L

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies of groups representing patients, users and carers in the UK indicate that their principal focus is on health care and treatment services. In recent years, UK government policy has emphasised prevention and health promotion as part of its wider public health agenda. This paper investigates how this might have affected health consumer and patients' organisations (HCPOs) by presenting findings from an online survey of 312 UK groups undertaken in the summer of 2010. The sample was identified using the publicly available membership lists of a number of large alliance organisations. The survey achieved a 39% response rate. The findings suggest that the main focus of lobbying and campaigning remains on health care rather than public health issues. However, a significant minority of groups stated they prioritised public health campaigning and lobbying. Possible explanations for engagement with the public health agenda include: the presence of public health on the government's agenda, the influence of other, more powerful interests in the health policy process, and growing awareness among groups of health promotion, prevention and environmental causes of illness. The paper argues that although HCPOs may be more active in the public health policy arena, more research is needed - notably with regard to their relationship with devolved governments, EU institutions and the current UK government's public health and voluntary sector agenda. The reasons why some groups engage more than others with the public health agenda also merit closer investigation. Moreover, not enough is currently known about the influence of HCPOs on the public health agenda and policies in this field.

  8. Assessing patients' health behaviours. Essential steps for motivating patients to adopt and maintain behaviours conducive to oral health.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ruth; Ismail, Amid

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a summary of various approaches to behaviour change in oral health. The current research evidence does not support the practice of giving 'instructions' or 'advice' to patients as a means of modifying their attitudes or changing their health behaviours. A number of explanatory models are described which address both the complexity and the factors that influence and predict an individual's health behaviour. A practical guide of what should be assessed and professional assumptions which may be made to assist patients change and maintain their health behaviours are provided. The potential for difficulty during this assessment period is raised since this awareness will allow for flexibility when negotiating with patients to help them develop strategies to modify, change and maintain their health behaviours. Thus, the last part of the chapter describes new approaches that rely on multiple models that focus on patients' or recipients' beliefs, desired goals and readiness to change which are preferable to the traditional patient education approaches in dentistry. PMID:19494679

  9. How patients' review sites will change health care.

    PubMed

    Hotopf, Max

    2013-10-01

    TripAdvisor has changed how the travel industry treats customers. Is the same likely to happen to health services? Review sites are growing fast across Europe, propelled by expansions in patient choice. What impact will they have on the medical profession and on providers, both public and private? How will they change the nature of health care? To address these questions, those at the forefront of developing review sites in Europe were interviewed. PMID:23904237

  10. Health numeracy: perspectives about using numbers in health management from African American patients receiving dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wright Nunes, Julie A; Osborn, Chandra Y; Ikizler, T Alp; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2015-04-01

    Health numeracy is linked to important clinical outcomes. Kidney disease management relies heavily on patient numeracy skills across the continuum of kidney disease care. Little data are available eliciting stakeholder perspectives from patients receiving dialysis about the construct of health numeracy. Using focus groups, we asked patients receiving hemodialysis open-ended questions to identify facilitators and barriers to their understanding, interpretation, and application of numeric information in kidney care. Transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Twelve patients participated with a mean (standard deviation) age of 56 (12) years. All were African American, 50% were women, and 83% had an annual income <$20,000/year. Although patients felt numbers were critical to every aspect in life, they noted several barriers to understanding, interpreting and applying quantitative information specifically to manage their health. Low patient self-efficacy related to health numeracy and limited patient-provider communication about quantitatively based feedback, were emphasized as key barriers. Through focus groups of key patient stakeholders we identified important modifiable barriers to effective kidney care. Additional research is needed to develop tools that support numeracy-sensitive education and communication interventions in dialysis. PMID:25358522

  11. Communicating with Patients with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kimberly M; Heaton, Lisa J

    2016-07-01

    People with special health care needs (PSHCN) often have difficulty communicating with providers in health care settings, including dental practices. This difficulty can affect access to care as well as the quality of care received. This article provides practical tips and tools dental professionals can use to facilitate communication for a diverse population of PSHCNs. The article discusses communication needs of patients with communication disorders; augmentative and alternative communication; and communication for patients with intellectual disability, psychiatric conditions; and dental fears. Examples are given of communication breakdowns, and descriptions of how communication challenges can be resolved. PMID:27264858

  12. Promoting oral health practice among patients with diabetes attending primary health care clinics.

    PubMed

    Aljaber, Abeer; Al-Surimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    The oral public health program for patients with diabetes was initiated by Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health (MoH) based on international quality standard to control the severity of oral disease in patients with diabetes through improving the accessibility of patients to dental clinics in primary health care centers (PHCC). This program intends to deliver oral health care (OHC) for each patient with diabetes at least one visit every six months. However, we found that more than 90% of patients with diabetes that visited prince Mohammed bin Saud PHCC in Riyadh do not get their regular dental check up every six months. We developed a quality improvement project (QIP) using the quality improvement model to activate MoH oral health program for patients with diabetes visiting prince Mohamed bin Saud PHCC. The aim of our QIP was to increase number of patients with diabetes receiving their regular oral health check up during the PHC visit. The quality team tested two simple improvement ideas. The first idea was having the dentist signature on appointment request. The testing of the first idea led to the second idea, that both physician and dentist should sign the referral form. After running several PDSA cycles to test these interventions ideas, we found the number of patients with diabetes seen in dental clinic had increased dramatically compared with the baseline assessment. We conclude that the idea of signing the referral form by both physician and dentist is a practical and simple strategy to be executed and has a direct impact on the patient clinical flow between clinics. PMID:26734427

  13. Health Literacy and Education as Mediators of Racial Disparities in Patient Activation Within an Elderly Patient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D; Winter, Michael; Cabral, Howard; Waite, Katherine; Henault, Lori; Bickmore, Timothy; Hanchate, Amresh; Wolf, Michael; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) assesses facets of patient engagement to identify proactive health behaviors and is an important predictor of health outcomes. Health literacy and education are also important for patient participation and successful navigation of the health care system. Because health literacy, education, and patient activation are associated with racial disparities, we sought to investigate whether health literacy and education would mediate racial differences in patient activation. Participants were 265 older adults who participated in a computer-based exercise interventional study. Health literacy was assessed using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Of 210 eligible participants, 72% self-identified as Black and 28% as White. In adjusted analyses, education and health literacy each significantly reduced racial differences in patient activation. These findings are especially important when considering emerging data on the significance of patient activation and new strategies to increase patient engagement. PMID:27524777

  14. Patient health information materials in waiting rooms of family physicians: do patients care?

    PubMed Central

    Moerenhout, Tania; Borgermans, Liesbeth; Schol, Sandrina; Vansintejan, Johan; Van De Vijver, Erwin; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient health information materials (PHIMs), such as leaflets and posters are widely used by family physicians to reinforce or illustrate information, and to remind people of information received previously. This facilitates improved health-related knowledge and self-management by patients. Objective This study assesses the use of PHIMs by patient. It also addresses their perception of the quality and the impact of PHIMs on the interaction with their physician, along with changes in health-related knowledge and self-management. Methods Questionnaire survey among patients of family practices of one town in Belgium, assessing: (1) the extent to which patients read PHIMs in waiting rooms (leaflets and posters) and take them home, (2) the patients’ perception of the impact of PHIMs on interaction with their physician, their change in health-related knowledge and self-management, and (3) the patients judgment of the quality of PHIMs. Results We included 903 questionnaires taken from ten practices. Ninety-four percent of respondents stated they read PHIMs (leaflets), 45% took the leaflets home, and 78% indicated they understood the content of the leaflets. Nineteen percent of respondents reportedly discussed the content of the leaflets with their physician and 26% indicated that leaflets allowed them to ask fewer questions of their physician. Thirty-four percent indicated that leaflets had previously helped them to improve their health-related knowledge and self-management. Forty-two percent reportedly discussed the content of the leaflets with others. Patient characteristics are of significant influence on the perceived impact of PHIMS in physician interaction, health-related knowledge, and self-management. Conclusion This study suggests that patients value health information materials in the waiting rooms of family physicians and that they perceive such materials as being helpful in improving patient–physician interaction, health-related knowledge, and

  15. Holistic health assessment tool for patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Singhania, P R; Mandalika, S

    2012-07-01

    The recent emphasis on assessment of the psychological status, availability of newer and better methods of interpreting the anthropometric measurements of renal patients on dialysis therapy prompted the authors to develop the "Holistic Health Assessment Tool for dialysis patients (HHAT-D)." A total of 30 subjects (25-65 years), enrolled from dialysis centers in Mumbai were administered the HHAT-D tool to assess anthropometric, biochemical, functional, and psychological status (knowledge, needs, that coping strategies) along with dietary intake. The results showed that majority of the patients (73.3%) were mild to moderately malnourished. A highly significant negative correlation of anthropometric measurements (BMI, lean body mass, mid arm circumference, arm muscle area, bicep skin fold thickness, % usual body weight, and % standard body weight) with the HHAT-D scores (P<0.01) confirmed the validity of the tool in assessing the degree of malnutrition. The poor health status of the patients was further confirmed by the average (40%) to poor (36.6%) flexibility status and poor dietary nutrient intake. Moderate (36.6%) to high (60%) coping effectiveness was recorded in the patients as assessed using the "coping effectiveness inventory." A high degree of interitem correlation (Cronbach's coefficient alpha-test value 0.836) also proved the reliability of the HHAT-D tool. Thus, the HHAT-D was found to be a specific and reliable tool for assessment of holistic health status of patients on maintenance hemodialysis to improve quality of life and facilitate faster recovery.

  16. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  17. Patient-Provider Communication: Understanding the Role of Patient Activation for Latinos in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Dharma E.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Fortuna, Lisa; Reinfeld, Sarah; Alegria, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights results from the Right Question Project-Mental Health (RQP-MH), an intervention designed to teach skills in question formulation and to increase patients' participation in decisions about mental health treatment. Of participants in the RQP-MH intervention, 83% were from a Latino background, and 75% of the interviews were…

  18. Physician Notification of Their Diabetes Patients' Limited Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K; Wang, Frances F; Palacios, Jorge L; Wilson, Clifford C; Daher, Carolyn; Piette, John D; Schillinger, Dean

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients with chronic disease have limited health literacy (HL). Because physicians have difficulty identifying these patients, some experts recommend instituting screening programs in clinical settings. It is unclear if notifying physicians of patients' limited HL improves care processes or outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether notifying physicians of their patients' limited HL affects physician behavior, physician satisfaction, or patient self-efficacy. DESIGN We screened all patients for limited HL and randomized physicians to be notified if their patients had limited HL skills. PARTICIPANTS Sixty-three primary care physicians affiliated with a public hospital and 182 diabetic patients with limited HL. MEASUREMENTS After their visit, physicians reported their management strategies, satisfaction, perceived effectiveness, and attitudes toward HL screening. We also assessed patients' self-efficacy, feelings regarding HL screening's usefulness, and glycemic control. RESULTS Intervention physicians were more likely than control physicians to use management strategies recommended for patients with limited HL (OR 3.2, P=.04). However, intervention physicians felt less satisfied with their visits (81% vs 93%, P=.01) and marginally less effective (38% vs 53%, P=.10). Intervention and control patients' post-visit self-efficacy scores were similar (12.6 vs 12.9, P=.6). Sixty-four percent of intervention physicians and 96% of patients felt HL screening was useful. CONCLUSIONS Physicians are responsive to receiving notification of their patients' limited HL, and patients support the potential utility of HL screening. However, instituting screening programs without specific training and/or system-wide support for physicians and patients is unlikely to be a powerful tool in improving diabetes outcomes. PMID:16307624

  19. 16 CFR 1105.9 - Itemized vouchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Itemized vouchers. 1105.9 Section 1105.9 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS CONTRIBUTIONS TO COSTS OF PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY STANDARDS § 1105.9...

  20. [The Catalan Patient Council: the direct voice of the patient in health policies in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Vallès Navarro, Roser; Costa Vilar, Núria; Davins Miralles, Josep; Garcia Cirera, Montserrat; Hernando Ortega, Maria Rosario; Iniesta Blasco, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    The transition from a more paternalistic model of care focused on the disease and on the medical professional's authority towards a more participatory model centered on the rights and duties of informed patients represents a significant change in public health policy. One of the most widespread methods of social participation in Catalonia today is the tendency to form associations around a particular disease. This kind of organizational participation is a pioneering tool in the debate around public health policy. The Government of the Generalitat de Catalunya undertook to promote the Strategic Plan of patient participation within the public health system. The Department of Health created the Patient Advisory Council of Catalonia (CCPC, as per the acronym in Catalan). This initiative constitutes a permanent consultative and participatory body for patient representatives in the Catalan healthcare system. The CCPC was set up with a solid determination to place the patient at the centre of the healthcare system, including them in the decision-making processes which directly affect them. This patient participation plan has defined and developed 8 different lines approved by the government, with consensus approval between regional government and the organisations. The CCPC has proven itself to be an effective tool for fostering active patient participation in health policy and its relationship with the system has evolved from that of a monologue to becoming the mechanism for dialogue it is today.

  1. [The Catalan Patient Council: the direct voice of the patient in health policies in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Vallès Navarro, Roser; Costa Vilar, Núria; Davins Miralles, Josep; Garcia Cirera, Montserrat; Hernando Ortega, Maria Rosario; Iniesta Blasco, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    The transition from a more paternalistic model of care focused on the disease and on the medical professional's authority towards a more participatory model centered on the rights and duties of informed patients represents a significant change in public health policy. One of the most widespread methods of social participation in Catalonia today is the tendency to form associations around a particular disease. This kind of organizational participation is a pioneering tool in the debate around public health policy. The Government of the Generalitat de Catalunya undertook to promote the Strategic Plan of patient participation within the public health system. The Department of Health created the Patient Advisory Council of Catalonia (CCPC, as per the acronym in Catalan). This initiative constitutes a permanent consultative and participatory body for patient representatives in the Catalan healthcare system. The CCPC was set up with a solid determination to place the patient at the centre of the healthcare system, including them in the decision-making processes which directly affect them. This patient participation plan has defined and developed 8 different lines approved by the government, with consensus approval between regional government and the organisations. The CCPC has proven itself to be an effective tool for fostering active patient participation in health policy and its relationship with the system has evolved from that of a monologue to becoming the mechanism for dialogue it is today. PMID:26711058

  2. HIV-infected mental health patients: characteristics and comparison with HIV-infected patients from the general population and non-infected mental health patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing mental health symptoms, which negatively influence the treatment of the HIV-infection. Mental health problems in HIV-infected patients may affect public health. Psychopathology, including depression and substance abuse, can increase hazardous sexual behaviour and, with it, the chance of spreading HIV. Therefore, it is important to develop an optimal treatment plan for HIV-infected patients with mental health problems. The majority of HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands (almost 60%) are homosexual men. The main objectives of this study were to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with HIV who seek treatment for their mental health symptoms in the Netherlands. Secondly, we tested whether HIV infected and non-infected homosexual patients with a lifetime depressive disorder differed on several mental health symptoms. Methods We compared a cohort of 196 patients who visited the outpatient clinic for HIV and Mental Health with HIV-infected patients in the general population in Amsterdam (ATHENA-study) and with non-HIV infected mental health patients (NESDA-study). DSM-IV diagnoses were determined, and several self-report questionnaires were used to assess mental health symptoms. Results Depressive disorders were the most commonly occurring diagnoses in the cohort and frequent drug use was common. HIV-infected homosexual men with a depressive disorder showed no difference in depressive symptoms or sleep disturbance, compared with non-infected depressive men. However, HIV-positive patients did express more symptoms like fear, anger and guilt. Although they showed significantly more suicidal ideation, suicide attempts were not more prevalent among HIV-infected patients. Finally, the HIV-infected depressive patients displayed a considerably higher level of drug use than the HIV-negative group. Conclusion Habitual drug use is a risk factor for spreading HIV. It is also more

  3. What can virtual patient simulation offer mental health nursing education?

    PubMed

    Guise, V; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of simulation in nursing education and training, including potential benefits and barriers associated with its use. In particular, it addresses the hitherto scant application of diverse simulation devices and dedicated simulation scenarios in psychiatric and mental health nursing. It goes on to describe a low-cost, narrative-based virtual patient simulation technique which has the potential for wide application within health and social care education. An example of the implementation of this technology in a web-based pilot course for acute mental health nurses is given. This particular virtual patient technique is a simulation type ideally suited to promoting essential mental health nursing skills such as critical thinking, communication and decision making. Furthermore, it is argued that it is particularly amenable to e-learning and blended learning environments, as well as being an apt tool where multilingual simulations are required. The continued development, implementation and evaluation of narrative virtual patient simulations across a variety of health and social care programmes would help ascertain their success as an educational tool.

  4. Cancer, Health Literacy, and Happiness: Perspectives from Patients under Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Pinto, Sara Maria; Alves Caldeira Berenguer, Sílvia Maria; Martins, José Carlos Amado

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a dreaded disease that affects all dimensions of human life. In this context, issues related to the quality of life—as happiness, perception about health status, or health literacy—are important. This study aims to analyze the following topics the perception: the Portuguese cancer patients have about their health status while undergoing chemotherapy, the satisfaction with the information relating to their health, their level of happiness, and their vision of the future. An observational, cross-sectional, and descriptive study was developed. Data were collected between May and July 2012 in the day hospital of a central hospital in northern Portugal. The sample was composed of 92 cancer patients who were asked to answer a questionnaire during chemotherapy. The results indicate that, despite this life-threatening disease, patients consider themselves fairly happy and have an optimistic view of the future. Information about their health condition and religious beliefs was important coping mechanisms to help dealing with the suffering caused by the disease. The study highlights the importance of providing care in a holistic way. Nurses must be alert and available to listen, answer questions, provide supporting structures, or refer to other professionals when needed. PMID:24089635

  5. Michigan health system launches integrated campaign using patient testimonials.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Spectrum Health System in Michigan recently launched The Right Decision campaign, which totes the system's heart center and cancer facilities. The effort is underway with aggressive print ads, television and radio spots, and Web site promotion. The 1,000-bed, acute-care system hopes to raise awareness of the heart and cancer centers through real-life patient testimonials.

  6. When Residents Need Health Care: Stigma of the Patient Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moutier, Christine; Cornette, Michelle; Lehrmann, Jon; Geppert, Cynthia; Tsao, Carol; DeBoard, Renee; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Whether and under what circumstances medical residents seek personal health care is a growing concern that has important implications for medical education and patient welfare, but has not been thoroughly investigated. Barriers to obtaining care have been previously documented, but very little empirical work has focused on trainees who…

  7. Michigan health system launches integrated campaign using patient testimonials.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Spectrum Health System in Michigan recently launched The Right Decision campaign, which totes the system's heart center and cancer facilities. The effort is underway with aggressive print ads, television and radio spots, and Web site promotion. The 1,000-bed, acute-care system hopes to raise awareness of the heart and cancer centers through real-life patient testimonials. PMID:16813347

  8. Oral health related quality of life in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants' knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample. PMID:25587385

  9. Measuring patient engagement: development and psychometric properties of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) Scale.

    PubMed

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Bonanomi, Andrea; Lozza, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the rhetorical call for increasing patients' engagement, policy makers recognize the urgency to have an evidence-based measure of patients' engagement and capture its effect when planning and implementing initiatives aimed at sustaining the engagement of consumers in their health. In this paper, authors describe the Patient Health Engagement Scale (PHE-scale), a measure of patient engagement that is grounded in rigorous conceptualization and appropriate psychometric methods. The scale was developed based on our previous conceptualization of patient engagement (the PHE-model). In particular, the items of the PHE-scale were developed based on the findings from the literature review and from interviews with chronic patients. Initial psychometric analysis was performed to pilot test a preliminary version of the items. The items were then refined and administered to a national sample of chronic patients (N = 382) to assess the measure's psychometric performance. A final phase of test-retest reliability was performed. The analysis showed that the PHE Scale has good psychometric properties with good correlation with concurrent measures and solid reliability. Having a valid and reliable measure to assess patient engagement is the first step in understanding patient engagement and its role in health care quality, outcomes, and cost containment. The PHE Scale shows a promising clinical relevance, indicating that it can be used to tailor intervention and assess changes after patient engagement interventions.

  10. The Influence of Health Literacy and Patient Activation on Patient Information Seeking and Sharing.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Christy J W; Cafferty, Lauren A; Russell, Travis C

    2015-01-01

    This study provided an assessment of how patients looked for information to prepare for a clinical appointment and whether they shared those findings with their provider. A cross-sectional survey allowed insight into patient attitudes, motivations, and behavior in clinical real time. At two hospital-based clinics, 243 patients completed surveys before and after clinical appointments. Younger patients with higher communicative and critical health literacy prepared for clinical appointments with information searches. The predicted association of health literacy and patient activation with information sharing was not supported. This study shows that patients with higher patient activation perceived that their providers responded more positively to patient-obtained medical information. The role of critical health literacy may show that individuals choosing to seek information are considering not just their ability to conduct the search but also their ability to synthesize and critically analyze the results of the information search. An implication for providers is to become skilled in directly asking or passively surveying what outside information sources the patient has engaged with, no matter if the patient does or does not introduce the information.

  11. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Larsen, Torben; Strömberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following components: integrated multidisciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimised treatment. Discussion We summarised the state of the art of home-based care for heart failure patients in Europe, described the typical content of such care to provide a guide for health care providers. PMID:24250283

  12. Pretesting mHealth: Implications for Campaigns among Underserved Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Disha; Arya, Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Background For health campaigns, pretesting the channel of message delivery and process evaluation is important to eventual campaign effectiveness. We conducted a pilot study to pretest text messaging as a mHealth channel for traditionally underserved patients. Aims The primary objectives of the research were to assess 1) successful recruitment of these patients for a text message study and 2) whether recruited patients would engage in a process evaluation after receiving the text message. Methods Recruited patients were sent a text message and then called a few hours later to assess whether they had received, read, and remembered the sent text message. Results We approached twenty patients, of whom fifteen consented to participate. Of these consented participants, ten (67%) engaged in the process evaluation and eight (53%) were confirmed as receiving, reading, and remembering the text message. Conclusion We found that traditionally underserved and under-researched patients can be recruited to participate in a text message study, and that recruited patients would engage in a process evaluation after receiving the text message. PMID:27540419

  13. Preventive strategies in oral health for special needs patients

    PubMed Central

    Vozza, Iole; Cavallè, Edoardo; Corridore, Denise; Ripari, Francesca; Spota, Andrea; Brugnoletti, Orlando; Guerra, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Summary As regards to the most common oral disease in pediatric patients, intellectual disability is not a risk factor for caries disease itself, but it rather reduces the individual capability to self-care and therefore to his own oral care. Children suffering of systemic pathologies and/or with different stages of disability are to be considered at high risk for dental caries development. According to recent guidelines for oral health prevention in childhood, individual additional strategies for a preventive care should be applied for these patients. All the health providers, family and caregivers should be involved with the aim of being aware, motivated and informed on oral health issues, and a better access system to the dental care structure, both logistic, professional and economical should be assured. PMID:26941896

  14. Meeting the health information needs of prostate cancer patients using personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Pai, H.H.; Lau, F.; Barnett, J.; Jones, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is interest in the use of health information technology in the form of personal health record (phr) systems to support patient needs for health information, care, and decision-making, particularly for patients with distressing, chronic diseases such as prostate cancer (pca). We sought feedback from pca patients who used a phr. Methods For 6 months, 22 pca patients in various phases of care at the BC Cancer Agency (bcca) were given access to a secure Web-based phr called provider, which they could use to view their medical records and use a set of support tools. Feedback was obtained using an end-of-study survey on usability, satisfaction, and concerns with provider. Site activity was recorded to assess usage patterns. Results Of the 17 patients who completed the study, 29% encountered some minor difficulties using provider. No security breaches were known to have occurred. The two most commonly accessed medical records were laboratory test results and transcribed doctor’s notes. Of survey respondents, 94% were satisfied with the access to their medical records, 65% said that provider helped to answer their questions, 77% felt that their privacy and confidentiality were preserved, 65% felt that using provider helped them to communicate better with their physicians, 83% found new and useful information that they would not have received by talking to their health care providers, and 88% said that they would continue to use provider. Conclusions Our results support the notion that phrs can provide cancer patients with timely access to their medical records and health information, and can assist in communication with health care providers, in knowledge generation, and in patient empowerment. PMID:24311957

  15. Social marketing meets health literacy: Innovative improvement of health care providers’ comfort with patient interaction

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Bui, Thuy; Fertman, Carl I.

    2010-01-01

    Objective It is essential to train health care providers to deliver care sensitive to the needs of diverse individuals with varying degrees of health literacy. We aimed to evaluate an innovative, theory-based, educational intervention involving social marketing and health literacy. Methods In 2006 at a large medical school, all first-year students were exposed to the intervention. They completed pre- and post-test anonymous surveys including demographic data, covariates, and key outcome variables. Paired t-tests and multiple linear regression were used to evaluate the intervention and to determine independent associations among the key outcome variables. Results Post-intervention scores were significantly higher than pre-intervention scores for social marketing (3.31 versus 1.90, p < 0.001), health literacy (3.41 versus 2.98, p < 0.001), and comfort in brochure development (3.11 versus 2.52, p < 0.001) (N = 83). After controlling for demographic and covariate data, health literacy and comfort in brochure development were independent predictors of comfort interacting with diverse populations. Conclusion A brief intervention involving social marketing and health literacy can improve skills that improve medical students’ comfort with patients of diverse backgrounds. Practice implications Health care providers can be taught educational principles and skills involved in developing effective patient education materials. These skills may improve providers’ comfort with direct patient interaction. PMID:17418522

  16. Emerging uses of patient generated health data in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Bennett, Antonia V; Basch, Ethan

    2015-05-01

    Recent advancements in consumer directed personal computing technology have led to the generation of biomedically-relevant data streams with potential health applications. This has catalyzed international interest in Patient Generated Health Data (PGHD), defined as "health-related data - including health history, symptoms, biometric data, treatment history, lifestyle choices, and other information-created, recorded, gathered, or inferred by or from patients or their designees (i.e. care partners or those who assist them) to help address a health concern."(Shapiro et al., 2012) PGHD offers several opportunities to improve the efficiency and output of clinical trials, particularly within oncology. These range from using PGHD to understand mechanisms of action of therapeutic strategies, to understanding and predicting treatment-related toxicity, to designing interventions to improve adherence and clinical outcomes. To facilitate the optimal use of PGHD, methodological research around considerations related to feasibility, validation, measure selection, and modeling of PGHD streams is needed. With successful integration, PGHD can catalyze the application of "big data" to cancer clinical research, creating both "n of 1" and population-level observations, and generating new insights into the nature of health and disease. PMID:25248998

  17. "It's safe to ask": promoting patient safety through health literacy.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Jan; Thompson, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The Manitoba Institute for Patient Safety launched "It's Safe to Ask" in January 2007. The communication and health literacy initiative is aimed at Manitoba's vulnerable populations and their primary care providers. Phase 1 includes a poster and brochure for patients and a toolkit for providers/organizations, pilot tested in six sites in Manitoba. Posters will serve as a symbol that dialogue is encouraged. Tools, available in 15 languages, provide patients and family members with three key questions to ask in healthcare interactions, tips on how to ask questions, and room for notes and listing of medications. The initiative will promote involvement in healthcare by patients, stronger communication between patient and provider, and reduction of risk for adverse events. "It's Safe to Ask" has been implemented in over 65 sites across Manitoba. A formal evaluation is underway. Phase 2 and 3 will enhance key tools and include interventions with specific populations. PMID:18382168

  18. Health service utilization patterns of primary care patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Joos, Stefanie; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Laux, Gunter; Wensing, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background To assess factors associated with visits to GPs, orthopaedists, and non-physician practitioners of complementary medicine (alternative practitioners) by primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Cross-sectional survey among 1250 consecutively addressed patients from 75 primary care practices in Germany. All patients suffered from OA of the knee or hip according to ACR criteria. They received questionnaires collecting sociodemographic data, data about health service utilisation, prescriptions, comorbidities. They also included established instruments as the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS2-SF) to assess disease-specific quality of life and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess depression. Hierarchical stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to reveal significant factors influencing health service utilization. Results 1021 of 1250 (81.6%) questionnaires were returned. Nonrespondents did not differ from participants. Factors associated with health service use (HSU) varied between providers of care. Not being in a partnership, achieving a high score on the PHQ-9, increased pain severity reflected in the “symptom” scale of the AIMS2-SF, and an increased number of drug prescriptions predicted a high frequency of GP visits. The PHQ-9 score was also a predictor for visits to orthopaedists, as were previous GP contacts, a high score in the "symptom" scale as well as a high score in the "lower limb scale" of the AIMS2-SF. Regarding visits to alternative practitioners, a high score in the AIMS -"social" scale was a positive predictor as older people were less likely to visit them. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for awareness of psychological factors contributing to the use of health care providers. Addressing the revealed factors associated with HSU appropriately may lead to decreased health care utilization. But further research is needed to assess how this can be done successfully. PMID:17956605

  19. The use of health functional foods in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hwa Pyoung; Lee, Hosun; Oh, Tak Geun; Lee, Kyong Joo; Park, Soo Jung; Chung, Moon Jae; Kim, Seung Up; Lee, Hyuk; Park, Jun Chul; Hong, Sung Pil; Park, Jun Yong; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Kim, Do Young; Cheon, Jae Hee; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2013-01-01

    As an adjunct to cancer treatment, the use of health functional foods (HFFs) seems to be increasing. However, little is known for the use of HFFs among cancer patients in Korea. The aims of this study were to investigate the exposure rate of HFF use among gastrointestinal (GI) cancer patients and to examine the relationship of socio-demographic and disease-related characteristics with the use of HFFs. A total of 126 patients diagnosed with GI cancer participated in the study. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a questionnaire. Over a half of all the patients surveyed (n = 67; 53.2%) used HFFs. Patients who were younger, had higher income, or longer duration of disease showed a trend to use HFFs more frequently, even though the tendency was not statistically significant. The most commonly used HFF was vitamin complex (n = 20; 16%), followed by red ginseng (n = 15; 12%), and sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua) (n = 11; 8.8%). About 26% of all responders expressed concerns for using HFFs. The primary concern was 'going against physician's recommendations' (36.8%). About 63% of respondents expressed a desire to consult with their physicians and follow their recommendations. More basic scientific data and educational materials regarding HFFs are required for both health-care professionals and cancer patients. A larger sample and size-controlled groups representing each cancer type will continue to be recruited for participation in this survey. PMID:23429665

  20. [Patient self-help, user perspective and health services research].

    PubMed

    Borgetto, B; von dem Knesebeck, O

    2009-01-01

    Patient's individual responsibility, self-help and active co-operation are essential for the health care system. This paper presents a synopsis of research in self-help groups and self-help organizations. Studies provide evidence that self-help initiatives are an important contribution to population health. Especially self-help groups increase mutual aid and social support, knowledge about the disease and its consequences and possibilities for changing attitudes of the group members and their social environment. They disburden primary networks and families and reinforce an 'intelligent' utilization of professional health care services. There has been as yet hardly any systematic investigation of the activities of self-help organizations, except from counseling services. Self-help groups and organizations increasingly receive financial support from the social security system and have increasingly become part of the health care system. However, the co-operation between self-help initiatives and the professional health care system is characterized by an imbalance between laymen and experts. Given these results, self-help, user perspective and the health-related behavior of laymen should obtain more significance in the conceptualization and definitions of health services research.

  1. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  2. Professionalism: good for patients and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael D; Monson, Verna

    2014-05-01

    Professionalism is an indispensable element in the compact between the medical profession and society that is based on trust and putting the needs of patients above all other considerations. The resurgence of interest in professionalism dates back to the 1980s when health maintenance organizations were formed and proprietary influences in health care increased. Since then, a rich and comprehensive literature has emerged in defining professionalism, including desirable individual attributes and behaviors and how they may be taught, promoted, and assessed. More recently, scholarship has shifted from individual to organizational professionalism. This literature addresses the role that health care organizations can play to establish environments that are conducive to the consistent expression of professionalism by individuals and health care teams. We reviewed interdisciplinary empirical studies from health care effectiveness and outcomes, organizational sciences, positive psychology, and social psychology, finding evidence that organizational and individual professionalism is associated with a wide range of benefits to patients and the organization. We identify actionable organizational strategies and approaches that, if adopted, can foster and promote combined organizational and individual professionalism. In doing so, trust in the medical profession and its institutions can be enhanced, which in turn will reconfirm a commitment to the social compact. PMID:24797645

  3. Professionalism: good for patients and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael D; Monson, Verna

    2014-05-01

    Professionalism is an indispensable element in the compact between the medical profession and society that is based on trust and putting the needs of patients above all other considerations. The resurgence of interest in professionalism dates back to the 1980s when health maintenance organizations were formed and proprietary influences in health care increased. Since then, a rich and comprehensive literature has emerged in defining professionalism, including desirable individual attributes and behaviors and how they may be taught, promoted, and assessed. More recently, scholarship has shifted from individual to organizational professionalism. This literature addresses the role that health care organizations can play to establish environments that are conducive to the consistent expression of professionalism by individuals and health care teams. We reviewed interdisciplinary empirical studies from health care effectiveness and outcomes, organizational sciences, positive psychology, and social psychology, finding evidence that organizational and individual professionalism is associated with a wide range of benefits to patients and the organization. We identify actionable organizational strategies and approaches that, if adopted, can foster and promote combined organizational and individual professionalism. In doing so, trust in the medical profession and its institutions can be enhanced, which in turn will reconfirm a commitment to the social compact.

  4. Community Health Workers in Brazil's Unified Health System: A Framework of their Praxis and Contributions to Patient Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rogério M.; da Silva, Sueli Bulhões; Soriano, Rafaela

    2012-01-01

    Community Health Workers (CHWs) play a pivotal role in primary care, serving as liaisons between community members and medical providers. However, the growing reliance of health care systems worldwide on CHWs has outpaced research explaining their praxis – how they combine indigenous and technical knowledge, overcome challenges and impact patient outcomes. This paper thus articulates the CHW Praxis and Patient Health Behavior Framework. Such a framework is needed to advance research on CHW impact on patient outcomes and to advance CHW training. The project that originated this framework followed Community-Based Participatory Research principles. A team of U.S.-Brazil research partners, including CHWs, worked together from conceptualization of the study to dissemination of its findings. The framework is built on an integrated conceptual foundation including learning/teaching and individual behavior theories. The empirical base of the framework comprises in-depth interviews with 30 CHWs in Brazil's Unified Health System, Mesquita, Rio de Janeiro. Data collection for the project which originated this report occurred in 2008–10. Semi-structured questions examined how CHWs used their knowledge/skills; addressed personal and environmental challenges; and how they promoted patient health behaviors. This study advances an explanation of how CHWs use self-identified strategies – i.e., empathic communication and perseverance – to help patients engage in health behaviors. Grounded in our proposed framework, survey measures can be developed and used in predictive models testing the effects of CHW praxis on health behaviors. Training for CHWs can explicitly integrate indigenous and technical knowledge in order for CHWs to overcome contextual challenges and enhance service delivery. PMID:22305469

  5. Congruence or Discrepancy? Comparing Patients' Health Valuations and Physicians' Treatment Goals for Rehabilitation for Patients with Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagl, Michaela; Farin, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the congruence of patients' health valuations and physicians' treatment goals for the rehabilitation of chronically ill patients. In addition, patient characteristics associated with greater or less congruence were to be determined. In a questionnaire study, patients' health valuations and physicians' goals were…

  6. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan; Keelan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians.

  7. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  8. Validation of the patient advocacy engagement scale for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeleine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles; Heidemann, Gretchen; Ananias, Debbie

    2015-04-01

    Codes of ethics of nursing, social work, and medicine, as well as Joint Commission Accreditation Standards, require members of these professions to engage in advocacy on behalf of patients. With use of expert panels, seven categories of patient problems in the healthcare milieu were identified: ethical rights, quality care, preventive care, culturally competent care, affordable/accessible care, mental health care, and care linked to patients' homes and communities. To measure the frequency with which healthcare professionals engage in patient advocacy related to these specific problems, the Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale (Patient-AES) scale was developed and validated through analysis of responses of 297 professionals (94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents) recruited from the personnel rosters of eight acute-care hospitals in Los Angeles County. Hospitals included public, not-for-profit, HMO, and church-affiliated hospitals that served general hospital populations, veterans, cancer patients, and children. Results supported the validity of both the concept and the instrument. Construct validity was supported by testing the hypothesized seven-factor solution through confirmatory factor analysis; 26 items loaded onto seven components. Pearson correlations for the overall scale and seven subscales in two administrations supported their test-retest stability. Cronbach α ranged from .55 to .94 for the seven subscales and .95 for the overall Patient-AES. The Patient-AES is, to our knowledge, the first scale that measures patient advocacy engagement by healthcare professionals in acute-care settings related to a broad range of specific patient problems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Holistic health assessment tool for patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Singhania, P. R.; Mandalika, S.

    2012-01-01

    The recent emphasis on assessment of the psychological status, availability of newer and better methods of interpreting the anthropometric measurements of renal patients on dialysis therapy prompted the authors to develop the “Holistic Health Assessment Tool for dialysis patients (HHAT-D).” A total of 30 subjects (25–65 years), enrolled from dialysis centers in Mumbai were administered the HHAT-D tool to assess anthropometric, biochemical, functional, and psychological status (knowledge, needs, that coping strategies) along with dietary intake. The results showed that majority of the patients (73.3%) were mild to moderately malnourished. A highly significant negative correlation of anthropometric measurements (BMI, lean body mass, mid arm circumference, arm muscle area, bicep skin fold thickness, % usual body weight, and % standard body weight) with the HHAT-D scores (P<0.01) confirmed the validity of the tool in assessing the degree of malnutrition. The poor health status of the patients was further confirmed by the average (40%) to poor (36.6%) flexibility status and poor dietary nutrient intake. Moderate (36.6%) to high (60%) coping effectiveness was recorded in the patients as assessed using the “coping effectiveness inventory.” A high degree of interitem correlation (Cronbach's coefficient alpha-test value 0.836) also proved the reliability of the HHAT-D tool. Thus, the HHAT-D was found to be a specific and reliable tool for assessment of holistic health status of patients on maintenance hemodialysis to improve quality of life and facilitate faster recovery. PMID:23162270

  10. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... or federal policy. More Health News on: Cancer Health Disparities Health Insurance Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cancer Health Disparities Health Insurance About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  11. Health Courts” and Accountability for Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Michelle M; Studdert, David M; Kachalia, Allen B; Brennan, Troyen A

    2006-01-01

    Proposals that medical malpractice claims be removed from the tort system and processed in an alternative system, known as administrative compensation or ‘health courts,’ attract considerable policy interest during malpractice ‘crises,’ including the current one. This article describes current proposals for the design of a health court system and the system's advantages for improving patient safety. Among these advantages are the cultivation of a culture of transparency regarding medical errors and the creation of mechanisms to gather and analyze data on medical injuries. The article discusses the experiences of foreign countries with administrative compensation systems for medical injury, including their use of claims data for research on patient safety; choices regarding the compensation system's relationship to physician disciplinary processes; and the proposed system's possible limitations. PMID:16953807

  12. Patient Safety and Patient Safety Culture: Foundations of Excellent Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    In 1999, patient safety moved to the forefront of health care based upon astonishing statistics and a landmark report released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This repor4 To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, caught the attention of the media, and there were headlines across the nation about the safety (or lack of safety)for patients in healthcare organizations. In the ensuing years, there have been many efforts to reduce medical errors. Clinicians reviewed their practices, researchers lookedfor better ways of doing things, and safety and quality organizationsfocused attention on the topic of patient safety. Initiatives and guidelines were established to define, measure, and improve patient safety practices and culture. Nurses remain central to providing an environment and culture of safety, and as a result, nurses are emerging as safety leaders in the healthcare setting. This article discusses the history of the patient safety movement in the United States and describes the concepts of patient safety and patient safety culture as the foundations for excellent health care delivery. PMID:26295088

  13. Is Patient Choice the Future of Health Care Systems?

    PubMed Central

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    Patient and user choice are at the forefront of the debate on the future direction of health and public services provision in many industrialized countries in Europe and elsewhere. It is used both, as a means to achieve desired policy goals in public health care systems such as greater efficiency and improved quality of care, and as a good with its own intrinsic value. However, the evidence suggests that its impact on efficiency and quality is at best a very limited while it might have negative consequences on equity because the pre-existing inequalities of income and education could influence patients’ access to information and, consequently, choices. The paper attempts to introduce multidisciplinary frameworks to account for the social and cultural factors guiding patients’ choices and to explain the rationale, processes and outcomes of decision making in health care. PMID:24596850

  14. Improving psychosocial health in hemodialysis patients after a disaster.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Sheila; Kutner, Nancy G; Bowles, Tess; Johnstone, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two social workers implemented a cognitive-behavioral intervention with 69 patients in 22 dialysis units in Louisiana to improve psychosocial health following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires measured psychosocial status domains (general health status, social functioning, burden of kidney disease, depressed mood, anxiety, and mastery). Participants rated their general health status (p < .05) and social functioning (p < .05) significantly higher after the intervention. Participants who listened to the class Managing stress through communication and problem solving and discussed it with their social worker, had significant improvement in depressed mood score (p < .05) after completing the program, compared to participants who did not discuss this material with their social worker. Sixty-five percent had scores indicating depressed mood before the program, compared with 56% following. The more positive participants' program evaluation, the higher their quality of life (lower perceived burden of kidney disease [p = .05]).

  15. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  16. Frequent Surfing on Social Health Networks is Associated With Increased Knowledge and Patient Health Activation

    PubMed Central

    Grosberg, Dafna; Grinvald, Haya; Reuveni, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of the Internet has driven a technological revolution that has changed our lives. As part of this phenomenon, social networks have attained a prominent role in health care. A variety of medical services is provided over the Internet, including home monitoring, interactive communications between the patient and service providers, and social support, among others. This study emphasizes some of the practical implications of Web-based health social networks for patients and for health care systems. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how participation in a social network among individuals with a chronic condition contributed to patient activation, based on the Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Methods A prospective, cross-sectional survey with a retrospective component was conducted. Data were collected from Camoni, a Hebrew-language Web-based social health network, participants in the diabetes mellitus, pain, hypertension, and depression/anxiety forums, during November 2012 to 2013. Experienced users (enrolled at least 6 months) and newly enrolled received similar versions of the same questionnaire including sociodemographics and PAM. Results Among 686 participants, 154 of 337 experienced and 123 of 349 newly enrolled completed the questionnaire. Positive correlations (P<.05) were found between frequency and duration of site visits and patient activation, social relationships, and chronic disease knowledge. Men surfed longer than women (χ²3=10.104, P<.05). Experienced users with diabetes surfed more than those with other illnesses and had significantly higher PAM scores (mean, M=69.3, standard deviation, SD=19.1, PAM level 4; Z=−4.197, P<.001) than new users (M=62.8, SD=18.7, PAM level 3). Disease knowledge directly predicted PAM for all users (β=.26 and .21, respectively). Frequency and duration of social health network use were correlated with increased knowledge about a chronic disease. Experienced surfers had higher PAM

  17. The Motivating Function of Healthcare Professional in eHealth and mHealth Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes Patients and the Mediating Role of Patient Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Bonanomi, Andrea; Menichetti, Julia

    2016-01-01

    eHealth and mHealth interventions for type 2 diabetes are emerging as useful strategies to accomplish the goal of a high functioning integrated care system. However, mHealth and eHealth interventions in order to be successful need the clear endorsement from the healthcare professionals. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 93 Italian-speaking type 2 diabetes patients and demonstrated the role of the perceived ability of healthcare professionals to motivate patients' initiative in improving the level of their engagement and activation in type 2 diabetes self-management. The level of type 2 diabetes patients' activation resulted also in being a direct precursor of their attitude to the use of mHealth and eHealth. Furthermore, patient engagement has been demonstrated to be a mediator of the relationship between the perceived ability of healthcare professionals in motivating type 2 diabetes patients and patients' activation. Finally, type 2 diabetes patients adherence did not result in being a direct consequence of the frequency of mHealth and eHealth use. Patient adherence appeared to be directly influenced by the level of perceived healthcare professionals ability of motivating patients' autonomy. These results offer important insights into the psychosocial and organizational elements that impact on type 2 diabetes patients' activation in self-management and on their willingness to use mHealth and eHealth devices. PMID:26881243

  18. When Health Systems Are Barriers to Health Care: Challenges Faced by Uninsured Mexican Kidney Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kierans, Ciara; Padilla-Altamira, Cesar; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Ibarra-Hernandez, Margarita; Mercado, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Kidney Disease disproportionately affects the poor in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). Mexico exemplifies the difficulties faced in supporting Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) and providing equitable patient care, despite recent attempts at health reform. The objective of this study is to document the challenges faced by uninsured, poor Mexican families when attempting to access RRT. Methods The article takes an ethnographic approach, using interviewing and observation to generate detailed accounts of the problems that accompany attempts to secure care. The study, based in the state of Jalisco, comprised interviews with patients, their caregivers, health and social care professionals, among others. Observations were carried out in both clinical and social settings. Results In the absence of organised health information and stable pathways to renal care, patients and their families work extraordinarily hard and at great expense to secure care in a mixed public-private healthcare system. As part of this work, they must navigate challenging health and social care environments, negotiate treatments and costs, resource and finance healthcare and manage a wide range of formal and informal health information. Conclusions Examining commonalities across pathways to adequate healthcare reveals major failings in the Mexican system. These systemic problems serve to reproduce and deepen health inequalities. A system, in which the costs of renal care are disproportionately borne by those who can least afford them, faces major difficulties around the sustainability and resourcing of RRTs. Attempts to increase access to renal therapies, therefore, need to take into account the complex social and economic demands this places on those who need access most. This paper further shows that ethnographic studies of the concrete ways in which healthcare is accessed in practice provide important insights into the plight of CKD patients and so constitute an

  19. Patient Abuse in the Health Care Setting: The Nurse as Patient Advocate.

    PubMed

    Albina, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    Incidents of verbal and physical patient abuse in health care settings continue to occur, with some making headline news. Nurses have a professional and ethical responsibility to advocate for their patients when incidents of abuse occur. Tolerating or ignoring inappropriate behaviors occurs for multiple reasons, including ignorance, fear of retaliation, the need for peer acceptance, and concerns for personal advancement. Nurses need to reflect on their biases before they can truly respect patients' autonomy. Through the examination of reported cases of patient abuse, the need for a change in hospital culture becomes evident. The primary steps in eliminating patient abuse are opening communication, providing education, establishing competency, eliminating tolerance of unacceptable behavior, and creating a code of mutual respect. A change in culture to one of mutual respect and dignity for staff members and patients will lead to the best outcomes for all involved. PMID:26746029

  20. Oral health resources for cancer patients in Texas.

    PubMed

    Bitouni, Anneta; Urankar, Yashashri

    2012-05-01

    Over 1.4 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed each year, and many of these patients will, by necessity, be treated in private practice, including dental practice. Dental professionals play a key role in helping patients understand that good oral care can prevent or reduce oral complications. Treatment of oral cancers and other malignancies cause oral sequelae that can compromise patients' quality of life and dictate reduction or discontinuation of optimal therapeutic regimens, which in turn reduces the odds of long-term survival. This can be prevented or better managed if dental and medical health care providers work together. The purpose of this article is to identify the cancer centers associated with dental clinics and the dental practitioners in the state of Texas, including maxillofacial prosthodontists, with training and/or a special interest in providing oral care to cancer patients. To be included on the list, which will be available on the Dental Oncology Education Program (DOEP) Web site (doep.org), please contact Grady Basler at the DOEP office (grady@doep.org), or the Department of Public Health Sciences (214-828-8350).

  1. Domiciliary health counselling in patients with sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Rathore, A S; Misra, R S; Ramesh, V

    1997-03-01

    To improve treatment compliance, follow-up and attendance of STD patients and their contacts, a programme, based on domiciliary visits was attempted. The programme was limited to male defaulters not responding to written and telephone calls. House visits to 79 out of 169 defaulters were made. Approximately half the number of houses were found locked. Fourteen defaulting patients reported for completion of their treatment and follow-up. Of these 11 were directly interviewed. None of the 14 patients agreed to disclose the addresses of their extramarital partners. During the study period 51 female sex contacts reported for treatment as compared to 27 in the control group. Though the numbers were small the study revealed that direct contact with the patient yielded the best results. It is suggested that to make the system cost-effective the health workers should spend time with STD patients in the clinic to mark out the correct location and time for meeting the patient either in the work place or at home in case of a follow-up.

  2. Patient-powered research networks aim to improve patient care and health research.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Beal, Anne C; Sheridan, Susan E; Johnson, Lorraine B; Selby, Joe V

    2014-07-01

    The era of big data, loosely defined as the development and analysis of large or complex data sets, brings new opportunities to empower patients and their families to generate, collect, and use their health information for both clinical and research purposes. In 2013 the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute launched a large national research network, PCORnet, that includes both clinical and patient-powered research networks. This article describes these networks, their potential uses, and the challenges they face. The networks are engaging patients, family members, and caregivers in four key ways: contributing data securely, with privacy protected; including diverse and representative groups of patients in research; prioritizing research questions, participating in research, and disseminating results; and participating in the leadership and governance of patient-powered research networks. If technical, regulatory, and organizational challenges can be overcome, PCORnet will allow research to be conducted more efficiently and cost-effectively and results to be disseminated quickly back to patients, clinicians, and delivery systems to improve patient health. PMID:25006148

  3. Patient-powered research networks aim to improve patient care and health research.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Beal, Anne C; Sheridan, Susan E; Johnson, Lorraine B; Selby, Joe V

    2014-07-01

    The era of big data, loosely defined as the development and analysis of large or complex data sets, brings new opportunities to empower patients and their families to generate, collect, and use their health information for both clinical and research purposes. In 2013 the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute launched a large national research network, PCORnet, that includes both clinical and patient-powered research networks. This article describes these networks, their potential uses, and the challenges they face. The networks are engaging patients, family members, and caregivers in four key ways: contributing data securely, with privacy protected; including diverse and representative groups of patients in research; prioritizing research questions, participating in research, and disseminating results; and participating in the leadership and governance of patient-powered research networks. If technical, regulatory, and organizational challenges can be overcome, PCORnet will allow research to be conducted more efficiently and cost-effectively and results to be disseminated quickly back to patients, clinicians, and delivery systems to improve patient health.

  4. The role of health literacy and social networks in arthritis patients' health information-seeking behavior: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Janette; Mullan, Judy; Worsley, Anthony; Pai, Nagesh

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients engage in health information-seeking behaviour to maintain their wellbeing and to manage chronic diseases such as arthritis. Health literacy allows patients to understand available treatments and to critically appraise information they obtain from a wide range of sources. Aims. To explore how arthritis patients' health literacy affects engagement in arthritis-focused health information-seeking behaviour and the selection of sources of health information available through their informal social network. Methods. An exploratory, qualitative study consisting of one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Twenty participants with arthritis were recruited from community organizations. The interviews were designed to elicit participants' understanding about their arthritis and arthritis medication and to determine how the participants' health literacy informed selection of where they found information about their arthritis and pain medication. Results. Participants with low health literacy were less likely to be engaged with health information-seeking behaviour. Participants with intermediate health literacy were more likely to source arthritis-focused health information from newspapers, television, and within their informal social network. Those with high health literacy sourced information from the internet and specialist health sources and were providers of information within their informal social network. Conclusion. Health professionals need to be aware that levels of engagement in health information-seeking behaviour and sources of arthritis-focused health information may be related to their patients' health literacy.

  5. Legal and regulatory considerations associated with use of patient-generated health data from social media and mobile health (mHealth) devices.

    PubMed

    Petersen, C; DeMuro, P

    2015-01-01

    Patient-generated health data are coming into broader use across the health care spectrum and hold great promise as a means to improve care and health outcomes. At the same time, rapid evolution in the social media and mobile health (mHealth) market has promoted an environment in which creation and transmission of personal health information is easy, quick, and appealing to patients. However, adoption of social media and mHealth by providers is hampered by legal and regulatory concerns with regard to data ownership and data use. This article defines common forms of patient-generated health data (PGHD) and describes how PGHD is used in clinical settings. It explores issues related to protection of personal health information, including that of children and adolescents, data security, and other potential barriers such as physician licensure. It also discusses regulatory and legal considerations providers and patients should consider before using social media and mobile health apps.

  6. Legal and Regulatory Considerations Associated with Use of Patient-Generated Health Data from Social Media and Mobile Health (mHealth) Devices

    PubMed Central

    DeMuro, P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patient-generated health data are coming into broader use across the health care spectrum and hold great promise as a means to improve care and health outcomes. At the same time, rapid evolution in the social media and mobile health (mHealth) market has promoted an environment in which creation and transmission of personal health information is easy, quick, and appealing to patients. However, adoption of social media and mHealth by providers is hampered by legal and regulatory concerns with regard to data ownership and data use. This article defines common forms of patient-generated health data (PGHD) and describes how PGHD is used in clinical settings. It explores issues related to protection of personal health information, including that of children and adolescents, data security, and other potential barriers such as physician licensure. It also discusses regulatory and legal considerations providers and patients should consider before using social media and mobile health apps. PMID:25848410

  7. Prioritizing the Preferences of Iranian Cancer Patients Regarding Acquisition of Health Information: Strategy for Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi; Fard, Farahnaz Ghahreman; Madani, Raihaneh; Iravani, Homa; Kahouei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing cancer patients' preferences to obtain health information can help improve and reform the methods of communicating and providing proper services and consequently lead to effective patient education. The present cross-sectional study to prioritize the preferences of cancer patients regarding the acquisition of health informationwas conducted on cancer patients referred to hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was developed. In the field of side effects of medications, 50 (46.7%) reported knowing about weight change, in the area of achieving relative health, 62(57.9%) announced awareness about diet, and 45 (42.1%) reported physical complications as a first regarding information needs. In the area of obtaining information, 50 (46.7%) tended to take their information through means outside of the hospital setting. These results can help with design of clinical information systems, as they inform the most relevant and useful coverage designed for cancer patients. Providing useful information through healthcare providers, the media and clinical information systems can act as a major source of social support for cancer patients. PMID:27356722

  8. Urinary Stone Disease: Advancing Knowledge, Patient Care, and Population Health.

    PubMed

    Scales, Charles D; Tasian, Gregory E; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Goldfarb, David S; Star, Robert A; Kirkali, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Expanding epidemiologic and physiologic data suggest that urinary stone disease is best conceptualized as a chronic metabolic condition punctuated by symptomatic, preventable stone events. These acute events herald substantial future chronic morbidity, including decreased bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, and CKD. Urinary stone disease imposes a large and growing public health burden. In the United States, 1 in 11 individuals will experience a urinary stone in their lifetime. Given this high incidence and prevalence, urinary stone disease is one of the most expensive urologic conditions, with health care charges exceeding $10 billion annually. Patient care focuses on management of symptomatic stones rather than prevention; after three decades of innovation, procedural interventions are almost exclusively minimally invasive or noninvasive, and mortality is rare. Despite these advances, the prevalence of stone disease has nearly doubled over the past 15 years, likely secondary to dietary and health trends. The NIDDK recently convened a symposium to assess knowledge and treatment gaps to inform future urinary stone disease research. Reducing the public health burden of urinary stone disease will require key advances in understanding environmental, genetic, and other individual disease determinants; improving secondary prevention; and optimal population health strategies in an increasingly cost-conscious care environment. PMID:26964844

  9. Life satisfaction and health in cancer patients, orthopedic patients and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Kreitler, S; Chaitchik, S; Rapoport, Y; Kreitler, H; Algor, R

    1993-02-01

    Life satisfaction (LS) is one of a set of constructs defining quality of life. Previous studies showed that LS was sometimes related to health and sometimes not. The study was designed to examine the relation of LS as a general construct to satisfaction in specific domains. We assumed that there is a tendency to maintain an acceptable level of LS even under stressful and threatening conditions, that it is related to optimism and that the likelihood of attaining satisfaction in a particular domain affected the selection of domains on which LS is based. We expected that in cancer patients LS would be related to more domains but not to health. The study was done with 55 head-and-neck cancer patients, of all stages and grades of tumor; 51 orthopedic patients, victims of accidents with good recovery chances; and 55 healthy individuals. The healthy individuals and orthopedic patients were matched (in terms of group values) to the cancer patients in age, gender and education. Single-item measures of LS and optimism, and a questionnaire with 49 multiple-choice items assessing adjustment in 13 domains were administered to all subjects. The results showed that in cancer patients LS was related to most domains but not to health and not to optimism, whereas in the other groups it was related to few domains including health, and also to optimism. The findings support the tendency to maintain LS with the materials available to the individual, and show that health is related to LS only if its maintenance or attainment are realistic goals. Thus, both bottom-up and top-down theories of LS are supported.

  10. [Bribes in health care and the patients' opinions].

    PubMed

    Masopust, V

    1989-07-01

    In May 1988 in the North Bohemian region an anonymous enquiry was made in which 3,767 respondents participated. The enquiry was focused among others on the problem of bribes in the health services. In the paper the author analyzes views of respondents why they give "small gifts" to health workers and why they assume that the patients get better treatment when they bribe. The reason for making "small gifts" or bribes is in 31.3% to manifest appreciation of treatment, in 27.7% an attempt to obtain better treatment and in 7.1% fear of receiving no treatment. People above 45 years, pensioners, employees of the services and chronic patients are more convinced of the positive motive of making "small gifts". Almost 10% of the entire group are convinced of the effect of bribes as a stimulant for provision of better care, 49% deny it and the remainder do not know. The most critically minded patient groups are those working in industry and respondents under 30 years. From the entire group 1.57% admitted making "small gifts", i.e. 59 of 3,767 respondents, the motive of almost half of them (42.3%) was appreciation of the care provided by the attending staff. An unequivocal bribe to obtain better care or fear that care will be refused was involved in 45.8% of the "bribing group". The views of patients who admitted "small gifts" as regards the health services are worse than the views of all respondents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2791115

  11. [E-health for all: are we reaching the patients who really need it?].

    PubMed

    Westerink, Jan; Hutten, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    The introduction and implementation of e-health into our healthcare system may have great benefits. E-health as a means of improving health and lowering healthcare expenditure may be especially efficacious when aimed specifically at older patients and those in lower income groups. However, older patients may not generally feel as comfortable using e-health as younger patients do, and sometimes lack the necessary skills. In addition, patients from lower income groups may not have the necessary access to e-health. New cost-effectiveness analyses of e-health should take into account costs necessary for improving computer skills as well as access to e-health.

  12. A patient-centred approach to health service delivery: improving health outcomes for people with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Wagner Model provides a framework that can help to facilitate health system transition towards a chronic care oriented model. Drawing on elements of this framework as well as health policy related to patient centred care, we describe the health needs of patients with chronic illness and compare these with services which should ideally be provided by a patient-centred health system. This paper aims to increase understanding of the challenges faced by chronically ill patients and family carers in relation to their experiences with the health care system and health service providers. Method We interviewed patients, carers and health care professionals (HCPs) about the challenges faced by people living with complicated diabetes, chronic heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results Patients indicated that they had a range of concerns related to the quality of health care encounters with health care professionals (HCPs), with these concerns being expressed as needs or wants. These included: 1) the need for improved communication and information delivery on the part of HCPs; 2) well organised health services and reduced waiting times to see HCPs; 3) help with self care; 4) greater recognition among professionals of the need for holistic and continuing care; and 5) inclusion of patients and carers in the decision making processes. Conclusions In order to address the challenges faced by people with chronic illness, health policy must be more closely aligned with the identified needs and wants of people affected by chronic illness than is currently the case. PMID:23819721

  13. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name "deep patient". We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems. PMID:27185194

  14. Understanding of definition and safety of oral health products among patients, physicians and pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Yasuko; Hori, Satoko; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to clarify the current understanding of the definition and safety of oral health products among patients and health professionals, and patients' perception about their communication with physicians and pharmacists regarding those products. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by patients at 17 community pharmacies in 14 prefectures of Japan. For health professionals, we sent a questionnaire to pharmacists and physicians who were registered as members of the Internet-based Medical Doctor's and Pharmacist's Information-Sharing System. The respondents were 242 patients, 158 physicians and 407 pharmacists. Some patients did not categorize dietary supplements as health products, while they did so categorize conventional foods (e.g., fermented soybeans, yogurt). Their understanding of the definition of health products was different from that of health professionals. Less than half of the patients considered that health products might potentiate or attenuate the effects of concomitant drugs, and this view was especially common among the elderly. The percentage of patients who reported that they rarely or never asked for advice from a pharmacist about their use of health products was significantly higher among those who had an incorrect understanding about health products. In conclusion, some patients' recognition of oral health products was different from that of health professionals, and most patients do not discuss their use of such products unless they are asked. Therefore, it is important for health professionals to check a patient's use of health products and be sure what he or she means when using the term 'health product'.

  15. Patient participation in health care: an underused resource.

    PubMed

    Lott, T F; Blazey, M E; West, M G

    1992-03-01

    The CCM has been in development for more than 3 years and in operation for more than 2 years. According to Peters, "Developing a vision is a messy, artistic process. Living it convincingly is a passionate one beyond any doubt." This statement expresses our personal experience in development of the CCM in terms of time, effort, hurdles, growth, and satisfaction. An environment has been created that strengthens the nurse's role as clinical educator, advocate, and coordinator. Capable patients and families on pilot units express satisfaction because they have learned to participate actively in their care during hospitalization, to better understand their disease, and to better manage their care at home. The time saved for nurses allows them to be engaged in activities of health promotion and education, deliver selected aspects of care, and consult with other team members on issues of problematic patient management. In this environment, professional nursing practice has been enhanced and nurses are influencing positive patient outcomes. In addition, our nurse recruiter reports that it is easier to recruit nurses for CCM pilot units than for nonpilot units with similar patient populations. This project has tapped an often underused resource, the patient's self-care ability, and created an environment that benefits not only the care recipients but also the caregivers. PMID:1545996

  16. Is the Authoritarian Trait in Mental Health Workers a Significant Predictor Variable of Patient Assault?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safian-Rush, Donna

    Mental health workers may be assaulted by their violent patients. A study was conducted to examine one predictor variable of aggressive behavior in patients. It was hypothesized that authoritarian traits in the mental health worker could result in more assaults against the mental health worker by patients. Participants (N=32) were mental health…

  17. Providing Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care: A Formative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Carolyn M.; Herman, Keith C.; Ferdinand, Lisa A.; Bailey, Tamika R.; Lopez, Manuel Thomas; Beato, Cristina; Adams, Diane; Cooper, Leslie L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the literature-based, testable, formative Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care Model that explains the associations between patient-centered culturally sensitive health care, health-promoting treatment behaviors, and health outcomes and statuses. An intervention program based on the model and its foundational…

  18. The patient as the pivot point for quality in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lengnick-Hall, C A

    1995-01-01

    Health care enterprises make comprehensive and durable changes in people. This human-centered purpose defines the fundamental nature of quality in health care settings. Traditional perspectives of quality and familiar views of customer satisfaction are inadequate to manage the complex relationships between the health care delivery firm and its patients. Patients play four roles in health care systems that must be reflected when defining and measuring quality in these settings: patient as supplier, patient as product, patient as participant, and patient as recipient. This article presents a conceptual model of quality that incorporates these diverse patient roles. The strategic and managerial implications of the model are also discussed. PMID:10140872

  19. The patient as the pivot point for quality in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lengnick-Hall, C A

    1995-01-01

    Health care enterprises make comprehensive and durable changes in people. This human-centered purpose defines the fundamental nature of quality in health care settings. Traditional perspectives of quality and familiar views of customer satisfaction are inadequate to manage the complex relationships between the health care delivery firm and its patients. Patients play four roles in health care systems that must be reflected when defining and measuring quality in these settings: patient as supplier, patient as product, patient as participant, and patient as recipient. This article presents a conceptual model of quality that incorporates these diverse patient roles. The strategic and managerial implications of the model are also discussed.

  20. Using health psychology to help patients: promoting wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-08-11

    This article explores the construct of wellbeing. Research concerning the relationship between subjective wellbeing and health is discussed. Key components of wellbeing that are important to health include 'sense of coherence', 'optimism' and 'benefit finding and post-traumatic growth'. A range of positive psychology interventions that aim to increase positive thoughts, feelings and emotions in order to improve wellbeing have been developed. Mindfulness-based approaches to improving wellbeing are especially popular and are evidence based. These focus on helping the individual to develop an awareness of the present with acceptance and attention. Instead of trying to change uncomfortable thoughts or feelings, the individual practices accepting these, without judgement. Nurses can draw on the information in this article to provide evidence-based advice and guidance to help improve their patients' and their own wellbeing.

  1. Using health psychology to help patients: promoting wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-08-11

    This article explores the construct of wellbeing. Research concerning the relationship between subjective wellbeing and health is discussed. Key components of wellbeing that are important to health include 'sense of coherence', 'optimism' and 'benefit finding and post-traumatic growth'. A range of positive psychology interventions that aim to increase positive thoughts, feelings and emotions in order to improve wellbeing have been developed. Mindfulness-based approaches to improving wellbeing are especially popular and are evidence based. These focus on helping the individual to develop an awareness of the present with acceptance and attention. Instead of trying to change uncomfortable thoughts or feelings, the individual practices accepting these, without judgement. Nurses can draw on the information in this article to provide evidence-based advice and guidance to help improve their patients' and their own wellbeing. PMID:27523757

  2. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  3. Promoting Immigrant Women's Cardiovascular Health Redesigning Patient Education Interventions.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Suzanne; Guruge, Sepali

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death among women from low- to middle-income countries. The most common cardiovascular nursing intervention is that of patient education. However, the applicability of this intervention is questionable, as these educational initiatives are typically designed and evaluated using samples of "white" homogeneous males. Using the social determinants of health framework, this discursive article identifies specific strategies for redesigning existing cardiovascular education interventions to enhance their applicability to immigrant women. The recommendations will allow nurses to enhance the educational support offered resulting in the reduction and/or prevention of cardiovascular-related symptoms and/or complications. PMID:26517345

  4. Health sciences librarians, patient contact, and secondary traumatic stress*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Rachel W.; McCrillis, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) in health sciences librarians (HSLs) who have direct contact with traumatized individuals and their families. Methods: A twenty-five-item survey and the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS) were distributed via email to three Medical Library Association email discussion lists. Results: A total of fifty-five HSLs responded to the survey. Survey results indicate moderate levels of STS and variability of symptoms among participants. Conclusions: Library and employee assistance program managers should be aware of the emotional toll of patient and/or family contact for HSLs. PMID:25918488

  5. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems. PMID:27185194

  6. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours. PMID:24195141

  7. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours.

  8. Oral health management of a patient with 47,XYY syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Manjunatha, B S; Bindayel, Naif A; Khounganian, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The 47,XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy (abnormal number) of sex chromosomes, where a human male receives an extra Y chromosome, making 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Individuals with 47,XYY are usually physically normal and tend to be tall and thin. They are not at increased risk of mental retardation and cardiovascular diseases. They may have speech delay, hyperactivity and normal/decreased IQ level. Behavioural problems are not common in 47,XYY individuals. There have been reports that suggest the tooth-size increase in 47,XYY males is due to a direct genetic effect. The patient presented with multiple over-retained deciduous, unerupted permanent teeth and increased incidence of carious lesions may be attributed to decreased oral hygiene maintenance. The present article describes the medical and dental history along with the clinical management of oral health issues in an 18-year-old male patient with 47,XYY syndrome having normal physical structure and development. PMID:24311410

  9. A health/patient education database for family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P A; Ruby, C; Craig, M D

    1991-01-01

    Using pilot project funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation (AAFP/F) developed a program by which health/patient education print materials were reviewed. Favorably reviewed materials were entered into a database accessible through the AAFP/F's Huffington Library. The review service and resulting database were designed to help the busy clinician identify scientifically accurate, reliable materials for use in patient education. The review process developed for the project is described, as is the database and its use by family physicians. Research findings from the pilot project are discussed, some of which assisted in planning the self-supporting second phase of the program. PMID:1958908

  10. Health self-assessment by hemodialysis patients in the Brazilian Unified Health System

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Tiago Ricardo; Giatti, Luana; Cesar, Cibele Comini; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine whether the level of complexity of the services structure and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients in hemodialysis are associated with the prevalence of poor health self-assessment. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated 1,621 patients with chronic terminal kidney disease on hemodialysis accompanied in 81 dialysis services in the Brazilian Unified Health System in 2007. Sampling was performed by conglomerate in two stages and a structured questionnaire was applied to participants. Multilevel multiple logistic regression was used for data analysis. RESULTS The prevalence of poor health self-assessment was of 54.5%, and in multivariable analysis it was associated with the following variables: increasing age (OR = 1.02; 95%CI 1.01–1.02), separated or divorced marital status (OR = 0.62; 95%CI 0.34–0.88), having 12 years or more of study (OR = 0.51; 95%CI 0.37–0.71), spending more than 60 minutes in commuting between home and the dialysis service (OR = 1.80; 95%CI 1.29–2.51), having three or more self-referred diseases (OR = 2.20; 95%CI 1.33–3.62), and reporting some (OR = 2.17; 95%CI 1.66–2.84) or a lot of (OR = 2.74; 95%CI 2.04–3.68) trouble falling asleep. Individuals in treatment in dialysis services with the highest level of complexity in the structure presented less chance of performing a self-assessment of their health as bad (OR = 0.59; 95%CI 0.42–0.84). CONCLUSIONS We showed poor health self-assessment is associated with age, years of formal education, marital status, home commuting time to the dialysis service, number of self-referred diseases, report of trouble sleeping, and also with the level of complexity of the structure of health services. Acknowledging these factors can contribute to the development of strategies to improve the health of patients in hemodialysis in the Brazilian Unified Health System. PMID:27143610

  11. Following the Francis report: investigating patient experience of mental health in-patient care

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, E.; Williams, P.; Rose, D.; Koeser, L.; McCrone, P.; Wykes, T.; Craig, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Francis report highlights perceptions of care that are affected by different factors including ward structures. Aims To assess patient and staff perceptions of psychiatric in-patient wards over time. Method Patient and staff perceptions of in-patient psychiatric wards were assessed over 18 months. We also investigated whether the type of ward or service structure affected these perceptions. We included triage and routine care. The goal was to include at least 50% of eligible patients and staff. Results The most dramatic change was a significant deterioration in all experiences over the courseof the study. Systems of care or specific wards did not affect patient experience but staff were more dissatisfied in the triage system. Conclusions This is the first report of deterioration in perceptions of the therapeutic in-patient environment that has been captured in a rigorous way. It may reflect contemporaneous experiences across the National Health Service of budget reductions and increased throughput. The ward systems we investigated did not improve patient experience and triage may have been detrimental to staff. PMID:26989098

  12. [Alcohol consumption patterns among patients in primary health care and detection by health professionals].

    PubMed

    Taufick, Maíra Lemos de Castro; Evangelista, Lays Aparecida; Silva, Michelle da; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Marques de

    2014-02-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated patterns of alcohol consumption among patients enrolled in the Family Health Program (FHP) in a city in Southeast Brazil, as well as the detection of such consumption by FHP professionals. A total of 932 adult patients were evaluated from November 2010 to November 2011. Of this total, 17.5% were considered at risk for hazardous drinking (AUDIT ≥ 8); increased risk was associated with male gender, younger age, and chronic illness. The CAGE questionnaire was positive in 98 patients (10.5%), with a higher proportion in men. Health professionals were more likely to ask about alcohol consumption in men, individuals aged ≥ 55 years, those with chronic illnesses, and heavier drinkers (438/932; 47.8%). Positive diagnosis of alcoholism was more frequent in men, individuals aged 35-54 years, and those with serious alcohol abuse (22/175; 12.6%). The study concluded that alcohol consumption is common among patients treated by FHP teams (although insufficiently recognized by professionals) and that a minority of alcoholics is instructed on the risks of drinking.

  13. [Alcohol consumption patterns among patients in primary health care and detection by health professionals].

    PubMed

    Taufick, Maíra Lemos de Castro; Evangelista, Lays Aparecida; Silva, Michelle da; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Marques de

    2014-02-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated patterns of alcohol consumption among patients enrolled in the Family Health Program (FHP) in a city in Southeast Brazil, as well as the detection of such consumption by FHP professionals. A total of 932 adult patients were evaluated from November 2010 to November 2011. Of this total, 17.5% were considered at risk for hazardous drinking (AUDIT ≥ 8); increased risk was associated with male gender, younger age, and chronic illness. The CAGE questionnaire was positive in 98 patients (10.5%), with a higher proportion in men. Health professionals were more likely to ask about alcohol consumption in men, individuals aged ≥ 55 years, those with chronic illnesses, and heavier drinkers (438/932; 47.8%). Positive diagnosis of alcoholism was more frequent in men, individuals aged 35-54 years, and those with serious alcohol abuse (22/175; 12.6%). The study concluded that alcohol consumption is common among patients treated by FHP teams (although insufficiently recognized by professionals) and that a minority of alcoholics is instructed on the risks of drinking. PMID:24627069

  14. The Impact of Validated, Online Health Education Resources on Patient and Community Members' Satisfaction and Health Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atack, Lynda; Luke, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: While access to health education information has become easier, the quality of information retrieved from the Internet varies considerably. In response to the need for accessible, quality health information that is tailored to meet individual patient needs, a patient education website, called PEPTalk, was developed. The site houses text…

  15. Cross-border mobility of health professionals: contesting patients' right to health.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Evgeniya Vadimovna

    2012-01-01

    Cross-border labour mobility in the health sector is portrayed as both an opportunity for health professionals immigrating to developed countries, and as a challenge for patients remaining in low-income countries with restricted access to health care provision. In policy debate, this problem is articulated as the opposition between, 'the right to freedom of movement' and 'the right to health'. The underlying layers of this dilemma expose competing institutional interests for source and destination countries, international organisations, private recruitment agencies, trade unions and professional organisations. To resolve some of these tensions, a 'soft law' regulation (ethical recruitment policy) was adopted in the UK in the early 2000s. This article argues that this ethical recruitment policy produces an ambivalent effect. The qualitative content analysis refers to documents produced by international organisations, government bodies, professional organisations and trade unions in the UK and source countries. We found that ethical recruitment on the one hand proposes a practical mechanism to the realisation of the right to health in source countries, through encouraging employers' behaviour in accordance with ethical principles in international recruitment. On the other hand, this policy protects the reputation of institutional stakeholders changing rhetoric around international recruitment rather than the practice. The findings of this study contribute to a broader discussion of the international norms diffusion and the ambivalent role of 'soft law' in their implementation. PMID:21435766

  16. Cross-border mobility of health professionals: contesting patients' right to health.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Evgeniya Vadimovna

    2012-01-01

    Cross-border labour mobility in the health sector is portrayed as both an opportunity for health professionals immigrating to developed countries, and as a challenge for patients remaining in low-income countries with restricted access to health care provision. In policy debate, this problem is articulated as the opposition between, 'the right to freedom of movement' and 'the right to health'. The underlying layers of this dilemma expose competing institutional interests for source and destination countries, international organisations, private recruitment agencies, trade unions and professional organisations. To resolve some of these tensions, a 'soft law' regulation (ethical recruitment policy) was adopted in the UK in the early 2000s. This article argues that this ethical recruitment policy produces an ambivalent effect. The qualitative content analysis refers to documents produced by international organisations, government bodies, professional organisations and trade unions in the UK and source countries. We found that ethical recruitment on the one hand proposes a practical mechanism to the realisation of the right to health in source countries, through encouraging employers' behaviour in accordance with ethical principles in international recruitment. On the other hand, this policy protects the reputation of institutional stakeholders changing rhetoric around international recruitment rather than the practice. The findings of this study contribute to a broader discussion of the international norms diffusion and the ambivalent role of 'soft law' in their implementation.

  17. Embryonic health: new insights, mHealth and personalised patient care.

    PubMed

    Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M; Steegers, Eric A P

    2015-05-01

    The worldwide epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCD), including obesity, is a burden to which poor lifestyles contribute significantly. Events in early life may enhance susceptibility to NCD, with transmission into succeeding generations. This may also explain, in part, why interventions in adulthood are less effective to reduce NCD risk. New insights reveal that the early embryo, in particular, is extremely sensitive to signals from gametes, trophoblastic tissue and periconception maternal lifestyles. Embryonic size and growth as determinants of embryonic health seem to impact future health. A relatively small embryo for gestational age is associated with pregnancy complications, as well as with the risk of early features of NCD in childhood. Although personal lifestyles are modifiable, they are extremely difficult to change. Therefore, adopting a life course approach from the periconception period onwards and integrated into patient care with short-term reproductive health benefits may have important implications for future prevention of NCD. The current reproductive population is used to Internet and social media. Therefore, they can be reached via mobile phone (mHealth) platforms that provide personalised lifestyle (pre)pregnancy programs. This will offer opportunities and possibly great benefits for the health of current and succeeding generations. PMID:25771352

  18. The Impact of an eHealth Portal on Health Care Professionals’ Interaction with Patients: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Faxvaag, Arild; Svanæs, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Background People who undergo weight loss surgery require a comprehensive treatment program to achieve successful outcomes. eHealth solutions, such as secure online portals, create new opportunities for improved health care delivery and care, but depend on the organizational delivery systems and on the health care professionals providing it. So far, these have received limited attention and the overall adoption of eHealth solutions remains low. In this study, a secure eHealth portal was implemented in a bariatric surgery clinic and offered to their patients. During the study period of 6 months, 60 patients and 5 health care professionals had access. The portal included patient information, self-management tools, and communication features for online dialog with peers and health care providers at the bariatric surgery clinic. Objective The aim of this study was to characterize and assess the impact of an eHealth portal on health care professionals’ interaction with patients in bariatric surgery. Methods This qualitative case study involved a field study consisting of contextual interviews at the clinic involving observing and speaking with personnel in their actual work environment. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with health care professionals who interacted with patients through the portal. Analysis of the collected material was done inductively using thematic analysis. Results The analysis revealed two main dimensions of using an eHealth portal in bariatric surgery: the transparency it represents and the responsibility that follows by providing it. The professionals reported the eHealth portal as (1) a source of information, (2) a gateway to approach and facilitate the patients, (3) a medium for irrevocable postings, (4) a channel that exposes responsibility and competence, and (5) a tool in the clinic. Conclusions By providing an eHealth portal to patients in a bariatric surgery program, health care professionals can observe patients

  19. Physicians, Patients, and the Electronic Health Record: An Ethnographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William; Kooienga, Sarah; Vuckovic, Nancy; Marlin, Ryan; Nygren, Peggy; Stewart, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about the effects of the electronic health record (EHR) on physician-patient encounters. The objectives of this study were to identify the factors that influence the manner by which physicians use the EHR with patients. METHODS This ethnographic study included 4 qualitative components: 80 hours of participant observation in 4 primary care offices in the Pacific Northwest; individual interviews with 52 patients, 12 office staff members, 23 physicians, and 1 nurse-practitioner; videotaped reviews of 29 clinical encounters; and 5 focus-group interviews with physicians and computer advocates. The main outcome measures were factors that influence how physicians use the EHR. Researchers qualitatively derived these factors through serial reviews of data. RESULTS This study identified 14 factors that influence how EHRs are used and perceived in medical practice today. These factors were categorized into 4 thematic domains: (1) spatial—effect of the physical presence and location of EHRs on interactions between physicians and patients; (2) relational—perceptions of physicians and patients about the EHR and how those perceptions affected its use; (3) educational—issues of developing physicians’ proficiency with and improving patients’ understandings about EHR use; and (4) structural—institutional and technological forces that influence how physicians perceived their use of EHR. CONCLUSIONS This study found that the introduction of EHRs into practice influences multiple cognitive and social dimensions of the clinical encounter. It brings into focus important questions that through further inquiry can determine how to make best use of the EHR to enhance therapeutic relationships. PMID:16569715

  20. Engaging African-American Veterans in Mental Health Care: Patients' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Eliacin, Johanne; Rollins, Angela L; Burgess, Diana J; Salyers, Michelle P; Matthias, Marianne S

    2016-04-01

    Despite growing interest in patient engagement, the concept remains poorly defined. Moreover, patients' perspectives on engagement are lacking, particularly those of minority patients. A better understanding of patients' views and what influences their engagement in health services will facilitate better patient education and implementation practices to enhance patient participation in health care. This article addresses patients' perspectives of facilitators and barriers to engagement in outpatient mental health services. Forty-nine African-American veterans with mental illness receiving routine medication management visits were interviewed. Qualitative data analysis was guided by a constructivist grounded theory approach. Participants identified several barriers and facilitators to engagement in mental health services, including patient as well as provider-related factors. Results emphasize the role of providers in facilitating sustained involvement of patients in their own care. Based on the findings, the authors offer a preliminary framework for patient engagement that encompasses patient and provider factors. PMID:26894316

  1. Coalition of attitude and practice behaviors among dental practitioners regarding pregnant patient's oral health and pregnant patient's perception toward oral health in and around Pondicherry

    PubMed Central

    Jeelani, S.; Khader, K. Abdul; Rangdhol, R. Vishwanath; Dany, A.; Paulose, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, practice behaviors among general dental practitioners and assess the perception toward oral health by pregnant patients in and around Puducherry. Methodology: A self-designed and structured questionnaire was used to obtain information from the dental practitioner and the pregnant patients. Results: The majority of the dental practitioners had a lack of knowledge, attitude, practice behaviors regarding pregnant patient's oral health and similarly majority of pregnant patient's perception toward oral health was poor. Conclusions: Drowning and dilemmatic attitude and practice behavior of dentists to be streamlined to render right care to the pregnant women at the right time. Perplexing perception toward oral health care by pregnant women to be overcome to orient them to understand the impact of oral health on their general systemic health. PMID:26538908

  2. At the Bedside: Traditional Navajo practitioners in a patient-centered health care model.

    PubMed

    Joe, Jennie R; Young, Robert S; Moses, Jill; Knoki-Wilson, Ursula; Dennison, Johnson

    2016-01-01

    The growing national racial and ethnic diversity has created a greater need for health care delivery systems and health care providers to be more responsive to unique patient needs, that goes beyond meeting the immediate health problems to include attention to other critical component of patient care that take into account cultural competency such as health literacy, health beliefs and behaviors, cultural practices, etc. PMID:27115131

  3. Provider-sponsored virtual communities for chronic patients: improving health outcomes through organizational patient-centred knowledge management.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Warren J; Choo, Chun Wei

    2003-12-01

    Patients with long-term chronic disease experience numerous illness patterns and disease trends over time, resulting in different sets of knowledge needs than patients who intermittently seek medical care for acute or short-term problems. Health-care organizations can promote knowledge creation and utilization by chronic patients through the introduction of a virtual, private, disease-specific patient community. This virtual socialization alters the role of chronic disease patients from external consumers of health-care services to a 'community of practice' of internal customers so that, with the tacit support of their health-care organization, they have a forum supporting the integration of knowledge gained from the experiences of living with chronic disease in their self-management. Patient-centred health-care organizations can employ the virtual community to direct and support the empowerment of chronic patients in their care.

  4. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  5. Evaluating Patient Motivation and the Use of Online Health Information: Keeping Patients and Families in the Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Carol Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the adult patient's understanding of the emergency department (ED) discharge instructions and motivation to use an online health education website. A survey of the ED staff was incorporated into the study to evaluate the ED staff members' motivation to include patient education on an online health education website prior to…

  6. Stories Patients Tell: The Role of Interpersonal Communication in Patients' Narratives on Memorable Health Care Encounters and Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruben, Brent D.

    A content analysis examined the narratives of 3,868 patients at 6 health care institutions, who described critical incidents during hospitalization and ambulatory health care. Results indicated that from the patient perspective, assessments of quality have less to do with clinical and administrative quality, than with providers' communication…

  7. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information.

  8. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information. PMID:25480723

  9. Helping Doctors and Patients Make Sense of Health Statistics.

    PubMed

    Gigerenzer, Gerd; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Kurz-Milcke, Elke; Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven

    2007-11-01

    Many doctors, patients, journalists, and politicians alike do not understand what health statistics mean or draw wrong conclusions without noticing. Collective statistical illiteracy refers to the widespread inability to understand the meaning of numbers. For instance, many citizens are unaware that higher survival rates with cancer screening do not imply longer life, or that the statement that mammography screening reduces the risk of dying from breast cancer by 25% in fact means that 1 less woman out of 1,000 will die of the disease. We provide evidence that statistical illiteracy (a) is common to patients, journalists, and physicians; (b) is created by nontransparent framing of information that is sometimes an unintentional result of lack of understanding but can also be a result of intentional efforts to manipulate or persuade people; and (c) can have serious consequences for health. The causes of statistical illiteracy should not be attributed to cognitive biases alone, but to the emotional nature of the doctor-patient relationship and conflicts of interest in the healthcare system. The classic doctor-patient relation is based on (the physician's) paternalism and (the patient's) trust in authority, which make statistical literacy seem unnecessary; so does the traditional combination of determinism (physicians who seek causes, not chances) and the illusion of certainty (patients who seek certainty when there is none). We show that information pamphlets, Web sites, leaflets distributed to doctors by the pharmaceutical industry, and even medical journals often report evidence in nontransparent forms that suggest big benefits of featured interventions and small harms. Without understanding the numbers involved, the public is susceptible to political and commercial manipulation of their anxieties and hopes, which undermines the goals of informed consent and shared decision making. What can be done? We discuss the importance of teaching statistical thinking and

  10. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  11. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  12. Informal, Incidental and Ad Hoc: The Information-Seeking and Learning Strategies of Health Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papen, Uta

    2012-01-01

    When people are ill, they want to know what is happening to them and how they can get better. Current health policies support patients' access to health information and encourage them to take part in decisions regarding their health. But little is known about how patients learn and the difficulties they may encounter in the process. This paper…

  13. The Northampton Physical Health and Wellbeing Project: the views of patients with severe mental illness about their physical health check.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Sheila; Deane, Katherine; Gray, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Background Annual health checks are recommended for people with severe mental illness, as they are at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We trained practice nurses from six primary care centres in Northampton, in the UK, how to deliver health checks for this population. Aims The purpose of this study was to examine patients' views about the physical health check delivered by a nurse trained in the Northampton Physical Health and Wellbeing (PhyHWell) project. Method We interviewed five patients from three primary care centres using a topic guide. Results From a total of 29 patients who were invited, five attended. They had a good understanding of the importance of a healthy diet and taking regular exercise, but did not appear to be aware of the risk of cardiovascular disease. Being treated consistently by the same healthcare professional and/or by a nurse was cited as a helpful factor in managing their physical health. Most of the patients were glad to be invited for a health check and thought that it was worthwhile. They would have liked more information about blood tests and medication. All of the patients reported that they had started to make changes to their lifestyle since the health check. Recommendations Training for practice nurses to provide physical health checks for people with severe mental illness should emphasise the patients' views of what will make them effective.

  14. The Psychological Attitude of Patients toward Health Practitioners in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Fouad; Fares, Youssef; Fares, Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients often complain about their doctor's attitude toward them. They describe the interaction that they have with some doctors as quick, cold, discourteous, or hardhearted. Although this does not apply to all Lebanese doctors, it does apply to some. Aims: The purpose of this study was to (1) examine the general perception of satisfaction, trust, and openness that Lebanese patients hold toward the work, office, personal, and social characteristics of their doctors — physician or dentist; and (2) identify the aspects on which a Lebanese health practitioner should focus to improve his/her practice. Materials and Methods: A convenient sample of 450 individuals from an area housing nine hospitals and hundreds of private clinics in Greater Beirut were surveyed regarding the qualities of their health practitioners. They were asked to complete a nine-page, 85-item, anonymous, and voluntary questionnaire that dealt with the medical and dental practice in Lebanon. Participants were older than 18 years and mentally competent. None was physicians, dentists, or nurses. The questionnaire was open-ended and initially pretested and piloted among a random sample. Results: Four hundred-fifteen (92%) individuals responded. Participants were from different ages, genders, geographical areas, educational backgrounds, and professions. The doctor traits most preferred by the Lebanese public were found to be: Empathy (90%), professionalism (87%), miscellaneous traits (86%), and academics (81%). Conclusion: The results support the conventional wisdom that the idealized perception of a doctor as a care-giving, compassionate, knowledgeable, well-appearing, and healthy role model still holds true within the Lebanese community. PMID:26713291

  15. Patient-Centered e-Health Record over the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilacopoulos, George; Prentza, Andrianna; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Malamateniou, Flora; Maglaveras, Nicos; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Mourouzis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Patient-Centered e-Health (PCEH) conceptual aspects alongside a multidisciplinary project that combines state-of-the-art technologies like cloud computing. The project, by combining several aspects of PCEH, such as: (a) electronic Personal Healthcare Record (e-PHR), (b) homecare telemedicine technologies, (c) e-prescribing, e-referral, e-learning, with advanced technologies like cloud computing and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), will lead to an innovative integrated e-health platform of many benefits to the society, the economy, the industry, and the research community. To achieve this, a consortium of experts, both from industry (two companies, one hospital and one healthcare organization) and academia (three universities), was set to investigate, analyse, design, build and test the new platform. This paper provides insights to the PCEH concept and to the current stage of the project. In doing so, we aim at increasing the awareness of this important endeavor and sharing the lessons learned so far throughout our work.

  16. Experiences as input to eHealth design - a hip surgery patient journey case.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria; Bolin, Peter; Koch, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to describe the planned hip-surgery care process as experienced by patients and healthcare professionals, as well as a qualitative analysis of problems. Data was collected through 3 focus group meetings with patients and healthcare professionals. We present the results in form of a patient journey model, examples of problems as expressed by patients and examples of proposed eHealth services by both patients and care professionals. The results indicate that although the patient journey is similar for most patients, their experiences are highly individual and designing eHealth to improve the patient journey will require flexibility and adaptability to the individual's needs.

  17. Correlates of Health Literacy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Dan; Clark, Dan; Tu, Wanzhu; Wu, Jingwei; Weiner, Michael; Steinley, Douglas; Murray, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Many older adults have inadequate health-related literacy, which is associated with poor health outcomes. Thus, it is important to identify determinants of health literacy. We investigated relationships between health literacy and general cognitive and sensory abilities, as well as education, health, and demographic variables, in a…

  18. Health promotion services for lifestyle development within a UK hospital – Patients' experiences and views

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Charlotte L

    2008-01-01

    Background UK public health policy requires hospitals to have in place health promotion services which enable patients to improve their health through adopting healthy behaviours, i.e. health education. This study investigated hospitalised patients' experiences of health education for smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and weight, and their views concerning the appropriateness of hospitals as a setting for the delivery of health education services. Methods Recently discharged adult hospital patients (n = 322) were sent a questionnaire asking about their smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and weight. For each of these risk factors, participants were asked whether they agreed with screening for the risk factor, whether they received health education, whether it was "helpful", and if they wanted to change their behaviour. Participants were also asked a set of general questions concerning health education within hospitals. Results 190 patients responded (59%). Over 80% agreed with screening for all risk factors. 80% of smokers, 52% consuming alcohol above recommended limits, 86% of obese, 66% consuming less than five fruit and vegetables a day, and 61% of physically inactive participants wanted to change their respective behaviour. However only a third reported receiving health education. While over 60% of patients wanted health education around discharge, the majority of those receiving health education did so at admission. The majority agreed that "hospital is a good place for patients to receive" health education (87%) and that "the hospital should provide patients with details of community organisations that provide" health education (83%). Only a minority (31%) reported a preference for health education from their GP instead of hospital. Conclusion While the delivery of health education to patients within hospital was poor, hospitals are viewed by patients as an appropriate, and in some cases preferred setting for the screening of risk

  19. The evolving role of health educators in advancing patient safety: forging partnerships and leading change.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Annette

    2007-04-01

    At least 1.5 million preventable injuries because of adverse drug events occur in the United States each year, according to an Institute of Medicine report. IOM and other organizations at the forefront of health care improvement emphasize that stronger partnerships between patients, their families, and health care providers are necessary to make health care safer. Health educators possess a skill set and an ethical framework that effectively equip them to advance patient and family-centered care and contribute in other significant ways to a safer health care system. Health educators in clinical settings are playing varied and significant roles in advancing patient safety. They are removing barriers to clear communication and forging partnerships between patients, their families, and staff. Health educators are leading patient safety culture change within their institutions and contributing to the shift from provider-centric to patient-centric systems. To expand their impact in improving patient safety, health educators in clinical settings are participating in public awareness campaigns. In seeking to enhance patient safety, health educators face a number of challenges. To successfully manage those, health educators must expand their knowledge, broaden connections, and engage patients and families in meaningful ways.

  20. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... discharged patients. 32.90 Section 32.90 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.90 Notification to health authorities regarding...

  1. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... discharged patients. 32.90 Section 32.90 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.90 Notification to health authorities regarding...

  2. Effect of proper oral rehabilitation on general health of mandibulectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ammar A; Raad, Kais; Mustafa, Nazih S

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Here, we aimed to assess whether postoperative oral rehabilitation for mandibulectomy patients is necessary to improve patients’ general health in terms of health-related quality of life. PMID:26576270

  3. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. PMID:23906128

  4. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care.

  5. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Dubbin, Leslie A.; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. PMID:23906128

  6. Patient Perspectives on Online Health Information and Communication With Doctors: A Qualitative Study of Patients 50 Years Old and Over

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background As health care systems around the world shift toward models that emphasize self-care management, there is increasing pressure for patients to obtain health information online. It is critical that patients are able to identify potential problems with using the Internet to diagnose and treat a health issue and that they feel comfortable communicating with their doctor about the health information they acquire from the Internet. Objective Our aim was to examine patient-identified (1) problems with using the Internet to identify and treat a health issue, (2) barriers to communication with a doctor about online health information seeking, and (3) facilitators of communication with a doctor about patient searches for health information on the Internet. Methods For this qualitative exploratory study, semistructured interviews were conducted with a sample of 56 adults age 50 years old and over. General concerns regarding use of the Internet to diagnose and treat a health issue were examined separately for participants based on whether they had ever discussed health information obtained through the Internet with a doctor. Discussions about barriers to and facilitators of communication about patient searches for health information on the Internet with a doctor were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Six higher-level general concerns emerged: (1) limitations in own ability, (2) credibility/limitations of online information, (3) anxiety, (4) time consumption, (5) conflict, and (6) non-physical harm. The most prevalent concern raised by participants who communicated with a doctor about their online health information seeking related to the credibility or limitations in online information. Participants who had never communicated with a doctor about their online health information seeking most commonly reported concerns about non-physical harm. Four barriers to communication emerged: (1) concerns about embarrassment, (2) concerns that the doctor doesn’t want

  7. Consumer Health Informatics: The Application of ICT in Improving Patient-Provider Partnership for a Better Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Larweh, Benjamin Teye

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest concerning the potential of ICT solutions that are customized to consumers. This emerging discipline referred to as consumer health informatics (CHI) plays a major role in providing information to patients and the public, and facilitates the promotion of self-management. The concept of CHI has emerged out of the desire of most patients to shoulder responsibilities regarding their health and a growing desire of health practitioners to fully appreciate the potential of the patient. Aim To describe the role of ICT in improving the patient-provider partnership in consumer health informatics. Methods Systematic reviewing of literature, identification of reference sources and formulation of search strategies and manual search regarding the significance of developed CHI applications in healthcare delivery. Results New consumer health IT applications have been developed to be used on a variety of different platforms, including the Web, messaging systems, PDAs, and cell phones. These applications assists patients with self-management through reminders and prompts, delivery of real-time data on a patient’s health condition to patients and providers, web-based communication and personal electronic health information. Conclusion New tools are being developed for the purposes of providing information to patients and the public which has enhanced decision making in health matters and an avenue for clinicians and consumers to exchange health information for personal and public use. This calls for corroboration among healthcare organizations, governments and the ICT industry to develop new research and IT innovations which are tailored to the health needs of the consumer. PMID:25422724

  8. Patients Know Best: Qualitative Study on How Families Use Patient-Controlled Personal Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Hanna; Hill, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management technologies, such as patient-controlled electronic health records (PCEHRs), have the potential to help people manage and cope with disease. Objective This study set out to investigate patient families’ lived experiences of working with a PCEHR. Methods We conducted a semistructured qualitative field study with patient families and clinicians at a children’s hospital in the UK that uses a PCEHR (Patients Know Best). All families were managing the health of a child with a serious chronic condition, who was typically under the care of multiple clinicians. As data gathering and analysis progressed, it became clear that while much of the literature assumes that patients are willing and waiting to take more responsibility for and control over their health management (eg, with PCEHRs), only a minority of participants in our study responded in this way. Their experiences with the PCEHR were diverse and strongly shaped by their coping styles. Theory on coping identifies a continuum of coping styles, from approach to avoidance oriented, and proposes that patients’ information needs depend on their style. Results We identified 3 groups of patient families and an outlier, distinguished by their coping style and their PCEHR use. We refer to the outlier as controlling (approach oriented, highly motivated to use PCEHR), and the 3 groups as collaborating (approach oriented, motivated to use PCEHR), cooperating (avoidance oriented, less motivated to use PCEHR), and avoiding (very avoidance oriented, not motivated to use PCEHR). Conclusions The PCEHR met the needs of controller and collaborators better than the needs of cooperators and avoiders. We draw on the Self-Determination Theory to propose ways in which a PCEHR design might better meet the needs of avoidance-oriented users. Further, we highlight the need for families to also relinquish control at times, and propose ways in which PCEHR design might support a better distribution of control

  9. Expanding patient engagement in quality improvement and health system redesign: Three Canadian case studies.

    PubMed

    Baker, G Ross; Fancott, Carol; Judd, Maria; O'Connor, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare organizations face growing pressures to increase patient-centred care and to involve patients more in organizational decisions. Yet many providers worry that such involvement requires additional time and resources and do not see patients as capable of contributing meaningfully to decisions. This article discusses three efforts in four organizations to engage patients in quality improvement efforts. McGill University Health Centre, Saskatoon Health Region, and Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Health Regions all engaged patients in quality improvement and system redesign initiatives that were successful in improving care processes, outcomes, and patient experience measures. Patient involvement in redesigning care may provide a way to demonstrate the value of patients' experiences and inputs into problem-solving, building support for their involvement in other areas. Further study of these cases and a broader survey of organizational experiences with patient involvement may help elucidate the factors that support greater patient engagement. PMID:27576853

  10. Addressing health disparities through patient education: the development of culturally-tailored health education materials at Puentes de Salud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Isobel; O'Brien, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    The availability of culturally appropriate written health information is essential for promoting health in diverse populations. Lack of English fluency has been shown to negatively impact health outcomes for Latinos in the United States. The authors conducted a needs assessment at a clinic serving Latino immigrants, focusing on patients' health and previous experiences with written health information. Based on these results and a literature review, we developed 10 Spanish language brochures to better serve the target population. This article outlines the process of developing and implementing this intervention, which can serve as a model for similar projects targeting diverse populations.

  11. Addressing health disparities through patient education: the development of culturally-tailored health education materials at Puentes de Salud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Isobel; O'Brien, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    The availability of culturally appropriate written health information is essential for promoting health in diverse populations. Lack of English fluency has been shown to negatively impact health outcomes for Latinos in the United States. The authors conducted a needs assessment at a clinic serving Latino immigrants, focusing on patients' health and previous experiences with written health information. Based on these results and a literature review, we developed 10 Spanish language brochures to better serve the target population. This article outlines the process of developing and implementing this intervention, which can serve as a model for similar projects targeting diverse populations. PMID:22053763

  12. Brainstorming Design for Health: Helping Patients Utilize Patient-Generated Information on the Web

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; Hartzler, Andrea; Munson, Sean; Anderson, Nick; Edwards, Kelly; Gore, John L.; McDonald, David; O’Leary, Jim; Parker, Andrea; Streat, Derek; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Pratt, Wanda; Ackerman, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners show increasing sinterest in utilizing patient-generated information on the Web. Although the HCI and CSCW communities have provided many exciting opportunities for exploring new ideas and building broad agenda in health, few venues offer a platform for interdisciplinary and collaborative brainstorming about design challenges and opportunities in this space. The goal of this workshop is to provide participants with opportunities to interact with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and practices—researchers, practitioners, designers, programmers, and ethnographers—and together generate tangible design outcomes that utilize patient-generated information on the Web. Through small multidisciplinary group work, we will provide participants with new collaboration opportunities, understanding of the state of the art, inspiration for future work, and ideally avenues for continuing to develop research and design ideas generated at the workshop. PMID:24499843

  13. Brainstorming Design for Health: Helping Patients Utilize Patient-Generated Information on the Web.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jina; Hartzler, Andrea; Munson, Sean; Anderson, Nick; Edwards, Kelly; Gore, John L; McDonald, David; O'Leary, Jim; Parker, Andrea; Streat, Derek; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Pratt, Wanda; Ackerman, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners show increasing sinterest in utilizing patient-generated information on the Web. Although the HCI and CSCW communities have provided many exciting opportunities for exploring new ideas and building broad agenda in health, few venues offer a platform for interdisciplinary and collaborative brainstorming about design challenges and opportunities in this space. The goal of this workshop is to provide participants with opportunities to interact with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and practices-researchers, practitioners, designers, programmers, and ethnographers-and together generate tangible design outcomes that utilize patient-generated information on the Web. Through small multidisciplinary group work, we will provide participants with new collaboration opportunities, understanding of the state of the art, inspiration for future work, and ideally avenues for continuing to develop research and design ideas generated at the workshop.

  14. Health IT for Patient Safety and Improving the Safety of Health IT.

    PubMed

    Magrabi, Farah; Ong, Mei-Sing; Coiera, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Alongside their benefits health IT applications can pose new risks to patient safety. Problems with IT have been linked to many different types of clinical errors including prescribing and administration of medications; as well as wrong-patient, wrong-site errors, and delays in procedures. There is also growing concern about the risks of data breach and cyber-security. IT-related clinical errors have their origins in processes undertaken to design, build, implement and use software systems in a broader sociotechnical context. Safety can be improved with greater standardization of clinical software and by improving the quality of processes at different points in the technology life cycle, spanning design, build, implementation and use in clinical settings. Oversight processes can be set up at a regional or national level to ensure that clinical software systems meet specific standards. Certification and regulation are two mechanisms to improve oversight. In the absence of clear standards, guidelines are useful to promote safe design and implementation practices. Processes to identify and mitigate hazards can be formalised via a safety management system. Minimizing new patient safety risks is critical to realizing the benefits of IT. PMID:27198089

  15. Health IT for Patient Safety and Improving the Safety of Health IT.

    PubMed

    Magrabi, Farah; Ong, Mei-Sing; Coiera, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Alongside their benefits health IT applications can pose new risks to patient safety. Problems with IT have been linked to many different types of clinical errors including prescribing and administration of medications; as well as wrong-patient, wrong-site errors, and delays in procedures. There is also growing concern about the risks of data breach and cyber-security. IT-related clinical errors have their origins in processes undertaken to design, build, implement and use software systems in a broader sociotechnical context. Safety can be improved with greater standardization of clinical software and by improving the quality of processes at different points in the technology life cycle, spanning design, build, implementation and use in clinical settings. Oversight processes can be set up at a regional or national level to ensure that clinical software systems meet specific standards. Certification and regulation are two mechanisms to improve oversight. In the absence of clear standards, guidelines are useful to promote safe design and implementation practices. Processes to identify and mitigate hazards can be formalised via a safety management system. Minimizing new patient safety risks is critical to realizing the benefits of IT.

  16. Patient Education in University Health Services: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Planning and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensley, Loren B., Jr.; Moffitt, Patrick B.

    1978-01-01

    This article looks at the patient education program and explains the role of the patient education intern at Central Michigan University. Included are helpful recommendations for persons interested in developing similar health education programs. (YG)

  17. Allied Health Technologies Multiskilled Patient Care Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiersema, Mary; Stacy, Carole Ann

    This curriculum guide explains the national health care skills standards and lists skill standards for health care technicians, especially in Michigan. The 10 sections of the guide cover the following: (1) introduction to the national health care skills strands; (2) allied health technologies multiskilled curriculum framework and program design…

  18. Application of a marketing concept to patient-centered care: co-producing health with heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Leone, Robert P; Walker, Charles A; Curry, Linda Cox; Agee, Elizabeth J

    2012-05-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are being treated for heart failure each year. One out of four of the heart failure patients who receives care in a hospital is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge. Effective discharge instruction is critical to prevent these patient readmissions. Co-production is a marketing concept whereby the customer is a partner in the delivery of a good or service. For example, a patient and nurse may partner to co-produce a patient-centered health regimen to improve patient outcomes. In this article we review the cost of treating heart failure patients and current strategies to decrease hospital readmissions for these patients along with the role of the nurse and the concept of co-producing health as related to heart failure patients. Next we describe our study assessing the degree to which discharge processes were co-produced on two hospital units having a preponderance of heart failure patients, and present our findings indicating minimal evidence of co-production. A discussion of our findings, along with clinical implications of these findings, recommendations for change, and suggestions for future research are offered. We conclude that standardized discharge plans lead to a mindset of 'one size fits all,' a mindset inconsistent with the recent call for patient-centered care. We offer co-production as a patient-centered strategy for customizing discharge teaching and improving health outcomes for heart failure patients.

  19. On the usage of health records for the design of virtual patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The process of creating and designing Virtual Patients for teaching students of medicine is an expensive and time-consuming task. In order to explore potential methods of mitigating these costs, our group began exploring the possibility of creating Virtual Patients based on electronic health records. This review assesses the usage of electronic health records in the creation of interactive Virtual Patients for teaching clinical decision-making. Methods The PubMed database was accessed programmatically to find papers relating to Virtual Patients. The returned citations were classified and the relevant full text articles were reviewed to find Virtual Patient systems that used electronic health records to create learning modalities. Results A total of n = 362 citations were found on PubMed and subsequently classified, of which n = 28 full-text articles were reviewed. Few articles used unformatted electronic health records other than patient CT or MRI scans. The use of patient data, extracted from electronic health records or otherwise, is widespread. The use of unformatted electronic health records in their raw form is less frequent. Patient data use is broad and spans several areas, such as teaching, training, 3D visualisation, and assessment. Conclusions Virtual Patients that are based on real patient data are widespread, yet the use of unformatted electronic health records, abundant in hospital information systems, is reported less often. The majority of teaching systems use reformatted patient data gathered from electronic health records, and do not use these electronic health records directly. Furthermore, many systems were found that used patient data in the form of CT or MRI scans. Much potential research exists regarding the use of unformatted electronic health records for the creation of Virtual Patients. PMID:24011027

  20. Social Uses of Personal Health Information Within PatientsLikeMe, an Online Patient Community: What Can Happen When Patients Have Access to One Another’s Data

    PubMed Central

    Massagli, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Background This project investigates the ways in which patients respond to the shared use of what is often considered private information: personal health data. There is a growing demand for patient access to personal health records. The predominant model for this record is a repository of all clinically relevant health information kept securely and viewed privately by patients and their health care providers. While this type of record does seem to have beneficial effects for the patient–physician relationship, the complexity and novelty of these data coupled with the lack of research in this area means the utility of personal health information for the primary stakeholders—the patients—is not well documented or understood. Objective PatientsLikeMe is an online community built to support information exchange between patients. The site provides customized disease-specific outcome and visualization tools to help patients understand and share information about their condition. We begin this paper by describing the components and design of the online community. We then identify and analyze how users of this platform reference personal health information within patient-to-patient dialogues. Methods Patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) post data on their current treatments, symptoms, and outcomes. These data are displayed graphically within personal health profiles and are reflected in composite community-level symptom and treatment reports. Users review and discuss these data within the Forum, private messaging, and comments posted on each other’s profiles. We analyzed member communications that referenced individual-level personal health data to determine how patient peers use personal health information within patient-to-patient exchanges. Results Qualitative analysis of a sample of 123 comments (about 2% of the total) posted within the community revealed a variety of commenting and questioning behaviors by patient members. Members

  1. Patient and Citizen Participation in Health: The Need for Improved Ethical Support

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Patient and citizen participation is now regarded as central to the promotion of sustainable health and health care. Involvement efforts create and encounter many diverse ethical challenges that have the potential to enhance or undermine their success. This article examines different expressions of patient and citizen participation and the support health ethics offers. It is contended that despite its prominence and the link between patient empowerment and autonomy, traditional bioethics is insufficient to guide participation efforts. In addition, the turn to a “social paradigm” of ethics in examinations of biotechnologies and public health does not provide an account of values that is commensurable with the pervasive autonomy paradigm. This exacerbates rather than eases tensions for patients and citizens endeavoring to engage with health. Citizen and patient participation must have a significant influence on the way we do health ethics if its potential is to be fulfilled. PMID:24809598

  2. Patient Core Data Set. Standard for a longitudinal health/medical record.

    PubMed

    Renner, A L; Swart, J C

    1997-01-01

    Blue Chip Computers Company, in collaboration with Wright State University-Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health, with support from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Public Health Service, completed Small Business innovative Research research to design a comprehensive integrated Patient information System. The Wright State University consultants undertook the development of a Patient Core Data Set (PCDS) in response to the lack of uniform standards of minimum data sets, and lack of standards in data transfer for continuity of care. The purpose of the Patient Core Data Set is to develop a longitudinal patient health record and medical history using a common set of standard data elements with uniform definitions and coding consistent with Health Level 7 (HL7) protocol and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. The PCDS, intended for transfer across all patient-care settings, is essential information for clinicians, administrators, researchers, and health policy makers.

  3. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  4. How patients and clinicians make meaning of physical suffering in mental health evaluations.

    PubMed

    Carson, Nicholas J; Katz, Arlene M; Alegría, Margarita

    2016-10-01

    Clinicians in community mental health settings frequently evaluate individuals suffering from physical health problems. How patients make meaning of such "comorbidity" can affect mental health in ways that may be influenced by cultural expectations and by the responses of clinicians, with implications for delivering culturally sensitive care. A sample of 30 adult mental health intakes exemplifying physical illness assessment was identified from a larger study of patient-provider communication. The recordings of patient-provider interactions were coded using an information checklist containing 21 physical illness items. Intakes were analyzed for themes of meaning making by patients and responses by clinicians. Post-diagnostic interviews with these patients and clinicians were analyzed in similar fashion. Clinicians facilitated disclosures of physical suffering to varying degrees and formulated them in the context of the culture of mental health services. Patients discussed their perceptions of what was at stake in their experience of physical illness: existential loss, embodiment, and limits on the capacity to work and on their sense of agency. The experiences of physical illness, mental health difficulties, and social stressors were described as mutually reinforcing. In mental health intakes, patients attributed meaning to the negative effects of physical health problems in relation to mental health functioning and social stressors. Decreased capacity to work was a particularly salient concern. The complexity of these patient-provider interactions may best be captured by a sociosomatic formulation that addresses the meaning of physical and mental illness in relation to social stressors.

  5. How patients and clinicians make meaning of physical suffering in mental health evaluations.

    PubMed

    Carson, Nicholas J; Katz, Arlene M; Alegría, Margarita

    2016-10-01

    Clinicians in community mental health settings frequently evaluate individuals suffering from physical health problems. How patients make meaning of such "comorbidity" can affect mental health in ways that may be influenced by cultural expectations and by the responses of clinicians, with implications for delivering culturally sensitive care. A sample of 30 adult mental health intakes exemplifying physical illness assessment was identified from a larger study of patient-provider communication. The recordings of patient-provider interactions were coded using an information checklist containing 21 physical illness items. Intakes were analyzed for themes of meaning making by patients and responses by clinicians. Post-diagnostic interviews with these patients and clinicians were analyzed in similar fashion. Clinicians facilitated disclosures of physical suffering to varying degrees and formulated them in the context of the culture of mental health services. Patients discussed their perceptions of what was at stake in their experience of physical illness: existential loss, embodiment, and limits on the capacity to work and on their sense of agency. The experiences of physical illness, mental health difficulties, and social stressors were described as mutually reinforcing. In mental health intakes, patients attributed meaning to the negative effects of physical health problems in relation to mental health functioning and social stressors. Decreased capacity to work was a particularly salient concern. The complexity of these patient-provider interactions may best be captured by a sociosomatic formulation that addresses the meaning of physical and mental illness in relation to social stressors. PMID:27460985

  6. Be More Involved in Your Health Care: Tips for Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Organization (PSO) Program Quality Measure Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Value Surveys on Patient Safety Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey ...

  7. Prevalence and Demographic and Clinical Associations of Health Literacy in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Maria K.; Shields, Anne Marie; Sevick, Mary Ann; Palevsky, Paul M.; Fine, Michael J.; Arnold, Robert M.; Weisbord, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Although limited health literacy is estimated to affect over 90 million Americans and is recognized as an important public health concern, there have been few studies examining this issue in patients with chronic kidney disease. We sought to characterize the prevalence of and associations of demographic and clinical characteristics with limited health literacy in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements As part of a prospective clinical trial of symptom management strategies in 288 patients treated with chronic hemodialysis, we assessed health literacy using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM). We defined limited health literacy as a REALM score ≤60 and evaluated independent associations of demographic and baseline clinical characteristics with limited health literacy using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of the 260 patients who completed the REALM, 41 demonstrated limited health literacy. African-American race, lower educational level, and veteran status were independently associated with limited health literacy. There was no association of limited health literacy with age, gender, serologic values, dialysis adequacy, overall symptom burden, quality of life, or depression. Conclusions Limited health literacy is common among patients receiving chronic hemodialysis. African-American race and socioeconomic factors are strong independent predictors of limited health literacy. These findings can help inform the design and implementation of interventions to improve health literacy in the hemodialysis population. PMID:21551025

  8. eHealth in Belgium, a new "secure" federal network: role of patients, health professions and social security services.

    PubMed

    France, Francis Roger

    2011-02-01

    eHealth platform is the official federal network in Belgium (created by law on 21 August 2008) devoted to a secure exchange of health data in many types of applications, such as health care purposes, simplification of administrative procedures and contribution to health policy. It implies a controlled access to decentralized databases and uses encrypted personal data. The national identification number has been chosen in order to authenticate the requester, the patient, and the receiver of information exchange. Authorizations have to be respected in order to obtain personal health data. Several questions are raised about its security: the lack of mandatory request for systematic journaling on accesses to the electronic patient record as well as the absence of explicit procedures for sanctions in case of unauthorized access, the new role of social security administration in managing security where a eHealth manager can be both judge and party (in the function of trusted third party for health data encryption and of a required lawyer for texts proposed by physicians to the Commission for the protection of private life). Another critic concerns the number of physicians in minority and the absence of patients' delegates in the eHealth Board. At a time when the patient is becoming a partner in the care team, should not he be the gate-keeper for the access to his own health record? How could networks help him to get the appropriate knowledge to contribute to care and to write his testament of life? Recent laws (on private life, patient rights and euthanasia) have contributed to a behavioural change in citizens and physician attitudes. Recommendations are made in order to improve the acceptability of eHealth platform.

  9. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. Results: All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. Conclusions: There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges. PMID:26937315

  10. High need patients receiving targeted entitlements: what responsibilities do they have in primary health care?

    PubMed

    Buetow, S

    2005-05-01

    Patient responsibilities in primary health care are controversial and, by comparison, the responsibilities of high need patients are less clear. This paper aims to suggest why high need patients receiving targeted entitlements in primary health care are free to have prima facie special responsibilities; why, given this freedom, these patients morally have special responsibilities; what these responsibilities are, and how publicly funded health systems ought to be able to respond when these remain unmet. It is suggested that the special responsibilities and their place in public policy acquire moral significance as a means to discharge a moral debt, share special knowledge, and produce desirable consequences in regard to personal and collective interests. Special responsibilities magnify ordinary patient responsibilities and require patients not to hesitate regarding attendance for primary health care. Persistent patient disregard of special responsibilities may necessitate limiting the scope of these responsibilities, removing system barriers, or respecifying special rights. PMID:15863693

  11. Emerging Patient-Driven Health Care Models: An Examination of Health Social Networks, Consumer Personalized Medicine and Quantified Self-Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    A new class of patient-driven health care services is emerging to supplement and extend traditional health care delivery models and empower patient self-care. Patient-driven health care can be characterized as having an increased level of information flow, transparency, customization, collaboration and patient choice and responsibility-taking, as well as quantitative, predictive and preventive aspects. The potential exists to both improve traditional health care systems and expand the concept of health care though new services. This paper examines three categories of novel health services: health social networks, consumer personalized medicine and quantified self-tracking. PMID:19440396

  12. Metabolic control in a nationally representative diabetic elderly sample in Costa Rica: patients at community health centers vs. patients at other health care settings

    PubMed Central

    Brenes-Camacho, Gilbert; Rosero-Bixby, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Background Costa Rica, like other developing countries, is experiencing an increasing burden of chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM), especially among its elderly population. This article has two goals: (1) to assess the level of metabolic control among the diabetic population age ≥ 60 years old in Costa Rica, and (2) to test whether diabetic elderly patients of community health centers differ from patients in other health care settings in terms of the level of metabolic control. Methods Data come from the project CRELES, a nationally representative study of people aged 60 and over in Costa Rica. This article analyzes a subsample of 542 participants in CRELES with self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Odds ratios of poor levels of metabolic control at different health care settings are computed using logistic regressions. Results Lack of metabolic control among elderly diabetic population in Costa Rica is described as follows: 37% have glycated hemoglobin ≥ 7%; 78% have systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmHg; 66% have diastolic blood pressure ≥ 80 mmHg; 48% have triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dl; 78% have LDL ≥ 100 mg/dl; 70% have HDL ≤ 40 mg/dl. Elevated levels of triglycerides and LDL were higher in patients of community health centers than in patients of other clinical settings. There were no statistical differences in the other metabolic control indicators across health care settings. Conclusion Levels of metabolic control among elderly population with DM in Costa Rica are not that different from those observed in industrialized countries. Elevated levels of triglycerides and LDL at community health centers may indicate problems of dyslipidemia treatment among diabetic patients; these problems are not observed in other health care settings. The Costa Rican health care system should address this problem, given that community health centers constitute a means of democratizing access to primary health care to underserved and poor areas. PMID

  13. The patient-as-partner approach in health care: a conceptual framework for a necessary transition.

    PubMed

    Karazivan, Philippe; Dumez, Vincent; Flora, Luigi; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Del Grande, Claudio; Ghadiri, Djahanchah Philip; Fernandez, Nicolas; Jouet, Emmanuelle; Las Vergnas, Olivier; Lebel, Paule

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases today calls for new ways of working with patients to manage their care. Although patient-centered approaches have contributed to significant advances in care and to treatments that more fully respect patients' preferences, values, and personal experiences, the reality is that health care professionals still hold a monopoly on the role of healer. Patients live with their conditions every day and are experts when it comes to their own experiences of illness; this expertise should be welcomed, valued, and fostered by other members of the care team. The patient-as-partner approach embodies the ideal of making the patient a bona fide member of the health care team, a true partner in his or her care. Since 2010, the University of Montreal, through the Direction of Collaboration and Patient Partnership, has embraced this approach. Patients are not only active members of their own health care team but also are involved in research and provide valuable training to health sciences students. Including patients as full partners in the health care team entails a significant shift in both the medical practice and medical education cultures. In this perspective, the authors describe this innovative approach to patient care, including the conceptual framework used in its development and the main achievements of patient partners in education, health care, and research. PMID:25607943

  14. The patient-as-partner approach in health care: a conceptual framework for a necessary transition.

    PubMed

    Karazivan, Philippe; Dumez, Vincent; Flora, Luigi; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Del Grande, Claudio; Ghadiri, Djahanchah Philip; Fernandez, Nicolas; Jouet, Emmanuelle; Las Vergnas, Olivier; Lebel, Paule

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases today calls for new ways of working with patients to manage their care. Although patient-centered approaches have contributed to significant advances in care and to treatments that more fully respect patients' preferences, values, and personal experiences, the reality is that health care professionals still hold a monopoly on the role of healer. Patients live with their conditions every day and are experts when it comes to their own experiences of illness; this expertise should be welcomed, valued, and fostered by other members of the care team. The patient-as-partner approach embodies the ideal of making the patient a bona fide member of the health care team, a true partner in his or her care. Since 2010, the University of Montreal, through the Direction of Collaboration and Patient Partnership, has embraced this approach. Patients are not only active members of their own health care team but also are involved in research and provide valuable training to health sciences students. Including patients as full partners in the health care team entails a significant shift in both the medical practice and medical education cultures. In this perspective, the authors describe this innovative approach to patient care, including the conceptual framework used in its development and the main achievements of patient partners in education, health care, and research.

  15. Limited health literacy and decline in executive function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Shwetha S; Eggermont, Laura H P; Silliman, Rebecca A; Bickmore, Timothy W; Henault, Lori E; Winter, Michael R; Nelson, Kerrie; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Limited health literacy is associated with worse executive function, but the association between limited health literacy and decline in executive function has not been established because of a lack of longitudinal studies. The authors aimed to examine this association by studying a prospective cohort in the setting of a randomized controlled trial to promote walking in older adults. Participants were community-dwelling older adults (65 years of age or older) who scored 2 or more on the Mini-Cog, without depression (score of less than 15 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire), and who completed baseline and 12-month evaluations (n = 226). Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Executive function measured at baseline and 12 months using the Trail Making Test (TMT), Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Category Fluency. The associations between health literacy and 12-month decline in each test of executive function were modeled using multivariate linear regression. Health literacy was found to be limited in 37% of participants. Limited health literacy was associated with reduced performance on all 3 executive function tests. In fully adjusted models, limited health literacy was associated with greater 12-month decline in performance on the TMT than higher health literacy (p = .01). In conclusion, older adults with limited health literacy are at risk for more rapid decline in scores on the TMT, a measure of executive function.

  16. Tying eHealth Tools to Patient Needs: Exploring the Use of eHealth for Community-Dwelling Patients With Complex Chronic Disease and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Background Health policy makers have recently shifted attention towards examining high users of health care, in particular patients with complex chronic disease and disability (CCDD) characterized as having multimorbidities and care needs that require ongoing use of services. The adoption of eHealth technologies may be a key strategy in supporting and providing care for these patients; however, these technologies need to address the specific needs of patients with CCDD. This paper describes the first phase of a multiphased patient-centered research project aimed at developing eHealth technology for patients with CCDD. Objective As part of the development of new eHealth technologies to support patients with CCDD in primary care settings, we sought to determine the perceived needs of these patients with respect to (1) the kinds of health and health service issues that are important to them, (2) the information that should be collected and how it could be collected in order to help meet their needs, and (3) their views on the challenges/barriers to using eHealth mobile apps to collect the information. Methods Focus groups were conducted with community-dwelling patients with CCDD and caregivers. An interpretive description research design was used to identify the perceived needs of participants and the information sharing and eHealth technologies that could support those needs. Analysis was conducted concurrently with data collection. Coding of transcripts from four focus groups was conducted by 3 authors. QSR NVivo 10 software was used to manage coding. Results There were 14 total participants in the focus groups. The average age of participants was 64.4 years; 9 participants were female, and 11 were born in Canada. Participants identified a need for open two-way communication and dialogue between themselves and their providers, and better information sharing between providers in order to support continuity and coordination of care. Access issues were mainly around

  17. Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

  18. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Elias; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time-motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health worker

  19. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Elias; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time–motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health

  20. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Elias; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time-motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health worker

  1. Understanding and Predicting Social Media Use Among Community Health Center Patients: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of social media by health care organizations is growing and provides Web-based tools to connect patients, caregivers, and providers. Objective The aim was to determine the use and factors predicting the use of social media for health care–related purposes among medically underserved primary care patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 444 patients of a federally qualified community health center. Results Community health center patients preferred that their providers use email, cell phones for texting, and Facebook and cell phone apps for sharing health information. Significantly more Hispanic than white patients believed their providers should use Facebook (P=.001), YouTube (P=.01), and Twitter (P=.04) for sharing health information. Use and intentions to use social media for health-related purposes were significantly higher for those patients with higher subjective norm scores. Conclusions Understanding use and factors predicting use can increase adoption and utilization of social media for health care–related purposes among underserved patients in community health centers. PMID:25427823

  2. Market-Based Health Care in Specialty Surgery: Finding Patient-Centered Shared Value.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Cote, David; Cybulski, George; Laws, Edward R

    2015-10-01

    : The US health care system is struggling with rising costs, poor outcomes, waste, and inefficiency. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act represents a substantial effort to improve access and emphasizes value-based care. Value in health care has been defined as health outcomes for the patient per dollar spent. However, given the opacity of health outcomes and cost, the identification and quantification of patient-centered value is problematic. These problems are magnified by highly technical, specialized care (eg, neurosurgery). This is further complicated by potentially competing interests of the 5 major stakeholders in health care: patients, doctors, payers, hospitals, and manufacturers. These stakeholders are watching with great interest as health care in the United States moves toward a value-based system. Market principles can be harnessed to drive costs down, improve outcomes, and improve overall value to patients. However, there are many caveats to a market-based, value-driven system that must be identified and addressed. Many excellent neurosurgical efforts are already underway to nudge health care toward increased efficiency, decreased costs, and improved quality. Patient-centered shared value can provide a philosophical mooring for the development of health care policies that utilize market principles without losing sight of the ultimate goals of health care, to care for patients.

  3. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  4. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300 Section 880.6300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... identification code is used to access patient identity and corresponding health information stored in a...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300 Section 880.6300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... identification code is used to access patient identity and corresponding health information stored in a...

  6. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300 Section 880.6300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... identification code is used to access patient identity and corresponding health information stored in a...

  7. 76 FR 74788 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HealthWatch, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Relinquishment From HealthWatch, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION...Watch, Inc. of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality... the list of federally approved PSOs. AHRQ has accepted a notification from HealthWatch, Inc.,...

  8. Cumulative Adverse Financial Circumstances: Associations with Patient Health Status and Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisgaier, Joanna; Rhodes, Karin V.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines associations between cumulative adverse financial circumstances and patient health in a sample of 1,506 urban emergency department (ED) patients. Study participants completed a previously validated Social Health Survey between May and October 2009. Five categories of economic deprivation were studied: food insecurity, housing…

  9. Building a case for using technology: health literacy and patient education.

    PubMed

    Cassey, Margaret Z

    2007-01-01

    The interplay of a mobile population can affect the quality of patient outcomes and the economics of health care delivery significantly. Helping patients with limited English proficiency understand the basics of self-care for optimal health will continue to be a challenge in the delivery of the highest quality nursing care. Becoming familiar with high-quality, peer-reviewed, and reliable health education materials and Web sites is the responsibility of every health care provider so that patients receive culturally and linguistically appropriate resources to support healthy lifestyles and choices.

  10. Patient empowerment by the means of citizen-managed Electronic Health Records: web 2.0 health digital identity scenarios.

    PubMed

    Falcão-Reis, Filipa; Correia, Manuel E

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of more sophisticated and comprehensive healthcare information systems, system builders are becoming more interested in patient interaction and what he can do to help to improve his own health care. Information systems play nowadays a crucial and fundamental role in hospital work-flows, thus providing great opportunities to introduce and improve upon "patient empowerment" processes for the personalization and management of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). In this paper, we present a patient's privacy generic control mechanisms scenarios based on the Extended OpenID (eOID), a user centric digital identity provider previously developed by our group, which leverages a secured OpenID 2.0 infrastructure with the recently released Portuguese Citizen Card (CC) for secure authentication in a distributed health information environment. eOID also takes advantage of Oauth assertion based mechanisms to implement patient controlled secure qualified role based access to his EHR, by third parties.

  11. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients.

  12. Patient credentialing as a population health management strategy: a diabetes case study.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lindsay L; Bluml, Benjamin M; Skoufalos, Alexandria

    2015-06-01

    When given the opportunity to become actively involved in the decision-making process, patients can positively impact their health outcomes. Understanding how to empower patients to become informed consumers of health care services is an important strategy for addressing disparities and variability in care. Patient credentialing identifies people who have a certain diagnosis and have achieved certain levels of competency in understanding and managing their disease. Patient credentialing was developed to meet 3 core purposes: (1) enhance patient engagement by increasing personal accountability for health outcomes, (2) create a mass customization strategy for providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered collaborative care, and (3) provide payers with a foundation for properly aligning health benefit incentives. The Patient Self-Management Credential for Diabetes, a first-of-its-kind, psychometrically validated tool, has been deployed within 3 practice-based research initiatives as a component of innovative diabetes care. Results from these projects show improved clinical outcomes, reduced health care costs, and a relationship between credential achievement levels and clinical markers of diabetes. Implementing patient credentialing as part of collaborative care delivered within various settings across the health care system may be an effective way to reduce disparities, improve access to care and appropriate treatments, incentivize patient engagement in managing their health, and expend time and resources in a customized way to meet individual needs.

  13. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients. PMID:27642542

  14. Patient satisfaction with treatment for alcohol use disorders: comparing patients with and without severe mental health symptoms

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Stacey L; Andrews, Jane M; Gaughwin, Matthew D; Turnbull, Deborah A; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest patients with co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and severe mental health symptoms (SMHS) are less satisfied with standard AUD treatment when compared to patients with an AUD alone. This study compared patient satisfaction with standard AUD treatment among patients with and without SMHS and explored how standard treatment might be improved to better address the needs of these patients. Methods Eighty-nine patients receiving treatment for an AUD either at an inpatient hospital, outpatient clinic, inpatient detoxification, or residential/therapeutic community services were surveyed. Patient satisfaction with treatment was assessed using the Treatment Perception Questionnaire (range: 0–40). Patients were stratified according to their score on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Forty patients scored in the extremely severe range of depression (score >14) and/or anxiety (score >10) (indicating SMHS) and 49 patients did not. An inductive content analysis was also conducted on qualitative data relating to areas of service improvement. Results Patients with SMHS were found to be equally satisfied with treatment (mean =25.10, standard deviation =8.12) as patients with an AUD alone (mean =25.43, standard deviation =6.91). Analysis revealed that being an inpatient in hospital was associated with reduced treatment satisfaction. Patients with SMHS were found to be significantly less satisfied with staffs’ understanding of the type of help they wanted in treatment, when compared to patients with AUDs alone. Five areas for service improvement were identified, including staff qualities, informed care, treatment access and continuity, issues relating to inpatient stay, and addressing patients’ mental health needs. Conclusion While findings suggest that AUD treatment services adequately meet the needs of patients with SMHS in treatment, patients with SMHS do feel that staff lack understanding of their treatment needs. Findings have

  15. The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches…

  16. 75 FR 82277 - Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Requirements Under the Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 158 RIN 0950-AA06 Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio... ``Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Requirements Under the Patient Protection... Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Requirements accurately states...

  17. Communicating with limited English proficiency (LEP) patients: question of health-care access.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the ability to understand English plays an essential role in how well patients and health-care providers communicate. This article highlights the concerns of providers, differential health-care outcomes, and risk management concerns of providing health care in an increasingly diverse and polyglot population. PMID:15500018

  18. Implementation of Patient's Rights Charter: a Report from Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Iran.

    PubMed

    Parsapoor, A R; Salari, P; Larijani, B

    2013-01-01

    At the aim of explaining the rights of health care recipients and upgrading ethical observance in the field of treatment-the most important field of health care-, the Patient's Rights Charter was declared by Ministry of Health and Medical Education to all medical universities in September 2009. This paper provides a report of strategic planning for implementation of Patient's Rights Charter and a summary of other projects.

  19. Implementation of Patient's Rights Charter: a Report from Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Iran.

    PubMed

    Parsapoor, A R; Salari, P; Larijani, B

    2013-01-01

    At the aim of explaining the rights of health care recipients and upgrading ethical observance in the field of treatment-the most important field of health care-, the Patient's Rights Charter was declared by Ministry of Health and Medical Education to all medical universities in September 2009. This paper provides a report of strategic planning for implementation of Patient's Rights Charter and a summary of other projects. PMID:23865009

  20. How do physicians discuss e-health with patients? the relationship of physicians' e-health beliefs to physician mediation styles.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Yuki; Stewart, Erin

    2013-01-01

    A survey of 104 physicians examined the role of physicians' evaluation of the quality of e-health and beliefs about the influence of patients' use of e-health in how physicians discuss e-health materials with patients. Physicians' lower (poor) evaluation of the quality of e-health content predicted more negative mediation (counter-reinforcement of e-health content). Perceived benefits of patients' e-health use predicted more positive (endorsement of e-health content). Physician's perceived concerns (negative influence) regarding patients' e-health use were not a significant predictor for their mediation styles. Results, challenging the utility of restrictive mediation, suggested reconceptualizing it as redirective mediation in a medical interaction. The study suggested that patient-generated e-health-related inquiries invite physician mediation in medical consultations. Findings and implications are discussed in light of the literature of physician-patient interaction, incorporating the theory of parental mediation of media into a medical context.

  1. The Development of an eHealth Tool Suite for Prostate Cancer Patients and Their Partners

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Donna; Hawkins, Robert; Pingree, Suzanne; Jarrard, David

    2013-01-01

    Background eHealth resources for people facing health crises must balance the expert knowledge and perspective of developers and clinicians against the very different needs and perspectives of prospective users. This formative study explores the information and support needs of posttreatment prostate cancer patients and their partners as a way to improve an existing eHealth information and support system called CHESS (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System). Methods Focus groups with patient survivors and their partners were used to identify information gaps and information-seeking milestones. Results Both patients and partners expressed a need for assistance in decision making, connecting with experienced patients, and making sexual adjustments. Female partners of patients are more active in searching for cancer information. All partners have information and support needs distinct from those of the patient. Conclusions Findings were used to develop a series of interactive tools and navigational features for the CHESS prostate cancer computer-mediated system. PMID:22591675

  2. A Patient-Centered Approach to Postgraduate Trainee Health and Wellness: An Applied Review and Health Care Delivery Model.

    PubMed

    Carvour, Martha L; Ayyar, Balaji K; Chien, Kelly S; Ramirez, Natalie C; Yamamoto, Haru

    2016-09-01

    Attention to the health and wellness of postgraduate medical trainees has increased considerably in recent years, yet the scholarly literature consistently indicates that, in many instances, the medical and mental health care needs of this population remain unmet or only partially met. As a result, trainee health care often falls short of the current standards of the medical profession. Combined with the prevalence of burnout and other mental health conditions among trainees, inadequate health care for this patient population may result in significant negative consequences for trainees' health, safety, and performance.Here, the authors review the scholarly literature explicating the health care needs of postgraduate trainees. They explore the patient-centered medical home model as a potentially effective solution to address the unmet and partially met health care needs of trainees. The authors describe several practical interventions to improve access to care. These include care coordination and referral support, confidential care without perceived conflicts of interest in the training environment, co-location of medical and mental health care, and accommodations for schedule constraints. Finally, the authors explore the role of the medical home in developing and supporting broader institutional efforts to promote wellness. PMID:27415444

  3. Mental health of patients with human immunodeficiency virus in Japan: a comparative analysis of employed and unemployed patients.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Shimada, Megumi; Ikeda, Kazuko; Ishiuchi-Ishitani, Seiko; Tsuno, Yoko Sumikawa; Ohira, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    In developed countries, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has become a chronic disease. The aims of this study were to clarify the physical, social, and psychological factors affecting Japanese HIV patients in a stable condition and to identify factors related to mental health of employed and unemployed HIV patients. The target subjects were people with HIV infection who were treated as outpatients at core hospitals for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatment in Japan. A questionnaire including items from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was sent to each medical facility with a request for participation from the HIV-infected outpatients. Responses from 1199 patients were analyzed. Mental health was reportedly better in the employed patients than in the unemployed patients. The unemployed patients were more likely to have resigned from their jobs because of poor health, to have resigned voluntarily, or to have been unfairly dismissed. Once the patients stopped working because of HIV, returning to work became difficult. In the employed patients, a good workplace environment was strongly related to lower scores on HADS. Higher HADS scores were recorded for employed patients infected with HIV for six years or more. For the unemployed patients, a relationship was observed between strong feelings of stigmatization and HADS scores. Quitting a job because of an experience related to HIV status may be related to feelings of stigmatization.

  4. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments’ domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  5. Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Skoufalos, Alexis; Medalia, Alice; Fendrick, A. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting Janice L. Clarke, RN, Alexis Skoufalos, EdD, Alice Medalia, PhD, and A. Mark Fendrick, MD Editorial: A Call to Action: David B. Nash, MD, MBA   S-2 Overview: Depression and the Population Health Imperative   S-3 Promoting Awareness of the Issues and Opportunities for Improvement   S-5 Cognitive Dysfunction in Affective Disorders   S-5 Critical Role of Employers in Improving Health Outcomes for Employees with Depression   S-6 Closing the Behavioral Health Professional and Process Gaps   S-6 Achieving the Triple Aim for Patients with Depressive Disorders   S-6 Improving the Experience of Care for Patients with Depression   S-6 Improving Quality of Care and Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression   S-7 Changing the Cost of Care Discussion from How Much to How Well   S-8 Panel Insights and Recommendations   S-9 Conclusion   S-10 PMID:27636743

  6. Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janice L; Skoufalos, Alexis; Medalia, Alice; Fendrick, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting Janice L. Clarke, RN, Alexis Skoufalos, EdD, Alice Medalia, PhD, and A. Mark Fendrick, MD Editorial: A Call to Action : David B. Nash, MD, MBA   S-2 OVERVIEW: Depression and the Population Health Imperative    S-3 Promoting Awareness of the Issues and Opportunities for Improvement    S-5 Cognitive Dysfunction in Affective Disorders    S-5 Critical Role of Employers in Improving Health Outcomes for Employees with Depression    S-6 Closing the Behavioral Health Professional and Process Gaps    S-6 Achieving the Triple Aim for Patients with Depressive Disorders    S-6 Improving the Experience of Care for Patients with Depression    S-6 Improving Quality of Care and Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression    S-7 Changing the Cost of Care Discussion from How Much to How Well    S-8 Panel Insights and Recommendations    S-9 Conclusion    S-10. PMID:27636743

  7. Improve Synergy Between Health Information Exchange and Electronic Health Records to Increase Rates of Continuously Insured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Rachel; Burdick, Tim; Angier, Heather; Wallace, Lorraine; Nelson, Christine; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Sumic, Aleksandra; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Affordable Care Act increases health insurance options, yet many Americans may struggle to consistently maintain coverage. While health care providers have traditionally not been involved in providing insurance enrollment support to their patients, the ability for them to do so now exists. We propose that providers could capitalize on the expansion of electronic health records (EHRs) and the advances in health information exchanges (HIEs) to improve their patients’ insurance coverage rates and continuity. Evidence for Argument: We describe a project in which we are building strategies for linking, and thus improving synergy between, payer and EHR data. Through this effort, care teams will have access to new automated tools and increased EHR functionality designed to help them assist their patients in obtaining and maintaining health insurance coverage. Suggestion for the Future: The convergence of increasing EHR adoption, improving HIE functionality, and expanding insurance coverage options, creates new opportunities for clinics to help their patients obtain public health insurance. Harnessing this nascent ability to exchange information between payers and providers may improve synergies between HIE and EHRs, and thus support clinic-based efforts to keep patients continuously insured. PMID:26355818

  8. Assessment of surgical wounds in the home health patient: definitions and accuracy with OASIS-C.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Rhonda A

    2011-10-01

    The number of surgical patients receiving home care continues to grow as hospitals discharge patients sooner. Home health clinicians must gain knowledge of the wound healing stages and surgical wound classification to collect accurate data in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set-C (OASIS-C). This article provides the information clinicians need to accurately assess surgical wounds and implement best practices for improving surgical wounds in the home health patient.

  9. Compliance or patient empowerment in online communities: reformation of health care services?

    PubMed

    Wentzer, Helle; Bygholm, Ann

    2010-01-01

    New technologies enable a different organization of the public's admission to health care services. The article discusses whether online support groups in patient treatment are to be understood in the light of patient empowerment or within the tradition of compliance. The back-ground material of the discussion is complementary data from quantitative research on characteristics of patient support groups, and from two qualitative, in depth studies of the impact of patient networks for lung patients and for women with fertility problems. We conclude that in spite of the potential of online communities of opening up health care to the critical voice of the public, the quantitative and qualitative studies surprisingly point to a synthesis of the otherwise opposite positions of empowerment and compliance in patient care. Thereby the critical potential of online communities in health care services seems reverted into configuring ideal patients from diverse users. PMID:20543380

  10. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff.

  11. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff. PMID:27683669

  12. Developing and Implementing Patients' Full-Scale Electronic Access to Their Health Record.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tove; Johansen, Monika A

    2016-01-01

    To increase patients' empowerment and involvement in their own health, several countries has decided to provide patients with electronic access to their health record. This paper reports on the main findings from sub-studies and pilots prior to the implementation of patients' access to their medical records in large-scale in the Northern Norway Region. The largest pilot included nearly 500 patients. Data for the participatory design process was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The results revealed that the service in general functioned as expected. The patients reported that they would continue to use the service, recommend it to others, and generally had no problems in understanding the content. PMID:27577347

  13. 'Task shifting' in an antiretroviral clinic in Malawi: can health surveillance assistants manage patients safely?

    PubMed

    Tweya, H; Feldacker, C; Ben-Smith, A; Weigel, R; Boxshall, M; Phiri, S; Jahn, A

    2012-12-21

    Malawi has a critical shortage of clinicians and nurses. This study evaluated whether health surveillance assistants (HSAs) could provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently and safely for stable patients. HSAs could identify patients with previously established criteria requiring clinical management, including ART initiates, children and patients on second-line treatment. HSAs were not capable of correctly identifying current complications, including potentially severe side effects and toxicities, and inappropriately referred stable patients to clinicians, reducing efficiency. While task shifting to HSAs appears promising, to be safe and efficient, additional clinical training is needed before potentially task shifting stable ART patient care to less skilled health care cadres.

  14. mHealth is an Innovative Approach to Address Health Literacy and Improve Patient-Physician Communication – An HIV Testing Exemplar

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Disha; Arya, Monisha

    2015-01-01

    Low health literacy is a barrier for many patients in the U.S. Patients with low health literacy have poor communication with their physicians, and thus face worse health outcomes. Several government agencies have highlighted strategies for improving and overcoming low health literacy. Mobile phone technology could be leveraged to implement these strategies to improve communication between patients and their physicians. Text messaging, in particular, is a simple and interactive platform that may be ideal for patients with low health literacy. We provide an exemplar for improving patient-physician communication and increasing HIV testing through a text message intervention. PMID:25729441

  15. Detecting psychological distress among patients attending secondary health care clinics. Self-report and physician rating.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D; Rabinowitz, J; Ben Yehuda, Y

    1995-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, as reported by patients and their physicians, in orthopedic, neurology, dermatology, and ophthalmology clinics; to study their accuracy in detecting psychological distress; and to determine if there is any connection among psychological distress, accuracy of detecting distress, and use of mental health and primary health care physicians' prognosis for the somatic complaints. Five hundred and fifty-six patients, ages 18-21, responded to the Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Demoralization Scale (PERI-D), a measure of psychological distress, and to questions about their mental health and use of mental health and primary health services. Physicians, who were blind to patients' responses, were asked to what extent they thought the cause of patients' complaints was physical and to what extent they thought it was psychological in nature, and to prognosticate. Based on the PERI-D, about 25% of patients were distressed, this was less for females than males and varied between clinics. Based on self-reporting, about 14% of patients (males and females) were distressed. Based on physician reporting, about 17% (males less) were distressed. Physicians identified 35% of the PERI-D-distressed cases and 79% of nondistressed cases. About 66% of patients identified their distress and 83% their lack of distress. Increased use of primary health care and mental health care was related to distress. The prognosis was negatively related to distress. Based on this study, there is a need for more attention to psychological distress among secondary health care patients. Patients' ability to identify their distress suggests the importance of involving the patient in the diagnostic process. Correct detection of distress alone does not appear to decrease the use of primary medical and mental health services. PMID:8714802

  16. Living with Lung Cancer--Patients' Experiences as Input to eHealth Service Design.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria; Bolin, Peter; Koch, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to describe the lung cancer care process as experienced by patients, as well as to perform a qualitative analysis of problems they encounter throughout the patient journey. A user-centered design approach was used and data collected through two focus group meetings with patients. We present the results in the form of a patient journey model, descriptions of problems related to the journey as expressed by patients and proposed eHealth services discussed by patients in the focus groups. The results indicate that not only is the patient journey fragmented and different for each patient going through it depending upon their specific type of lung cancer and treatment options, but their experiences are also highly individual and dependent on their personal needs and interpretations of the process. Designing eHealth to improve the patient journey will therefore require flexibility and adaptability to the individual's needs.

  17. Using electronic wristbands and a triage protocol to protect mental health patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Macy, Deborah; Johnston, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In the emergency department of Mercy Hospital, concerns about possible elopement of mental health patients led to the use of the services of security officers, who were called for an average of 40 patient watches per week. Modified electronic wristbands, paired with a triage protocol, have significantly decreased the need for patient watches and decreased security costs.

  18. Oral health promotion in patients with chronic renal failure admitted in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Alexandre Franco; Lia, Erica Negrini; de Carvalho, Tatiane Maciel; Piau, Cinthia Gonçalves Barbosa de Castro; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto

    2016-01-01

    Oral hygiene deficiency is common in patients treated in ICUs and it enables biofilm colonization by microorganisms that lead to respiratory infections. A 30-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure was hospitalized. Dental procedures were performed in the ICU and contributed to the patient's health after a few days.

  19. Integrating patient voices into health information for self-care and patient-clinician partnerships: Veterans Affairs design recommendations for patient-generated data applications.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan S; Evans, Neil C; Frisbee, Kathleen L

    2016-05-01

    Electronic health record content is created by clinicians and is driven largely by intermittent and brief encounters with patients. Collecting data directly from patients in the form of patient-generated data (PGD) provides an unprecedented opportunity to capture personal, contextual patient information that can supplement clinical data and enhance patients' self-care. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is striving to implement the enterprise-wide capability to collect and use PGD in order to partner with patients in their care, improve the patient healthcare experience, and promote shared decision making. Through knowledge gained from Veterans' and healthcare teams' perspectives, VA created a taxonomy and an evolving framework on which to design and develop applications that capture and help physicians utilize PGD. Ten recommendations for effectively collecting and integrating PGD into patient care are discussed, addressing health system culture, data value, architecture, policy, data standards, clinical workflow, data visualization, and analytics and population reach.

  20. The health of healthcare, Part II: patient healthcare has cancer.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we make the etiologic diagnosis for a sick patient named Healthcare: the cancer of greed. When we explore the two forms of this cancer--corporate and bureaucratic--we find the latter is the greater danger to We the Patients. The "treatments" applied to patient Healthcare by the Congressional "doctors" have consistently made the patient worse, not better. At the core of healthcare's woes is the government's diversion of money from healthcare services to healthcare bureaucracy. As this is the root cause, it is what we must address in order to cure, not sedate or palliate, patient Healthcare. PMID:24236323

  1. Utilisation of health care system by chronic pain patients who applied for disability pensions.

    PubMed

    Højsted, J; Alban, A; Hagild, K; Eriksen, J

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how economic compensation for disability (disability pensions) to chronic pain patients affected their utilisation of health care services. The study was carried out as a register investigation. Inclusion of 144 study patients was based on records from 1989 and 1990 of the Rehabilitation and Pension Board in the Municipality of Copenhagen. Only patients of Danish origin with chronic non-malignant pain were included. The study period was divided into three: Subperiod 1: The year preceding the submission of the application for a disability pension. Subperiod 2: The period from the submission of the application to the decision was made. Subperiod 3: The year following the final decision of the health authorities. The patients were divided into 4 Subgroups according to whether disability pensions was awarded or rejected, or whether the patients accepted or appealed the decision. Based on number and charges of visits to the GPs the total costs of care in the primary sector were calculated. By means of number of bed days, visits to outpatients clinics, operations, blood samples, and various investigations, the total costs of hospital care were calculated. We found that application for a disability pension in chronic pain patients significantly influenced the health care utilisation. Chronic pain patients had a significantly lower health care utilisation after receiving a disability pension than before the pension was awarded. Chronic pain patients who did not get a disability pension and those who were not satisfied with the level of the pension awarded, maintained their health care utilisation after the decision. The mean health care use by the patients who appealed the level of the pension was three times higher than the mean health care use by the patients who accepted the level of the pension awarded. The study may indicate that lack of or insufficient economic compensation from the social system in chronic pain patients

  2. [Evaluation of patients' satisfaction in relation to private or public health care providers].

    PubMed

    Lech, Medard M; Petryka, Irmina

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate of patients satisfaction in relation to private or public health care provider in the Warsaw's (capital of Poland) region. The authors have used original (partially psychometric test) tool named "Skala AB". 590 adult patients were randomly chosen from 20 private and public owned clinics and hospitals. Main outcome of the study was that patients of private owned clinics (but working on contract with general health insurance system) are much more satisfied from the services provided by these clinics than patients treated by local government-owned clinics. In general patients treated in hospitals were more satisfied than patients treated in clinics. Comparison of more detailed determinants of satisfaction, has shown that all health service facilities in study region, in their practices do not consider the "concentration on real needs of patients" as a serious matter and this is the reason of patients dissatisfaction. Level of satisfaction from the services provided by health care facilities did not correlate with gender or age of the respondents. In opposite, the (higher) level of education and place of living (in a big city) have negatively correlated with patients satisfaction. The tool ("Skala AB") used in this survey was found very convenient for evaluation of the patients satisfaction of services provided by health care facilities. PMID:15002261

  3. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration. PMID:26174867

  4. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration.

  5. Arthritis Patient Education: How Economic Evaluations Can Inform Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ann E.

    1997-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness evaluation of an Arthritis Self-Management Program assessed direct and indirect costs through self-reporting of health services use. Diminished productivity and effectiveness were measured through a visual analog scale and the health status dimensions of the Canadian Medical Outcomes Study short form. (JOW)

  6. Patient choice and mobility in the UK health system: internal and external markets.

    PubMed

    Dusheiko, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) has been the body of the health care system in the United Kingdom (UK) for over 60 years and has sought to provide the population with a high quality service free of user charges for most services. The information age has seen the NHS rapidly transformed from a socialist, centrally planned and publicly provided system to a more market based system orientated towards patients as consumers. The forces of globalization have provided patients in the UK with greater choice in their health care provision, with NHS treatment now offered from any public or approved private provider and the possibility of treatment anywhere in the European Economic Area (EEA) or possibly further. The financial crisis, a large government deficit and austerity public spending policies have imposed a tight budget constraint on the NHS at a time of increasing demand for health care and population pressure. Hence, further rationing of care could imply that patients are incentivised to seek private treatment outside the constraints of the NHS, where the possibility of much greater choice exists in an increasingly globally competitive health care market. This chapter examines the evidence on the response of patients to the possibilities of increased choice and mobility within the internal NHS and external overseas health care markets. It also considers the relationships between patient mobility, health care provision and health policy. Patients are more mobile and willing to travel further to obtain better care outcomes and value for money, but are exposed to greater risk. PMID:24864384

  7. The impact of the EU Directive on patients' rights and cross border health care in Malta.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi-Muscat, Natasha; Aluttis, Christoph; Sorensen, Kristine; Pace, Roderick; Brand, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The patients' rights and cross-border health care directive was implemented in Malta in 2013. Malta's transposition of the directive used the discretionary elements allowable to retain national control on cross-border care to the fullest extent. This paper seeks to analyse the underlying dynamics of this directive on the Maltese health care system through the lens of key health system stakeholders. Thirty-three interviews were conducted. Qualitative content analysis of the interviews reveals six key themes: fear from the potential impact of increased patient mobility, strategies employed for damage control, opportunities exploited for health system reform, moderate enhancement of patients' rights, negligible additional patient mobility and unforeseen health system reforms. The findings indicate that local stakeholders expected the directive to have significant negative effects and adopted measures to minimise these effects. In practice the directive has not affected patient mobility in Malta in the first months following its implementation. Government appears to have instrumentalised the implementation of the directive to implement certain reforms including legislation on patients' rights, a health benefits package and compulsory indemnity insurance. Whilst the Maltese geo-demographic situation precludes automatic generalisation of the conclusions from this case study to other Member States, the findings serve to advance our understanding of the mechanisms through which European legislation on health services is influencing health systems, particularly in small EU Member States.

  8. Prospective care of elderly patients in family practice. Part 3: Prevalence of unrecognized treatable health concerns.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, W. I.; Browne, G.; Roberts, J.; Jamieson, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of recognized and unrecognized health concerns and risks in an elderly population. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey. SETTING: Institutional primary care practice in a small southern Ontario city. PATIENTS: Volunteer sample of all patients older than 65 years (N = 1385) who were registered with the practice; were not demented, unstable, or residing in institutions at the time of contact; consented to participate; and completed a questionnaire (n = 674). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported health concerns and health risks, including compliance with periodic health examinations; patient-generated concerns; and medical, lifestyle, and psychosocial issues. RESULTS: Most (92%) patients had at least one health concern or risk; 83% of these had one or more unreported or unrecognized health concerns or risks. The proportion with at least one concern or risk did not differ by sex or by age group. Many but not all complied with periodic health examinations. Loneliness was a meaningful psychosocial problem. Many patients had unreported medical concerns; the proportion rose slightly with age. Seniors with more concerns visited more frequently. CONCLUSIONS: Although most seniors had health concerns or risks, on average, each patient had only one or two concerns. These concerns are not concentrated in any particular area. Although non-attenders have fewer concerns, many have risk factors for diseases likely to progress without preventive measures, such as influenza vaccine and screening procedures for hypertension and breast, cervical, and prostate cancer. PMID:8829580

  9. Patient choice and mobility in the UK health system: internal and external markets.

    PubMed

    Dusheiko, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) has been the body of the health care system in the United Kingdom (UK) for over 60 years and has sought to provide the population with a high quality service free of user charges for most services. The information age has seen the NHS rapidly transformed from a socialist, centrally planned and publicly provided system to a more market based system orientated towards patients as consumers. The forces of globalization have provided patients in the UK with greater choice in their health care provision, with NHS treatment now offered from any public or approved private provider and the possibility of treatment anywhere in the European Economic Area (EEA) or possibly further. The financial crisis, a large government deficit and austerity public spending policies have imposed a tight budget constraint on the NHS at a time of increasing demand for health care and population pressure. Hence, further rationing of care could imply that patients are incentivised to seek private treatment outside the constraints of the NHS, where the possibility of much greater choice exists in an increasingly globally competitive health care market. This chapter examines the evidence on the response of patients to the possibilities of increased choice and mobility within the internal NHS and external overseas health care markets. It also considers the relationships between patient mobility, health care provision and health policy. Patients are more mobile and willing to travel further to obtain better care outcomes and value for money, but are exposed to greater risk.

  10. Consumers’ Patient Portal Preferences and Health Literacy: A Survey Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Kaitlyn; Peterson, Ellen; Aberle, Denise R; Bui, Alex AT; Arnold, Corey W

    2016-01-01

    Background eHealth apps have the potential to meet the information needs of patient populations and improve health literacy rates. However, little work has been done to document perceived usability of portals and health literacy of specific topics. Objective Our aim was to establish a baseline of lung cancer health literacy and perceived portal usability. Methods A survey based on previously validated instruments was used to assess a baseline of patient portal usability and health literacy within the domain of lung cancer. The survey was distributed via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to 500 participants. Results Our results show differences in preferences and literacy by demographic cohorts, with a trend of chronically ill patients having a more positive reception of patient portals and a higher health literacy rate of lung cancer knowledge (P<.05). Conclusions This article provides a baseline of usability needs and health literacy that suggests that chronically ill patients have a greater preference for patient portals and higher level of health literacy within the domain of lung cancer. PMID:27278634

  11. Beyond barriers: fundamental 'disconnects' underlying the treatment of breast cancer patients' sexual health.

    PubMed

    Halley, Meghan C; May, Suepattra G; Rendle, Katharine A S; Frosch, Dominick L; Kurian, Allison W

    2014-01-01

    Sexual health concerns represent one of the most frequently experienced and longest-lasting effects of breast cancer treatment, but research suggests that service providers rarely discuss sexual health with their patients. Existing research examining barriers to addressing patients' sexual health concerns has focused on discrete characteristics of the provider-patient interaction without considering the broader context in which these interactions occur. Drawing on the experiences of 21 breast cancer survivors, this paper explores three ways in which fundamental cultural and structural characteristics of the cancer care system in the USA may prevent breast cancer survivors from addressing their sexual health concerns, including: (1) when patients discussed sexual health with their providers, their providers approached sexuality as primarily physical, while participants experienced complex, multidimensional sexual health concerns; (2) specialisation within cancer care services made it difficult for patients to identify the appropriate provider to address their concerns; and (3) the structure of cancer care literally disconnects patients from the healthcare system at the time when sexual side effects commonly emerged. These data suggest that addressing breast cancer survivors' sexual health concerns requires a multifaceted approach to health systems change. PMID:25138386

  12. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  13. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use. PMID:24313072

  14. The Impact of Patient-to-Patient Interaction in Health Facility Waiting Rooms on Their Perception of Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Willis, William Kent; Ozturk, Ahmet Ozzie; Chandra, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Patients have to wait in waiting rooms prior to seeing the physician. But there are few studies that demonstrate what they are actually doing in the waiting room. This exploratory study was designed to investigate the types of discussions that patients in the waiting room typically engage in with other patients and how the conversations affected their opinion on general reputation of the clinic, injections/blocks as treatment procedures, waiting time, time spent with the caregiver, overall patient satisfaction, and the pain medication usage policy. The study demonstrates that patient interaction in the waiting room has a positive effect on patient opinion of the pain clinic and the caregivers.

  15. Benchmarking HIV health care: from individual patient care to health care evaluation. An example from the EuroSIDA study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV patients based on four key indicators. Methods Four indicators of health care were assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of: 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); 2) chemoprophylaxis; 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring; and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA < 500copies/ml for >90% of time on cART). Results 7097 EuroSIDA patients were included from Northern (n = 923), Southern (n = 1059), West Central (n = 1290) East Central (n = 1366), Eastern (n = 1964) Europe, and Argentina (n = 495). Patients in Eastern Europe with a CD4 < 200cells/mm3 were less likely to initiate cART and Pneumocystis jiroveci-chemoprophylaxis compared to patients from all other regions, and less frequently had a laboratory assessment of their disease status. The proportion of patients with virological response was highest in Northern, 89% vs. 84%, 78%, 78%, 61%, 55% in West Central, Southern, East Central Europe, Argentina and Eastern Europe, respectively (p < 0.0001). Compared to Northern, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for Eastern Europe and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16 [95%CI 0.11-0.23, p < 0.0001]; 0.20[0.14-0.28, p < 0.0001] respectively). Conclusions This assessment of HIV health care utilization revealed pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for the assessment and benchmarking of the clinical management of HIV patients in any setting worldwide. PMID:23009317

  16. Patient-generated health data: a pathway to enhanced long-term cancer survivorship.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Carolyn

    2016-05-01

    The growing ability to collect and transmit patient-generated health data, also referred to as people-generated health data and patient-reported outcomes, is creating an opportunity to greatly improve how cancer survivors and their providers manage survivors' health in the months and years following cancer treatment. Although cancer survivors are at higher risk of chronic health problems and early death as a result of cancer treatment, some experience difficulty identifying and receiving the care they need to optimize their health post-treatment. This article describes the challenges that cancer survivors and their providers face in managing survivors' care and identifies several ways that using patient-generated health data can improve survivors' and providers' ability to manage survivorship care at the individual and population levels.

  17. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas A; Kendrick, David C

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient's health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 - 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments. PMID:25954350

  18. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas A; Kendrick, David C

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient's health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 - 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments.

  19. Using Patient-Generated Health Data From Mobile Technologies for Diabetes Self-Management Support

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Shantanu; Lu, Chen-Yuan E.; Hogan, Patrick; Mishra, Anjuli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile health and patient-generated health data are promising health IT tools for delivering self-management support in diabetes, but little is known about provider perspectives on how best to integrate these programs into routine care. We explored provider perceptions of a patient-generated health data report from a text-message-based diabetes self-management program. The report was designed to relay clinically relevant data obtained from participants’ responses to self-assessment questions delivered over text message. Methods: Likert-type scale response surveys and in-depth interviews were conducted with primary care physicians and endocrinologists who pilot tested the patient-generated health data report in an actual clinical encounter. Interview guides were designed to assess providers’ perceptions of the feasibility and utility of patient-generated health data in routine clinical practice. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results: Twelve providers successfully piloted the summary report in clinic. Although only a minority of providers felt the report changed the care they provided (3 of 12 or 25%), most were willing to use the summary report in a future clinical encounter (9 of 12 or 75%). Perceived benefits of patient-generated health data included agenda setting, assessment of self-care, and identification of patient barriers. Major themes discussed included patient selection, reliability of patient-generated health information, and integration into clinical workflow. Conclusion: Providers perceived multiple benefits of patient-generated health data in overcoming common barriers to self-management support in clinical practice and found the summary report feasible and usable in a clinical context. PMID:24876541

  20. Health activism and the logic of connective action. A case study of rare disease patient organisations

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Stefania; Cappai, Franco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This exploratory work investigates the role of digital media in expanding health discourse practices in a way to transform traditional structures of agency in public health. By focusing on a sample of rare disease patient organisations as representative of contemporary health activism, this study investigates the role of digital communication in the development of (1) bottom-up sharing and co-production of health knowledge, (2) health public engagement dynamics and (3) health information pathways. Findings show that digital media affordances for patient organisations go beyond the provision of social support for patient communities; they ease one-way, two-way and crowdsourced processes of health knowledge sharing, exchange and co-production, provide personalised routes to health public engagement and bolster the emergence of varied pathways to health information where experiential knowledge and medical authority are equally valued. These forms of organisationally enabled connective action can help the surfacing of personal narratives that strengthen patient communities, the bottom-up production of health knowledge relevant to a wider public and the development of an informational and eventually cultural context that eases patients’ political action. PMID:27499676

  1. Let's Talk About Sex! - Improving sexual health for patients in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiqi; Bosnyak, Stephanie; Bontempo, Tiziana; Enns, Amie; Fourie, Candice; Ismail, Farooq; Lo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Sexual health contributes greatly to quality of life. Research shows that stroke survivors want to learn and talk about sexual health, but are not given information. In keeping with the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care, this project aimed to provide all stroke rehabilitation inpatients with the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns with healthcare providers at West Park Healthcare Centre, a rehabilitation and complex continuing care centre in Toronto. Gap analysis conducted via staff member interviews and retrospective chart reviews showed that close to no patients were given the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns at baseline. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was used as the project framework. The changes implemented included a reminder system, standardization of care processes for sexual health, patient-centred time points for the delivery of sexual health discussions, and the development of a sexual health supported conversation tool for patients with aphasia. By the end of the ten month project period and after three PDSA cycles, the percentage of patients provided with the opportunity to discuss sexual health during inpatient rehabilitation increased to 80%. This quality improvement project successfully implemented the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care with respect to sexual health. Lessons learned included the importance of early baseline data collection and advance planning for tools used in QI projects. Future projects may focus on improving the discussion of sexual health concerns during outpatient stroke rehabilitation.

  2. Let's Talk About Sex! - Improving sexual health for patients in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiqi; Bosnyak, Stephanie; Bontempo, Tiziana; Enns, Amie; Fourie, Candice; Ismail, Farooq; Lo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Sexual health contributes greatly to quality of life. Research shows that stroke survivors want to learn and talk about sexual health, but are not given information. In keeping with the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care, this project aimed to provide all stroke rehabilitation inpatients with the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns with healthcare providers at West Park Healthcare Centre, a rehabilitation and complex continuing care centre in Toronto. Gap analysis conducted via staff member interviews and retrospective chart reviews showed that close to no patients were given the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns at baseline. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was used as the project framework. The changes implemented included a reminder system, standardization of care processes for sexual health, patient-centred time points for the delivery of sexual health discussions, and the development of a sexual health supported conversation tool for patients with aphasia. By the end of the ten month project period and after three PDSA cycles, the percentage of patients provided with the opportunity to discuss sexual health during inpatient rehabilitation increased to 80%. This quality improvement project successfully implemented the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care with respect to sexual health. Lessons learned included the importance of early baseline data collection and advance planning for tools used in QI projects. Future projects may focus on improving the discussion of sexual health concerns during outpatient stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26734449

  3. The Impact of Internet Health Information on Patient Compliance: A Research Model and an Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, Khaled; Yuan, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients have been increasingly seeking and using Internet health information to become more active in managing their own health in a partnership with their physicians. This trend has both positive and negative effects on the interactions between patients and their physicians. Therefore, it is important to understand the impact that the increasing use of Internet health information has on the patient-physician relationship and patients’ compliance with their treatment regimens. Objective This study examines the impact of patients’ use of Internet health information on various elements that characterize the interactions between a patient and her/his physician through a theoretical model based on principal-agent theory and the information asymmetry perspective. Methods A survey-based study consisting of 225 participants was used to validate a model through various statistical techniques. A full assessment of the measurement model and structural model was completed in addition to relevant post hoc analyses. Results This research revealed that both patient-physician concordance and perceived information asymmetry have significant effects on patient compliance, with patient-physician concordance exhibiting a considerably stronger relationship. Additionally, both physician quality and Internet health information quality have significant effects on patient-physician concordance, with physician quality exhibiting a much stronger relationship. Finally, only physician quality was found to have a significant impact on perceived information asymmetry, whereas Internet health information quality had no impact on perceived information asymmetry. Conclusions Overall, this study found that physicians can relax regarding their fears concerning patient use of Internet health information because physician quality has the greatest impact on patients and their physician coming to an agreement on their medical situation and recommended treatment regimen as well as

  4. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. Methods An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Results Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Conclusions Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with

  5. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  6. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  7. Prevention by Design: Construction and Renovation of Health Care Facilities for Patient Safety and Infection Prevention.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Russell N

    2016-09-01

    The built environment supports the safe care of patients in health care facilities. Infection preventionists and health care epidemiologists have expertise in prevention and control of health care-associated infections (HAIs) and assist with designing and constructing facilities to prevent HAIs. However, design elements are often missing from initial concepts. In addition, there is a large body of evidence that implicates construction and renovation as being associated with clusters of HAIs, many of which are life threatening for select patient populations. This article summarizes known risks and prevention strategies within a framework for patient safety. PMID:27515144

  8. MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine Menu Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Search ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: ...

  9. eSalud: Designing and Implementing Culturally Competent eHealth Research With Latino Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Banas, Jennifer; Smith, Jeremiah; Languido, Lauren; Shen, Elaine; Gutierrez, Sandra; Cordero, Evelyn; Flores, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    eHealth is characterized by technology-enabled processes, systems, and applications that expedite accurate, real-time health information, feedback, and skill development to advance patient-centered care. When designed and applied in a culturally competent manner, eHealth tools can be particularly beneficial for traditionally marginalized ethnic minority groups, such as Latinos, a group that has been identified as being at the forefront of emerging technology use in the United States. In this analytic overview, we describe current eHealth research that has been conducted with Latino patient populations. In addition, we highlight cultural and linguistic factors that should be considered during the design and implementation of eHealth interventions with this population. With increasing disparities in preventive care information, behaviors, and services, as well as health care access in general, culturally competent eHealth tools hold great promise to help narrow this gap and empower communities. PMID:25320901

  10. Connected health: a review of technologies and strategies to improve patient care with telemedicine and telehealth.

    PubMed

    Kvedar, Joseph; Coye, Molly Joel; Everett, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    With the advent of national health reform, millions more Americans are gaining access to a health care system that is struggling to provide high-quality care at reduced costs. The increasing adoption of electronic technologies is widely recognized as a key strategy for making health care more cost-effective. This article examines the concept of connected health as an overarching structure for telemedicine and telehealth, and it provides examples of its value to professionals as well as patients. Policy makers, academe, patient advocacy groups, and private-sector organizations need to create partnerships to rapidly test, evaluate, deploy, and pay for new care models that use telemedicine.

  11. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: opportunities for prevention and public health.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Frederic E; Asomugha, Chisara N; Conway, Patrick H; Rein, Andrew S

    2014-07-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which was enacted by the US Congress in 2010, marks the greatest change in US health policy since the 1960s. The law is intended to address fundamental problems within the US health system, including the high and rising cost of care, inadequate access to health insurance and health services for many Americans, and low health-care efficiency and quality. By 2019, the law will bring health coverage--and the health benefits of insurance--to an estimated 25 million more Americans. It has already restrained discriminatory insurance practices, made coverage more affordable, and realised new provisions to curb costs (including tests of new health-care delivery models). The new law establishes the first National Prevention Strategy, adds substantial new funding for prevention and public health programmes, and promotes the use of recommended clinical preventive services and other measures, and thus represents a major opportunity for prevention and public health. The law also provides impetus for greater collaboration between the US health-care and public health systems, which have traditionally operated separately with little interaction. Taken together, the various effects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act can advance the health of the US population.

  12. Exploring the Challenges and Opportunities of eHealth Tools for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Issom, David-Zacharie; Zosso, Alexandra; Ehrler, Frederic; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian; Koch, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most prevalent inherited blood disorder in the world. The symptoms decrease the quality of life of patients and can cause premature death. Self-help solutions for chronic patients are rising and increase the quality of life of patients. We are interested to identify the usefulness of eHealth tools for patients with SCD. We did a literature review to identify the main problems faced by patients and the existing eHealth solutions. The results show a low number of studies in the field but a multi-disciplinary interest. Positive health benefits for patients are reported as well as the need for more research. Patients and caregivers lack of education about the disease, healthy behaviors are unknown and clinical best practices underused. E-health tools can offer an appropriate support for the self-management of SCD by improving the quality of life of patients, by enhancing patient health literacy and by allowing clinicians to make better decisions. PMID:26262200

  13. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy. PMID:25941146

  14. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  15. Digitally enabled patients, professionals and providers: making the case for an electronic health record in mental health services

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jonathan; McDonald, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The move to a digital health service may improve some components of health systems: information, communication and documentation of care. This article gives a brief definition and history of what is meant by an electronic health record (EHR). There is some evidence of benefits in a number of areas, including legibility, accuracy and the secondary use of information, but there is a need for further research, which may need to use different methodologies to analyse the impact an EHR has on patients, professionals and providers. PMID:27752348

  16. Health services, suicide, and self-harm: patient distress and system anxiety.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael J; Bouch, Joe; Bradstreet, Simon; Lakey, Trevor; Nightingale, Anne; O'Connor, Rory C

    2015-03-01

    Patients often become distressed in health settings, and provision of emotional support is a routine part of clinical care. However, in some situations, patient distress can become disturbing to both clinicians and patients, and can affect ordinary therapeutic engagement. We argue that health systems that support people presenting with suicidal acts and self-harm are particularly at risk of providing maladaptive responses, which we have termed dysregulation. If health systems become dysregulated, staff and patients might find it difficult to think clearly and respond adaptively. We describe some common characteristics of dysregulation, including negative feelings about patients, an inappropriately narrow focus on diagnosis and risk assessment, and ad-hoc, abrupt, and inconsistent decision making. These dysregulated responses might impair more adaptive responses such as containment of distress, safety planning, and negotiated responsibility with patients and carers. We discuss the main drivers of dysregulation and the implications for clinical practice in the management of self-harm and suicide risk.

  17. Patients' understanding of shared decision making in a mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Eliacin, Johanne; Salyers, Michelle P; Kukla, Marina; Matthias, Marianne S

    2015-05-01

    Shared decision making is a fundamental component of patient-centered care and has been linked to positive health outcomes. Increasingly, researchers are turning their attention to shared decision making in mental health; however, few studies have explored decision making in these settings from patients' perspectives. We examined patients' accounts and understanding of shared decision making. We analyzed interviews from 54 veterans receiving outpatient mental health care at a Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in the United States. Although patients' understanding of shared decision making was consistent with accounts published in the literature, participants reported that shared decision making goes well beyond these components. They identified the patient-provider relationship as the bedrock of shared decision making and highlighted several factors that interfere with shared decision making. Our findings highlight the importance of the patient-provider relationship as a fundamental element of shared decision making and point to areas for potential improvement.

  18. Patient information provision: its effect on patient anxiety and the role of health information services and libraries.

    PubMed

    Bolton, V; Brittain, M

    1994-06-01

    This article is concerned with the importance of communicating information to patients as an aid to recovery by decreasing anxiety. Recent research suggests that pre-operative information helps to decrease post-operative stress and leads to a quicker recovery. The health belief model has proven to be an effective predictor of individuals' responses towards health-related matters. It is described as a useful theoretical framework for medical professionals in deciding the content and quantity of information that each patient should receive. A study for further research is suggested, exploring the hypothesis that reading about illness significantly helps to reduce anxiety when the patient has added emotional support from a health professional. The existing problem of who is ultimately responsible for giving information to patients is highlighted in the general practice, hospital and public settings. Recommendations are made for the improvement of patient information provision in these three areas. Librarians are seen as being in a good position to liaise with medical professionals to provide the most effective health information service possible for patients and the consumer in general. PMID:10172100

  19. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  20. How can health literacy influence outcomes in heart failure patients? Mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Cheryl; Sethares, Kristen; Davidson, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Health literacy is discussed in papers from 25 countries where findings suggest that approximately a third up to one half of the people in developed countries have low health literacy. Specifically, health literacy is the mechanism by which individuals obtain and use health information to make health decisions about individual treatments in the home, access care in the community, promote provider-patient interactions, structure self-care, and navigate health care programs both locally and nationally. Further, health literacy is a key determinant of health and a critical dimension for assessing individuals' needs, and, importantly, their capacity for self-care. Poorer health knowledge/status, more medication errors, costs, and higher rates of morbidity, readmissions, emergency room visits, and mortality among patients with health illiteracy have been demonstrated. Individuals at high risk for low health literacy include the elderly, disabled, Blacks, those with a poverty-level income, some or less high school education, either no insurance or Medicare or Medicaid, and those for whom English is a second language. As a consequence, health literacy is a complex, multifaceted, and evolving construct including aspects of social, psychological, cultural and economic circumstances. The purpose of this paper is to describe the mechanisms and consequences of health illiteracy. Specifically, the prevalence, associated demographics, and models of health literacy are described. The mechanism of health illiteracy's influence on outcomes in heart failure is proposed. Tools for health literacy assessment are described and compared. Finally, the health outcomes and general interventions to enhance the health outcomes in heart failure are discussed. PMID:23873404

  1. How can health literacy influence outcomes in heart failure patients? Mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Cheryl; Sethares, Kristen; Davidson, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Health literacy is discussed in papers from 25 countries where findings suggest that approximately a third up to one half of the people in developed countries have low health literacy. Specifically, health literacy is the mechanism by which individuals obtain and use health information to make health decisions about individual treatments in the home, access care in the community, promote provider-patient interactions, structure self-care, and navigate health care programs both locally and nationally. Further, health literacy is a key determinant of health and a critical dimension for assessing individuals' needs, and, importantly, their capacity for self-care. Poorer health knowledge/status, more medication errors, costs, and higher rates of morbidity, readmissions, emergency room visits, and mortality among patients with health illiteracy have been demonstrated. Individuals at high risk for low health literacy include the elderly, disabled, Blacks, those with a poverty-level income, some or less high school education, either no insurance or Medicare or Medicaid, and those for whom English is a second language. As a consequence, health literacy is a complex, multifaceted, and evolving construct including aspects of social, psychological, cultural and economic circumstances. The purpose of this paper is to describe the mechanisms and consequences of health illiteracy. Specifically, the prevalence, associated demographics, and models of health literacy are described. The mechanism of health illiteracy's influence on outcomes in heart failure is proposed. Tools for health literacy assessment are described and compared. Finally, the health outcomes and general interventions to enhance the health outcomes in heart failure are discussed.

  2. Health beliefs and perceived need for mental health care of anxiety and depression--the patients' perspective explored.

    PubMed

    Prins, Marijn A; Verhaak, Peter F M; Bensing, Jozien M; van der Meer, Klaas

    2008-07-01

    Patients' illness representations and beliefs about treatment for depression and anxiety, as well as their perceived needs, are important for treatment. A systematic review was conducted of 71 studies describing the beliefs or perceived needs of patients and non-patients. Patients give multi-dimensional explanations for depression and see both psychological and medication treatment as helpful. People who suffer from depression have more positive beliefs about biological etiology and medication treatment than healthy people, or those with less severe depressive symptoms. Anxiety patients view psychological interventions as their best treatment option. Between 49% and 84% of the patients with depression or anxiety perceive a need for treatment, mostly for counseling and medication. All patients prefer psychological treatment forms to medication. A majority of patients view antidepressants as addictive and many perceive stigma and see practical and economic barriers to care. The most vulnerable groups in terms of seeking and receiving mental health care for depression and anxiety seem to be minority groups, as well as younger and older patients. More research is required into the specific needs of anxiety and depression patients. Open communication between patient and provider could lead to valuable improvements in treatment.

  3. Health policy considerations for our sexual minority patients.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlan, Katherine A

    2006-03-01

    Homosexuality and transsexuality are still widely viewed by lay individuals as morally negative and deserving of legal proscription. Peer-reviewed data confirm that experiences of legal discrimination are associated with stress-related health problems, reduced utilization of health care, and financial and legal challenges for individuals and families, especially those with children. In the last 3 years, the American Psychiatric Association, American Psychological Association, and American Psychoanalytic Association have each reviewed the research on sexual orientation and identity, and each has confirmed that sexual orientation and gender identity do not correlate with mental illness or immorality. They have each endorsed laws that confer equality to sexual minorities, including nondiscrimination in employment, medical insurance coverage, adoption, and access to civil marriage. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), by virtue of its history of advocacy for women's health, is in a position to promote policy and make similar recommendations, recognizing that sexual minority women's health and their family issues are an integral component of taking care of all women. The College should review the policies of America's premier mental health associations and consider including sexual orientation and gender identity in its own nondiscrimination policy, and ACOG should issue a policy statement in support of laws to provide safety from violence and discrimination, equal employment opportunities, equal health insurance coverage, and equal access to civil marriage.

  4. Determinants and Equity Evaluation for Health Expenditure Among Patients with Rare Diseases in China

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiao-Xiong; Zhao, Liang; Guan, Xiao-Dong; Shi, Lu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background: China has not established social security system for rare diseases. Rare diseases could easily impoverish patients and their families. Little research has studied the equity and accessibility of health services for patients with rare diseases in China. This study aimed to explore the factors that influence health expenditure of rare diseases and evaluate its equity. Methods: Questionnaire survey about living conditions and cost burden of patients with rare diseases was conducted. Individual and family information, health expenditure and reimbursement in 2014 of 982 patients were collected. The impact of medical insurance, individual sociodemographic characteristics, family characteristics, and healthcare need on total and out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures was analyzed through the generalized linear model. Equity of health expenditure was evaluated by both concentration index and Lorenz curve. Results: Of all the surveyed patients, 11.41% had no medical insurance and 92.10% spent money to seek medical treatment in 2014. It was suggested female (P = 0.048), over 50 years of age (P = 0.062), high-income group (P = 0.021), hospitalization (P = 0.000), and reimbursement ratio (RR) (P = 0.000) were positively correlated with total health expenditure. Diseases not needing long-term treatment (P = 0.000) was negatively correlated with total health expenditure. Over 50 years of age (P = 0.065), high-income group (P = 0.018), hospitalization (P = 0.000) and having Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) (P = 0.022) were positively correlated with OOP health expenditure. Patient or the head of the household having received higher education (P = 0.044 and P = 0.081) and reimbursement ratio (P = 0.078) were negatively correlated with OOP health expenditure. The equity evaluation found concentration indexes of health expenditure before and after reimbursement were 0.0550 and 0.0539, respectively. Conclusions: OOP health expenditure of patients with UEBMI

  5. Patients as consumers of health care in South Africa: the ethical and legal implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background South Africa currently has a pluralistic health care system with separate public and private sectors. It is, however, moving towards a socialised model with the introduction of National Health Insurance. The South African legislative environment has changed recently with the promulgation of the Consumer Protection Act and proposed amendments to the National Health Act. Patients can now be viewed as consumers from a legal perspective. This has various implications for health care systems, health care providers and the doctor-patient relationship. Discussion Calling a recipient of health care a ‘consumer’ as opposed to a ‘patient’ has distinct connotations and may result in differential behaviour. Labels reflect the ideals of the context in which they are used. Various models of the doctor-patient relationship exist and different metaphors have been used to describe it. Increasingly there are third parties involved within the doctor-patient relationship making it more difficult for the doctor to play the fiduciary role. In certain parts of the world, there has been a shift from a traditional paternalistic model to a consumerist model. The ethical implications of the commodification of health care are complex. As health care becomes a ‘product’ supplied by the health care ‘provider’, there is the risk that doctors will replace professional ethics with those of the marketplace. Health care is a universal human need and cannot be considered a mere commodity. In modern medical ethics, great emphasis is placed on the principle of respect for patient autonomy. Patients are now the ultimate decision-makers. The new Consumer Protection Act in South Africa applies to consumers and patients alike. It enforces strict liability for harm caused by goods and services. Everyone in the supply chain, including the doctor, can be held jointly and severally liable. This may lead to enormous challenges in health care delivery. Summary Viewing patients as

  6. PatientsLikeMe: Consumer health vocabulary as a folksonomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine Arnott; Wicks, Paul J

    2008-11-06

    PatientsLikeMe is an online social networking community. Subcommunities center on three diagnoses: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinsons Disease. Community members can describe their symptoms online in natural language, resulting in folksonomic tags available for clinical analysis and for browsing by other users to find patients like me. Forty-three percent of PatientsLikeMe symptom terms are present as exact (24%) or synonymous (19%) terms in the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus (National Library of Medicine; 2007AC). Slightly more than half of the symptom terms either do not match the UMLS, or are unclassifiable. A clinical vocabulary, SNOMED CT, accounts for 93% of the matching terms. Analysis of the failed matches reveals challenges for online patient communication, not only with healthcare professionals, but with other patients. In a Web 2.0 environment with lowered barriers between consumers and professionals, a deficiency in knowledge representation affects not only professionals, but consumers as well.

  7. Similarities and differences between asthma health care professional and patient views regarding medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Sandra; Bacon, Simon L; Aulls, Mark W; Lacoste, Guillaume; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature has reported disparate views between patients and health care professionals regarding the roles of various factors affecting medication adherence. OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of asthma patients, physicians and allied health professionals regarding adherence to asthma medication. METHODOLOGY: A qualitative, multiple, collective case study design with six focus-group interviews including 38 participants (13 asthma patients, 13 pulmonologist physicians and 12 allied health professionals involved in treating asthma patients) was conducted. RESULTS: Patients, physicians and allied health professionals understood adherence to be an active process. In addition, all participants believed they had a role in treatment adherence, and agreed that the cost of medication was high and that access to the health care system was restricted. Major disagreements regarding patient-related barriers to medication adherence were identified among the groups. For example, all groups referred to side effects; however, while patients expressed their legitimate concerns, health care professionals believed that patients’ opinions of medication side effects were based on inadequate perceptions. CONCLUSION: Differences regarding medication adherence and barriers to adherence among the groups examined in the present study will provide insight into how disagreements may be translated to overcome barriers to optimal asthma adherence. Furthermore, when designing an intervention to enhance medication adherence, it is important to acknowledge that perceptual gaps exist and must be addressed. PMID:24712015

  8. Patient- versus physician-reporting of symptoms and health status in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, Fabio; Rosti, Gianantonio; Aaronson, Neil; Cottone, Francesco; Angelucci, Emanuele; Molica, Stefano; Vignetti, Marco; Mandelli, Franco; Baccarani, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the reporting of health status and symptom severity, for a set of core symptoms related to imatinib therapy, between chronic myeloid leukemia patients and their treating physicians. Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire including questions on symptom severity and health status. The symptoms assessed were: abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, edema, fatigue, headache, muscle cramps, musculoskeletal pain, nausea and skin problems. The physicians were asked to complete a questionnaire for each of their patients entering the study. Four hundred twenty-two patients were included in the study. All respective paired physicians (n=29) completed the questionnaire, and thus the analyses are based on 422 patient-physician dyads. Agreement on symptom ratings ranged from 34% (for muscle cramps) to 66% (for nausea). For all symptoms, patients reported higher severity more often than their physicians. The three symptoms whose severity was most frequently underestimated by physicians were fatigue (51%), muscle cramps (49%) and musculoskeletal pain (42%). Health status was overestimated by physicians in 67% of the cases. Physicians and their patients with chronic myeloid leukemia often disagree in their ratings of the patients’ symptom severity. Most typically, physicians tend to underestimate symptom severity and overestimate the overall health status of their patients. Current findings support the use of patient-reported outcome measures as a possible means to enhance the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24241488

  9. Patient satisfaction with specialized mental health service for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important outcome variable that is increasingly used in mental health service evaluation. There are no results available for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) yet. Methods Using the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale, patient satisfaction with a specialized mental health service was examined in patients with OCD. Results OCD patients were overall satisfied with the professional help provided, whereas satisfaction with the professional involvement of relatives within the treatment and health care process was found to be quite low. Patients with more severe OCD, as measured by the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, as well as chronically ill and more disabled patients were more likely to be dissatisfied with the overall care they received. Patient satisfaction plays an important role in the long-term course of an illness such OCD. This seems to be decreased so longer illness is not or badly treated. There is a stronger need for involvement of family members in the treatment and health care of patients with OCD. Conclusions More OCD-specific treatment offers have to be established for patients with this long-term illness such as psychotherapy in groups. PMID:24341311

  10. [Environment-related health disorders. Experience and perspectives in the care of patients with environment-related health disorders].

    PubMed

    Hornberg, C; Malsch, A K F; Weissbach, W; Wiesmüller, G A

    2004-08-01

    Environmental medicine outpatient clinics, counseling centers, and practicing physicians have observed environment-related health disorders in patient groups of mixed age as well as for groups consisting only of adults or children. Practicing physicians suspected correlations between environmental factors and health disorders in 36-45% of cases, environmental medicine outpatient clinics and counseling centers in 4-34% for mixed-age groups, 0-24% for adults, and 9-13% for children. A comparison of these data is difficult due to differences in data acquisition, evaluation methods, and descriptive statistics used. Furthermore, data on children are insufficient. Patient-oriented environmental medicine faces a number of problems regarding determination of exposure, effects, and susceptibility, including a lack of scientifically verified cause-and-effect models as well as incorrect diagnoses, attributions, and conclusions. In view of the scope and intensity of environment-related health disorders, the topic cannot be ignored. A functioning program of environmental medicine counseling and patient care is needed for practicing physicians, universities and/or the public sector to deliver effective primary medical care in this field. As always, the building blocks of environ-mental medicine counseling are medical history, physical examination, differential diagnosis, human biomonitoring, and on-site inspection with environmental monitoring while also taking gender differences into account. Uniform basic documentation procedures and health science analyses will help to optimize patient care in environ-mental medicine. The value of a diagnostic algorithm in the care of patients with environment-related health disorders is beyond dispute. Last but not least, quality assurance and control are a sine qua non of patient-oriented environmental medicine. PMID:15340722

  11. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Tallner, Alexander; Waschbisch, Anne; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  12. Health literacy, communication, and treatment decision-making in older cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Sunil; Starkweather, Chelsea; Nguyen, Christopher; Naeim, Arash

    2009-04-15

    Inadequate health literacy and physician-patient communication are associated with poor health outcomes and appear to limit quality of medical decision-making. This review presents and consolidates data concerning health literacy, physician-patient communication, and their impact on medical treatment decisions in elderly cancer patients. This population faces increasingly complex management options, cognitive and sensory deficits, and intergenerational barriers. As a result of these and other factors, older cancer patients have among the lowest health literacy and numeracy rates and often suffer from suboptimal physician-patient communication. These deficiencies impair elderly cancer patients' ability to understand, recall, and act upon information concerning treatment risk and benefit. This situation also makes it difficult for patients to have self-confidence in communicating with their provider and sharing in the decision-making. Moreover, since older cancer patients usually bring a companion to medical appointments, the positive and negative role of a companion in the context of communication and decision-making needs to be considered. Future research should center on developing ways to identify and overcome health communication barriers to improve geriatric cancer care.

  13. Mental health among people with psoriasis undergoing patient education in climate therapy.

    PubMed

    Langeland, E; Robinson, H S; Moum, T; Larsen, M H; Wahl, A K

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the mental health of people with psoriasis undergoing patient education in climate therapy. A prospective design included a baseline assessment and two follow-ups after a 3-week patient education program. Participants were 254 adults. Positive mental health was measured by the mental health continuum short form (0-70), and negative mental health by the emotional distress subscale (1-4) of the health education impact questionnaire. Paired-samples t-tests were used to evaluate changes in mental health from baseline to follow-up. Multiple linear regression was used to analyse the ability of socio-demographic and clinical variables and emotional distress to predict changes in positive mental health. To predict change in negative mental health we repeated the same analysis but with a change in negative mental health as a dependent variable and positive mental health as an independent variable. The results show that positive mental health and health-related emotional distress improved significantly from before to after the intervention by 7.1 points, p < 0.001 and 0.21 points, p < 0.001) respectively. At the second follow-up, health-related emotional distress remained significantly improved compared with baseline levels by 0.11 points, p = 0.004. The longer participants had lived with psoriasis ( β = 146, p = 0.027), and the presence of co-morbid health problems (β  =  111, p = 0.051) the greater the improvement in the positive mental health immediately after the intervention. No predictors were identified for negative mental health. This study indicates that the promotion of positive mental health needs to be integrated into the climate therapy program, and sustained in their home context.

  14. Empowerment of patients over their personal health record implies sharing responsibility with the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Benzenine, Eric; Auverlot, Bertrand; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2011-01-01

    Through this article, we point out the unavoidable empowerment of patients with regard to their personal health record and propose the mixed management of patients' medical records. This mixed management implies sharing responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner (MP) by making patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their patients' medical information. We propose a solution to gather and update patients' administrative and medical data in order to reconstitute patients' medical histories accurately. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide patients administrative data, in order to know where and when they received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: outpatient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide patients' medical information and to validate it under the responsibility of the MP with the help of patients if needed. During these two processes, the patients' privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows the pseudonymization of patients' identities. The Medical Record Search Engine we propose will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the MP all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's true identity. Associated with strong traceability of all access, modifications or deletions, our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management while reinforcing the empowerment of patients over their medical records.

  15. Patient Satisfaction, Empowerment, and Health and Disability Status Effects of a Disease Management-Health Promotion Nurse Intervention among Medicare Beneficiaries with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Liebel, Dianne V.; Saad, Zabedah B.; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report the impact on patient and informal caregiver satisfaction, patient empowerment, and health and disability status of a primary care-affiliated disease self-management-health promotion nurse intervention for Medicare beneficiaries with disabilities and recent significant health services use. Design and Methods: The Medicare…

  16. "Your Health Care--Be Involved": the evaluation of a provincial patient afety tips initiative.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Sudha; Weil, Sarena

    2006-01-01

    When patients take an active role in their healthcare, the results may be better, safer care. That is the premise behind the Ontario Hospital Association's (OHA) "Your Health Care--Be Involved" campaign. Launched in September 2005 by the OHA's Patient Safety Support Service, the campaign encourages active two-way communication between patients and providers and highlights the important role of patient involvement in the form of five patient safety tips. This article discusses the development, implementation and evaluation of Ontario's first-ever patient safety tips program, and what its future might hold. PMID:17087177

  17. Using Unlicensed Health Coaches to Improve Care for Insured Patients with Diabetes and Hypertension: Patient and Physician Perspectives on Recruitment and Uptake.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Ellis; Panattoni, Laura; Meehan, Amy; Chuang, Judith; Wilson, Caroline; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Health coach programs using low-cost unlicensed providers have largely targeted uninsured or underserved populations, raising questions about uptake and effectiveness for insured patients. This observational study evaluated the referral process, uptake, and effectiveness of a health coach program for patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a multispecialty clinic. Data included appointment observations; interviews with patients, physicians, and health coaches; patient and physician characteristics; and measures of utilization and clinical outcomes. Out of 1313 eligible patients, 308 (23.5%) were referred over a 12-month period and 169 (54.9%) had at least 1 health coach appointment. Although the health coach program did not change patients' biometrics, physicians and patients reported improved care processes and reduced physician workload. Barriers to enrollment included variability in physician referral practices, patient willingness, and scheduling difficulties. Modifications to physician and health coach workflow are needed to determine the program's true effectiveness.

  18. Denial of Treatment to Obese Patients-the Wrong Policy on Personal Responsibility for Health.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Nir

    2013-08-01

    In many countries around the world, including Iran, obesity is reaching epidemic proportions. Doctors have recently taken, or expressed support for, an extreme 'personal responsibility for health' policy against obesity: refusing services to obese patients. This policy may initially seem to improve patients' incentives to fight obesity. But turning access to medical services into a benefit dependent on health improvement is bad policy. It conditions the very aid that patients need in order to become healthier on success in becoming healthier. Whatever else we may think of personal responsibility for health policies, this particular one is absurd. Unfortunately, quite a few personal responsibility for health policies use similar absurd conditioning. They mistakenly use as 'carrots' or 'sticks' for adherence the basic means to the same health outcomes that they seek to promote. This perspective proposes the following rule of thumb: any conditional incentive for healthy choice should be in a currency other than the basic means to that healthy choice.

  19. Relationship among patients' perceived capacity for communication, health literacy, and diabetes self-care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela Yee Man; Cheung, Mike Kwun Ting; Chi, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the relations among health literacy, perceived capacity for communication, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care are unclear. This study tested this relation using structural equation modeling with a sample of 137 Chinese patients 65 years of age or older with type 2 diabetes. The model showed that health literacy, knowledge, communication capacity, and diabetes self-care formed complex relations. After adjusting for age, education, and Chinese cultural influence, health literacy affected diabetes self-care indirectly through perceived capacity for communication (standardized estimate coefficient=.641, p<.001) but not diabetes knowledge. To enhance self-care, interventions should be tailored to increase patient health literacy and perceived capacity for communication with health care providers. Training should be provided to patients to enhance their communication abilities.

  20. Using a patient-centered approach for health and social care integration.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, Mikaela; Papakonstantinou, Despoina; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2012-01-01

    The drive in using health and social care resources more effectively has resulted in undertaking various efforts towards better coordination in order to improve patient-centered and personalized care for the individuals. This requires horizontal integration in terms of processes among health and social care organizations existing information systems (ISs) and personal health records (PHRs) in order to enable integrated patient information sharing among all the health and social care staff and individuals involved. Service-oriented and business process management (BPM) technologies are considered most appropriate for achieving such integration especially when is required to change existing processes and to integrate diverse information systems. On these grounds, a patient-centered approach is proposed for redesigning health and social care processes and for integrating diverse ISs and PHRs with the objective to meet holistic care goals.

  1. Efficacy of lifestyle interventions in physical health management of patients with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Awareness of the importance of maintaining physical health for patients with severe mental illnesses has recently been on the increase. Although there are several elements contributing to poor physical health among these patients as compared with the general population, risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and obesity are of particular significance due to their relationship with mortality and morbidity. These patients present higher vulnerability to cardiovascular risk factors based on several issues, such as genetic predisposition to certain pathologies, poor eating habits and sedentary lifestyles, high proportions of smokers and drug abusers, less access to regular health care services, and potential adverse events during pharmacological treatment. Nevertheless, there is ample scientific evidence supporting the benefits of lifestyle interventions based on diet and exercise designed to minimize and reduce the negative impact of these risk factors on the physical health of patients with severe mental illnesses. PMID:21929761

  2. Students or Patients? Provision of Education in the Mental Health Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter; Godding, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    British government proposals for community care of psychiatric patients require a response from adult educators about the need for learning opportunities both inside and outside institutions for people with mental health problems. (SK)

  3. Using secondary analysis of qualitative data of patient experiences of health care to inform health services research and policy.

    PubMed

    Ziebland, Sue; Hunt, Kate

    2014-02-26

    Qualitative research is recognized as an important method for including patients' voices and experiences in health services research and policy-making, yet the considerable potential to analyse existing qualitative data to inform health policy and practice has been little realized. This failure may partly be explained by: a lack of awareness amongst health policy makers of the increasing wealth of qualitative data available; and around 15 years of internal debates among qualitative researchers on the strengths, limitations and validity of re-use of qualitative data. Whilst acknowledging the challenges of qualitative secondary data analysis, we argue that there is a growing imperative to be pragmatic and to undertake analysis of existing qualitative data collections where they have the potential to contribute to health policy formulation. Time pressures are inherent in the policy-making process and in many circumstances it is not possible to seek funding, conduct and analyse new qualitative studies of patients' experiences in time to inform a specific policy. The danger then is that the patient voice, and the experiences of relatives and carers, is either excluded or included in a way that is easily dismissed as 'unrepresentative'. We argue that secondary analysis of qualitative data collections may sometimes be an effective means to enable patient experiences to inform policy decision-making.

  4. A Standards-Based Architecture Proposal for Integrating Patient mHealth Apps to Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fontelo, P.; Rossi, E.; Ackerman, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mobile health Applications (mHealth Apps) are opening the way to patients’ responsible and active involvement with their own healthcare management. However, apart from Apps allowing patient’s access to their electronic health records (EHRs), mHealth Apps are currently developed as dedicated “island systems”. Objective Although much work has been done on patient’s access to EHRs, transfer of information from mHealth Apps to EHR systems is still low. This study proposes a standards-based architecture that can be adopted by mHealth Apps to exchange information with EHRs to support better quality of care. Methods Following the definition of requirements for the EHR/mHealth App information exchange recently proposed, and after reviewing current standards, we designed the architecture for EHR/mHealth App integration. Then, as a case study, we modeled a system based on the proposed architecture aimed to support home monitoring for congestive heart failure patients. We simulated such process using, on the EHR side, OpenMRS, an open source longitudinal EHR and, on the mHealth App side, the iOS platform. Results The integration architecture was based on the bi-directional exchange of standard documents (clinical document architecture rel2 – CDA2). In the process, the clinician “prescribes” the home monitoring procedures by creating a CDA2 prescription in the EHR that is sent, encrypted and de-identified, to the mHealth App to create the monitoring calendar. At the scheduled time, the App alerts the patient to start the monitoring. After the measurements are done, the App generates a structured CDA2-compliant monitoring report and sends it to the EHR, thus avoiding local storage. Conclusions The proposed architecture, even if validated only in a simulation environment, represents a step forward in the integration of personal mHealth Apps into the larger health-IT ecosystem, allowing the bi-directional data exchange between patients and

  5. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities.

  6. The emotional experience of patient care: a case for innovation in health care design.

    PubMed

    Altringer, Beth

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers recent developments in health care facility design and in the psychology literature that support a case for increased design sensitivity to the emotional experience of patient care. The author discusses several examples of innovative patient-centred health care design interventions. These generally resulted in improvements in the patient and staff experience of care, at less cost than major infrastructural interventions. The paper relates these developments in practice with recent neuroscience research, illustrating that the design of the built environment influences patient emotional stress. In turn, patient emotional stress appears to influence patient satisfaction, and in some instances, patient outcomes. This paper highlights the need for further research in this area.

  7. Health literacy screening of patients attending a student-led osteopathy clinic: A pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Brett; Mulcahy, Jane; Fitzgerald, Kylie

    2016-08-01

    Adequate levels of health literacy (HL) are required for patients to access appropriate health services and develop an understanding of the options for managing their healthcare needs. There is limited literature on HL of patients seeking care for a musculoskeletal complaint. The present study sought to screen the HL of patients presenting to an Australian osteopathy student-led clinic using a single screening question 'Are you confident completing medical forms?'. Less than 10% of patients attending the clinic were considered to have below adequate levels of HL using this question, consistent with other work in Australian populations. Logistic regression analysis identified that the most significant demographic variables associated with lower HL were patients who did not speak English at home, those with lower education levels, and those who were less satisfied with their life. Evaluation of a patients' HL may assist practitioners to improve patient education and management strategies. PMID:27502799

  8. Multi-dimensional knowledge translation: enabling health informatics capacity audits using patient journey models.

    PubMed

    Catley, Christina; McGregor, Carolyn; Percival, Jennifer; Curry, Joanne; James, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-dimensional approach to knowledge translation, enabling results obtained from a survey evaluating the uptake of Information Technology within Neonatal Intensive Care Units to be translated into knowledge, in the form of health informatics capacity audits. Survey data, having multiple roles, patient care scenarios, levels, and hospitals, is translated using a structured data modeling approach, into patient journey models. The data model is defined such that users can develop queries to generate patient journey models based on a pre-defined Patient Journey Model architecture (PaJMa). PaJMa models are then analyzed to build capacity audits. Capacity audits offer a sophisticated view of health informatics usage, providing not only details of what IT solutions a hospital utilizes, but also answering the questions: when, how and why, by determining when the IT solutions are integrated into the patient journey, how they support the patient information flow, and why they improve the patient journey. PMID:19162956

  9. Health System Performance for the High-Need Patient: A Look at Access to Care and Patient Care Experiences.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Claudia A; Hayes, Susan L; McCarthy, Douglas; Radley, David C; Abrams, Melina K; Shah, Tanya; Anderson, Gerard F

    2016-08-01

    Issue: Achieving a high-performing health system will require improving outcomes and reducing costs for high-need, high-cost patients--those who use the most health care services and account for a disproportionately large share of health care spending. Goal: To compare the health care experiences of adults with high needs--those with three or more chronic diseases and a functional limitation in the ability to care for themselves or perform routine daily tasks--to all adults and to those with multiple chronic diseases but no functional limitations. Methods: Analysis of data from the 2009--2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Key findings: High-need adults were more likely to report having an unmet medical need and less likely to report having good patient-provider communication. High-need adults reported roughly similar ease of obtaining specialist referrals as other adults and greater likelihood of having a medical home. While adults with private health insurance reported the fewest unmet needs overall, privately insured high-need adults reported the greatest difficulties having their needs met. Conclusion: The health care system needs to work better for the highest-need, most-complex patients. This study's findings highlight the importance of tailoring interventions to address their needs. PMID:27571600

  10. Health literacy, health information seeking behaviors and internet use among patients attending a private and public clinic in the same geographic area.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Natalia; Kindratt, Tiffany B; Pagels, Patti; Foster, Barbara; Gimpel, Nora E

    2014-02-01

    Despite the growing body of health information available online, patients with limited health literacy may lack either internet access or skills necessary to utilize this information. Nonetheless, patients at all health literacy levels may prefer other primary sources to obtain health information. We conducted a cross-sectional study to measure health literacy of patients attending two clinics in Dallas, TX and determine associations between health literacy, health information access and internet usage before and after controlling for confounders. Patients from both clinics (county N = 265; private N = 233) completed a brief survey which included sociodemographics, internet patterns, confidence in filling out medical forms and a self-administered Newest Vital Sign to measure health literacy. In the county clinic, most patients (61.5 %) were Hispanic, had low income (<$19,000/year), limited education (<11th grade) and a high likelihood or possibility of limited health literacy (68.5 %). In the private clinic, participants were mostly black (40.4 %) or white (38.6 %), had higher incomes (≥$46,000), higher education (technical college or college) and adequate health literacy (75.1 %). The primary source of obtaining health information in both clinics was their health care professional (50.6 % county; 40.1 % private). In multivariate analyses to determine differences by health literacy level, there were no statistically significant differences between patients with limited and adequate health literacy and their primary information source. Regardless of health literacy, patients rely on their health care providers to obtain health information. These results showcase the importance of providers' effective communication with patients to make shared decisions about their health regardless of other factors.

  11. Information seeking and social support in online health communities: impact on patients' perceived empathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Many healthcare organizations (HCOs) including Kaiser Permanente, Johns Hopkins, Cleveland Medical Center, and MD Anderson Cancer Center, provide access to online health communities as part of their overall patient support services. The key objective in establishing and running these online health communities is to offer empathic support to patients. Patients' perceived empathy is considered to be critical in patient recovery, specifically, by enhancing patient's compliance with treatment protocols and the pace of healing. Most online health communities are characterized by two main functions: informational support and social support. This study examines the relative impact of these two distinct functions—that is, as an information seeking forum and as a social support forum—on patients' perceived empathy in online health communities. Design This study tests the impact of two variables that reflect the above functions of online health communities—information seeking effectiveness and perceived social support—on perceived empathy. The model also incorporates the potential moderating effect of homophily on these relationships. Measurements A web-based survey was used to collect data from members of the online health communities provided by three major healthcare centers. A regression technique was used to analyze the data to test the hypotheses. Results The study finds that it is the information seeking effectiveness rather than the social support which affects patient's perceived empathy in online health communities run by HCOs. The results indicate that HCOs that provide online health communities for their patients need to focus more on developing tools that will make information seeking more effective and efficient. PMID:21486888

  12. Practicing preventive ethics, protecting patients: challenges of the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Satkoske, Valerie B; Parker, Lisa S

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of guidelines regarding breaches of electronic health information requires an anticipatory stance and physician and patient education regarding security and monitoring measures and methods of redress. Adopting a preventive ethics, rather than a crisis management, model may also increase physician awareness of how the information they choose to include and privilege within the health record may expose patients to added harms if not done mindfully.

  13. Social Network and Health Outcomes among African American Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tkatch, Rifky; Artinian, Nancy T.; Abrams, Judith; Mahn, Jennifer R.; Franks, Melissa M.; Keteyian, Steven J.; Franklin, Barry; Pienta, Amy; Schwartz, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypotheses that the number of close social network members and health-related support provided by social network members is predictive of coping efficacy and health behaviors. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected from 115 African Americans enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation. Measures included Social Convoy Model, SF-36, Social Interaction Questionnaire, the Patient Self-Efficacy Questionnaire and an investigator developed assessment of health behaviors. Results Bivariate relationships were found between the number of inner network members and coping efficacy (r=.19, p<.05) health behaviors (r=.18, p<.06) and between health related support and coping efficacy (r=.22, p.05) and health behaviors (r=.28, p<.001). Regression analyses support the hypotheses that close network members predicted better coping efficacy (β=.18, p<.05) and health behaviors (β=.19, p<.05). Health-related support also predicted coping efficacy (β=.23, p<.05) and health behaviors (β=.30, p<.01). Conclusion African Americans with larger inner networks have more health support, better health behaviors and higher coping efficacy. The number of close social network members and related health support promote health through health behaviors and coping efficacy. PMID:20674978

  14. Empowering Saudi patients: how do Saudi health websites compare to international health websites?

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Alsughayar, Abdulrahman; Al-Mutairi, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Little information is known about how Saudi health websites compare internationally. The purpose of this paper is to compare two leading Saudi health websites with leading international health websites. The study was conducted as a convenience sample at a graduate health college in Saudi Arabia. A total of 42 students participated in the study. The study found that, in general, English websites have higher levels of performance with regard to quality of information, authority and objectivity, coverage and currency, and design. However, the respondents considered Saudi health websites to be superior with regard to maintaining privacy and security. The results indicate that much more work is needed in designing Saudi Health to make them more trustworthy and credible. The limitations of this work and future research directions are also discussed. PMID:23388302

  15. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  16. Patient Involvement: A New Source of Stress in Health Care Work?

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Judith E; Zhdanova, Ludmila; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2016-12-01

    Patients have become increasingly well informed with higher expectations to be involved in decision-making processes regarding their care and treatment. However, few studies have examined the impact of patient involvement on health care providers' partnership-building communication. The aim of this study was to measure and explore the self-reported effects of patient involvement on the work of physicians and nurses. A questionnaire survey was distributed among cardiology staff in 12 Swedish hospitals (N = 488, response rate 67%). The sample was comprised of registered nurses (RNs, n = 303), licensed practical nurses (LPNs, n = 132), and physicians (MDs, n = 53). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine seven questionnaire statements concerning implications of patient involvement for one's clinical work. Regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with staff's partnership-building communication. Analysis confirmed two distinct factors accounting for 57% of the total variance, representing both negative-"Hassles"-and positive-"Uplifts"-aspects of patient involvement. Regression analyses revealed that only positive aspects (i.e., uplifts) of patient involvement predicted staff behavior aimed at involving patients. Working with actively involved patients may be a source of stress, both negative and positive, for health care professionals. By developing work routines for involving patients in their care, health care workplaces may help health care professionals to buffer the negative effects, and enhance the positive effects, of that stress. PMID:27054396

  17. To talk or not to talk: exploring culturally diverse patients' health information communication choices.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Rupa; Patton, Tim; Brennan, Patricia

    2010-11-13

    As care shifts from institutional to home- and community-based settings, consumer health information technology (IT) must be designed to support patients' new health information management responsibilities. We developed and piloted a new methodology grounded in social network analysis and human factors engineering to explore two often overlooked aspects of this phenomenon: the task of health information communication with members of the social network and the context of culture. Such knowledge is necessary to inform the appropriate design of consumer health IT. We asked a culturally diverse sample of participants to describe what, to whom, why, and how they communicate health information and to provide direct feedback about the methodology. The methodology was acceptable to all participants and able to capture similarities and differences in their health information communication practices. Prior to the main study we will need to refine the methodology to further explore patients' cultural context and IT use.

  18. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care.

  19. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care. PMID:26996767

  20. Virtual patient training to improve reproductive health care for women with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Sara E; Sanders, Carla L; Kleinert, Harold L; Huff, Marlene B; Lock, Sharon; Johnson, Stephanie; Clevenger, Kim; Bush, Nathania A; Van Dyke, Eileen; Clark, Tara L

    2008-01-01

    A multimedia virtual patient module, involving the case of a young woman with mild intellectual disabilities with a complaint of diffuse abdominal pain, was developed as a clinical training tool for students in health care professions. Primary objectives following use of the module included improved knowledge and reduced perception of difficulty in treating women's health patients with intellectual disabilities. The module was developed using an iterative, collaborative process of a core development team that included medical professionals, multimedia specialists, the parent of a child with intellectual disability, and a disability advocate. Over the course of the module, students were required to identify appropriate and effective clinician-patient interactions in addition to relevant medical and developmental concerns for this patient population. Pilot data from a sample of nursing, physician assistant, and medical students suggest that the module is an effective tool for both improving students' knowledge and reducing their perception of difficulty in providing care to women's health patients with intellectual disabilities.

  1. Developing a Framework for Evaluating the Patient Engagement, Quality, and Safety of Mobile Health Applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karandeep; Drouin, Kaitlin; Newmark, Lisa P; Rozenblum, Ronen; Lee, Jaeho; Landman, Adam; Pabo, Erika; Klinger, Elissa V; Bates, David W

    2016-02-01

    Rising ownership of smartphones and tablets across social and demographic groups has made mobile applications, or apps, a potentially promising tool for engaging patients in their health care, particularly those with high health care needs. Through a systematic search of iOS (Apple) and Android app stores and an analysis of apps targeting individuals with chronic illnesses, we assessed the degree to which apps are likely to be useful in patient engagement efforts. Usefulness was determined based on the following criteria: description of engagement, relevance to the targeted patient population, consumer ratings and reviews, and most recent app update. Among the 1,046 health care-related, patient-facing applications identified by our search, 43 percent of iOS apps and 27 percent of Android apps appeared likely to be useful. We also developed criteria for evaluating the patient engagement, quality, and safety of mobile apps. PMID:26934758

  2. Shortfalls identified in the management of tuberculosis for Mozambican patients obtaining health care services in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Muula, Adamson S; Nyasulu, Yohane; Feluzi, Henry; Magalasi, Collins

    2003-06-01

    We report findings of a pilot qualitative study in which we aimed to determine management gaps among TB patients from Mozambique obtaining health care services in Malawi. The study was conducted between April and May 2002 involved twelve health workers and 4 Mozambican patients. Semi-structured questionnaires were used and responses were followed up with in-depth interviews. Several areas of management gaps were identified. These included; language barrier if patients are formally referred with documents in Portuguese; lack of follow-up system in case of patients defaulting; no structured contact-tracing possibilities and no initiation of Isoniazid prophylaxis in the case of children living in households with a sputum smear positive adult case. We conclude that logistical management gaps exist in the management of TB patients from Mozambique obtaining care in Malawian health care facilities.

  3. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment.

  4. Patient-Centered Care and Population Health: Establishing Their Role in the Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Jared L; Butler, Craig A; Page, Alexandra E

    2016-05-18

    As health care increasingly emphasizes high value, the terms "population health" and "patient-centered care" have become common, but their application is less clear. Patient-centered care encourages using data to optimize care for an individual. Population health offers a framework to consider how to efficiently and effectively manage a condition for a population, how prevention affects large groups, and the specific distribution of a given disorder. Integrating both concepts into practice can facilitate required outcome-measure reporting and potentially improve patient outcomes. Clinical practice guidelines and appropriate use criteria are examples of reconciliation of these topics. By embracing attempts to decrease variation in treating musculoskeletal disorders while personalizing delivery to individual patients, surgeons may benefit from the improvement of both efficiency and patient experience. PMID:27194502

  5. Value-Based Health Care for Chronic Care: Aligning Outcomes Measurement with the Patient Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Essén, Anna; Ernestam, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Value-based health care is increasingly used for developing health care services by relating patient outcomes to costs. A hierarchical value scorecard for creating outcome measurements has been suggested: the 3-tier model. The objective of this study was to test the model against the patient's view of value in a chronic care setting. Methods: Semistructured interviews with 22 persons with rheumatoid arthritis were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Themes were extracted, and the model was critically applied and revised. Results: The study validates existing dimensions in the model but suggests adding information, social health, predictability, and continuity to make it more useful and representative of patients' preferences. Conclusion: Although the model aims to focus on outcomes relevant to patients, it lacks dimensions important to individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The data illustrate difficulties in finding patients' preferred outcomes and imply tactics for arriving at meaningful measurements. PMID:27749717

  6. Patients' reasons for refraining from discussing internet health information with their healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Imes, Rebecca S; Bylund, Carma L; Sabee, Christina M; Routsong, Tracy R; Sanford, Amy Aldridge

    2008-11-01

    This exploratory study examined factors that constrain patients from discussing Internet health information with their healthcare providers. Participants (N = 714) were asked to list reasons why they have not talked with their providers about Internet health information they had found. Factors (N = 767) included patient attributions about the information, systems or circumstances, fear of treading on the provider's turf, face-saving concerns, and patient perceptions of provider attributions about the information. Comparisons between those who had and those who had not talked to their healthcare providers about their Internet research revealed significant differences in types of constraining factors indicated. Issues concerning an increasingly Internet-savvy public and provider-patient relationships are considered in the discussion within the framework of the goals, planning, action theory. Continued efforts in provider and patient education can help to overcome barriers that restrict communication concerning Internet health research.

  7. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment. PMID:19042527

  8. Patient engagement: four case studies that highlight the potential for improved health outcomes and reduced costs.

    PubMed

    Laurance, Jeremy; Henderson, Sarah; Howitt, Peter J; Matar, Mariam; Al Kuwari, Hanan; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Darzi, Ara

    2014-09-01

    The energy of patients and members of the public worldwide who care about improving health is a huge, but still largely unrecognized and untapped, resource. The aim of patient engagement is to shift the clinical paradigm from determining "what is the matter?" to discovering "what matters to you?" This article presents four case studies from around the world that highlight the proven and potential abilities of increased patient engagement to improve health outcomes and reduce costs, while extending the reach of treatment and diagnostic programs into the community. The cases are an online mental health community in the United Kingdom, a genetic screening program in the United Arab Emirates, a World Health Organization checklist for new mothers, and a hospital-based patient engagement initiative in the United States. Evidence from these and similar endeavors suggests that closer collaboration on the part of patients, families, health care providers, health care systems, and policy makers at multiple levels could help diverse nations provide more effective and population-appropriate health care with fewer resources.

  9. The use of humor in forensic mental health staff-patient interactions.

    PubMed

    Gildberg, Frederik A; Bradley, Stephen K; Paaske, Kristian J; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Humor utilized in the practice of forensic mental health nursing might seem somehow inappropriate, given the serious circumstances surrounding most forensic mental health patients. However, some recent research has pointed to the use of humor as an important component in staff interactions with forensic mental health patients. This study reviews the existing international forensic mental health research literature on humor to investigate (a) what characterizes forensic mental health staff-patient use of humor and (b) what significance humor holds within the forensic mental health setting. The search was conducted in June 2013. Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsychINFO were searched using keywords relevant to the study. Articles were categorized using a literature matrix and analyzed using thematic analysis. Twelve research articles were reviewed and included in the analysis. Three themes were identified: (a) "humor as staff skill," showing that staff found humor to be important as an interpersonal ability; (b) "humor as a relational tool" with the purpose of establishing and maintaining staff-patient interactions; and (c) "the impact of humor on patients," describing impacts on conflicts, dimensions of health, and motivation. The results of the analysis are however limited because of the dearth of published articles on the subject.

  10. Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system.

  11. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess patients’ desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. Materials and methods A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients’ records contained sensitive health information. Results No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Discussion Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. Conclusions To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients’ preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR. PMID:23184192

  12. Care coordination for patients with complex health profiles in inpatient and outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Rock, Beth L; Smith Houskamp, Beth; Brueggeman, Joan; Tucker, Lois

    2013-02-01

    Patients with the most complex health profiles consume a disproportionate percentage of health care expenditures, yet often receive fragmented, suboptimal care. Since 2003, Wisconsin-based Gundersen Health has improved the quality of life and reduced the cost burden of patients with complex health profiles with an integrated care coordination program. Those results are consistent with data from the most successful care coordination demonstration projects funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Specifically, Gundersen's program has been associated with reduced hospital stays, lower costs for inpatients, less use of inpatient services, and increased patient satisfaction. Gundersen's success is rooted in its team-based approach to coordinated care. Teams, led by a subspecialty-trained nurse, have regular, face-to-face contact with patients and their physicians in both inpatient and outpatient settings; involve patients deeply in care-related decisions; access a system-wide electronic medical record database that tracks patients' care; and take a macrolevel view of care-related factors and costs. Gundersen's model offers specific take-home lessons for institutions interested in coordinated care as they design programs aimed at improving quality and lowering costs. This institutional case study provides a window into well-executed care coordination at a large health care system in an era when major changes in health care provision and reimbursement mechanisms are on the horizon.

  13. Measurement of patient-derived utility values for periodontal health using a multi-attribute scale.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, C A; Brickley, M R; McAndrew, R

    1996-09-01

    Periodontal health states are difficult to quantify and no formal scale quantifying patients' utilities for periodontal health states exits. Multi-attribute utility (MAU) techniques were used to develop such a scale. The MAU scale may be used to quantify patients' assessment of their current periodontal health and that of possible treatment outcomes. Such data, combined with probability values in formal decision analysis techniques would result in improved rationality of treatment planning for periodontal disease. 20 patients attending for routine undergraduate care were interviewed. Data from these interviews were sorted into groups of common interest (domains). Intra-domain health statements were complied from the interview content. 21 patients ranked the intra-domain statements on a scale of 0-100. This same group of patients also performed an inter-domain weighting. Mean results showed that patients were 2X as concerned with how they felt and with the prognosis of possible outcomes, than with how they looked and what facts they knew about their oral health. However, the real value of utilities research lies in application of individual results to treatment planning as there is a wide range of opinion regarding outcome health states. PMID:8891929

  14. Development and usability evaluation of the mHealth Tool for Lung Cancer (mHealth TLC): A virtual world health game for lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Johnson, Cati G.; Berrean, Beth; Cataldo, Janine K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility and usability of mHealth TLC, an interactive, immersive 3-dimensional iPad health game that coaches lung cancer patients toward assertive communication strategies during first-person virtual clinics visits. Method We observed players and conducted semi-structured interviews. Research questions focused on scenario believability, the impact of technical issues, transparency of game goals, and potential of mHealth TLC to decrease lung cancer stigma (LCS) and improve patient–clinician communication. Results Eight users confirmed mHealth TLC to be: (1) believable, (2) clinic-appropriate, and (3) helpful in support of informed healthcare consumers. Concerns were expressed about emotionally charged content and plans to use mHealth TLC in clinic settings as opposed to at home. Conclusions Although the dialog and interactions addressed emotionally charged issues, players were able to engage, learn, and benefit from role-play in a virtual world. Health games have the potential to improve patient–clinician communication, and mHealth TLC specifically may decrease LCS, and promote optimal self-management. Practice implications Process reflection revealed the need for health games to be created by experienced game developers in collaboration with health care experts. To prepare for this best practice, research institutions and game developers interested in health games should proactively seek out networking and collaboration opportunities. PMID:25620075

  15. Group-Based Randomized Trial of Contingencies for Health and Abstinence in HIV Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Weinstock, Jeremiah; Alessi, Sheila M.; Lewis, Marilyn W.; Dieckhaus, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Contingency management (CM) treatments are usually applied individually for drug abstinence, but CM can also be targeted toward health behaviors and implemented in groups. This study evaluated effects of a group-based CM intervention that focused on reinforcing health behaviors. Method: HIV-positive patients with cocaine or opioid use…

  16. Patient Autonomy Investigation under the Technology-Based Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    With widespread advances in the diffusion and application of medical technologies, the phenomena of misuse and overuse have become pervasive. These phenomena not only increase the cost of health care systems and deplete the accessibility and availability of health care services, they also jeopardize patient autonomy. From a literature review on…

  17. How Does Sensitivity Training of Health Care Workers Impact Patient Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vinci, Katrina Marie

    2010-01-01

    Health care of the 21st century is undergoing major changes due to a myriad of social factors affecting every level of society. From financial desperation due to the high cost of health care to the increased awareness of a generation asking for better services, the importance of patient satisfaction is paramount. The Centers for Medicare and…

  18. "Doing Ethics" in the Context of Sharing Patients' Personal Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    There are at present two inconsistencies with respect to the sharing of personal health information (PHI) among health care professionals caring for a patient whom the information concerns. First, there is an inconsistency between what is in theory the ethics and law governing the confidentiality and privacy of this information--it may only be…

  19. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Flu shot helps type 2 diabetes patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Health: NLM update Transcript Flu shot helps type 2 diabetes patients : 09/26/2016 To use the sharing ... within the 'start here' section of MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page . The National Center for Farmworker ...

  20. Health related quality of life and psychological wellbeing in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, S.; O'Donoghue, A. C.; McKenna, W. J.; Steptoe, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the health related quality of life and psychological wellbeing of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, to correlate these with symptoms, clinical, and psychosocial factors. DESIGN: Questionnaire distributed to 171 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients aged at least 14 years, selected at random from a dataset of 480 patients. Assessments included the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression questionnaire, and measures of adjustment, worry, and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: There was an 80.1% response rate to the questionnaire. Patients had severe limitations in all eight dimensions of quality of life assessed by the SF-36: physical functioning, role limitations owing to physical problems, role limitations owing to emotional problems, social functioning, mental health, general health perceptions, vitality, and bodily pain. Levels of anxiety and depression were also high compared with population norms. Quality of life was particularly impaired in patients with chest pain and dyspnoea, but was less consistently related to clinical cardiological measures. Adjustment to the condition and patient satisfaction were generally good. In multivariate analysis, quality of life was associated with a combination of symptom patterns and psychosocial factors. No differences in quality of life, anxiety or depression were observed between patients with no known family history, those with familial cardiomyopathy, and patients with a family history of premature sudden death. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is associated with substantial restrictions in health related quality of life. Symptoms, adjustment, and quality of interactions with clinical staff contribute to these limitations. Recognition of the problems confronted by patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy requires continued efforts at education both of the public and health professionals. PMID:9326995

  1. Patients as Partners: A Qualitative Study of Patients’ Engagement in Their Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Karazivan, Philippe; Fernandez, Nicolas; Clavel, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    To advocate for patients to be more actively involved with the healthcare services they receive, particularly patients living with chronic illness, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Montreal and its affiliated hospitals developed the Patients as Partners concept where the patient is considered a full-fledged partner of the health care delivery team and the patient’s experiential knowledge is recognized. This study aims to show how patients view their engagement with healthcare professionals regarding their direct care. Using theoretical sampling, 16 semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients with chronic illness who were familiar with the concept of Patients as Partners. Data analysis followed a constructivist grounded theory approach. Patients describe themselves as proactively engaging in three types of practice, regardless of health professionals’ openness to their role as partners. The first is a process of continuous learning that allows them to acquire experiential knowledge about their health, as well as scientific information and technical know-how. The second involves their assessment of the healthcare they receive, in terms of its quality and how it aligns with their personal preferences. It includes their assessment of the quality of their relationship with the health professional and of the latter’s scientific knowledge and technical know-how. The third type, adaptation practices, builds on patients’ learning and assessments to compensate for and adapt to what has been perceived as optimal or non-optimal health or healthcare circumstances. Patients appear to play a more active and less docile role in their own direct care than suggested so far in the literature, regardless of the degree of reciprocity of the partnership or the degree to which the health professional seeks to encourage patient engagement. PMID:25856569

  2. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  3. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care

    PubMed Central

    El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care. PMID:27493399

  4. Exploring the Pathogens Present at the Patient Care Equipments & Supplies to Sensitise the Health Care Workers for Preventing Health Care-Associated Infections among In-Patients.

    PubMed

    Dadhich, Amit; Arya, Sanjay; Kapil, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Health care-associated infection (HCAI) is an infection that a person acquires in hospital after 24 hours of his/her admission. A health care worker (HCW) does not have any right to provide another infection to in-patients. While caring the patients, HCW innocently or otherwise can transmit various pathogens to the patient. It is both ethically and legally wrong and HCW is answerable for it. The current study was conducted with the objectives to find out the rate of presence of pathogens at the patient care equipments & supplies, to identify the most common pathogens present at the patient care equipments & supplies and to identify such equipments & supplies that are at high risk of contamination. Investigator collected 1,145 samples of different equipments & supplies used for patient care from operation theaters, labour room & medical wards of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. The sample was collected from April 2012 to April 2013 by random sampling. Out of 1,145 samples, 112 were positive or contaminated with certain kind of pathogen. The finding revealed that the contamination rate of patient care equipments & supplies is 9.78 percent. The most common and frequent pathogen present at the equipments & supplies is Pseudomonas (39.29%) and water of oxygen humidifier is most commonly and frequently infected (47.32%). Nurses as the backbone of hospital should strictly adhere to the policies and protocols of the institution. She/he must update the knowledge of infection control practices and various methods of controlling HCAI including hand hygiene, disinfection of patient care equipments & supplies and cleanliness of environment. A Nurse should also transmit this knowledge to other team members so as to minimise the health care-associated infection rate.

  5. Patient-Centered Communication: Exploring the Dentist's Role in the Era of e-Patients and Health 2.0.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Brittany; Yang, Helen; Getman, Rebekah; Barrow, Jane; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    In today's digital era, people are increasingly relying on the Internet-including social media-to access health information and inform their health decisions. This article describes an exploratory initiative to better understand and define the role of dentists in patient education in the context of e-patients and Health 2.0. This initiative consisted of four phases. In Phase I, an interdisciplinary expert advisory committee was assembled for a roundtable discussion about patients' health information-seeking behaviors online. In Phase II, a pilot case study was conducted, with methods and analysis informed by Phase I recommendations. Phase III consisted of a debriefing conference to outline future areas of research on modernizing health communication strategies. In Phase IV, the findings and working theories were presented to 75 dental students, who then took a survey regarding their perspectives with the objective of guiding potential curriculum design for predoctoral courses. The results of the survey showed that the validity of online content was often secondary to the strength of the network sharing it and that advocacy online could be more effective if it allowed for emotional connections with peers rather than preserving accuracy of the information. Students expressed high interest in learning how to harness modern health communications in their clinical care since the role of the dentist is evolving from giving information to giving personalized guidance against the backdrop of an often contradictory modern information environment. The authors recommend that the dental profession develop patient-centered health communication training for predoctoral students and professional development and continuing education for practicing professionals. PMID:27251352

  6. The voluntary sector and health policy: the role of national level health consumer and patients' organisations in the UK.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Rob; Jones, Kathryn

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the policy role of health consumer and patients' organisations (HCPOs), an important subset of the UK voluntary health sector. Based on research findings from two surveys, the article examines the activities, resources and contacts of HCPOs. It also assesses their impact on health policy and reform. There is some evidence that HCPOs can influence policy and reform. However, much depends on the alliances they build with other policy actors (including other HCPOs), their resources and leadership. HCPOs seem to have more impact on the detail of policy than on the direction of travel. In addition, there are potentially adverse consequences for HCPOs that do engage with the policy process, which may partly explain why some are wary of such involvement. For example, it is possible that HCPOs can be manipulated by government and other powerful policy actors such as health professionals and the drugs industry.

  7. Partners in Health: A Conceptual Framework for the Role of Community Health Workers in Facilitating Patients' Adoption of Healthy Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Van Devanter, Nancy; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    We formulated a conceptual framework that begins to answer the national call to improve health care access, delivery, and quality by explaining the processes through which community health workers (CHWs) facilitate patients’ adoption of healthy behaviors. In September 2011 to January 2012, we conducted a qualitative study that triangulated multiple data sources: 26 in-depth interviews, training documents, and patient charts. CHWs served as partners in health to immigrant Filipinos with hypertension, leveraging their cultural congruence with intervention participants, employing interpersonal communication techniques to build trust and rapport, providing social support, and assisting with health behavior change. To drive the field forward, this work can be expanded with framework testing that may influence future CHW training and interventions. PMID:25790405

  8. Physician privacy concerns when disclosing patient data for public health purposes during a pandemic influenza outbreak

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Privacy concerns by providers have been a barrier to disclosing patient information for public health purposes. This is the case even for mandated notifiable disease reporting. In the context of a pandemic it has been argued that the public good should supersede an individual's right to privacy. The precise nature of these provider privacy concerns, and whether they are diluted in the context of a pandemic are not known. Our objective was to understand the privacy barriers which could potentially influence family physicians' reporting of patient-level surveillance data to public health agencies during the Fall 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza outbreak. Methods Thirty seven family doctors participated in a series of five focus groups between October 29-31 2009. They also completed a survey about the data they were willing to disclose to public health units. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the amount of patient detail the participants were willing to disclose, factors that would facilitate data disclosure, and the consensus on those factors. The analysis of the qualitative data was based on grounded theory. Results The family doctors were reluctant to disclose patient data to public health units. This was due to concerns about the extent to which public health agencies are dependable to protect health information (trusting beliefs), and the possibility of loss due to disclosing health information (risk beliefs). We identified six specific actions that public health units can take which would affect these beliefs, and potentially increase the willingness to disclose patient information for public health purposes. Conclusions The uncertainty surrounding a pandemic of a new strain of influenza has not changed the privacy concerns of physicians about disclosing patient data. It is important to address these concerns to ensure reliable reporting during future outbreaks. PMID:21658256

  9. Processes of patient-centred care in Family Health Teams: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; Ryan, Bridget L.; Thorpe, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-centred care, access to care, and continuity of and coordination of care are core processes in primary health care delivery. Our objective was to evaluate how these processes are enacted by 1 primary care model, Family Health Teams, in Ontario. Methods: Our study used grounded theory methodology to examine these 4 processes of care from the perspective of health care providers. Twenty Family Health Team practice sites in Ontario were selected to represent maximum variation (e.g., location, year of Family Health Team approval). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant. A constant comparative approach was used to analyze the data. Results: Our final sample population involved 110 participants from 20 Family Health Teams. Participants described how their Family Health Team strived to provide patient-centred care, to ensure access, and to pursue continuity and coordination in their delivery of care. Patient-centred care was provided through a variety of means forging the links among the other processes of care. Participants from all teams articulated a commitment to timely access, spontaneously expressing the importance of access to mental health services. Continuity of care was linked to both access and patient-centred care. Coordination of care by the team was perceived to reduce unnecessary walk-in clinic and emergency department visits, and facilitated a smoother transition from hospital to home. Interpretation: These 4 processes of patient care were inextricably linked. Patient-centred care was the focal point, and these processes in turn served to enhance the delivery of patient-centred care. PMID:27398373

  10. Algorithm linking patients and general practices in Denmark using the Danish National Health Service Register

    PubMed Central

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Vedsted, Peter; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Vestergaard, Mogens; Flarup, Kaare Rud; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Background The patient list system in Denmark assigns virtually all residents to a general practice. Nevertheless, historical information on this link between patient and general practice is not readily available for research purposes. Objectives To develop, implement, and evaluate the performance of an algorithm linking individual patients to their general practice by using information from the Danish National Health Service Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Materials and methods The National Health Service Register contains information on all services provided by general practitioners from 1990 and onward. On the basis of these data and information on migration history and death obtained from the Civil Registration System, we developed an algorithm that allocated patients to a general practice on a monthly basis. We evaluated the performance of the algorithm between 2002 and 2007. During this time period, we had access to information on the link between patients and general practices. Agreement was assessed by the proportion of months for which the algorithm allocated patients to the correct general practice. We also assessed the proportion of all patients in the patient list system for which the algorithm was able to suggest an allocation. Results The overall agreement between algorithm and patient lists was 98.6%. We found slightly higher agreement for women (98.8%) than for men (98.4%) and lower agreement in the age group 18–34 years (97.1%) compared to all other age groups (≥98.6%). The algorithm had assigned 83% of all patients in the patient list system after 1 year of follow-up, 91% after 2 years of follow-up, and peaked at 94% during the fourth year. Conclusion We developed an algorithm that enables valid and nearly complete linkage between patients and general practices. The algorithm performs better in subgroups of patients with high health care needs. The algorithm constitutes a valuable tool for primary health care research. PMID

  11. Serious game scores as health condition indicator for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Konrad; Kayali, Fares; Reithofer, Andrea; Wölfle, Rebecca; Mateus-Berr, Ruth; Kuczwara, Jens; Lehner, Zsuzsanna; Lawitschka, Anita; Brunmaier, Barbara; Martinek, Daniel; Silbernagl, Marisa; Hlavacs, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present INTERACCT (Integrating Entertainment and Reaction Assessment into Child Cancer Therapy), a multidisciplinary research project aiming at creating a communication tool for pediatric patients after cancer treatment with HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) in after care. The communication platform should foster communication between patients and clinicians, but also increase motivation for treatment compliance by using appropriate designs and gamification elements. A state of the art web interface enables the physicians to evaluate data submitted by the patients, joining data from various sources (lab data, survey data, physiotherapy performance) using HL7 and visualizing imporant changes. This contribution outlines the challenges of designing such a system and presents a solution for the medical data interface and evaluation. PMID:25991284

  12. Smartphone derived movement profiles to detect changes in health status in COPD patients - A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel; Donnelly, Seamas; Caulfield, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Over 3.2 million people in the UK alone have the lung disease Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Identifying when COPD patients are at risk of an exacerbation is a major problem and there is a need for smart solutions that provide us with a means of tracking patient health status. Smart-phone sensor technology provides us with an opportunity to automatically monitor patients. With sensors providing the ability to measure aspects of a patient's daily life, such a motion, methods to interpret these signals and infer health related information are needed. In this work we aim to investigate the feasibility of utilizing motion sensors, built within smartphones, to measure patient movement and to infer the health related information about the patient. We perform experiments, based on 7 COPD patients using data collected over a 12 week period for each patient, and identify a measure to distinguish between periods when a patient feels well Vs periods when a patient feels unwell. PMID:26736299

  13. Health-related quality of life in 975 patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Gijsbrecht A J; Perez, Roberto S G M; van Gestel, Miriam A; Huygen, Frank J P M; van Kleef, Maarten; van Eijs, Frank; Dahan, Albert; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Marinus, Johan

    2014-03-01

    There are limited data available on health-related quality of life (QoL) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In the present study we examined QoL in 975 CRPS patients attending 6 different clinics in the Netherlands. QoL was assessed using the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) with the Mental Health Summary Score (MHS) and the Physical Health Summary Score (PHS) as dependent variables. The influences of gender, type of affected limb, disease duration, pain scores, CRPS severity and set of diagnostic criteria used were investigated. We found the lowest scores of QoL in the physical domains of the SF-36, with lower-limb CRPS patients reporting poorer results than patients with an affected upper limb. Influence of gender on QoL was not observed, and correlations of QoL with disease duration and the CRPS severity score were weak. Pain correlated moderately with QoL. In addition, patients fulfilling stricter diagnostic criteria (ie, the Budapest criteria) had lower QoL scores than patients fulfilling less strict criteria (ie, the Orlando criteria). We conclude that loss of QoL in CRPS patients is due mainly to reduced physical health. A comparison with data available from the literature shows that CRPS patients generally report poorer QoL than patients with other chronic pain conditions, particularly in the physical domains. Pain correlated moderately with QoL and therefore deserves ongoing attention by physicians. Finally, patients meeting the diagnostic Budapest criteria have lower QoL scores than patients meeting the Orlando criteria, highlighting the impact of different sets of criteria on population characteristics.

  14. Quality of life and mental health status of arsenic-affected patients in a Bangladeshi population.

    PubMed

    Syed, Emdadul H; Poudel, Krishna C; Sakisaka, Kayako; Yasuoka, Junko; Ahsan, Habibul; Jimba, Masamine

    2012-09-01

    Contamination of groundwater by inorganic arsenic is one of the major public-health problems in Bangladesh. This cross-sectional study was conducted (a) to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) and mental health status of arsenic-affected patients and (b) to identify the factors associated with the QOL. Of 1,456 individuals, 521 (35.78%) were selected as case and control participants, using a systematic random-sampling method. The selection criteria for cases (n=259) included presence of at least one of the following: melanosis, leucomelanosis on at least 10% of the body, or keratosis on the hands or feet. Control (nonpatient) participants (n=262) were selected from the same villages by matching age (±5 years) and gender. The Bangladeshi version of the WHOQOL-BREF was used for assessing the QOL, and the self-reporting questionnaire (SRQ) was used for assessing the general mental health status. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and the WHOQOL-BREF and SRQ scores between the patients and the non-patients were compared. The mean scores of QOL were significantly lower in the patients than those in the non-patients of both the sexes. Moreover, the mental health status of the arsenic-affected patients (mean score for males=8.4 and females=10.3) showed greater disturbances than those of the non-patients (mean score for males=5.2 and females=6.1) of both the sexes. The results of multiple regression analysis revealed that the factors potentially contributing to the lower QOL scores included: being an arsenic-affected patient, having lower age, and having lower annual income. Based on the findings, it is concluded that the QOL and mental health status of the arsenic-affected patients were significantly lower than those of the non-patients in Bangladesh. Appropriate interventions are necessary to improve the well-being of the patients.

  15. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important. PMID:11727291

  16. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important.

  17. Cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour and health promotion activities: a critical incident analysis.

    PubMed

    Björklund, M; Fridlund, B

    1999-12-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer report several disease- and health-related problems before, during and a long time after completed treatment. Nurses have an important role in educating/supporting these patients about/through the disease and treatment so that they can attain well-being. This study describes the cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour in terms of critical incidents after nurses had given them care to promote health. The study had a qualitative, descriptive design and the method used was the critical incident technique. Twenty-one informants from the Nordic countries diagnosed with head and neck cancer were strategically selected. It was explained to the informants what a critical incident implies before the interviews took place; this was defined as a major event of great importance, an incident, which the informants still remember, due to its great importance for the outcome of their health and well-being. The nurses' behaviour was examined, and critical incidents were involved in 208 cases-150 positive and 58 negative ones-the number of incidents varying between three and 20 per informant. The nurses' health promotion activities or lack of such activities based on the patients' disease, treatment and symptoms, consisted of informing and instructing the patients as well as enabling their participation. Personal consideration and the nurses' cognisance, knowledge, competence, solicitude, demeanour and statements of understanding were found to be important. Continuous health promotion nursing interventions were of considerable value for the majority of this group of cancer patients. Oncology nurses could reconfirm and update the care of head and neck cancer patients by including health promotion activities in individual care plans. By more frequent use of health promotion models, such as the empowerment model, the nurses could identify and focus on those individuals who needed to alter their life-style as well as tailor their approach

  18. Ill health in spouses of psychiatric patients: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Vandereycken, W

    1994-10-01

    1. In the literature on the marital relationship of psychiatric patients it often has been reported that the healthy spouses may show a considerable degree of psychological distress. 2. A correlation of psychiatric disorders in married couples commonly has been interpreted according to two models: assortative mating and pathogenic interaction, neither of which can sufficiently explain the spousal psychiatric illness correlation. 3. The issue of psychiatric illness in the spouses of patients merits more attention from both researchers and clinicians. A psychiatric illness in one spouse must be understood within the ongoing interaction of the marital relationship.

  19. The Relationship between Health Professionals and the Elderly Patient Facing Drug Prescription: A Qualitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefevre, Fernando; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Lefevre, Ana Maria Cavalcanti; de Castro, Lia Lusitana Cardozo; Spinola, Aracy Witt de Pinho

    2004-01-01

    Aiming at identifying the relationship between the elderly patient facing drug prescription and health professionals, an exploratory and descriptive study of a qualitative cut was carried out using semi-structured interviews. To this end, the Collective Subject Discourse analysis technique was employed. Thirty elderly patients living in the urban…

  20. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life of Food-Insecure Ethnic Minority Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gany, Francesca; Leng, Jennifer; Ramirez, Julia; Phillips, Serena; Aragones, Abraham; Roberts, Nicole; Mujawar, Mohammed Imran; Costas-Muñiz, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The association between food insecurity and health-related quality of life (QOL) of racial/ethnic minority patients with cancer has not been examined. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between food insecurity and health-related QOL reported by racial/ethnic minority patients with cancer. Methods: A consecutive sample of 1,390 underserved ethnic minority patients receiving cancer care in 10 cancer clinics and hospitals in New York City participated in this study. Health-related QOL was measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) and food security was assessed by the US Department of Agriculture Core Food Security Module. Results: Of the 1,390 patients, 581 (41.8%) were classified as food secure, 571 (41.1%) with low food security, and 238 (17.1%) with very low food security. Health-related QOL decreased with each lower food security level. Patient self-reported physical, functional, social, and emotional well-being subscale scores decrease significantly with increasing food insecurity. After controlling for demographic and medical-related factors, the decreases in QOL, physical, functional, social and emotional well-being scores with increasing food insecurity remained significant. Conclusion: Food insecurity was associated with lower QOL in this sample of underserved racial/ethnic minority patients with cancer. Underserved ethnic minority patients diagnosed with cancer are a vulnerable patient population, at significant risk for inadequate food access and the related lower QOL. PMID:26286100

  2. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  3. User Interfaces for Patient-Centered Communication of Health Status and Care Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox-Patterson, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The recent trend toward patients participating in their own healthcare has opened up numerous opportunities for computing research. This dissertation focuses on how technology can foster this participation, through user interfaces to effectively communicate personal health status and care progress to hospital patients. I first characterize the…

  4. Assessing Medical Students' Awareness of and Sensitivity to Diverse Health Beliefs Using a Standardized Patient Station.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Lynne S.; White, Casey B.; Alexander, Gwen L.; Gruppen, Larry D.; Grum, Cyril M.

    2001-01-01

    Assessed students' competence in addressing the health beliefs and cultural concerns of a standardized patient, an African American woman with diabetes, during a clinical interview. Found that minority students displayed greater competence in addressing the patient's concerns about altering culturally-based dietary behaviors; white students…

  5. Empowering the chronically ill? Patient collectives in the new Dutch health insurance system.

    PubMed

    Bartholomée, Yvette; Maarse, Hans

    2007-12-01

    On January 1, 2006, the Dutch government instituted major reforms to the country's health insurance scheme. One of the features of the new system is the opportunity for groups to form collectives that may negotiate and enter into group contracts with health insurers. This article discusses one particular type of collective, namely patient collectives. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if, and to what extent, patient collectives empower chronically ill patients. The results of the study show that some patient groups were able to contract collective agreements with health insurers, whereas others were not. The eligibility of a group's disease for compensation through the risk equalisation fund (which subsidises the costs for many but not all disorders) seems to determine whether or not a patient organisation is able to successfully negotiate a collective contract for its members. Another key factor for success is the presence of a large membership whose constituents have similar healthcare needs. If both of these factors are present, insurers are more likely to develop specific products for particular groups of patients, as is the case for people with diabetes. Furthermore, the presence of patient collectives accords patient associations with a new role. It may be possible for them to become powerful players in the health insurance market. However, this new role may also lead to tensions, both within and between associations. PMID:17485132

  6. Cable Television and Health Promotion: A Feasibility Study with Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study undertaken to ascertain the extent to which arthritis patients could be targeted by arthritis-related programming over a local cable system. Some conceptual and practical issues involved in targeting chronic patient groups for health programming are discussed. (Author/CT)

  7. Empowering the chronically ill? Patient collectives in the new Dutch health insurance system.

    PubMed

    Bartholomée, Yvette; Maarse, Hans

    2007-12-01

    On January 1, 2006, the Dutch government instituted major reforms to the country's health insurance scheme. One of the features of the new system is the opportunity for groups to form collectives that may negotiate and enter into group contracts with health insurers. This article discusses one particular type of collective, namely patient collectives. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if, and to what extent, patient collectives empower chronically ill patients. The results of the study show that some patient groups were able to contract collective agreements with health insurers, whereas others were not. The eligibility of a group's disease for compensation through the risk equalisation fund (which subsidises the costs for many but not all disorders) seems to determine whether or not a patient organisation is able to successfully negotiate a collective contract for its members. Another key factor for success is the presence of a large membership whose constituents have similar healthcare needs. If both of these factors are present, insurers are more likely to develop specific products for particular groups of patients, as is the case for people with diabetes. Furthermore, the presence of patient collectives accords patient associations with a new role. It may be possible for them to become powerful players in the health insurance market. However, this new role may also lead to tensions, both within and between associations.

  8. Enabling eHealth as a Pathway for Patient Engagement: a Toolkit for Medical Practice.

    PubMed

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Triberti, Stefano; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Bosio, A Claudio; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Academic and managerial interest in patient engagement is rapidly earning attention and becoming a necessary tool for researchers, clinicians and policymakers worldwide to manage the increasing burden of chronic conditions. The concept of patient engagement calls for a reframe of healthcare organizations' models and approaches to care. This also requires innovations in the direction of facilitating the exchanges between the patients and the healthcare. eHealth, namely the use of new communication technologies to provide healthcare, is proved to be proposable to innovate healthcare organizations and to improve exchanges between patients and health providers. However, little attention has been still devoted to how to best design eHealth tools in order to engage patients in their care. eHealth tools have to be appropriately designed according to the specific patients' unmet needs and priorities featuring the different phases of the engagement process. Basing on the Patient Engagement model and on the Positive Technology paradigm, we suggest a toolkit of phase-specific technological resources, highlighting their specific potentialities in fostering the patient engagement process.

  9. Patient proactivity: behaviors, attitudes, and its relationship with satisfaction with the American health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Sam; McCullough, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 1,031 U.S. adult residents provided information regarding actions that fall within the realm of patient proactivity, that is to say efforts that are overtly designed to maintain or regain one's health. An assessment of consumers revealed that they engage in, or at least support, behaviors that would be characterized as proactive. Furthermore, there is a significant relationship between some elements of patient proactivity and the level of satisfaction with the American health care system. The relationships are modest, but they offer managerial insight that will benefit those responsible for both delivering and marketing health care. PMID:24617724

  10. Connecting Patients to mHealth Applications to Enhance Self-care Management.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Meghan K

    2015-09-01

    Smartphone use and the desire to use mHealth are growing in the population of patients who most commonly use home healthcare (HHC) services, a population with chronic conditions and complex healthcare management needs. HHC nurses are positioned to connect HHC patients with mHealth Apps to access health-related information, engage in interactive monitoring, and manage self-care activities. The challenge of finding reputable Apps is discussed and resources are presented to overcome this challenge at the business orindividual level. PMID:26323008

  11. Measuring the effects of online health information for patients: Item generation for an e-health impact questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Ziebland, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Objective The internet is a valuable resource for accessing health information and support. We are developing an instrument to assess the effects of websites with experiential and factual health information. This study aimed to inform an item pool for the proposed questionnaire. Methods Items were informed through a review of relevant literature and secondary qualitative analysis of 99 narrative interviews relating to patient and carer experiences of health. Statements relating to identified themes were re-cast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n = 21) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results Eighty-two generic items were identified following secondary qualitative analysis and expert review. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, 62 items and the response options were acceptable to patients and carers. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 62 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. Practice implications The final questionnaire will initially be used in a randomized controlled trial examining the effects of online patient's experiences. This will inform recommendations on the best way to present patients’ experiences within health information websites. PMID:23598293

  12. Health Instruction Packages: Humanistic Nursing--Nurse/Patient Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Wanda L.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in humanistic, non-technical aspects of patient care. The first module, "Introduction to Humanistic Nursing Practice Theory" by Wanda L. Carpenter, draws upon the theories of existentialism and phenomenology to define…

  13. [Health maintenance, relaxation and hypnosis for chronic pain patients].

    PubMed

    Boiron, Clare

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of chronic pain patients integrates more and more complementary therapies such as relaxation and hypnosis, implemented by specially trained nurses. These techniques are offered on the basis of nurses' diagnoses carried out in the framework of a clinical approach.

  14. Lower Health-Related Quality of Life in Polytrauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Hagelschuer, Paul; Langenmair, Elia; Bode, Gerrit; Herget, Georg; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Hammer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although trauma-associated mortality has fallen in recent decades, and medical care has continued to improve in many fields, the quality of life after experiencing polytrauma has attracted little attention in the literature. This group of patients suffer from persisting physical disabilities. Moreover, they experience long-term social, emotional, and psychological effects that limit/lower considerably their quality of life. We analyzed retrospective data on 147 polytraumatized patients by administering written questionnaires and conducting face-to-face interviews 6 ± 0.8 years after the trauma in consideration of the following validated scores: Glasgow Outcome Scale, European Quality of Life Score, Short Form-36, Trauma Outcome Profile, and Beck Depressions Inventory II. Our analysis of these results reveals that polytraumatized patients suffer from persistent pain and functional disabilities after >5 years. We also observed changes in their socioeconomic situation, as well as psychological after-effects. The rehabilitation of this particular group of patients should not only address their physical disabilities. The psychological after-effects of trauma must be acknowledged and addressed for an even longer period of time. PMID:27175646

  15. [Health maintenance, relaxation and hypnosis for chronic pain patients].

    PubMed

    Boiron, Clare

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of chronic pain patients integrates more and more complementary therapies such as relaxation and hypnosis, implemented by specially trained nurses. These techniques are offered on the basis of nurses' diagnoses carried out in the framework of a clinical approach. PMID:25518140

  16. Patient health satisfaction survey in connecticut correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Tanguay, Sandra; Trestman, Robert; Weiskopf, Connie

    2014-04-01

    Although routine in the community, patient satisfaction surveys are relatively rare in correctional settings. This article describes the development of an instrument specifically adapted to the correctional environment and population, the statewide implementation of the survey, the initial results, and the quality improvement initiatives evolving from this effort.

  17. Experiences of patients and healthcare professionals of NHS cardiovascular health checks: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Riley, R.; Coghill, N.; Montgomery, A.; Feder, G.; Horwood, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background NHS Health Checks are a national cardiovascular risk assessment and management programme in England and Wales. We examined the experiences of patients attending and healthcare professionals (HCPs) conducting NHS Health Checks. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 28 patients and 16 HCPs recruited from eight general practices across a range of socio-economic localities. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, anonymized and analysed thematically. Results Patients were motivated to attend an NHS Health Check because of health beliefs, the perceived value of the programme, a family history of cardiovascular and other diseases and expectations of receiving a general health assessment. Some patients reported benefits including reassurance and reinforcement of healthy lifestyles. Others experienced confusion and frustration about how results and advice were communicated, some having a poor understanding of the implications of their results. HCPs raised concerns about the skill set of some staff to competently communicate risk and lifestyle information. Conclusions To improve the satisfaction of patients attending and improve facilitation of lifestyle change, HCPs conducting the NHS Health Checks require sufficient training to equip them with appropriate skills and knowledge to deliver the service effectively. PMID:26408822

  18. Patient-provider connectivity and the role of e-health.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Suzanne C; Kearns, Ellen Hope

    2003-01-01

    Patient-provider connectivity (PPC) offers innovative approaches to control costs, improve quality, and sustain a healthy workforce. The application of e-commerce to health care is one facet of PPC and provides solutions to educating, informing, and more efficiently using scarce resources to sustain the nation's health. Technology is available to provide real-time access to clinical results, medical records, health-care providers, and other time-sensitive patient information. This is the first article in a series on PPC that explores the application of e-commerce to the health-care industry from the consumers' and providers' points of view and examines and assesses trends and data from various interdisciplinary sources and studies. Two models exemplifying PPC are explored including the Science Business & Education, Inc., proof-of-concept patient demonstration project, and the emerging application of peer-to-peer (P2P) technology. PPC promises to improve efficiency, facilitate communication between physician and patient, monitor compliance with medical regimens, and positively affect the quality of health care provided and the overall health of the patient. Future articles will address the growth of telemedicine, issues of confidentiality and e-risk, and other PPC applications.

  19. Health Literacy Impact on Patient-Provider Interactions Involving the Treatment of Dental Problems

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Leonard A.; Bonito, Arthur J.; Eicheldinger, Celia; Manski, Richard J.; Edwards, Robert R.; Khanna, Niharika

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy-related problems can interfere with effective doctor-patient communication and effective patient care. This study examined several health literacy-related markers for patients seeking treatment in hospital emergency departments and physician and dentist offices for dental problems and injuries. Participants consisted of low-income white, black, and Hispanic adults who had experienced a dental problem or injury during the previous twelve months and who visited a hospital emergency department, physician, or dentist for treatment. A stratified random sample of Maryland households participated in a cross-sectional telephone survey. Interviews were completed with 94.8 percent of 423 eligible individuals. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Only 10.0 percent of the respondents expressed a difficulty understanding what they were told by the health provider, while 4.9 percent expressed a difficulty understanding the dental or medical forms they were asked to complete and 6.9 percent reported that they had difficulty getting the health provider to understand their dental problem or injury. Logistic regression analysis found that males and Hispanics were significantly (p<0.05) more likely to experience health literacy-related problems. In general, respondents did not express health literacy-related problems. Additional research is needed to identify health literacy-related barriers to effective patient-provider communication. PMID:21890851

  20. The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Ching; Chang, Hong-Jer; Liu, Yueh-Min; Hsieh, Hsiang-Li; Lo, Lan; Lin, Mei-Yu; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD) treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD group had lower resilience than either high-risk or early CKD groups. Factors affecting pre-ESRD resilience were gender, occupational status, diabetes and health-promoting behaviors. Factors affecting resilience of the high-risk group included level of education and health-promoting behaviors while factors affecting resilience in the early CKD group involved whether they are employed and health promoting behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between health promoting behavior and resilience in all study subjects. Multiple regression analysis found that factors which could effectively predict resilience in patients at high-risk for CKD were gender, whether the patient had a job, nutrition, self-actualization, and stress level, accounting for 69.7% of the variance. Therefore, nursing education should focus on health promotion advocacy throughout the life of not only patients but also their families. PMID:23589703

  1. Cardiac patient-spouse dissimilarities in illness perception: Associations with patient self-rated health and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Karademas, Evangelos C; Zarogiannos, Aristeides; Karamvakalis, Nikolaos

    2010-04-01

    The study examined the illness perception dissimilarities between chronic cardiac patients and their spouses, as well as the associations of perception dissimilarities with patients' overall self-rated health (SRH) and illness-related coping strategies. Seventy-three patients (65 males, 8 females) with an old myocardial infarction and subsequent cardiovascular problems, and their spouses completed the Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire. Patients also completed a coping measure (the Coping with Health Injuries and Problems Scale) and a question regarding SRH. Significant differences, with spouses scoring higher than patients, were found in perceptions regarding illness chronicity, personal control and the emotional impact of the illness. The correlations of dissimilarity scores to SRH and coping were sporadic and weak. Additionally, after controlling for patients' own perceptions, the effects of dissimilarity scores almost disappeared. However, when three different groups were constructed reflecting whether both partners scored high, low, or in an opposing way on each IPQ-R subscale, the overall matching in several illness perceptions was associated with certain coping strategies, even after controlling for the effects of the patients' own perceptions. With respect to SRH, no significant effects were found. PMID:20204941

  2. Six health care trends that will reshape the patient-provider dynamic.

    PubMed

    Liao, Joshua M; Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Navathe, Amol S

    2016-09-01

    Six trends - movement towards value-based payment, rapid adoption of digital health technology, care delivery in non-traditional settings, development of individualized clinical guidelines, increased transparency, and growing cultural awareness about the harms of medical overuse - are driving the US health care system towards a future defined by quality- and patient-centric care. Health care organizations are responding to these changes by implementing provider and workforce changes, pursuing stronger payer-provider integration, and accelerating the use of digital technology and data. While these efforts can also improve the clinical relationship and create positive system redesign among health care organizations, they require alignment between organizational and physician incentives that can inadvertently harm the dynamic between patients and providers. Organizations can utilize several strategies to preserve the patient-physician relationship and advance the positive benefits of new organizational strategies while guarding against unintended consequences.

  3. Understanding CAM Natural Health Products: Implications of Use Among Cancer Patients and Survivors.

    PubMed

    Fouladbakhsh, Judith M; Balneaves, Lynda; Jenuwine, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Herbs, vitamins, and other natural health products are being used by cancer patients and survivors with increasing prevalence in the United States. These complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products, which are also referred to as natural health products in Canada and abroad, are used during cancer treatment and the survivorship period to ease the burden of symptoms such as pain, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and depression and hence improve overall quality of life. Data indicate that while patients choose these products for self-treatment, they often do not inform their health-care providers, thereby presenting the potential for negative interactions. This article gives an overview of CAM natural health products, including discussion of herbs, vitamins, and other supplements such as minerals, enzymes, and more. Related research is presented, and implications for advanced practitioners are discussed. Insights into guiding safe and effective use among patients as well as appropriate decision-making strategies are explored. PMID:25032009

  4. Six health care trends that will reshape the patient-provider dynamic.

    PubMed

    Liao, Joshua M; Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Navathe, Amol S

    2016-09-01

    Six trends - movement towards value-based payment, rapid adoption of digital health technology, care delivery in non-traditional settings, development of individualized clinical guidelines, increased transparency, and growing cultural awareness about the harms of medical overuse - are driving the US health care system towards a future defined by quality- and patient-centric care. Health care organizations are responding to these changes by implementing provider and workforce changes, pursuing stronger payer-provider integration, and accelerating the use of digital technology and data. While these efforts can also improve the clinical relationship and create positive system redesign among health care organizations, they require alignment between organizational and physician incentives that can inadvertently harm the dynamic between patients and providers. Organizations can utilize several strategies to preserve the patient-physician relationship and advance the positive benefits of new organizational strategies while guarding against unintended consequences. PMID:27396533

  5. Understanding CAM Natural Health Products: Implications of Use Among Cancer Patients and Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Fouladbakhsh, Judith M.; Balneaves, Lynda; Jenuwine, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Herbs, vitamins, and other natural health products are being used by cancer patients and survivors with increasing prevalence in the United States. These complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products, which are also referred to as natural health products in Canada and abroad, are used during cancer treatment and the survivorship period to ease the burden of symptoms such as pain, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and depression and hence improve overall quality of life. Data indicate that while patients choose these products for self-treatment, they often do not inform their health-care providers, thereby presenting the potential for negative interactions. This article gives an overview of CAM natural health products, including discussion of herbs, vitamins, and other supplements such as minerals, enzymes, and more. Related research is presented, and implications for advanced practitioners are discussed. Insights into guiding safe and effective use among patients as well as appropriate decision-making strategies are explored. PMID:25032009

  6. How I do it: managing bone health in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Jack

    2014-08-01

    Urologists have two scenarios where they have to address bone loss or increased risk of fractures in men with prostate cancer. In the first setting, a patient who has been started on androgen deprivation therapy may develop cancer-treatment-induced bone loss. In the second setting, a patient's prostate cancer may have metastasized to the bone. This article describes six steps to manage bone health in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer in a community practice.

  7. Improving cardiovascular health and metabolic comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ogdie, Alexis; Eder, Lihi

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested a link between psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and comorbidities, in particular cardiovascular disease and metabolic comorbidities such as diabetes. The co-existence of these comorbidities is likely the result of systemic inflammation. In order to improve the health of patients with PsA and provide optimal care, these comorbidities must be addressed. However, little is known about how to improve metabolic and cardiovascular health in patients with PsA. In this perspective, we describe the research needs in the area of improving cardiovascular disease and metabolic comorbidities among patients with PsA. PMID:27134682

  8. Health profiles for patients with Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Holgers, Kajsa-Mia; Finizia, Caterina

    2001-01-01

    The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) has been used to investigate the health profiles for many medical conditions, such as herpes zoster infection, migraine, cancer and epilepsy. However, so far, it has not been used to investigate the health profile for patients suffering from Ménière's disease, but only for patients with dizziness, severe hearing loss and tinnitus. Each of these three symptoms have shown to have a significant impact on the quality of life. In the present study, 116 consecutive patients with Ménière's disease, diagnosed according to the AAO-HNS guidelines, visiting at the department of Audiology were included in the study. The NHP was used to measure the health related quality of life and includes the following subscales: "Sleep", "Energy", "Emotional reaction", "Pain", "Physical mobility", "Social isolation" and items concerning daily activity. The Tinnitus Severity Questionnaire (TSQ) was used to measure symptoms specific to tinnitus. The results showed that the perceived severity of tinnitus i