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Sample records for 9-tetrahydrocannabinol delta 9-thc

  1. Urinary excretion profiles of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-hydroxy-delta9-THC: cannabinoid metabolites to creatinine ratio study IV.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D; Worth, David

    2004-07-16

    The objective of this study was to compare urinary excretion patterns of two cannabinoid metabolites in subjects with a history of chronic marijuana use. The first metabolite analyzed was nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC-COOH), the major urinary cannabinoid metabolite that is pharmacologically inactive. The second metabolite 11-OH-delta9-THC is an active cannabinoid metabolite and is not routinely measured. Urine specimens were collected from four subjects on 12-20 occasions > or = 96 h apart in an uncontrolled clinical setting. Creatinine was analyzed in each urine specimen by the colorimetric modified Jaffé reaction on a SYVA 30R biochemical analyzer. All urine specimens analyzed for 11-OH-delta9-THC had screened positive for cannabinoids with the EMIT II Plus cannabinoids assay (cut-off 50 ng/mL) on a SYVA 30R analyzer and submitted for delta9-THC-COOH confirmation by GC-MS (cut-off concentration 15 ng/mL). Eleven-OH-delta9-THC was measured by GC-MS with a cut-off concentration of 3 ng/mL. Both GC-MS methods for cannabinoid metabolites used deuterated internal standards for quantitative analysis. The mean (range) of urinary delta9-THC-COOH concentration was 1153 ng/mL (78.7-2634) with a cut-off of 15 ng/mL. The mean (range) of delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratios (ng/mL delta9-THC-COOH/mmol/L creatinine) was 84.1 (8.1-122.1). The mean (range) urinary of 11-OH-delta9-THC concentration was 387.6 ng/mL (11.9-783) with a cut-off of 3 ng/mL, and the mean (range) of 11-OH-delta9-THC/creatinine ratio (ng/mL 11-OH-delta9-THC/mmol/L creatinine) was 29.7 (1.2-40.7). Of the 63 urine specimens submitted for delta9-THC-COOH confirmation by GC-MS, 59/63 urine specimens (94%) were positive for delta9 -THC-COOH and 51/63 (81%) were positive for 11-OH-delta9-THC. Overall, the concentrations of 11-OH-delta9-THC in urine specimens collected > or = 96 h apart were lower than delta9-THC-COOH concentrations in 50/51 of the urine specimens in this population

  2. Hormonal status and age differentially affect tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) on learning in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Winsauer, Peter J.; Filipeanu, Catalin M.; Weed, Peter F.; Sutton, Jessie L.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of hormone status and age on the development of tolerance to Δ9-THC were assessed in sham-operated (intact) or ovariectomized (OVX) female rats that received either intraperitoneal saline or 5.6 mg/kg of Δ9-THC daily from postnatal day (PD) 75–180 (early adulthood onward) or PD 35–140 (adolescence onward). During this time, the four groups for each age (i.e., intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline, and OVX/THC) were trained in a learning and performance procedure and dose-effect curves were established for Δ9-THC (0.56–56 mg/kg) and the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (0.32–10 mg/kg). Despite the persistence of small rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in intact and OVX females from both ages during chronic Δ9-THC, all of the Δ9-THC groups developed tolerance. However, the magnitude of tolerance, as well as the effect of hormone status, varied with the age at which chronic Δ9-THC was initiated. There was no evidence of dependence in any of the groups. Hippocampal protein expression of CB1R, AHA1 (a co-chaperone of CB1R) and HSP90β (a molecular chaperone modulated by AHA-1) was affected more by OVX than chronic Δ9-THC; striatal protein expression was not consistently affected by either manipulation. Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression varied with age, hormone status, and chronic treatment. Thus, hormonal status differentially affects the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) on learning and performance behavior in adolescent, but not adult, female rats. These factors and their interactions also differentially affect cannabinoid signaling proteins in the hippocampus and striatum, and ultimately, neural plasticity. PMID:26191005

  3. Hormonal status and age differentially affect tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) on learning in female rats.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, Peter J; Filipeanu, Catalin M; Weed, Peter F; Sutton, Jessie L

    2015-01-01

    The effects of hormone status and age on the development of tolerance to Δ(9)-THC were assessed in sham-operated (intact) or ovariectomized (OVX) female rats that received either intraperitoneal saline or 5.6 mg/kg of Δ(9)-THC daily from postnatal day (PD) 75-180 (early adulthood onward) or PD 35-140 (adolescence onward). During this time, the four groups for each age (i.e., intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline, and OVX/THC) were trained in a learning and performance procedure and dose-effect curves were established for Δ(9)-THC (0.56-56 mg/kg) and the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (0.32-10 mg/kg). Despite the persistence of small rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in intact and OVX females from both ages during chronic Δ(9)-THC, all of the Δ(9)-THC groups developed tolerance. However, the magnitude of tolerance, as well as the effect of hormone status, varied with the age at which chronic Δ(9)-THC was initiated. There was no evidence of dependence in any of the groups. Hippocampal protein expression of CB1R, AHA1 (a co-chaperone of CB1R) and HSP90β (a molecular chaperone modulated by AHA-1) was affected more by OVX than chronic Δ(9)-THC; striatal protein expression was not consistently affected by either manipulation. Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression varied with age, hormone status, and chronic treatment. Thus, hormonal status differentially affects the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) on learning and performance behavior in adolescent, but not adult, female rats. These factors and their interactions also differentially affect cannabinoid signaling proteins in the hippocampus and striatum, and ultimately, neural plasticity.

  4. Hexadeutero-11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid: a superior internal standard for the GC/MS analysis of delta 9-THC acid metabolite in biological specimens.

    PubMed

    elSohly, M A; Little, T L; Stanford, D F

    1992-01-01

    GC/MS analysis of biological specimens is believed to be the most forensically accepted method for confirming the presence of abused drugs. 11-Nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (delta 9-THC-COOH) is the major metabolite of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) for which testing (including GC/MS) is directed as an indication of marijuana use. The currently available internal standard for delta 9-THC-COOH is d3-delta 9-THC-COOH, which has the deuterium atoms located on the side chain. In addition to the high cost of this compound, it suffers from a limited dynamic range of analysis, especially when the methyl derivative is used. This is because of a contribution to one of the internal standard ions (m/z 316) from a fragmentation of the natural drug which involves loss of the side chain. The new internal standard, d6-11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (d6-delta 9-THC-COOH), avoids these disadvantages. The six deuterium atoms are located on the two methyl groups of Carbon 6 in the dibenzopyran structure. The dynamic range of analysis with the new internal standard was tested between 6.25 to 1,000 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.998. Analysis of several urine specimens for delta 9-THC metabolite using both d3- and d6-internal standards showed a correlation coefficient of 0.9987.

  5. Radioimmunoanalysis of delta-9-THC in blood by means of an /sup 125/I tracer. [Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, S.M.; McBay, A.J.; Reisner, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for delta-9-THC in plasma, whole blood, or hemolyzed blood specimens has been presented. Samples and standards were diluted with methanol and centrifuged. An aliquot of the supernatant fluid was incubated with RIA buffer, /sup 125/I-labeled delta-8-THC and rabbit anti-THC serum. Solid phase goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were added to separate bound from free THC. After centrifugation the supernatant fluid was aspirated and the radioactivity of the precipitate was counted in a gamma counter. The concentration of THC was calculated from a standard curve using the logit-log transformation of the average counts of duplicate tubes. The assay had several advantages. Methanol dilution gave better results than direct analysis. The /sup 125/I-labeled THC had high specific activity and could be counted in a gamma counter. The immunological separation of antibody-bound THC from free THC was better than separation techniques using ammonium sulfate and activated charcoal. THC was determined in 0.1 ml of sample with a sensitivity of 1.5 ng/ml in plasma and 3.0 ng/ml in hemolyzed blood.

  6. Urinary excretion profiles of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Study III. A Delta9-THC-COOH to creatinine ratio study.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D; Worth, David

    2003-11-26

    Huestis and Cone reported in [J. Anal. Toxicol. 22 (1998) 445] that serial monitoring of Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratios in paired urine specimens collected at least 24h apart could differentiate new drug use from residual Delta(9)-THC-COOH excretion following acute marijuana use in a controlled setting. The best accuracy (85.4%) for predicting new marijuana use was for a Delta(9)-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio > or = 0.5 (dividing the Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio of specimen no. 2 by the specimen no. 1 ratio). In previous studies in this laboratory [J. Anal. Toxicol. 23 (1999) 531 and Forensic Sci. Int. 133 (2003) 26], urine specimens were collected from chronic marijuana users > or = 24 h or > = 48 h apart in an uncontrolled setting. Subjects with a history of chronic marijuana use were screened for cannabinoids with the EMIT II Plus cannabinoids assay (cut-off 50 ng/ml) followed by confirmation for Delta9-THC-COOH by GC-MS (cut-off 15 ng/ml). Creatinine was analyzed as an index of dilution. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether creatinine corrected specimens could differentiate new marijuana or hashish use from the excretion of residual Delta(9)-THC-COOH in chronic marijuana users based on the Huestis 0.5 ratio. Urine specimens (N=376) were collected from 29 individuals > or = 96 h between urine collections. The mean urinary Delta9-THC-COOH concentration was 464.4 ng/ml, mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio (ng/(ml Delta9-THC-COOH mmoll creatinine)) was 36.8 and the overall mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio of specimen 2/mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio of specimen 1 was 1.37. The Huestis ratio calculation indicated new drug use in 83% of all sequentially paired urine specimens. The data were sub-divided into three groups (Groups A-C) based on mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine values. Interindividual mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine values ranged from 4.7 to 13.4 in Group A where 80% of paired specimens indicated new drug use (N=10

  7. Urinary excretion profiles of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol: a Delta9-THC-COOH to creatinine ratio study #2.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D; Worth, David

    2003-04-23

    Subjects with a history of chronic marijuana use were screened for cannabinoids in urine specimens with the EMIT((R)) II Plus cannabinoids assay with a cut-off value of 50 ng/ml. All presumptively positive specimens were submitted for confirmatory analysis for the major urinary cannabinoid metabolite (Delta(9)-THC-COOH) by GC-MS with a cut-off value of 15 ng/ml. Creatinine was analyzed in each specimen as an index of dilution. Huestis and Cone [J. Anal. Toxicol. 22 (1998) 445] reported that serial monitoring of Delta(9)-THC-COOH to creatinine ratios in paired urine specimens collected at least 24h apart could differentiate new drug use from residual Delta(9)-THC-COOH excretion. The best accuracy (85.4%) for predicting new marijuana use was a Delta(9)-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio > or =0.5 (dividing the Delta(9)-THC-COOH to creatinine ratio of specimen 2 by the specimen 1 ratio). In a previous study in this laboratory [J. Anal. Toxicol. 23 (1999) 531], urine specimens were collected from chronic marijuana users at least 24h apart and dilute urine specimens (creatinine values <2.2 micromol/l) were excluded from the data analysis. The objective of the present study was to determine whether creatinine corrected urine specimens positive for cannabinoids could differentiate new marijuana use from the excretion of residual Delta(9)-THC-COOH in chronic users of marijuana based on the Huestis 0.5 ratio. Urine specimens (N=946) were collected from 37 individuals with at least 48h between collections. All urine specimens were included in the data review irrespective of creatinine concentration. The mean urinary Delta(9)-THC-COOH concentration was 302.4 ng/ml, mean Delta(9)-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio (ng/ml Delta(9)-THC-COOH/(mmol/l) creatinine) was 29.3 and the Huestis ratio calculation indicated new drug use in 83% of all sequentially paired urine specimens. The data were sub-divided into three groups (A-C) based on the mean Delta(9)-THC-COOH/creatinine values. Interindividual

  8. [Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Goullé, J-P; Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C

    2008-08-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis. Smoking is currently most common use of cannabis. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The variability of THC in plant material which has significantly increased in recent years leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. This variability of THC content has an important impact on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacology. After smoking THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level near 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is eliminated quickly from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, which is responsible for its pharmacologic effects. Body fat then serves as a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetics explains the noncorrelation between THC blood level and clinical effects as is observed for ethanol. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20 and 100% of parent, respectively). The elimination of THC and its many metabolites, mainly THC-COOH, occurs via the feces and urine for several weeks. Thus, to confirm abstinence, urine THC-COOH analysis would be a useful tool. A positive result could be checked by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry THC blood analysis, indicative of a recent cannabis exposure.

  9. Chronic administration during early adulthood does not alter the hormonally-dependent disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) on complex behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, Peter J; Sutton, Jessie L

    2014-02-01

    This study examined whether chronic Δ(9)-THC during early adulthood would produce the same hormonally-dependent deficits in learning that are produced by chronic Δ(9)-THC during adolescence. To do this, either sham-operated (intact) or ovariectomized (OVX) female rats received daily saline or 5.6 mg/kg of Δ(9)-THC i.p. for 40 days during early adulthood. Following chronic administration, and a drug-free period to train both a learning and performance task, acute dose-effect curves for Δ(9)-THC (0.56-10 mg/kg) were established in each of the four groups (intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline and OVX/THC). The dependent measures of responding under the learning and performance tasks were the overall response rate and the percentage of errors. Although the history of OVX and chronic Δ(9)-THC in early adulthood did not significantly affect non-drug or baseline behavior under the tasks, acute administration of Δ(9)-THC produced both rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects on learning and performance behavior, and these effects were dependent on their hormone condition. More specifically, both intact groups were more sensitive to the rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects of Δ(9)-THC than the OVX groups irrespective of chronic Δ(9)-THC administration, as there was no significant main effect of chronic treatment and no significant interaction between chronic treatment (saline or Δ(9)-THC) and the dose of Δ(9)-THC administered as an adult. Post mortem examination of 10 brain regions also indicated there were significant differences in agonist-stimulated GTPγS binding across brain regions, but no significant effects of chronic treatment and no significant interaction between the chronic treatment and cannabinoid signaling. Thus, acute Δ(9)-THC produced hormonally-dependent effects on learning and performance behavior, but a period of chronic administration during early adulthood did not alter these effects significantly, which is contrary to what we

  10. Differential modulation by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9)-THC) of CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in activated mouse splenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Crawford, Robert B; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2012-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids has been widely demonstrated in experimental animal models and in humans. CD40-CD40-ligand (L) interactions are among the most crucial initiators of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of ∆(9)-THC on CD40L expression in mouse splenic T cells after activation with various stimuli. Time course studies demonstrated that peak surface expression of CD40L by CD4(+) T cells after anti-CD3/CD28 or phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io) occurred 8 h post activation. Peak CD40L mRNA levels were observed at 2 h post PMA/Io treatment and at 4 h post anti-CD3/CD28 treatment. Pretreatment with ∆(9)-THC significantly impaired the upregulation of CD40L induced by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level. By contrast, ∆(9)-THC did not affect PMA/Io-induced surface CD40L expression on CD4(+) T cells. Additionally, ∆(9)-THC also attenuated anti-CD3/CD28-induced CD40L expression on CD4(+) T cells derived from CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. We investigated whether the mechanism by which ∆(9)-THC suppressed CD40L expression involved putative cannabinoid activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Although activation of GR resulted in suppression of CD40L induction by anti-CD3/CD28, no interaction between ∆(9)-THC and GR was observed by a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ∆(9)-THC targets proximal T cell receptor-associated signaling in a cannabinoid receptor- and glucocorticoid receptor-independent manner. These findings identify suppression of CD40L expression as a novel part of the mechanism by which ∆(9)-THC exerts anti-inflammatory activity.

  11. Susceptibility of Naegleria fowleri to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, H L; Bradley, S G; Harris, L S

    1979-01-01

    Growth of the pathogenic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri is inhibited by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC). delta 9-THC is amoebostatic at 5 to 50 micrograms/ml. delta 9-THC prevents enflagellation and encystment, but does not impair amoeboid movement. Calf serum at 10 and 20% (vol/vol) reduces the antiamoeba activity of delta 9-THC. Only 1-methoxy delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol, of 17 cannabinoids tested, failed to inhibit growth of N. fowleri. Antinaeglerial activity was not markedly altered by opening the pyran ring, by converting the cyclohexyl ring to an aromatic ring, or by reversing the hydroxyl and pentyl groups on the benzene ring. delta 9-THC prevented the cytopathic effect of N. fowleri on African green monkey (Vero) cells and human epithelioma (HEp-2) cells in culture. delta 9-THC afforded modest protection to mice infected with N. fowleri. Images PMID:526010

  12. Oxidative and genetic responses induced by Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) to Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea

    2014-01-15

    Cannabis is the most used illicit substance worldwide and its main psychoactive compound, the Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC), is detected in aquatic environments at measurable concentrations. Even though its occurrence is well documented, no information is available on its hazard to aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the adverse effects induced to zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) specimens by 14 day exposures to environmentally relevant Δ-9-THC concentrations (0.05 μg/L and 0.5 μg/L) by means of the application of a biomarker suite. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, as well as the lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyl content (PCC), were measured as oxidative stress indices. The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, the DNA diffusion assay and the micronucleus test (MN test) were applied to investigate DNA injuries, while the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) was used to assess Δ-9-THC cytotoxicity. The lowest treatment induced negligible adverse effects to bivalves, while 0.5 μg/L Δ-9-THC exposure caused remarkable alterations in D. polymorpha oxidative status, which lead to significant increase of lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and DNA damage.

  13. Isolation of Delta9-THCA-A from hemp and analytical aspects concerning the determination of Delta9-THC in cannabis products.

    PubMed

    Dussy, Franz E; Hamberg, Cornelia; Luginbühl, Marco; Schwerzmann, Thomas; Briellmann, Thomas A

    2005-04-20

    A simple procedure based on a common silica gel column chromatography for the isolation of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (Delta9-THCA-A) from hemp in a multi-milligram scale is presented. Further, the decarboxylation reaction of Delta9-THCA-A to the toxicologically active Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) at different analytical and under-smoking conditions is investigated. Maximal conversion in an optimised analytical equipment yields about 70% Delta9-THC. In the simulation of the smoking process, only about 30 % of the spiked substance could be recovered as Delta9-THC.

  14. Hair analysis for delta(9)-THC, delta(9)-THC-COOH, CBN and CBD, by GC/MS-EI. Comparison with GC/MS-NCI for delta(9)-THC-COOH.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Maria João; Monsanto, Paula Verâncio; Pinho Marques, Estela Gouveia; Bermejo, Ana; Avila, Sofia; Castanheira, Alice Martelo; Margalho, Cláudia; Barroso, Mário; Vieira, Duarte Nuno

    2002-08-14

    A sensitive analytical method was developed for quantitative analysis of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta(9)-THC), 11-nor-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid (delta(9)-THC-COOH), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD) in human hair. The identification of delta(9)-THC-COOH in hair would document Cannabis use more effectively than the detection of parent drug (delta(9)-THC) which might have come from environmental exposure. Ketamine was added to hair samples as internal standard for CBN and CBD. Ketoprofen was added to hair samples as internal standard for the other compounds. Samples were hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase for 2h at 40 degrees C. After cooling, samples were extracted with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure (with chloroform/isopropyl alcohol, after alkalinization, and n-hexane/ethyl acetate, after acidification), which was developed in our laboratory. The extracts were analysed before and after derivatization with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) and pentafluoropropanol (PFPOH) using a Hewlett Packard gas chromatographer/mass spectrometer detector, in electron impact mode (GC/MS-EI). Derivatized delta(9)-THC-COOH was also analysed using a Hewlett Packard gas chromatographer/mass spectrometer detector, in negative ion chemical ionization mode (GC/MS-NCI) using methane as the reagent gas. Responses were linear ranging from 0.10 to 5.00 ng/mg hair for delta(9)-THC and CBN, 0.10-10.00 ng/mg hair for CBD, 0.01-5.00 ng/mg for delta(9)-THC-COOH (r(2)>0.99). The intra-assay precisions ranged from <0.01 to 12.40%. Extraction recoveries ranged from 80.9 to 104.0% for delta(9)-THC, 85.9-100.0% for delta(9)-THC-COOH, 76.7-95.8% for CBN and 71.0-94.0% for CBD. The analytical method was applied to 87 human hair samples, obtained from individuals who testified in court of having committed drug related crimes. Quantification of delta(9)-THC-COOH using GC/MS-NCI was found to be more convenient than GC/MS-EI. The latter may give rise

  15. Opposite effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on human brain function and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Morrison, Paul D; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Borgwardt, Stefan; Winton-Brown, Toby; Nosarti, Chiara; O' Carroll, Colin M; Seal, Marc; Allen, Paul; Mehta, Mitul A; Stone, James M; Tunstall, Nigel; Giampietro, Vincent; Kapur, Shitij; Murray, Robin M; Zuardi, Antonio W; Crippa, José A; Atakan, Zerrin; McGuire, Philip K

    2010-02-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD), the two main ingredients of the Cannabis sativa plant have distinct symptomatic and behavioral effects. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy volunteers to examine whether Delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on regional brain function. We then assessed whether pretreatment with CBD can prevent the acute psychotic symptoms induced by Delta-9-THC. Fifteen healthy men with minimal earlier exposure to cannabis were scanned while performing a verbal memory task, a response inhibition task, a sensory processing task, and when viewing fearful faces. Subjects were scanned on three occasions, each preceded by oral administration of Delta-9-THC, CBD, or placebo. BOLD responses were measured using fMRI. In a second experiment, six healthy volunteers were administered Delta-9-THC intravenously on two occasions, after placebo or CBD pretreatment to examine whether CBD could block the psychotic symptoms induced by Delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on activation relative to placebo in the striatum during verbal recall, in the hippocampus during the response inhibition task, in the amygdala when subjects viewed fearful faces, in the superior temporal cortex when subjects listened to speech, and in the occipital cortex during visual processing. In the second experiment, pretreatment with CBD prevented the acute induction of psychotic symptoms by Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Delta-9-THC and CBD can have opposite effects on regional brain function, which may underlie their different symptomatic and behavioral effects, and CBD's ability to block the psychotogenic effects of Delta-9-THC.

  16. Biochemical and immunohistochemical changes in delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-treated type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Bolkent, Sema

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of glucose, lipid metabolism and immunoreactivities of insulin and glucagon peptides by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) in diabetes were examined in an experimental rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) Δ(9)-THC treated, (3) diabetic, and (4) diabetic+Δ(9)-THC. The type 2 diabetic rat model was established by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of nicotinamide (85 mg/kg body weight) followed after 15 min by i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ) at 65 mg/kg of body weight. Δ(9)-THC and Δ(9)-THC treated diabetic groups received 3mg/kg/day of Δ(9)-THC for 7 days. The immunolocalization of insulin and glucagon peptides was investigated in the pancreas using a streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and total protein (TP) levels were measured in serum. Total islet area percent of insulin immunoreactive cells slightly changed in diabetic+Δ(9)-THC rats compared to diabetic animals. However, the area percent of glucagon immunoreactive cells showed a decrease in diabetic+Δ(9)-THC rats compared to that of diabetic animals alone. Serum TC, HDL and LDL levels of diabetes+Δ(9)-THC group showed a decrease compared to the diabetic group. These results indicate that Δ(9)-THC may serve a protective role against hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in diabetic rats.

  17. Intranasal absorption of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and WIN55,212-2 mesylate in rats.

    PubMed

    Valiveti, Satyanarayana; Agu, Remigius U; Hammell, Dana C; Paudel, Kalpana S; Earles, D Caroline; Wermeling, Daniel P; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential of the nasal route for systemic delivery of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) and WIN55,212-2 mesylate. Anesthetized rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which Delta(9)-THC (10 mg/kg) or WIN55,212-2 (150 microg/kg) in propylene glycol alone or propylene glycol and ethanol (9:1) were administered. Rats were also administered Delta(9)-THC (1 mg/kg) and WIN55,212-2 (150 microg/kg) intravenously in order to determine absolute bioavailabilities of the nasal doses. Plasma Delta(9)-THC and WIN55,212-2 concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS). The pharmacokinetics of the drugs after intranasal administration was best described by a one-compartment model with an absorption phase. WIN55,212-2 was absorbed more rapidly (T(max)=0.2-0.3h) than Delta(9)-THC (T(max)=1.5-1.6h) and to a higher extent than Delta(9)-THC. Addition of ethanol (10%) to the formulations had no significant effect on the C(max) after nasal administration (p>0.05). Furthermore, it had no significant effect on the absolute bioavailability (F(abs)): F(abs)=6.4+/-2.4% and 9.1+/-3.0% for Delta(9)-THC in propylene glycol, with and without ethanol, respectively. For WIN55,212-2, F(abs)=49.9+/-6.9% (propylene glycol alone) and 56.6+/-14.1% (propylene glycol with 10% ethanol). The results of the study showed that systemic delivery of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and WIN55,212-2 could be achieved following nasal administration in rats.

  18. Marijuana smoke and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol promote necrotic cell death but inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, T A; Tashkin, D P; Roth, M D

    2001-08-01

    Marijuana smoke shares many components in common with tobacco smoke except for the presence of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychotropic compound found only in Cannibis sativa. Delta(9)-THC has been shown to potentiate smoke-induced oxidative stress and necrotic cell death. In the present study, our objective was to determine the effects of Delta(9)-THC on the balance between Fas-induced apoptosis and necrosis in A549 lung tumor cells. We found that Fas-induced activation of caspase-3 was inhibited by whole smoke from both tobacco and marijuana cigarettes. Gas-phase smoke, which generates high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, had no effect on caspase-3 activity. However, particulate-phase smoke (tar) was a potent inhibitor of Fas-induced caspase-3 activity, with marijuana tar being more potent than either tobacco or placebo marijuana tar (lacking Delta(9)-THC). Delta(9)-THC also inhibited Fas-induced caspase-3 activity in A549 cells. In contrast, no inhibition was observed when Delta(9)-THC was incubated with activated caspase-3 enzyme, suggesting that Delta(9)-THC acts on the cell pathway(s) leading to caspase-3 activation and not directly on enzyme function. Flow cytometry was used to measure the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis (staining for annexin V) versus necrosis (staining for propidium iodide) and confirmed that both marijuana tar extract and synthetic Delta(9)-THC inhibit Fas-induced apoptosis while promoting necrosis. These observations suggest that the Delta(9)-THC contained in marijuana smoke disrupts elements of the apoptotic pathway, thereby shifting the balance between apoptotic and necrotic cell death. This shift may affect both the carcinogenic and immunologic consequences of marijuana smoke exposure.

  19. Effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on phosphorylated CREB in rat cerebellum: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Casu, Maria Antonietta; Pisu, Carla; Sanna, Angela; Tambaro, Simone; Spada, Gabriele Pinna; Mongeau, Raymond; Pani, Luca

    2005-06-28

    Several converging lines of evidence indicate that drugs of abuse may exert their long-term effects on the central nervous system by modulating signaling pathways controlling gene expression. Cannabinoids produce, beside locomotor effects, cognitive impairment through central CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Data clearly indicate that the cerebellum, an area enriched with CB1 receptors, has a role not only in motor function but also in cognition. This immunohistochemical study examines the effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), the principal psychoactive component of marijuana, on the levels of phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the rat cerebellum. Acute treatments with delta9-THC at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg induced a significant increase of p-CREB in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum, an effect blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Following chronic delta9-THC administration (10 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks), the density of p-CREB was markedly attenuated compared to controls, and this attenuation persisted 3 weeks after withdrawal from delta9-THC. These data provide evidence for the involvement of cerebellar granule cells in the adaptive changes occurring during acute and chronic delta9-THC exposure. This might be a mechanism by which delta9-THC interferes with motor and cognitive functions.

  20. Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol enhances MCF-7 cell proliferation via cannabinoid receptor-independent signaling.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Yamaori, Satoshi; Motoya, Erina; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuhito

    2008-03-12

    We recently reported that Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) has the ability to stimulate the proliferation of human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. However, the mechanism of action remains to be clarified. The present study focused on the relationship between receptor expression and the effects of Delta(9)-THC on cell proliferation. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that there was no detectable expression of CB receptors in MCF-7 cells. In accordance with this, no effects of cannabinoid 1/2 (CB1/2) receptor antagonists and pertussis toxin on cell proliferation were observed. Although MCF-7 cell proliferation is suggested to be suppressed by Delta(9)-THC in the presence of CB receptors, it was revealed that Delta(9)-THC could exert upregulation of living cells in the absence of the receptors. Interestingly, Delta(9)-THC upregulated human epithelial growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression, which is known to be a predictive factor of human breast cancer and is able to stimulate cancer cells as well as MCF-7 cells. Actinomycin D-treatment interfered with the upregulation of HER2 and cell proliferation by cannabinoid. Taken together, these studies suggest that, in the absence of CB receptors, Delta(9)-THC can stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by modulating, at least in part, HER2 transcription.

  1. Studies on the metabolism of the Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol precursor Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (Delta9-THCA-A) in rat using LC-MS/MS, LC-QTOF MS and GC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H; Neusüss, Christian; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Auwärter, Volker

    2009-10-01

    In Cannabis sativa, Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (Delta9-THCA-A) is the non-psychoactive precursor of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC). In fresh plant material, about 90% of the total Delta9-THC is available as Delta9-THCA-A. When heated (smoked or baked), Delta9-THCA-A is only partially converted to Delta9-THC and therefore, Delta9-THCA-A can be detected in serum and urine of cannabis consumers. The aim of the presented study was to identify the metabolites of Delta9-THCA-A and to examine particularly whether oral intake of Delta9-THCA-A leads to in vivo formation of Delta9-THC in a rat model. After oral application of pure Delta9-THCA-A to rats (15 mg/kg body mass), urine samples were collected and metabolites were isolated and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and high resolution LC-MS using time of flight-mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) for accurate mass measurement. For detection of Delta9-THC and its metabolites, urine extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identified metabolites show that Delta9-THCA-A undergoes a hydroxylation in position 11 to 11-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (11-OH-Delta9-THCA-A), which is further oxidized via the intermediate aldehyde 11-oxo-Delta9-THCA-A to 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (Delta9-THCA-A-COOH). Glucuronides of the parent compound and both main metabolites were identified in the rat urine as well. Furthermore, Delta9-THCA-A undergoes hydroxylation in position 8 to 8-alpha- and 8-beta-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A, respectively, (8alpha-Hydroxy-Delta9-THCA-A and 8beta-Hydroxy-Delta9-THCA-A, respectively) followed by dehydration. Both monohydroxylated metabolites were further oxidized to their bishydroxylated forms. Several glucuronidation conjugates of these metabolites were identified. In vivo conversion of Delta9-THCA-A to Delta9-THC was

  2. Blunted psychotomimetic and amnestic effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in frequent users of cannabis.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini; Braley, Gabriel; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Zimolo, Zoran; Cooper, Thomas; Perry, Edward; Krystal, John

    2008-09-01

    Cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit substances and there is growing interest in the association between cannabis use and psychosis. Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) the principal active ingredient of cannabis has been shown to induce psychotomimetic and amnestic effects in healthy individuals. Whether people who frequently use cannabis are either protected from or are tolerant to these effects of Delta-9-THC has not been established. In a 3-day, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, the dose-related effects of 0, 2.5, and 5 mg intravenous Delta-9-THC were studied in 30 frequent users of cannabis and compared to 22 healthy controls. Delta-9-THC (1) produced transient psychotomimetic effects and perceptual alterations; (2) impaired memory and attention; (3) increased subjective effects of 'high'; (4) produced tachycardia; and (5) increased serum cortisol in both groups. However, relative to controls, frequent users showed blunted responses to the psychotomimetic, perceptual altering, cognitive impairing, anxiogenic, and cortisol increasing effects of Delta-9-THC but not to its euphoric effects. Frequent users also had lower prolactin levels. These data suggest that frequent users of cannabis are either inherently blunted in their response to, and/or develop tolerance to the psychotomimetic, perceptual altering, amnestic, endocrine, and other effects of cannabinoids.

  3. Effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on reward and anxiety in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress.

    PubMed

    Fokos, S; Panagis, G

    2010-05-01

    Although cannabis derivatives produce clear subjective motivational responses in humans leading to drug-seeking behaviour, the reinforcing attributes of these subjective effects are difficult to define in experimental animals. The aim of this study was to examine how exposure to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) will affect reward function and anxiety after acute administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) in rats. Male rats were exposed to either 10 days of CUS or no stressor. Alterations in brain reward function were assessed with the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm, and anxiety responses were measured with the elevated plus maze. CUS did not affect baseline brain stimulation reward thresholds. Delta(9)-THC did not exhibit reinforcing actions in the ICSS paradigm neither in nonstressed nor in stressed animals. More importantly, in nonstressed animals, both the low and the high dose of Delta(9)-THC exerted anxiolytic-like effects. In stressed animals, however, only the high dose of THC induced an anxiolytic-like response, whereas the low dose induced anxiogenic effects. The present results provide clear evidence for an anxiolytic effect of Delta(9)-THC both in stressed and in nonstressed animals, and indicate that environmental conditions, such as stressful experiences, do not alter the behavioural effects of Delta( 9)-THC in the ICSS paradigm.

  4. Enhanced susceptibility of mice to combinations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and live or killed gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, S G; Munson, A E; Dewey, W L; Harris, L S

    1977-01-01

    Combinations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and bacterial endotoxin were shown to be hyperadditively toxic for mice. A variety of purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations elicted enhanced mortality in combination with delta 9-THC. Escherichia coli O26:B6 LPS (Boivin preparation) at an essentially nonlethal dose of 2.5 mg/kg reduced the dose of delta 9-THC required to kill 50% of the treated mice from ca. 350 to 150 mg/kg. Inbred BALB, DBA, and C3H/HeCr mice, noninbred ICR mice, and hybrid CDF1 and BDF1 mice were hyperreactive to combinations of delta 9-THC and LPS. Moreover, a variety of heat-killed intestinal and gram-negative bacteria, live E. coli, and complexes of lipid A with a variety of proteins substituted for LPS in the synergistic toxicity of LPS and delta 9-THC. Extracts of marijuana also elicited hyperreactivity to LPS. The hyperadditive lethality of combinations of delta 9-THC and LPS was markedly less in mice rendered refractory to LPS or delta 9-THC by repeated administration of LPS or delta 9-THC, respectively. PMID:330405

  5. Cannabidiol potentiates pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol via CB(1) receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Hazekawa, Mai; Sano, Kazunori; Irie, Keiichi; Orito, Kensuke; Egawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Naoki; Nishimura, Ryoji; Egashira, Nobuaki; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2008-01-10

    Cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis, has been reported to have interactions with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). However, such interactions have not sufficiently been clear and may have important implications for understanding the pharmacological effects of marijuana. In the present study, we investigated whether cannabidiol modulates the pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-THC on locomotor activity, catalepsy-like immobilisation, rectal temperature and spatial memory in the eight-arm radial maze task in mice. In addition, we measured expression level of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor at striatum, cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Delta(9)-THC (1, 3, 6 and 10 mg/kg) induced hypoactivity, catalepsy-like immobilisation and hypothermia in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Delta(9)-THC (1, 3 and 6 mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired spatial memory in eight-arm radial maze. On the other hand, cannabidiol (1, 3, 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) did not affect locomotor activity, catalepsy-like immobilisation, rectal temperature and spatial memory on its own. However, higher dose of cannabidiol (10 or 50 mg/kg) exacerbated pharmacological effects of lower dose of Delta(9)-THC, such as hypoactivity, hypothermia and impairment of spatial memory. Moreover, cannabidiol (50 mg/kg) with Delta(9)-THC (1 mg/kg) enhanced the expression level of CB(1) receptor expression in hippocampus and hypothalamus. Cannabidiol potentiated pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-THC via CB(1) receptor-dependent mechanism. These findings may contribute in setting the basis for interaction of cannabinoids and to find a cannabinoid mechanism in central nervous system.

  6. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) promotes neuroimmune-modulatory microRNA profile in striatum of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Liz; Song, Keijing; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Hollenbach, Andrew; Amedee, Angela; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter; Molina, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid administration before and after simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-inoculation ameliorated disease progression and decreased inflammation in male rhesus macaques. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) did not increase viral load in brain tissue or produce additive neuropsychological impairment in SIV-infected macaques. To determine if the neuroimmunomodulation of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miR) expression, miR expression in the striatum of uninfected macaques receiving vehicle (VEH) or Δ9-THC (THC) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV) or Δ9-THC (THC/SIV) was profiled using next generation deep sequencing. Among the 24 miRs that were differentially expressed among the four groups, 16 miRs were modulated by THC in the presence of SIV. These 16 miRs were classified into four categories and the biological processes enriched by the target genes determined. Our results indicate that Δ9-THC modulates miRs that regulate mRNAs of proteins involved in 1) neurotrophin signaling, 2) MAPK signaling, and 3) cell cycle and immune response thus promoting an overall neuroprotective environment in the striatum of SIV-infected macaques. This is also reflected by increased Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and decreased proinflammatory cytokine expression compared to the VEH/SIV group. Whether Δ9-THC-mediated modulation of epigenetic mechanisms provides neuroprotection in other regions of the brain and during chronic SIV-infection remains to be determined. PMID:26607731

  7. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) Promotes Neuroimmune-Modulatory MicroRNA Profile in Striatum of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV)-Infected Macaques.

    PubMed

    Simon, Liz; Song, Keijing; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; Hollenbach, Andrew; Amedee, Angela; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter; Molina, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Cannabinoid administration before and after simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-inoculation ameliorated disease progression and decreased inflammation in male rhesus macaques. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) did not increase viral load in brain tissue or produce additive neuropsychological impairment in SIV-infected macaques. To determine if the neuroimmunomodulation of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miR) expression, miR expression in the striatum of uninfected macaques receiving vehicle (VEH) or Δ9-THC (THC) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV) or Δ9-THC (THC/SIV) was profiled using next generation deep sequencing. Among the 24 miRs that were differentially expressed among the four groups, 16 miRs were modulated by THC in the presence of SIV. These 16 miRs were classified into four categories and the biological processes enriched by the target genes determined. Our results indicate that Δ9-THC modulates miRs that regulate mRNAs of proteins involved in 1) neurotrophin signaling, 2) MAPK signaling, and 3) cell cycle and immune response thus promoting an overall neuroprotective environment in the striatum of SIV-infected macaques. This is also reflected by increased Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and decreased proinflammatory cytokine expression compared to the VEH/SIV group. Whether Δ9-THC-mediated modulation of epigenetic mechanisms provides neuroprotection in other regions of the brain and during chronic SIV-infection remains to be determined.

  8. Effect of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Gideon W; Parsa, Arya; Park, Anthony K; McDowell, Beverly L P; Arroyo-Mendoza, Melissa; Girguis, Marie; Adler-Moore, Jill P; Olson, Jon; Buckley, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is known to suppress the immune responses to bacterial, viral and protozoan infections, but its effects on fungal infections have not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection. To determine the outcome of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on primary, acute systemic candidiasis, c57BL/6 mice were given vehicle or Δ9-THC (16 mg/kg) in vehicle on days 1-4, 8-11 and 15-18. On day 19, mice were infected with 5×10(5) C. albicans. We also determined the effect of chronic Δ9-THC (4-64 mg/kg) treatment on mice infected with a non-lethal dose of 7.5×10(4) C. albicans on day 2, followed by a higher challenge with 5×10(5) C. albicans on day 19. Mouse resistance to the infection was assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. Serum cytokine levels were determine to evaluate the immune responses. In the acute infection, chronic Δ9-THC treatment had no effect on mouse survival or tissue fungal load when compared to vehicle treated mice. However, Δ9-THC significantly suppressed IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 as well as marginally suppressed IL-17 versus vehicle treated mice. In comparison, when mice were given a secondary yeast infection, Δ9-THC significantly decreased survival, increased tissue fungal burden and suppressed serum IFN-γ and IL-12p40 levels compared to vehicle treated mice. The data showed that chronic Δ9-THC treatment decreased the efficacy of the memory immune response to candida infection, which correlated with a decrease in IFN-γ that was only observed after the secondary candida challenge.

  9. Analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in biological samples by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS).

    PubMed

    Chiarotti, M; Costamagna, L

    2000-10-09

    Gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS) analysis of 11-nor-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta(9)-THC-COOH), the major metabolite of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, in biological samples is reported. The proposed method, using deuterated delta(9)-THC-COOH as an internal standard, is able to detect the major metabolite of cannabis derivatives at very low levels (picograms/millilitre) with high specificity. These characteristics render the proposed analytical procedure suitable for confirmatory analysis in drug testing for cannabis use.

  10. Intraocular pressure, ocular toxicity and neurotoxicity after administration of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabichromene.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, B K; Powell, S R; Craig, C R

    1984-01-01

    delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) or cannabichromene, a structurally diverse naturally occurring cannabinoid, was delivered unilaterally to the corneas of cats either acutely by application of single drops or chronically via osmotic minipumps over a period of nine days. While delta 9-THC only reduced intraocular pressure (IOP) minimally after acute administration, this cannabinoid produced substantial reductions in ocular tension during the entire period of chronic administration. Ocular toxicity during chronic treatment, however, was pronounced; conjunctival chemosis, erythema, and hyperemia were sustained, and corneal opacities approximating the site of drug delivery became evident within three to five days. In contrast, cannabichromene did not significantly alter IOP either acutely or during the nine days of chronic administration, and ocular toxicity was not apparent. After systemic administration of delta 9-THC to rats, a dose-related increase in the appearance of 8-13 Hz polyspike discharges became evident in the electrocorticogram during wakefulness and behavioral depression. These polyspikes subsequently reappeared during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep episodes. Cannabichromene was devoid of this effect. These results indicate that, in contrast with acute administration, chronic delivery of delta 9-THC to cat eyes produces substantial reductions in IOP. The tension lowering effect, however, is accompanied by considerable ocular toxicity and neurotoxicity. As cannabichromene lacked these activities, the terpenoid portion of the cannabinoid structure appears to be important for their mediation.

  11. Effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on behavioral despair and on pre- and postsynaptic serotonergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Bambico, Francis Rodriguez; Hattan, Patrick R; Garant, Jean-Philippe; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2012-07-02

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that direct and indirect cannabinoid agonists, including enhancers of endocannabinoids, engender stress-relieving, anxiolytic and antidepressant effects, mediated by central CB(1) receptors (CB(1)Rs). The effect of the main pharmacologically active principle in cannabis, (-)-trans-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), on depressive behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system, which is implicated in the mechanism of action of antidepressants, has not been extensively clarified. Here, we showed that repeated (5 days), but not single (acute) intraperitoneal (ip) treatment with delta-9-THC (1mg/kg) exerts antidepressant-like properties in the rat forced swim test (FST). This effect was CB(1)R-dependent because it was blocked by the CB(1)R antagonist rimonabant (1mg/kg, ip). Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrated that delta-9-THC modulated dorsal raphe (DR) 5-HT neuronal activity through a CB(1)R-dependent mechanism. Acute intravenous delta-9-THC administration (0.1-1.5mg/kg) elicited a complex response profile, producing excitatory, inhibitory and inert responses of 5-HT neurons. Only excitatory responses were blocked by rimonabant. Finally, repeated but not single delta-9-THC administration (1mg/kg, ip) enhanced tonic 5-HT(1A) receptor activity in the hippocampus, a postsynaptic event commonly elicited by standard antidepressants. These results suggest that delta-9-THC, like other CB(1)R agonists and endocannabinoid enhancers, may possess antidepressant properties at low doses, and could modulate 5-HT transmission in the DR and hippocampus as standard antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  12. Effects of delta9-THC on the synaptosomal uptake of 3H-tryptophan and 3H-choline.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Dewey, W L

    1978-01-01

    The in vitro addition of (-)-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) resulted in a dose-responsive inhibition of the high-affinity specific synaptosomal uptake of both 3H-tryptophan and 3H-choline in mouse forebrain crude synaptosomal preparations. The approximate concentrations of delta9-THC required to cause a 50% inhibition of the uptake of 3H-tryptophan and 3H-choline were 33 and 16 muM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that inhibition of both compounds were consistent with a noncompetitive mechanism. The pretreatment of mice with doses of 10, 30 or 100 mg/kg delta9-THC had no effect on the subsequent in vitro synaptosomal uptake of either 3H-tryptophan or 3H-choline into forebrain synaptosomes.

  13. Complex pharmacology of natural cannabinoids: evidence for partial agonist activity of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and antagonist activity of cannabidiol on rat brain cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Petitet, F; Jeantaud, B; Reibaud, M; Imperato, A; Dubroeucq, M C

    1998-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), cannabinol and cannabidiol are three important natural cannabinoids from the Marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa). Using [35S]GTP-gamma-S binding on rat cerebellar homogenate as an index of cannabinoid receptor activation we show that: delta9-THC does not induce the maximal effect obtained by classical cannabinoid receptor agonists such as CP55940. Moreover at high concentration delta9-THC exhibits antagonist properties. Cannabinol is a weak agonist on rat cerebellar cannabinoid receptors and cannabidiol behaves as an antagonist acting in the micromolar range.

  14. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mouse spleen cells: a potential mechanism for cannabinoid-mediated immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Schatz, A R; Kessler, F K; Kaminski, N E

    1992-01-01

    The ability of delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) to modulate adenylate cyclase activity in mouse spleen cells was investigated. These studies were prompted by the recent identification and cloning of a G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor localized in certain regions of the brain and the potential for a common mechanism between cannabinoid-mediated CNS effects and immunosuppression. Temporal addition studies were initially performed to identify the period of time when spleen cells in culture were most susceptible to the inhibitory effects of delta 9-THC, as measured by the day 5 IgM antibody forming cell response. delta 9-THC was only inhibitory when added to spleen cell cultures during the first 2 hr following antigen sensitization. In light of this time course, adenylate cyclase activity was measured in spleen cells incubated in the presence of 22 microM delta 9-THC for 5 min and subsequently stimulated with forskolin. delta 9-THC treated spleen cells demonstrated a 33% inhibition and a 66% inhibition in intracellular cAMP after a 5 or 15 min stimulation with forskolin, respectively. These studies suggest that inhibition of immune function by delta 9-THC may be mediated through the inhibition of intracellular cAMP early after antigen stimulation.

  15. Involvement of hindbrain and peripheral prostanoids in gastric motor and cardiovascular responses to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the rat.

    PubMed

    Krowicki, Z K

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, inhibited gastric motor activity and evoked bradycardia and hypotension upon its parenteral administration in the rat. As prostanoids are important mediators of the actions of cannabinoids, we hypothesized that the inhibitory gastric motor and cardiovascular effects of delta-9-THC could depend on cyclooxygenase (COX) activation in the hindbrain and/or in the periphery. To test this hypothesis, vehicle or delta-9-THC (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.) were administered before and 15-min after the COX inhibitor tolmetin (50 mg/kg, i.v.) or 15 min after topical application of tolmetin to the surface of the dorsal medulla (0.5 mg/rat) in chloralose-anesthetized rats. Delta-9-THC-evoked gastric motor inhibition and bradycardia were abolished by parenteral and were attenuated by hindbrain administration of tolmetin. Moreover, administration of delta-9-THC after parenteral tolmetin evoked marked and long-lasting hypertension. We concluded that the inhibitory gastric motor and cardiovascular effects of systemically administered delta-9-THC depend on the hindbrain and peripheral activation of COX.

  16. Potency trends of delta9-THC and other cannabinoids in confiscated marijuana from 1980-1997.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, M A; Ross, S A; Mehmedic, Z; Arafat, R; Yi, B; Banahan, B F

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of 35,312 cannabis preparations confiscated in the USA over a period of 18 years for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and other major cannabinoids is reported. Samples were identified as cannabis, hashish, or hash oil. Cannabis samples were further subdivided into marijuana (loose material, kilobricks and buds), sinsemilla, Thai sticks and ditchweed. The data showed that more than 82% of all confiscated samples were in the marijuana category for every year except 1980 (61%) and 1981 (75%). The potency (concentration of delta9-THC) of marijuana samples rose from less than 1.5% in 1980 to approximately 3.3% in 1983 and 1984, then fluctuated around 3% till 1992. Since 1992, the potency of confiscated marijuana samples has continuously risen, going from 3.1% in 1992 to 4.2% in 1997. The average concentration of delta9-THC in all cannabis samples showed a gradual rise from 3% in 1991 to 4.47% in 1997. Hashish and hash oil, on the other hand, showed no specific potency trends. Other major cannabinoids [cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and cannabichromene (CBC)] showed no significant change in their concentration over the years.

  17. Detection of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A in human urine and blood serum by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julia; Kempf, Juergen; Mahler, Hellmut; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (Delta9-THCA-A) is the precursor of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) in hemp plants. During smoking, the non-psychoactive Delta9-THCA-A is converted to Delta9-THC, the main psychoactive component of marihuana and hashish. Although the decarboxylation of Delta9-THCA-A to Delta9-THC was assumed to be complete--which means that no Delta9-THCA-A should be detectable in urine and blood serum of cannabis consumers--we found Delta9-THCA-A in the urine and blood serum samples collected from police controls of drivers suspected for driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). For LC-MS/MS analysis, urine and blood serum samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction. Analysis was performed with a phenylhexyl column using gradient elution with acetonitrile. For detection of Delta9-THCA-A, the mass spectrometer (MS) (SCIEX API 365 triple-quadrupole MS with TurboIonSpray source) was operated in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the following transitions: m/z357 --> 313, m/z357 --> 245 and m/z357 --> 191. Delta9-THCA-A could be detected in the urine and blood serum samples of several cannabis consumers in concentrations of up to 10.8 ng/ml in urine and 14.8 ng/ml in serum. The concentration of Delta9-THCA-A was below the Delta9-THC concentration in most serum samples, resulting in molar ratios of Delta9-THCA-A/Delta9-THC of approximately 5.0-18.6%. Only in one case, where a short elapsed time between the last intake and blood sampling is assumed, the molar ratio was 18.6% in the serum. This indicates differences in elimination kinetics, which need to be investigated in detail.

  18. Involvement of subthalamic nucleus in the stimulatory effect of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Morera-Herreras, T; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Gómez-Urquijo, S; Ugedo, L

    2008-02-06

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor which is densely located in the basal ganglia is known to participate in the regulation of movement. The present study sought to determine the mechanisms underlying the effect of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) on neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) using single-unit extracellular recordings in anesthetized rats. Administration of Delta(9)-THC (0.25-2 mg/kg, i.v.) increased the firing rate of SNpc neurons (maximal effect: 33.54+/-6.90%, n=8) without modifying other firing parameters (coefficient of variation and burst firing). This effect was completely blocked by the cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.). In addition, the blockade of excitatory amino acids receptors by kynurenic acid (0.5 microM, i.c.v.) or a chemical lesion of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) with ibotenic acid abolished Delta(9)-THC effect. These results indicate that CB1 receptor activation modulates SNpc neuronal activity by an indirect mechanism involving excitatory amino acids, probably released from STN axon terminals in the SNpc.

  19. A behavioural comparison of acute and chronic Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in C57BL/6JArc mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2010-08-01

    Cannabis contains over 70 unique compounds and its abuse is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. The behavioural profiles of the psychotropic cannabis constituent Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and the non-psychotomimetic constituent cannabidiol (CBD) were investigated with a battery of behavioural tests relevant to anxiety and positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Male adult C57BL/6JArc mice were given 21 daily intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, Delta9-THC (0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5, 10 or 50 mg/kg). Delta9-THC produced the classic cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated tetrad of hypolocomotion, analgesia, catalepsy and hypothermia while CBD had modest hyperthermic effects. While sedative at this dose, Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) produced locomotor-independent anxiogenic effects in the open-field and light-dark tests. Chronic CBD produced moderate anxiolytic-like effects in the open-field test at 50 mg/kg and in the light-dark test at a low dose (1 mg/kg). Acute and chronic Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) decreased the startle response while CBD had no effect. Prepulse inhibition was increased by acute treatment with Delta9-THC (0.3, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5 and 50 mg/kg) and by chronic CBD (1 mg/kg). Chronic CBD (50 mg/kg) attenuated dexamphetamine (5 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting an antipsychotic-like action for this cannabinoid. Chronic Delta9-THC decreased locomotor activity before and after dexamphetamine administration suggesting functional antagonism of the locomotor stimulant effect. These data provide the first evidence of anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects of chronic but not acute CBD in C57BL/6JArc mice, extending findings from acute studies in other inbred mouse strains and rats.

  20. Delta(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol as potential curative agents for cancer: A critical examination of the preclinical literature.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C J

    2015-06-01

    An Internet search with search words "cannabis cures cancer" produce a wealth of sites claiming that cannabis has this effect. These sites are freely accessible to the general public and thus contribute to public opinion. But do delta(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) cure cancer? In the absence of clinical data other than a safety study and case reports, preclinical data should be evaluated in terms of its predictive value. Using a strict approach where only concentrations and/or models relevant to the clinical situation are considered, the current preclinical data do not yet provide robust evidence that systemically administered Δ(9) -THC will be useful for the curative treatment of cancer. There is more support for an intratumoral route of administration of higher doses of Δ(9) -THC. CBD produces effects in relevant concentrations and models, although more data are needed concerning its use in conjunction with other treatment strategies.

  1. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol regulates the p53 post-translational modifiers Murine double minute 2 and the Small Ubiquitin MOdifier protein in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gowran, Aoife; Murphy, Carrie E; Campbell, Veronica A

    2009-11-03

    The phytocannabinoid Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis, activates a number of signalling cascades including p53. This study examines the role of Delta(9)-THC in regulating the p53 post-translational modifier proteins, Murine double minute (Mdm2) and Small Ubquitin-like MOdifier protein 1 (SUMO-1) in cortical neurons. Delta(9)-THC increased both Mdm2 and SUMO-1 protein expression and induced the deSUMOylation of p53 in a cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1))-receptor dependent manner. We demonstrate that Delta(9)-THC decreased the SUMOylation of the CB(1) receptor. The data reveal a novel role for cannabinoid receptor activation in modulating the SUMO regulatory system.

  2. delta 9-THC and 17-beta-estradiol in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Foy, M R; Teyler, T J; Vardaris, R M

    1982-04-01

    Electrophysiological field potentials recorded from in vitro hippocampal slice preparations show dose-dependent differences in response to 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) added to the incubation medium. Using a wide range of doses (1 pM-10 nM), it was found that mid-range concentrations of estradiol (100 pM) and THC (10 pM) tended to increase field potentials in CA1 of rodents. Higher dose levels of each agent were found to depress neuronal activity. In the context of prior findings, these results suggest that the two compounds share a common mechanism of action in the hippocampus.

  3. Effects of expectancies on subjective responses to oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Kirk, J M; Doty, P; De Wit, H

    1998-02-01

    The effects of expectancies on subjective responses to oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) were examined. Thirty-five regular marijuana users were assigned to one of two groups: one group was told that they may receive a cannabinoid or placebo and a second group was told that they may receive a drug from one of several classes of drugs (e.g., stimulant, sedative, antiemetic) or placebo. Regardless of the group to which they were assigned, subjects received each of two oral doses of delta9-THC (7.5 and 15 mg) and placebo, one dose per session, for a total of three sessions. Measures of subjective effects, including visual analog scales and the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI), were administered at 0.5-h intervals throughout each session. Consistent with previous research using other drugs, subjects in the current experiment who expected to receive a cannabinoid reported greater pleasurable effects than subjects who did not have this expectancy. The results have implications for understanding the effects of cannabinoids when used in both recreational and clinical settings.

  4. Effects of daily delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment on heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.; France, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid abuse remains a significant public health problem; together with the greater availability of marijuana in some regions there is an increasing likelihood that opioids and marijuana will be used together. Poly-drug abuse is associated with increased toxicity and poorer treatment outcome; thus, a better understanding of the consequences of repeated co-administration of these drugs will facilitate the development of better prevention and treatment strategies. This study examined the effects of daily treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) and its discontinuation on self-administration of heroin in rhesus monkeys (n=4) lever-pressing under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule. Heroin self-administration (0.32–32 μg/kg/infusion, i.v.) generated an inverted U-shaped dose–effect curve. Administered acutely, Δ9-THC (0.01–0.32 mg/kg, s.c.) dose dependently decreased responding for heroin and flattened the self-administration dose-effect curve. Daily treatment with Δ9-THC (0.01–0.1 mg/kg/12hr, s.c.) either had no effect on or decreased responding for heroin. In addition, daily treatment did not significantly impact extinction of heroin self-administration or resumption of responding for heroin after extinction. Discontinuation of daily Δ9-THC treatment did not systematically impact rates of heroin self-administration. These data suggest that repeated administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist likely does not increase, and possibly decreases, the positive reinforcing effects of a mu opioid receptor agonist. PMID:26397756

  5. Hippocampal CB(1) receptors mediate the memory impairing effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Wise, Laura E; Thorpe, Andrew J; Lichtman, Aron H

    2009-08-01

    It is firmly established that the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in spatial learning, episodic memory, and consolidation, contains a high concentration of CB(1) receptors. Moreover, systemic and intrahippocampal administration of cannabinoid agonists have been shown to impair hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. However, the degree to which CB(1) receptors in the hippocampus play a specific functional role in the memory disruptive effects of marijuana or its primary psychoactive constituent Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) is unknown. This study was designed to determine whether hippocampal CB(1) receptors play a functional role in the memory disruptive effects of systemically administered cannabinoids, using the radial arm maze, a well characterized rodent model of working memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bilateral cannulae aimed at the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. The CB(1) receptor antagonist, rimonabant, was delivered into the hippocampus before to a systemic injection of either Delta(9)-THC or the potent cannabinoid analog, CP-55,940. Strikingly, intrahippocampal administration of rimonabant completely attenuated the memory disruptive effects of both cannabinoids in the radial arm maze task, but did not affect other pharmacological properties of cannabinoids, as assessed in the tetrad assay (that is, hypomotility, analgesia, catalepsy, and hypothermia). Infusions of rimonabant just dorsal or ventral to the hippocampus did not prevent Delta(9)-THC-induced memory impairment, indicating that its effects on mnemonic function were regionally selective. These findings provide compelling evidence in support of the view that hippocampal CB(1) receptors play a necessary role in the memory disruptive effects of marijuana.

  6. Medicinal cannabis: is delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol necessary for all its effects?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, J D; Whalley, B J; Baker, D; Pryce, G; Constanti, A; Gibbons, S; Williamson, E M

    2003-12-01

    Cannabis is under clinical investigation to assess its potential for medicinal use, but the question arises as to whether there is any advantage in using cannabis extracts compared with isolated Delta9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9THC), the major psychoactive component. We have compared the effect of a standardized cannabis extract (SCE) with pure Delta9THC, at matched concentrations of Delta9THC, and also with a Delta9THC-free extract (Delta9THC-free SCE), using two cannabinoid-sensitive models, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and an in-vitro rat brain slice model of epilepsy. Whilst SCE inhibited spasticity in the mouse model of MS to a comparable level, it caused a more rapid onset of muscle relaxation, and a reduction in the time to maximum effect compared with Delta9THC alone. The Delta9THC-free extract or cannabidiol (CBD) caused no inhibition of spasticity. However, in the in-vitro epilepsy model, in which sustained epileptiform seizures were induced by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine-M in immature rat piriform cortical brain slices, SCE was a more potent and again more rapidly-acting anticonvulsant than isolated Delta9THC, but in this model, the Delta9THC-free extract also exhibited anticonvulsant activity. Cannabidiol did not inhibit seizures, nor did it modulate the activity of Delta9THC in this model. Therefore, as far as some actions of cannabis were concerned (e.g. antispasticity), Delta9THC was the active constituent, which might be modified by the presence of other components. However, for other effects (e.g. anticonvulsant properties) Delta9THC, although active, might not be necessary for the observed effect. Above all, these results demonstrated that not all of the therapeutic actions of cannabis herb might be due to the Delta9THC content.

  7. delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol excites rat VTA dopamine neurons through activation of cannabinoid CB1 but not opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    French, E D

    1997-05-02

    Behavioral, biochemical and recent electrophysiological data have increasingly implicated the involvement of dopamine in the central actions of cannabinoid compounds. However, the site and mechanism by which cannabinoids stimulate dopamine systems has been somewhat controversial. Central opioid systems have also been suggested to play a role in some cannabinoid-induced behaviors as evidenced by their attenuation in the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone. However, recent studies using the cannabinoid receptor-selective antagonist SR141716A suggest that the central actions of psychoactive cannabinoids are mediated principally through activation of CB1 receptors. Using single cell electrophysiological recordings in the rat we assessed the effects of both SR141716A and naloxone on delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced activation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons. While dopamine cell firing was dose-dependently increased following cumulative dosing with delta9-THC it was partially or completely inhibited following pretreatment with 0.5 and 2 mg/kg SR141716A, respectively. However, 1 and 10 mg/kg naloxone failed to alter the response to delta9-THC. These data provide the first evidence that delta9-THC-induced changes in mesolimbic dopamine neuronal activity are mediated by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, but a causal link for the involvement of opioid systems could not be established.

  8. Simultaneous determination of cannabidiol, cannabinol, and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Suh, Sung Ill; In, Moon Kyo; Paeng, Ki-Jung; Chung, Bong Chul

    2005-09-01

    An analytical method was developed for evaluating the cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) level in human hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Hair samples (50 mg) were washed with isopropyl alcohol and cut into small fragments (< 1 mm). After adding a deuterated internal standard, the hair samples were incubated in 1.0 M NaOH for 10 min at 95 degrees C. The analytes from the resulting hydrolyzed samples were extracted using a mixture of n-hexane-ethyl acetate (75:25, v/v). The extracts were then evaporated, derivatized, and injected into the GC-MS. The recovery ranges of CBD, CBN, and delta9-THC at three concentration levels were 37.9-94.5% with good correlation coefficients (r2 >0.9989). The intra-day precision and accuracy ranged from -9.4% to 17.7%, and the inter-day precision and accuracy ranged from -15.5% to 14.5%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) for CBD, CBN, and delta9-THC were 0.005, 0.002, and 0.006 ng/mg, respectively. The applicability of this method of analyzing the hair samples from cannabis abusers was demonstrated.

  9. Two opposite effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on subthalamic nucleus neuron activity: involvement of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Ruiz-Ortega, Jose Angel; Ugedo, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the basal ganglia interferes with movement regulation. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) on neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in this effect using single-unit extracellular recordings in anesthetized rats. Administration of Delta(9)-THC (0.25-2 mg/kg, i.v.) stimulated (by 107% +/- 32%) neurons mainly recorded in the ventromedial portion of the caudal STN, whereas it inhibited (by 65% +/- 4%) neurons recorded in the dorsolateral portion of the rostral STN. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg, i.v.) completely reverted these effects. The excitatory effect of Delta(9)-THC on STN neurons was not observed after antagonism of GABA(A) receptors by bicuculline administration (10 ng, icv.) or after chemical lesion of the globus pallidus with ibotenic acid. The inhibitory effect was abolished when excitatory amino acid receptors were blocked by kynurenic acid (0.5 mumol, icv.). These results indicate that CB1 receptor activation modulates STN neuron activity by indirect mechanisms involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

  10. Environmental Factors Involved in the Development of Tolerance to Behavior Effects of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    Squirrel monkeys were trained under a variety of behavioral procedures, and then Delta- 9 - tetrahydrocannabinol was administered daily until tolerance...effects of Delta- 9 - tetrahydrocannabinol . Three classes of experiments were performed. The first group of experiments examined the roles of behavioral

  11. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol differently affects striatal c-Fos expression following haloperidol or clozapine administration.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Giorgio; Sanna, Angela; Casu, Gianluca; Casti, Paola; Spada, Gabriele Pinna; Ruiu, Stefania; Pani, Luca

    2008-11-19

    It was previously shown that haloperidol, but not clozapine, induced intense rat catalepsy when co-administered with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The present study investigated whether similar alterations could be observed on striatal c-Fos immunoreactivity after administration of the same drug combinations. Western Blot and immunocytochemistry stereological analyses indicated that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (0.5 mg/kg) increased striatal c-Fos immunoreactivity induced by haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg). Conversely, no significant alterations of striatal c-Fos immunoreactivity were observed after injections of clozapine (10 mg/kg)+vehicle, clozapine+delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or vehicle+delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The present results indicate that the behavioral effects induced by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in haloperidol- and clozapine-treated rats are associated with different striatal c-Fos expressions.

  12. Behavioral sensitization to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cross-sensitization with morphine: differential changes in accumbal shell and core dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Cadoni, Cristina; Valentini, Valentina; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2008-08-01

    Although cannabinoid-induced behavioral sensitization and cross-sensitization with opiates has been recently demonstrated, no information is available on the associated state and responsiveness of dopamine (DA) transmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core. In this study we investigate by means of dual probe microdialysis, the effect of exposure to a sensitizing regimen of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) and morphine on the extracellular concentrations of DA under basal conditions and after challenge with Delta(9)-THC and morphine in the NAc shell and core. Different groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered twice daily for 3 days with increasing doses of Delta(9)-THC (2, 4, and 8 mg/kg i.p.), morphine (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg s.c.), and vehicle. After 14-20 days from the last injection, the animals were implanted with two microdialysis probes, one aimed at the NAc shell and the other at the core. The following day animals pre-treated with Delta(9)-THC and vehicle controls were challenged with 150 microg/kg i.v. of Delta(9)-THC or 0.5 mg/kg i.v. of morphine. Animals pre-treated with morphine and their vehicle controls were administered with 150 microg/kg i.v. of Delta(9)-THC. Rats pre-exposed to Delta(9)-THC showed behavioral sensitization associated with a reduced stimulation of DA transmission in the NAc shell and an increased stimulation in the NAc core in response to Delta(9)-THC challenge. Pre-exposure to Delta(9)-THC induced behavioral sensitization to morphine also, but only a reduced stimulation of DA transmission in the NAc shell was observed. Animals pre-treated with morphine showed behavioral sensitization and differential changes of DA in the NAc shell and core in response to Delta(9)-THC challenge with a decreased response in the shell and an increased response in the core. The results show that Delta(9)-THC-induced behavioral sensitization is associated with changes in the responsiveness of DA transmission in the NAc

  13. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol content of commercially available hemp products.

    PubMed

    Holler, Justin M; Bosy, Thomas Z; Dunkley, Christopher S; Levine, Barry; Past, Marilyn R; Jacobs, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive compound present in marijuana. THC can also be found, as a contaminant, in some commercially available hemp products marketed in health food stores and on the internet as a good source of essential fatty acids. The products range from oil to alcoholic beverages to nutritional bars to candies, with oil being the most popular and commonly available. The analytical results are separated into two groups, products tested prior to and after publication of 21 CFR Part 1308, "clarification of listing of tetrahydrocannabinols." The data presented are a summary of 79 different hemp products tested for THC. THC was separated by a liquid-liquid or solid-liquid extraction, depending upon the product matrix. THC concentrations range from none detected to 117.5 microg THC/g material. Typical limits of detection for the assay (depending on matrix) are 1.0-2.5 microg THC/g material. Products that were of aqueous base (beer, tea) had much lower limits of detection (2.5 ng/mL). No THC was detected in 58% of the products from group 1 and 86% of the products from group 2. The amounts indicate that THC levels in currently marketed hemp products are significantly lower than in those products available before 2003 and reported in previous studies. The results reported here may be used as a general guideline for the THC content of hemp products recently found in the marketplace today.

  14. On the pharmacological properties of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara

    2007-08-01

    Cannabis is one of the first plants used as medicine, and the notion that it has potentially valuable therapeutic properties is a matter of current debate. The isolation of its main constituent, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 and their endogenous ligands) made possible studies concerning the pharmacological activity of cannabinoids. This paper reviews some of the most-important findings in the field of THC pharmacology. Clinical trials, anecdotal reports, and experiments employing animal models strongly support the idea that THC and its derivatives exhibit a wide variety of therapeutic applications. However, the psychotropic effects observed in laboratory animals and the adverse reactions reported during human trials, as well as the risk of tolerance development and potential dependence, limit the application of THC in therapy. Nowadays, researchers focus on other therapeutic strategies by which the endocannabinoid system might be modulated to clinical advantage (inhibitor or activator of endocannabinoid biosynthesis, cellular uptake, or metabolism). However, emerging evidence highlights the beneficial effects of the whole cannabis extract over those observed with single components, indicating cannabis-based medicines as new perspective to revisit the pharmacology of this plant.

  15. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol induces dopamine release in the human striatum.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; van Berckel, Bart N M; Boellaard, Ronald; Zuurman, Lineke; Schuit, Robert C; Windhorst, Albert D; van Gerven, Joop M A; Ramsey, Nick F; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Kahn, René S

    2009-02-01

    The influence of cannabis on mental health receives growing scientific and political attention. An increasing demand for treatment of cannabis dependence has refueled the discussion about the addictive potential of cannabis. A key feature of all addictive drugs is the ability to increase synaptic dopamine levels in the striatum, a mechanism involved in their rewarding and motivating effects. However, it is currently unknown if cannabis can stimulate striatal dopamine neurotransmission in humans. Here we show that Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component in cannabis, induces dopamine release in the human striatum. Using the dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor tracer [(11)C]raclopride and positron emission tomography in seven healthy subjects, we demonstrate that THC inhalation reduces [(11)C]raclopride binding in the ventral striatum and the precommissural dorsal putamen but not in other striatal subregions. This is consistent with an increase in dopamine levels in these regions. These results suggest that THC shares a potentially addictive property with other drugs of abuse. Further, it implies that the endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulating striatal dopamine release. This allows new directions in research on the effects of THC in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.

  16. Rapid quantification of urinary 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid using fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Matthew H; Welton, Robert M; Morris-Kukoski, Cynthia L; Klette, Kevin L

    2005-10-01

    Human urine specimens that were determined to be presumptively positive for metabolites of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol by immunoassay screening were assayed using a novel fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (FGC-MS) analytical method to determine whether this method would improve the efficiency of specimen processing without diminishing the reliability of metabolite identification and quantification. Urine specimens were spiked with deuterated internal standard, subjected to solid-phase extraction, and derivatized using tetramethylammonium hydroxide and iodomethane. The methyl ester/methyl ether derivatives were identified and quantified using both a traditional GC-MS method and the newly developed FGC-MS method. The FGC-MS method was demonstrated to be linear between 3.8 and 1500 ng/mL 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta-THC-COOH). The intrarun precision of 15 replicates of a 15 ng/mL control and the interrun precision of 161 sets of 7, 15, and 60 ng/mL controls were acceptable (coefficients of variation < 5.5%). The FGC-MS method was demonstrated to be specific for identifying 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH and none of 43 tested substances interfered with identification and quantification of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH. Excellent data concordance (R2 > 0.993) was found for two specimen sets assayed using both methods. The FGC-MS method, when compared with a traditional GC-MS method, reduces total assay time by approximately 40% with no decrease in data quality.

  17. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced dopamine release as a function of psychosis risk: 18F-fallypride positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Rebecca; Ceccarini, Jenny; Lataster, Johan; van Os, Jim; van Kroonenburgh, Marinus; van Gerven, Joop M A; Marcelis, Machteld; Van Laere, Koen; Henquet, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with psychosis, particularly in those with expression of, or vulnerability for, psychotic illness. The biological underpinnings of these differential associations, however, remain largely unknown. We used Positron Emission Tomography and (18)F-fallypride to test the hypothesis that genetic risk for psychosis is expressed by differential induction of dopamine release by Δ(9)-THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis). In a single dynamic PET scanning session, striatal dopamine release after pulmonary administration of Δ(9)-THC was measured in 9 healthy cannabis users (average risk psychotic disorder), 8 patients with psychotic disorder (high risk psychotic disorder) and 7 un-related first-degree relatives (intermediate risk psychotic disorder). PET data were analyzed applying the linear extension of the simplified reference region model (LSRRM), which accounts for time-dependent changes in (18)F-fallypride displacement. Voxel-based statistical maps, representing specific D2/3 binding changes, were computed to localize areas with increased ligand displacement after Δ(9)-THC administration, reflecting dopamine release. While Δ(9)-THC was not associated with dopamine release in the control group, significant ligand displacement induced by Δ(9)-THC in striatal subregions, indicative of dopamine release, was detected in both patients and relatives. This was most pronounced in caudate nucleus. This is the first study to demonstrate differential sensitivity to Δ(9)-THC in terms of increased endogenous dopamine release in individuals at risk for psychosis.

  18. Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Dopamine Release as a Function of Psychosis Risk: 18F-Fallypride Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuepper, Rebecca; Ceccarini, Jenny; Lataster, Johan; van Os, Jim; van Kroonenburgh, Marinus; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Marcelis, Machteld; Van Laere, Koen; Henquet, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with psychosis, particularly in those with expression of, or vulnerability for, psychotic illness. The biological underpinnings of these differential associations, however, remain largely unknown. We used Positron Emission Tomography and 18F-fallypride to test the hypothesis that genetic risk for psychosis is expressed by differential induction of dopamine release by Δ9-THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis). In a single dynamic PET scanning session, striatal dopamine release after pulmonary administration of Δ9-THC was measured in 9 healthy cannabis users (average risk psychotic disorder), 8 patients with psychotic disorder (high risk psychotic disorder) and 7 un-related first-degree relatives (intermediate risk psychotic disorder). PET data were analyzed applying the linear extension of the simplified reference region model (LSRRM), which accounts for time-dependent changes in 18F-fallypride displacement. Voxel-based statistical maps, representing specific D2/3 binding changes, were computed to localize areas with increased ligand displacement after Δ9-THC administration, reflecting dopamine release. While Δ9-THC was not associated with dopamine release in the control group, significant ligand displacement induced by Δ9-THC in striatal subregions, indicative of dopamine release, was detected in both patients and relatives. This was most pronounced in caudate nucleus. This is the first study to demonstrate differential sensitivity to Δ9-THC in terms of increased endogenous dopamine release in individuals at risk for psychosis. PMID:23936196

  19. Urinary pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol after controlled oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Richard A; Kim, Insook; Stout, Peter R; Klette, Kevin L; George, M P; Moolchan, Eric T; Levine, Barry; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-04-01

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of orally administered cannabinoids is vitally important for optimizing therapeutic usage and to determine the impact of positive tests on drug detection programs. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (limit of quantitation = 2.5 ng/mL) was used to monitor the excretion of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in 4381 urine voids collected from seven participants throughout a controlled clinical study of multiple oral doses of THC. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the study and each participant provided informed consent. Seven participants received 0, 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg THC/day for five days in this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized protocol conducted on a closed research ward. No significant differences (P /= 15 ng/mL. An average of only 2.9 +/- 1.6%, 2.5 +/- 2.7%, 1.5 +/- 1.4%, and 0.6 +/- 0.5% of the THC in the 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg/day doses, respectively, was excreted as THCCOOH in the urine over each 14-day dosing session. This study demonstrated that the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH following oral administration was approximately two to three days for doses ranging from 0.39 to 14.8 mg/d. These data also demonstrate that the apparent urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH prior to reaching a 15 ng/mL concentration is significantly shorter than the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2). These controlled drug administration data

  20. Blunting of the HPA-axis underlies the lack of preventive efficacy of early post-stressor single-dose Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

    PubMed

    Mayer, Tzur Alexander; Matar, Michael Alex; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Cohen, Hagit

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic value of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) in the aftermath of trauma has recently raised interest. A prospective animal model for posttraumatic stress disorder was employed to assess the behavioral effects of a single dose of Δ9-THC administered intraperitoneally following exposure to psychogenic stress. Animals were exposed to predator scent stress and treated 1h later with Δ9-THC (1, 5 and 10mg/kg) or vehicle. The outcome measures included behavior in an elevated plus-maze and acoustic startle response 1, 6 and 24 h or 7 days after exposure and freezing behavior upon exposure to a trauma cue on day 8. Pre-set cut-off behavioral criteria classified exposed animals as those with "extreme," "minimal" or "intermediate" (partial) response. Circulating corticosterone levels were assessed over 2h after exposure with and without Δ9-THC. The behavioral effects of a CB1 antagonist (AM251) administered systemically 1h post exposure were evaluated. In the short term (1-6 h), 5 mg/kg of Δ9-THC effectively attenuated anxiety-like behaviors. In the longer-term (7 days), it showed no effect in attenuating PTSD-like behavioral stress responses, or freezing response to trauma cue. Δ9-THC significantly decreased corticosterone levels. In contrast, administration of AM251 (a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist) 1 h post exposure attenuated long-term behavioral stress responses through activation of the HPA-axis. The demonstrated lack of preventive efficacy of early Δ9-THC treatment and reports of its anxiogenic effects in many individuals raises doubts not only regarding its potential clinical value, but also the advisability of clinical trials. The endocannabinoids exert complex effects on behavioral responses mediating glucocorticoid effects on memory of traumatic experiences.

  1. Urine pH, container composition, and exposure time influence adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Matthew H; McCue, Joseph J; Klette, Kevin L

    2005-10-01

    11-nor-delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH) is the primary cannabinoid present in the urine of individuals who have used marijuana and is the target analyte identified at forensic urinalysis drug testing laboratories. The preparation, storage, transport, and processing of control materials for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of human urine specimens is critical to accurate compound identification and quantification. Previous studies have suggested that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is influenced by container composition and storage temperature. In this study, urine solutions of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH (7.5, 15, 60, and 500 ng/mL) at three physiologically-relevant pHs (4.6, 6.5, and 8.4) were prepared and subjected to storage and processing in containers of different compositions (polypropylene and borosilicate glass). Analyte identification and quantification were achieved using tetramethylammonium hydroxide/iodomethane-based derivatization followed by GC separation and electron-impact MS. These analyses demonstrate that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is a phenomenon found in acidic urine solutions and is relatively absent in urine solutions that are near-neutral or basic. Furthermore, the data indicate that the adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is dependent on solution-container exposure time and is similar between containers of two distinct compositions. These results suggest that for optimal analytical control performance, solution pH and control processing times are critical elements.

  2. [Respiratory failure due to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in a tetraplegic patient].

    PubMed

    Neuburger, M; Schley, M; Schmelz, M; Schuepfer, G; Konrad, C

    2006-11-01

    We report on a patient with an incomplete tetraplegia below C2 who suffered from a post-traumatic abdominal spasticity, spasticity of the legs, and bladder contractions of high intensity. Breathing was possible during the day using accessory respiratory musculature. All standard therapeutic regimes against spasticity failed. Treatment was started with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol administered orally in a dosage of 2 x 2.5 mg/day. The spasticity of the legs and the bladder improved with the treatment. After 3 days, the patient complained about dyspnea and shortness of breath. Treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol was discontinued after 5 days but the patient needed ventilatory support for 1 week. After 1 week, spontaneous breathing was possible again. The reasons for respiratory failure in endangered patients during treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol could be effects such as sedation, combined treatment with baclofen, muscle weakness, or central nervous effects in the medulla oblongata.

  3. Significant developments in radioimmune methods applied to delta 9-THC and its 9-substituted metabolites.

    PubMed

    Soares, J R; Grant, J D; Gross, S J

    1982-01-01

    Novel RIA's have been developed for marijuana detection. Modified simple techniques measure the "acute" metabolites in minute saliva, breath, and dried blood samples. Solid purified antibody matches the sensitivity and yields sensitivity values identical to liquid assays. The importance of the polar 9-substituted metabolites (9SM) of THC in acute users is shown by time course data that indicate their levels remain high in the critical post-intoxication period when delta 9-THC clears from the blood. Therefore a single-tube assay using solid-phase reagents was constructed to quantitate simultaneously delta 9-THC and 9SM. When delta 9-THC values are low or questionable in subject samples, 9SM would appear useful to confirm or refute acute marijuana use.

  4. Enzymatic digestion and selective quantification of underivatised delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cocaine in human hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Breidi, Salah Eddine; Barker, James; Petróczi, Andrea; Naughton, Declan P

    2012-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods for drug analysis routinely employ derivatising reagents. The aim of this paper was to develop a method for the analysis of two recreational drugs, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) and cocaine in hair samples using GC-MS, without prior derivatisation, thus allowing the sample to be reanalysed in its original form. An enzymatic digestion technique was also developed. Ten hair samples, that were known positive for either Δ(9)-THC and/or cocaine, were enzymatically digested, extracted, and then analysed by GC-MS. All samples measured contained Δ(9)-THC and one sample contained cocaine. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 ng/mg and 0.05 ng/mg, respectively, for cocaine and 0.015 ng/mg and 0.02 ng/mg, respectively, for Δ(9)-THC. The wide detection window, ease of direct analysis by GC-MS, lower detection limits of underivatised samples, and the stability of drugs using this technique may offer an improved method of analysis.

  5. Simultaneous determination of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy- Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maralikova, Barbora; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for the simultaneous confirmatory analysis of three forensic most relevant cannabinoids, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), by means of high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in human plasma was developed and fully validated. Sample clean-up was performed by automated silica-based solid-phase extraction and the separation was carried out using a PhenylHexyl column (50 x 2 mm i.d., 3 micro m) and acetonitrile-5 mM ammonium acetate gradient elution. Data were acquired with an API 3000 LC/MS/MS system equipped with a turboionspray interface and triple quadrupole mass analyzer using positive electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring. Two MS/MS transitions for each substance were monitored and deuterated analogues of analytes were used as internal standards for quantitation. The limit of quantitation was 0.8 ng ml(-1) for THC, 0.8 ng ml(-1) for 11-OH-THC and 4.3 ng ml(-1) for THC-COOH and linearity with a correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.999 was achieved up to 100 ng ml(-1) for THC and 11-OH-THC and 500 ng ml(-1) for THC-COOH. The limits of detection were 0.2 ng ml(-1) for THC, 0.2 ng ml(-1) for 11-OH-THC and 1.6 ng ml(-1) for THC-COOH. The developed LC/MS/MS method was also successfully used for the determination of THC-COOH-glucuronide, the phase II metabolite of THC-COOH.

  6. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma after controlled oral administration of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robert S; Gustafson, Richard A; Barnes, Allan; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-08-01

    A clinical study to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral tetrahydrocannabinol was performed. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, inpatient study compared the effects of THC-containing hemp oils in liquid and capsule form to dronabinol (synthetic THC) in doses used for appetite stimulation. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and each participant provided informed consent. Detection times and concentrations of THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in plasma were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [limits of quantification (LOQ)=0.5, 0.5, and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively] after oral THC administration. Six volunteers ingested liquid hemp oil (0.39 and 14.8 mg THC/d), hemp oil in capsules (0.47 mg THC/d), dronabinol capsules (7.5 mg THC/d), and placebo. Plasma specimens were collected during and after each dosing condition. THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were low and never exceeded 6.1 ng/mL. Analytes were detectable 1.5 hour after initiating dosing with the 7.5 mg THC/d regimen and 4.5 hour after starting the 14.8 mg THC/d sessions. THCCOOH was detected 1.5 hour after the first dose, except for the 0.47 mg THC/d session, which required 4.5 hour for concentrations to reach the LOQ. THCCOOH concentrations peaked at 3.1 ng/mL during dosing with the low-dose hemp oils. Plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were negative for all participants at all doses within 15.5 hours after the last THC dose. Plasma THCCOOH persisted for at least 39.5 hours after the end of dosing and at much higher concentrations (up to 43.0 ng/mL). This study demonstrated that subjects who used high THC content hemp oil (347 mug/mL) as a dietary supplement had THC and metabolites in plasma in quantities comparable to those of patients using dronabinol for appetite stimulation. There was a significant

  7. Determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in indoor air as an indicator of marijuana cigarette smoking using adsorbent sampling and in-injector thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chou, Su-Lien; Ling, Yong-Chien; Yang, Mo-Hsiung; Pai, Chung-Yen

    2007-08-13

    The marijuana leaves are usually mixed with tobaccos and smoked at amusement places in Taiwan. Recently, for investigation-legal purposes, the police asked if we can identify the marijuana smoke in a KTV stateroom (a private room at the entertainment spot for singing, smoking, alcohol drinking, etc.) without marijuana residues. A personal air-sampler pump fitted with the GC liner-tube packed with Tenax-TA adsorbent was used for air sampling. The GC-adsorbent tube was placed in the GC injector port and desorbed directly, followed by GC-MS analysis for the determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) in indoor air. The average desorption efficiency and limit of detection for delta9-THC were 89% and 0.1 microg m(-3), respectively, approximately needing 1.09 mg of marijuana leaves smoked in an unventilated closed room (3.0 m x 2.4 m x 2.7 m) to reach this level. The mean delta9-THC contained in the 15 marijuana plants seized from diverse locations was measured to be 0.32%. The delta9-THC in room air can be successfully identified from mock marijuana cigarettes, mixtures of marijuana and tobacco, and an actual case. The characteristic delta9-THC peak in chromatogram can serve as the indicator of marijuana. Positive result suggests marijuana smoking at the specific scene in the recent past, facilitating the formulation of further investigation.

  8. A single in-vivo exposure to delta 9THC blocks endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mato, Susana; Chevaleyre, Vivien; Robbe, David; Pazos, Angel; Castillo, Pablo E; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2004-06-01

    Endogenous cannabinoids (eCB) mediate synaptic plasticity in brain regions involved in learning and reward. Here we show that in mice, a single in-vivo exposure to Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) abolishes the retrograde signaling that underlies eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in both nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus in vitro. This effect is reversible within 3 days and is associated with a transient modification in the functional properties of cannabinoid receptors.

  9. Direct NMR analysis of cannabis water extracts and tinctures and semi-quantitative data on delta9-THC and delta9-THC-acid.

    PubMed

    Politi, M; Peschel, W; Wilson, N; Zloh, M; Prieto, J M; Heinrich, M

    2008-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. is the source for a whole series of chemically diverse bioactive compounds that are currently under intensive pharmaceutical investigation. In this work, hot and cold water extracts as well as ethanol/water mixtures (tinctures) of cannabis were compared in order to better understand how these extracts differ in their overall composition. NMR analysis and in vitro cell assays of crude extracts and fractions were performed. Manufacturing procedures to produce natural remedies can strongly affect the final composition of the herbal medicines. Temperature and polarity of the solvents used for the extraction resulted to be two factors that affect the total amount of Delta(9)-THC in the extracts and its relative quantity with respect to Delta(9)-THC-acid and other metabolites. Diffusion-edited (1)H NMR (1D DOSY) and (1)H NMR with suppression of the ethanol and water signals were used. With this method it was possible, without any evaporation or separation step, to distinguish between tinctures from different cannabis cultivars. This approach is proposed as a direct analysis of plant tinctures.

  10. Role of cannabinoidergic mechanisms in ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking in rat adult offspring following perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Economidou, Daina; Mattioli, Laura; Ubaldi, Massimo; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Soverchia, Laura; Hardiman, Gary; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2007-08-15

    The present study evaluated the consequences of perinatal {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol ({delta}{sup 9}-THC) treatment (5 mg/kg/day by gavage), either alone or combined with ethanol (3% v/v as the only fluid available), on ethanol self-administration and alcohol-seeking behavior in rat adult offspring. Furthermore, the effect of the selective cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist, SR-141716A, on ethanol self-administration and on reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced either by stress or conditioned drug-paired cues was evaluated in adult offspring of rats exposed to the same perinatal treatment. Lastly, microarray experiments were conducted to evaluate if perinatal treatment with {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, ethanol or their combination causes long-term changes in brain gene expression profile in rats. The results of microarray data analysis showed that 139, 112 and 170 genes were differentially expressed in the EtOH, {delta}{sup 9}-THC, or EtOH + {delta}{sup 9}-THC group, respectively. No differences in alcohol self-administration and alcohol seeking were observed between rat groups. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of SR-141716A (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) significantly reduced lever pressing for ethanol and blocked conditioned reinstatement of alcohol seeking. At the same doses SR-141716A failed to block foot-shock stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. The results reveal that perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-THC ethanol or their combination results in evident changes in gene expression patterns. However, these treatments do not significantly affect vulnerability to ethanol abuse in adult offspring. On the other hand, the results obtained with SR-141716A emphasize that endocannabinoid mechanisms play a major role in ethanol self-administration, as well as in the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced by conditioned cues, supporting the idea that cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonists may represent interesting

  11. Validated method for the simultaneous determination of Delta9-THC and Delta9-THC-COOH in oral fluid, urine and whole blood using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Helena; Verstraete, Alain; Proença, Paula; Corte-Real, Francisco; Monsanto, Paula; Vieira, Duarte Nuno

    2007-08-06

    A fully validated, sensitive and specific method for the extraction and quantification of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-COOH) and for the detection of 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-THC (11-OH THC) in oral fluid, urine and whole blood is presented. Solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique were used, with electrospray ionization. Three ions were monitored for THC and THC-COOH and two for 11-OH THC. The compounds were quantified by selected ion recording of m/z 315.31, 329.18 and 343.16 for THC, 11-OH THC and THC-COOH, respectively, and m/z 318.27 and 346.26 for the deuterated internal standards, THC-d(3) and THC-COOH-d(3), respectively. The method proved to be precise for THC and THC-COOH both in terms of intra-day and inter-day analysis, with intra-day coefficients of variation (CV) less than 6.3, 6.6 and 6.5% for THC in saliva, urine and blood, respectively, and 6.8 and 7.7% for THC-COOH in urine and blood, respectively. Day-to-day CVs were less than 3.5, 4.9 and 11.3% for THC in saliva, urine and blood, respectively, and 6.2 and 6.4% for THC-COOH in urine and blood, respectively. Limits of detection (LOD) were 2 ng/mL for THC in oral fluid and 0.5 ng/mL for THC and THC-COOH and 20 ng/mL for 11-OH THC, in urine and blood. Calibration curves showed a linear relationship for THC and THC-COOH in all samples (r(2)>0.999) within the range investigated. The procedure presented here has high specificity, selectivity and sensitivity. It can be regarded as an alternative method to GC-MS for the confirmation of positive immunoassay test results, and can be used as a suitable analytical tool for the quantification of THC and THC-COOH in oral fluid, urine and/or blood samples.

  12. Plasma and urine profiles of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites 11-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol after cannabis smoking by male volunteers to estimate recent consumption by athletes.

    PubMed

    Brenneisen, Rudolf; Meyer, Pascale; Chtioui, Haithem; Saugy, Martial; Kamber, Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Since 2004, cannabis has been prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency for all sports competitions. In the years since then, about half of all positive doping cases in Switzerland have been related to cannabis consumption. In doping urine analysis, the target analyte is 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), the cutoff being 15 ng/mL. However, the wide urinary detection window of the long-term metabolite of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) does not allow a conclusion to be drawn regarding the time of consumption or the impact on the physical performance. The purpose of the present study on light cannabis smokers was to evaluate target analytes with shorter urinary excretion times. Twelve male volunteers smoked a cannabis cigarette standardized to 70 mg THC per cigarette. Plasma and urine were collected up to 8 h and 11 days, respectively. Total THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH), and THC-COOH were determined after hydrolysis followed by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The limits of quantitation were 0.1-1.0 ng/mL. Eight puffs delivered a mean THC dose of 45 mg. Plasma levels of total THC, THC-OH, and THC-COOH were measured in the ranges 0.2-59.1, 0.1-3.9, and 0.4-16.4 ng/mL, respectively. Peak concentrations were observed at 5, 5-20, and 20-180 min. Urine levels were measured in the ranges 0.1-1.3, 0.1-14.4, and 0.5-38.2 ng/mL, peaking at 2, 2, and 6-24 h, respectively. The times of the last detectable levels were 2-8, 6-96, and 48-120 h. Besides high to very high THC-COOH levels (245 +/- 1,111 ng/mL), THC (3 +/- 8 ng/mL) and THC-OH (51 +/- 246 ng/mL) were found in 65 and 98% of cannabis-positive athletes' urine samples, respectively. In conclusion, in addition to THC-COOH, the pharmacologically active THC and THC-OH should be used as target analytes for doping urine analysis. In the case of light cannabis use, this may allow the estimation of more recent consumption, probably influencing

  13. Delat9-tetrahydrocannabinol content in cannabis plants of greek origin.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, M; Athanaselis, S; Alevisopoulos, G; Papoutsis, J; Koutselinis, A

    2000-05-01

    The delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) content was identified and determined quantitatively using a Gas Chromatography Detector (Gas Chromatography-Electron Ion Detector) instrument in samples of illicit herbal cannabis. Law enforcement authorities sent the samples to the Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, University of Athens, for toxicological analysis. The concentrations of delta9-THC in these samples ranged from 0.08% to 4.41%. Such concentrations suggest that Greece might be at high risk, as an area for the illicit cultivation of "pedigree" cannabis plants. The forensic aspects of cannabis classification are discussed.

  14. Development of fluoroimmunoassay methods for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Heterogeneous, competitive, labelled-ligand solid-phase primary antibody fluoroimmunoassay methods for the detection of THC in blood and plasma were proposed, and the required assay components were produced and characterized. These components included polyclonal rabbit antisera and monoclonal antibodies reactive with tetrahydrocannabinols, solid-phase immunoglobin reagents, a fluoroligand, and protein conjugates of THC for immunization and immunoassay response amplification. The stereoselective rabbit anti-THC antiserum F-444-12 was found to have a high binding titer, a high affinity (K/sub D/ = 3.4 x 10/sup -/exclamation/sup 1/ M for 5'-iodo/sup -125/I-..delta../sup 2/-THC), and high specificity versus a large number of cannabinoid compounds. Immobilization of the immunoglobulin fraction of the antiserum on hydrophilic polyacrylamide microspheres resulted in only a four fold increase in K/sub D/, and a two fold increase in the concentration of binding sites required for the production of equivalent binding titers. Specificity for small ligands was not affected, but the binding of THC-protein conjugates was reduced in potency. Two monoclonal hybridoma cell lines were produced that secrete monoclonal antibodies which bind the radioligand. The fluoroligand was synthesized from 5'-carboxy-..delta../sup 2/-THC and FITC using a diamimoethane linkage structure. While the compound had the fluorescence properties of FTIC, it was bound to the antiserum F-144-12 with a cross-reactive potency 1.4x greater than the radioligand, and 10x greater than THC.

  15. Dependence on delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol: studies on precipitated and abrupt withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Aceto, M D; Scates, S M; Lowe, J A; Martin, B R

    1996-09-01

    A cannabinoid antagonist, SR 141716A, dose dependently precipitated a behavioral withdrawal syndrome in rats continuously infused i.p. for only 4 days with relatively low-dose regimens of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The following dose regimens, expressed as mg/kg/24 hr, were used for days 1 through 4: high-12.5, 25, 50 and 100; medium-2.5, 5, 10 and 20; and low-0.5, 1, 2 and 4. The major withdrawal signs of the syndrome were scratching, rubbing face with paws, licking, wetdog shakes, arched back and ptosis (at least 50% closure of eyelids). At the highest dose regimen, other signs noted in fewer subjects were biting, tongue rolling, retropulsion, head shakes, extended limbs or high stepping, ataxia, myoclonic spasms and front paw treading. During abrupt withdrawal (delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol was discontinued and vehicle substituted) abstinence signs were also noted; however, except during a 48-hr observation period, withdrawal was not sufficiently robust to achieve statistical significance. The results of this study provide evidence that a modest course of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol can produce physical dependence. Hence, the risk and incidence of marijuana dependence in humans may be greater than previously projected.

  16. The effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol physical dependence on brain cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Breivogel, Christopher S; Scates, Susan M; Beletskaya, Irina O; Lowery, Olivia B; Aceto, Mario D; Martin, Billy R

    2003-01-17

    The effects of chronic Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on cannabinoid receptor levels and receptor-G-protein coupling were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused continuously with low or high dose regimens of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol or vehicle for 4 days. Following treatment, rats were sacrificed for cannabinoid CB(1) receptor binding analysis or challenged with the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide HCl (SR141716A). The rats receiving Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol exhibited antagonist-precipitated withdrawal signs. Each brain region (cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus and basal ganglia) from high-dose rats showed 30-70% decreases in [3H] (-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)cyclohexanol (WIN55212-2) B(max) values, indicating receptor down-regulation. Most regions showed decreased WIN55212-2-stimulated [35S]guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate (GTPgammaS) binding, indicating desensitization of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Additional receptor binding assays in cerebellar membranes showed a significantly greater decrease in agonist than in antagonist B(max) values, indicating a lower fraction of coupled receptors after treatment. Concentration-effect analysis of five agonists revealed that the treatment resulted in greater decreases in the efficacy of low-efficacy agonists.

  17. Using sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography to analyze Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Su, Hsiu-Li; Feng, Lan-Ing; Jen, Hsiu-Ping; Hsieh, You-Zung

    2009-04-17

    We have applied sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) to the simultaneous determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolites, 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH). We monitored the effects of several of the sweeping-MEKC parameters, including the proportion of organic modifier, the concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the pH, and the sample injection volume, to optimize the separation process. The optimal buffer for the analysis of the three analytes was 25 mM citric acid/disodium hydrogenphosphate (pH 2.6) containing 40% methanol and 75 mM SDS. Under the optimized separation parameters, the enrichment factors for THC, THC-COOH, and THC-OH when using sweeping-MEKC (relative to MEKC) were 77, 139, and 200, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for the three compounds in standard solutions ranged from 3.87 to 15.2 ng/mL. We combined the sweeping-MEKC method with solid-phase extraction to successfully detect THC, THC-COOH, and THC-OH in human urine with acceptable repeatability. The LODs of these analytes in urine samples ranged from 17.2 to 23.3 ng/mL. Therefore, this sweeping-MEKC method is useful for determining, with high sensitivity, the amounts of THC and its metabolites in the urine of suspected THC users.

  18. A comparison of the apoptotic effect of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the neonatal and adult rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Downer, Eric J; Gowran, Aoife; Campbell, Veronica A

    2007-10-17

    The maternal use of cannabis during pregnancy results in a number of cognitive deficits in the offspring that persist into adulthood. The endocannabinoid system has a role to play in neurodevelopmental processes such as neurogenesis, migration and synaptogenesis. However, exposure to phytocannabinoids, such as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, during gestation may interfere with these events to cause abnormal patterns of neuronal wiring and subsequent cognitive impairments. Aberrant cell death evoked by Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol may also contribute to cognitive deficits and in cultured neurones Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol induces apoptosis via the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor. In this study we report that Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (5-50 microM) activates the stress-activated protein kinase, c-jun N-terminal kinase, and the pro-apoptotic protease, caspase-3, in in vitro cerebral cortical slices obtained from the neonatal rat brain. The proclivity of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to impact on these pro-apoptotic signalling molecules was not observed in in vitro cortical slices obtained from the adult rat brain. In vivo, subcutaneous administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (1-30 mg/kg) activated c-jun N-terminal kinase, caspase-3 and cathepsin-D, and induced DNA fragmentation in the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats. In contrast, in vivo administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to adult rats was not associated with the apoptotic pathway in the cerebral cortex. The data provide evidence which supports the hypothesis that the neonatal rat brain is more vulnerable to the neurotoxic influence of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, suggesting that the cognitive deficits that are observed in humans exposed to marijuana during gestation may be due, in part, to abnormal engagement of the apoptotic cascade during brain development.

  19. Simplified analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human meconium: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Tynon, Marykathryn; Porto, Marcellino; Logan, Barry K

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a sensitive analytical method for the analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCC) in meconium using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platform. The method was validated according to protocols, which included assessment of accuracy, precision, robustness, stability in meconium and in-process stability, interference and sensitivity and specificity. The method consists of a solid phase extraction with alkaline hydrolysis and derivatization of the analytes with N, O-Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacteamide, followed by GC/MS analysis using selected ion monitoring. The method uses deuterated internal standards for both analytes. Calibration curves had r(2) values >0.998, and extraction efficiency was determined to be 84.7% for THCC and 78.6% for 11-OH-THC. The detection limit for both analytes was 5 ng/g. This confirmatory method was successfully applied to 183 meconium samples that had screened positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 67.2% were confirmed for THCC, and 2.2% were confirmed positive for 11-OH-THC. The mean (SD) and median (range) THCC (n = 123) concentrations detected were 55.0 ng/g (±59.0) and 33.75 ng/g (5-265 ng/g), while the mean and median (range) for 11-OH-THC (n = 4) concentrations were 8.25 ng/g (±4.71) and 6.5 ng/g (5-15 ng/g).

  20. The influence of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol and cannabidiol on tissue oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Chiu, P; Karler, R; Craven, C; Olsen, D M; Turkanis, S A

    1975-10-01

    The mechanism of the hypothermia produced in mice by the naturally occurring cannabinoids, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol, and cannabidiol, was investigated by evaluating the direct effect of these drugs on the oxygen consumption of tissue homogenates and isolated mitochondria. The tissues studied were brain, liver, skeletal muscle, and heart; the mitochondrial preparations were limited to brain and skeletal muscle. The in-vitro studies included a description of the influence of various cannabinoid vehicles containing Tween 80, ethanol, Pluronic F68, and albumin on the oxygen consumption of tissue preparations. Of these vehicles, only albumin was without effect on all tissues. The other vehicles produced diverse responses, including some that were qualitatively different; the data illustrate that the influence of each vehicle on oxygen consumption must be defined for each tissue employed. In spite of the different vehicle effects, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol generally reduced oxygen consumption of all tissue preparations; however, the vehicles were capable of modifying the dose-effect relationship. The results of all three drugs prepared in Pluronic F68 on brain and skeletal muscle indicated that the cannabinoids generally cause a dose-related depression of oxygen consumption. The findings demonstrate that the cannabinoids can directly decrease oxidative metabolism of tissue and isolated mitochondria and that a marked response occurs in the concentration range of 1 X 10(-5) to 1 X 10(-4) M. Because these concentrations can exist in tissues following the in-vivo administration of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the results suggest that the depressant effect of the cannabinoids on metabolic rate may contribute to the mechanism of the hypothermia produced by the drugs.

  1. Effects of low doses of alcohol on delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol's effects in pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Subramanian, M.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Pregnant rats were intubated with 50 mg/kg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or with THC plus alcohol to determine if a low dose of alcohol would significantly increase blood levels of THC. On the basis of this study, a second study was conducted in which pregnant rats were intubated with THC plus alcohol from gestation day six to parturition. THC reduced birth weights but did not significantly affect litter size or passive avoidance learning. Alcohol did not have a significant effect on offspring birth weight nor did it interact with THC to affect offspring.

  2. Nicotine and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol withdrawal induce Narp in the central nucleus of the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Reti, Irving M; Han, Sungho; Miskimon, Matthew; Rosen, Jeffrey B; Baraban, Jay M

    2009-03-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala plays a key role in mediating aversive responses to drug withdrawal, effects thought to contribute to continued drug use. In previous studies, we found that the immediate early gene Narp, which encodes a secreted protein that binds to AMPA receptors, is induced in this nucleus following opiate withdrawal. Furthermore, Narp deletion alters the acquisition and extinction of aversive conditioning induced by opiate withdrawal. We now report that Narp is also induced in the central nucleus following withdrawal from other drugs of abuse, nicotine and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, indicating that Narp is a common component of the transcriptional response triggered by drug withdrawal.

  3. Effect of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on the morphine-induced hyperactivity of mice.

    PubMed

    Ulkü, E; Ayhan, I H; Tulunay, F C; Uran, B; Kaymakçalan, S

    1980-01-01

    The effect of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the locomotor activity-stimulating action of morphine has been investigated in mice. THC (10 mg/kg) has been found to potentiate morphine-induced hyperactivity. On the other hand, the stimulating action of morphine on motor activity strongly diminished in mice rendered tolerant by the implantation of a morphine pellet. The pretreatment of morphine-tolerant mice with the same dose of THC did not change the effect of morphine on the motor activity. These results suggest that tolerance also developed to the potentiating action of THC on morphine-induced hyperactivity during the development of tolerance to this action of morphine.

  4. The detection of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the breath of human subjects.

    PubMed

    Manolis, A; McBurney, L J; Bobbie, B A

    1983-08-01

    Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was detected in breath of human subjects by gas liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) up to twelve minutes after smoking marijuana. A number of adsorbents were tested for THC entrapment and subsequent detection (Tenax-GC, ethanol, 0.75 N ethanolic KOH, Amberlite resin XAD-2, and Sephadex G-10). All of these gave poor recoveries. The decay rate of breath THC was much faster than that of plasma THC and there was very poor correlation between breath THC and plasma THC. We conclude that the detection of breath THC is probably due to that emanating from the surface of the mouth and respiratory system.

  5. Effects of chronic delta-9-THC treatment on cardiac beta-adrenoceptors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.B.; Seifen, E.; Kennedy, R.H.; Kafiluddi, R.; Paule, M.G.; Scallet, A.C.; Ali, S.F.; Slikker, W. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    This study was designed to determine if chronic treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alters cardiac beta-adrenoceptors in the rat. Following daily oral administration of 10 or 20 mg/kg THC or an equivalent volume of control solvent for 90 days, rats were sacrificed, and sarcolemmal membranes were prepared from ventricular myocardium. Beta-adrenoceptor density and binding affinity estimated with (-)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol; a beta-adrenergic antagonist, were not significantly affected by treatment with THC when compared to vehicle controls. These results suggest that the tolerance to cardiovascular effects of THC which develops during chronic exposure in the rat is not associated with alterations in cardiac beta-adrenoceptors as monitored by radiolabeled antagonist binding.

  6. Synthetic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol) can improve the symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Glenn; Karajgi, Basawaraj; McCarthy, Richard

    2009-06-01

    We are reporting improvement of symptoms of schizophrenia in a small group of patients who received the cannabinoid agonist dronabinol (synthetic Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). Before this report, cannabinoids had usually been associated with worsening of psychotic symptoms. In a heuristic, compassionate use study, we found that 4 of 6 treatment-refractory patients with severe chronic schizophrenia but who had a self-reported history of improving with marijuana abuse improved with dronabinol. This improvement seems to have been a reduction of core psychotic symptoms in 3 of the 4 responders and not just nonspecific calming. There were no clinically significant adverse effects. These results complement the recent finding that the cannabinoid blocker rimonabant does not improve schizophrenic symptoms and suggest that the role of cannabinoids in psychosis may be more complex than previously thought. They open a possible new role for cannabinoids in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  7. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances an increase of plasma corticosterone levels induced by forced swim-stress.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazunori; Koushi, Emi; Irie, Keiichi; Higuchi, Sei; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Kinjo, Junei; Egashira, Nobuaki; Oishi, Ryozo; Uchida, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Ryoji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2009-12-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on susceptibility to stress. We reported that THC significantly prolonged the immobility time during the forced swim-stress. The selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist O-2050 significantly reduced the enhancement of immobility by THC. We investigated the effect of THC on levels of stress hormone corticosterone under non-stress and forced swim-stress conditions. THC did not affect plasma corticosterone levels under non-stress conditions. However, THC, together with forced swim-stress, significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels. This effect was inhibited by O-2050. This evidence suggests that THC, under stressful conditions, enhances the susceptibility of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis to stress via the CB(1) receptor, thereby increasing the risk of depression.

  8. Actions of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis: relation to use, abuse, dependence.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    Cannabis use disorders have been recently identified as a relevant clinical issue: a subset of cannabis smokers seeks treatment for their cannabis use, yet few succeed in maintaining long-term abstinence. The rewarding and positive reinforcing effects of the primary psychoactive component of smoked cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. The CB1 receptor has also been shown to mediate cannabinoid dependence and expression of withdrawal upon cessation of drug administration, a phenomenon verified across species. This paper will review findings implicating the CB1 receptor in the behavioural effects of exogenous cannabinoids with a focus on cannabinoid dependence and reinforcement, factors that contribute to the maintenance of chronic cannabis smoking despite negative consequences. Opioidergic modulation of these effects is also discussed.

  9. Differential effects of delta9-THC on learning in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young May; White, Aaron M; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, H S

    2006-03-01

    Marijuana use remains strikingly high among young users in the U.S., and yet few studies have assessed the effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescents compared to adults. This study measured the effects of THC on male adolescent and adult rats in the Morris water maze. In Experiment 1, adolescent (PD=30-32) and adult (PD=65-70) rats were treated acutely with 5.0 mg/kg THC or vehicle while trained on the spatial version of the water maze on five consecutive days. In Experiment 2, adolescent and adult rats were treated acutely with 2.5 or 10.0 mg/kg THC or vehicle while trained on either the spatial and non-spatial versions of the water maze. In Experiment 3, adolescent and adult rats were treated with 5.0 mg/kg THC or vehicle daily for 21 days, and were trained on the spatial and then the non-spatial versions of the water maze task four weeks later in the absence of THC. THC impaired both spatial and nonspatial learning more in adolescents than in adults at all doses tested. However, there were no long-lasting significant effects on either spatial or non-spatial learning in rats that had been previously exposed to THC for 21 days. This developmental sensitivity is analogous to the effects of ethanol, another commonly used recreational drug.

  10. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and the corresponding acid in hemp containing foods with special regard to the fluorescence properties of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Zoller, O; Rhyn, P; Zimmerli, B

    2000-03-03

    A solvent programmed reversed-phase HPLC method with UV detection for the determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A) in foods containing parts of hemp such as edible oil, herb-teas (infusion), herbal hemp or hempseed is presented. The THC peak is also detected by fluorescence. The detection limits with UV detection are 0.01 ng for THC and 0.05 ng for THCA-A and with fluorescence detection 0.1 ng for THC. The relative standard deviation under repeatability conditions of the chromatographic procedure is about 0.5% and that of the over-all analytical procedure for THC in vegetable oils 2% (concentration range of 10-100 mg/kg).

  11. The detection of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) in whole blood using two-dimensional gas chromatography and EI-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Rodger D; Ohlson, Greg B; Worthen, David K

    2006-05-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous analysis of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its carboxylic acid metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) as their trimethylsiyl derivatives using 2-dimensional chromatography and electron ionization-mass spectrometric detection. The addition of a Deans switch to a standard GC oven allows the use of two chromatographic columns of differing stationary phase to greatly reduce matrix interference. The analytes are extracted from 1 mL of whole blood by first precipitating the blood proteins with the addition of acetonitrile followed by solid-phase extraction. The limit of quantitation for both THC and THCA was determined to be 1.0 ng/mL. The between-run precision at 1.0 ng/mL (N = 30) was 7.7% and 7.4% for THC and THCA, respectively. The method is linear from 1 to 100 ng/mL.

  12. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol protects against MPP+ toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells by restoring proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeissler, Marie-Louise; Eastwood, Jordan; McCorry, Kieran; Hanemann, C. Oliver; Zajicek, John P.; Carroll, Camille B.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation can result in transcription of proteins involved in oxidative stress defence and mitochondrial biogenesis which could rescue mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD). The PPARγ agonist pioglitazone is protective in models of PD; however side effects have limited its clinical use. The cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) may have PPARγ dependent anti-oxidant properties. Here we investigate the effects of Δ9-THC and pioglitazone on mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress. Differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to the PD relevant mitochondrial complex 1 inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP+). We found that only Δ9-THC was able to restore mitochondrial content in MPP+ treated SH-SY5Y cells in a PPARγ dependent manner by increasing expression of the PPARγ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), the mitochondrial transcription factor (TFAM) as well as mitochondrial DNA content. Co-application of Δ9-THC with pioglitazone further increased the neuroprotection against MPP+ toxicity as compared to pioglitazone treatment alone. Furthermore, using lentiviral knock down of the PPARγ receptor we showed that, unlike pioglitazone, Δ9-THC resulted in a PPARγ dependent reduction of MPP+ induced oxidative stress. We therefore suggest that, in contrast to pioglitazone, Δ9-THC mediates neuroprotection via PPARγ-dependent restoration of mitochondrial content which may be beneficial for PD treatment. PMID:27366949

  13. Development and pharmacokinetic characterization of pulmonal and intravenous delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans.

    PubMed

    Naef, Myrtha; Russmann, Stefan; Petersen-Felix, Steen; Brenneisen, Rudolf

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a physiologically compatible inhalation solution of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and to compare the pharmacokinetic and analgesic properties of pulmonal THC versus pulmonal placebo and intravenous (iv) THC, respectively. Eight healthy volunteers were included in this randomized, double-blind, crossover study. The aqueous THC formulations were prepared by using a solubilization technique. iv THC (0.053 mg/kg body weight), pulmonal THC (0.053 mg/kg), or a placebo inhalation solution was administered as single dose. At defined time points, blood samples were collected, and somatic and psychotropic side effects as well as vital functions monitored. An ice water immersion test was performed to measure analgesia. Using a pressure-driven nebulizer, the pulmonal administration of the THC liquid aerosol resulted in high THC peak plasma levels within minutes. The bioavailability of the pulmonal THC was 28.7 +/- 8.2% (mean +/- SEM). The side effects observed after pulmonal THC were coughing and slight irritation of the upper respiratory tract, very mild psychotropic symptoms, and headache. The side effects after iv THC were much more prominent. Neither pulmonal nor iv THC significantly reduced experimentally induced pain.

  14. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol stimulates glucose utilization in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C; Velasco, G; Guzmán, M

    1997-08-29

    The present work was undertaken to study the metabolic response of C6 glioma cells to physiologically relevant doses of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active component of marijuana. At those concentrations (i.e. nanomolar range), THC produced a dose-dependent increase in the rates of glucose oxidation to CO2 and glucose incorporation into phospholipids and glycogen. The THC-induced stimulation of glucose utilization was (i) dose-dependent up to 100 nM THC, (ii) mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210, and (iii) prevented by pertussis toxin and the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A. In contrast to THC, forskolin markedly depressed CO2 production, phospholipid synthesis and glycogen synthesis from glucose. The forskolin-induced inhibition of glucose utilization was (i) mimicked by dibutyryl-cAMP, and (ii) prevented by THC, HU-210 and H-7, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Likewise, THC was able to antagonize in part the forskolin-induced elevation of intracellular cAMP concentration, and this antagonistic effect was prevented by SR141716A. However, THC per se did not affect basal cAMP concentration. Results thus indicate that physiologically relevant doses of THC stimulate glucose metabolism in C6 glioma cells through a cannabinoid receptor-mediated process. Although cannabinoid receptors may be coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in C6 glioma cells, this does not seem to be the mechanism involved in the THC-induced stimulation of glucose metabolism.

  15. Concentrations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cocaine and 6-monoacetylmorphine in hair of drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Kauert, G; Röhrich, J

    1996-01-01

    Hair samples taken from 850 individuals with presumed drug abuse were tested simultaneously for delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cocaine, heroin, the primary heroin metabolite 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine. The drugs were extracted with methanol under sonication. Compared to other extraction procedures this solvent extraction technique provides high extraction yields and less experimental effort. The analyses were carried out using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. This procedure allows the simultaneous detection of amphetamine, methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methylenedioxylamphetamine (MDE). THC was found in 104 (12.2%), cocaine in 230 (27%) and 6-MAM in 141 (16.6%) samples. In addition to 6-MAM, morphine was detected in 87 (10.2%) and heroin in 38 samples (4.5%). The concentrations found were in a range 0.009-16.7 ng/mg for THC, 0.037-129.68 ng/mg for cocaine, 0.028-79.82 ng/mg for 6-MAM, 0.045-53.14 ng/mg for heroin and 0.011-7.800 ng/mg for morphine. The statistical distribution of the drug concentrations compared with the self-reported consumption behaviour of the users may possibly lead to a better understanding of the relationship between drug dosage and corresponding concentrations in hair.

  16. Genetic dissection of behavioural and autonomic effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice.

    PubMed

    Monory, Krisztina; Blaudzun, Heike; Massa, Federico; Kaiser, Nadine; Lemberger, Thomas; Schütz, Günther; Wotjak, Carsten T; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2007-10-01

    Marijuana and its main psychotropic ingredient Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exert a plethora of psychoactive effects through the activation of the neuronal cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), which is expressed by different neuronal subpopulations in the central nervous system. The exact neuroanatomical substrates underlying each effect of THC are, however, not known. We tested locomotor, hypothermic, analgesic, and cataleptic effects of THC in conditional knockout mouse lines, which lack the expression of CB1 in different neuronal subpopulations, including principal brain neurons, GABAergic neurons (those that release gamma aminobutyric acid), cortical glutamatergic neurons, and neurons expressing the dopamine receptor D1, respectively. Surprisingly, mice lacking CB1 in GABAergic neurons responded to THC similarly as wild-type littermates did, whereas deletion of the receptor in all principal neurons abolished or strongly reduced the behavioural and autonomic responses to the drug. Moreover, locomotor and hypothermic effects of THC depend on cortical glutamatergic neurons, whereas the deletion of CB1 from the majority of striatal neurons and a subpopulation of cortical glutamatergic neurons blocked the cataleptic effect of the drug. These data show that several important pharmacological actions of THC do not depend on functional expression of CB1 on GABAergic interneurons, but on other neuronal populations, and pave the way to a refined interpretation of the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids on neuronal functions.

  17. Passive inhalation of marijuana smoke: urinalysis and room air levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, E.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Darwin, W.D.; Yousefnejad, D.; Mell, L.D.; Paul, B.D.; Mitchell, J.

    1987-05-01

    In two separate studies, 5 drug-free male volunteers with a history of marijuana use were passively exposed to the sidestream smoke of 4 and 16 marijuana cigarettes (2.8% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) for 1 h each day for 6 consecutive days. A third study was similarly performed with 2 marijuana-naive subjects passively exposed to the smoke of 16 marijuana cigarettes. Passive smoke exposure was conducted in a small, unventilated room. Room air levels of THC and CO were monitored frequently. All urine specimens were collected and analyzed by EMIT d.a.u. assay, Abuscreen radioimmunoassay and GC/MS. The studies show that significant amounts of THC were absorbed by all subjects at the higher level of passive smoke exposure (eg., smoke from 16 marijuana cigarettes), resulting in urinary excretion of significant amounts of cannabinoid metabolites. However, it seems improbable that subjects would unknowingly tolerate the noxious smoke conditions produced by this exposure. At the lower level of passive marijuana-smoke exposure, specimens tested positive only infrequently or were negative. Room air levels of THC during passive smoke exposure appeared to be the most critical factor in determining whether a subject produced cannabinoid-positive urine specimens.

  18. Detection of conjugated 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Rana, Sumandeep; Coulter, Cynthia; Day, David; Vincent, Michael; Soares, James

    2007-05-01

    The presence of the conjugated marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) glucuronide in oral fluid specimens is described for the first time. Oral fluid specimens were collected using a Quantisal device and analyzed for the presence of THCA using two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric (GC-MS) detection both before and after hydrolysis. The nature of the conjugation was determined by analyzing specimens from a marijuana user without hydrolysis, with base hydrolysis, with beta-glucuronidase treatment, and hydrolysis using sulfatase only. Treatment with sodium hydroxide proved to be the most efficient hydrolytic procedure. Specimens collected over 48 h showed an average conjugation of over 64.5%. The specimens were also analyzed for the active component, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which was detected in the oral fluid, in most cases, for up to 24 h. Parent THC was not found to be glucuronide bound. Specimens were then subjected to commercially available immunoassays in order to determine their utility as screening procedures. The metabolite, THCA, was detected in all samples up to and including the specimen 48 h after smoking, using the more sensitive screening assay and two-dimensional GC-MS. Moreover, proof that the THCA is conjugated in oral fluid minimizes concerns associated with passive inhalation.

  19. Interactions between delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on i.v. heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001–0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1–1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032–0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose-dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared to data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g., for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of the individual drugs. PMID:23044830

  20. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol + cannabidiol. A reasonable option for some patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    Conventional drugs have only a limited impact on spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis and are rarely satisfactory. A solution for oral transmucosal delivery (spray) containing a mixture of cannabis extracts (2.7 mg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol + 2.5 mg of cannabidiol per spray) has been granted marketing authorisation in France for patients who are inadequately relieved by standard treatments. Three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in a total of about 300 patients tested this combination, in addition to ongoing treatment, for periods of 6 to 14 weeks. Individually, none of these trials showed any tangible anti-spastic efficacy, but two combined analyses showed "response rates" of about 35% with the mixture versus about 25% with placebo. In a trial with 572 patients, the 241 patients who "responded" after 4 weeks of treatment were randomised to either continue using the cannabis extract or receive placebo. Twelve weeks later, 75% of patients using the extract were still "responders", versus 51% of patients switched to placebo. The principal adverse effects of the cannabis extracts consist of neuropsychiatric disorders that resolve on treatment withdrawal. The potential for abuse increases with the dose and is tangible from 16 sprays per day. Pharmacokinetic interactions due to P-glycoprotein inhibition are likely. Treatment during pregnancy may lead to neonatal withdrawal symptoms. In practice, about 10% of patients in whom standard anti-spastic medications are unsatisfactory benefit from a specific effect of the cannabis extracts contained in this oral spray.

  1. Cannabidiol reverses the reduction in social interaction produced by low dose Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in rats.

    PubMed

    Malone, Daniel Thomas; Jongejan, Dennis; Taylor, David Alan

    2009-08-01

    While Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive constituent of the cannabis plant, a non-psychoactive constituent is cannabidiol (CBD). CBD has been implicated as a potential treatment of a number of disorders including schizophrenia and epilepsy and has been included with THC in a 1:1 combination for the treatment of conditions such as neuropathic pain. This study investigated the effect of THC and CBD, alone or in combination, on some objective behaviours of rats in the open field. Pairs of rats were injected with CBD or vehicle followed by THC or vehicle and behaviour in the open field was assessed for 10 min. In vehicle pretreated rats THC (1 mg/kg) significantly reduced social interaction between rat pairs. Treatment with CBD had no significant effect alone, but pretreatment with CBD (20 mg/kg) reversed the THC-induced decreases in social interaction. A higher dose of THC (10 mg/kg) produced no significant effect on social interaction. However, the combination of high dose CBD and high dose THC significantly reduced social interaction between rat pairs, as well as producing a significant decrease in locomotor activity. This data suggests that CBD can reverse social withdrawal induced by low dose THC, but the combination of high dose THC and CBD impairs social interaction, possibly by decreasing locomotor activity.

  2. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and endogenous cannabinoid anandamide directly potentiate the function of glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Nadia; Zhou, Chunyi; Oz, Murat; Sun, Hui; Ye, Jiang Hong; Zhang, Li

    2006-03-01

    Anandamide (AEA) and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are endogenous and exogenous ligands, respectively, for cannabinoid receptors. Whereas most of the pharmacological actions of cannabinoids are mediated by CB1 receptors, there is also evidence that these compounds can produce effects that are not mediated by the activation of identified cannabinoid receptors. Here, we report that THC and AEA, in a CB1 receptor-independent manner, cause a significant potentiation of the amplitudes of glycine-activated currents (I(Gly)) in acutely isolated neurons from rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) and in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human homomeric (alpha1) and heteromeric (alpha1beta1) subunits of glycine receptors (GlyRs). The potentiation of I(Gly) by THC and AEA is concentration-dependent, with respective EC50 values of 86 +/- 9 and 319 +/- 31 nM for alpha1 homomeric receptors, 73 +/- 8 and 318 +/- 24 nM for alpha1beta1 heteromeric receptors, and 115 +/- 13 and 230 +/- 29 nM for native GlyRs in VTA neurons. The effects of THC and AEA are selective for I(Gly), because GABA-activated current in VTA neurons or in X. laevis oocytes expressing alpha2beta3gamma2 GABA(A) receptor subunits were unaffected by these compounds. The maximal potentiation by THC and AEA was observed at the lowest concentration of glycine; with increasing concentrations of glycine, the potentiation significantly decreased. The site for THC and AEA seems to be distinct from that of the alcohol and volatile anesthetics. The results indicate that THC and AEA, in pharmacologically relevant concentrations, directly potentiate the function of GlyRs through an allosteric mechanism.

  3. Adolescent exposure to chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks opiate dependence in maternally deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Lydie J; Giros, Bruno; Daugé, Valérie

    2009-10-01

    Maternal deprivation in rats specifically leads to a vulnerability to opiate dependence. However, the impact of cannabis exposure during adolescence on this opiate vulnerability has not been investigated. Chronic dronabinol (natural delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, THC) exposure during postnatal days 35-49 was made in maternal deprived (D) or non-deprived (animal facility rearing, AFR) rats. The effects of dronabinol exposure were studied after 2 weeks of washout on the rewarding effects of morphine measured in the place preference and oral self-administration tests. The preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA levels and the relative density and functionality of CB1, and mu-opioid receptors were quantified in the striatum and the mesencephalon. Chronic dronabinol exposure in AFR rats induced an increase in sensitivity to morphine conditioning in the place preference paradigm together with a decrease of PPE mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens and the caudate-putamen nucleus, without any modification for preference to oral morphine consumption. In contrast, dronabinol treatment on D-rats normalized PPE decrease in the striatum, morphine consumption, and suppressed sensitivity to morphine conditioning. CB1 and mu-opioid receptor density and functionality were not changed in the striatum and mesencephalon of all groups of rats. These results indicate THC potency to act as a homeostatic modifier that would worsen the reward effects of morphine on naive animals, but ameliorate the deficits in maternally D-rats. These findings point to the self-medication use of cannabis in subgroups of individuals subjected to adverse postnatal environment.

  4. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the treatment of end-stage open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Allan J

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence exists that the administration of cannabinoid derivatives can lower intraocular pressure. Some patients with glaucoma believe they are being deprived of a potentially beneficial treatment. Therefore, the Research Advisory Panel of California instituted the Cannabis Therapeutic Research Program to permit compassionate access to cannabinoid derivatives. Data about the potential therapeutic usefulness and toxicity of these agents were collected. This study reviews the results of this program with the specific aim of providing further direction for these investigational efforts. METHODS: A survey of local ophthalmologists indicated an impressive interest in participating in and contributing patients with glaucoma unresponsive to treatment to this study. Appropriate patients were treated with either orally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol capsules or inhaled marijuana in addition to their existing therapeutic regimen. RESULTS: Although 20 ophthalmologists were approved as investigators, only nine patients were enrolled in the study. An initial decrease in intraocular pressure was observed in all patients, and the investigator's therapeutic goal was met in four of the nine patients. However, the decreases in intraocular pressure were not sustained, and all patients elected to discontinue treatment within 1 to 9 months for various reasons. CONCLUSIONS: This uncontrolled, unmasked, nonrandomized study does not permit definitive conclusions about the efficacy or toxicity of cannabinoids in the treatment of glaucoma. There is an impression that this treatment can lower intraocular pressure, but the development of tolerance and significant systemic toxicity appears to limit the usefulness of this potential treatment. Both patients and ophthalmologists greatly appreciated the opportunity to participate in this study. PMID:12545695

  5. Identification of candidate genes affecting Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Marks, M David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P; Omburo, Stephanie N; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R; Weiblen, George D; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands.

  6. Inhibition of recombinant human T-type calcium channels by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Ross, Hamish Redmond; Napier, Ian; Connor, Mark

    2008-06-06

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the most prevalent biologically active constituents of Cannabis sativa. THC is the prototypic cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist and is psychoactive and analgesic. CBD is also analgesic, but it is not a CB1 receptor agonist. Low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels, encoded by the Ca(V)3 gene family, regulate the excitability of many cells, including neurons involved in nociceptive processing. We examined the effects of THC and CBD on human Ca(V)3 channels stably expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and T-type channels in mouse sensory neurons using whole-cell, patch clamp recordings. At moderately hyperpolarized potentials, THC and CBD inhibited peak Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.2 currents with IC(50) values of approximately 1 mum but were less potent on Ca(V)3.3 channels. THC and CBD inhibited sensory neuron T-type channels by about 45% at 1 mum. However, in recordings made from a holding potential of -70 mV, 100 nm THC or CBD inhibited more than 50% of the peak Ca(V)3.1 current. THC and CBD produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the steady state inactivation potentials for each of the Ca(V)3 channels, which accounts for inhibition of channel currents. Additionally, THC caused a modest hyperpolarizing shift in the activation of Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.2. THC but not CBD slowed Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.2 deactivation and inactivation kinetics. Thus, THC and CBD inhibit Ca(V)3 channels at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. However, THC, but not CBD, may also increase the amount of calcium entry following T-type channel activation by stabilizing open states of the channel.

  7. Behavioral and temperature effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human-relevant doses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Michael S.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana smoking dramatically alters responses to various environmental stimuli. To study this phenomenon, we assessed how delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a primary psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, affects locomotor and brain (nucleus accumbens or NAcc), muscle and skin temperature responses to natural arousing stimuli (one-min tail-pinch and one-min social interaction with another male rat) and iv cocaine (1 mg/kg) in male rats. THC was administered at three widely varying doses (0.5, 2.0 and 8.0 mg/kg, ip), and the drug-induced changes in basal values and responses to stimuli were compared to those occurring following ip vehicle injections (control). Each stimulus in control conditions caused acute locomotor activation, a prolonged increase in brain and muscle temperature (0.6–1.0°C for 20–50 min) and transient decrease in skin temperature (−0.6°C for 1–3 min). While THC at any dose had a tendency to decrease spontaneous locomotion as well as brain and muscle temperatures, true hypothermia and hypoactivity as well as clearly diminished locomotor and temperature responses to all stimuli were only seen following the largest dose. In this case, temperature decreases in the NAcc were stronger than in the muscle, suggesting metabolic brain inhibition as the primary cause of hypoactivity, hypothermia and hyporesponsiveness. While weaker in strength and without associated vasodilatation, this response pattern is mimicked by general anesthetics, questioning to what extent the hypothermic action of THC is specific (i.e., mediated via endogenous cannabinoid receptors) or non-specific, reflecting drug interaction with membrane lipids or other receptors. In contrast, weaker behavioral and temperature effects of THC at lower doses resemble those of diazepam, whose locomotion- and temperature-decreasing effects are evident only in activated conditions, when rats are moving and basal temperatures are elevated. PMID:18619424

  8. Effects of daily delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment on heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Opioid abuse remains a significant public health problem; together with the greater availability of marijuana in some regions there is an increasing likelihood that opioids and marijuana will be used together. Polydrug abuse is associated with increased toxicity and poorer treatment outcome; thus, a better understanding of the consequences of repeated coadministration of these drugs will facilitate the development of better prevention and treatment strategies. This study examined the effects of daily treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-THC) and its discontinuation on self-administration of heroin in rhesus monkeys (n=4) lever-pressing under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule. Heroin self-administration (0.32-32 μg/kg/infusion, intravenously) generated an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve. Administered acutely, Δ-THC (0.01-0.32 mg/kg, subcutaneously) dose dependently decreased responding for heroin and flattened the self-administration dose-effect curve. Daily treatment with Δ-THC (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/12 h, subcutaneously) either had no effect on or decreased responding for heroin. In addition, daily treatment did not significantly impact extinction of heroin self-administration or resumption of responding for heroin after extinction. Discontinuation of daily Δ-THC treatment did not systematically impact rates of heroin self-administration. These data suggest that repeated administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist likely does not increase, and possibly decreases, the positive reinforcing effects of a mu opioid receptor agonist.

  9. Distribution of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in traffic fatality cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Liang; Lin, Reng-Lang

    2005-01-01

    11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) distributions in postmortem specimens are rarely reported. Fifty New Jersey State Medical Examiner's cases in which automobile accident deaths suspected of involving marijuana intake were studied for the distributions of THC-COOH in postmortem urine, blood, vitreous humor, and bile specimens. Cases were selected based on immunoassay (TDx) urine test results. If the preliminary urine test indicated the presence of THC-COOH (apparent THC-COOH concentration > or = 20 ng/mL), urine, heart blood, vitreous humor, and bile specimens from the case were analyzed for THC-COOH concentrations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mean, standard deviation, and range of THC-COOH in heart blood, urine, and bile found in these 50 cases were 0.081, 0.082, and 0.016-0.33 microg/mL; 0.314, 0.415, and 0.044-2.33 microg/mL; and 12.9, 11.4, and 1.03-43.7 microg/mL, respectively. THC-COOH was absent (detection limit, 1 ng/mL) or at low concentration (< 10 ng/mL) in vitreous humor specimens. The mean, standard deviation, and range of the bile-to-blood and urine-to-blood ratios were 242, 196, and 17.2-888 and 4.70, 4.05, and 1.14-19.2, respectively. The highest concentrations of THC-COOH were found in bile and the lowest in vitreous humor. These findings are consistent with the high hydrophobicity nature of THC-COOH and further suggest that bile is the specimen of choice for detecting low level of THC-COOH in postmortem cases.

  10. Estrogenic modulation of delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol effects on nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity in the female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, A; Ferández-Ruiz, J J; Martín, M; De Fonseca, F R; De Miguel, R; Ramos, J A

    1992-08-01

    In this work we studied the possible estrogenic modulation of the effects of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity. Thus, we examined the effects of an acute dose of this cannabinoid: (i) during the three phases of the estrous cycle; (ii) after ovariectomy, chronic estrogen replacement, and/or tamoxifen (TMX)-induced blockade of cytosolic estrogenic receptors; and (iii) combined with a single and physiological injection of estradiol to ovariectomized rats, whose effects were measured early, with no time for genomic induction. THC increased the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in the striatum of ovariectomized rats implanted with estradiol-filled Silastic capsules or ovariectomized rats. This effect: (i) depended on the presence of an intact estrogenic receptor mechanism, because it was prevented by pretreatment with TMX, and (ii) did not appear when THC was coadministered with estradiol, suggesting an inhibitory modulation of cannabinoid effect by the nongenomic mechanism of action of this steroid. The striatal content of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and its ratio with dopamine content, which can be used as an index of neuronal activity, also increased following acute THC administration. However, this effect was seen only in ovariectomized rats without estrogen replacement. The administration of THC in combination with a single estradiol injection or to estradiol-implanted ovariectomized rats was ineffective for both parameters. All these effects appeared after ovariectomy with/without estrogen replacement. However, we did not observe any statistically significant effects when THC was administered to normal cycling rats during each phase of the estrous cycle. This observation might be related to the fact that the affinity of striatal cannabinoid receptors, which are the main candidates to mediate cannabinoid effects on this area, significantly increased after ovariectomy compared with that measured in normal cycling rats. In

  11. [Comparison of altered states of consciousness induced by the hallucinogens (--)-delta9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dittrich, A; Bickel, P; Schöpf, J; Zimmer, D

    1976-12-31

    The study compares altered states of consciousness induced by the hallucinogens (--)delta9-trans-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) using two placebo control groups. A total of 24 subjects received 250 mug delta9-THC p.o./kg body weight and 26 subjects were treated with 250 mug DMT i.m./kg. Placebo was given to 24 subjects. The effects were assessed by a questionnaire administered following the experimental conditions. Questionnaire items were combined into the following eight scales according to their content and several cirteria of the theory of mental testing: visual hallucinations (illusions), auditory hallucinations (illusions), impairment of memory and attention, depersonalization syndrome, deprealization syndrome, changes of body image, euphoric state and anxious-depressive state. The two hallucinogen groups differed significantly from placebo on all eight scales. No difference, however, between delta9-THC and DMT was significant. On the scale "optical hallucinations (illusions)" a tendency that DMT might have stronger effects than delta9-THC was found. Methodological problems of comparing different hallucinogens are discussed.

  12. The effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on the conversion of [3H]trypotphan to 5-[3H] hydroxytryptamine in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Dewey, W L

    1978-10-01

    The effects of a 30-min pretreatment with varying doses of delta9-tetrahydrocannibinol (delta9-THC) on the synthesis of 5-[3H]hydroxytryptamine (5-[3H]HT) from an intravenous 10-min pulse of L-[3H]tryptophan ([3H]try) were measured in the mouse brain. We also determined the effects of delta9-THC on several parameters believed to influence the synthesis of brain 5-HT, including total and free plasma tryptophan and the high-affinity synaptosomal uptake of tryptophan. Delta9-THC was found to increase the amount of [3H]try accumulated by the brain as well as the amount of 5-[3H]HT synthesized. This effect was greater at intermediate doses than at the highest dose tested. However, delta9-THC was determined to have no effect on the actual rate of conversion of [3H]try into 5-[3H]HT at any dose tested. Delta9-THC had no effect on either plasma tyrosine ot free tryptophan levels. However, delta9-THC decreased total plasma tryptophan at low and intermediate doses, but had no effect at the highest dose tested. Synaptosomal uptake of [3H]try was unaffected by pretreatment with delta9-THC at any dose tested. These data suggest that delta9-THC increases the synthesis of 5-HT, not by altering the actual rate of conversion of tryptophan to 5-HT, but by altering, via an unknown mechanism, the quantity of tryptophan available for conversion to 5-HT.

  13. The analysis of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and metabolite in whole blood and 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine using disposable pipette extraction with confirmation and quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Jennifer L; Marinetti, Laureen J; Smith, Roy K; Brewer, William E; Clelland, Brandi L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2008-10-01

    Essential to forensic laboratories is the desire to find a more sensitive, rapid method of analyzing Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and metabolite in biological specimens. Disposable pipette extraction (DPX) is a valuable method in extracting THC and 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCc) in blood and THCc in urine. Less waste and solvent usage; smaller specimen volume; clean chromatograms; and utilization of lowcost equipment and consumables were achieved using this method. Differing from traditional solid-phase extraction devices, DPX uses loosely packed sorbent allowing thorough mixing with the specimen without requiring vacuum for elution. Prior to extraction, urine specimens were hydrolyzed and proteins precipitated from blood. Specimen volume requirements were 1 mL of blood and 0.2 mL of urine. The limits of quantitation for THC and THCc in blood were 1 and 2 ng/mL, respectively, and 3 ng/mL for THCc in urine. With R2 values > or = 0.99, blood calibration curves were linear from 1 to 200 ng/mL and 2 to 500 ng/mL for THC and THCc, respectively, with urine THCc linear from 3 to 2000 ng/mL.

  14. The seed and the soil: effect of dosage, personality and starting state on the response to delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol in man.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, H; Golding, J; Marsh, V R; Millman, J E; Thompson, J W

    1981-01-01

    1 The effects of two doses of delta 9THC (2.5 and 10 mg), delivered by paced smoking of herbal cigarettes, on CNV magnitude, subjective mood ratings and heart rate were studied in 20 subjects. 2 There were highly significant interactions between drug dosage and Extraversion and Neuroticism scores, so that the direction and degree of response to the different doses of delta 9THC depended on the personality characteristics of the subjects. 3 The effects of 9 mg delta 9THC and placebo, delivered in herbal cigarettes smoked naturally, on smoking behaviour, subjective mood ratings, measures of autonomic activity and auditory and visual cortical evoked responses were compared in 12 subjects. 4 Smoking behaviour, subjective 'high' rating and elevation of heart rates were the most significant discriminators between drug and placebo. The latency of some of the components of the visual evoked responses was also increased by delta 9THC. 5 There was a significant correlation between the effects of delta 9THC on skin conductance reactivity and the basal (pre-drug) level, reactivity increasing after drug in subjects with low basal reactivity and decreasing in those with high basal levels. 6 Both experiments provided clear evidence of dose-dependent biphasic stimulant and depressant actions of delta 9THC on both subjective and objective measures, and these effects were influenced by the personality and the starting state of the subjects. PMID:6277355

  15. Determination of plasma and urine levels of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its main metabolite by liquid chromatography after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Musenga, Alessandro; Comin, Irene; Baccini, Cesare; Conti, Matteo; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-05-12

    Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol is the most widespread drug of abuse in the world and it is also currently available as the active principle of formulations for the treatment of chronic pain. Its main metabolite, 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid, is the most important marker of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol consumption. An original liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the determination of these two analytes in human plasma and urine. Separation was obtained on a C8 column using a mobile phase with 35% phosphate buffer at pH 2.7 and 65% acetonitrile. The UV detector was set at 220 nm and indomethacin was used as the internal standard. Sample pre-treatment was carried out by solid-phase extraction with C8 cartridges; urine samples were subjected to basic hydrolysis before extraction. Both extraction yields (>91%) and precision values were highly satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to biological samples collected from Cannabis users. Accuracy and selectivity results were satisfactory. This is the first HPLC-UV method developed for the simultaneous quantification of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in both plasma and urine for the monitoring of either therapeutic or recreational use.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC) after intravenous administration of CTHC in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Glaz-Sandberg, A; Dietz, L; Nguyen, H; Oberwittler, H; Aderjan, Rolf; Mikus, Gerd

    2007-07-01

    After cannabis consumption there is only limited knowledge about the pharmacokinetic (PK) and metabolic properties of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC), which is formed by oxidative breakdown from Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Despite widely-varying concentrations observed in smoking studies, attempts have been made to interpret consumption behavior with special regard to a cumulated or decreasing concentration of CTHC in serum. Ten healthy nonsmoking white male individuals received 5 mg CTHC intravenously over 10 min. Highest serum concentrations of CTHC were observed at the end of the infusion (336.8+/-61.7 microg/l) followed by a quick decline. CTHC concentration could be quantified up to 96 h after administration, with a terminal elimination half-life of 17.6+/-5.5 h. Total clearance was low (91.2+/-24.0 ml/min), with renal clearance having only a minor contribution (0.136+/-0.094 ml/min). This first metabolite-based kinetic approach will allow an advanced understanding of CTHC PKs data obtained in previous studies with THC.

  17. Ethanol increases plasma Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels and subjective effects after marihuana smoking in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lukas, S E; Orozco, S

    2001-10-01

    Marihuana and alcohol are often used together, yet little is known about why they are combined. Male volunteers were assigned to one marihuana treatment group (placebo, low or moderate dose Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) and, on three separate study days, they also drank a different dose of ethanol (placebo, 0.35 or 0.7 g/kg). Plasma THC levels and changes in subjective mood states were recorded for 90 min after smoking. For many of the drug combinations, when subjects consumed ethanol they detected marihuana effects more quickly, reported more episodes of euphoria and had higher plasma THC levels than when they consumed placebo ethanol. These data suggest that ethanol may increase the absorption of THC resulting in an increase in the positive subjective mood effects of smoked marihuana and contributing to the popularity of this drug combination.

  18. Rapid method for the GC/MS confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in urine.

    PubMed

    Baker, T S; Harry, J V; Russell, J W; Myers, R L

    1984-01-01

    A rigorously tested simple extraction procedure for the GC/MS determination of 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-acid) from urine is described. This assay provides sensitivity, specificity and reliability and is particularly well suited for the routine determination of large numbers of samples. The THC-acid is detected as its trimethylsilyl derivative using electron impact ionization GC/MS with an on column detection limit below 1 ng/mL. The assay gives excellent reproducibility and linearity using the trideuterated analog of THC-acid as the internal standard. The procedure was evaluated with over 1300 samples and provided inter- and intra-day precision of 10% and 6% standard deviation, respectively.

  19. The inhibitory effect induced by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on the contractions of the isolated rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, M; Lapa, A J; Valle, J R

    1978-11-01

    To analyse the influence of delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the effects induced by sympathomimetic, parasympathomimetic and direct spasmogenic drugs, the isolated rat vas deferens preparation was chosen. Instead of the usual emulsifying agents, we have used 1% ethanol (ET-OH) to keep the cannabinoids in homogeneous dispersion in the bath. THC exerted a non-competitive inhibition of noradrenaline and of acetylcholine responses but no synergistic action nor competitive antagonism was seen on the dose range used. BaCl2 was potentiated by ethanol and this effect was abolished by THC. The water soluble derivative SP 111 showed actions similar to those of THC on noradrenaline and acetylcholine responses. It did not affect BaCl2 contractions, indicating that the cannabinoid might act by depressing early events of membrane activation.

  20. Psychoactive drugs and false memory: comparison of dextroamphetamine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on false recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Several psychoactive drugs are known to influence episodic memory. However, these drugs’ effects on false memory, or the tendency to incorrectly remember nonstudied information, remain poorly understood. Objectives Here, we examined the effects of two commonly used psychoactive drugs, one with memory-enhancing properties (dextroamphetamine; AMP), and another with memory-impairing properties (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), on false memory using the Deese/Roediger–McDermott (DRM) illusion. Methods Two parallel studies were conducted in which healthy volunteers received either AMP (0, 10, and 20 mg) or THC (0, 7.5, and 15 mg) in within-subjects, randomized, double-blind designs. Participants studied DRM word lists under the influence of the drugs, and their recognition memory for the studied words was tested 2 days later, under sober conditions. Results As expected, AMP increased memory of studied words relative to placebo, and THC reduced memory of studied words. Although neither drug significantly affected false memory relative to placebo, AMP increased false memory relative to THC. Across participants, both drugs’ effects on true memory were positively correlated with their effects on false memory. Conclusions Our results indicate that AMP and THC have opposing effects on true memory, and these effects appear to correspond to similar, albeit more subtle, effects on false memory. These findings are consistent with previous research using the DRM illusion and provide further evidence that psychoactive drugs can affect the encoding processes that ultimately result in the creation of false memories. PMID:21647577

  1. Sex-dimorphic psychomotor activation after perinatal exposure to (-)-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol. An ontogenic study in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Rubio, P; Rodríguez de Fonseca, F

    1994-12-01

    The ontogeny and the adult expression of motor behaviors were studied in male and female rats born from mothers exposed to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 5 mg/kg) during gestation and lactation. Perinatal exposure to THC increased both rearing and locomotor activities in males and females at immature preweanling ages (P-15 and P-20). These effects disappeared after ceasing THC exposure (postweaning ages), but they were observed again in adult (P-70) females. The effects appeared as persistently high motor activity in familiar environments, disappearing the characteristic habituation profile in locomotor and exploratory behaviors. In novel environment condition tests, adult (P-70) THC-exposed females, but not males, exhibited lower locomotor activity in the socio-sexual approach test, and an increase in the emergence latency in the dark-light emergence test. Additionally, animals of both sexes exposed to THC showed a increase in the time spent grooming measured in novelty conditions. These findings suggest that perinatal exposure to THC affects both the development and the adult expression of motor behaviors and it resulted in a sex-dimorphic psychomotor activation very similar to that observed after perinatal exposure to other drugs of abuse. A possible role of THC-induced pituitary-adrenal (PA) axis activation was also evaluated by measuring plasma corticosterone levels in adult animals perinatally exposed: THC-exposed females exhibit a clear increase of this adrenal hormone, whereas THC-exposed males displayed lower levels of this hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The non-specific membrane binding properties of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and the effects of various solubilizers.

    PubMed

    Roth, S H; Williams, P J

    1979-04-01

    The binding of [3H]delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol to crude and purified synaptosomal membrane suspended in either Krebs solution or 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer was examined. The membrane/buffer partition coefficient was found to be 12,500, and was constant over a free concentration range of 10(-8) to 10(-6)M. Binding was similar in both suspending media, and to both crude and purified synaptosomal membrane. The solubilizing agent Cremophor E.L. (8 microgram ml-1) decreased the partition coefficient by one-half, and by greater than 99% at 0.4 mg ml-1. Similar effects were observed with Tween 80, while ethanol caused a maximum decrease of 60%. Membrane concentrations of THC were calculated at various effective concentrations reported in the literature, and were within the range predicted by the Meyer-Overton rule of anaesthesia. An apparent non-specific interaction with neuronal membranes and effective membrane concentrations of the order 2 x 10(-4) to 1 x 10(-2) mol kg-1 suggests THC may exert some of its effects by a mechanism analogous to the general anaesthetics, and thus may be classified as a partial anaesthetic.

  3. Chronic adolescent exposure to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in COMT mutant mice: impact on indices of dopaminergic, endocannabinoid and GABAergic pathways.

    PubMed

    Behan, Aine T; Hryniewiecka, Magdalena; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Kinsella, Anthony; Cannon, Mary; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A; Waddington, John L; Cotter, David R

    2012-06-01

    Cannabis use confers a two-fold increase in risk for psychosis, with adolescent use conferring an even greater risk. A high-low activity polymorphism in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), a gene encoding the COMT enzyme involved in dopamine clearance in the brain, may interact with adolescent cannabis exposure to increase risk for schizophrenia. The impact of such an interaction on central neurotransmitter pathways implicated in schizophrenia is unknown. Male mice with knockout of the COMT gene were treated chronically with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence (postnatal day 32-52). We measured the size and density of GABAergic cells and the protein expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) in knockout mice relative to heterozygous mutants and wild-type controls. Size and density of dopaminergic neurons was also assessed in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) across the genotypes. COMT genotype × THC treatment interactions were observed for: (1) dopaminergic cell size in the VTA, (2) CB1R protein expression in the HPC, and (3) parvalbumin (PV) cell size in the PFC. No effects of adolescent THC treatment were observed for PV and dopaminergic cell density across the COMT genotypes. COMT genotype modulates the effects of chronic THC administration during adolescence on indices of neurotransmitter function in the brain. These findings illuminate how COMT deletion and adolescent cannabis use can interact to modulate the function of neurotransmitters systems implicated in schizophrenia.

  4. Effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on altered antioxidative enzyme defense mechanisms and lipid peroxidation in mice testes.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Das, Niladri Sekhar

    2009-04-01

    The present study examined the adverse effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (i.p injection in albino mice) on free radical damage of testicular lipids (lipid peroxidation) at low doses and the role of antioxidant enzymes defense system at high dose and particularly at the withdrawal of the drug after applying higher dose (recovery dose). At lower doses (total doses ranging from 6 mg to 28 mg), there was a significant increase of lipid peroxidation and decrease in testicular lipid content. But the effects were slightly lowered at high dose (total dose 70 mg) and at the withdrawal of the drug (recovery dose). Similarly, marked decrease of antioxidant enzyme systems (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and glutathione content were noticed at low doses. But the effects were slightly higher at high dose and at the withdrawal of the drug. Similarly, low-dose treatments caused significant shrinkage of tubular diameter and detrimental changes in seminiferous epithelium of testis resulting in lowered plasma testosterone and pituitary gonadotropins (follicular stimulating and luteinizing hormone levels. But at high dose and particularly at withdrawal of the drug, regression of seminiferous tubules and recovery of various germ cell layers of testes through the revival of testosterone hormone and pituitary gonadotropins were observed.

  5. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol protects cardiac cells from hypoxia via CB2 receptor activation and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Shmist, Yelena A; Goncharov, Igor; Eichler, Maor; Shneyvays, Vladimir; Isaac, Ahuva; Vogel, Zvi; Shainberg, Asher

    2006-02-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active component of marijuana, has a beneficial effect on the cardiovascular system during stress conditions, but the defence mechanism is still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the central (CB1) and the peripheral (CB2) cannabinoid receptor expression in neonatal cardiomyoctes and possible function in the cardioprotection of THC from hypoxia. Pre-treatment of cardiomyocytes that were grown in vitro with 0.1 - 10 microM THC for 24 h prevented hypoxia-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and preserved the morphological distribution of alpha-sarcomeric actin. The antagonist for the CB2 (10 microM), but not CB1 receptor antagonist (10 microM) abolished the protective effect of THC. In agreement with these results using RT-PCR, it was shown that neonatal cardiac cells express CB2, but not CB1 receptors. Involvement of NO in the signal transduction pathway activated by THC through CB2 was examined. It was found that THC induces nitric oxide (NO) production by induction of NO synthase (iNOS) via CB2 receptors. L-NAME (NOS inhibitor, 100 microM) prevented the cardioprotection provided by THC. Taken together, our findings suggest that THC protects cardiac cells against hypoxia via CB2 receptor activation by induction of NO production. An NO mechanism occurs also in the classical pre-conditioning process; therefore, THC probably pre-trains the cardiomyocytes to hypoxic conditions.

  6. Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol Oromucosal Spray (Sativex(®)): A Review in Multiple Sclerosis-Related Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2017-04-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray (THC/CBD, Sativex(®), nabiximols) is available in numerous countries worldwide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS)-related moderate to severe spasticity in patients who have not responded adequately to other anti-spasticity medication and who demonstrate clinically significant improvement in spasticity-related symptoms during an initial trial of therapy. Twelve weeks' therapy with THC/CBD improved MS-related spasticity in patients with an inadequate response to other anti-spasticity agents who had undergone a successful initial trial of THC/CBD therapy, according to the results of a pivotal phase 3 trial. Improvements in spasticity were maintained in the longer term with THC/CBD with no evidence of dose tolerance, and results of real-world studies confirm the effectiveness of THC/CBD in everyday clinical practice. Improvements in health-related quality of life and activities of daily living were also seen with THC/CBD. THC/CBD is generally well tolerated; adverse effects such as dizziness may occur whilst the THC/CBD dosage is being optimized. THC/CBD has low abuse potential and a low risk of psychoactive effects. In conclusion, THC/CBD oromucosal spray is a useful option for the treatment of MS-related spasticity not completely relieved with current anti-spasticity medication.

  7. Testing human hair for Cannabis. III. rapid screening procedure for the simultaneous identification of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol, and cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Sachs, H; Kintz, P; Mangin, P

    1996-01-01

    delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol (CBN) are three constituents of the 16 that can be currently isolated from some Cannabis spp plants. Their identification in decontaminated hair can indicate exposure to cannabis. In this study, we propose a rapid, simple, and direct (without derivatization) screening procedure for the simultaneous identification and quantitation of CBD, CBN, and THC in hair of chronic cannabis abusers. Hair samples were washed with methylene chloride, hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide, extracted with n-hexane-ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v), evaporated to dryness, and injected directly on a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric system operating in electron-impact mode. THC-d3 was used as the internal standard. Thirty hair samples were tested. CBD was detected 23 times, CBN was detected 22 times, and THC was detected five times. Concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 3.00 ng/mg (mean, 0.44 ng/mg), from 0.01 to 1.07 ng/mg (mean, 0.13 ng/mg), and from 0.1 to 0.29 ng/mg hair (mean, 0.15 ng/mg) for CBD, CBN, and THC, respectively. These results show that this new screening procedure is suitable for the detection of CBD and CBN in the hair of cannabis abusers.

  8. The psychosis-like effects of Δ9-THC are associated with increased cortical ‘noise’ in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Briones, Jose A.; Cahill, John D.; Skosnik, Patrick D.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Williams, Ashley; Sewell, R. Andrew; Roach, Brian J.; Ford, Judith M.; Ranganathan, Mohini; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Background Drugs that induce psychosis may do so by increasing the level of task-irrelevant random neural activity or neural noise. Increased levels of neural noise have been demonstrated in psychotic disorders. We tested the hypothesis that neural noise could also be involved in the psychotomimetic effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC), the principal active constituent of cannabis. Methods Neural noise was indexed by measuring the level of randomness in the electroencephalogram during the pre-stimulus baseline period of an oddball task using Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC), a non-linear measure of signal randomness. The acute, dose-related effects of Δ9-THC on LZC and signal power were studied in humans (n=24) who completed three test days during which they received intravenous Δ9-THC (placebo, 0.015 and 0.03 mg/kg) in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and counterbalanced design. Results Δ9-THC increased neural noise in a dose-related manner. Furthermore, there was a strong positive relationship between neural noise and the psychosis-like positive and disorganization symptoms induced by Δ9-THC, which was independent of total signal power. Instead, there was no relationship between noise and negative-like symptoms. In addition, Δ9-THC reduced total signal power during both active drug conditions compared to placebo but no relationship was detected between signal power and psychosis-like symptoms. Conclusions At doses that produced psychosis-like effects, Δ9-THC increased neural noise in humans in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, increases in neural noise were related with increases in Δ9-THC-induced psychosis-like symptoms but not negative-like symptoms. These findings suggest that increases in neural noise may contribute to the psychotomimetic effects of Δ9-THC. PMID:25913109

  9. Simultaneous determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Moody, D E; Andrenyak, D M; Smith, E K; Foltz, R L; Huestis, M A; Newton, J F

    2001-10-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) in human plasma can be simultaneously detected using solid-phase extraction with gas chromatography and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. THC-d3 and THCA-d3 are added as internal standards; protein is precipitated with acetonitrile and the resulting supernatants diluted with 0.1 M sodium acetate (pH 7.0) prior to application to the solid-phase extraction columns. THC and THCA were eluted separately and then pooled, dried under air, and derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol. The derivatized THC-d0 gives abundant molecular anions (m/z 410), and the derivatized THCA-d0 gives abundant fragment ions (m/z 422) formed by loss of (CF3)2CHOH from its molecular anion. The recoveries of THC and THCA were 74% and 17%, respectively. The lower and upper limits of quantitation were 0.5 and 100 ng/mL for THC and 2.5 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL for THCA. The within-run accuracy and precision for THC (measured at 0.5, 1, 10 and 75 ng/mL) ranged from 98 to 106% (% target) and 4.1 to 9.5 (%CV), respectively. For THCA, the within-run accuracy and precision (measured at 2.5, 5, 10, and 75 ng/mL) ranged from 89 to 101% and 4.3 to 7.5%, respectively. The between-run accuracy and precision for THC ranged from 92 to 110% and 0.4 to 12.4%, respectively. The between-run accuracy and precision for THCA ranged from 97 to 103% and 6.5 to 12.3%, respectively. In processed samples stored in reconstituted form at -20 degrees C, THC and THCA were stable for at least three days. THC and THCA stored in plasma were stable following three freeze/thaw cycles. THC and THCA in whole blood at room temperature for 6 h, or in plasma stored at room temperature for 24 h, did not show significant change. Storage in polypropylene containers for 7 days at -20 degrees C and the presence of 1% sodium fluoride or the cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716, at 1 microg/mL did not

  10. Consumption and quantitation of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in commercially available hemp seed oil products.

    PubMed

    Bosy, T Z; Cole, K A

    2000-10-01

    There has been a recent and significant increase in the use and availability of hemp seed oil products. These products are being marketed as a healthy source of essential omega fatty acids when taken orally. Although the health aspects of these oils is open to debate, the probability that oils derived from the hemp seed will contain delta9-tetrahyrdocannabinol (THC) is noteworthy. Recent additions to the literature cite a number of studies illustrating that the ingestion of these products results in urinary levels of the THC metabolite, delta9-tetrahyrdocannabinol carboxylic acid (THCA), well above the administrative cutoff (50 ng/mL) used during random drug screens. Testing performed by our laboratory found that the concentration of THC in hemp oil products has been reduced considerably since the publication of earlier studies. The purpose of this study is to quantitate the THC levels in commercially available hemp oils and to administer those oils tested to THC-free volunteers to determine urine metabolite levels following several 15-g doses. Two extraction protocols were evaluated for removing THC from the oil matrix: a single step liquid-liquid extraction was compared to a two-phase process using both liquid-liquid and solid-phase techniques. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine THC levels in several products: four from Spectrum Essentials (3 bottled oils and 1-g capsules), two from Health from the Sun (1-g capsules and bottled oil) oils, and single samples of both Hempstead and Hempola hemp oils. These hemp oil products contained THC concentrations of 36.0, 36.4, 117.5, 79.5, 48.6, 45.7, 21.0, and 11.5 mg/g, respectively. The Abbott AxSYM FPIA and Roche On-Line KIMS immunoassays were used to screen the urine samples, and GC-MS was used to determine the amount of THC in each oil as well as confirm and quantitate THCA in the urine of study participants immediately before and 6 h after each dose. Peak THCA levels in the participants' urine

  11. Sex differences in the effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spatial learning in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young May; Jones, Katherine H; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, Harry Scott

    2007-09-01

    Like other recreational drugs, cannabinoids may produce different effects in men and women. In this study we measured the effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on spatial learning in two groups that are underrepresented in drug research--females and adolescents. In the first experiment, adolescent (postnatal day 30) and adult (postnatal day 70) rats of both sexes were treated subchronically with 5.0 mg/kg THC or vehicle for five consecutive days. Thirty minutes after each daily injection, they were tested on the spatial version of the Morris water maze task. In the second experiment, a separate group of adolescent and adult rats of both sexes was treated with 5.0 mg/kg THC or vehicle daily for 21 days and tested, 4 weeks later, on the spatial version of the water maze. Subchronic THC impaired spatial learning, and this effect was dependent upon both the age and sex of the animals tested. Prior exposure to chronic THC, however, did not cause any long-lasting spatial learning deficits. On the basis of our previous studies in male rats the third experiment assessed the dose-response relationship for the effects of THC on spatial learning and memory in female animals. We found that subchronic THC treatment (2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) disrupted learning in both adolescents and adults, but with greater effects at higher doses in adolescents compared with adults. The developmental sensitivity to subchronic THC confirms previous work carried out in our laboratory, and the sex-dependent effects highlight the importance of including females in drug abuse and addiction research.

  12. Novel time-dependent vascular actions of {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E. . E-mail: Saoirse.o'sullivan@nottingham.ac.uk; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Kendall, David A.; Randall, Michael D.

    2005-11-25

    Cannabinoids have widespread effects on the cardiovascular system, only some of which are mediated via G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. The active ingredient of cannabis, {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes acute vasorelaxation in various arteries. Here we show for the first time that THC also causes slowly developing vasorelaxation through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPAR{gamma}). In vitro, THC (10 {mu}M) caused time-dependent vasorelaxation of rat isolated arteries. Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC was similar to that produced by the PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone and was inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 (1 {mu}M), but not the cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251 (1 {mu}M). Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC requires an intact endothelium, nitric oxide, production of hydrogen peroxide, and de novo protein synthesis. In transactivation assays in cultured HEK293 cells, THC-activated PPAR{gamma}, transiently expressed in combination with retinoid X receptor {alpha} and a luciferase reporter gene, in a concentration-dependent manner (100 nM-10 {mu}M). In vitro incubation with THC (1 or 10 {mu}M, 8 days) stimulated adipocyte differentiation in cultured 3T3L1 cells, a well-accepted property of PPAR{gamma} ligands. The present results provide strong evidence that THC is a PPAR{gamma} ligand, stimulation of which causes time-dependent vasorelaxation, implying some of the pleiotropic effects of cannabis may be mediated by nuclear receptors.

  13. Cortical neuroinflammation contributes to long-term cognitive dysfunctions following adolescent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zamberletti, Erica; Gabaglio, Marina; Prini, Pamela; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    Over 180 million people consume cannabis globally. Cannabis use peaks during adolescence with a trend for continued consumption by adults. Notably, several studies have shown that long-term and heavy cannabis use during adolescence can impair brain maturation and predispose to neurodevelopmental disorders, although the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this association remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated whether, in female rats, chronic administration of increasing doses of the psychotropic plant-derived cannabis constituent, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), during adolescence (PND 35-45) could affect microglia function in the long-term. Furthermore, we explored a possible contribution of microglia to the development of THC-induced alterations in mood and cognition in adult female rats. Present data indicate that adolescent THC administration induces a persistent neuroinflammatory state specifically localized within the adult prefrontal cortex (PFC), characterized by increased expression of the pro-inflammatory markers, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2, and reduction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. This neuroinflammatory phenotype is associated with down-regulation of CB1 receptor on neuronal cells and up-regulation of CB2 on microglia cells, conversely. Interestingly, blocking microglia activation with ibudilast during THC treatment significantly attenuates short-term memory impairments in adulthood, simultaneously preventing the increases in TNF-α, iNOS, COX-2 levels as well as the up-regulation of CB2 receptors on microglia cells. In contrast, THC-induced depressive-like behaviors were unaffected by ibudilast treatment. Our findings demonstrate that adolescent THC administration is associated with persistent neuroinflammation within the PFC and provide evidence for a causal association between microglial activation and the development long-term cognitive deficits induced by adolescent THC treatment.

  14. FAAH-/- mice display differential tolerance, dependence, and cannabinoid receptor adaptation after delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and anandamide administration.

    PubMed

    Falenski, Katherine W; Thorpe, Andrew J; Schlosburg, Joel E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Abdullah, Rehab A; Smith, Tricia H; Selley, Dana E; Lichtman, Aron H; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2010-07-01

    Repeated administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, induces profound tolerance that correlates with desensitization and downregulation of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors in the CNS. However, the consequences of repeated administration of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) on cannabinoid receptor regulation are unclear because of its rapid metabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). FAAH(-/-) mice dosed subchronically with equi-active maximally effective doses of AEA or THC displayed greater rightward shifts in THC dose-effect curves for antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia than in AEA dose-effect curves. Subchronic THC significantly attenuated agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in brain and spinal cord, and reduced [(3)H]WIN55,212-2 binding in brain. Interestingly, AEA-treated FAAH(-/-) mice showed less CB(1) receptor downregulation and desensitization than THC-treated mice. Experiments examining tolerance and cross-tolerance indicated that the behavioral effects of THC, a low efficacy CB(1) receptor agonist, were more sensitive to receptor loss than those of AEA, a higher efficacy agonist, suggesting that the expression of tolerance was more affected by the intrinsic activity of the ligand at testing than during subchronic treatment. In addition, the CB(1) receptor antagonist, rimonabant, precipitated a markedly reduced magnitude of withdrawal in FAAH(-/-) mice treated subchronically with AEA compared with mice treated repeatedly with THC. The findings that repeated AEA administration produces lesser adaptive changes at the CB(1) receptor and has reduced dependence liability compared with THC suggest that pharmacotherapies targeting endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes are less likely to promote tolerance and dependence than direct acting CB(1) receptor agonists.

  15. Gonadal hormones do not alter the development of antinociceptive tolerance to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wakley, Alexa A; Wiley, Jenny L; Craft, Rebecca M

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex differences in the development of antinociceptive tolerance to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are due to activational effects of gonadal hormones. Rats were sham-gonadectomized (sham-GDX) or gonadectomized (GDX). GDX females received no hormone replacement (GDX+0), estradiol (GDX+E2), progesterone (GDX+P4), or both (GDX+E2/P4). GDX male rats received no hormone (GDX+0) or testosterone (GDX+T). Two weeks later, antinociceptive potency of THC was determined (pre-chronic test) on the warm water tail withdrawal and paw pressure assays. Vehicle or a sex-specific THC dose (females, 5.7mg/kg, males, 9.9mg/kg) was administered twice-daily for 9days, then the THC dose-effect curves were re-determined (post-chronic test). On the pre-chronic test (both assays), THC was more potent in sham-GDX females than males, and gonadectomy did not alter this sex difference. In GDX females, P4 significantly decreased THC's antinociceptive potency, whereas E2 had no effect. In GDX males, T did not alter THC's antinociceptive potency. After chronic THC treatment, THC's antinociceptive potency was decreased more in sham-GDX females than males, on the tail withdrawal test; this sex difference in tolerance was not altered in GDX or hormone-treated groups. These results suggest that greater antinociceptive tolerance in females, which occurred despite females receiving 40% less THC than males, is not due to activational effects of gonadal hormones.

  16. Modulation of Auditory and Visual Processing by Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol: an fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Winton-Brown, Toby T; Allen, Paul; Bhattacharrya, Sagnik; Borgwardt, Stefan J; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Crippa, Jose A; Seal, Marc L; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Ffytche, Dominic; Zuardi, Antonio W; Atakan, Zerrin; McGuire, Philip K

    2011-01-01

    Although the effects of cannabis on perception are well documented, little is known about their neural basis or how these may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) during visual and auditory processing in healthy volunteers. In total, 14 healthy volunteers were scanned on three occasions. Identical 10 mg THC, 600 mg CBD, and placebo capsules were allocated in a balanced double-blinded pseudo-randomized crossover design. Plasma levels of each substance, physiological parameters, and measures of psychopathology were taken at baseline and at regular intervals following ingestion of substances. Volunteers listened passively to words read and viewed a radial visual checkerboard in alternating blocks during fMRI scanning. Administration of THC was associated with increases in anxiety, intoxication, and positive psychotic symptoms, whereas CBD had no significant symptomatic effects. THC decreased activation relative to placebo in bilateral temporal cortices during auditory processing, and increased and decreased activation in different visual areas during visual processing. CBD was associated with activation in right temporal cortex during auditory processing, and when contrasted, THC and CBD had opposite effects in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, the right-sided homolog to Wernicke's area. Moreover, the attenuation of activation in this area (maximum 61, −15, −2) by THC during auditory processing was correlated with its acute effect on psychotic symptoms. Single doses of THC and CBD differently modulate brain function in areas that process auditory and visual stimuli and relate to induced psychotic symptoms. PMID:21412224

  17. Effects of oxidizing adulterants on detection of 11-nor-delta9-THC-9-carboxylic acid in urine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Buddha D; Jacobs, Aaron

    2002-10-01

    Bleach, nitrite, chromate, and hydrogen peroxide-peroxidase are effective urine adulterants used by the illicit drug users to conceal marijuana-positive results. Methods for detecting nitrite and chromate are available. Effects of other oxidizing agents that could possibly be used as adulterants and are difficult to detect or measure are presented in this report. Urine samples containing 40 ng/mL of 11-nor-delta9-THC-9-carboxylic acid (THC-acid) were treated with 10 mmol/L of commonly available oxidizing agents. Effects of horseradish peroxidase of activity 10 unit/mL and extracts from 2.5 g of red radish (Raphanus sativus, Radicula group), horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), Japanese radish (Raphanus sativus, Daikon group), and black mustard seeds (Brassica nigra), all with 10 mmol/L of hydrogen peroxide, were also examined. After 5 min, 16 h and 48 h of exposure at room temperature (23 degrees C) the specimens were tested by a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for THC-acid. A control group treated with sodium hydrosulfite to reduce the oxidants, was also tested to investigate the effect of oxidizing agents on THC-acid in the extraction method. THC-acid was lost completely in the extraction method when treated with chromate, nitrite, oxone, and hydrogen peroxide/ferrous ammonium sulfate (Fenton's reagent). Some losses were also observed with persulfate and periodate (up to 25%). These oxidants, and other oxidizing agents like permanganate, periodate, peroxidase, and extracts from red radish, horseradish, Japanese radish and black mustard seeds destroyed most of the THC-acid (> 94%) within 48 h of exposure. Chlorate, perchlorate, iodate, and oxychloride under these conditions showed little or no effect. Complete loss was observed when THC-acid was exposed to 50 mmol/L of oxychloride for 48 h. Several oxidizing adulterants that are difficult to test by the present urine adulterant testing methods showed considerable effects on the destruction of THC

  18. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses vomiting behavior and Fos expression in both acute and delayed phases of cisplatin-induced emesis in the least shrew.

    PubMed

    Ray, Andrew P; Griggs, Lisa; Darmani, Nissar A

    2009-01-03

    Cisplatin chemotherapy frequently causes severe vomiting in two temporally separated clusters of bouts dubbed the acute and delayed phases. Cannabinoids can inhibit the acute phase, albeit through a poorly understood mechanism. We examined the substrates of cannabinoid-mediated inhibition of both the emetic phases via immunolabeling for serotonin, Substance P, cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB(1), CB(2)), and the neuronal activation marker Fos in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva). Shrews were injected with cisplatin (10mg/kg i.p.), and one of vehicle, Delta(9)-THC, or both Delta(9)-THC and the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (2mg/kg i.p.), and monitored for vomiting. Delta(9)-THC-pretreatment caused concurrent decreases in the number of shrews expressing vomiting and Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR), effects which were blocked by SR141716A-pretreatment. Acute phase vomiting induced Fos-IR in the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNX), and area postrema (AP), whereas in the delayed phase Fos-IR was not induced in the AP at all, and was induced at lower levels in the other nuclei when compared to the acute phase. CB(1) receptor-IR in the NTS was dense, punctate labeling indicative of presynaptic elements, which surrounded Fos-expressing NTS neurons. CB(2) receptor-IR was not found in neuronal elements, but in vascular-appearing structures. All areas correlated with serotonin- and Substance P-IR. These results support published acute phase data in other species, and are the first describing Fos-IR following delayed phase emesis. The data suggest overlapping but separate mechanisms are invoked for each phase, which are sensitive to antiemetic effects of Delta(9)-THC mediated by CB(1) receptors.

  19. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) affects forelimb motor map expression but has little effect on skilled and unskilled behavior.

    PubMed

    Scullion, K; Guy, A R; Singleton, A; Spanswick, S C; Hill, M N; Teskey, G C

    2016-04-05

    It has previously been shown in rats that acute administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exerts a dose-dependent effect on simple locomotor activity, with low doses of THC causing hyper-locomotion and high doses causing hypo-locomotion. However the effect of acute THC administration on cortical movement representations (motor maps) and skilled learned movements is completely unknown. It is important to determine the effects of THC on motor maps and skilled learned behaviors because behaviors like driving place people at a heightened risk. Three doses of THC were used in the current study: 0.2mg/kg, 1.0mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg representing the approximate range of the low to high levels of available THC one would consume from recreational use of cannabis. Acute peripheral administration of THC to drug naïve rats resulted in dose-dependent alterations in motor map expression using high resolution short duration intracortical microstimulation (SD-ICMS). THC at 0.2mg/kg decreased movement thresholds and increased motor map size, while 1.0mg/kg had the opposite effect, and 2.5mg/kg had an even more dramatic effect. Deriving complex movement maps using long duration (LD)-ICMS at 1.0mg/kg resulted in fewer complex movements. Dosages of 1.0mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg THC reduced the number of reach attempts but did not affect percentage of success or the kinetics of reaching on the single pellet skilled reaching task. Rats that received 2.5mg/kg THC did show an increase in latency of forelimb removal on the bar task, while dose-dependent effects of THC on unskilled locomotor activity using the rotorod and horizontal ladder tasks were not observed. Rats may be employing compensatory strategies after receiving THC, which may account for the robust changes in motor map expression but moderate effects on behavior.

  20. Concentrations of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxytetrahydrocannabinol in blood and urine after passive exposure to Cannabis smoke in a coffee shop.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, J; Schimmel, I; Zörntlein, S; Becker, J; Drobnik, S; Kaufmann, T; Kuntz, V; Urban, R

    2010-05-01

    Cannabinoid concentrations in blood and urine after passive exposure to cannabis smoke under real-life conditions were investigated in this study. Eight healthy volunteers were exposed to cannabis smoke for 3 h in a well-attended coffee shop in Maastricht, Netherlands. An initial blood and urine sample was taken from each volunteer before exposure. Blood samples were taken 1.5, 3.5, 6, and 14 h after start of initial exposure, and urine samples were taken after 3.5, 6, 14, 36, 60, and 84 h. The samples were subjected to immunoassay screening for cannabinoids and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-nor-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH). It could be demonstrated that all volunteers absorbed THC. However, the detected concentrations were rather small. None of the urine samples produced immunoassay results above the cutoff concentration of 25 ng/mL. THC-COOH concentrations up to 5.0 and 7.8 ng/mL before and after hydrolysis, respectively, were found in the quantitative GC-MS analysis of urine. THC could be detected in trace amounts close to the detection limit of the used method in the first two blood samples after initial exposure (1.5 and 3.5 h). In the 6 h blood samples, THC was not detectable anymore. THC-COOH could be detected after 1.5 h and was still found in 3 out of 8 blood samples after 14 h in concentrations between 0.5 and 1.0 ng/mL.

  1. The dual effects of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on cholangiocarcinoma cells: anti-invasion activity at low concentration and apoptosis induction at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Leelawat, Surang; Leelawat, Kawin; Narong, Siriluck; Matangkasombut, Oraphan

    2010-05-01

    Currently, only gemcitabine plus platinum demonstrates the considerable activity for cholangiocarcinoma. The anticancer effect of Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active component of cannabinoids has been demonstrated in various kinds of cancers. We therefore evaluate the antitumor effects of THC on cholangiocarcinoma cells. Both cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and surgical specimens from cholangiocarcinoma patients expressed cannabinoid receptors. THC inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis. THC also decreased actin polymerization and reduced tumor cell survival in anoikis assay. pMEK1/2 and pAkt demonstrated the lower extent than untreated cells. Consequently, THC is potentially used to retard cholangiocarcinoma cell growth and metastasis.

  2. Simultaneous quantification of delta-9-THC, THC-acid A, CBN and CBD in seized drugs using HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Ambach, Lars; Penitschka, Franziska; Broillet, Alain; König, Stefan; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Bernhard, Werner

    2014-10-01

    An HPLC-DAD method for the quantitative analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (THCA-A), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol (CBN) in confiscated cannabis products has been developed, fully validated and applied to analyse seized cannabis products. For determination of the THC content of plant material, this method combines quantitation of THCA-A, which is the inactive precursor of THC, and free THC. Plant material was dried, homogenized and extracted with methanol by ultrasonication. Chromatographic separation was achieved with a Waters Alliance 2695 HPLC equipped with a Merck LiChrospher 60 RP-Select B (5μm) precolumn and a Merck LiChroCart 125-4 LiChrospher 60 RP-Select B (5μm) analytical column. Analytes were detected and quantified using a Waters 2996 photo diode array detector. This method has been accepted by the public authorities of Switzerland (Bundesamt für Gesundheit, Federal Office of Public Health), and has been used to analyse 9092 samples since 2000. Since no thermal decarboxylation of THCA-A occurs, the method is highly reproducible for different cannabis materials. Two calibration ranges are used, a lower one for THC, CBN and CBD, and a higher one for THCA-A, due to its dominant presence in fresh plant material. As provider of the Swiss proficiency test, the robustness of this method has been tested over several years, and homogeneity tests even in the low calibration range (1%) show high precision (RSD≤4.3%, except CBD) and accuracy (bias≤4.1%, except CBN).

  3. 3H-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol tissue and subcellular distribution in the central nervous system and tissue distribution in peripheral organs of tolerant and nontolerant dogs.

    PubMed

    Martin, B R; Dewey, W L; Harris, L S; Beckner, J S

    1976-01-01

    Tolerant and nontolerant dogs received one i.v. administration of 0.5 mg/kg of 3H-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol 30 minutes before they were sacrificed. Plasma, peripheral and brain tissues, as well as subcellular fractions of brain tissues from both treatment groups, were analyzed for radioactivity. Throughout the time period before sacrifice, the plasma concentrations of radioactivity in the tolerant and nontolerant dogs were not significantly different. The percentage of radioactivity in brain and plasma that was due to either unchanged delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol or a major metabolite was the same in each group. Of the radioactivity in brain, 46% was identified as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Regardless of treatment, there was a specific accumulation of radioactivity in adrenals, liver, kidney, heart and pancreas. The only significant differences in radioactivity between tolerant and nontolerant peripheral tissues were found in liver, kidney cortex, heart and lymph nodes. Although all brain areas from tolerant dogs contained less radioactivity than the comparable brain areas from nontolerant animals, only pituitary and putamen were significantly less. There was a specific accumulation of radioactivity in some brain areas that could be associated with behavioral effects. The concentration in cerebellar and cerebral gray was significantly greater than that in white, and there was a marked reduction in the concentration in gray after tolerance developed. The mean percentage of radioactivity in each subcellular fraction was as follows: 23% crude nuclei, 44% mitochondria, 8% cholinergic nerve endings, 7% noncholinergic nerve endings, 2% free mitochondria and 6% synaptic vesicles. The quantity of radioactivity in homogenates of brains from tolerant dogs was 17% less than brains of nontolerant animals, which was merely a reflection of the respective plasma concentrations. The distribution of radioactivity was similar in both groups, although most of the subcellular

  4. Development and validation of a method for the quantitation of Delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Abbara, Chadi; Galy, Romain; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Bonhomme-Faivre, Laurence

    2006-06-07

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the determination of Delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in human plasma is described. A two-step solid-phase extraction on CN cartridges was coupled with a reversed phase HPLC system. THC was eluted using a mobile phase composed of methanol, acetonitrile and tetrabutylammonium perchlorate solution (0.005 M, pH 3.2), through a C18 Nucleosil column and detected at a wavelength of 215 nm. Calibration curve was linear over the range 5-100 ng/ml with a lower limit of quantification validated at 5 ng/ml. Extraction recovery using the developed extraction procedure was higher than 85%. This method is presently used for the quantification of THC in plasma samples from regular cannabis smokers.

  5. [Dronabinol (delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol) in long-term treatment. Symptom control in patients with multiple sclerosis and spasticity, neuropathic pain, loss of appetite and cachexia].

    PubMed

    Nauck, F; Klaschik, E

    2004-12-01

    Cannabinoid drugs have been used increasingly in the treatment of neuropathic pain and spasticity. Even though the evidence still is scarce, patients with multiple sclerosis seem to benefit substiantially from cannabinoid therapy. In a case report dose finding and long-term therapie with delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are described. Dronabinol proved effective and was well tolerated in long-term treatment. Pain was reduced significantly and opioid requirements decreased. At the same time spasticity was reduced and appetite and weight increased. It still needs to bei discussed whether or not part of the positive effect on symptoms was probably mediated by psychomimetic effects. This case report shows, that dronabinol offers an additional therapeutic option in a palliative treatment concept for patiens with high symptom load.

  6. Preparation and certification of standard reference material 1507: 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in freeze-dried urine.

    PubMed

    Craft, N E; Byrd, G D; Hilpert, L R

    1989-03-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has prepared and certified SRM 1507, a freeze-dried urine fortified with 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-9-COOH), the major urinary metabolite of marijuana. The certified concentration of 20 +/- 1 ng/mL for the analyte was obtained from the concordant results of analyses of the material by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Solid-phase extraction was used to prepare the sample for GC/MS analyses, and liquid-liquid extraction was used for the HPLC-EC analyses. The multistep HPLC method was developed at NIST to circumvent interferences from urinary constituents. The results of a round robin test on this material among five Department of Defense laboratories involved in drug testing are reported.

  7. Perinatal exposure to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol causes enduring cognitive deficits associated with alteration of cortical gene expression and neurotransmission in rats.

    PubMed

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Trezza, Viviana; Cassano, Tommaso; Gaetani, Silvana; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Ubaldi, Massimo; Soverchia, Laura; Antonelli, Tiziana; Ferraro, Luca; Massi, Maurizio; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether perinatal exposure to a moderate dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alters cortical gene expression and neurotransmission, leading to enduring cognitive dysfunctions in rat offspring. To this purpose, rat dams were treated, from gestational day 15 to postnatal day 9, with THC at a daily dose (5 mg/kg, per os) devoid of overt signs of toxicity. THC did not influence reproduction parameters, whereas it caused subtle neurofunctional deficits in the adult offspring. Particularly, perinatal THC induced long-lasting alterations of cortical genes related to glutamatergic and noradrenergic systems, associated with a decrease in the cortical extracellular levels of both neurotransmitters. These alterations may account, at least in part, for the enduring cognitive impairment displayed by THC-exposed offspring. Taken together, the present results highlight how exposure to cannabinoids during early stages of brain development can lead to irreversible, subtle dysfunctions in the offspring.

  8. Identification of 11-Nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine by ion trap GC-MS-MS in the context of doping analysis.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Gerardo M; D'Angelo, Carlos; Fraguío, Mariá Sol; Centurión, Osvaldo Teme

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a sensitive and specific alternative to current gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) selected ion monitoring confirmation methods of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (cTHC) in human urine samples, in the context of doping analysis. An identification procedure based on the comparison, among suspicious and control samples, of the relative abundances of cTHC selected product ions obtained by GC-tandem MS in an ion trap is presented. The method complies with the identification criteria for qualitative assays established by sports authorities; the comparison procedure is precise, reproducible, specific, and sensitive, thus indicating that it is fit for the purpose of identification accordingly to World Antidoping Agency requirements.

  9. ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol decreases NOP receptor density and mRNA levels in human SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Cannarsa, Rosalia; Carretta, Donatella; Lattanzio, Francesca; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2012-02-01

    Several studies demonstrated a cross-talk between the opioid and cannabinoid system. The NOP receptor and its endogenous ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ represent an opioid-related functional entity that mediates some non-classical opioid effects. The relationship between cannabinoid and nociceptin/NOP system is yet poorly explored. In this study, we used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line to investigate the effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆(9)-THC) on nociceptin/NOP system. Results revealed that the exposure to ∆(9)-THC (100, 150, and 200 nM) for 24 h produces a dose-dependent NOP receptor B (max) down-regulation. Moreover, ∆(9)-THC caused a dose-dependent decrease in NOP mRNA levels. The selective cannabinoid receptor CB1 antagonist AM251 (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide) reduces both effects, suggesting that ∆(9)-THC activation of CB1 receptor is involved in the observed effects. These data show evidence of a cross-talk between NOP and CB1 receptors, thus suggesting a possible interplay between cannabinoid and nociceptin/NOP system.

  10. Sex-specific alterations in hippocampal cannabinoid 1 receptor expression following adolescent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment in the rat.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lindsay; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Izenwasser, Sari; Frank, Ashley; Wade, Dean; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2015-08-18

    Marijuana use by adolescents has been on the rise since the early 1990s. With recent legalization and decriminalization acts passed, cannabinoid exposure in adolescents will undoubtedly increase. Human studies are limited in their ability to examine underlying changes in brain biochemistry making rodent models valuable. Studies in adult and adolescent animals show region and sex specific downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor following chronic cannabinoid treatment. However, although sex-dependent changes in behavior have been observed during the drug abstinence period following adolescent cannabinoid exposure, little is known about CB1 receptor expression during this critical time. In order to characterize CB1 receptor expression following chronic adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we used [(3)H] CP55,940 binding to assess CB1 receptor expression in the dentate gyrus and areas CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus in both male and female adolescent rats at both 24h and 2 weeks post chronic THC treatment. Consistent with other reported findings, we found downregulation of the CB1 receptor in the hippocampal formation at 24h post treatment. While this downregulation persisted in both sexes following two weeks of abstinence in the CA2 region, in females, this downregulation also persisted in areas CA1 and CA3. Expression in the dentate gyrus returned to the normal range by two weeks. These data suggest that selective regions of the hippocampus show persistent reductions in CB1 receptor expression and that these reductions are more widespread in female compared to male adolescents.

  11. Sex-Specific Alterations in Hippocampal Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Expression Following Adolescent Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Lindsay; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Izenwasser, Sari; Frank, Ashley; Wade, Dean; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use by adolescents has been on the rise since the early 1990’s. With recent legalization and decriminalization acts passed, cannabinoid exposure in adolescents will undoubtedly increase. Human studies are limited in their ability to examine underlying changes in brain biochemistry making rodent models valuable. Studies in adult and adolescent animals show region and sex specific downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor following chronic cannabinoid treatment. However, although sex-dependent changes in behavior have been observed during the drug abstinence period following adolescent cannabinoid exposure, little is known about CB1 receptor expression during this critical time. In order to characterize CB1 receptor expression following chronic adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we used [3H]CP55,940 binding to assess CB1 receptor expression in the dentate gyrus and areas CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus in both male and female adolescent rats at both 24 hours and 2 weeks post chronic THC treatment. Consistent with other reported findings, we found downregulation of the CB1 receptor in the hippocampal formation at 24 hours post treatment. While this downregulation persisted in both sexes following two weeks of abstinence in the CA2 region, in females, this downregulation also persisted in areas CA1 and CA3. Expression in the dentate gyrus returned to the normal range by two weeks. These data suggest that selective regions of the hippocampus show persistent reductions in CB1 receptor expression and that these reductions are more widespread in female compared to male adolescents. PMID:26118897

  12. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts hippocampal neuroplasticity and neurogenesis in trained, but not untrained adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Steel, Ryan W J; Miller, John H; Sim, Dalice A; Day, Darren J

    2014-02-22

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug, and disruption of learning and memory are commonly reported consequences of cannabis use. We have previously demonstrated a spatial learning impairment by ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (Steel et al., 2011). The molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural impairment by cannabis remain poorly understood, although the importance of adaptive changes in neuroplasticity (synaptic number and strength) and neurogenesis during learning are accepted. Here we aimed to identify any effects of THC on the early induction of these adaptive processes supporting learning, so we conducted our analyses at the mid-training point of our previous study. Both untrained and trained (15 days of training) adolescent (P28-P42) Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily with THC (6 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle, and changes in the levels of markers of hippocampal neuroplasticity (CB1R, PSD95, synapsin-I, synapsin-III) and neurogenesis (Ki67, DCX, PSA-NCAM, BrdU labelling) by training were measured. Training of control animals, but not THC-treated animals increased neuroplasticity marker levels. However training of THC-treated animals, but not control animals reduced immature neuronal marker levels. Levels of hippocampal proliferation, and survival of the BrdU-labelled progeny of these divisions were unaffected by THC in trained and untrained animals. These data show a smaller neuroplastic response, and a reduction of new-born neuronal levels not attributable to effects on proliferation or survival by THC-treatment during training. Importantly no effects of THC were seen in the absence of training, indicating that these effects represent specific impairments by THC on training-induced responses.

  13. Chronic Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration Reduces IgE(+)B Cells but Unlikely Enhances Pathogenic SIVmac251 Infection in Male Rhesus Macaques of Chinese Origin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Liu, Li; Cong, Zhe; Wu, Xiaoxian; Wang, Hui; Qin, Chuan; Molina, Patricia; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-09-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) is the major psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Δ(9)-THC has been used in the active ingredient of Marinol as an appetite stimulant for AIDS patients. Its impact on progression of HIV-1 infection, however, remains debatable. Previous studies indicated that Δ(9)-THC administration enhanced HIV-1 infection in huPBL-SCID mice but seemingly decreased early mortality in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected male Indian-derived rhesus macaques. Here, we determine the chronic effect of Δ(9)-THC administration using 0.32 mg/kg or placebo (PBO), i.m., twice daily for 428 days on SIVmac251 infected male Chinese-derived rhesus macaques. Sixteen animals were divided into four study groups: Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(+), Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(-), PBO/SIV(+) and PBO/SIV(-) (n = 4/group). One-month after daily Δ(9)-THC or PBO administrations, macaques in groups one and three were challenged intravenously with pathogenic SIVmac251/CNS, which was isolated from the brain of a Chinese macaque with end-staged neuroAIDS. No significant differences in peak and steady state plasma viral loads were seen between Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(+) and PBO/SIV(+) macaques. Regardless of Δ(9)-THC, all infected macaques displayed significant drop of CD4/CD8 T cell ratio, loss of CD4(+) T cells and higher persistent levels of Ki67(+)CD8(+) T cells compared with uninfected animals. Moreover, long-term Δ(9)-THC treatment reduced significantly the frequency of circulating IgE(+)B cells. Only one Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(+) macaque died of simian AIDS with paralyzed limbs compared with two deaths in the PBO/SIV(+) group during the study period. These findings indicate that chronic Δ(9)-THC administration resulted in reduction of IgE(+)B cells, yet it unlikely enhanced pathogenic SIVmac251/CNS infection in male Rhesus macaques of Chinese origin.

  14. Separate and combined effects of the GABAA positive allosteric modulator diazepam and Δ9-THC in humans discriminating Δ9-THC

    PubMed Central

    Lile, Joshua A.; Kelly, Thomas H.; Hays, Lon R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous research suggested the involvement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in particular the GABAB receptor subtype, in the interoceptive effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC). The aim of the present study was to determine the potential involvement of the GABAA receptor subtype by assessing the separate and combined effects of the GABAA positive allosteric modulator diazepam and Δ9-THC using pharmacologically selective drug-discrimination procedures. Methods Ten cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral Δ9-THC from placebo and then received diazepam (5 and 10 mg), Δ9-THC (5, 15 and 30 mg) and placebo, alone and in combination. Self-report, task performance and physiological measures were also collected. Results Δ9-THC functioned as a discriminative stimulus, produced subjective effects typically associated with cannabinoids (e.g., High, Stoned, Like Drug) and elevated heart rate. Diazepam alone impaired performance on psychomotor performance tasks and increased ratings on a limited number of self-report questionnaire items (e.g., Any Effect, Sedated), but did not substitute for the Δ9-THC discriminative stimulus or alter the Δ9-THC discrimination dose-response function. Similarly, diazepam had limited impact on the other behavioral effects of Δ9-THC. Conclusions These results suggest that the GABAA receptor subtype has minimal involvement in the interoceptive effects of Δ9-THC, and by extension cannabis, in humans. PMID:25124305

  15. Quantitation of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in urine and blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Frazee, C Clinton; Kiscoan, Michael; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Marijuana, which is made from crushing the leaves, flowers, and sometimes the stems of the plant Cannabis sativa, contains more than 30 cannabinoids. The major psychoactive cannabinoid is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The major metabolite of THC, 11-nor-delta 9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabionol (THC-COOH), is excreted in the urine primarily as a glucuronide conjugate and is commonly analyzed in biological specimens for detecting marijuana usage. The procedure described here involves the addition of deuterated internal standard THC-COOH-d9 into the sample followed by hydrolysis of conjugated THC-COOH by alkali. THC-COOH is extracted from urine or blood using liquid-liquid extraction followed by preparation of its trimethylsilyl derivatives. The analysis of derivatized THC-COOH is performed using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Quantification of the drug in a sample is achieved by comparing the responses of the unknown sample to the responses of the calibrators using selected ion monitoring.

  16. Hair analysis for Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A--new insights into the mechanism of drug incorporation of cannabinoids into hair.

    PubMed

    Auwärter, Volker; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Traber, Jessica; Thieme, Detlef; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2010-03-20

    Differentiation between external contamination and incorporation of drugs or their metabolites from inside the body via blood, sweat or sebum is a general issue in hair analysis and of high concern when interpreting analytical results. In hair analysis for cannabinoids the most common target is Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), sometimes cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) are determined additionally. After repeated external contamination by cannabis smoke these analytes are known to be found in hair even after performing multiple washing steps. A widely accepted strategy to unequivocally prove active cannabis consumption is the analysis of hair extracts for the oxidative metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH). Although the acidic nature of this metabolite suggests a lower rate of incorporation into the hair matrix compared to THC, it is not fully understood up to now why hair concentrations of THC-COOH are generally found to be much lower (mostly <10 pg/mg) than the corresponding THC concentrations. Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA A) is the preliminary end product of the THC biosynthesis in the cannabis plant. Unlike THC it is non-psychoactive and can be regarded as a 'precursor' of THC being largely decarboxylated when heated or smoked. The presented work shows for the first time that THCA A is not only detectable in blood and urine of cannabis consumers but also in THC positive hair samples. A pilot experiment performed within this study showed that after oral intake of THCA A on a regular basis no relevant incorporation into hair occurred. It can be concluded that THCA A in hair almost exclusively derives from external contamination e.g. by side stream smoke. Elevated temperatures during the analytical procedure, particularly under alkaline conditions, can lead to decarboxylation of THCA A and accordingly increase THC concentrations in hair. Additionally, it has to be kept in mind that in hair samples tested positive for THCA A at least a

  17. Novel automated extraction method for quantitative analysis of urinary 11-nor-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH).

    PubMed

    Fu, Shanlin; Lewis, John

    2008-05-01

    An automated extraction method for extracting the major urinary metabolite of cannabis, 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) was developed on the four-probe Gilson ASPEC XL4trade mark solid-phase extraction (SPE) system. The method works on liquid-liquid extraction principles but does not require the use of SPE cartridges. The limits of detection and quantitation and the upper limit of linearity (ULOL) of the developed method were found to be 1, 2, and 1,500 ng/mL, respectively. There was no detectable carry over after 10,000 ng/mL analyte. For a batch of 76 samples, the process uses less than 100 mL methanol, 450 mL extracting solvent hexane/ethyl acetate (5:1, v/v) and 1 L rinsing solvent, 30% methanol in water. The automated extraction process takes 5 h to complete. Precision and accuracy of the method are comparable to both manual liquid-liquid extraction and automated SPE methods. The method has proven to be a simple, speedy, and economical alternative to the currently popular automated SPE method for the quantitative analysis of urinary THC-COOH.

  18. The effect of chronic prepubertal administration of marihuana (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) on the onset of puberty and the postpubertal reproductive functions in female rats.

    PubMed

    Wenger, T; Croix, D; Tramu, G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of the main psychoactive component of marihuana, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was investigated on the onset of puberty and on the reproductive function in female rats up to the seventy-fifth to eightieth day of life. The drug was administered i.p. at a dose of 1 microgram/kg/day between the twenty-second postnatal day and the day of vaginal opening (V.O.). The administration of THC caused a 2-day delay in V. O., and the number of ova on the day of first estrus was significantly lower in treated rats than in controls. No differences were observed in serum gonadotropin and prolactin (PRL) levels on the day of V. O. After puberty, alterations occurred in the neuroendocrine functions of animals receiving THC that persisted until adulthood: estrous cycles were irregular, the number of ova in animals killed 35-40 days after V. O. was reduced, and serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were decreased (diminution of serum FSH content was less expressed). An increase in serum PRL concentration could be demonstrated only in animals killed on the day of estrus. From these results, it might be concluded that THC administered to prepubertal rats--even in a very low dose--causes long-term irreversible alterations in reproductive functions. The importance of the fight against drug abuse is emphasized.

  19. Pharmacological activity of the basic fraction of marihuana whole smoke condensate alone and in combination with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J M; Lemberger, L; Novotny, M; Forney, R B; Dalton, W S; Maskarinec, M P

    1984-03-15

    This basic fraction (BF) of marihuana whole smoke condensate was subjected to pharmacological testing in males, Swiss-Webster mice. In a general pharmacological activity screen looking at behavioral, neurologic, and autonomic parameters, BF, at iv doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, caused impairment of visual placing, increase in tail pinch response, decrease in tail elevation, and induction of piloerection. These effects, although statistically significant, were slight and not consistently dose dependent. In a second study with doses ranging from 10 to 29 mg/kg, BF caused a decrease in spatial locomotion, rearing behavior, and urination incidence. In a third study, body temperatures of mice were measured periodically for 2 hr following administration of BF (1.2, 2.4, and 4.8 mg/kg) alone or in combination with 1.0 mg/kg delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). BF did not alter body temperature, nor did it affect THC-induced hypothermia. These results, although suggesting that the basic fraction of marihuana whole smoke condensate has pharmacological activity in mice, offers little evidence for the presence of highly active compounds.

  20. Simple and sensitive determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol in hair by combined silylation, headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nadulski, Thomas; Pragst, Fritz

    2007-02-01

    A new method for determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) in hair based on alkaline hair hydrolysis, extraction by iso-octane, combined derivatization with N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and headspace solid phase microextraction of the extract residue, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed and evaluated. The limits of detection of the three compounds were 0.01-0.02 ng/mg. The method was routinely applied to more than 250 hair samples. In 77 positive samples, the concentrations ranged from LOD to 4.2 ng/mg for THC (mean 0.49 ng/mg), to 12.1 ng/mg for CBD (mean 0.37 ng/mg) and to 0.85 ng/mg for CBN (mean 0.12 ng/mg) using a sample amount of 30 mg. The frequently observed increase of the segmental drug concentrations from proximal to distal is explained by progressive accumulation in the hair shaft from sebum or side stream smoke.

  1. Assessing the potential of a "color effect" for hair analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol: analysis of a large sample of hair specimens.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, Tom

    2003-12-12

    It has been hypothesized that hair color may play a role in the concentration of various drugs of abuse in hair. Several studies have shown that melanin in hair appears to play a binding role for at least some commonly abused drugs. However, these studies have been limited by a number of factors when assessing the clinical significance of a hypothesized melanin or color effect. This study evaluates the possible effect of hair color on the concentration of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (c-THC) in human hair. The analysis is based on 3886 positive c-THC hair specimens drawn from a universe of approximately 80000 specimens of scalp hair harvested from the posterior vertex of the head. Analysis of variance of color categorization by c-THC concentration shows that c-THC concentration does not have a significant association with hair color (Hair Color F = 1.148, p =.332) and therefore does not have a demonstrable "color effect".

  2. Short communication: Urinary excretion of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a pregnant woman following heavy, chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Westin, Andreas A; Huestis, Marilyn A; Aarstad, Kjell; Spigset, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Differentiating new intake of drugs-of-abuse from residual drug excretion may be difficult, especially following chronic drug usage and for drugs with long elimination half-lives such as cannabis. In the present case, cannabis was found in the urine of a young pregnant woman following heavy and chronic cannabis use. She was warned that if she continued using cannabis while pregnant she would be forced to be hospitalized. She was subjected to serial urine testing with 2-7-day intervals. Urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) concentrations, measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, declined from 348 to 3.9 ng/mL over a surprisingly long period of 12 weeks (84 days). Several algorithms for detecting new drug intake were applied during this time course; most indicated that the woman continued to smoke cannabis following the first urine test. The woman denied any use after the first specimen collection. In retrospect, her THCCOOH excretion profile supports her story. Algorithms for detecting new drug intake have been validated for occasional cannabis users only. We advise caution when interpreting urine test results from heavy, chronic cannabis users, especially when serious consequences are involved.

  3. Polymeric systems for amorphous Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol produced by a hot-melt method. Part I: chemical and thermal stability during processing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, Manish; Stodghill, Steven P; Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Repka, Michael A

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present research was to investigate the stability of an amorphous drug, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in polymer-based transmucosal systems. THC was incorporated in polyethylene oxide and hydroxypropylcellulose matrices by a hot-melt fabrication procedure, utilizing various processing aids. The chemical stability of the drug in the polymeric matrices was investigated with respect to processing temperature, processing time, formulation additives, and storage conditions. HPLC analysis of the THC-loaded systems indicated that the extent of drug degradation was influenced by all of the above mentioned variables. THC was particularly unstable in the vitamin E succinate-processed films, indicating a potential incompatibility. Thermal stability of the drug, polymers, and other ingredients at the elevated processing temperatures during the fabrication procedure, was evaluated using the isothermal mode of thermo-gravimetric analysis. When held at 160 and 200 degrees C, the weight percentage of THC decreased linearly as a function of time. Weight loss was controlled by blending the drug with polymers, PEO and HPC, of which PEO was determined to be more effective. Although higher temperatures lowered the polymer melt viscosity, THC and other materials were chemically and thermally unstable at such high temperatures. Due to this, matrix fabrication was found to be favorable at relatively lower temperatures, such as 120 degrees C.

  4. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of mouse cerebellum reveals alterations in RasGRF1 expression following in vivo chronic treatment with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Rusconi, Francesco; Rubino, Tiziana; Cattaneo, Angela; Martegani, Enzo; Parolaro, Daniela; Bachi, Angela; Zippel, Renata

    2009-02-01

    We have applied transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to identify changes in the RNA and the protein levels in the mouse cerebellum after chronic treatment with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Among approximately 14,000 transcripts in a mouse cDNA microarray library, we found 11 genes with altered expression. RasGRF1, a neuron-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor, showed a reduction both at the RNA and protein levels with a specific decrease of the protein pool associated to cell membranes. In addition, proteomic analysis on cerebellum obtained from chronically THC-treated mice detected quantitative changes of additional 27 spots, mostly in the membranous fraction. We found enrichment of alpha (Galphao, Galphaq) and beta subunits (beta4/beta2 and beta5) of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and of two calcium-binding proteins, calretinin and hippocalcin-like protein-1. In addition, we also detected a significant increase in the membrane fraction of proteins involved in exo-endocytosis such as septins, dynamin-1, and vesicle protein sorting 29. By western blotting, we confirmed increased membrane localization of calretinin and of dynamin-1 isoforms with higher isoelectric point, indicative for an underphosphorylated state of the molecule. In conclusion, our results indicate that chronic THC modulates the expression and subcellular localization of proteins implicated in Ras signaling, calcium-buffering potential, and trafficking.

  5. Efficacy of Crude Marijuana and Synthetic Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol as Treatment for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Jayme

    2009-05-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To synthesize the research to determine whether oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and smoked marijuana are effective treatments for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and to evaluate side effects and patient preference of these treatments.Data Sources: Original research, review articles, and other published articles in CINAHL(R), MEDLINE(R), and Cochrane Library databases.Data Synthesis: Cannabinoids are effective in controlling CINV, and oral THC and smoked marijuana have similar efficacy. However, smoked marijuana may not be accessible or safe for all patients with cancer. Also, these drugs have a unique side-effect profile that may include alterations in motor control, dizziness, dysphoria, and decreased concentration.Conclusions: This synthesis shows that cannabinoids are more effective than placebo and comparable to antiemetics such as prochlorperazine and ondansetron for CINV.Implications for Nursing: Nurses should feel supported by the literature to recommend oral synthetic THC as a treatment for CINV to their patients and physician colleagues. Nurses should be cognizant of the side-effect profile for this medication and provide appropriate patient education.

  6. Direct quantification of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in relation to doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Chebbah, C; Pozo, O J; Deventer, K; Van Eenoo, P; Delbeke, F T

    2010-04-30

    An accurate and precise method for the quantification of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) in urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for doping analysis purposes has been developed. The method involves the use of only 200 microL of urine and the use of D(9)-THCA as internal standard. No extraction procedure is used. The urine samples are hydrolysed using sodium hydroxide and diluted with a mixture of methanol/glacial acetic acid (1:1). Chromatographic separation is achieved using a C8 column with gradient elution. All MS and MS/MS parameters were optimised in both positive and negative electrospray ionisation modes. For the identification and the quantification of THCA three product ions are monitored in both ionisation modes. The method is linear over the studied range (5-40 ng/mL), with satisfactory intra-and inter-assay precision, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are lower than 15%. Good accuracy is achieved with bias less than 10% at all levels tested. No significant matrix effects are observed. The selectivity and specificity are satisfactory, and no interferences are detected. The LC/MS/MS method was applied for the analysis of 48 real urine samples previously analysed with a routine gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method. A good correlation between the two methods was obtained (r(2) > 0.98) with a slope close to 1.

  7. Analytical procedure for the determination of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Coulter, Cynthia; Rana, Sumandeep; Vincent, Michael; Soares, James

    2006-09-01

    The determination of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) in oral fluid specimens is described for the first time using a Quantisal oral fluid collection device and gas chromatography with single-quadrupole mass spectrometric detection. Oral fluid specimens were confirmed for the presence of THCA using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to achieve the low concentration levels previously reported to be present in oral fluid. The extraction efficiency for THCA from the oral fluid collection pad was determined to be 80% at a concentration of 10 pg/mL with a coefficient of variation of 8.23%. The intraday precision of the assay ranged from 3.4% to 7.9% over four concentrations; the interday precision ranged from 8.3% to 18.5%. The limit of quantitation was 2 pg/mL. The method was applied to oral fluid specimens collected from a frequent user of marijuana. Samples were collected almost immediately after the subject smoked and then at intervals of 15 and 45 min and 1, 2, and 8 h after smoking. THCA was present in all the specimens, even the initial specimen taken almost immediately after smoking. The presence of THCA minimizes the argument for passive exposure to marijuana in drug-testing cases.

  8. Quantification of 11-Carboxy-Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in Meconium Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Davis, Brehon; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is an ongoing concern and detecting drug use during pregnancy is an important component of neonatal care when drug abuse is suspected. Meconium is the preferred specimen for drug testing because it is easier to collect than neonatal urine and it provides a much broader time frame of drug exposure. We describe a method for quantifying 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in meconium. After adding a labeled internal standard (THC-COOH D9) and acetonitrile, samples are sonicated to release both free and conjugated THC-COOH. The acetonitrile/aqueous layer is removed and mixed with a strong base to hydrolyze the conjugated THC-COOH. The samples are then extracted with an organic solvent mixture as part of a sample "cleanup." The organic solvent layer is discarded and the remaining aqueous sample is acidified. Following extraction with a second organic mixture, the organic layer is removed and concentrated to dryness. The resulting residue is converted to a trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode.

  9. Detection of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid specimens and its contribution to positive results in screening assays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Ross, Wayne; Coulter, Cynthia; Adams, Laura; Rana, Sumandeep; Vincent, Michael; Soares, James

    2006-09-01

    The detection of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in oral fluid specimens is described, and its contribution to an immunoassay for the detection of cannabinoids is investigated. Oral fluid specimens, screened using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA), were carried forward to confirmation for both tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and THC-COOH using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One hundred and fifty-three specimens were analyzed, of which 143 screened positive for cannabinoids. Ninety-five (66.4%) of these specimens were positive for both THC and THC-COOH; 14 (9.7%) were positive for THC-COOH only, and 27 (18.8%) were positive for THC only. The GC-MS assay for the detection of THC-COOH in oral fluid was linear to 160 pg/mL with a limit of quantitation of 2 pg/mL. The detection of the marijuana metabolite, THC-COOH, in 76.2% of oral fluid specimens screening positive for cannabinoids is reported. As a potential defense against passive exposure claims, proposed SAMHSA regulations may require the simultaneous collection of a urine sample when oral fluid samples are used. The detection of the metabolite, THC-COOH, is a significant alternative to this approach because its presence in oral fluid minimizes the argument for passive exposure to marijuana in drug testing cases.

  10. Dose-Related Modulation of Event-Related Potentials to Novel and Target Stimuli by Intravenous Δ9-THC in Humans

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Fridberg, Daniel J; Skosnik, Patrick D; Williams, Ashley; Roach, Brian; Singh, Nagendra; Carbuto, Michelle; Elander, Jacqueline; Schnakenberg, Ashley; Pittman, Brian; Sewell, R Andrew; Ranganathan, Mohini; Mathalon, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids induce a host of perceptual alterations and cognitive deficits in humans. However, the neural correlates of these deficits have remained elusive. The current study examined the acute, dose-related effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) on psychophysiological indices of information processing in humans. Healthy subjects (n=26) completed three test days during which they received intravenous Δ9-THC (placebo, 0.015 and 0.03 mg/kg) in a within-subject, double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and counterbalanced design. Psychophysiological data (electroencephalography) were collected before and after drug administration while subjects engaged in an event-related potential (ERP) task known to be a valid index of attention and cognition (a three-stimulus auditory ‘oddball' P300 task). Δ9-THC dose-dependently reduced the amplitude of both the target P300b and the novelty P300a. Δ9-THC did not have any effect on the latency of either the P300a or P300b, or on early sensory-evoked ERP components preceding the P300 (the N100). Concomitantly, Δ9-THC induced psychotomimetic effects, perceptual alterations, and subjective ‘high' in a dose-dependent manner. Δ9-THC -induced reductions in P3b amplitude correlated with Δ9-THC-induced perceptual alterations. Lastly, exploratory analyses examining cannabis use status showed that whereas recent cannabis users had blunted behavioral effects to Δ9-THC, there were no dose-related effects of Δ9-THC on P300a/b amplitude between cannabis-free and recent cannabis users. Overall, these data suggest that at doses that produce behavioral and subjective effects consistent with the known properties of cannabis, Δ9-THC reduced P300a and P300b amplitudes without altering the latency of these ERPs. Cannabinoid agonists may therefore disrupt cortical processes responsible for context updating and the automatic orientation of attention, while leaving processing speed and earlier sensory ERP components intact

  11. CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors mediate different aspects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced T helper cell shift following immune activation by Legionella pneumophila infection.

    PubMed

    Newton, Catherine A; Chou, Ping-Jen; Perkins, Izabella; Klein, Thomas W

    2009-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila infection of mice induces proinflammatory cytokines and Th1 immunity as well as rapid increases in serum levels of IL-12 and IFNgamma and splenic IL-12Rbeta2 expression. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) treatment prior to infection causes a shift from Th1 to Th2 immunity and here we demonstrate that CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors mediate different aspects of the shift. Using cannabinoid receptor antagonists and cannabinoid receptor gene deficient mice (CB(1) (-/-) and CB(2) (-/-)), we showed that both CB(1) and CB(2) receptors were involved in the THC-induced attenuation of serum IL-12 and IFNgamma. IFNgamma production is dependent upon signaling through IL-12Rbeta2 (beta2) and THC treatment suppressed splenic beta2 message; moreover, this effect was CB(1) but not CB(2)-dependent from studies with receptor antagonists and CB1(-/-) and CB2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, observed increases in IL-4 induced by THC, were not involved in the drug effect on beta2 from studies with IL-4 deficient mice. The GATA-3 transcription factor is necessary for IL-4 production and is selectively expressed in Th2 cells. GATA-3 message levels were elevated in spleens of THC-treated and L. pneumophila-infected mice and the effect was shown to be CB(2) but not CB(1)-dependent. Furthermore, GATA-3 regulatory factors were modulated in that Notch ligand Delta4 mRNA was decreased and Jagged1 increased by THC also in a CB2-dependent manner and splenic NFkappaB p65 was increased. Together, these results indicate that CB(1) and CB(2) mediate the THC-induced shift in T helper activity in L. pneumophila-infected mice, with CB(1) involved in suppressing IL-12Rbeta2 and CB(2) involved in enhancing GATA-3.

  12. Long-term administration of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol desensitizes CB1-, adenosine A1-, and GABAB-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Selley, Dana E; Cassidy, Michael P; Martin, Billy R; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2004-11-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the cerebellum mediate the inhibitory effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on motor coordination. Intracellular effects of CB(1) receptors include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via activation of G(i/o) proteins. There is evidence for the convergence of other neuronal receptors, such as adenosine A(1) and GABA(B), with the cannabinoid system on this signaling pathway to influence motor function. Previous studies have shown that brain CB(1) receptors are desensitized and down-regulated by long-term THC treatment, but few studies have examined the effects of long-term THC treatment on downstream effector activity in brain. Therefore, these studies examined the relationship between CB(1), adenosine A(1), and GABA(B) receptors in cerebella of mice undergoing prolonged treatment with vehicle or THC at the level of G protein activation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. In control cerebella, CB(1) receptors produced less than additive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with GABA(B) and A(1) receptors, indicating that these receptors are localized on overlapping populations of cells. Long-term THC treatment produced CB(1) receptor down-regulation and desensitization of both cannabinoid agonist-stimulated G protein activation and inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase. However, G protein activation by GABA(B) or A(1) receptors was unaffected. It is noteworthy that heterologous attenuation of GABA(B) and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was observed, even though absolute levels of basal and forskolin- or G(s)-stimulated activity were unchanged. These results indicate that long-term THC administration produces a disruption of inhibitory receptor control of cerebellar adenylyl cyclase and suggest a potential mechanism of cross-tolerance to the motor incoordinating effects of cannabinoid, GABA(B), and A(1) agonists.

  13. Cognitive Impairment Induced by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol Occurs through Heteromers between Cannabinoid CB1 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Viñals, Xavier; Moreno, Estefanía; Lanfumey, Laurence; Cordomí, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de La Torre, Rafael; Gasperini, Paola; Navarro, Gemma; Howell, Lesley A; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluís, Carmen; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces a variety of negative effects with major consequences in cannabis users that constitute important drawbacks for the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. For this reason, there is a tremendous medical interest in harnessing the beneficial effects of THC. Behavioral studies carried out in mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) revealed a remarkable 5-HT2AR-dependent dissociation in the beneficial antinociceptive effects of THC and its detrimental amnesic properties. We found that specific effects of THC such as memory deficits, anxiolytic-like effects, and social interaction are under the control of 5-HT2AR, but its acute hypolocomotor, hypothermic, anxiogenic, and antinociceptive effects are not. In biochemical studies, we show that CB1R and 5-HT2AR form heteromers that are expressed and functionally active in specific brain regions involved in memory impairment. Remarkably, our functional data shows that costimulation of both receptors by agonists reduces cell signaling, antagonist binding to one receptor blocks signaling of the interacting receptor, and heteromer formation leads to a switch in G-protein coupling for 5-HT2AR from Gq to Gi proteins. Synthetic peptides with the sequence of transmembrane helices 5 and 6 of CB1R, fused to a cell-penetrating peptide, were able to disrupt receptor heteromerization in vivo, leading to a selective abrogation of memory impairments caused by exposure to THC. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism for the functional interaction between CB1R and 5-HT2AR mediating cognitive impairment. CB1R-5-HT2AR heteromers are thus good targets to dissociate the cognitive deficits induced by THC from its beneficial antinociceptive properties.

  14. Reduction of the fertilizing capacity of sea urchin sperm by cannabinoids derived from marihuana. III. Activation of phospholipase A2 in sperm homogenate by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Chang, M C; Berkery, D; Laychock, S G; Schuel, H

    1991-07-25

    Inhibition of the egg jelly induced acrosome reaction by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is associated with the localized disruption of the nuclear envelope and the formation of lipid deposits in sea urchin sperm. This suggests that THC may activate phospholipase(s) within the sperm. We now report effects of THC on phospholipase A2 activity in homogenates of sea urchin sperm using 1-stearoyl-2-[1-14C]arachidonyl phosphatidylcholine as substrate. The release of radioactive arachidonic acid was measured after a 30-min incubation with the enzyme. In the absence of exogenous Ca2+, 100 microM THC produced a significant (P less than 0.001) increase in phospholipase A2 activity. THC activated phospholipase A2 in a concentration (1-100 microM) and time-dependent (0-30 min) manner. Exogenous calcium (10 mM) significantly augmented basal (P less than 0.001) and THC-stimulated (P less than 0.005) phospholipase A2 activity. Calcium chelators [ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)] inhibited the basal level of phospholipase A2 activity in the sperm homogenate, and prevented the activation of phospholipase A2 by THC. Submicromolar levels of free calcium ions were required for THC stimulation of phospholipase A2. Cannabinol which mimics the effects of THC on the acrosome reaction also activated phospholipase A2 in sperm homogenate. These results suggest that THC may alter lipid metabolism in sperm by activating calcium-dependent phospholipase A2. Putative metabolites derived from this process may inhibit the acrosome reaction and thereby reduce the fertilizing capacity of sea urchin sperm.

  15. Cognitive Impairment Induced by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol Occurs through Heteromers between Cannabinoid CB1 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lanfumey, Laurence; Cordomí, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de La Torre, Rafael; Gasperini, Paola; Navarro, Gemma; Howell, Lesley A.; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluís, Carmen; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces a variety of negative effects with major consequences in cannabis users that constitute important drawbacks for the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. For this reason, there is a tremendous medical interest in harnessing the beneficial effects of THC. Behavioral studies carried out in mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) revealed a remarkable 5-HT2AR-dependent dissociation in the beneficial antinociceptive effects of THC and its detrimental amnesic properties. We found that specific effects of THC such as memory deficits, anxiolytic-like effects, and social interaction are under the control of 5-HT2AR, but its acute hypolocomotor, hypothermic, anxiogenic, and antinociceptive effects are not. In biochemical studies, we show that CB1R and 5-HT2AR form heteromers that are expressed and functionally active in specific brain regions involved in memory impairment. Remarkably, our functional data shows that costimulation of both receptors by agonists reduces cell signaling, antagonist binding to one receptor blocks signaling of the interacting receptor, and heteromer formation leads to a switch in G-protein coupling for 5-HT2AR from Gq to Gi proteins. Synthetic peptides with the sequence of transmembrane helices 5 and 6 of CB1R, fused to a cell-penetrating peptide, were able to disrupt receptor heteromerization in vivo, leading to a selective abrogation of memory impairments caused by exposure to THC. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism for the functional interaction between CB1R and 5-HT2AR mediating cognitive impairment. CB1R-5-HT2AR heteromers are thus good targets to dissociate the cognitive deficits induced by THC from its beneficial antinociceptive properties. PMID:26158621

  16. 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (THC-COOEt): unsuccessful search for a marker of combined cannabis and alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Nadulski, Thomas; Bleeck, Simona; Schräder, Johannes; Bork, Wolf-Rainer; Pragst, Fritz

    2010-03-20

    11-Nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (THC-COOEt) can be presumed to be a mixed metabolite formed during combined consumption of cannabinoids and alcohol. In order to examine this hypothesis, THC-COOEt and its deuterated analogue D(3)-THC-COOEt were synthesized as reference substance and internal standard from the corresponding carboxylic acids and diazoethane and methods were developed for the sensitive detection of THC-COOEt in plasma and hair based on gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry after silylation with N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) as well as tandem mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS-MS) after derivatization with pentafluoropropionyl anhydride. The methods were applied for THC-COOEt determination to plasma samples from 22 drunk driving cases which contained both ethanol (0.30-2.16 mg/g) and THC-COOH (15-252 ng/mL) as well as to 12 hair samples from drug fatalities which were both positive for THC (0.09-2.04 ng/mg) and fatty acid ethyl esters as markers of chronic alcohol abuse (0.70-6.3 ng/mg). In none of these samples THC-COOEt could be found with limits of detection of 0.3 ng/mL in plasma and 2 pg/mg in hair in 11 samples using GC-NCI-MS and 0.2 pg/mg in one sample using GC-NCI-MS. Therefore, the use of this compound as a marker for combined cannabis and alcohol consumption could not be achieved.

  17. A rapid and sensitive method for the identification of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Anna; Lewis, John; Doble, Philip; Hansen, Glyn; Prolov, Tatiana; Fu, Shanlin

    2012-02-10

    A fast and sensitive method was developed for detecting delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method is suitable for samples of small volume and low concentration. For method development and validation, neat oral fluid (200 μL) spiked with THC and d(3)-THC (internal standard) was extracted via liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). The LLE method had an extraction efficiency of 75% with no significant matrix effects observed in either diluted or neat oral fluid samples. LC was performed on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 Rapid Resolution HT column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 1.8 μm particle size) with positive electrospray ionisation and selected reaction monitoring. The total run time was an efficient 3.5 min in isocratic elution mode. The limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL and the analysis was linear over the range of 1-500 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The imprecision (RSD) of the method was 13% and inaccuracy (MRE) was 4%. The method was subsequently applied to two neat oral fluid samples taken from a chronic cannabis smoker. It was also applied to buffer diluted residual oral fluid samples (n=48) collected using the Cozart RapiScan(®) system through the Roadside Drug Testing Program (RDTP) in NSW, Australia. A stability study was performed that revealed freezing or refrigerating resulted in comparable decreases in THC recovery from neat oral fluid at the end of two weeks of storage. Storage at room temperature even for one day invoked significant losses and is not recommended.

  18. A Preliminary Investigation of Individual Differences in Subjective Responses to D-Amphetamine, Alcohol, and Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Using a Within-Subjects Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Margaret C.; Marcus, Benjamin A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Polydrug use is common, and might occur because certain individuals experience positive effects from several different drugs during early stages of use. This study examined individual differences in subjective responses to single oral doses of d-amphetamine, alcohol, and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in healthy social drinkers. Each of these drugs produces feelings of well-being in at least some individuals, and we hypothesized that subjective responses to these drugs would be positively correlated. We also examined participants’ drug responses in relation to personality traits associated with drug use. In this initial, exploratory study, 24 healthy, light drug users (12 male, 12 female), aged 21–31 years, participated in a fully within-subject, randomized, counterbalanced design with six 5.5-hour sessions in which they received d-amphetamine (20mg), alcohol (0.8 g/kg), or THC (7.5 mg), each paired with a placebo session. Participants rated the drugs’ effects on both global measures (e.g. feeling a drug effect at all) and drug-specific measures. In general, participants’ responses to the three drugs were unrelated. Unexpectedly, “wanting more” alcohol was inversely correlated with “wanting more” THC. Additionally, in women, but not in men, “disliking” alcohol was negatively correlated with “disliking” THC. Positive alcohol and amphetamine responses were related, but only in individuals who experienced a stimulant effect of alcohol. Finally, high trait constraint (or lack of impulsivity) was associated with lower reports of liking alcohol. No personality traits predicted responses across multiple drug types. Generally, these findings do not support the idea that certain individuals experience greater positive effects across multiple drug classes, but instead provide some evidence for a “drug of choice” model, in which individuals respond positively to certain classes of drugs that share similar subjective effects, and dislike other

  19. Chemical stability and bioadhesive properties of an ester prodrug of Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in poly(ethylene oxide) matrices: effect of formulation additives.

    PubMed

    Thumma, Sridhar; Majumdar, Soumyajit; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Repka, Michael A

    2008-10-01

    The objective of the present research was to stabilize a novel hemiglutarate ester prodrug of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymeric matrices produced by hot-melt fabrication, for systemic delivery of THC through the oral transmucosal route. For this purpose, the influence of pH modifiers and antioxidants employed as stabilizing agents in these matrices was investigated. Based on the stability studies, two final formulations were made, and the stability of the active was assessed in these systems. In addition, the bioadhesive properties of PEO matrices were studied as a function of bioadhesive polymer type and concentration, contact time, drug loading and wetting time. Of all of the polymers investigated, bioadhesion was highest with Carbopol 971p. Bioadhesion increased with bioadhesive polymer concentration and wetting time to a certain level beyond which there was no further contribution. Both the contact time and drug loading influenced the bioadhesion. Severe degradation of the prodrug was observed during storage, even at room temperature (75% at the end of 3 months). Incorporation of the stabilizing agents in the PEO matrices reduced the degradation of the prodrug considerably. Citric acid was the most effective of all of the pH modifiers studied. Among the various antioxidants utilized, degradation was observed least in presence of BHT and ascorbic acid. Only 7.6% and 8.2% of prodrug degraded in these matrices, respectively, as compared to the PEO-only matrices (59.4%) at the end of 3 months at 25 degrees C/60% RH. The prodrug was very stable in both of the final formulations at the end of the 3 months at 40 degrees C/75% RH.

  20. A Preliminary Investigation of Individual Differences in Subjective Responses to D-Amphetamine, Alcohol, and Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Using a Within-Subjects Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Margaret C; Marcus, Benjamin A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Polydrug use is common, and might occur because certain individuals experience positive effects from several different drugs during early stages of use. This study examined individual differences in subjective responses to single oral doses of d-amphetamine, alcohol, and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in healthy social drinkers. Each of these drugs produces feelings of well-being in at least some individuals, and we hypothesized that subjective responses to these drugs would be positively correlated. We also examined participants' drug responses in relation to personality traits associated with drug use. In this initial, exploratory study, 24 healthy, light drug users (12 male, 12 female), aged 21-31 years, participated in a fully within-subject, randomized, counterbalanced design with six 5.5-hour sessions in which they received d-amphetamine (20mg), alcohol (0.8 g/kg), or THC (7.5 mg), each paired with a placebo session. Participants rated the drugs' effects on both global measures (e.g. feeling a drug effect at all) and drug-specific measures. In general, participants' responses to the three drugs were unrelated. Unexpectedly, "wanting more" alcohol was inversely correlated with "wanting more" THC. Additionally, in women, but not in men, "disliking" alcohol was negatively correlated with "disliking" THC. Positive alcohol and amphetamine responses were related, but only in individuals who experienced a stimulant effect of alcohol. Finally, high trait constraint (or lack of impulsivity) was associated with lower reports of liking alcohol. No personality traits predicted responses across multiple drug types. Generally, these findings do not support the idea that certain individuals experience greater positive effects across multiple drug classes, but instead provide some evidence for a "drug of choice" model, in which individuals respond positively to certain classes of drugs that share similar subjective effects, and dislike other types of drugs.

  1. The cannabinoid delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT survival signalling and induces BAD-mediated apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Greenhough, Alexander; Patsos, Helena A; Williams, Ann C; Paraskeva, Christos

    2007-11-15

    Deregulation of cell survival pathways and resistance to apoptosis are widely accepted to be fundamental aspects of tumorigenesis. As in many tumours, the aberrant growth and survival of colorectal tumour cells is dependent upon a small number of highly activated signalling pathways, the inhibition of which elicits potent growth inhibitory or apoptotic responses in tumour cells. Accordingly, there is considerable interest in therapeutics that can modulate survival signalling pathways and target cancer cells for death. There is emerging evidence that cannabinoids, especially Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), may represent novel anticancer agents, due to their ability to regulate signalling pathways critical for cell growth and survival. Here, we report that CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human colorectal adenoma and carcinoma cells, and show for the first time that THC induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. THC-induced apoptosis was rescued by pharmacological blockade of the CB1, but not CB2, cannabinoid receptor. Importantly, THC treatment resulted in CB1-mediated inhibition of both RAS-MAPK/ERK and PI3K-AKT survival signalling cascades; two key cell survival pathways frequently deregulated in colorectal tumours. The inhibition of ERK and AKT activity by THC was accompanied by activation of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD. Reduction of BAD protein expression by RNA interference rescued colorectal cancer cells from THC-induced apoptosis. These data suggest an important role for CB1 receptors and BAD in the regulation of apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. The use of THC, or selective targeting of the CB1 receptor, may represent a novel strategy for colorectal cancer therapy.

  2. Cannabinoids Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol differentially inhibit the lipopolysaccharide-activated NF-kappaB and interferon-beta/STAT proinflammatory pathways in BV-2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Kozela, Ewa; Pietr, Maciej; Juknat, Ana; Rimmerman, Neta; Levy, Rivka; Vogel, Zvi

    2010-01-15

    Cannabinoids have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory activities in various in vivo and in vitro experimental models as well as ameliorate various inflammatory degenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms of these effects are not completely understood. Using the BV-2 mouse microglial cell line and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce an inflammatory response, we studied the signaling pathways engaged in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabinoids as well as their influence on the expression of several genes known to be involved in inflammation. We found that the two major cannabinoids present in marijuana, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), decrease the production and release of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and interferon (IFN)beta, from LPS-activated microglial cells. The cannabinoid anti-inflammatory action does not seem to involve the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors or the abn-CBD-sensitive receptors. In addition, we found that THC and CBD act through different, although partially overlapping, mechanisms. CBD, but not THC, reduces the activity of the NF-kappaB pathway, a primary pathway regulating the expression of proinflammatory genes. Moreover, CBD, but not THC, up-regulates the activation of the STAT3 transcription factor, an element of homeostatic mechanism(s) inducing anti-inflammatory events. Following CBD treatment, but less so with THC, we observed a decreased level of mRNA for the Socs3 gene, a main negative regulator of STATs and particularly of STAT3. However, both CBD and THC decreased the activation of the LPS-induced STAT1 transcription factor, a key player in IFNbeta-dependent proinflammatory processes. In summary, our observations show that CBD and THC vary in their effects on the anti-inflammatory pathways, including the NF-kappaB and IFNbeta-dependent pathways.

  3. Alterations of prefrontal cortex GABAergic transmission in the complex psychotic-like phenotype induced by adolescent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Zamberletti, Erica; Beggiato, Sarah; Steardo, Luca; Prini, Pamela; Antonelli, Tiziana; Ferraro, Luca; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Although several findings indicate an association between adolescent cannabis abuse and the risk to develop schizophrenia later in life, the evidence for a causal relationship is still inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the emergence of psychotic-like behavior in adult female rats chronically exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence. To this aim, female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with THC during adolescence (PND 35-45) and, in adulthood (PND 75), a series of behavioral tests and biochemical assays were performed in order to investigate the long-term effects of adolescent THC exposure. Adolescent THC pretreatment leads to long-term behavioral alterations, characterized by recognition memory deficits, social withdrawal, altered emotional reactivity and sensitization to the locomotor activating effects of acute PCP. Moreover, since cortical disinhibition seems to be a key feature of many different animal models of schizophrenia and GABAergic hypofunction in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been observed in postmortem brains from schizophrenic patients, we then investigated the long-lasting consequences of adolescent THC exposure on GABAergic transmission in the adult rat PFC. Biochemical analyses revealed that adolescent THC exposure results in reduced GAD67 and basal GABA levels within the adult PFC. GAD67 expression is reduced both in parvalbumin (PV)- and cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons; this alteration may be related to the altered emotional reactivity triggered by adolescent THC, as silencing PFC GAD67 expression through a siRNA-mediated approach is sufficient to impact rats' behavior in the forced swim test. Finally, the cellular underpinnings of the observed sensitized response to acute PCP in adult THC-treated rats could be ascribed to the increased cFos immunoreactivity and glutamate levels in the PFC and dorsal striatum. The present findings support the hypothesis that adolescent THC exposure may

  4. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®): a review of its use in patients with moderate to severe spasticity due to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y; McKeage, Kate; Scott, Lesley J

    2014-04-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) [Sativex®] is an oromucosal spray formulation that contains principally THC and CBD at an approximately 1:1 fixed ratio, derived from cloned Cannabis sativa L. plants. The main active substance, THC, acts as a partial agonist at human cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and thus, may modulate the effects of excitatory (glutamate) and inhibitory (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurotransmitters. THC/CBD is approved in a number of countries, including Germany and the UK, as an add-on treatment for symptom improvement in adult patients with moderate to severe spasticity due to multiple sclerosis who have not responded adequately to other anti-spasticity medication and who demonstrate clinically significant improvement in spasticity-related symptoms during an initial trial of therapy. In the largest multinational clinical trial that evaluated the approved THC/CBD regimen in this population, 12 weeks' double-blind treatment with THC/CBD significantly reduced spasticity severity (primary endpoint) compared with placebo in patients who achieved a clinically significant improvement in spasticity after 4 weeks' single-blind THC/CBD treatment, as assessed by a patient-rated numerical rating scale. A significantly greater proportion of THC/CBD than placebo recipients achieved a ≥ 30% reduction (a clinically relevant reduction) in spasticity severity. The efficacy of THC/CBD has been also shown in at least one everyday clinical practice study (MOVE 2). THC/CBD was generally well tolerated in clinical trials. Dizziness and fatigue were reported most frequently during the first 4 weeks of treatment and resolved within a few days even with continued treatment. Thus, add-on THC/CBD is a useful symptomatic treatment option for its approved indication.

  5. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol prolongs the immobility time in the mouse forced swim test: involvement of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor and serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Tomomi; Koushi, Emi; Higashihara, Fuminori; Mishima, Kenichi; Chidori, Shozo; Hasebe, Nobuyoshi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Nishimura, Ryoji; Oishi, Ryozo; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2008-07-28

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive component of marijuana, on immobility time during the forced swim test. THC (2 and 6 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly prolonged the immobility time. In addition, THC at the same doses did not significantly affect locomotor activity in the open-field test. The selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the enhancement of immobility by THC (6 mg/kg). Similarly, the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and 5-HT(1A/7) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced this THC-induced effect. Moreover, the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclohexane carboxamide dihydrochloride (WAY100635, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist MM-77 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed this reduction effect of 8-OH-DPAT (0.3 mg/kg). In contrast, the selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist (R)-3-[2-[2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl]pyrrolidine-1-sulfonyl]phenol hydrochloride (SB269970) had no effect on this reduction effect of 8-OH-DPAT. WAY100635 (1 mg/kg) also reversed the reduction effect of citalopram (10 mg/kg). These findings suggest that the 5-HT(1A) receptors are involved in THC-induced enhancement of immobility.

  6. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of FDA-Approved Products of Oral Solutions Containing Dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-transtetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] in Schedule II. Interim final rule, with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2017-03-23

    On July 1, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug application for Syndros, a drug product consisting of dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] oral solution. Thereafter, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provided the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) with a scheduling recommendation that would result in Syndros (and other oral solutions containing dronabinol) being placed in schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). In accordance with the CSA, as revised by the Improving Regulatory Transparency for New Medical Therapies Act, DEA is hereby issuing an interim final rule placing FDA-approved products of oral solutions containing dronabinol in schedule II of the CSA.

  7. Long-lasting alterations of hippocampal GABAergic neurotransmission in adult rats following perinatal Δ(9)-THC exposure.

    PubMed

    Beggiato, Sarah; Borelli, Andrea Celeste; Tomasini, Maria Cristina; Morgano, Lucia; Antonelli, Tiziana; Tanganelli, Sergio; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Ferraro, Luca

    2017-03-01

    The long-lasting effects of gestational cannabinoids exposure on the adult brain of the offspring are still controversial. It has already been shown that pre- or perinatal cannabinoids exposure induces learning and memory disruption in rat adult offspring, associated with permanent alterations of cortical glutamatergic neurotransmission and cognitive deficits. In the present study, the risk of long-term consequences induced by perinatal exposure to cannabinoids on rat hippocampal GABAergic system of the offspring, has been explored. To this purpose, pregnant rats were treated daily with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC; 5mg/kg) or its vehicle. Perinatal exposure to Δ(9)-THC induced a significant reduction (p<0.05) in basal and K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-GABA outflow of 90-day-old rat hippocampal slices. These effects were associated with a reduction of hippocampal [(3)H]-GABA uptake compared to vehicle exposed group. Perinatal exposure to Δ(9)-THC induced a significant reduction of CB1 receptor binding (Bmax) in the hippocampus of 90-day-old rats. However, a pharmacological challenge with either Δ(9)-THC (0.1μM) or WIN55,212-2 (2μM), similarly reduced K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-GABA outflow in both experimental groups. These reductions were significantly blocked by adding the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A. These findings suggest that maternal exposure to cannabinoids induces long-term alterations of hippocampal GABAergic system. Interestingly, previous behavioral studies demonstrated that, under the same experimental conditions as in the present study, perinatal cannabinoids exposure induced cognitive impairments in adult rats, thus resembling some effects observed in humans. Although it is difficult and sometimes misleading to extrapolate findings obtained from animal models to humans, the possibility that an alteration of hippocampus aminoacidergic transmission might underlie, at least in part, some of the cognitive deficits affecting the offspring of

  8. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol prevents methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Castelli, M Paola; Madeddu, Camilla; Casti, Alberto; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4 × 10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart) were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg) and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP). Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i) METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu) was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-19% and -28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -25% and -21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals); (ii) METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (-50%) and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (-53%); (iii) METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-34% and -47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -37% and -29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the PFC and CPu. Our

  9. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Prevents Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, M. Paola; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M. Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4×10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart) were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg) and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP). Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i) METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu) was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (−19% and −28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; −25% and −21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals); (ii) METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (−50%) and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (−53%); (iii) METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (−34% and −47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; −37% and −29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the

  10. Assessment of driving capability through the use of clinical and psychomotor tests in relation to blood cannabinoids levels following oral administration of 20 mg dronabinol or of a cannabis decoction made with 20 or 60 mg Delta9-THC.

    PubMed

    Ménétrey, Annick; Augsburger, Marc; Favrat, Bernard; Pin, Marie A; Rothuizen, Laura E; Appenzeller, Monique; Buclin, Thierry; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is frequently found in the blood of drivers suspected of driving under the influence of cannabis or involved in traffic crashes. The present study used a double-blind crossover design to compare the effects of medium (16.5 mg THC) and high doses (45.7 mg THC) of hemp milk decoctions or of a medium dose of dronabinol (20 mg synthetic THC, Marinol on several skills required for safe driving. Forensic interpretation of cannabinoids blood concentrations were attempted using the models proposed by Daldrup (cannabis influencing factor or CIF) and Huestis and coworkers. First, the time concentration-profiles of THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) (active metabolite of THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in whole blood were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-negative ion chemical ionization. Compared to smoking studies, relatively low concentrations were measured in blood. The highest mean THC concentration (8.4 ng/mL) was achieved 1 h after ingestion of the strongest decoction. Mean maximum 11-OH-THC level (12.3 ng/mL) slightly exceeded that of THC. THCCOOH reached its highest mean concentration (66.2 ng/mL) 2.5-5.5 h after intake. Individual blood levels showed considerable intersubject variability. The willingness to drive was influenced by the importance of the requested task. Under significant cannabinoids influence, the participants refused to drive when they were asked whether they would agree to accomplish several unimportant tasks, (e.g., driving a friend to a party). Most of the participants reported a significant feeling of intoxication and did not appreciate the effects, notably those felt after drinking the strongest decoction. Road sign and tracking testing revealed obvious and statistically significant differences between placebo and treatments. A marked impairment was detected after ingestion of the strongest decoction. A CIF value, which relies on the

  11. Opposing Actions of Chronic[Deta][superscript 9] Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabinoid Antagonists on Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Oz, Murat; Yang, Ruiqin; Lichtman, Aron H.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2007-01-01

    Memory deficits produced by marijuana arise partly via interaction of the psychoactive component, [Deta][superscript 9]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([Deta][superscript 9]-THC), with cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus. Although cannabinoids acutely reduce glutamate release and block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a potential substrate for…

  12. Cannabidiol enhances the inhibitory effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol on human glioblastoma cell proliferation and survival

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Jahan P.; Christian, Rigel T.; Lau, Darryl; Zielinski, Anne J.; Horowitz, Maxx P.; Lee, Jasmine; Pakdel, Arash; Allison, Juanita; Limbad, Chandani; Moore, Dan H.; Yount, Garret L.; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D.

    2009-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor agonist, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has been shown to be a broad range inhibitor of cancer in culture and in vivo, and is currently being used in a clinical trial for the treatment of glioblastoma. It has been suggested that other plant-derived cannabinoids, which do not interact efficiently with CB1 and CB2 receptors, can modulate the actions of Δ9-THC. However, there are conflicting reports as to what extent other cannabinoids can modulate Δ9-THC activity, and most importantly, it is not clear whether other cannabinoid compounds can either potentiate or inhibit the actions of Δ9-THC. We therefore tested cannabidiol (CBD), the second most abundant plant derived cannabiniod, in combination with Δ9-THC. In U251 and SF126 glioblastoma cell lines, Δ9-THC and CBD acted synergistically to inhibit cell proliferation. The treatment of glioblastoma cells with both compounds led to significant modulations of the cell cycle and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis as well as specific modulations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and caspase activities. These specific changes were not observed with either compound individually, indicating that the signal transduction pathways affected by the combination treatment were unique. Our results suggest that the addition of CBD to Δ9-THC may improve the overall effectiveness of Δ9-THC in the treatment of glioblastoma in cancer patients. PMID:20053780

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of supratherapeutic oral doses of Δ(9) -THC in cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Kelly, Thomas H; Charnigo, Richard J; Stinchcomb, Audra L; Hays, Lon R

    2013-07-01

    Oral Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC) has been evaluated as a medication for cannabis dependence, but repeated administration of acute oral doses up to 40 mg has not been effective at reducing drug-taking behavior. Larger doses might be necessary to affect cannabis use. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the physiological and behavioural effects of oral Δ(9) -THC at acute doses higher than those tested previously. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of oral Δ(9) -THC, administered in ascending order in 15 mg increments across separate sessions, up to a maximum of 90 mg, was determined in seven cannabis users. Five subjects received all doses and two experienced untoward side effects at lower doses. Δ(9) -THC produced a constellation of effects consistent with previous clinical studies. Low cannabinoid concentrations were associated with significant effects on drug-sensitive measures, although progressively greater levels did not lead to proportionately larger drug effects. Considerable variability in Cmax and tmax was observed. Doses of oral Δ(9) -THC larger than those tested previously can be administered to individuals with a history of cannabis use, although given the pharmacokinetic variability of oral Δ(9) -THC and individual differences in sensitivity, individualized dose adjustment is needed to avoid side effects and maximize therapeutic response.

  14. Automated solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in human urine specimens: application to a high-throughput urine analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Robandt, P V; Klette, K L; Sibum, M

    2009-10-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS-MS) method for the analysis of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in human urine specimens was developed. The method was linear (R(2) = 0.9986) to 1000 ng/mL with no carryover evidenced at 2000 ng/mL. Limits of quantification and detection were found to be 2 ng/mL. Interrun precision was evaluated at the 15 ng/mL level over nine batches spanning 15 days (n = 45). The coefficient of variation (%CV) was found to be 5.5% over the course of the validation. Intrarun precision of a 15 ng/mL control (n = 5) ranged from 0.58% CV to 7.4% CV for the same set of analytical batches. Interference was tested using (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, (-)-Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and cannabinol. One hundred and nineteen specimens previously found to contain THC-COOH by a previously validated gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure were compared to the SPE-LC-MS-MS method. Excellent agreement was found (R(2) = 0.9925) for the parallel comparison study. The automated SPE procedure eliminates the human factors of specimen handling, extraction, and derivatization, thereby reducing labor costs and rework resulting from human error or technique issues. Additionally, method runtime is greatly reduced (e.g., during parallel studies the SPE-LC-MS-MS instrument was often finished with analysis by the time the technician finished the offline SPE and derivatization procedure prior to the GC-MS analysis).

  15. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts estrogen-signaling through up-regulation of estrogen receptor β (ERβ).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Yoshida, Kazutaka; Nishimura, Hajime; Harada, Mari; Okajima, Shunsuke; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2013-07-15

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) has been reported as possessing antiestrogenic activity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly delineated. In this study, we used the estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, as an experimental model and showed that Δ(9)-THC exposures markedly suppresses 17β-estradiol (E2)- induced MCF-7 cell proliferation. We demonstrate that these effects result from Δ(9)-THC's ability to inhibit E2-liganded ERα activation. Mechanistically, the data obtained from biochemical analyses revealed that (i) Δ(9)-THC up-regulates ERβ, a repressor of ERα, inhibiting the expression of E2/ERα-regulated genes that promote cell growth and that (ii) Δ(9)-THC induction of ERβ modulates E2/ERα signaling in the absence of direct interaction with the E2 ligand binding site. Therefore, the data presented support the concept that Δ(9)-THC's antiestrogenic activities are mediated by the ERβ disruption of E2/ERα signaling.

  16. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses cytotoxic T lymphocyte function independent of CB1 and CB 2, disrupting early activation events.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Peer W F; Chen, Weimin; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2012-12-01

    Previously, CD8(+) T cells were found to be a sensitive target for suppression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) in a murine model of influenza infection. To study the effect of Δ(9)-THC on CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), an allogeneic model of MHC I mismatch was used to elicit CTL. In addition, to determine the requirement for the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB(1)) and 2 (CB(2)) in Δ(9)-THC-mediated CTL response modulation, mice null for both receptors were used (CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-)). Δ(9)-THC suppressed CTL function independent of CB(1) and CB(2) as evidenced by reduction of (51)Cr release by CTL generated from CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-) mice. Furthermore, viability in CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner with Δ(9)-THC, independent of CB(1) and CB(2), but no effect of Δ(9)-THC on proliferation was observed, suggesting that Δ(9)-THC decreases the number of T cells initially activated. Δ(9)-THC increased expression of the activation markers, CD69 in CD8(+) cells and CD25 in CD4(+) cells in a concentration-dependent manner in cells derived from WT and CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-) mice. Furthermore, Δ(9)-THC synergized with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, to increase CD69 expression on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In addition, without stimulation, Δ(9)-THC increased CD69 expression in CD8(+) cells from CB(1) (-/-)CB(2) (-/-) and WT mice. Overall, these results suggest that CB(1) and CB(2) are dispensable for Δ(9)-THC-mediated suppression and that perturbation of Ca(2+) signals during T cell activation plays an important role in the mechanism by which Δ(9)-THC suppresses CTL function.

  17. Acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and their combination on facial emotion recognition: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Hindocha, Chandni; Freeman, Tom P; Schafer, Grainne; Gardener, Chelsea; Das, Ravi K; Morgan, Celia J A; Curran, H Valerie

    2015-03-01

    Acute administration of the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), impairs human facial affect recognition, implicating the endocannabinoid system in emotional processing. Another main constituent of cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), has seemingly opposite functional effects on the brain. This study aimed to determine the effects of THC and CBD, both alone and in combination on emotional facial affect recognition. 48 volunteers, selected for high and low frequency of cannabis use and schizotypy, were administered, THC (8mg), CBD (16mg), THC+CBD (8mg+16mg) and placebo, by inhalation, in a 4-way, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. They completed an emotional facial affect recognition task including fearful, angry, happy, sad, surprise and disgust faces varying in intensity from 20% to 100%. A visual analogue scale (VAS) of feeling 'stoned' was also completed. In comparison to placebo, CBD improved emotional facial affect recognition at 60% emotional intensity; THC was detrimental to the recognition of ambiguous faces of 40% intensity. The combination of THC+CBD produced no impairment. Relative to placebo, both THC alone and combined THC+CBD equally increased feelings of being 'stoned'. CBD did not influence feelings of 'stoned'. No effects of frequency of use or schizotypy were found. In conclusion, CBD improves recognition of emotional facial affect and attenuates the impairment induced by THC. This is the first human study examining the effects of different cannabinoids on emotional processing. It provides preliminary evidence that different pharmacological agents acting upon the endocannabinoid system can both improve and impair recognition of emotional faces.

  18. Acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and their combination on facial emotion recognition: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in cannabis users

    PubMed Central

    Hindocha, Chandni; Freeman, Tom P.; Schafer, Grainne; Gardener, Chelsea; Das, Ravi K.; Morgan, Celia J.A.; Curran, H. Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Acute administration of the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), impairs human facial affect recognition, implicating the endocannabinoid system in emotional processing. Another main constituent of cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), has seemingly opposite functional effects on the brain. This study aimed to determine the effects of THC and CBD, both alone and in combination on emotional facial affect recognition. 48 volunteers, selected for high and low frequency of cannabis use and schizotypy, were administered, THC (8 mg), CBD (16 mg), THC+CBD (8 mg+16 mg) and placebo, by inhalation, in a 4-way, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. They completed an emotional facial affect recognition task including fearful, angry, happy, sad, surprise and disgust faces varying in intensity from 20% to 100%. A visual analogue scale (VAS) of feeling ‘stoned’ was also completed. In comparison to placebo, CBD improved emotional facial affect recognition at 60% emotional intensity; THC was detrimental to the recognition of ambiguous faces of 40% intensity. The combination of THC+CBD produced no impairment. Relative to placebo, both THC alone and combined THC+CBD equally increased feelings of being ‘stoned’. CBD did not influence feelings of ‘stoned’. No effects of frequency of use or schizotypy were found. In conclusion, CBD improves recognition of emotional facial affect and attenuates the impairment induced by THC. This is the first human study examining the effects of different cannabinoids on emotional processing. It provides preliminary evidence that different pharmacological agents acting upon the endocannabinoid system can both improve and impair recognition of emotional faces. PMID:25534187

  19. Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol impairs reversal learning but not extra-dimensional shifts in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Wright, M. Jerry; Vandewater, Sophia A.; Parsons, Loren H.; Taffe, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of medical marijuana use in the US and the recently successful decriminalization of recreational marijuana in two States elevates interest in the specific cognitive effects of Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol9THC), the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana. Controlled laboratory studies in nonhuman primates provide mixed evidence for specific effects of Δ9THC in learning and memory tasks, with a suggestion that frontal-mediated tasks may be most sensitive. In this study, adult male rhesus monkeys were trained on tasks which assess reversal learning, extradimensional attentional shift learning and spatial delayed-response. Subjects were challenged with 0.1–0.5 mg/kg Δ9THC, i.m., in randomized order and evaluated on the behavioral measures. Peak plasma levels of Δ9THC were observed 30 min after 0.2 mg/kg (69 ±29 ng/ml) and 60 min after 0.5 mg/kg (121 ±23 ng/ml) was administered and behavioral effects on a bimanual motor task persisted for up to 2 hrs after injection. An increase in errors-to-criterion (ETC) associated with reversal learning was further increased by Δ9THC in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in ETC associated with extradimensional shifts was not affected by Δ9-THC. Spatial delayed-response performance was impaired by Δ9THC in a retention-interval dependent manner. Overall the pattern of results suggest a more profound effect of Δ9THC on tasks mediated by orbitofrontal (reversal learning) versus dorsolateral (extradimensional shifts) prefrontal mechanisms. PMID:23333671

  20. Δ(9)Tetrahydrocannabinol impairs reversal learning but not extra-dimensional shifts in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Wright, M J; Vandewater, S A; Parsons, L H; Taffe, M A

    2013-04-03

    Expansion of medical marijuana use in the US and the recently successful decriminalization of recreational marijuana in two States elevates interest in the specific cognitive effects of Δ(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)THC), the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana. Controlled laboratory studies in nonhuman primates provide mixed evidence for specific effects of Δ(9)THC in learning and memory tasks, with a suggestion that frontal-mediated tasks may be the most sensitive. In this study, adult male rhesus monkeys were trained on tasks which assess reversal learning, extradimensional attentional shift learning and spatial delayed-response. Subjects were challenged with 0.1-0.5mg/kg Δ(9)THC, i.m., in randomized order and evaluated on the behavioral measures. Peak plasma levels of Δ(9)THC were observed 30min after 0.2mg/kg (69±29ng/ml) and 60min after 0.5mg/kg (121±23ng/ml) was administered and behavioral effects on a bimanual motor task persisted for up to 2h after injection. An increase in errors-to-criterion (ETC) associated with reversal learning was further increased by Δ(9)THC in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in ETC associated with extradimensional shifts was not affected by Δ(9)THC. Spatial delayed-response performance was impaired by Δ(9)THC in a retention-interval-dependent manner. Overall the pattern of results suggests a more profound effect of Δ(9)THC on tasks mediated by orbitofrontal (reversal learning) versus dorsolateral (extradimensional shifts) prefrontal mechanisms.

  1. The determination of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in hair using negative ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Moore, C; Guzaldo, F; Donahue, T

    2001-10-01

    The determination of 11-nor-delta9-THC-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in hair specimens at the sensitivity required to detect marijuana users is a difficult analytical problem. A sensitive and specific method has been developed for the quantitative assay of THC-COOH in hair. Hair specimens were washed, incubated in sodium hydroxide, subjected to solid-phase extraction, and analyzed using high-volume injection coupled with negative chemical ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. A common disadvantage of chemical ionization, the production of a single mass-to-charge ratio ion, was also addressed. By specific selection of the derivatizing agent, three ions were monitored, allowing the calculation of two ion ratios, as in electron impact mode. The method was applied to several hair specimens taken from known marijuana users and workplace specimens. This is the first publication describing the use of high-volume injection and NCI mass spectrometry for the determination of THC-COOH in hair.

  2. Additive antiemetic efficacy of low-doses of the cannabinoid CB(1/2) receptor agonist Δ(9)-THC with ultralow-doses of the vanilloid TRPV1 receptor agonist resiniferatoxin in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Darmani, Nissar A; Chebolu, Seetha; Zhong, Weixia; Trinh, Chung; McClanahan, Bryan; Brar, Rajivinder S

    2014-01-05

    Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1/2 and vanilloid TRPV1 agonists (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), respectively) can attenuate the emetic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. In this study we used the least shrew to demonstrate whether combinations of varying doses of Δ(9)-THC with resiniferatoxin can produce additive antiemetic efficacy against cisplatin-induced vomiting. RTX by itself caused vomiting in a bell-shaped dose-dependent manner with maximal vomiting at 18 μg/kg when administered subcutaneously (s.c.) but not intraperitoneally (i.p.). Δ(9)-THC up to 10 mg/kg provides only 80% protection of least shrews from cisplatin-induced emesis with an ID50 of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg. Combinations of 1 or 5 μg/kg RTX with varying doses of Δ(9)-THC completely suppressed both the frequency and the percentage of shrews vomiting with ID50 dose values 5-50 times lower than Δ(9)-THC doses tested alone against cisplatin. A less potent TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, by itself did not cause emesis (i.p. or s.c.), but it did significantly reduce vomiting induced by cisplatin given after 30 min but not at 2 h. The TRPV1-receptor antagonist, ruthenium red, attenuated cisplatin-induced emesis at 5mg/kg; however, another TRPV1-receptor antagonist, capsazepine, did not. In summary, we present evidence that combination of CB1/2 and TRPV1 agonists have the capacity to completely abolish cisplatin-induced emesis at doses that are ineffective when used individually.

  3. Supported liquid extraction (SLE) for the analysis of methylamphetamine, methylenedioxymethylamphetamine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in oral fluid and blood of drivers.

    PubMed

    Rositano, Joanna; Harpas, Peter; Kostakis, Chris; Scott, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Since 2006, the South Australian Government has been conducting roadside oral fluid testing of drivers for the illicit drugs methylamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) using the Securetec Drugwipe II Twin and Alere DDS 805 AP saliva collection kit. Forensic Science South Australia carries out the confirmatory analysis by LC/MS for the positive test results of oral fluid roadside testing along with the pre-screened ELISA positive road traffic accident blood samples. The number of blood and oral fluid samples received in the laboratory has been steadily increasing during this time, and over 10,000 samples were received in 2014. The proportion of positive results from these samples has also been increasing over the decade of driver drug testing, and this data is presented. A simple and efficient method has been developed for the analysis of the three drugs using Biotage Isolute(®) SLE+ 96-well plates. Sample preparation included 1:1 dilution with a dilute ammonia solution for buffered oral fluids (1:3 dilution for blood samples), and addition of deuterated internal standards. Samples were loaded onto the phase, left to absorb for 5min then eluted with methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). The samples were evaporated and reconstituted in methanol. LC/MS analysis was performed on an AB Sciex 5500 Q-Trap in positive ion mode, monitoring 3 transitions for each analyte. Separation was achieved on a Restek Ultrabiphenyl 50×2.1mm column with a gradient system of acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid over 5min. Method validation and recoveries were carried out on drug free ante mortem blood and DDS buffer solution provided by Alere, Australia. Recoveries above 80% were achieved for MA and MDMA at a concentration of 25ng/mL, whilst recoveries of greater than 65% were achieved for THC at 4.5ng/mL. Accuracy and precision were acceptable down to the LLOQ for all three analytes (5, 5 and 1ng/mL for MA, MDMA and THC, respectively). Mean

  4. Sex and age specific effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol during the periadolescent period in the rat: The unique susceptibility of the prepubescent animal.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lindsay; Black, Rita; Michaelides, Michael; Hurd, Yasmin L; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    Adolescents who use marijuana are more likely to exhibit anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders, including psychotic-like symptoms. Additionally, the age at onset of use and the stress history of the individual can affect responses to cannabis. To examine the effect of early life experience on adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we exposed adolescent (postnatal day (P) 29-38) male and female rats, either shipped from a supplier or born in our vivarium, to once daily injections of 3mg/kg THC. Our findings suggest that males are more sensitive to the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of THC, as measured by the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST), respectively, than females. Exposure to the FST increased plasma corticosterone levels, regardless of drug treatment or origin and females had higher levels than males overall. Shipping increased THC responses in females (acoustic startle habituation) and in males (latency to immobility in FST). No significant effects of THC or shipping on pre-pulse inhibition were observed. Due to differences in timing of puberty in males and females during the P29-38 period of THC treatment, we also dosed female rats between P21-30 (pre-puberty) and male rats between P39-48 (puberty). Pre-pubertal animals showed reductions in anxiety on the EPM, an effect that was not seen in animals treated during puberty. These results suggest that both sexes are more susceptible to changes in emotional behavior when THC exposure occurs just prior to the onset of puberty. Within the animals dosed from P29-38, THC increased cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) mRNA expression and tended to decrease CP55,940 stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the central amygdala only of females. Therefore, early stress enhances THC responses in males (in FST) and females (ASR habituation), THC alters CB1R expression and function in females only and prepubescent rats are generally more responsive to THC than pubertal rats. In summary

  5. Quantification of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its major metabolites in meconium by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay: assay validation and preliminary results of the "meconium project".

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Pellegrini, Manuela; Pacifici, Roberta; Palmi, Ilaria; Lozano, Jaime; García-Algar, Oscar; Pichini, Simona

    2006-10-01

    A rapid and simple procedure based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described for determination of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH) and 11-nor-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in meconium using Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-THC) and deuterated THC-COOH as internal standards. The biological matrix was subjected to liquid-liquid extraction after enzyme hydrolysis for conjugated analytes.Chromatography was performed on a fused silica capillary column and analytes were determined in the selected-ion-monitoring (SIM) mode. The method was validated in the range 20 to 500 microg/g using 1g of meconium per assay. The method was applied to the analysis of meconium in a cohort of newborns to assess eventual fetal exposure to cannabis. Within positive samples, THC-COOH and THC-OH (range: 33.7 to 182.1 and 20.7 to 493.3 microg/g, respectively) were both present in the majority of cases with only 1 specimen with THC-OH as the most abundant metabolite and 2 with THC only.

  6. Estimation of measurement uncertainty for the quantification of 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid and its glucuronide in urine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwon, Woonyong; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Sungill; In, Moon Kyo

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the estimation of the measurement uncertainty has become a significant issue in the quality control of forensic drug testing. In the present study, the uncertainty of the measurement was calculated for the quantification of 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) and its glucuronide conjugate (THC-COOH-glu) in urine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The procedure was based on liquid-liquid extraction of a volume of urine (800 µL) with ethyl acetate. The sources of uncertainty were identified and classified into four major categories as follows: standard preparation, calibration curve, method precision and bias. The overall contribution of combined standard uncertainty on THC-COOH increased in the order of standard preparation (0.9%), method precision (10.4%), calibration curve (30.3%) and bias (58.4%) and, while calibration curve (53.0%) and bias (40.4%) gave the bigger contributions to the combined standard uncertainty for THC-COOH-glu than method precision and standard preparation, which accounted for 6.3 and 0.3%, respectively. The reliability of a measurement was expressed by stating the expanded uncertainty of the measurement result at 95% confidence level. The concentrations of THC-COOH and THC-COOH-glu in the urine sample with their expanded uncertainties were 10.20 ± 1.14 ng/mL and 25.42 ± 5.01 ng/mL, respectively.

  7. Application of two-dimensional gas chromatography with electron capture chemical ionization mass spectrometry to the detection of 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in hair.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Rana, Sumandeep; Coulter, Cynthia; Feyerherm, Fred; Prest, Harry

    2006-04-01

    The proposed federal regulations for the detection in hair of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), a metabolite of marijuana, require a confirmatory detection level of 0.05 pg/mg. At present, the only way to achieve this on a routine basis has been with the use gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) technology. Tandem MS is an expensive approach and dissuades laboratories from attempting to enter the hair-testing market. A procedure for the determination of THC-COOH in hair using two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-GC-MS) is described for the first time. The method makes use of several small improvements in the extraction, GC, and MS procedures to allow the required sensitivity to be achieved. The results of this approach demonstrate detection of THC-COOH in hair at a concentration level of 0.05 pg/mg with both a target quantitation ion and a unique confirming qualifier ion, using a single-quadrupole mass selective detector. These two ions and the enhanced separation of the GC-GC provide a high degree of confidence in the determinations. The method has been successfully applied to the detection of THC-COOH in hair specimens from known marijuana users, and it reaches the levels currently proposed in the Federal Register.

  8. Exposure of Adolescent Mice to Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Long-Lasting Modulation of Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in Hypothalamus and Hippocampus Similar to that Observed for Peripheral Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Sarah; Franchi, Silvia; Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Somaini, Lorenzo; Panerai, Alberto; Sacerdote, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis use is frequent among adolescents. Its main component, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), affects the immune system. We recently demonstrated that chronic exposure of adolescent mice to THC suppressed immunity immediately after treatment but that after a washout period THC induced a long-lasting opposite modulation towards a proinflammatory and T-helper-1 phenotype in adulthood. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether the same effect was also present in brain regions such as the hypothalamus and hippocampus. Thirty-three-day-old adolescent and 80-day-old adult male mice were used. Acute THC administration induced a similar reduction of macrophage proinflammatory cytokines and an IL-10 increase in adult and adolescent mice. THC did not affect brain cytokines in adult mice, but a proinflammatory cytokine decrease was evident in the adolescent brain. A similar effect was present in the hypothalamus and hippocampus after 10 days' THC administration. In contrast, when brain cytokines were measured 47 days after the final THC administration, we observed an inverted effect in adult mice treated as adolescents, i.e., IL-1β and TNF-α increased and IL-10 decreased, indicating a shift toward neuroinflammation. These data suggest that THC exposure in adolescence has long-lasting effects on brain cytokines that parallel those present in the periphery. This modulation may affect vulnerability to immune and behavioural diseases in adulthood.

  9. Accurate identification and quantification of 11-nor-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine drug testing: evaluation of a direct high efficiency liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method.

    PubMed

    Stephanson, Nikolai; Josefsson, Martin; Kronstrand, Robert; Beck, Olof

    2008-08-01

    A direct liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for measurement of urinary Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THCA) was developed. The method involved dilution of the urine sample with water containing (2)H(9)-deuterated analogue as internal standard, hydrolysis with ammonia, reversed phase chromatography using a Waters ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) equipment with gradient elution, negative electrospray ionization, and monitoring of two product ions in selected reaction monitoring mode. The measuring range was 2-1000 ng/mL for THCA, and the intra- and inter-assay imprecision, expressed as the coefficient of variation, was below 5%. Influence from urine matrix on ionization efficiency was noted in infusion experiments, but was compensated for by the internal standard. Comparison with established gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods in authentic patient samples demonstrated accuracy in both qualitative and quantitative results. A small difference in mean ratios (~15%) may be explained by the use of different hydrolysis procedures between methods. In conclusion, the high efficiency LC-MS/MS method was capable of accurately identify and quantify THCA in urine with a capacity of 14 samples per hour.

  10. Fast confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine by LC/MS/MS using negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI).

    PubMed

    Weinmann, W; Goerner, M; Vogt, S; Goerke, R; Pollak, S

    2001-09-15

    A fast method using automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) and short-column liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) has been developed for the confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine samples. This highly specific method which combines chromatographic separation and MS/MS-analysis can be used for the confirmation of positive immunoassay results with a NIDA cut-off of 15ng/ml. The conjugates of THC-COOH were hydrolysed prior to SPE, and a standard SPE was performed using C18-SPE columns. No derivatisation of the extracts was needed as in GC/MS analysis, and the LC run-time was 6.5min by gradient elution with a retention time of 2.4min. Linearity of calibration was obtained in the range between 0 and 500ng/ml (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.998). Using linear regression (0-50ng/ml) the limit of detection (LOD) was 2.0ng/ml and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 5.1ng/ml; day-to-day reproducibility and precision were tested at 15 and 250ng/ml and were 13.4ng/ml+/-3.3% and 255.8ng/ml+/-4.5%, respectively.

  11. Δ9-THC Disrupts Gamma (γ)-Band Neural Oscillations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Briones, Jose; Skosnik, Patrick D; Mathalon, Daniel; Cahill, John; Pittman, Brian; Williams, Ashley; Sewell, R Andrew; Ranganathan, Mohini; Roach, Brian; Ford, Judith; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Gamma (γ)-band oscillations play a key role in perception, associative learning, and conscious awareness and have been shown to be disrupted by cannabinoids in animal studies. The goal of this study was to determine whether cannabinoids disrupt γ-oscillations in humans and whether these effects relate to their psychosis-relevant behavioral effects. The acute, dose-related effects of Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) were studied in humans (n=20) who completed 3 test days during which they received intravenous Δ9-THC (placebo, 0.015, and 0.03 mg/kg) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced design. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded while subjects listened to auditory click trains presented at 20, 30, and 40 Hz. Psychosis-relevant effects were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome scale (PANSS). Δ9-THC (0.03 mg/kg) reduced intertrial coherence (ITC) in the 40 Hz condition compared with 0.015 mg/kg and placebo. No significant effects were detected for 30 and 20 Hz stimulation. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between 40 Hz ITC and PANSS subscales and total scores under the influence of Δ9-THC. Δ9-THC (0.03 mg/kg) reduced evoked power during 40 Hz stimulation at a trend level. Recent users of cannabis showed blunted Δ9-THC effects on ITC and evoked power. We show for the first time in humans that cannabinoids disrupt γ-band neural oscillations. Furthermore, there is a relationship between disruption of γ-band neural oscillations and psychosis-relevant phenomena induced by cannabinoids. These findings add to a growing literature suggesting some overlap between the acute effects of cannabinoids and the behavioral and psychophysiological alterations observed in psychotic disorders. PMID:25709097

  12. Δ9-THC Disrupts Gamma (γ)-Band Neural Oscillations in Humans.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Briones, Jose; Skosnik, Patrick D; Mathalon, Daniel; Cahill, John; Pittman, Brian; Williams, Ashley; Sewell, R Andrew; Ranganathan, Mohini; Roach, Brian; Ford, Judith; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-08-01

    Gamma (γ)-band oscillations play a key role in perception, associative learning, and conscious awareness and have been shown to be disrupted by cannabinoids in animal studies. The goal of this study was to determine whether cannabinoids disrupt γ-oscillations in humans and whether these effects relate to their psychosis-relevant behavioral effects. The acute, dose-related effects of Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) were studied in humans (n=20) who completed 3 test days during which they received intravenous Δ(9)-THC (placebo, 0.015, and 0.03 mg/kg) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced design. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded while subjects listened to auditory click trains presented at 20, 30, and 40 Hz. Psychosis-relevant effects were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome scale (PANSS). Δ(9)-THC (0.03 mg/kg) reduced intertrial coherence (ITC) in the 40 Hz condition compared with 0.015 mg/kg and placebo. No significant effects were detected for 30 and 20 Hz stimulation. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between 40 Hz ITC and PANSS subscales and total scores under the influence of Δ(9)-THC. Δ(9)-THC (0.03 mg/kg) reduced evoked power during 40 Hz stimulation at a trend level. Recent users of cannabis showed blunted Δ(9)-THC effects on ITC and evoked power. We show for the first time in humans that cannabinoids disrupt γ-band neural oscillations. Furthermore, there is a relationship between disruption of γ-band neural oscillations and psychosis-relevant phenomena induced by cannabinoids. These findings add to a growing literature suggesting some overlap between the acute effects of cannabinoids and the behavioral and psychophysiological alterations observed in psychotic disorders.

  13. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Like Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Compounds Commonly Found in K2/Spice

    PubMed Central

    Gatch, Michael B.; Forster, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of cannabinoid compounds are being sold in the form of incense as “legal” alternatives to marijuana. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether the most common of these compounds have discriminative stimulus effects similar to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main active component in marijuana. Locomotor depressant effects of JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, JWH-203, JWH-250, AM-2201 and CP 47,497-C8-homolog were tested in mice. The compounds were then tested for substitution in rats trained to discriminate Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (3 mg/kg, i.p.). The time course of the peak dose of each compound was also tested. Each of the synthetic cannabinoids dose-dependently decreased locomotor activity for one to two hours. Each of the compounds fully substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, mostly at doses that produced only marginal amounts of rate suppression. JWH-250 and CP 47,497-C8-homolog suppressed response rates at doses that fully substituted for Δ9-THC. The time courses varied markedly between compounds. Most of the compounds had a shorter onset than Δ9-THC, and three lasted substantially longer (JWH-073, JWH-250 and CP 47,497-C8-homolog). Several of the most commonly used synthetic cannabinoids produce behavioral effects comparable to those of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, which suggests that these compounds may share the psychoactive effects of marijuana responsible for abuse liability. The extremely long time course of the discriminative stimulus effects and adverse effects of CP 47,497-C8-homolog suggest that CP 47,497-C8-homolog may be associated with increased hazards in humans. PMID:25325289

  14. Separate and combined effects of gabapentin and Δ9-THC in humans discriminating Δ9-THC

    PubMed Central

    Lile, Joshua A.; Wesley, Michael J.; Kelly, Thomas H.; Hays, Lon R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine a potential mechanism of action of gabapentin to manage cannabis-use disorders by determining the interoceptive effects of gabapentin in cannabis users discriminating Δ9-THC using a pharmacologically selective drug-discrimination procedure. Eight cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral Δ9-THC from placebo and then received gabapentin (600 and 1200 mg), Δ9-THC (5, 15 and 30 mg) and placebo, alone and in combination. Self-report, task performance and physiological measures were also collected. Δ9-THC served as a discriminative stimulus, produced positive subjective effects, elevated heart rate and impaired psychomotor performance. Both doses of gabapentin substituted for the Δ9-THC discriminative stimulus and engendered subjective and performance-impairing effects that overlapped with those of Δ9-THC when administered alone. When administered concurrently, gabapentin shifted the discriminative-stimulus effects of Δ9-THC leftward/upward, and combinations of Δ9-THC and gabapentin generally produced larger effects on cannabinoid-sensitive outcomes relative to Δ9-THC alone. These results suggest that one mechanism by which gabapentin might facilitate cannabis abstinence is by producing effects that overlap with those of cannabinoids. PMID:26313650

  15. Cannabinoids in Disguise: Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Like Effects of Tetramethylcyclopropyl Ketone Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Lefever, Timothy W.; Grabenauer, Megan; Moore, Katherine N.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic indole-derived cannabinoids have become commonly used recreational drugs and continue to be abused despite their adverse consequences. As compounds that were identified early in the epidemic (e.g., naphthoylindoles) have become legally banned, new compounds have appeared on the drug market. Two tetramethylcyclopropyl ketone indoles, UR-144 [(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone] and XLR-11 [(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone], recently have been identified in confiscated products. These compounds are structurally related to a series of CB2-selective compounds explored by Abbott Labs. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which UR-144 and XLR-11 shared cannabinoid effects with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC). Indices of in vitro and in vivo activity at cannabinoid receptors were assessed. Similar to other psychoactive cannabinoid agonists, XLR-11 and UR-144 showed low nanomolar (< 30) affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors, activated these receptors as full agonists, and produced dose-dependent effects that were blocked by rimonabant in mice, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotor activity. The potency of both compounds was several-fold greater than Δ9-THC. XLR-11 and UR-144 also substituted for Δ9-THC in a Δ9-THC discrimination procedure in mice, effects that were attenuated by rimonabant. Analysis of urine from mice treated with the compounds revealed that both were extensively metabolized, with predominant urinary excretion as glucuronide conjugates. Together, these results demonstrate that UR-144 and XLR-11 share a pharmacological profile of in vitro and in vivo effects with Δ9-THC and other abused indole-derived cannabinoids and would be predicted to produce Δ9-THC-like subjective effects in humans. PMID:23916483

  16. An exploratory study of the combined effects of orally administered methylphenidate and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on cardiovascular function, subjective effects, and performance in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kollins, Scott H; Schoenfelder, Erin N; English, Joseph S; Holdaway, Alex; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Benjamin R; Dew, Rachel; Chrisman, Allan K

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and is often used illicitly by young adults. Illicit users often coadminister MPH with marijuana. Little is known about physiologic and subjective effects of these substances used in combination. In this double-blind, cross-over experiment, sixteen healthy adult subjects free from psychiatric illness (including ADHD) and reporting modest levels of marijuana use participated in 6 experimental sessions wherein all combinations of placebo or 10mg oral doses of delta-9-tetrahydocannibinol (THC); and 0mg, 10mg and 40 mg of MPH were administered. Sessions were separated by at least 48 hours. Vital signs, subjective effects, and performance measure were collected. THC and MPH showed additive effects on heart rate and rate pressure product (e.g., peak heart rate for 10mg THC+0mg, 10mg, and 40 mg MPH=89.1, 95.9, 102.0 beats/min, respectively). Main effects of THC and MPH were also observed on a range of subjective measures of drug effects, and significant THC dose × MPH dose interactions were found on measures of "Feel Drug," "Good Effects," and "Take Drug Again." THC increased commission errors on a continuous performance test (CPT) and MPH reduced reaction time variability on this measure. Effects of THC, MPH, and their combination were variable on a measure of working memory (n-back task), though in general, MPH decreased reaction times and THC mitigated these effects. These results suggest that the combination of low to moderate doses of MPH and THC produces unique effects on cardiovascular function, subjective effects and performance measures.

  17. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced catalepsy-like immobilization is mediated by decreased 5-HT neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens due to the action of glutamate-containing neurons.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Mishima, K; Koushi, E; Orito, K; Egashira, N; Irie, K; Takasaki, K; Katsurabayashi, S; Iwasaki, K; Uchida, N; Egawa, T; Kitamura, Y; Nishimura, R; Fujiwara, M

    2008-01-24

    Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been reported to induce catalepsy-like immobilization, but the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. In the present study, in order to fully understand the neural circuits involved, we determined the brain sites involved in the immobilization effect in rats. THC dose-dependently induced catalepsy-like immobilization. THC-induced catalepsy-like immobilization is mechanistically different from that induced by haloperidol (HPD), because unlike HPD-induced catalepsy, animals with THC-induced catalepsy became normal again following sound and air-puff stimuli. THC-induced catalepsy was reversed by SR141716, a selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist. Moreover, THC-induced catalepsy was abolished by lesions in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and central amygdala (ACE) regions. On the other hand, HPD-induced catalepsy was suppressed by lesions in the caudate putamen (CP), substantia nigra (SN), globus pallidus (GP), ACE and lateral hypothalamus (LH) regions. Bilateral microinjection of THC into the NAc region induced catalepsy-like immobilization. This THC-induced catalepsy was inhibited by serotonergic drugs such as 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), a 5-HT precursor, and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT), a 5-HT receptor agonist, as well as by anti-glutamatergic drugs such as MK-801 and amantadine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. THC significantly decreased 5-HT and glutamate release in the NAc, as shown by in vivo microdialysis. SR141716 reversed and MK-801 inhibited this decrease in 5-HT and glutamate release. These findings suggest that the THC-induced catalepsy is mechanistically different from HPD-induced catalepsy and that the catalepsy-like immobilization induced by THC is mediated by decreased 5-HT neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens due to the action of glutamate-containing neurons.

  18. Correlation of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol concentrations determined by LC-MS-MS in oral fluid and plasma from impaired drivers and evaluation of the on-site Dräger DrugTest.

    PubMed

    Laloup, Marleen; Del Mar Ramirez Fernandez, Maria; Wood, Michelle; De Boeck, Gert; Maes, Viviane; Samyn, Nele

    2006-09-12

    Oral fluid (collected with the Intercept((R)) device) and plasma samples were obtained from 139 individuals suspected of driving under the influence of drugs and analyzed for Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive constituent of cannabis, using a validated quantitative LC-MS-MS method. The first aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the analytical data obtained in the plasma and oral fluid samples, to evaluate the use of oral fluid as a 'predictor' of actual cannabis influence. The results of the study indicated a good accuracy when comparing THC detection in oral fluid and plasma (84.9-95.7% depending on the cut-off used for plasma analysis). ROC curve analysis was subsequently used to determine the optimal cut-off value for THC in oral fluid with plasma as reference sample, in order to 'predict' a positive plasma result for THC. When using the LOQ of the method for plasma (0.5 ng/mL), the optimal cut-off was 1.2 ng/mL THC in oral fluid (sensitivity, 94.7%; specificity, 92.0%). When using the legal cut-off in Belgium for driving under the influence in plasma (2 ng/mL), an optimal cut-off value of 5.2 ng/mL THC in oral fluid (sensitivity, 91.6%; specificity, 88.6%) was observed. In the second part of the study, the performance of the on-site Dräger DrugTest for the screening of THC in oral fluid during roadside controls was assessed by comparison with the corresponding LC-MS-MS results in plasma and oral fluid. Since the accuracy was always less than 66%, we do not recommend this Dräger DrugTest system for the on-site screening of THC in oral fluid.

  19. Validation of a two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of cannabidiol, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC, and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC in plasma.

    PubMed

    Karschner, Erin L; Barnes, Allan J; Lowe, Ross H; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-05-01

    A sensitive analytical method for simultaneous quantification of sub-nanogram concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD), Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in plasma is presented for monitoring cannabinoid pharmacotherapy and illicit cannabis use. Analytes were extracted from 1 mL plasma by solid-phase extraction, derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide with 1% trimethylchlorosilane, and analyzed by two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (2D-GCMS) with cryofocusing. The lower calibration curve was linear from 0.25-25 ng/mL for CBD and THC, 0.125-25 ng/mL for 11-OH-THC and 0.25-50 ng/mL for THCCOOH. A second higher linear range from 5-100 ng/mL, achieved through modification of injection parameters, was validated for THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH and was only implemented if concentrations exceeded the lower curve upper limit of linearity. This procedure prevented laborious re-extraction by allowing the same specimen to be re-injected for quantification on the high calibration curve. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision, determined at four quality control concentrations, were or=72.9% for all analytes. Analytes were stable when stored at 22 degrees C for 16 h, 4 degrees C for 48 h, after three freeze-thaw cycles at -20 degrees C and when stored on the autosampler for 48 h. This sensitive and specific 2D-GCMS assay provides a new means of simultaneously quantifying CBD, THC and metabolite biomarkers in clinical medicine, forensic toxicology, workplace drug testing, and driving under the influence of drugs programs.

  20. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  1. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide produces delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-like discriminative and neurochemical effects that are enhanced by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase but not by inhibition of anandamide transport.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Justinova, Zuzana; Wertheim, Carrie E; Yasar, Sevil; Piomelli, Daniele; Vadivel, Subramanian K; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R

    2007-04-01

    Anandamide is an endogenous ligand for brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptors, but its behavioral effects are difficult to measure due to rapid inactivation. Here we used a drug-discrimination procedure to test the hypothesis that anandamide, given i.v. or i.p., would produce discriminative effects like those of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats when its metabolic inactivation was inhibited. We also used an in vivo microdialysis procedure to investigate the effects of anandamide, given i.v. or i.p., on dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell in rats. When injected i.v., methanandamide (AM-356), a metabolically stable anandamide analog, produced clear dose-related THC-like discriminative effects, but anandamide produced THC-like discriminative effects only at a high 10-mg/kg dose that almost eliminated lever-press responding. Cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB-597), an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for metabolic inactivation of anandamide, produced no THC-like discriminative effects alone but dramatically potentiated discriminative effects of anandamide, with 3 mg/kg anandamide completely substituting for the THC training dose. URB-597 also potentiated the ability of anandamide to increase dopamine levels in the accumbens shell. The THC-like discriminative-stimulus effects of anandamide after URB-597 and methanandamide were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant, but not the vanilloid VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine. Surprisingly, the anandamide transport inhibitors N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-eicosa-5,8,11,14-tetraenamide (AM-404) and N-(3-furylmethyl)eicosa-5,8,11,14-tetraenamide (UCM-707) did not potentiate THC-like discriminative effects of anandamide or its dopamine-elevating effects. Thus, anandamide has THC-like discriminative and neurochemical effects that are enhanced after treatment with a FAAH inhibitor but not after treatment with transport inhibitors, suggesting

  2. Induction of the fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) gene by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Harada, Mari; Su, Shengzhong; Okajima, Shunsuke; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Yoshida, Kazutaka; Nishimura, Hajime; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2013-01-01

    To investigate gene(s) being regulated by ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆(9)-THC), we performed DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are poorly differentiated breast cancer cells, treated with ∆(9)-THC for 48 hr at an IC50 concentration of approximately 25 µM. Among the highly up-regulated genes (> 10-fold) observed, fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) was significantly induced (17.8-fold). Although the physiological role of FA2H has not yet been fully understood, FA2H has been shown to modulate cell differentiation. The results of Oil Red O staining after ∆(9)-THC exposure showed the distribution of lipid droplets (a sign of the differentiated phenotype) in cells. Taken together, the results obtained here indicate that FA2H is a novel ∆(9)-THC-regulated gene, and that ∆(9)-THC induces differentiation signal(s) in poorly differentiated MDA-MB-231 cells.

  3. Suppression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol of the primary immunoglobulin M response by human peripheral blood B cells is associated with impaired STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Carney, Stephen; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-08-09

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the mechanism for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)-mediated suppression of primary immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses in humans. An in vitro activation model, which employs cell surface-expressed CD40 ligand (CD40L) and recombinant cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, -6, and -10), was used to differentiate human peripheral blood (HPB) naïve B cells into IgM secreting cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC significantly decreased the number of IgM secreting cells as determined by ELISPOT. The attenuation of IgM secretion by Δ(9)-THC involved, at least in part, the impairment of plasma cell differentiation as evidenced by suppression of immunoglobulin joining chain (IgJ) mRNA expression. The analysis at each of two different stages critically involved in plasma cell differentiation indicates that Δ(9)-THC impaired both the primary activation stage and proliferation of B cells. Interestingly, Δ(9)-THC selectively suppressed the surface expression of CD80, but not other measured B-cell activation markers (CD69, CD86, and ICAM1). Furthermore, pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC was accompanied by a robust decrease of STAT3 phosphorylation, whereas the phosphorylation of the p65 NFκB subunit was not affected. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the mechanisms for impaired B cell function by Δ(9)-THC.

  4. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population.

  5. Determination of the relative percentage distribution of THCA and Δ(9)-THC in herbal cannabis seized in Austria - Impact of different storage temperatures on stability.

    PubMed

    Taschwer, Magdalena; Schmid, Martin G

    2015-09-01

    Cannabis is globally by far the most widespread illicit drug of abuse. Especially since its legalization in some of the US, controversies about the legal status of cannabis for recreational and medical use have come up. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), which is the major active ingredient in cannabis products, is mainly responsible for the psychoactive effects. Its inactive biosynthetic precursor tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) is present in different quantities in fresh and undried cannabis plants. Under influence of drying, temperature and UV exposure it decomposes to Δ(9)-THC. In this study, a quantification of Δ(9)-THC and THCA was carried out to check the stability of cannabis samples. The determination of the degradation of THCA to Δ(9)-THC in 29 cannabis products seized in Austria was monitored by HPLC-UV. Mobile phase consisted of a 25mM triethylammoniumphosphate buffer (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile (36:64). A common LiChrospher(®) 100 RP-18 column was utilized as stationary phase. To check the influence of low as well as high temperature on the degradation process of the cannabinoid THCA to Δ(9)-THC, samples were stored in a freezer or in a drying cabinet for a specified time period. It was shown successfully that high storage temperatures led to a more rapid and complete decomposition of THCA to Δ(9)-THC while at low temperatures only slight or no changes of the percentage distribution were determined.

  6. Novel solid-phase extraction protocol for 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol from urine samples employing a polymeric mixed-mode cation-exchange resin, Strata-X-C, suitable for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Huq, Shahana; Dixon, Art; Kelly, Kory; Kallury, Krishna M R

    2005-05-06

    A novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed for extraction and cleanup of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), the major metabolite of the active principle of marijuana, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, from urine samples. The protocol utilizes a polymeric mixed-mode cationic sorbent, Strata-X-C, which exhibits strong retention for the metabolite facilitating a more rigorous organic wash to eliminate matrix components/endogenous materials. Acetonitrile containing acetic acid was used as the elution solvent and is compatible with both LC-MS and GC-MS modes of analysis. The hydrophobic retention of Strata-X-C was demonstrated to be higher than a neutral polymeric sorbent, Strata-X, of the same backbone but devoid of the cation-exchange moiety (sulfonic acid), by LC studies employing homologous paraben probes. Simultaneously, the polar (non-ionic) interaction capability of Strata-X-C is also greater than that of Strata-X, as assessed through regioisomeric nitrophenol probes. These two features enable the metabolite to be retained strongly on Strata-X-C. Good linearity and precision was obtained for THC-COOH by GC-MS analysis of its trimethylsilyl derivative in the range 1-50 ng. A simplified room temperature instantaneous derivatization procedure was developed that is suitable for high-throughput screening of THC-COOH.

  7. Acute Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks gastric hemorrhages induced by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Cole, Erica C

    2013-09-05

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are among the most widely used analgesics in the world, cause gastrointestinal inflammation that is potentially life-threatening. Although inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes protect against gastropathy in fasted NSAID-treated mice, the gastroprotective effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, have yet to be investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were fasted, administered vehicle or Δ(9)-THC (.01-50mg/kg; oral or intraperitoneal), and then treated with the NSAID diclofenac sodium (100mg/kg, p.o.) to induce gastric lesions. In separate groups of mice, the cannabimimetic behavioral effects of Δ(9)-THC given via each route of administration were compared using a battery of tests, consisting of assessment of locomotor activity, nociception in the tail withdrawal test, catalepsy in the bar test, and hypothermia. Δ(9)-THC dose-dependently attenuated diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhagic streaks through both p.o. and i.p. routes of administration (ED50 (95% confidence interval)=0.64 (0.26-1.55)mg/kg and 0.06 (0.01-0.34) mg/kg, respectively). Δ(9)-THC given i.p. was 2-3 orders of magnitude more potent in reducing diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers than in producing locomotor immobility, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, while the potency of ratio of p.o. Δ(9)-THC between each behavior measure was 7-18. These data indicate that the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC protects against diclofenac-induced gastric inflammatory tissue damage at doses insufficient to cause common cannabinoid side effects.

  8. Acute Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks gastric hemorrhages induced by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Cole, Erica C.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are among the most widely used analgesics in the world, cause gastrointestinal inflammation that is potentially life-threatening. Although inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes protect against gastropathy in fasted NSAID-treated mice, the gastroprotective effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, have yet to be investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were fasted, administered vehicle or Δ9-THC (.01–50 mg/kg; oral or intraperitoneal), and then treated with the NSAID diclofenac sodium (100 mg/kg, p.o.) to induce gastric lesions. In separate groups of mice, the cannabimimetic behavioral effects of Δ9-THC given via each route of administration were compared using a battery of tests, consisting of assessment of locomotor activity, nociception in the tail withdrawal test, catalepsy in the bar test, and hypothermia. Δ9-THC dose-dependently attenuated diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhagic streaks through both p.o. and i.p. routes of administration (ED50 (95% confidence interval) = 0.64 (0.26 – 1.55) mg/kg and 0.06 (0.01 – 0.34) mg/kg, respectively). Δ9-THC given i.p. was 2–3 orders of magnitude more potent in reducing diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers than in producing locomotor immobility, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, while the potency of ratio of p.o. Δ9-THC between each behavior measure was 7–18. These data indicate that the phytocannabinoid Δ9-THC protects against diclofenac-induced gastric inflammatory tissue damage at doses insufficient to cause common cannabinoid side effects. PMID:23769745

  9. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4(+) T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ(9)-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ(9)-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ(9)-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ(9)-THC suppresses human T cell function.

  10. Acute and chronic effects of beta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on seizures in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Ten Ham, M; Loskota, W J; Lomax, P

    1975-03-01

    Beta9-THC was injected daily for 6 days into gerbils from our breeding colony that exhibit spontaneous epileptiform seizures. At a dose of 20 mg/kg no effect was seen on the latency, duration or severity of the seizures induced after 1 and 6 days of treatment. Delta9-THC (50 mg/kg) completely abolished the seizures after a single injection but tolerance developed to this effect so that no protection was afforded after 6 daily doses. Severe toxic signs were evident at the higher dose level with marked depression of spontaneous motor activity. The toxic effect increased progressively with chronic treatment and half the animals failed to survive.

  11. Comparisons of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Anandamide on a Battery of Cognition-Related Behavior in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael Z.; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Alapafuja, Shakiru O.; Nikas, Spyros P.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Bergman, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The primary psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC), has medicinal value but also produces unwanted deleterious effects on cognitive function, promoting the search for improved cannabinergic therapeutics. The present studies used a battery of touchscreen procedures in squirrel monkeys to compare the effects of different types of cannabinergic drugs on several measures of performance including learning (repeated acquisition), cognitive flexibility (discrimination reversal), short-term memory (delayed matching-to-sample), attention (psychomotor vigilance), and motivation (progressive ratio). Drugs studied included the cannabinoid agonist Δ9-THC, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597), and endocannabinoid anandamide and its stable synthetic analog methanandamide [(R)-(+)-arachidonyl-1′-hydroxy-2′-propylamide]. The effects of Δ9-THC and anandamide after treatment with the cannabinoid receptor type 1 inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1Hpyrazole-3-carboxamide] and the FAAH inhibitor URB597, respectively, also were examined. The results showed the following: 1) Δ9-THC produced dose-related impairments of discrimination-based cognitive behavior with potency that varied across tasks (discriminative capability < learning < flexibility < short-term memory); 2) anandamide alone and URB597 alone were without effect on all endpoints; 3) anandamide following URB597 pretreatment and methanandamide had negligible effects on discriminative capability, learning, and reversal, but following large doses affected delayed matching-to-sample performance in some subjects; 4) all drugs, except anandamide and URB597, disrupted attention; and 5) progressive ratio breakpoints were generally unaffected by all drugs tested, suggesting little to no effect on motivation. Taken together, these data indicate that

  12. Exposure to a high-fat diet decreases sensitivity to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced motor effects in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Jones, Amanda R.; Wright, M. Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Arachidonic acid, a fatty acid component of neuronal cell membranes, forms the backbone of endogenous ligands of the endocannabinoid system. The lipid nature of this system may make it particularly susceptible to changes in fat content of the diet, which may, in turn, affect endocannabinoid tone and subsequent changes in receptor expression or activity. The latter would also be expected to affect responses to exogenous cannabinoids. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of a high-fat diet on sensitivity to the pharmacological effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC). Male and female Long-Evans rats were fed either a diet of standard rodent chow or chow enhanced with corn oil. Subsequently, they were repeatedly assessed for Δ9-THC-induced hypomobility, catalepsy and hypothermia. Female rats that received the high fat diet beginning in adolescence or in adulthood became significantly less sensitive to the effects of Δ9-THC on motor behavior, but not its hypothermic effects, with faster development of decreased sensitivity in female rats that began the high-fat diet as adults. In contrast, diet-induced differences either did not occur, or were less pronounced, in male rats of both ages. After acute injection, brain and blood levels of Δ9-THC and its two primary metabolites were similar regardless of diet. Combined with the fact that diet differentially affected only some of the measures, these results suggest that pharmacokinetic differences cannot fully account for the effects of the high-fat diet on response to Δ9-THC. Further, these results suggest that dietary fat content may represent an important consideration in predicting the effects of marijuana in females. PMID:20850461

  13. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueous setup the specific activity decreased by a factor of approximately 2 pointing to a substrate limitation of CBGA in the two-liquid phase system. However, the specific activity remained stable for at least 3h illustrating the benefit of the two-liquid phase setup. In a repeated-batch setup, THCAS showed only a minor loss of specific activity in the third batch pointing to a high intrinsic stability and high solvent tolerance of the enzyme. Maximal space-time-yields of 0.121gL(-1)h(-1) were reached proving the two-liquid phase concept suitable for biotechnological production of cannabinoids.

  14. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NFκB. • Δ{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • Δ{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β.

  15. Distinct pharmacology and metabolism of K2 synthetic cannabinoids compared to Δ(9)-THC: mechanism underlying greater toxicity?

    PubMed

    Fantegrossi, William E; Moran, Jeffery H; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Prather, Paul L

    2014-02-27

    K2 or Spice products are emerging drugs of abuse that contain synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs). Although assumed by many teens and first time drug users to be a "safe" and "legal" alternative to marijuana, many recent reports indicate that SCBs present in K2 produce toxicity not associated with the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). This mini-review will summarize recent evidence that use of K2 products poses greater health risks relative to marijuana, and suggest that distinct pharmacological properties and metabolism of SCBs relative to Δ(9)-THC may contribute to the observed toxicity. Studies reviewed will indicate that in contrast to partial agonist properties of Δ(9)-THC typically observed in vitro, SCBs in K2 products act as full cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R) agonists in both cellular assays and animal studies. Furthermore, unlike Δ(9)-THC metabolism, several SCB metabolites retain high affinity for, and exhibit a range of intrinsic activities at, CB1 and CB2Rs. Finally, several reports indicate that although quasi-legal SCBs initially evaded detection and legal consequences, these presumed "advantages" have been limited by new legislation and development of product and human testing capabilities. Collectively, evidence reported in this mini-review suggests that K2 products are neither safe nor legal alternatives to marijuana. Instead, enhanced toxicity of K2 products relative to marijuana, perhaps resulting from the combined actions of a complex mixture of different SCBs present and their active metabolites that retain high affinity for CB1 and CB2Rs, highlights the inherent danger that may accompany use of these substances.

  16. Proof of cannabis administration by sensitive detection of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in hair using selective methylation and application of liquid chromatography- tandem and multistage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Sachs, Hans; Uhl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The identification of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCCOOH) in hair represents an exceptional forensic analytical challenge due to low target concentrations in a complex matrix. Several dedicated techniques [gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS/MS) or GC-GC-MS couplings] were specifically introduced into forensic toxicology aiming to a selective and sensitive identification of THCCOOH in hair. The combination of liquid-chromatography (LC) and MS/MS gained an outstanding relevance in forensic toxicology (including the detection of cannabinoids). However, its application to hair matrix is characterized by a lack of specificity which is due to the unspecific decarboxylation as most abundant fragmentation reaction. Therefore, various chemical modifications of the carboxyl and/or phenolic hydroxyl groups were examined to improve the selectivity. The selective methylation of the 9-carboxyl-group proved to be the most efficient derivatization procedure. Hair extracts were redissolved in acetonitrile and after addition of few milligrams of solid sodium carbonate derivatized with 25 μL methyl iodide. The resulting THC-9-carboxymethylester was separated by conventional reverse phase LC and selectively detected using negative electrospray ionization by recording the fragmentation reactions 357➔325 and 357➔297. Resulting limits of quantification were below 100 fg/mg. A further significant improvement was achieved by application of the multistage MS3 fragmentation 357➔325➔297. To verify the validity of this procedure, a systematic quantitative comparison of THCCOOH concentrations in hair with data from a well established GC-NCI-MS/MS technique was performed. Both techniques proved to be in good accordance (R(2)=0.647, p = <0.001) and equally suitable for hair testing of THCCOOH.

  17. Effects of cannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid and cannabidiol in MPP+ affected murine mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Moldzio, Rudolf; Pacher, Thomas; Krewenka, Christopher; Kranner, Barbara; Novak, Johannes; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2012-06-15

    Cannabinoids derived from Cannabis sativa demonstrate neuroprotective properties in various cellular and animal models. Mitochondrial impairment and consecutive oxidative stress appear to be major molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Therefore we studied some major cannabinoids, i.e. delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in mice mesencephalic cultures for their protective capacities against 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity. MPP(+) is an established model compound in the research of parkinsonism that acts as a complex I inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, resulting in excessive radical formation and cell degeneration. MPP(+) (10 μM) was administered for 48 h at the 9th DIV with or without concomitant cannabinoid treatment at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10 μM. All cannabinoids exhibited in vitro antioxidative action ranging from 669 ± 11.1 (THC), 16 ± 3.2 (THCA) to 356 ± 29.5 (CBD) μg Trolox (a vitamin E derivative)/mg substance in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay. Cannabinoids were without effect on the morphology of dopaminergic cells stained by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreaction. THC caused a dose-dependent increase of cell count up to 17.3% at 10 μM, whereas CBD only had an effect at highest concentrations (decrease of cell count by 10.1-20% at concentrations of 0.01-10 μM). It influenced the viability of the TH immunoreactive neurons significantly, whereas THCA exerts no influence on dopaminergic cell count. Exposure of cultures to 10 μM of MPP(+) for 48 h significantly decreased the number of TH immunoreactive neurons by 44.7%, and shrunken cell bodies and reduced neurite lengths could be observed. Concomitant treatment of cultures with cannabinoids rescued dopaminergic cells. Compared to MPP(+) treated cultures, THC counteracted toxic effects in a dose-dependent manner. THCA and CBD treatment at a concentration of 10

  18. Excretion of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Sweat

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Marilyn A.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Saito, Takeshi; Fortner, Neil; Abraham, Tsadik; Gustafson, Richard A.; Smith, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Sweat testing is a noninvasive technique for monitoring drug exposure over a 7-day period in treatment, criminal justice, and employment settings. We evaluated Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) excretion in 11 daily cannabis users after cessation of drug use. PharmChek® sweat patches worn for 7 days were analyzed for THC by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The limit of quantification (LOQ) for the method was 0.4 ng THC/patch. Sweat patches worn the first week of continuously monitored abstinence had THC above the United States Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration’s proposed cutoff concentration for federal workplace testing of 1 ng THC/patch. Mean ± S.E.M. THC concentrations were 3.85 ± 0.86 ng THC/patch. Eight of 11 subjects had negative patches the second week and one produced THC positive patches for four weeks of monitored abstinence. We also tested daily and weekly sweat patches from 7 subjects who were administered oral doses of up to 14.8 mg THC/day for five consecutive days. In this oral THC administration study, no daily or weekly patches had THC above the LOQ; concurrent plasma THC concentrations were all less than 6.1 μg/L. In conclusion, using proposed federal cutoff concentrations, most daily cannabis users will have a positive sweat patch in the first week after ceasing drug use and a negative patch after subsequent weeks, although patches may remain positive for four weeks or more. Oral ingestion of up to 14.8 mg THC daily does not produce a THC positive sweat patch test. PMID:17481836

  19. In vivo effects of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 and phytocannabinoid Δ9-THC in mice: inhalation versus intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Marshell, R; Kearney-Ramos, T; Brents, L K; Hyatt, W S; Tai, S; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2014-09-01

    Human users of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) JWH-018 and JWH-073 typically smoke these drugs, but preclinical studies usually rely on injection for drug delivery. We used the cannabinoid tetrad and drug discrimination to compare in vivo effects of inhaled drugs with injected doses of these two SCBs, as well as with the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Mice inhaled various doses of Δ(9)-THC, JWH-018 or JWH-073, or were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with these same compounds. Rectal temperature, tail flick latency in response to radiant heat, horizontal bar catalepsy, and suppression of locomotor activity were assessed in each animal. In separate studies, mice were trained to discriminate Δ(9)-THC (IP) from saline, and tests were performed with inhaled or injected doses of the SCBs. Both SCBs elicited Δ(9)-THC-like effects across both routes of administration, and effects following inhalation were attenuated by pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant. No cataleptic effects were observed following inhalation, but all compounds induced catalepsy following injection. Injected JWH-018 and JWH-073 fully substituted for Δ(9)-THC, but substitution was partial (JWH-073) or required relatively higher doses (JWH-018) when drugs were inhaled. These studies demonstrate that the SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 elicit dose-dependent, CB1 receptor-mediated Δ(9)-THC-like effects in mice when delivered via inhalation or via injection. Across these routes of administration, differences in cataleptic effects and, perhaps, discriminative stimulus effects, may implicate the involvement of active metabolites of these compounds.

  20. In vivo effects of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 and phytocannabinoid Δ9-THC in mice: Inhalation versus intraperitoneal injection

    PubMed Central

    Marshell, R.; Kearney-Ramos, T.; Brents, L.K.; Hyatt, W.S.; Tai, S.; Prather, P.L.; Fantegrossi, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Human users of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) JWH-018 and JWH-073 typically smoke these drugs, but preclinical studies usually rely on injection for drug delivery. We used the cannabinoid tetrad and drug discrimination to compare in vivo effects of inhaled drugs with injected doses of these two SCBs, as well as with the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC). Mice inhaled various doses of Δ9-THC, JWH-018 or JWH-073, or were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with these same compounds. Rectal temperature, tail flick latency in response to radiant heat, horizontal bar catalepsy, and suppression of locomotor activity were assessed in each animal. In separate studies, mice were trained to discriminate Δ9-THC (IP) from saline, and tests were performed with inhaled or injected doses of the SCBs. Both SCBs elicited Δ9-THC-like effects across both routes of administration, and effects following inhalation were attenuated by pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant. No cataleptic effects were observed following inhalation, but all compounds induced catalepsy following injection. Injected JWH-018 and JWH-073 fully substituted for Δ9-THC, but substitution was partial (JWH-073) or required relatively higher doses (JWH-018) when drugs were inhaled. These studies demonstrate that the SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 elicit dose-dependent, CB1 receptor-mediated Δ9-THC-like effects in mice when delivered via inhalation or via injection. Across these routes of administration, differences in cataleptic effects and, perhaps, discriminative stimulus effects, may implicate the involvement of active metabolites of these compounds. PMID:24857780

  1. Disruption of hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation by psychoactive synthetic cannabinoid 'Spice' compounds: comparison with Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Lycas, Matthew D; Kaczmarzyk, Jakub R; Spivak, Charles E; Baumann, Michael H; Lupica, Carl R

    2017-03-01

    There has been a marked increase in the availability of synthetic drugs designed to mimic the effects of marijuana. These cannabimimetic drugs, sold illicitly as 'Spice' and related products, are associated with serious medical complications in some users. In vitro studies suggest that synthetic cannabinoids in these preparations are potent agonists at central cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs), but few investigations have delineated their cellular effects, particularly in comparison with the psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC). We compared the ability of three widely abused synthetic cannabinoids and Δ(9) -THC to alter glutamate release and long-term potentiation in the mouse hippocampus. JWH-018 was the most potent inhibitor of hippocampal synaptic transmission (EC50 ~15 nM), whereas its fluoropentyl derivative, AM2201, inhibited synaptic transmission with slightly lower potency (EC50 ~60 nM). The newer synthetic cannabinoid, XLR-11, displayed much lower potency (EC50 ~900 nM) that was similar to Δ(9) -THC (EC50 ~700 nM). The effects of all compounds occurred via activation of CB1Rs, as demonstrated by reversal with the selective antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 or the neutral CB1R antagonist PIMSR1. Moreover, AM2201 was without effect in the hippocampus of transgenic mice lacking the CB1R. Hippocampal slices exposed to either synthetic cannabinoids or Δ(9) -THC exhibited significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP). We find that, compared with Δ(9) -THC, the first-generation cannabinoids found in Spice preparations display higher potency, whereas a recent synthetic cannabinoid is roughly equipotent with Δ(9) -THC. The disruption of synaptic function by these synthetic cannabinoids is likely to lead to profound impairments in cognitive and behavioral function.

  2. Δ(9)-THC modulation of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) gene expression: possible involvement of induced levels of PPARα in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Ikeda, Eriko; Su, Shengzhong; Harada, Mari; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Nishimura, Hajime; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kakizoe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Aya; Tokuyasu, Miki; Himeno, Taichi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-12-04

    We recently reported that Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), a major cannabinoid component in Cannabis Sativa (marijuana), significantly stimulated the expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) was previously implicated in this induction. However, the mechanisms mediating this induction have not been elucidated in detail. We performed a DNA microarray analysis of Δ(9)-THC-treated samples and showed the selective up-regulation of the PPARα isoform coupled with the induction of FA2H over the other isoforms (β and γ). Δ(9)-THC itself had no binding/activation potential to/on PPARα, and palmitic acid (PA), a PPARα ligand, exhibited no stimulatory effects on FA2H in MDA-MB-231 cells; thus, we hypothesized that the levels of PPARα induced were involved in the Δ(9)-THC-mediated increase in FA2H. In support of this hypothesis, we herein demonstrated that; (i) Δ(9)-THC activated the basal transcriptional activity of PPARα in a concentration-dependent manner, (ii) the concomitant up-regulation of PPARα/FA2H was caused by Δ(9)-THC, (iii) PA could activate PPARα after the PPARα expression plasmid was introduced, and (iv) the Δ(9)-THC-induced up-regulation of FA2H was further stimulated by the co-treatment with L-663,536 (a known PPARα inducer). Taken together, these results support the concept that the induced levels of PPARα may be involved in the Δ(9)-THC up-regulation of FA2H in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  3. Brain Mapping-Based Model of Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Effects on Connectivity in the Pain Matrix.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Oertel, Bruno G; Felden, Lisa; Kell, Christian A; Nöth, Ulrike; Vermehren, Johannes; Kaiser, Jochen; Deichmann, Ralf; Lötsch, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    Cannabinoids receive increasing interest as analgesic treatments. However, the clinical use of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) has progressed with justified caution, which also owes to the incomplete mechanistic understanding of its analgesic effects, in particular its interference with the processing of sensory or affective components of pain. The present placebo-controlled crossover study therefore focused on the effects of 20 mg oral THC on the connectivity between brain areas of the pain matrix following experimental stimulation of trigeminal nocisensors in 15 non-addicted healthy volunteers. A general linear model (GLM) analysis identified reduced activations in the hippocampus and the anterior insula following THC administration. However, assessment of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) revealed that the effects of THC first consisted in a weakening of the interaction between the thalamus and the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2). From there, dynamic causal modeling (DCM) was employed to infer that THC attenuated the connections to the hippocampus and to the anterior insula, suggesting that the reduced activations in these regions are secondary to a reduction of the connectivity from somatosensory regions by THC. These findings may have consequences for the way THC effects are currently interpreted: as cannabinoids are increasingly considered in pain treatment, present results provide relevant information about how THC interferes with the affective component of pain. Specifically, the present experiment suggests that THC does not selectively affect limbic regions, but rather interferes with sensory processing which in turn reduces sensory-limbic connectivity, leading to deactivation of affective regions.

  4. The effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinole treatment on gonadal micro-vascularization and affected fertility examined by SEM and 3D-morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlbacher, K. M. T.; Minnich, B.

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the reproductive system in nude rats with special emphasis on how Δ9-THC impacts the vascularization of testes which in turn indirectly influences fertility. Basically, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) causes not only negative (psychoactive) effects in the human body as cannabinole administration in medical use (dose-dependent) offers multiple new treatment opportunities such as pain relief or containment of various cancers. Concerning the reproductive system it strongly influences CB-receptors along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis resulting in reduced plasma testosterone levels. There is also altered sperm quality parameters reported such as sperm motility or sperm count. On the other hand Δ9-THC effects endothelial growth factors (VEGF, Ang-1 etc.) respectively acts on their specific receptors which in turn modify angiogenesis and vascularization of tissues and organs (e.g. tumorous tissues). This leads to new therapeutical strategies in the suppression of various cancers by inhibiting (neo-)vascularization and in turn famishment of tumorous tissues (lack of nutrition supply). Here we studied the micro-vascularization of gonads in a long-term THC-treated nude rat model by vascular corrosion casting, SEM and 3D-morphometry.

  5. Decarboxylation of Δ 9-tetrahydrocannabinol: Kinetics and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotin-Brunel, Helene; Buijs, Wim; van Spronsen, Jaap; van Roosmalen, Maaike J. E.; Peters, Cor J.; Verpoorte, Rob; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2011-02-01

    Efficient tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9-THC) production from cannabis is important for its medical application and as basis for the development of production routes of other drugs from plants. This work presents one of the steps of Δ 9-THC production from cannabis plant material, the decarboxylation reaction, transforming the Δ 9-THC-acid naturally present in the plant into the psychoactive Δ 9-THC. Results of experiments showed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, with an activation barrier of 85 kJ mol -1 and a pre-exponential factor of 3.7 × 10 8 s -1. Using molecular modeling, two options were identified for an acid catalyzed β-keto acid type mechanism for the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Each of these mechanisms might play a role, depending on the actual process conditions. Formic acid proved to be a good model for a catalyst of such a reaction. Also, the computational idea of catalysis by water to catalysis by an acid, put forward by Li and Brill, and Churchev and Belbruno was extended, and a new direct keto-enol route was found. A direct keto-enol mechanism catalyzed by formic acid seems to be the best explanation for the observed activation barrier and the pre-exponential factor of the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Evidence for this was found by performing an extraction experiment with Cannabis Flos. It revealed the presence of short chain carboxylic acids supporting this hypothesis. The presented approach is important for the development of a sustainable production of Δ 9-THC from the plant.

  6. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study about the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on the pharmacokinetics of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) after oral application of THC verses standardized cannabis extract.

    PubMed

    Nadulski, Thomas; Pragst, Fritz; Weinberg, Gordon; Roser, Patrik; Schnelle, Martin; Fronk, Eva-Maria; Stadelmann, Andreas Michael

    2005-12-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is known to modify the effects of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) by decreasing anxiety and antagonizing other THC-effects. As a reason, pharmacodynamic as well as pharmacokinetic mechanisms were suggested. In context of the use of cannabis-based medicine extracts for therapeutic purposes, a study was performed in a double-blind and placebo-controlled cross-over design in which each of 24 volunteers (12 male and 12 female, age 18-45 years) obtained soft-gelatin capsules with 10 mg THC (THC-set), cannabis extract containing 10 mg THC +5.4 mg CBD (CAN-set) or placebo in weekly intervals. Blood samples were taken 30 minutes before and 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, 9 hours and 24 hours after the intake. The concentrations of THC, of its metabolites 11-OH-THC, THC-COOH and of CBD in the plasma samples were determined by automatic solid phase extraction, derivatization with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)triflouroacetamide and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The concentration versus time curves (maximum concentrations Cmax, corresponding time tmax and areas under the curves AUC) were evaluated by statistical methods with respect to equivalence or differences between the CAN-set and the THC-set. Furthermore, the intra-individual ratios of Cmax and AUC for 11-OH-THC/THC, THC-COOH/THC and THC-COOH/11-OH-THC were compared between the THC-set and the CAN-set. Despite the large variation of the data, evidence emerged from the total of the results that CBD partially inhibits the CYP 2C catalyzed hydroxylation of THC to 11-OH-THC. The probability for this inhibition is particularly high for oral intake because THC and CBD attain relatively high concentrations in the liver and because of the high first-pass metabolism of THC. However, the effect of CBD is small in comparison to the variability caused by other factors. Therefore, a pharmacokinetic reason for the differences determined between pure THC and cannabis extract is improbable at

  7. Potency trends of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids in confiscated cannabis preparations from 1993 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Mehmedic, Zlatko; Chandra, Suman; Slade, Desmond; Denham, Heather; Foster, Susan; Patel, Amit S; Ross, Samir A; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2010-09-01

    The University of Mississippi has a contract with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to carry out a variety of research activities dealing with cannabis, including the Potency Monitoring (PM) program, which provides analytical potency data on cannabis preparations confiscated in the United States. This report provides data on 46,211 samples seized and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) during 1993-2008. The data showed an upward trend in the mean Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) content of all confiscated cannabis preparations, which increased from 3.4% in 1993 to 8.8% in 2008. Hashish potencies did not increase consistently during this period; however, the mean yearly potency varied from 2.5-9.2% (1993-2003) to 12.0-29.3% (2004-2008). Hash oil potencies also varied considerably during this period (16.8 ± 16.3%). The increase in cannabis preparation potency is mainly due to the increase in the potency of nondomestic versus domestic samples.

  8. Immunochemical approach using monoclonal antibody against Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) to discern cannabis plants and to investigate new drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb-4A4) against Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) showing extensive cross-reactivity against various cannabinoids was prepared. Using this antibody, a competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) was developed to detect Δ9-THCA in the range of 1 to 100 mg/ml. Various cannabinoids including Δ9-THC9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid), Δ8-THCA (Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid), Δ8-THC (Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD (cannabidiol), and CBN (cannabinol) were recognized by MAb-4A4, and their cross-reactivities were 55-1600% compared with Δ9-THCA (100%). This novel characteristic of this MAb enabled detection of marijuana residues in biological samples by detection of residual cannabinoids. The ELISA using MAb-4A4 was found to be applicable even for withered samples which contained only trace amounts of Δ9-THCA and Δ9-THC. In addition, this method using MAb-4A4 could be useful in forensic analysis since the MAb-4A4 also shows cross-reactivities against cannabinoid metabolites in body fluids. As well as forensic applications using this MAb, an investigation of new drug candidates focusing on cannabinoid metabolites arising from biotransformation in plant tissue was performed using immunochemical screening. The resulting new drug candidates were cannabinoid glycosides biotransformed by Pinellia ternata whose bioactivity is as yet unidentified. Our results indicate the utility of the application of ELISA using MAb-4A4 for further experiments involving marijuana and cannabinoids not only in the forensic field but also in the context of drug discovery.

  9. Sex differences in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolism and in vivo pharmacology following acute and repeated dosing in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Burston, James J

    2014-07-25

    Mechanisms that may underlie age and sex differences in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids are relatively unexplored. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether sex differences in metabolism of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), similar to those observed previously in adult rats, also occurred in adolescent rats and might contribute to age and sex differences in its in vivo pharmacology. Male and female adolescent rats were exposed to THC acutely or repeatedly for 10 days. Subsequently, some of the rats were sacrificed and blood and brain levels of THC and one of its metabolites, 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC (11-OH-THC), were measured. Other rats were evaluated in a battery of in vivo tests that are sensitive to cannabinoids. Concentrations of 11-OH-THC in the brains of female adult and adolescent rats exceeded those observed in male conspecifics, particularly after repeated THC administration. In contrast, brain levels of THC did not differ between the sexes. In vivo, acute THC produced dose-related hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotion in adolescent rats of both sexes, with tolerance developing after repeated administration. With a minor exception, sex differences in THC's effects in the in vivo assays were not apparent. Together with previous findings, the present results suggest that sex differences in pharmacokinetics cannot fully explain the patterns of sex differences (and lack of sex differences) in cannabinoid effects across behaviors. Hormonal and/or pharmacodynamic factors are also likely to play a role.

  10. Chronic Administration of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory MicroRNA Expression during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Lawrance C.; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including Δ9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving Δ9-THC (n = 3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n = 4) or THC (THC/SIV; n = 4). Chronic Δ9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ∼28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal

  11. Cloud point extraction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol from cannabis resin.

    PubMed

    Ameur, S; Haddou, B; Derriche, Z; Canselier, J P; Gourdon, C

    2013-04-01

    A cloud point extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/UV) method was developed for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in micellar phase. The nonionic surfactant "Dowfax 20B102" was used to extract and pre-concentrate THC from cannabis resin, prior to its determination with a HPLC-UV system (diode array detector) with isocratic elution. The parameters and variables affecting the extraction were investigated. Under optimum conditions (1 wt.% Dowfax 20B102, 1 wt.% Na2SO4, T = 318 K, t = 30 min), this method yielded a quite satisfactory recovery rate (~81 %). The limit of detection was 0.04 μg mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation was less than 2 %. Compared with conventional solid-liquid extraction, this new method avoids the use of volatile organic solvents, therefore is environmentally safer.

  12. Controlled release tablet formulation containing natural Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Punyamurthula, Nagendra S; Hingorani, Tushar; Adelli, Goutham; Gul, Waseem; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Repka, Michael A; Majumdar, Soumyajit

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids are increasingly being used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) because of their action on the cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. The currently marketed capsule formulations (sesame oil based and crystalline powder) are required to be administered frequently to maintain therapeutic levels, which leads to non-compliance. In the present study, oral controlled release tablet formulations of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were prepared using the lipids Precirol® and Compritol®. Release profiles using THC-lipid matrices and/or with the lipids in the external phase (blend) were evaluated. The effect of directly compressible diluents lactose mixture (Ludipress®), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (Emcompress®) and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel® 102) on tablet characteristics and in vitro drug release was also investigated. Further, in vitro THC release in the presence of a lipase inhibitor, Pluronic® F68, was also studied. A 24 h zero-order THC release profile was obtained with a combination of Precirol® and Compritol® in the compression blend. Addition of Pluronic® F68 did not alter THC release in vitro. These optimized tablets were chemically and physically stable for 3 months, the last time point tested, at 25 °C/60% RH. The overall results demonstrate the feasibility of preparing oral THC tablets for once a day administration which can improve CINV management.

  13. Cannabis and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) for weight loss?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Bernard; Trigo, Jose M; Sharkey, Keith A; Le Strat, Yann

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is one of the highest preventable causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world [1]. It has been well known for a long time that exposure to cannabis produces an increase of appetite (a phenomenon referred to as the 'munchies'). This phenomenon led to an exploration of the role of the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of obesity and associated metabolic syndrome. This effort subsequently led to the development of a successful therapeutic approach for obesity that consisted of blocking the cannabinoid CB1 receptors using ligands such as Rimonabant in order to produce weight loss and improve metabolic profile [2]. Despite being efficacious, Rimonabant was associated with increased rates of depression and anxiety and therefore removed from the market. We recently discovered that the prevalence of obesity is paradoxically much lower in cannabis users as compared to non-users and that this difference is not accounted for by tobacco smoking status and is still present after adjusting for variables such as sex and age. Here, we propose that this effect is directly related to exposure to the Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) present in cannabis smoke. We therefore propose the seemingly paradoxical hypothesis that THC or a THC/cannabidiol combination drug may produce weight loss and may be a useful therapeutic for the treatment of obesity and its complications.

  14. AB-CHMINACA, AB-PINACA, and FUBIMINA: Affinity and Potency of Novel Synthetic Cannabinoids in Producing Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Like Effects in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Marusich, Julie A; Lefever, Timothy W; Antonazzo, Kateland R; Wallgren, Michael T; Cortes, Ricardo A; Patel, Purvi R; Grabenauer, Megan; Moore, Katherine N; Thomas, Brian F

    2015-09-01

    Diversion of synthetic cannabinoids for abuse began in the early 2000s. Despite legislation banning compounds currently on the drug market, illicit manufacturers continue to release new compounds for recreational use. This study examined new synthetic cannabinoids, AB-CHMINACA (N-[1-amino-3-methyl-oxobutan-2-yl]-1-[cyclohexylmethyl]-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide), AB-PINACA [N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide], and FUBIMINA [(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-benzo[d]imadazol-2-yl)(naphthalen-1-yl)methanone], with the hypothesis that these compounds, like those before them, would be highly susceptible to abuse. Cannabinoids were examined in vitro for binding and activation of CB1 receptors, and in vivo for pharmacological effects in mice and in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) discrimination. AB-CHMINACA, AB-PINACA, and FUBIMINA bound to and activated CB1 and CB2 receptors, and produced locomotor suppression, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy. Furthermore, these compounds, along with JWH-018 [1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole], CP47,497 [rel-5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-[(1R,3S)-3-hydroxycyclohexyl]-phenol], and WIN55,212-2 ([(3R)-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenyl-methanone, monomethanesulfonate), substituted for Δ(9)-THC in Δ(9)-THC discrimination. Rank order of potency correlated with CB1 receptor-binding affinity, and all three compounds were full agonists in [(35)S]GTPγS binding, as compared with the partial agonist Δ(9)-THC. Indeed, AB-CHMINACA and AB-PINACA exhibited higher efficacy than most known full agonists of the CB1 receptor. Preliminary analysis of urinary metabolites of the compounds revealed the expected hydroxylation. AB-PINACA and AB-CHMINACA are of potential interest as research tools due to their unique chemical structures and high CB1 receptor efficacies. Further studies on these chemicals are likely to include research on understanding cannabinoid

  15. Development and validation of a LC/MS method for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata: Forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Karampela, Sevasti; Pistos, Constantinos; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Stoukas, Vasilios; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Zorba, Eleni; Koupparis, Michalis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    In a number of forensic toxicological cases, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolite 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) are frequently considered as contributor factors to the event. To that, a liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric method is described for the identification and quantitation of THC and its metabolite THCA in the forensically important larvae of L. sericata. Larvae of Lucilia sericata were fortified with varying concentrations of THC and THCA covering the calibration range between 10 and 500pg/mg. For the isolation of the analytes from larvae, several extraction techniques were evaluated and finally liquid-liquid extraction under acidic pH was selected using hexane-ethyl acetate (50:50, v/v) as extraction solvent. For the chromatographic separation, a Waters Symmetry® C18 analytical column was used while the mobile phase was acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (2mM) (30:70, v/v). The detection was performed using electrospray ionization source in negative mode (ESI-) and the selected ions monitored were m/z 313 for THC and m/z 343 for THCA. The proposed method which is simple and sufficiently sensitive for the detection of THC and THCA even in a single larva sampling, assisted the investigation of a forensic case.

  16. Modulation of adipocyte biology by δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Diana; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição; Azevedo, Isabel; Monteiro, Rosário

    2010-11-01

    It is recognized that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays a crucial role in the modulation of food intake and other aspects of energy metabolism. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on adipocyte biology. 3T3-L1 cells were used to evaluate proliferation by sulforhodamine B (SRB) staining and methyl-(3)H-thymidine incorporation after 48 or 72 h of treatment with THC (1-500 nmol/l). Cells were differentiated in the presence or absence of the cannabinoid, and adipogenesis was determined by measuring lipid accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcription through reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Lipolysis was quantified under basal conditions or after isoproterenol (IP, 100 nmol/l) or insulin (INS, 100 nmol/l) treatment. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), diacylglycerol lipase α, and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) transcriptions were determined by RT-PCR in preadipocytes and adipocytes and adiponectin only in adipocytes. THC treatment increased culture protein content and reduced methyl-(3)H-thymidine incorporation. Cells treated with THC underwent adipogenesis shown by the expression of PPARγ and had increased lipid accumulation. Basal and IP-stimulated lipolyses were inhibited by THC and there was no effect on lipolysis of INS-treated adipocytes. The effects on methyl-(3)H-thymidine incorporation and lipolysis seem to be mediated through CB1- and CB2-dependent pathways. THC decreased NAPE-PLD in preadipocytes and increased adiponectin and TGFβ transcription in adipocytes. These results show that the ECS interferes with adipocyte biology and may contribute to adipose tissue (AT) remodeling. Although these observations point toward increased AT deposition, the stimulation of adiponectin production and inhibition of lipolysis may be in favor of improved INS sensitivity under cannabinoid influence.

  17. The disease-modifying effects of a Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are preferentially due to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol acting through CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Feliú, Ana; Espejo-Porras, Francisco; Mecha, Miriam; Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guaza, Carmen; de Lago, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Sativex(®), an equimolecular combination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-botanical drug substance (Δ(9)-THC-BDS) and cannabidiol-botanical drug substance (CBD-BDS), is a licensed medicine that may be prescribed for alleviating specific symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) such as spasticity and pain. However, further evidence suggest that it could be also active as disease-modifying therapy given the immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties of their two major components. In this study, we investigated this potential in the experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model of MS in mice. We compared the effect of a Sativex-like combination of Δ(9)-THC-BDS (10 mg/kg) and CBD-BDS (10 mg/kg) with Δ(9)-THC-BDS (20 mg/kg) or CBD-BDS (20 mg/kg) administered separately by intraperitoneal administration to EAE mice. Treatments were initiated at the time that symptoms appear and continued up to the first relapse of the disease. The results show that the treatment with a Sativex-like combination significantly improved the neurological deficits typical of EAE mice, in parallel with a reduction in the number and extent of cell aggregates present in the spinal cord which derived from cell infiltration to the CNS. These effects were completely reproduced by the treatment with Δ(9)-THC-BDS alone, but not by CBD-BDS alone which only delayed the onset of the disease without improving disease progression and reducing the cell infiltrates in the spinal cord. Next, we investigated the potential targets involved in the effects of Δ(9)-THC-BDS by selectively blocking CB(1) or PPAR-γ receptors, and we found a complete reversion of neurological benefits and the reduction in cell aggregates only with rimonabant, a selective CB(1) receptor antagonist. Collectively, our data support the therapeutic potential of Sativex as a phytocannabinoid formulation capable of attenuating EAE progression, and that the active compound was Δ(9)-THC-BDS acting through CB(1

  18. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol discriminative stimulus effects of AM2201 and related aminoalkylindole analogues in rats

    PubMed Central

    Järbe, Torbjörn U.C.; Gifford, Roger S.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    The recent recreational use of synthetic cannabinoid ligands, collectively referred to as ‘Spice’, has raised concerns about their safety and possible differences in their biological effect(s) from marijuana / Δ9-THC. AM2201, a highly efficacious, potent CB1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, is a recently detected compound in ‘Spice’ preparations. Furthermore, structural analogues of AM2201 are now being found in ‘Spice’. The present studies were conducted to investigate their Δ9-THC-like effects using drug (Δ9-THC) discrimination in rats. Results show that the tested compounds were potent cannabinergics that generalized to the response to Δ9-THC, with AM2201 being most potent, exhibiting a 14-fold potency difference over Δ9-THC. The other analogues were between 2.5 and 4-fold more potent than THC. Surmountable antagonism of AM2201 with the selective CB1R antagonist / inverse agonist rimonabant also established that the discrimination is CB1R dependent. Time course data reveal that AM2201 likely peaks rapidly with an in vivo functional half-life of only 60 minutes. The present data confirm and extend previous observations regarding Δ9-THC-like effects of ‘Spice’ components. PMID:26397760

  19. Regioselective synthesis of isotopically labeled Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A-D3) by reaction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D3 with magnesium methyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Roth, Nadine; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Müller, Michael; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-10-10

    For the reliable quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in biological matrices by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS(/MS), an isotopically labeled internal standard was synthesized starting from Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D(3) (THC-D(3)). Synthesis strategy was based on a method reported by Mechoulam et al. in 1969 using magnesium methyl carbonate (MMC) as carboxylation reagent for the synthesis of cannabinoid acids. Preliminary experiments with THC to optimize yield of the product (THCA-A) resulted in the synthesis of the positional isomer tetrahydrocannabinolic acid B (THCA-B) as a byproduct. Using the optimized conditions for the desired isomer, THCA-A-D(3) was prepared and isolated with a yield of approx. 10% after two synthesis cycles. Isotope purity was estimated to be >99% by relative abundance of the molecular ions. The synthesized compound proved to be suitable as an internal standard for quantification of THCA-A in serum and hair samples of cannabis consumers.

  20. Distribution of Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    classified as current marijuana ( Cannabis sativa) users in the United States and 5.4 million people aged 12 and older used marijuana on a daily or almost...report from the European Union, cannabis use is common in many parts of the world.3 As a result of such widespread marijuana use and its well...knowledge regarding the postmortem distribution of cannabi - noids in humans primarily because cannabinoid testing is not routine in many postmortem

  1. Distribution of ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Philip M; Cardona, Patrick S; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Soper, John W

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the postmortem distribution of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). Data from 55 pilots involved in fatal aviation accidents are presented in this study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis obtained mean THC concentrations in blood from multiple sites, liver, lung, and kidney of 15.6 ng/mL, 92.4 ng/g, 766.0 ng/g, 44.1 ng/g and mean THCCOOH concentrations of 35.9 ng/mL, 322.4 ng/g, 42.6 ng/g, 138.5 ng/g, respectively. Heart THC concentrations (two cases) were 184.4 and 759.3 ng/g, and corresponding THCCOOH measured 11.0 and 95.9 ng/g, respectively. Muscle concentrations for THC (two cases) were 16.6 and 2.5 ng/g; corresponding THCCOOH, "confirmed positive" and 1.4 ng/g. The only brain tested in this study showed no THC detected and 2.9 ng/g THCCOOH, low concentrations that correlated with low values in other specimens from this case. This research emphasizes the need for postmortem cannabinoid testing and demonstrates the usefulness of a number of tissues, most notably lung, for these analyses.

  2. Simultaneous determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabinol and 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in hair using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dulaurent, S; Gaulier, J M; Imbert, L; Morla, A; Lachâtre, G

    2014-03-01

    For several years, hair analyses have become a powerful tool to investigate past exposure towards xenobiotics. In the case of illicit drugs and more precisely of cannabis exposure, four compounds are usually investigated: Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active compound of cannabis, one of its metabolites [11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH)] and two cannabinoids (cannabinol and cannabidiol). Up until now, the hair determination of the carboxylic metabolite of THC, which has been described as the only marker allowing distinguishing consumption and passive exposure, has been performed using a gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The aim of this study was to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of the four markers. The sample preparation was based on an alkaline hydrolysis of hair samples followed by a liquid-liquid extraction of compounds in acidic conditions using a hexane/ethyl acetate mixture. The method was validated and the results were satisfactory: intra- and inter-assay accuracies below 9% and relative standard deviation below 15% for the four compounds. Moreover, the limit of quantification for THC-COOH, the most challenging compound, was validated at 0.2 pg/mg. This concentration is in accordance with the recommendations made by a scientific society which specializes in hair testing. It makes it possible to distinguish the kind of exposure to cannabis.

  3. Simultaneous determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in oral fluid using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pin Duo; Chang, Yuan-Jhe; Lin, Keh-Liang; Chang, Yan-Zin

    2012-01-01

    The detection and confirmation of cannabinoids in oral fluid are important in forensic toxicology. Currently, the presence of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is used for the detection of cannabis in oral fluid. A low concentration of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) is found in oral fluid, which suggested a convenient and low-sensitivity confirmation assay can be used in a routine forensic laboratory. In this study, a highly sensitive isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method following dansylation was successfully developed for simultaneous determination of THC and THC-COOH in oral fluid. The dansylated derivatives dramatically demonstrated and enhanced the sensitivity of THC and THC-COOH. To avoid signal influenced by the matrix, a 5-min liquid chromatography gradient program was evaluated and optimized, which reduced the sample diffusion and caused sharp peaks (less than 12 s) and thus helped to achieve detection at a low level. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision were also evaluated, and high quantitative accuracy and precision were obtained. The limit of quantitation of this approach was 25 pg/mL for THC and 10 pg/mL for THC-COOH in oral fluid. Finally, the method was successfully applied to eight suspected cannabis users. Among them, in six oral fluid samples THC-COOH was determined at a concentration from 13.1 to 47.2 pg/mL.

  4. Enrichment and identification of Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase from Pichia pastoris culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Poetsch, Ansgar; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2015-09-01

    This data article refers to the report Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) production in Pichia pastoris enables chemical synthesis of cannabinoids (Lange et. al. 2015) [2]. THCAS was produced on a 2 L lab scale using recombinant P. pastoris KM71 KE1. Enrichment of THCAS as a technically pure enzyme was realized using dialysis and cationic exchange chromatography. nLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis identified THCAS in different fractions obtained by cationic exchange chromatography.

  5. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase production in Pichia pastoris enables chemical synthesis of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2015-10-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is of increasing interest as a pharmaceutical and bioactive compound. Chemical synthesis of THC uses a laborious procedure and does not satisfy the market demand. The implementation of biocatalysts for specific synthesis steps might be beneficial for making natural product availability independent from the plant. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from C. sativa L. catalyzes the cyclization of cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is non-enzymatically decarboxylated to THC. We report the preparation of THCAS in amounts sufficient for the biocatalytic production of THC(A). Active THCAS was most efficiently obtained from Pichia pastoris. THCAS was produced on a 2L bioreactor scale and the enzyme was isolated by single-step chromatography with a specific activity of 73Ug(-1)total protein. An organic/aqueous two-liquid phase setup for continuous substrate delivery facilitated in situ product removal. In addition, THCAS activity in aqueous environments lasted for only 20min whereas the presence of hexane stabilized the activity over 3h. In conclusion, production of THCAS in P. pastoris Mut(S) KM71 KE1, subsequent isolation, and its application in a two-liquid phase setup enables the synthesis of THCA on a mg scale.

  6. Hair analysis for Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A) and Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) after handling cannabis plant material.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2016-01-01

    A previous study has shown that Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the non-psychoactive precursor of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the cannabis plant does not get incorporated in relevant amounts into the hair through the bloodstream after repeated oral intake. However, THCA-A can be measured in forensic hair samples in concentrations often exceeding the detected THC concentrations. To investigate whether the handling of cannabis plant material prior to consumption is a contributing factor for THC-positive hair results and also the source for THCA-A findings in hair, a study comprising ten participants was conducted. In this study, the participants rolled a marijuana joint on five consecutive days and hair samples of each participant were obtained. Urine samples were taken to exclude cannabis consumption prior to and during the study. THCA-A and THC could be detected in the hair samples from all participants taken at the end of the exposure period (concentration range: 15-1800 pg/mg for THCA-A and < 10-93 pg/mg for THC). Four weeks after the first exposure, THCA-A could still be detected in the hair samples of nine participants (concentration range: 4-57 pg/mg). Furthermore, THC could be detected in the hair samples of five participants (concentration range: < 10-17 pg/mg). Based on these results, it can be concluded that at least parts of the THC as well as the major part of THCA-A found in routine hair analysis derives from external contamination caused by direct transfer through contaminated fingers. This finding is of particular interest in interpreting THC-positive hair results of children or partners of cannabis users, where such a transfer can occur due to close body contact. Analytical findings may be wrongly interpreted as a proof of consumption or at least passive exposure to cannabis smoke. Such misinterpretation could lead to severe consequences for the people concerned.

  7. Synthesis of [13C4]-labeled ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol as internal standards for reducing ion suppressing/alteration effects in LC/MS-MS quantification.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-09-01

    (-)-∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol is the principal psychoactive component of the cannabis plant and also the active ingredient in some prescribed drugs. To detect and control misuse and monitor administration in clinical settings, reference samples of the native drugs and their metabolites are needed. The accuracy of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric quantification of drugs in biological samples depends among others on ion suppressing/alteration effects. Especially, 13C-labeled drug analogues are useful for minimzing such interferences. Thus, to provide internal standards for more accurate quantification and for identification purpose, synthesis of [13C4]-∆9-tetrahydro-cannabinol and [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was developed via [13C4]-olivetol. Starting from [13C4]-olivetol the synthesis of [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was shortened from three to two steps by employing nitromethane as a co-solvent in condensation with (+)-apoverbenone.

  8. Hemp oil ingestion causes positive urine tests for delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Costantino, A; Schwartz, R H; Kaplan, P

    1997-10-01

    A hemp oil product (Hemp Liquid Gold) was purchased from a specialty food store. Fifteen milliliters was consumed by seven adult volunteers. Urine samples were taken from the subjects before ingestion and at 8, 24, and 48 h after the dose was taken. All specimens were screened by enzyme immunoassay with SYVA EMIT II THC 20, THC 50, and THC 100 kits. The tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THCA) concentration was determined on all samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (5). A total of 18 postingestion samples were submitted. Fourteen of the samples screened above the 20-ng cutoff, seven were above the 50-ng cutoff, and two screened greater than the 100-ng cutoff. All of the postingestion samples showed the presence of THCA by GC-MS.

  9. Effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on reproductive neuroendocrine function in the female: animal studies.

    PubMed

    Tyrey, L; Murphy, L L

    1984-01-01

    The rat experimental model has been utilized to demonstrate pronounced suppressive effects of THC on the secretion of both LH and PRL, a point of considerable interest since the tonic secretions of these two hormones are regulated in opposite fashions, that of LH requiring active stimulation, and that of PRL, continued inhibition. Moreover, both the tonic and surge modes of secretion of both hormones are inhibited or completely blocked by THC action even though these different secretory modes are presumed to be governed by different CNS regulatory mechanisms. The most direct explanation for this broad inhibitory capability of THC would be direct inhibitory action on the pituitary cells secreting LH and PRL. However, experimental evidence drawn from the rat model, consistent with that from other species, provides no support for the possibility of direct pituitary inhibition of significant consequence. Instead, the evidence strongly favors the hypothesis that THC exerts its neuroendocrine action centrally and thereby influences pituitary function through alterations in the release of hypothalamic hormones into the hypophysial portal circulation. With the evidence favoring a central neuroendocrine mechanism for THC action, the rat model becomes particularly valuable because of the enormous body of information already available regarding neuroendocrine function in that species. Initial experiments with the rat have failed to provide evidence supporting the possibility of direct THC action on the hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons terminating in the median eminence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Disposition of smoked cannabis with high {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol content: A kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Hunault, Claudine C.; Eijkeren, Jan C.H. van; Mensinga, Tjeert T.; Vries, Irma de; Leenders, Marianne E.C.; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2010-08-01

    Introduction: No model exists to describe the disposition and kinetics of inhaled cannabis containing a high THC dose. We aimed to develop a kinetic model providing estimates of the THC serum concentrations after smoking cannabis cigarettes containing high THC doses (up to 69 mg THC). Methods: Twenty-four male non-daily cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes containing 29.3 mg, 49.1 mg, and 69.4 mg THC. Blood samples were collected over a period of 0-8 h and serum THC concentrations were measured. A two-compartment open model was fitted on the individual observed data. Results: Large inter-individual variability was observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters. The median pharmacokinetic parameters generated by the model were C{sub max} = 175 ng/mL, T{sub max} = 14 min, and AUC{sub 0-8h} = 8150 ng x min/mL for the 69.4 mg THC dose. Median model results show an almost linear dose response relation for C{sub max}/Dose = 2.8 x 10{sup -6}/mL and AUC{sub 0-8h}/Dose = 136 x 10{sup -6} min/mL. However, for increasing dose level, there was a clear decreasing trend: C{sub max}/Dose = 3.4, 2.6 and 2.5 x 10{sup -6}/mL and AUC{sub 0-8h}/Dose = 157, 133 and 117 x 10{sup -6} min/mL for the 29.3, 49.1 and 69.4 mg dose, respectively. Within the restriction of 8 h of observation, the apparent terminal half life of THC was 150 min. Conclusion: The model offers insight into the pharmacokinetics of THC in recreational cannabis users smoking cannabis containing high doses of THC mixed with tobacco. The model is an objective method for providing serum THC concentrations up to 8 h after smoking cannabis with a high THC content (up to 23%).

  11. Mother-Infant Interaction in Rhesus Monkeys Treated Chronically with Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Mari S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Drug-exposed mother-infant rhesus monkey pairs were similar to nontreated controls in the amount and types of activity displayed at the infant's tenth and ninetieth day of age. At about 3 months of age drug-exposed pairs increased in interaction, signaling mother-infant independence. This finding suggests that mother-infant attachment may be…

  12. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy older subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amir I A; van den Elsen, Geke A H; Colbers, Angela; van der Marck, Marjolein A; Burger, David M; Feuth, Ton B; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Kramers, Cornelis

    2014-09-01

    There is a great concern about the safety of THC-based drugs in older people (≥65 years), as most of THC-trials did not include such group. In this phase 1, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, we evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of three oral doses of Namisol(®), a novel THC in tablet form, in older subjects. Twelve healthy older subjects (6 male; mean age 72±5 years) randomly received a single oral dose of 3mg, 5mg, or 6.5mg of THC or matching placebo, in a crossover manner, on each intervention day. The data for 11 subjects were included in the analysis. The data of 1 subject were excluded due to non-compliance to study medication. THC was safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) were drowsiness (27%) and dry mouth (11%). Subjects reported more AEs with THC 6.5mg than with 3mg (p=0.048), 5mg (p=0.034) and placebo (p=0.013). There was a wide inter-individual variability in plasma concentrations of THC. Subjects for whom the Cmax fell within the sampling period (over 2h), Cmax was 1.42-4.57ng/mL and Tmax was 67-92min. The AUC0-2h (n=11) was 1.67-3.51ng/mL. Overall, the pharmacodynamic effects of THC were smaller than effects previously reported in young adults. In conclusion, THC appeared to be safe and well tolerated by healthy older individuals. Data on safety and effectiveness of THC in frail older persons are urgently required, as this population could benefit from the therapeutic applications of THC.

  13. Effects of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol on Cisplatin-Induced Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Hannah M; Sufka, Kenneth J; Gul, Waseem; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    Sativex, a cannabinoid extract with a 1 : 1 ratio of tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol, has been shown to alleviate neuropathic pain associated with chemotherapy. This research examined whether tetrahydocannabinol or cannabidiol alone could attenuate or prevent cisplatin-induced tactile allodynia. In experiment 1, mice (C57BL/6) received eight administrations of 2.3 mg/kg cisplatin or saline solution IP every other day to induce tactile allodynia. Mice were then administered vehicle, 100 mg/kg gabapentin, 2 mg/kg tetrahydocannabinol, or 2 mg/kg cannabidiol IP and tested 60 min later on an electronic Von Frey. In experiment 2, prevention studies, cannabidiol (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg) or tetrahydocannabinol (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg) was given IP 30 min prior to cisplatin administration (2.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) utilizing a six-dose alternate day protocol. In both studies, tactile responses to the hind paws were quantified in g of force using an electronic Von Frey prior to and after the cisplatin administration protocol. Cisplatin produced a reduction in g of force indicative of neuropathy that was attenuated by gabapentin, tetrahydocannabinol, and cannabidiol but not prevented by either cannabinoid. These data demonstrate that each of the major constituents of Sativex alone can achieve analgesic effects against cisplatin neuropathy.

  14. Environmental Factors Involved in the Development of Tolerance to Behavioral Effects of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    tolerance seems a reliable outcome when simple motor responses are maintained by schedules of positive reinforcement (e.g., Carlini, 1968; Ferr~ro and...when simple responses are maintained by schedules of positive reinforcement . On the other hand, when procedures that employ "unlearned" (elicited

  15. Recent advances in LC-MS/MS analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Ferreirós, Nerea

    2013-11-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world. The pharmacological properties of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol also make it a promising molecule in the treatment of different pathologies. Understanding the PKs and PDs of this drug requires the determination of the concentration of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and metabolites in biological matrices. For this purpose many analytical methodologies using mass spectrometric detection have been developed. In recent years, LC-MS/MS has become the gold standard in analysis of tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites due to the high selectivity and sensitivity, but above all, due to the ability to determine free and conjugate analytes in one run.

  16. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary.

  17. Cannabidiol Attenuates the Appetitive Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Humans Smoking Their Chosen Cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia JA; Freeman, Tom P; Schafer, Gráinne L; Curran, H Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide cannabis dependence is increasing, as is the concentration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in street cannabis. At the same time, the concentration of the second most abundant cannabinoid in street cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), is decreasing. These two cannabinoids have opposing effects both pharmacologically and behaviorally when administered in the laboratory. No research has yet examined how the ratio of these constituents impacts on the appetitive/reinforcing effects of cannabis in humans. A total of 94 cannabis users were tested 7 days apart, once while non-intoxicated and once while acutely under the influence of their own chosen smoked cannabis on dependence-related measures. Using an unprecedented methodology, a sample of cannabis (as well as saliva) was collected from each user and analyzed for levels of cannabinoids. On the basis of CBD : THC ratios in the cannabis, individuals from the top and bottom tertiles were directly compared on indices of the reinforcing effects of drugs, explicit liking, and implicit attentional bias to drug stimuli. When intoxicated, smokers of high CBD : THC strains showed reduced attentional bias to drug and food stimuli compared with smokers of low CBD : THC. Those smoking higher CBD : THC strains also showed lower self-rated liking of cannabis stimuli on both test days. Our findings suggest that CBD has potential as a treatment for cannabis dependence. The acute modulation of the incentive salience of drug cues by CBD may possibly generalize to a treatment for other addictive disorders. PMID:20428110

  18. Automated GC-MS Determination of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, Cannabinol and Cannabidiol in Hair.

    PubMed

    Heinl, Sonja; Lerch, Oliver; Erdmann, Freidoon

    2016-09-01

    The determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD) in hair is a major routine task in forensic laboratories worldwide. A comprehensively automated liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method has been developed. The automation was carried out by an x-y-z sample robot equipped with modules capable of shaking, centrifugation and solvent evaporation. It comprises digestion of hair in sodium hydroxide solution, LLE, extract evaporation, reconstitution in silylation reagent, inlet derivatization and GC-MS analysis. Method validation guidelines of the Society for Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry were fulfilled. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.01 ng/mg for THC, 0.06 ng/mg for CBN and 0.03 ng/mg for CBD. This is below the required LOQ for THC (0.02 ng/mg) in medical psychological assessments in Germany. Also it is far below the required LOQ of the Society of Hair Testing of 0.1 ng/mg for THC. Four-round robin tests were passed successfully and several post- and ante-mortem samples were analyzed. To date the method is routinely employed at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen, Germany. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication on a comprehensively automated classical LLE workflow in the field of hair analysis.

  19. Ocular Disposition of the Hemiglutarate Ester Prodrug of ∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol from Various Ophthalmic Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Tushar; Adelli, Goutham R.; Punyamurthula, Nagendra; Gul, Waseem; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Repka, Michael A.; Majumdar, Soumyajit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The overall goal of this project is to enhance ocular delivery of ∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) through the topical route. Methods Solubility, stability and in vitro transcorneal permeability of the relatively hydrophilic hemiglutarate ester derivative, THC-HG, was studied in the presence of surfactants. The solutions were characterized with respect to micelle size, zeta potential and solution viscosity. In vivo studies were carried out in New Zealand albino rabbits. A previously reported promising THC-HG ion-pair formulation was also studied in vivo. Results Aqueous solubility and stability and in vitro transcorneal permeability of THCHG was enhanced significantly in the presence of surfactants. THC levels in the ocular tissues (except cornea) were found to be below detection limits from mineral oil, surfactant or emulsion based formulations containing THC. In contrast, micellar and ion pair based THC-HG formulations produced significantly higher total THC concentrations in the anterior ocular chamber. Conclusion In this study, although delivery of THC to the anterior chamber ocular tissues could be significantly increased through the prodrug and formulation approaches tested, further studies are needed to increase penetration to the back-of-the eye. PMID:23737345

  20. The endocannabinoid system and emotional processing: a pharmacological fMRI study with ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; van Hell, Hendrika H; Jager, Gerry; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F; Jansma, J Martijn

    2013-12-01

    Various psychiatric disorders such as major depression are associated with abnormalities in emotional processing. Evidence indicating involvement of the endocannabinoid system in emotional processing, and thus potentially in related abnormalities, is increasing. In the present study, we examined the role of the endocannabinoid system in processing of stimuli with a positive and negative emotional content in healthy volunteers. A pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted with a placebo-controlled, cross-over design, investigating effects of the endocannabinoid agonist ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on brain function related to emotional processing in 11 healthy subjects. Performance and brain activity during matching of stimuli with a negative ('fearful faces') or a positive content ('happy faces') were assessed after placebo and THC administration. After THC administration, performance accuracy was decreased for stimuli with a negative but not for stimuli with a positive emotional content. Our task activated a network of brain regions including amygdala, orbital frontal gyrus, hippocampus, parietal gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and regions in the occipital cortex. THC interacted with emotional content, as activity in this network was reduced for negative content, while activity for positive content was increased. These results indicate that THC administration reduces the negative bias in emotional processing. This adds human evidence to support the hypothesis that the endocannabinoid system is involved in modulation of emotional processing. Our findings also suggest a possible role for the endocannabinoid system in abnormal emotional processing, and may thus be relevant for psychiatric disorders such as major depression.

  1. Chronic Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration increases lymphocyte CXCR4 expression in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    LeCapitaine, Nicole J; Zhang, Ping; Winsauer, Peter; Walker, Edith; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; Porretta, Constance; Molina, Patricia E

    2011-12-01

    Cannabinoids have been reported to produce various immunomodulatory effects, which could potentially impact the host response to bacterial or viral infection. We have recently demonstrated that chronic Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; 0.32 mg/kg i.m., BID) decreased early mortality in rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). However, the possibility that prolonged THC administration affects lymphocyte counts, phenotype, and proliferation indices has not been addressed. We examined expression of proliferative and phenotypic markers in circulating lymphocytes of male young adult rhesus macaques chronically-treated with THC (i.m. twice daily 0.32 mg/kg) for 12 months. Chronic THC administration did not alter lymphocyte subtypes, naïve and memory subsets, proliferation, or apoptosis of T lymphocytes when compared to time-matched vehicle-treated controls. However, chronic THC increased T lymphocyte CXCR4 expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes compared to control. These results show that chronic THC administration produces changes in T cell phenotype, which can potentially contribute to host immunomodulation to infectious challenges.

  2. Interactions between Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of µ-opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on intravenous heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001-0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared with data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g. for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of individual drugs.

  3. Temperature Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Incorporated Hydroxypropylcellulose Polymer Matrix Systems

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael A.; Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the bioadhesive profiles of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) polymer matrices as a function of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. In addition, the effect of processing temperature on the stability of THC and its extent of degradation to cannabinol (CBN) was investigated. A hot-melt cast molding method was used to prepare HPC polymer matrix systems incorporated with THC at 0, 4, 8, and 16 percent. Bioadhesive measurements including peak adhesive force, area under the curve, and elongation at adhesive failure were recorded utilizing the TA.XT2i Texture Analyzer™. Data obtained from these tests at various contact time intervals suggested that the incorporation of THC led to an increase in the bioadhesive strength of the HPC polymer matrices. To determine the stability of THC and the resulting CBN content in the matrices, three different processing temperatures were utilized (120, 160, and 200°C). Post-production High Performance Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the processed systems contained at least 94% of THC and the relative percent formation of CBN was 0.5% at 120°C and 0.4% at 160°C compared to 1.6% at 200°C. These findings indicate that the cannabinoid may be a plausible candidate for incorporation into systems utilizing hot-melt extrusion techniques for the development of an effective mucoadhesive transmucosal matrix system for delivery of THC. PMID:16455601

  4. Default mode network in the effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on human executive function.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jansma, J Martijn; van Hell, Hendrika H; Jager, Gerry; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is increasing for involvement of the endocannabinoid system in cognitive functions including attention and executive function, as well as in psychiatric disorders characterized by cognitive deficits, such as schizophrenia. Executive function appears to be associated with both modulation of active networks and inhibition of activity in the default mode network. In the present study, we examined the role of the endocannabinoid system in executive function, focusing on both the associated brain network and the default mode network. A pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted with a placebo-controlled, cross-over design, investigating effects of the endocannabinoid agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on executive function in 20 healthy volunteers, using a continuous performance task with identical pairs. Task performance was impaired after THC administration, reflected in both an increase in false alarms and a reduction in detected targets. This was associated with reduced deactivation in a set of brain regions linked to the default mode network, including posterior cingulate cortex and angular gyrus. Less deactivation was significantly correlated with lower performance after THC. Regions that were activated by the continuous performance task, notably bilateral prefrontal and parietal cortex, did not show effects of THC. These findings suggest an important role for the endocannabinoid system in both default mode modulation and executive function. This may be relevant for psychiatric disorders associated with executive function deficits, such as schizophrenia and ADHD.

  5. Evaluation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolites and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Bolkent, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The object of the study is to examine the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) against oxidative stress in the blood and excretion of THC metabolites in urine of type 2 diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: The control (n=8), THC control (n=6), diabetes (n=8) and diabetes + THC (n=7) groups were created. Type 2 diabetes was induced by nicotinamide (NA, 85 mg/kg) + streptozotocin (STZ, 65 mg/kg). THC was administered intraperitoneally for seven days. The glutathione (GSH) level in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities in plasma were measured. THC metabolites were analyzed in urine. Results: The results showed that the erythrocyte GSH levels were significantly increased (P<0.05), but plasma MDA levels were non-significantly decreased in diabetes group treated with THC when compared with the diabetes group. The CAT activity was non-significantly reduced and SOD was significantly increased (P<0.01) in the plasma of diabetes induced by THC in comparison with the diabetic group. The excretion of THC metabolites was higher in the urine of diabetes + THC rats as compared to the THC control rats. Conclusion: These findings highlight that THC treatment may attenuate slightly the oxidative stress in diabetic rats. The excretion rate of THC may vary in the type 2 diabetes mellitus status. PMID:27081459

  6. The safety of modafinil in combination with oral ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Dawn E; Poling, James; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2011-03-01

    Marijuana (cannabis) is the most widely used illicit substance globally, and cannabis use is associated with a range of adverse consequences. Currently, no medications have been proven to be effective for the treatment of cannabis addiction. The goals of this study were to examine the safety and efficacy of a potential treatment medication, modafinil, in combination with oral ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Twelve male and female occasional cannabis users participated in an outpatient double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Across four sessions, participants were randomly assigned to a sequence of four oral treatments: (1) 400 mg modafinil+placebo, (2) 15 mg THC+placebo, (3) 400 mg modafinil+15 mg THC, or (4) placebo+placebo. Outcome measures included heart rate, blood pressure, performance on the Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVIP), and the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT), and subjective measures. Oral THC increased heart rate, and produced increased subjective ratings of feeling "high" and "sedated," as well as increased ratings of euphoria. Modafinil alone increased the Profiles of Mood States (POMS) subscales of vigor and tension. These findings support the safety of modafinil in combination with THC. The effects of modafinil in combination with a range of doses of THC need to be determined in future studies.

  7. Evidence based decontamination protocols for the removal of external Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from contaminated hair.

    PubMed

    Duvivier, Wilco F; Peeters, Ruth J P; van Beek, Teris A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-02-01

    External contamination can cause false positive results in forensic hair testing for drugs of abuse and is therefore a major concern when hair evidence is used in court. Current literature about decontamination strategies is mainly focused on external cocaine contamination and no consensus on the best decontamination procedure for hair samples containing cannabinoids has been reached so far. In this study, different protocols with solvents, both organic as well as aqueous, were tested on blank and drug user hair for their performance on removing external cannabis contamination originating from either smoke or indirect contact with cannabis plant material. Smoke contamination was mimicked by exposing hair samples to smoke from a cannabis cigarette and indirect contact contamination by handling hair with cannabis contaminated gloves or hands. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels in the hair samples and wash solvents were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Aqueous surfactant solutions removed more THC contamination compared to water, but much less than organic solvents. Methanol, dichloromethane and chloroform were most efficient in removing THC contamination. Due to its lower environmental impact, methanol was chosen as the preferred decontamination solvent. After testing of different sequential wash steps on externally contaminated blank hair, three protocols performed equally well, removing all normal level and more than 99% of unrealistically high levels of external cannabis contamination. Thorough testing on cannabis users' hair, both as such and after deliberate contamination, showed that using these protocols all contamination could be washed from the hair while no incorporated THC was removed from truly positive samples. The present study provides detailed scientific evidence in support of the recommendations of the Society of Hair Testing: a protocol using a single methanol wash followed by a single aqueous

  8. Identification of candidate genes affecting Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M. David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Omburo, Stephanie N.; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R.; Weiblen, George D.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands. PMID:19581347

  9. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  10. The psychoactive compound of Cannabis sativa, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhibits the human trophoblast cell turnover.

    PubMed

    Costa, M A; Fonseca, B M; Marques, F; Teixeira, N A; Correia-da-Silva, G

    2015-08-06

    The noxious effects of cannabis consumption for fertility and pregnancy outcome are recognized for years. Its consumption during gestation is associated with alterations in foetal growth, low birth weight and preterm labor. The main psychoactive molecule of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairs the production of reproductive hormones and is also able to cross the placenta barrier. However, its effect on the main placental cells, the trophoblasts, are unknown. Actually, the role of THC in cell survival/death of primary human cytotrophoblasts (CTs) and syncytiotrophoblasts (STs) and in the syncytialization process remains to be explored. Here, we show that THC has a dual effect, enhancing MTT metabolism at low concentrations, whereas higher doses decreased cell viability, on both trophoblast phenotypes, though the effects on STs were more evident. THC also diminished the generation of oxidative and nitrative stress and the oxidized form of glutathione, whereas the reduced form of this tripeptide was increased, suggesting that THC prevents ST cell death due to an antioxidant effect. Moreover, this compound enhanced the mitochondrial function of STs, as observed by the increased MTT metabolism and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were independent of cannabinoid receptors activation. Besides, THC impaired CT differentiation into STs, since it decreased the expression of biochemical and morphological biomarkers of syncytialization, through a cannabinoid receptor-dependent mechanism. Together, these results suggest that THC interferes with trophoblast turnover, preventing trophoblast cell death and differentiation, and contribute to disclose the cellular mechanisms that lead to pregnancy complications in women that consume cannabis-derived drugs during gestation.

  11. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol alone and combined with cannabidiol mitigate fear memory through reconsolidation disruption.

    PubMed

    Stern, Cristina A J; Gazarini, Lucas; Vanvossen, Ana C; Zuardi, Antonio W; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guimaraes, Francisco S; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J

    2015-06-01

    Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the major constituents of the Cannabis sativa plant, which is frequently consumed by subjects exposed to life-threatening situations to relief their symptomatology. It is still unknown, however, whether THC could also affect the maintenance of an aversive memory formed at that time when taken separately and/or in conjunction with CBD. The present study sought to investigate this matter at a preclinical level. We report that THC (0.3-10mg/kg, i.p.) was able to disrupt the reconsolidation of a contextual fear memory, resulting in reduced conditioned freezing expression for over 22 days. This effect was dependent on activation of cannabinoid type-1 receptors located in prelimbic subregion of the medial prefrontal cortex and on memory retrieval/reactivation. Since CBD may counteract the negative psychotropic effects induced by THC and has been shown to be a reconsolidation blocker, we then investigated and demonstrated that associating sub-effective doses of these two compounds was equally effective in attenuating fear memory maintenance in an additive fashion and in a dose ratio of 10 to 1, which contrasts with that commonly found in C. sativa recreational samples. Of note, neither THC alone nor CBD plus THC interfered with anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity, as assessed in the elevated plus-maze test, at a time point coinciding with that used to evaluate their effects on memory reconsolidation. Altogether, present findings suggest a potential therapeutic value of using THC and/or CBD to mitigate a dysfunctional aversive memory through reconsolidation disruption in post-traumatic stress disorder patients.

  12. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and endocannabinoid degradative enzyme inhibitors attenuate intracranial self-stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M; Grim, Travis W; Owens, Robert A; Lazenka, Matthew F; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Abdullah, Rehab A; Niphakis, Micah J; Vann, Robert E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Wiley, Jenny L; Negus, S Stevens; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates endogenous cannabinoids as modulators of the mesolimbic dopamine system and motivated behavior. Paradoxically, the reinforcing effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis, have been difficult to detect in preclinical rodent models. In this study, we investigated the impact of THC and inhibitors of the endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) on operant responding for electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle [intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS)], which is known to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. These drugs were also tested in assays of operant responding for food reinforcement and spontaneous locomotor activity. THC and the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 (4-[bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)hydroxymethyl]-1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 4-nitrophenyl ester) attenuated operant responding for ICSS and food, and also reduced spontaneous locomotor activity. In contrast, the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-3-pyridinyl-4-[[3-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-1-piperidinecarboxamide) was largely without effect in these assays. Consistent with previous studies showing that combined inhibition of FAAH and MAGL produces a substantially greater cannabimimetic profile than single enzyme inhibition, the dual FAAH-MAGL inhibitor SA-57 (4-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 2-(methylamino)-2-oxoethyl ester) produced a similar magnitude of ICSS depression as that produced by THC. ICSS attenuation by JZL184 was associated with increased brain levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), whereas peak effects of SA-57 were associated with increased levels of both N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-AG. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptor antagonist rimonabant, but not the cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor antagonist SR144528, blocked the attenuating effects of THC, JZL184, and SA-57 on

  13. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol decreases willingness to exert cognitive effort in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Mason M.; Adams, Wendy K.; Morena, Maria; Hill, Matthew N.; Winstanley, Catharine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acceptance of cannabis use is growing. However, prolonged use is associated with diminished psychosocial outcomes, potentially mediated by drug-induced cognitive impairments. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, yet other phytocannabinoids in the plant, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have unique properties. Given that CBD can modulate the undesirable effects of THC, therapeutic agents, such as nabiximols, contain higher CBD:THC ratios than illicit marijuana. We tested the hypothesis that THC impairs a relevant cognitive function for long-term success, namely willingness to exert cognitive effort for greater rewards, and that CBD could attenuate such decision-making impairments. Methods Male Long–Evans rats (n = 29) performing the rat cognitive effort task (rCET) received acute THC and CBD, independently and concurrently, in addition to other cannabinoids. Rats chose between 2 options differing in reward magnitude, but also in the cognitive effort (attentional load) required to obtain them. Results We found that THC decreased choice of hard trials without impairing the animals’ ability to accurately complete them. Strikingly, this impairment was correlated with CB1 receptor density in the medial prefrontal cortex — an area previously implicated in effortful decision-making. In contrast, CBD did not affect choice. Coadministration of 1:1 CBD:THC matching that in nabiximols modestly attenuated the deleterious effects of THC in “slacker” rats. Limitations Only male rats were investigated, and the THC/CBD coadministration experiment was carried out in a subset of individuals. Conclusion These findings confirm that THC, but not CBD, selectively impairs decision-making involving cognitive effort costs. However, coadministration of CBD only partially ameliorates such THC-induced dysfunction. PMID:28245177

  14. Inhaled delivery of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to rats by e-cigarette vapor technology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jacques D; Aarde, Shawn M; Vandewater, Sophia A; Grant, Yanabel; Stouffer, David G; Parsons, Loren H; Cole, Maury; Taffe, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most human Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) use is via inhalation, and yet few animal studies of inhalation exposure are available. Popularization of non-combusted methods for the inhalation of psychoactive drugs (Volcano(®), e-cigarettes) further stimulates a need for rodent models of this route of administration. This study was designed to develop and validate a rodent chamber suitable for controlled exposure to vaporized THC in a propylene glycol vehicle, using an e-cigarette delivery system adapted to standard size, sealed rat housing chambers. The in vivo efficacy of inhaled THC was validated using radiotelemetry to assess body temperature and locomotor responses, a tail-flick assay for nociception and plasma analysis to verify exposure levels. Hypothermic responses to inhaled THC in male rats depended on the duration of exposure and the concentration of THC in the vehicle. The temperature nadir was reached after ∼40 min of exposure, was of comparable magnitude (∼3 °Celsius) to that produced by 20 mg/kg THC, i.p. and resolved within 3 h (compared with a 6 h time course following i.p. THC). Female rats were more sensitive to hypothermic effects of 30 min of lower-dose THC inhalation. Male rat tail-flick latency was increased by THC vapor inhalation; this effect was blocked by SR141716 pretreatment. The plasma THC concentration after 30 min of inhalation was similar to that produced by 10 mg/kg THC i.p. This approach is flexible, robust and effective for use in laboratory rats and will be of increasing utility as users continue to adopt "vaping" for the administration of cannabis.

  15. Development of a Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Amino Acid-Dicarboxylate Prodrug With Improved Ocular Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Adelli, Goutham R.; Bhagav, Prakash; Taskar, Pranjal; Hingorani, Tushar; Pettaway, Sara; Gul, Waseem; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Repka, Michael A.; Majumdar, Soumyajit

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of the relatively hydrophilic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) prodrugs, mono and di-valine esters (THC-Val and THC-Val-Val) and the amino acid (valine)-dicarboxylic acid (hemisuccinate) ester (THC-Val-HS), with respect to ocular penetration and intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering activity. THC, timolol, and pilocarpine eye drops were used as controls. Methods THC-Val, THC-Val-Val, and THC-Val-HS were synthesized and chemically characterized. Aqueous solubility and in vitro transcorneal permeability of THC and the prodrugs, in the presence of various surfactants and cyclodextrins, were determined. Two formulations were evaluated for therapeutic activity in the α-chymotrypsin induced rabbit glaucoma model, and the results were compared against controls comprising of THC emulsion and marketed timolol maleate and pilocarpine eye drops. Results THC-Val-HS demonstrated markedly improved solubility (96-fold) and in vitro permeability compared to THC. Selected formulations containing THC-Val-HS effectively delivered THC to the anterior segment ocular tissues in the anesthetized rabbits: 62.1 ng/100 μL of aqueous humor (AH) and 51.4 ng/50 mg of iris ciliary bodies (IC) (total THC). The duration and extent of IOP lowering induced by THC-Val-HS was 1 hour longer and 10% greater, respectively, than that obtained with THC and was comparable with the pilocarpine eye drops. Timolol ophthalmic drops, however, exhibited a longer duration of activity. Both THC and THC-Val-HS were detected in the ocular tissues following multiple dosing of THC-Val-HS in conscious animals. The concentration of THC in the iris-ciliary bodies at the 60- and 120-minute time points (53 and 57.4 ng/50 mg) were significantly greater than that of THC-Val-HS (24.2 and 11.3 ng/50 mg). Moreover, at the two time points studied, the concentration of THC was observed to increase or stay relatively constant, whereas THC-Val-HS concentration decreased

  16. Combined Treatment with Morphine and Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Rhesus Monkeys: Antinociceptive Tolerance and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Gerak, L R; France, C P

    2016-05-01

    Opioid receptor agonists are effective for treating pain; however, tolerance and dependence can develop with repeated use. Combining opioids with cannabinoids can enhance their analgesic potency, although it is less clear whether combined treatment alters opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, four monkeys received 3.2 mg/kg morphine alone or in combination with 1 mg/kg Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) twice daily; the antinociceptive effects (warm water tail withdrawal) of morphine, the cannabinoid receptor agonists WIN 55,212 [(R)-(1)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate] and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol), and the κ opioid receptor agonist U-50,488 (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzenacetamide methanesulfonate) were examined before, during, and after treatment. To determine whether concurrent THC treatment altered morphine dependence, behavioral signs indicative of withdrawal were monitored when treatment was discontinued. Before treatment, each drug increased tail withdrawal latency to 20 seconds (maximum possible effect). During treatment, latencies did not reach 20 seconds for morphine or the cannabinoids up to doses 3- to 10-fold larger than those that were fully effective before treatment. Rightward and downward shifts in antinociceptive dose-effect curves were greater for monkeys receiving the morphine/THC combination than monkeys receiving morphine alone. When treatment was discontinued, heart rate and directly observable withdrawal signs increased, although they were generally similar in monkeys that received morphine alone or with THC. These results demonstrated that antinociceptive tolerance was greater during treatment with the combination, and although treatment conditions were sufficient to result in the development of dependence on morphine, withdrawal was not

  17. Dried blood spots: liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its main metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Mandrioli, Roberto; Sorella, Vittorio; Somaini, Lorenzo; Giocondi, Daniele; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2013-01-04

    A sensitive and selective HPLC-MS/MS method has been developed for the first time for the analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (the most important active cannabinoid) and its hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites in human Dried Blood Spots (DBSs). The simultaneous determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its two main metabolites allows assessing the time elapsed after the drug intake and distinguishing between acute or former consumption. This is an important information in specific contexts such as "on street" controls by police forces. DBSs have been chosen as the optimal biological matrix for this kind of testing, since they provide information on the actual state of intoxication, without storage and transportation problems usually associated with classical blood testing. The analysis is carried out on a C8 reversed phase column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid in a water/methanol mixture and an electrospray ionisation (ESI) source, coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated according to international guidelines, with satisfactory results in terms of extraction yields, precision, stability and accuracy. Application to real DBS samples from Cannabis abusers gave reliable results, thus confirming the methodology suitability for roadside testing.

  18. Differential effects of presynaptic versus postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) self-administration in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Justinová, Zuzana; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-05-07

    Different doses of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 [3,7-dihydro-8-[(1E)-2-(3-ethoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-7 methyl-3-[3-(phosphooxy)propyl-1-(2 propynil)-1H-purine-2,6-dione] were found previously to either decrease or increase self-administration of cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or anandamide in squirrel monkeys. It was hypothesized that the decrease observed with a relatively low dose of MSX-3 was related to blockade of striatal presynaptic A2A receptors that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, whereas the increase observed with a higher dose was related to blockade of postsynaptic A2A receptors localized in striatopallidal neurons. This hypothesis was confirmed in the present study by testing the effects of the preferential presynaptic and postsynaptic A2A receptor antagonists SCH-442416 [2-(2-furanyl)-7-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine] and KW-6002 [(E)-1, 3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione], respectively, in squirrel monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer THC. SCH-442416 produced a significant shift to the right of the THC self-administration dose-response curves, consistent with antagonism of the reinforcing effects of THC. Conversely, KW-6002 produced a significant shift to the left, consistent with potentiation of the reinforcing effects of THC. These results show that selectively blocking presynaptic A2A receptors could provide a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of marijuana dependence and underscore corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission as a possible main mechanism involved in the rewarding effects of THC.

  19. Long-term behavioral and biochemical effects of an ultra-low dose of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC): neuroprotection and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Miriam; Gov, Sahar; Assaf, Fadi; Gafni, Mikhal; Keren, Ora; Sarne, Yosef

    2012-09-01

    We have previously reported that a single injection of an ultra-low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana) protected the brain from pentylenentetrazole (PTZ)-induced cognitive deficits when applied 1-7 days before or 1-3 days after the insult. In the present study we expanded the protective profile of THC by showing that it protected mice from cognitive deficits that were induced by a variety of other neuronal insults, including pentobarbital-induced deep anesthesia, repeated treatment with 3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy") and exposure to carbon monoxide. The protective effect of THC lasted for at least 7 weeks. The same ultra-low dose of THC (0.002 mg/kg, a dose that is 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the doses that produce the known acute effects of the drug in mice) induced long-lasting (7 weeks) modifications of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and cerebellum of the mice. The alterations in ERK activity paralleled changes in its activating enzyme MEK and its inactivating enzyme MKP-1. Furthermore, a single treatment with the low dose of THC elevated the level of pCREB (phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein) in the hippocampus and the level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in the frontal cortex. These long-lasting effects indicate that a single treatment with an ultra-low dose of THC can modify brain plasticity and induce long-term behavioral and developmental effects in the brain.

  20. Molecularly imprinted polymer for selective determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid using LC-MS/MS in urine and oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Lendoiro, E; de Castro, A; Fernández-Vega, H; Cela-Pérez, M C; López-Vilariño, J M; González-Rodríguez, M V; Cruz, A; López-Rivadulla, M

    2014-06-01

    The use of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for solid phase extraction (MISPE) allows a rapid and selective extraction compared with traditional methods. Determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in oral fluid (OF) and urine was performed using homemade MISPEs for sample clean-up and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cylindrical MISPE shaped pills were synthesized using catechin as a mimic template. MISPEs were added to 0.5 mL OF or urine sample and sonicated 30 min for adsorption of analytes. For desorption, the MISPE was transfered to a clean tube, and sonicated for 15 min with 2 mL acetone:acetonitrile (3:1, v/v). The elution solvent was evaporated and reconstituted in mobile phase. Chromatographic separation was performed using a SunFire C18 (2.5 μm; 2.1 × 20 mm) column, and formic acid 0.1% and acetonitrile as mobile phase, with a total run time of 5 min. The method was fully validated including selectivity (no endogenous or exogenous interferences), linearity (1-500 ng/mL in OF, and 2.5-500 ng/mL in urine), limit of detection (0.75 and 1 ng/mL in OF and urine, respectively), imprecision (%CV <12.3%), accuracy (98.2-107.0% of target), extraction recovery (15.9-53.5%), process efficiency (10.1-46.2%), and matrix effect (<-55%). Analytes were stable for 72 h in the autosampler. Dilution 1:10 was assured in OF, and Quantisal™ matrix effect showed ion suppression (<-80.4%). The method was applied to the analysis of 20 OF and 11 urine specimens. This is the first method for determination of THC and THC-COOH in OF using MISPE technology.

  1. Characterization of the Solutol® HS15/water phase diagram and the impact of the Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol solubilization.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Sergio; Fadda, Paolo; Colafemmina, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Corrado, Luigi; Lazzari, Paolo; Monduzzi, Maura; Palazzo, Gerardo

    2013-01-15

    Here, the phase behavior of the commercial non-ionic surfactant Solutol® HS15 in water was investigated. The focus was on the evolution of the system nanostructure at low water content. Particularly, it was demonstrated that spherical micelles found in dilute surfactant solutions coalesce at a surfactant volume fraction close to 0.5. As consequence, a heterogeneous pseudo-binary mixture occurs. No liquid crystalline phases were detected even at the highest HS15 concentrations in water. Alteration of the micellar morphology induced by the addition of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to the surfactant/water binary system was also investigated. It was found that the cannabinoid molecules become entrapped within the surfactant hydrophobic tails, thus increasing the surfactant effective packing parameter and inducing a radical change of the micelle shape. At sufficiently low water content (18-35 wt.%), such alteration of the interfacial packing results in a lamellar organization of the surfactant molecules.

  2. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Himes, Sarah K; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-07-01

    Currently, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01% acetic acid in water and 0.01% acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12-1,020 pg/mL (R(2) > 0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8-65.1 and -2.4-11.5%, respectively (n = 10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0-113.3 and 6.6-8.4% coefficient of variation, respectively (n = 20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing.

  3. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Himes, Sarah K.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Currently, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01 % acetic acid in water and 0.01 % acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12–1,020 pg/mL (R2>0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8–65.1 and −2.4–11.5 %, respectively (n=10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0–113.3 and 6.6–8.4 % coefficient of variation, respectively (n=20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing. PMID:23681203

  4. Rapid isolation procedure for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA) from Cannabis sativa using two flash chromatography systems.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Mahler, Hellmut; Auwärter, Volker

    2011-10-15

    Two isolation procedures for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA), the biogenetic precursor in the biosynthesis of the psychoactive Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the cannabis plant, are presented. Two flash chromatography systems that can be used independently from each other were developed to separate THCA from other compounds of a crude cannabis extract. In both systems UV absorption at 209 and 270 nm was monitored. Purity was finally determined by HPLC-DAD, NMR and GC-MS analysis with a focus on the impurity THC. System 1 consisted of a normal phase silica column (120 g) as well as cyclohexane and acetone--both spiked with the modifier pyridine--as mobile phases. Gradient elution was performed over 15 min. After the chromatographic run the fractions containing THCA fractions were pooled, extracted with hydrochloric acid to eliminate pyridine and evaporated to dryness. Loading 1800 mg cannabis extract yielded 623 mg THCA with a purity of 99.8% and a THC concentration of 0.09%. System 2 was based on a reversed-phase C18 column (150 g) combined with 0.55% formic acid and methanol as mobile phases. A very flat gradient was set over 20 minutes. After pooling the THCA-containing fractions methanol was removed in a rotary evaporator. THCA was re-extracted from the remaining aqueous phase with methyl tert-butyl ether. The organic phase was finally evaporated under high vacuum conditions. Loading 300 mg cannabis extract yielded 51 mg THCA with a purity of 98.8% and a THC concentration of 0.67%.

  5. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol accumulation, metabolism and cell-type-specific adverse effects in aggregating brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne Hazekamp, Arno; Perret, Nicolas; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian; Honegger, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Cannabis as recreational drug or as medicine, little is known about its toxicity. The accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of THC were analyzed 10 days after a single treatment, and after repeated exposures during 10 days. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures of fetal rat telencephalon were used as in vitro model, as well as aggregates enriched either in neurons or in glial cells. It was found that THC accumulated preferentially in neurons, and that glia-neuron interactions decreased THC accumulation. The quantification of 11-OH-THC and of THC-COOH showed that brain aggregates were capable of THC metabolism. No cell-type difference was found for the metabolite 11-OH-THC, whereas the THC-COOH content was higher in mixed-cell cultures. No cell death was found at THC concentrations of 2 {mu}M in single treatment and of 1 {mu}M and 2 {mu}M in repeated treatments. Neurons, and particularly GABAergic neurons, were most sensitive to THC. Only the GABAergic marker was affected after the single treatment, whereas the GABAergic, cholinergic and astrocytic markers were decreased after the repeated treatments. JWH 015, a CB2 receptor agonist, showed effects similar to THC, whereas ACEA, a CB1 receptor agonist, had no effect. The expression of the cytokine IL-6 was upregulated 48 h after the single treatment with 5 {mu}M of THC or JWH 015, whereas the expression of TNF-{alpha} remained unchanged. These results suggest that the adverse effects of THC were related either to THC accumulation or to cannabinoid receptor activation and associated with IL-6 upregulation.

  6. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol accumulation, metabolism and cell-type-specific adverse effects in aggregating brain cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne; Hazekamp, Arno; Perret, Nicolas; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian; Honegger, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Cannabis as recreational drug or as medicine, little is known about its toxicity. The accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of THC were analyzed 10 days after a single treatment, and after repeated exposures during 10 days. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures of fetal rat telencephalon were used as in vitro model, as well as aggregates enriched either in neurons or in glial cells. It was found that THC accumulated preferentially in neurons, and that glia-neuron interactions decreased THC accumulation. The quantification of 11-OH-THC and of THC-COOH showed that brain aggregates were capable of THC metabolism. No cell-type difference was found for the metabolite 11-OH-THC, whereas the THC-COOH content was higher in mixed-cell cultures. No cell death was found at THC concentrations of 2 microM in single treatment and of 1 microM and 2 microM in repeated treatments. Neurons, and particularly GABAergic neurons, were most sensitive to THC. Only the GABAergic marker was affected after the single treatment, whereas the GABAergic, cholinergic and astrocytic markers were decreased after the repeated treatments. JWH 015, a CB2 receptor agonist, showed effects similar to THC, whereas ACEA, a CB1 receptor agonist, had no effect. The expression of the cytokine IL-6 was upregulated 48 h after the single treatment with 5 microM of THC or JWH 015, whereas the expression of TNF-alpha remained unchanged. These results suggest that the adverse effects of THC were related either to THC accumulation or to cannabinoid receptor activation and associated with IL-6 upregulation.

  7. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  8. Comparative effects of phencyclidine (PCP) and. delta. /sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on glucose oxidation in the rat testis

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, S.; Bauer, V.

    1986-03-05

    Glucose and fructose are important fuels of cellular energetics in organs like testis and brain. The previous in-vitro studies indicated that THC may disrupt many gonadal functions by inhibiting energy metabolism in the testis. PCP is sold on the street as any one of a variety of psychoactive drugs. Most commonly it is misrepresented as THC. Therefore, to compare the effects of PCP and THC on glucose utilization, in-vitro radiorespirometric experiments were conducted in rat testicular tissues. The /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from 5.5 mM radiolabelled glucose was followed in the presence and absence of 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, 0.01, 0.005, 0.0025 mM PCP. PCP produced a dose-dependent biphasic effect, stimulating /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production by 6.2, 17 and 5.8% and then inhibiting it by 13.2, 15.4 and 8.9% with respective concentrations of PCP. This is in contrast to THC which produced a dose-related inhibition of 15.2, 18.1, 20.1 and 25.3% in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mM THC. These observations are significant due to the possible abuse of PCP together with THC either deliberately or by misrepresentation.

  9. Determination of ∆-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC, 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC and Cannabidiol in Human Plasma using Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrenyak, David M; Moody, David E; Slawson, Matthew H; O'Leary, Daniel S; Haney, Margaret

    2017-01-08

    Two marijuana compounds of particular medical interest are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). A gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) method was developed to test for CBD, THC, hydroxy-THC (OH-THC) and carboxy-THC (COOH-THC) in human plasma. Calibrators (THC and OH-THC, 0.1 to 100; CBD, 0.25 to 100; COOH-THC, 0.5-500 ng/mL) and controls (0.3, 5 and 80 ng/mL, except COOH-THC at 1.5, 25 and 400 ng/mL) were prepared in blank matrix. Deuterated (d3) internal standards were added to 1-mL samples. Preparation involved acetonitrile precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction (hexane:ethyl acetate, 9:1), and MSTFA derivatization. An Agilent 7890 A GC was interfaced with an Agilent 7000 MS Triple Quadrupole. Selected reaction monitoring was employed. Blood samples were provided from a marijuana smoking study (two participants) and a CBD ingestion study (eight participants). Three analytes with the same transitions (THC, OH-THC and COOH-THC) were chromatographically separated. Matrix selectivity studies showed endogenous chromatographic peak area ratios (PAR) at the analyte retention times were <20% of the analyte limit of quantitation PAR. The intra-assay accuracy ranged from 83.5% to 118% of target and the intra-run imprecision ranged from 2.0% to 19.1%. The inter-assay accuracy ranged from 90.3% to 104% of target and the inter-run imprecision ranged from 6.5% to 12.0%. Stability was established for 25 hours at room temperature, 207 days at -20°C, after three freeze-thaw cycles and for 26 days for rederivatized processed samples. After smoking marijuana predictable concentrations of THC, OH-THC and COOH-THC were seen; low concentrations of CBD were detected at early time points. In moderate users who had not smoked for at least 9 hours before ingesting an 800 mg oral dose of CBD, the method was sensitive enough to follow residual concentrations of THC and OH-THC; sustained COOH-THC concentrations over 50 ng/mL validated its higher

  10. Establishment of the measurement uncertainty of 11-nor-D9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in hair.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Yang, Wonkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Kim, Eunmi; In, Sangwhan; Choi, Hwakyung; Lee, Sangki; Chung, Heesun; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-03-20

    The quantitative analysis of 11-nor-D(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCCOOH) in hair requires a sensitive method to detect a low-pg level. Before applying the method to real hair samples, the method was validated; in this study, we examined the uncertainty obtained from around the cut-off level of THCCOOH in hair. We calculated the measurement uncertainty (MU) of THCCOOH in hair as follows: specification of the measurand, identification of parameters using "cause and effect" diagrams, quantification of the uncertainty contributions using three factors, the uncertainty of weighing the hair sample, the uncertainty from calibrators and the calibration curve, and the uncertainty of the method precision. Finally, we calculated the degrees of freedom and the expanded uncertainty (EU). The concentration of THCCOOH in the hair sample with its EU was (0.60 ± 0.1) × 10(-4)ng/mg. The relative uncertainty percent for the measurand 0.60 × 10(-4)ng was 9.13%. In this study, we also selected different concentrations of THCCOOH in real hair samples and then calculated the EU, the relative standard uncertainty (RSU) of the concentration of THCCOOH in the test sample [u(r)(c0)], the relative uncertainty percent, and the effective degree of freedom (v(eff)). When the concentrations of THCCOOH approached the cut-off level, u(r)(c0) and the relative uncertainty percent increased but absolute EU and v(eff) decreased.

  11. Tolerance to effects of high-dose oral δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and plasma cannabinoid concentrations in male daily cannabis smokers.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-01-01

    Oral cannabinoids are taken for medicinal or recreational purposes, yet little is known about tolerance to their effects after high-dose extended exposure. The development of tolerance to effects of around-the-clock oral synthetic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (20 mg every 3.5-6 h) was evaluated in 13 healthy male daily cannabis smokers residing on a secure research unit: 40 mg on Day 1; 100 mg on Days 2-4; 120 mg on Days 5-6. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), heart rate, and symptoms of subjective intoxication (100 mm visual-analogue scales, VAS) were assessed the morning of Day 1 (before any oral THC), and on Days 2, 4 and 6, every 30 min for 3 h after the first morning THC dose. Morning subjective intoxication ratings increased from Days 1 to 2, and then declined on Days 4 and 6. The morning THC dose increased intoxication ratings on Day 2, but had less effect on Days 4 and 6, a pattern consistent with tolerance. THC lowered BP and increased heart rate over the six days. Plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations increased significantly over the first five days of dosing. Six days of around-the-clock, oral THC produced tolerance to subjective intoxication, but not to cardiovascular effects.

  12. Preparation and characterization of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-loaded biodegradable polymeric microparticles and their antitumoral efficacy on cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hernán Pérez de la Ossa, Dolores; Gil-Alegre, Maria Esther; Ligresti, Alessia; Aberturas, María Del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús; Torres, Ana Isabel; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    Cannabinoids present an interesting therapeutic potential as antiemetics, appetite stimulants in debilitating diseases (cancer, AIDS and multiple sclerosis), analgesics, and in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and cancer, among other conditions. However, despite their high clinical potential, only few dosage forms are available to date. In this paper, the development of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) biodegradable microspheres as an alternative delivery system for cannabinoid parenteral administration is proposed. Tetrahydrocannabinol was encapsulated into biodegradable microspheres by the oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation method. Several formulations were prepared using different drug:polymer ratios. The influence of antioxidant (α-tocopherol acetate) concentration on the release of THC from the microparticles was studied. Elevated process yield and entrapment efficiencies were achieved. The in vitro drug release studies showed that the encapsulated drug was released over a two week period. As THC has shown therapeutic potential as anticancer drug, the efficacy of the microspheres was tested on different cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the microspheres were able to inhibit cancer cell proliferation during the nine-day study period. All the above results suggest that the use of biodegradable microspheres would be a suitable alternative delivery system for THC administration.

  13. The major plant-derived cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol promotes hypertrophy and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wong, A; Gunasekaran, N; Hancock, D P; Denyer, G S; Meng, L; Radford, J L; McGregor, I S; Arnold, J C

    2012-02-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists activate lipoprotein lipase and the formation of lipid droplets in cultured adipocytes. Here we extend this work by examining whether Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a major plant-derived cannabinoid, increases adipocyte size in vivo. Further, possibly as a consequence of hypertrophy, we hypothesize that THC exposure promotes macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue, an inflammatory state observed in obese individuals. Rats repeatedly exposed to THC in vivo had reduced body weight, fat pad weight, and ingested less food over the drug injection period. However, THC promoted adipocyte hypertrophy that was accompanied by a significant increase in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) expression, an enzyme important in packaging triglycerides. We also showed that THC induced macrophage infiltration and increased expression of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in adipose tissue but did not induce apoptosis as measured by TUNEL staining. That THC increased adipocyte cell size in the absence of greater food intake, body weight and fat provides a unique model to explore mechanisms underlying changes in adipocyte size associated with a mild inflammatory state in fat tissue.

  14. An on-line stacking capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui-Ling; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Hsu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Yi-Hui

    2015-12-24

    The objective of this study was to establish a practical and reliable analytical method for monitoring trace amounts of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolites in biological samples. A novel on-line preconcentration capillary electrophoresis method combining large volume sample injection, anion selective exhaustive injection and sweeping was developed to enhance analytical sensitivity. A background buffer composed with 30mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) containing 40% methanol and 100mM SDS was used to suppress the electroosmotic flow of the uncoated fused silica capillary (40cm×50μm i.d.). High conductivity buffer (200mM phosphate, pH 2.5) was injected for analyte accumulation. The samples, prepared in phosphate buffer or Tris buffer, were introduced by hydrodynamic injection and electrokinetic injection. After sweeping, the separation was performed in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) mode at -15kV. During the method validation, the coefficient of determination of the regression curve was measured at greater than 0.993, and the relative standard deviation and relative error were lower than 11.06% and 9.24%, respectively. Under optimized conditions, an improvement of up to 2000-fold higher sensitivity was achieved. This method was applied to the analysis of urine samples, indicating that it could be satisfactorily utilized in the toxicological and clinical monitoring of cannabis.

  15. Conditioned taste avoidance induced by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the Fischer (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rat strains.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Alison G P; Riley, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Although Fischer (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats differ in their sensitivity to the rewarding effects of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), no data have been reported on differences in their sensitivity to the drug's aversive effects, a limiting factor in drug use and abuse. Examining the degree of differences (if any) in such effects in these strains may help further characterize possible genetic factors important to abuse vulnerability. Accordingly, the aversive effects of THC (1-5.6 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) were examined in 32F344 and 32 LEW subjects using the conditioned taste avoidance (CTA) procedure. Thermoregulation was assessed following an acute injection of THC (same as CTA groups) after a week washout period following the last trial. Subjects in both strains displayed dose-dependent THC-induced taste avoidance, with no significant strain difference. THC induced dose-dependent decreases in core body temperature in both strains. LEW subjects displayed lower core body temperatures than F344 rats, although this effect was independent of THC and was likely stress related. These results were discussed in terms of the nature of THC-induced taste avoidance and the basis of strain differences in the aversive effects of drugs of abuse.

  16. Enhanced Brain Disposition and Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in P-Glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Adena S.; Wong, Alexander; Boucher, Aurélie A.; Arnold, Jonathon C.

    2012-01-01

    The ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2) regulate the CNS disposition of many drugs. The main psychoactive constituent of cannabis Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has affinity for P-gp and Bcrp, however it is unknown whether these transporters modulate the brain accumulation of THC and its functional effects on the CNS. Here we aim to show that mice devoid of Abcb1 and Abcg2 retain higher brain THC levels and are more sensitive to cannabinoid-induced hypothermia than wild-type (WT) mice. Abcb1a/b (−/−), Abcg2 (−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with THC before brain and blood were collected and THC concentrations determined. Another cohort of mice was examined for THC-induced hypothermia by measuring rectal body temperature. Brain THC concentrations were higher in both Abcb1a/b (−/−) and Abcg2 (−/−) mice than WT mice. ABC transporter knockout mice exhibited delayed elimination of THC from the brain with the effect being more prominent in Abcg2 (−/−) mice. ABC transporter knockout mice were more sensitive to THC-induced hypothermia compared to WT mice. These results show P-gp and Bcrp prolong the brain disposition and hypothermic effects of THC and offer a novel mechanism for both genetic vulnerability to the psychoactive effects of cannabis and drug interactions between CNS therapies and cannabis. PMID:22536451

  17. The Application of Voltammetric Analysis of Δ(9) -THC for the Reduction of False Positive Results in the Analysis of Suspected Marijuana Plant Matter.

    PubMed

    Balbino, Marco A; de Oliveira, Laura S; Eleotério, Izabel C; Oiye, Erica N; Ribeiro, Maria F M; McCord, Bruce R; Ipolito, Antonio J; de Oliveira, Marcelo F

    2016-07-01

    The development of methodologies using inexpensive, fast, and reliable instrumention is desirable in illicit drug analysis. The purpose of this study was based on cyclic voltammetry technique to differentiate the electrochemical behavior of ∆(9) -THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana, and five different extract plants to yield false positive results after analysis protocol for cannabinoids using thin-layer chromatography and Fast Blue B salt. After applying a deposition potential of -0.5 V in a glassy carbon working electrode, the results indicated an anodic peak current at 0.0 V versus Ag/AgCl after addition of ∆(9) -THC solution in the electrochemical cell, and limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 ng mL(-1) and 3.5 ng mL(-1) , respectively. Other interfering plants showed distinct amperometric responses. This methodology was useful to detect ∆(9) -THC even in the presence of the Fast Blue B salt, which avoided false positive results for all the studied extract plants.

  18. Oral Fluid and Plasma Cannabinoid Ratios after Around-the-Clock Controlled Oral Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oral fluid (OF) testing is increasingly important for drug treatment, workplace, and drugged-driving programs. There is interest in predicting plasma or whole-blood concentrations from OF concentrations; however, the relationship between these matrices is incompletely characterized because of few controlled drug-administration studies. METHODS Ten male daily cannabis smokers received around-the-clock escalating 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, dronabinol) doses (40–120 mg/day) for 8 days. Plasma and OF samples were simultaneously collected before, during, and after dosing. OF THC, 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by GC-MS at 0.5-μg/L, 0.5-μg/L, and 7.5-ng/L limits of quantification (LOQs), respectively. In plasma, the LOQs were 0.25 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 0.5 μg/L for 11-hydroxy-THC. RESULTS Despite multiple oral THC administrations each day and increasing plasma THC concentrations, OF THC concentrations generally decreased over time, reflecting primarily previously self-administered smoked cannabis. The logarithms of the THC concentrations in oral fluid and plasma were not significantly correlated (r = −0.10; P = 0.065). The OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations, albeit with 1000-fold higher concentrations in plasma, increased throughout dosing. The logarithms of OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations were significantly correlated (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), although there was high interindividual variation. A high OF/plasma THC ratio and a high OF THC/THCCOOH ratio indicated recent cannabis smoking. CONCLUSIONS OF monitoring does not reliably detect oral dronabinol intake. The time courses of THC and THCCOOH concentrations in plasma and OF were different after repeated oral THC doses, and high inter-individual variation was observed. For these reasons, OF cannabinoid concentrations cannot predict concurrent plasma concentrations. PMID:21875944

  19. Adolescent Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Exposure Alters WIN55,212-2 Self-Administration in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Scherma, Maria; Dessì, Christian; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Lecca, Salvatore; Satta, Valentina; Luchicchi, Antonio; Pistis, Marco; Panlilio, Leigh V; Fattore, Liana; Goldberg, Steven R; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, and use is typically initiated during adolescence. The endocannabinoid system has an important role in formation of the nervous system, from very early development through adolescence. Cannabis exposure during this vulnerable period might lead to neurobiological changes that affect adult brain functions and increase the risk of cannabis use disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescent rats might enhance reinforcing effects of cannabinoids in adulthood. Male adolescent rats were treated with increasing doses of THC (or its vehicle) twice/day for 11 consecutive days (PND 45-55). When the animals reached adulthood, they were tested by allowing them to intravenously self-administer the cannabinoid CB1-receptor agonist WIN55,212-2. In a separate set of animals given the same THC (or vehicle) treatment regimen, electrophysiological and neurochemical experiments were performed to assess possible modifications of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which is critically involved in cannabinoid-induced reward. Behavioral data showed that acquisition of WIN55,212-2 self-administration was enhanced in THC-exposed rats relative to vehicle-exposed controls. Neurophysiological data showed that THC-exposed rats displayed a reduced capacity for WIN55,212-2 to stimulate firing of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area and to increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell. These findings-that early, passive exposure to THC can produce lasting alterations of the reward system of the brain and subsequently increase cannabinoid self-administration in adulthood-suggest a mechanism by which adolescent cannabis exposure could increase the risk of subsequent cannabis dependence in humans.

  20. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

    PubMed

    Elmes, Matthew W; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M; Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Tsirka, Stella E; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G

    2015-04-03

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

  1. Distribution of Synthetic cannabinoids JWH-210, RCS-4 and ∆ 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol After Intravenous Administration to Pigs.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Kettner, Mattias; Laschke, Matthias W; Schlote, Julia; Ewald, Andreas H; Menger, Michael D; Maurer, Hans H; Schmidt, Peter H

    2016-11-11

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) have become an increasing issue in forensic toxicology. Controlled human studies evaluating pharmacokinetic data of SCs are lacking and only few animal studies have been published. Thus, an interpretation of analytical results found in intoxicated or poisoned individuals is difficult. Therefore, the distribution of two selected SCs, namely 4-ethylnaphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-210) and 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) as well as ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as reference were examined in pigs. Pigs (n = 6 per drug) received a single intravenous 200 µg/kg BW dose of JWH-210, RCS-4, or THC. Six hours after administration, the animals were exsanguinated and relevant organs, important body fluids such as bile, and tissues such as muscle and adipose tissue, as well as the bradytrophic specimens dura and vitreous humor were collected. After hydrolysis and solid phase extraction, analysis was performed by LC-MS/MS. To overcome matrix effects of the LC-MS/MS analysis, a standard addition method was applied for quantification. The parent compounds could be detected in every analyzed specimen with the exception of THC that was not present in dura and vitreous humor. Moderate concentrations were present in brain, the site of biological effect. Metabolite concentrations were highest in tissues involved in metabolism and/or elimination. Besides kidneys and lungs routinely analyzed in postmortem toxicology, brain, adipose, and muscle tissue could serve as alternative sources, particularly if other specimens are not available. Bile fluid is the most appropriate specimen for SCs and THC metabolites detection.

  2. Pharmacological evaluation of the natural constituent of Cannabis sativa, cannabichromene and its modulation by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Gerald T; Wolf, Carl E; Poklis, Alphonse; Lichtman, Aron H

    2010-11-01

    In contrast to the numerous reports on the pharmacological effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the pharmacological activity of another substituent of Cannabis sativa, cannabichromene (CBC) remains comparatively unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether CBC elicits cannabinoid activity in the tetrad assay, which consists of the following four endpoints: hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia. Because cannabinoids are well documented to possess anti-inflammatory properties, we examined CBC, THC, and combination of both phytocannabinoids in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) paw edema assay. CBC elicited activity in the tetrad that was not blocked by the CB(1) receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Moreover, a behaviorally inactive dose of THC augmented the effects of CBC in the tetrad that was associated with an increase in THC brain concentrations. Both CBC and THC elicited dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects in the LPS-induced paw edema model. The CB(2) receptor, SR144528 blocked the anti-edematous actions of THC, but not those produced by CBC. Isobolographic analysis revealed that the anti-edematous effects of these cannabinoids in combination were additive. Although CBC produced pharmacological effects, unlike THC, its underlying mechanism of action did not involve CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. In addition, there was evidence of a possible pharmacokinetic component in which CBC dose-dependently increased THC brain levels following an i.v. injection of 0.3mg/kg THC. In conclusion, CBC produced a subset of behavioral activity in the tetrad assay and reduced LPS-induced paw edema through a noncannabinoid receptor mechanism of action. These effects were augmented when CBC and THC were co-administered.

  3. Effect of ion pairing on in vitro transcorneal permeability of a Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol prodrug: potential in glaucoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Tushar; Gul, Waseem; Elsohly, Mahmoud; Repka, Michael A; Majumdar, Soumyajit

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and improve the in vitro transcorneal permeability characteristics of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) through prodrug derivatization and formulation approaches. In vitro corneal permeability of THC and its hemisuccinate (THC-HS) and hemiglutarate (THC-HG) ester prodrugs and WIN 55-212-2 (WIN), a synthetic cannabinoid, was determined using isolated rabbit cornea. The formulations studied included hydroxypropyl beta cyclodextrin (HPβCD) or randomly methylated beta cyclodextrin (RMβCD), as well as prodrug-ion-pair complexes with l-arginine or tromethamine. Corneal permeability of WIN was found to be two-fold higher than THC in the presence of HPβCD. THC-HS and THC-HG exhibited pH-dependent permeability. In the presence of HPβCD, at pH 5 (donor solution pH), both prodrugs exhibited six-fold higher permeability compared with THC. However, permeability of the prodrugs was about three-fold lower than that of THC at pH 7.4. RMβCD, at pH 7.4, led to a significant improvement in permeability. Formation of ion-pair complexes markedly improved the solubility and permeability of THC-HG (sevenfold and threefold greater permeability compared with THC and WIN, respectively) at pH 7.4. The in vitro results demonstrate that the use of an ion-pair complex of THC-HG could be an effective strategy for topical delivery of THC.

  4. Subjective Effects of Ethanol, Morphine, Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol, and Ketamine Following a Pharmacological Challenge Are Related to Functional Brain Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kleinloog, Daniël; Rombouts, Serge; Zoethout, Remco; Klumpers, Linda; Niesters, Marieke; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop

    2015-12-01

    This analysis examines the neuronal foundation of drug-induced psychomimetic symptoms by relating the severity of these symptoms to changes in functional connectivity for a range of different psychoactive compounds with varying degrees of psychomimetic effects. The repeated measures design included 323 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series and measures of subjective effects in 36 healthy male volunteers. Four different pharmacological challenges with ethanol, morphine, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and ketamine (12 subjects per drug) were applied. A set of 10 "template" resting-state networks was used to determine individual connectivity maps. Linear regression was used for each individual subject to relate these connectivity maps to three clusters of drug-induced subjective psychomimetic effects ("perception," "relaxation," and "dysphoria") as measured with visual analogue scales. Group analysis showed that the subjective effects of perception correlated significantly across drugs with the connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and precentral gyrus with the sensorimotor network (p < 0.005, corrected). No significant correlations were found for relaxation or dysphoria. The posterior cingulate cortex has a role in visuospatial evaluation and the precentral gyrus has been associated with auditory hallucinations. Both the posterior cingulate cortex and the precentral gyrus show changes in activation in patients with schizophrenia, which can be related to the severity of positive symptoms (i.e., hallucinations and delusions), and have previously been related to changes induced by psychoactive drugs. The similarity of functional connectivity changes for drug-induced psychomimetic effects and symptoms of psychosis provides further support for the use of pharmacological challenges with psychomimetic drugs as models for psychosis.

  5. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins (FABPs) Are Intracellular Carriers for Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD)*

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew W.; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T.; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P.; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M.; Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Tsirka, Stella E.; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:25666611

  6. Pharmacological Evaluation of the Natural Constituent of Cannabis Sativa, Cannabichromene and its Modulation by Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol*

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Gerald T.; Wolf, Carl E.; Poklis, Alphonse; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the numerous reports on the pharmacological effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the pharmacological activity of another substituent of Cannabis sativa, cannabichromene (CBC) remains comparatively unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether CBC elicits cannabinoid activity in the tetrad assay, which consists of the following four endpoints: hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia. Because cannabinoids are well documented to possess anti-inflammatory properties, we examined CBC, THC, and combination of both phytocannabinoids in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) paw edema assay. CBC elicited activity in the tetrad that was not blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Moreover, a behaviorally inactive dose of THC augmented the effects of CBC in the tetrad that was associated with an increase in THC brain concentrations. Both CBC and THC elicited dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects in the LPS-induced paw edema model. The CB2 receptor, SR144528 blocked the anti-edematous actions of THC, but not those produced by CBC. Isobolographic analysis revealed that the anti-edematous effects of these cannabinoids in combination were additive. Although CBC produced pharmacological effects, unlike THC, its underlying mechanism of action did not involve CB1 or CB2 receptors. In addition, there was evidence of a possible pharmacokinetic component in which CBC dose-dependently increased THC brain levels following an i.v. injection of 0.3 mg/kg THC. In conclusion, CBC produced a subset of behavioral activity in the tetrad assay and reduced LPS-induced paw edema through a noncannabinoid receptor mechanism of action. These effects were augmented when CBC and THC were co-administered. PMID:20619971

  7. Activation of Marginally Reactive Boron Enolates by MeLi for the Formation of Enol Phosphates and Synthesis of the Δ(9)-THC Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ikoma, Atsushi; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi

    2015-09-18

    The addition of MeLi to boron enolates produced by the 1,4-addition of Ar2Cu(CN)Li2 to BF3·OEt2-activated enones was followed by the reaction with ClP(O)(OEt)2 to afford the corresponding enol phosphates in moderate to good yields. The scope of this method was examined with sterically hindered or electronically biased enones and/or reagents. This activation of boron enolates was successfully applied to the synthesis of the methyl ether of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

  8. Tetrahydrocannabinols in clinical and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kochanowski, Maciej; Kała, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoids are the natural constituents of marihuana (cannabis). The main of them are delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (9THC)--psychoactive agent, cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD). Cannabis is administered either by smoking or orally. 9THC potency and duration of action as well as its and two of its major metabolites concentrations in organism highly depend on the route of administration. A single active dose of 9THC is estimated on 520 mg. 9THC is rapidly metabolised. It is hydroxylated to an active metabolite, I1 -hydroxy-delta9-tetrahydro-cannabinol (11-OH-THC), then oxidised to an inactive 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH), which is conjugated with glucuronic acid and predominantly excreted in the urine. The maximum psychological effect persists for 4-6 h after administration despite of very low 9THC blood concentrations. 9THC plasma concentration declined to values of 2-3 ng/ml during 3-4 h after smoking. Such a low concentration of the active compound in human organism create a demand for use of sensitive analytical methods for detection and determination of 9THC and its metabolites. The most effective techniques for 9THC and related compounds determination in biological material are chromatographic ones (gas and liquid) with mass spectrometric detection and different ionization modes. 9THC and its two metabolites (11-OH-THC and THCCOOH) are present in blood and hair, 9THC in saliva, and THCCOOH in urine. 9THC and related compounds are determined in autopsy material, although deaths by overdose of cannabis are exceptionally rare. Fatalities happen most often after intravenous injection of hashish oil. 9THC and its metabolites determination in different biological materials gives the basis for a wide interpretation of analytical results for clinical and forensic toxicology purposes.

  9. Gonadal hormone modulation of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced antinociception and metabolism in female versus male rats.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Haas, A E; Wiley, J L; Yu, Z; Clowers, B H

    2017-01-01

    The gonadal hormones testosterone (T) in adult males and estradiol (E2) in adult females have been reported to modulate behavioral effects of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This study determined whether activational effects of T and E2 are sex-specific, and whether hormones modulate production of the active metabolite 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and the inactive metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH). Adult male and female rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and treated with nothing (0), T (10-mm Silastic capsule/100g body weight), or E2 (1-mm Silastic capsule/rat). Three weeks later, saline or the cytochrome P450 inhibitor proadifen (25mg/kg; to block THC metabolism and boost THC's effects) was injected i.p.; 1h later, vehicle or THC (3mg/kg females, 5mg/kg males) was injected i.p., and rats were tested for antinociceptive and motoric effects 15-240min post-injection. T did not consistently alter THC-induced antinociception in males, but decreased it in females (tail withdrawal test). Conversely, T decreased THC-induced catalepsy in males, but had no effect in females. E2 did not alter THC-induced antinociception in females, but enhanced it in males. The discrepant effects of T and E2 on males' and females' behavioral responses to THC suggests that sexual differentiation of THC sensitivity is not simply due to activational effects of hormones, but also occurs via organizational hormone or sex chromosome effects. Analysis of serum showed that proadifen increased THC levels, E2 increased 11-OH-THC in GDX males, and T decreased 11-OH-THC (and to a lesser extent, THC) in GDX females. Thus, hormone modulation of THC's behavioral effects is caused in part by hormone modulation of THC oxidation to its active metabolite. However, the fact that hormone modulation of metabolism did not alter THC sensitivity similarly on all behavioral measures within each sex suggests that other mechanisms also play a role in gonadal hormone modulation of THC sensitivity in adult rats.

  10. Glycolytic pathway (GP), kreb's cycle (KC), and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity in myocardial subcellular fractions exposed to cannabinoids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.T.; Manno, B.R.; King, J.W.; Fowler, M.R.; Dempsey, C.A.; Manno, J.E.

    1986-03-05

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (..delta../sup 9/-THC), the primary psychoactive component of marihuana, and its active metabolite 11-hydroxy-..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC) have been reported to produce a direct cardiac depressant effect. Studies in isolated perfused rat hearts have indicated a decreased force of contraction (inotropic response) when ..delta../sup 9/-THC or 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC was administered in microgram amounts. The mechanism and site of action have not been explained or correlated with associated metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on major myocardial energy producing pathways, GP and KC, and a non-energy producing pathway, HMS. Cardiac ventricular tissue from male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) was excised and homogenized for subcellular fractionation. KC, GP and HMS activity was assayed in the appropriate fractions by measuring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ generation from /sup 14/C-2-pyruvate, /sup 14/C-6-glucose and /sup 14/C-1-glucose respectively. Duplicate assays (n=8) were performed on tissue exposed to saline (control), empty liposomes (vehicle) and four doses each of ..delta../sup 9/-THC and 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC. Changes in metabolic activity and decreases in cardiac contractile performance may be associated.

  11. Differential effects of THC- or CBD-rich cannabis extracts on working memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Paola; Robinson, Lianne; Fratta, Walter; Pertwee, Roger G; Riedel, Gernot

    2004-12-01

    Cannabinoid receptors in the brain (CB(1)) take part in modulation of learning, and are particularly important for working and short-term memory. Here, we employed a delayed-matching-to-place (DMTP) task in the open-field water maze and examined the effects of cannabis plant extracts rich in either Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), or rich in cannabidiol (CBD), on spatial working and short-term memory formation in rats. Delta(9)-THC-rich extracts impaired performance in the memory trial (trial 2) of the DMTP task in a dose-dependent but delay-independent manner. Deficits appeared at doses of 2 or 5 mg/kg (i.p.) at both 30 s and 4 h delays and were similar in severity compared with synthetic Delta(9)-THC. Despite considerable amounts of Delta(9)-THC present, CBD-rich extracts had no effect on spatial working/short-term memory, even at doses of up to 50 mg/kg. When given concomitantly, CBD-rich extracts did not reverse memory deficits of the additional Delta(9)-THC-rich extract. CBD-rich extracts also did not alter Delta(9)-THC-rich extract-induced catalepsy as revealed by the bar test. It appears that spatial working/short-term memory is not sensitive to CBD-rich extracts and that potentiation and antagonism of Delta(9)-THC-induced spatial memory deficits is dependent on the ratio between CBD and Delta(9)-THC.

  12. Δ9-THC Intoxication by Cannabidiol-Enriched Cannabis Extract in Two Children with Refractory Epilepsy: Full Remission after Switching to Purified Cannabidiol

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, José A. S.; Crippa, Ana C. S.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Martín-Santos, Rocio; Zuardi, Antonio W.

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies and preliminary clinical trials have shown that cannabidiol (CBD)-enriched extracts may have beneficial effects for children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. However, these compounds are not yet registered as medicines by regulatory agencies. We describe the cases of two children with treatment-resistant epilepsy (Case A with left frontal dysplasia and Case B with Dravet Syndrome) with initial symptom improvement after the introduction of CBD extracts followed by seizure worsening after a short time. The children presented typical signs of intoxication by Δ9-THC (inappropriate laughter, ataxia, reduced attention, and eye redness) after using a CBD-enriched extract. The extract was replaced by the same dose of purified CBD with no Δ9-THC in both cases, which led to improvement in intoxication signs and seizure remission. These cases support pre-clinical and preliminary clinical evidence suggesting that CBD may be effective for some patients with epilepsy. Moreover, the cases highlight the need for randomized clinical trials using high-quality and reliable substances to ascertain the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids as medicines. PMID:27746737

  13. Determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (Δ9-THCA-A) in whole blood and plasma by LC-MS/MS and application in authentic samples from drivers suspected of driving under the influence of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Nikolaos; Schmid, Helene; Nussbaumer, Susanne; Ambach, Lars; Lanz, Stephan; Längin, Andreas; König, Stefan; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A) is the biosynthetic precursor of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in cannabis plants, and has no psychotropic effects. THCA-A can be detected in blood and urine, and several metabolites have been identified. THCA-A was also shown to be incorporated in hair by side stream smoke to a minor extent, but incorporation via blood stream or sweat seems unlikely. The detection of THCA-A in biological fluids may serve as a marker for differentiating between the intake of prescribed THC medication - containing only pure THC - and cannabis products containing THC besides THC-acid A and other cannabinoids. However, the knowledge about its usefulness in forensic cases is very limited. The aim of the present work was the development of a reliable method for THCA-A determination in human blood or plasma using LC-MS/MS and application to cases of driving under the influence of drugs. Fifty eight (58) authentic whole blood and the respective plasma samples were collected from drivers suspected of driving under the influence of cannabis from the region of Bern (Switzerland). Samples were first tested for THC, 11-OH-THC and THC-COOH, and then additionally for THCA-A. For this purpose, the existing LC-MS/MS method was modified and validated, and found to be selective and linear over a range of 1.0 to 200ng/mL (the correlation coefficients were above 0.9980 in all validation runs). Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.3ng/mL and 1.0ng/mL respectively. Intra- and inter-assay accuracy were equal or better than 90% and intra- and inter-assay precision were equal or better than 11.1%. The mean extraction efficiencies were satisfactory being equal or higher than 85.4%. THCA-A was stable in whole blood samples after 3 freeze/thaw cycles and storage at 4°C for 7 days. Re-injection (autosampler) stability was also satisfactory. THC was present in all blood samples with levels ranging from 0.7 to 51ng/mL. THCA

  14. Cannabinoid and heroin activation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission by a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Pontieri, F E; Di Chiara, G

    1997-06-27

    The effects of the active ingredient of Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), and of the highly addictive drug heroin on in vivo dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens were compared in Sprague-Dawley rats by brain microdialysis. Delta9-THC and heroin increased extracellular dopamine concentrations selectively in the shell of the nucleus accumbens; these effects were mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2. SR141716A, an antagonist of central cannabinoid receptors, prevented the effects of Delta9-THC but not those of heroin. Naloxone, a generic opioid antagonist, administered systemically, or naloxonazine, an antagonist of micro1 opioid receptors, infused into the ventral tegmentum, prevented the action of cannabinoids and heroin on dopamine transmission. Thus, Delta9-THC and heroin exert similar effects on mesolimbic dopamine transmission through a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism located in the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum.

  15. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  16. An in vitro experiment on the interaction of charcoal or wheat bran with 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Skopp, Gisela; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    The rather long yet variable terminal half-lives and detection times since last use of urinary cannabinoids may partly be attributed to their enterohepatic circulation which generally can be interrupted or restricted by chemical adsorbents. Therefore, an in vitro experiment was performed to study the adsorption/binding of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and its glucuronide to activated charcoal and wheat bran; remaining concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Adsorption/binding of 1,000 ng/mL of free or conjugated THC-COOH was complete using as little as 5 mg of charcoal whereas adsorption/binding to wheat bran increased with increasing amounts. Taking of remedies affecting enterohepatic recycling of THC-COOH and its glucuronide may challenge interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations used to detect or assess frequency of drug use or the time since last drug consumption.

  17. Repeated administration of phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC or synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 induces tolerance to hypothermia but not locomotor suppression in mice, and reduces CB1 receptor expression and function in a brain region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tai, S; Hyatt, W S; Gu, C; Franks, L N; Vasiljevik, T; Brents, L K; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2015-12-01

    These studies probed the relationship between intrinsic efficacy and tolerance/cross-tolerance between ∆(9)-THC and synthetic cannabinoid drugs of abuse (SCBs) by examining in vivo effects and cellular changes concomitant with their repeated administration in mice. Dose-effect relationships for hypothermic effects were determined in order to confirm that SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 are higher efficacy agonists than ∆(9)-THC in mice. Separate groups of mice were treated with saline, sub-maximal hypothermic doses of JWH-018 or JWH-073 (3.0mg/kg or 10.0mg/kg, respectively) or a maximally hypothermic dose of 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 5 consecutive days while core temperature and locomotor activity were monitored via biotelemetry. Repeated administration of all drugs resulted in tolerance to hypothermic effects, but not locomotor effects, and this tolerance was still evident 14 days after the last drug administration. Further studies treated mice with 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 4 days, then tested with SCBs on day 5. Mice with a ∆(9)-THC history were cross-tolerant to both SCBs, and this cross-tolerance also persisted 14 days after testing. Select brain regions from chronically treated mice were examined for changes in CB1 receptor expression and function. Expression and function of hypothalamic CB1Rs were reduced in mice receiving chronic drugs, but cortical CB1R expression and function were not altered. Collectively, these data demonstrate that repeated ∆(9)-THC, JWH-018 and JWH-073 can induce long-lasting tolerance to some in vivo effects, which is likely mediated by region-specific downregulation and desensitization of CB1Rs.

  18. Chemical stabilization of a Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol prodrug in polymeric matrix systems produced by a hot-melt method: Role of microenvironment pH.

    PubMed

    Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Repka, Michael A

    2006-09-01

    This research was conducted in order to fabricate stable polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based transmucosal systems of a Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) prodrug, a hemisuccinate ester, using a hot-melt method. Since Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-HS) was heat labile, a series of processing aids were evaluated in order to facilitate hot-melt production at lower temperatures, thereby reducing THC-HS degradation. The stability of THC-HS was influenced both by the processing conditions such as heating time and temperature, and the postprocessing storage conditions. The type of formulation additive also affected the extent of degradation. In the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-400, the percentage of relative degradation of THC-HS to THC was 13.5% and 49.4% at 80°C and 120°C, respectively. In contrast, incorporation of vitamin E succinate (VES) reduced processing degradation to 2.1% and 9.2%, respectively, under the same conditions. Severe degradation of THC-HS was observed during storage, even under freezing conditions (-18°C). A VES-Noveon AA-1 combination was observed to best stabilize the prodrug systems both during processing and postprocessing. Stabilization of THC-HS was achieved in these polyethylene oxide matrices at 4°C, with almost 90% of theoretical drug remaining for up to 8 months. Investigation of the pH effect revealed that the pH of the microenvironment in these polymeric systems could be modulated to significantly improve the stability of THC-HS, degradation being the least in a relatively acidic medium.

  19. Development of an electrospray LC-MS/MS method for quantification of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and its main metabolite in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Bylda, Caroline; Leinenbach, Andreas; Thiele, Roland; Kobold, Uwe; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2012-01-01

    A fast and sensitive reference method for quantification of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its main metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in oral fluid is described in this study. Samples were collected using an oral specimen collection device, followed by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chromatographic separation of the analytes was achieved by gradient elution on a reversed-phase column with subsequent detection by electrospray triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in positive ionization multiple reaction monitoring mode. Quantification was performed by means of deuterated analogues of the analytes as internal standards. Total run time of the assay was 12 min. The method allowed sensitive quantification of both analytes at a limit of quantification of 0.2 ng/ml. This sensitivity is essential for analysis of samples collected with the Intercept Oral Fluid Collection device (OraSure) and an assay for simultaneous quantification of THC and THCCOOH in saliva has not yet been described. The calibration curves for THC and THCCOOH were linear in the range between 0.25 and 8 ng/ml (r(2)  > 0.99). Ion suppression effects from endogenous or exogenous interferences were investigated using selected model substances (albumin, ascorbic acid, bilirubin, hemoglobin, breath spray, cigarette, chewing gum, chewing tobacco, candy, tooth whitening, and Tums antacid). These substances were chosen because of the high probability of their presence in the collected samples. None of the 11 endogenous model interferences altered the accuracy of analysis, demonstrating good robustness of the method with respect to interferences in common hygiene products, medicine, tobacco and naturally occurring endogenous substances.

  20. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), THC, CBN and CBD in hair.

    PubMed

    Roth, Nadine; Moosmann, Bjoern; Auwärter, Volker

    2013-02-01

    For analysis of hair samples derived from a pilot study ('in vivo' contamination of hair by sidestream marijuana smoke), an LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD). Hair samples were extracted in methanol for 4 h under occasional shaking at room temperature, after adding THC-D(3), CBN-D(3), CBD-D(3) and THCA-A-D(3) as an in-house synthesized internal standard. The analytes were separated by gradient elution on a Luna C18 column using 0.1% HCOOH and ACN + 0.1% HCOOH. Data acquisition was performed on a QTrap 4000 in electrospray ionization-multi reaction monitoring mode. Validation was carried out according to the guidelines of the German Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (GTFCh). Limit of detection and lower limit of quantification were 2.5 pg/mg for THCA-A and 20 pg/mg for THC, CBN and CBD. A linear calibration model was applicable for all analytes over a range of 2.5 pg/mg or 20 pg/mg to 1000 pg/mg, using a weighting factor 1/x. Selectivity was shown for 12 blank hair samples from different sources. Accuracy and precision data were within the required limits for all analytes (bias between -0.2% and 6.4%, RSD between 3.7% and 11.5%). The dried hair extracts were stable over a time period of one to five days in the dark at room temperature. Processed sample stability (maximum decrease of analyte peak area below 25%) was considerably enhanced by adding 0.25% lecithin (w/v) in ACN + 0.1% HCOOH for reconstitution. Extraction efficiency for CBD was generally very low using methanol extraction. Hence, for effective extraction of CBD alkaline hydrolysis is recommended.

  1. LC-MS/MS analysis of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A in serum after protein precipitation using an in-house synthesized deuterated internal standard.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-06-01

    An assay based on liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry is presented for the fast, precise and sensitive quantitation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA) in serum. THCA is the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis and has aroused interest in the pharmacological and forensic field especially as a potential marker for recent cannabis use. After addition of deuterated THCA, synthesized from D(3)-THC as starting material, and protein precipitation, the analytes were separated using gradient elution on a Luna C18 column (150 × 2.0 mm × 5 µm) with 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid. Data acquisition was performed on a triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer in multiple reaction monitoring mode with negative electrospray ionization. After optimization, the following sample preparation procedure was used: 200 μL serum was spiked with internal standard solution and methanol and then precipitated 'in fractions' with 500 μL ice-cold acetonitrile. After storage and centrifugation, the supernatant was evaporated and the residue redissolved in mobile phase. The assay was fully validated according to international guidelines including, for the first time, the assessment of matrix effects and stability experiments. Limit of detection was 0.1 ng/mL, and limit of quantification was 1.0 ng/mL. The method was found to be selective and proved to be linear over a range of 1.0 to 100 ng/mL using a 1/x weighted calibration model with regression coefficients >0.9996. Accuracy and precision data were within the required limits (RSD ≤ 8.6%, bias: 2.4 to 11.4%), extractive yield was greater than 84%. The analytes were stable in serum samples after three freeze/thaw cycles and storage at -20 °C for one month.

  2. Reintoxication: the release of fat-stored Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) into blood is enhanced by food deprivation or ACTH exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekaran, N; Long, LE; Dawson, BL; Hansen, GH; Richardson, DP; Li, KM; Arnold, JC; McGregor, IS

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in adipose tissue where it is stored for long periods of time. Here we investigated whether conditions that promote lipolysis can liberate THC from adipocytes to yield increased blood levels of THC. Experimental approach: In vitro studies involved freshly isolated rat adipocytes that were incubated with THC before exposure to the lipolytic agent adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). A complementary in vivo approach examined the effects of both food deprivation and ACTH on blood levels of THC in rats that had been repeatedly injected with THC (10 mg·kg−1) for 10 consecutive days. Lipolysis promoted by ACTH or food deprivation was indexed by measurement of glycerol levels. Key results: ACTH increased THC levels in the medium of THC-pretreated adipocytes in vitro. ACTH also enhanced THC release from adipocytes in vitro when taken from rats repeatedly pretreated with THC in vivo. Finally, in vivo ACTH exposure and 24 h food deprivation both enhanced the levels of THC and its metabolite, (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in the blood of rats that had been pre-exposed to repeated THC injections. Conclusions and implications: The present study shows that lipolysis enhances the release of THC from fat stores back into blood. This suggests the likelihood of ‘reintoxication’ whereby food deprivation or stress may raise blood THC levels in animals chronically exposed to the drug. Further research will need to confirm whether this can lead to functional effects, such as impaired cognitive function or ‘flashbacks’. PMID:19681888

  3. Effects of coadministration of cannabinoids and morphine on nociceptive behaviour, brain monoamines and HPA axis activity in a rat model of persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Finn, D P; Beckett, S R G; Roe, C H; Madjd, A; Fone, K C F; Kendall, D A; Marsden, C A; Chapman, V

    2004-02-01

    The antinociceptive effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) have been widely described; however, its therapeutic potential may be limited by secondary effects. We investigated whether coadministration of low doses of cannabinoids or cannabinoids and morphine produced antinociception in the absence of side-effects. Effects of preadministration (i.p.) of Delta9-THC (1 or 2.5 mg/kg), cannabidiol (5 mg/kg), morphine (2 mg/kg), Delta9-THC + morphine, Delta9-THC + cannabidiol or vehicle on formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour were studied over 60 min. Trunk blood and brains were collected 60 min after formalin injection and assayed for corticosterone and tissue levels of monoamines and metabolites, respectively. Drug effects on locomotor activity, core body temperature and grooming were assessed. Delta9-THC reduced both phases of formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour, enhanced the formalin-evoked corticosterone response and increased the 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol : noradrenaline ratio in the hypothalamus. Cannabidiol alone had no effect on these indices and did not modulate the effects of Delta9-THC. Morphine reduced both phases of formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour. Coadministration of Delta9-THC and morphine reduced the second phase of formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour to a greater extent than either drug alone, and increased levels of thalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine. While the antinociceptive effects of Delta9-THC and morphine alone occurred at doses devoid of effects on locomotor activity, coadministration of Delta9-THC and morphine inhibited locomotor activity. In conclusion, coadministration of a low dose of morphine, but not cannabidiol, with Delta9-THC, increased antinociception and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels in the thalamus in a model of persistent nociception. Nevertheless, these enhanced antinociceptive effects were associated with increased secondary effects on locomotor activity.

  4. Restoration of chronic- Δ9-THC-induced decline in sexuality in male rats by a novel benzoflavone moiety from Passiflora incarnata Linn

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Kamaldeep; Sharma, Anupam

    2003-01-01

    The present study comprised treatment of healthy male rats with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 10 mg kg−1, p.o.), and combinations of THC with benzoflavone moiety (BZF, 10 and 20 mg kg−1, p.o.) isolated from Passiflora incarnata Linneaus, over a period of 30 days. Upon 30-days chronic administrations, the THC-treated male rats had a significant loss of libido (mounting behaviour with non-oestrous female rats), decrease in sperm count, and number of impregnated pro-estrous female rats. Co-administration of BZF (10 and 20 mg kg−1 p.o.) afforded significant protection against the chronic-THC-induced decrease in libido, mating performance and fertility during 30-day experimental regimen. The 20 mg kg−1 dose of BZF exhibited better results. Upon discontinuation of THC, treatment with BZF (10 and 20 mg kg−1 p.o.) also facilitated the early restoration chronic-THC-induced decline in libido, sperm count and sexual fertility within 7 days. PMID:12522080

  5. Disposition of Cannabichromene, Cannabidiol, and Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and its Metabolites in Mouse Brain following Marijuana Inhalation Determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Poklis, Justin L.; Thompson, Candace C.; Long, Kelly A.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Poklis, Alphonse

    2011-01-01

    A liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS–MS) method was developed for the analysis of marijuana cannabinoids in mouse brain tissue using an Applied Biosystems 3200 Q trap with a turbo V source for TurbolonSpray attached to a Shimadzu SCL HPLC system. The method included cannabichromene (CBC), cannabidiol (CBD), D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxytetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-D9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH). These compounds were isolated by liquid-liquid extraction using cold acetonitrile. The following transition ions were monitored by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM): m/z 315>193, 315>259 for THC/CBD/CBC; m/z 331>193, 331>105 for 11-OH-THC; m/z 345>299, 345>193 for THC-COOH;c m/z 318>196 for THC-d3; m/z 334>196 for 11-OH-THC-d3, and m/z 348>302 for THCCOOH-d3. Linearity for THC, 1-OH-THC, and THC-COOH was 1-200 ng/g; for CBC and CBD, it was 0.5–20 ng/g. Within-run and between-run precisions for all the analytes yielded coefficients of variation of < 20%. Four C57BL6 mice were sacrificed 20 min after nose-only exposure to the smoke of 200 mg of marijuana containing 0.44 mg CBC, 0.93 mg CBD, and 8.81 mg THC. The mean brain concentrations were 3.9 ± 1.5 ng/g CBC, 21 ± 3.9 ng/g CBD, 364 ± 74 ng/g THC, and 28 ± 5.9 ng/g 11-OH-THC. THCCOOH was not detected. The relative mean brain cannabinoid concentrations correlated to the amounts of the cannabinoids in the inhaled marijuana. PMID:21258613

  6. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. ); Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  7. Ovarian hormones and chronic administration during adolescence modify the discriminative stimulus effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹-THC) in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, Peter J; Filipeanu, Catalin M; Bailey, Evangeline M; Hulst, Jerielle L; Sutton, Jessie L

    2012-09-01

    Marijuana abuse during adolescence may alter its abuse liability during adulthood by modifying the interoceptive (discriminative) stimuli produced, especially in females due to an interaction with ovarian hormones. To examine this possibility, either gonadally intact or ovariectomized (OVX) female rats received 40 intraperitoneal injections of saline or 5.6 mg/kg of Δ⁹-THC daily during adolescence, yielding 4 experimental groups (intact/saline, intact/Δ⁹-THC, OVX/saline, and OVX/Δ⁹-THC). These groups were then trained to discriminate Δ⁹-THC (0.32-3.2 mg/kg) from saline under a fixed-ratio (FR) 20 schedule of food presentation. After a training dose was established for the subjects in each group, varying doses of Δ⁹-THC were substituted for the training dose to obtain dose-effect (generalization) curves for drug-lever responding and response rate. The results showed that: 1) the OVX/saline group had a substantially higher mean response rate under control conditions than the other three groups, 2) both OVX groups had higher percentages of THC-lever responding than the intact groups at doses of Δ⁹-THC lower than the training dose, and 3) the OVX/Δ⁹-THC group was significantly less sensitive to the rate-decreasing effects of Δ⁹-THC compared to other groups. Furthermore, at sacrifice, western blot analyses indicated that chronic Δ⁹-THC in OVX and intact females decreased cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) levels in the striatum, and decreased phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (p-CREB) in the hippocampus. In contrast to the hippocampus, chronic Δ⁹-THC selectively increased p-CREB in the OVX/saline group in the striatum. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was not significantly affected by either hormone status or chronic Δ⁹-THC. In summary, these data in female rats suggest that cannabinoid abuse by adolescent human females could alter their subsequent responsiveness to cannabinoids as adults and have serious consequences for brain development.

  8. Interactions between cannabidiol and Δ(9)-THC following acute and repeated dosing: Rebound hyperactivity, sensorimotor gating and epigenetic and neuroadaptive changes in the mesolimbic pathway.

    PubMed

    Todd, Stephanie M; Zhou, Cilla; Clarke, David J; Chohan, Tariq W; Bahceci, Dilara; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2017-02-01

    The evidence base for the use of medical cannabis preparations containing specific ratios of cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is limited. While there is abundant data on acute interactions between CBD and THC, few studies have assessed the impact of their repeated co-administration. We previously reported that CBD inhibited or potentiated the acute effects of THC dependent on the measure being examined at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio. Further, CBD decreased THC effects on brain regions involved in memory, anxiety and body temperature regulation. Here we extend on these finding by examining over 15 days of treatment whether CBD modulated the repeated effects of THC on behaviour and neuroadaption markers in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway. After acute locomotor suppression, repeated THC caused rebound locomotor hyperactivity that was modestly inhibited by CBD. CBD also slightly reduced the acute effects of THC on sensorimotor gating. These subtle effects were found at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio but were not accentuated by a 5:1 dose ratio. CBD did not alter the trajectory of enduring THC-induced anxiety nor tolerance to the pharmacological effects of THC. There was no evidence of CBD potentiating the behavioural effects of THC. However we demonstrated for the first time that repeated co-administration of CBD and THC increased histone 3 acetylation (H3K9/14ac) in the VTA and ΔFosB expression in the nucleus accumbens. These changes suggest that while CBD may have protective effects acutely, its long-term molecular actions on the brain are more complex and may be supradditive.

  9. Novel method of determination of D9-tetrahydrocannabinol(THC) in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Kokubun, Hideya; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro

    2014-04-01

    In Europe and the United States, D9-tetrahydrocannabinol(THC, dronabinol), one of the psychoactive constituents of cannabis, has been used for both its anti-emetic and orexigenic effects in cancer patient receiving chemotherapy.However, dronabinol has not yet been launched in the market in Japan.In the future, it is necessary to ascertain the pharmacokinetics of dronabinol in cancer paitient.Therefore, we developed an HPLC procedure using electrochemical detection(ECD)for quan- titation of the concentrations of dronabinol in blood.An eluent of 50mM KH2PO4/CH3CN(9:16)was used as the mobile phase.The column was used the XTerra®RP18, and the voltage of the electrochemical detector in dronabinol was set at 400 mV.As a result, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 10 ng/mL to 100 ng/mL(y=964.85x -3,419, r=0.997).The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 ng/mL(S/N=3).The relative within-runs and between-runs standard deviations for the assay dronabinol were less than 4.7%. The method reported here is superior to previously reported methods in cancer patient.

  10. Investigation of the transformation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol during water chlorination by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Rodríguez, Isaac; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2013-10-15

    The stability of the main metabolite of cannabis, (±)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH), during water chlorination has been investigated. THCCOOH was degraded in few seconds following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sample pH turned out to be a significant factor, decreasing THCCOOH half-life with an increase in its values. Seven by-products could be positively identified from accurate mass measurements: three compounds resulted from electrophilic substitutions of hydrogen per chlorine (or bromine) in the aromatic ring, whereas the formation of the remaining four involved additional reactions in the C-C double bond (hydration and halogenation). The software predicted toxicity of these products towards Daphnia magna indicates that they are expected to have toxicity values similar or higher than its precursor compound. Experiments conducted with diluted urine showed that THCCOOH was stable in this matrix, probably due to a rapid and complete reaction between chlorine and other organic constituents already present in the samples. In real surface waters, the extent of the reaction was also affected by the organic matter content, and so THCCOOH was rapidly degraded in samples scarcely affected by human activities, being more stable in waters with a higher level of pollution.

  11. The yin and yang of cannabis-induced psychosis: the actions of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in rodent models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J C; Boucher, A A; Karl, T

    2012-01-01

    The link between cannabis and psychosis has often been debated with polarized views on the topic. There is substantial epidemiological evidence showing that cannabis increases the risk of psychosis, whereas other research suggests that schizophrenia patients self-medicate with the substance. These conflicting accounts may at least be partially explained by the two phytocannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and their opposing actions on schizophrenia-related symptoms. In the present review we will first focus on how traditional rodent models of schizophrenia have been used to improve our understanding of the propsychotic actions of THC and the antipsychotic actions of CBD. We will also review novel rodent models used to address genetic vulnerability to cannabis-induced schizophrenia and show that specific genes are being uncovered that modulate cannabinoid action (e.g. the schizophrenia susceptibility gene neuregulin 1). We will also review rodent studies that have addressed interactions between THC and CBD. These animal studies underscore great complexity with some studies showing that CBD antagonises the neurobehavioural effects of THC, while others show the opposite, that CBD potentiates the actions of THC. Various mechanisms are put forth to explain these divergent effects such as CBD antagonism at central CB1 receptors or that CBD inhibits proteins that regulate THC disposition and metabolism (e.g. the ABC transporter, P-glycoprotein).

  12. Fast quantification of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) using microwave-accelerated derivatisation and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Brabanter, Nik; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Hooghe, Fiona; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2013-01-10

    A rapid and sensitive determination of cannabinoids in urine is important in many fields, from workplace drug testing over toxicology to the fight against doping. The detection of cannabis abuse is normally based on the quantification of the most important metabolite 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) in urine. In most fields THCA needs to be present at a concentration of exceeding 15ng/mL before a positive result can be reported. The method described in this paper, combines a 4min GC-MS/MS method with a fast sample preparation procedure using microwave assisted derivatisation in order to complete the quantification of THCA in urine in 30min, using only 1mL of urine. The method is selective, linear over the range 5-100ng/mL and shows excellent precision and trueness and hence, the estimated measurement uncertainty at the threshold level is small. The method also complies with applicable criteria for mass spectrometry and chromatography. Therefore the method can be used for rapid screening and confirmatory purposes.

  13. Simple quantitation of formoterol and 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in doping control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Mi; Kim, Ho Jun; Son, Junghyun; Park, Ju-Hyung; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Lee, Jaeick

    2014-09-15

    11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) and formoterol are newly revised prohibited threshold substances (150 ng/mL for THC-COOH and 40 ng/mL for formoterol) by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). In continuation of our direct quantitation work of the prohibited threshold substances, direct LC-MS/MS methods combined with a simple sample preparation procedure have been developed and validated for the measurement of these two threshold substances in urine samples. After the enzymatic hydrolysis of urine samples, the resulting samples were diluted with acetonitrile and centrifuged. The supernatant was directly analyzed by LC-MS/MS using the selected reaction monitoring mode. The calibration curve range of the assay was ranged over 50-200% of the threshold value according to WADA guidelines. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 6.1 and 18.4 ng/mL for THC-COOH and 2.0 and 6.2 ng/mL for formoterol, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precisions were between 2.08% and 7.28% and the accuracies ranged from 95.16% to 104.49%. The present methods were successfully applied to the analysis of the proficiency test samples.

  14. Quantification of 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Human Oral Fluid by Gas Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in oral fluid collected with the Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with hexafluoroisopropanol and trifluoroacetic anhydride and quantified by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization. Standard curves, using linear least-squares regression with 1/x2 weighting were linear from 10 to 1000 ng/L with coefficients of determination >0.998 for both collection devices. Bias was 89.2%–112.6%, total imprecision 4.0%–5.1% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >79.8% across the linear range for Quantisal-collected specimens. Bias was 84.6%–109.3%, total imprecision 3.6%–7.3% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >92.6% for specimens collected with the Oral-Eze device at all 3 quality control concentrations (10, 120, and 750 ng/L). This effective high-throughput method reduces analysis time by 9 minutes per sample compared with our current 2-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method and extends the capability of quantifying this important oral fluid analyte to gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. This method was applied to the analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from individuals participating in controlled cannabis studies and will be effective for distinguishing passive environmental contamination from active cannabis smoking. PMID:24622724

  15. Effects of the cannabinoids on physical properties of brain membranes and phospholipid vesicles: fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Hillard, C J; Harris, R A; Bloom, A S

    1985-03-01

    The effects of four cannabinoids on the physical properties of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM), lipid extracts of SPM and phospholipid vesicles were evaluated using fluorescence probes. In vitro, the psychoactive cannabinoids, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and 11-hydroxyl-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta 9-THC) at concentrations of 1 and 3 microM decreased polarization of the fluorescence emission of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in SPM. At the same concentrations, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol, cannabinoids devoid of marijuana-like psychoactivity, had no effect on DPH polarization. The effects of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD on vesicles made from lipids extracted from SPM were identical to their effects on intact SPM. These changes in DPH polarization were not due to changes in fluorescence lifetime and indicate that, at low concentrations, the psychoactive cannabinoids increase the rotational mobility of DPH in the membrane core. In contrast, in SPM-extracted lipids, both 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD decreased the mobility of stearic acid with an anthroyloxy label at both the second (2-AS) and twelfth (12-AS) carbon atoms. Studies of DPH polarization in various phosphatidylcholines (PC) demonstrated that the actions of the cannabinoids were dependent on initial bilayer fluidity. 11-OH-delta 9-THC was less effective at decreasing polarization of trimethylammonium DPH (TMA-DPH), a probe of the bilayer surface, than of DPH whereas CBD affected mobility of the two probes equally. Neither CBD nor 11-OH-delta 9-THC altered DPH mobility in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine vesicles. These findings indicate that the psychoactive cannabinoids increase fluidity in the hydrophobic core of brain membranes and support a membrane perturbant hypothesis of the mechanism of delta 9-THC action.

  16. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase: relative activity of constituents and metabolites of marihuana.

    PubMed

    Howlett, A C

    1987-05-01

    delta 9Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been shown to inhibit the activity of adenylate cyclase in the N18TG2 clone of murine neuroblastoma cells. The concentration of delta 9THC exhibiting half-maximal inhibition was 500 nM. delta 8Tetrahydrocannabinol was less active, and cannabinol was only partially active. Cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, olivetol and compounds having a reduced length of the C3 alkyl side chain were inactive. The metabolites of delta 8THC and delta 9THC hydroxylated at the C11 position were more potent than the parent drugs. However, hydroxylation at the C8 position of the terpenoid ring resulted in loss of activity. Compounds hydroxylated along the C3 alkyl side chain were equally efficacious but less potent than delta 9THC. These findings are compared to the pharmacology of cannabinoids reported for psychological effects in humans and behavioral effects in a variety of animal models.

  17. Identification and quantification of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide (THC-COOH-glu) in hair by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as a potential hair biomarker of cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Pichini, Simona; Marchei, Emilia; Martello, Simona; Gottardi, Massimo; Pellegrini, Manuela; Svaizer, Fiorenza; Lotti, Andrea; Chiarotti, Marcello; Pacifici, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    We developed and validated an ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to identify and quantify 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide in hair of cannabis consumers. After hair washing with methyl alcohol and diethyl ether and subsequent addition of amiodarone as internal standard hair samples were treated with 500 μl VMA-T M3 buffer reagent for 1 h at 100 °C. After cooling, 10 μl VMA-T M3 extract were injected into chromatographic system. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a reversed phase column using a linear gradient elution with two solvents: 5 mM ammonium formate pH 3.0 (solvent A) and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile (solvent B). The flow rate was kept constant at 0.4 ml/min during the analysis. The separated analytes were detected with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode via positive electrospray ionization. Linear calibration curves were obtained for 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide with correlation coefficients (r(2)) of 0.99 and a limit of quantification of 0.25 pg/mg hair. Analytical recovery was between 79.6% and 100.7% and intra- and inter-assay imprecision and inaccuracy were always lower than 15%. Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of 20 different hair samples of cannabis consumers disclosed the presence of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide in the range of 0.5-8.6 pg/mg hair. These data provided a good start to consider 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide as alternative hair biomarker of cannabis consumption.

  18. Determination of main tetrahydrocannabinoids by GC-MS: impact of protein precipitation by acetonitrile on solid phase extraction of cannabinoids from human serum.

    PubMed

    Hidvégi, E; Somogyi, G P

    2014-06-01

    The analysis of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and its main metabolites [11-hydroxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta9-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol] in serum is a routine assay in forensic toxicology in the case of drivers influenced by Cannabis abuse and in other cases. Analysis of the specimen may involve protein precipitation, although there are authors who do not use this step. In this study we investigated the effect of acetonitrile as protein precipitant added to the serum on the absolute extraction recoveries of the analytes. This is very important not only from a forensic point of view, but also from the aspect of impact of delta9-THC therapy. Our results showed that in the case of spiked serum (2 ml), 80-87% extraction recovery can be achieved if 4 ml of acetonitrile is added before solid phase extraction. The second best result could be reached if no acetonitrile was added (64-73%). However, in the case of physiological sera of Cannabis consumers, no precipitation may be more advantageous in some cases. Matrix effects, which were studied by comparing the detectability and relative intensities of matrix peaks within the corresponding time windows of the analytes, were less influenced if the extraction was achieved with or without acetonitrile.

  19. Postmortem redistribution of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH)

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Michael G.; Schwope, David M.; Stoppacher, Robert; Gillen, Shane B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Postmortem redistribution (PMR), a well-described phenomenon in forensic toxicology for certain drugs, can result in increased central blood concentrations relative to peripheral blood concentrations. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component in cannabis or marijuana, is the illicit substance most commonly implicated in driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) cases and fatally-injured drivers. No investigation of PMR of THC in human blood has been reported to date. Methods Matched heart and iliac postmortem blood specimens were collected from 19 medical examiner cases (16 Males, 3 Females) with positive cannabinoid urine immunoassay screens. THC, its equipotent metabolite 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and non-psychoactive metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with cryofocusing, with 0.5 ng/mL limits of quantification (LOQ) for all analytes. Results 10 cases had quantifiable THC and 11-OH-THC; THCCOOH was present in all 19. Median (range) heart:iliac blood ratios were 1.5 for THC (range: 0.3–3.1); 1.6 for 11-OH-THC (range: 0.3–2.7); and 1.8 for THCCOOH (range: 0.5–3.0). Discussion Cannabinoids, in general, exhibited a mean and median central: peripheral (C: P) concentration ratio of less than 2 following death. A trend was observed for greater PMR with increasing postmortem interval between death and sampling. To our knowledge, these are the first data on THC PMR in humans, providing important scientific data to aid in the interpretation of postmortem cannabinoid concentrations in medico-legal investigations. PMID:21764230

  20. Blood levels do not predict behavioral or physiological effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in rhesus monkeys with different patterns of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Brett C.; Hruba, Lenka; Zaki, Armia; Javors, Martin; McMahon, Lance R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent changes in the legality of cannabis have prompted evaluation of whether blood levels of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or its metabolites could be used to substantiate impairment, particularly related to behavioral tasks such as driving. However, because marked tolerance develops to behavioral effects of THC, the applicability of a particular threshold of blood THC as an index of impairment in people with different patterns of use remains unclear. Studies relevant to this issue are difficult to accomplish in humans, as prior drug exposure is difficult to control. Methods Here, effects of THC to decrease rectal temperature and operant response rate compared to levels of THC and its metabolites were studied in blood in two groups of monkeys: one received intermittent treatment with THC (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) and another received chronic THC (1 mg/kg/12 h s.c.) for several years. Results In monkeys with intermittent THC exposure, a single dose of THC (3.2 mg/kg s.c.) decreased rectal temperature and response rate. The same dose did not affect response rate or rectal temperature in chronically exposed monkeys, indicative of greater tolerance. In both groups, blood levels of THC peaked 20–60 min post-injection and had a similar half life of elimination, indicating no tolerance to the pharmacokinetics of THC. Notably, in both groups, the behavioral effects of THC were not apparent when blood levels were maximal (20-min post-administration). Conclusion These data indicate that thresholds for blood levels of THC do not provide a consistent index of behavioral impairment across individuals with different patterns of THC exposure. PMID:24703610

  1. Modulation of Gut-Specific Mechanisms by Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration in Male Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus: A Systems Biology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Angela M.; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter J.; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; McGoey, Robin R.; Auten, Matthew W.; LaMotte, Lynn; Chandra, Lawrance C.; Birke, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is an important site for HIV replication and inflammation that can impact disease progression. We used a systems approach to examine the duodenal immune environment in 4- to 6-year-old male rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVMAC251 after 17 months of chronic THC administration (0.18–0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily). Duodenal tissue samples excised from chronic THC- (N=4) and vehicle (VEH)-treated (N=4) subjects at ∼5 months postinoculation showed lower viral load, increased duodenal integrin beta 7+(β7) CD4+ and CD8+ central memory T cells, and a significant preferential increase in Th2 cytokine expression. Gene array analysis identified six genes that were differentially expressed in intestinal samples of the THC/SIV animals when compared to those differentially expressed between VEH/SIV and uninfected controls. These genes were identified as having significant participation in (1) apoptosis, (2) cell survival, proliferation, and morphogenesis, and (3) energy and substrate metabolic processes. Additional analysis comparing the duodenal gene expression in THC/SIV vs. VEH/SIV animals identified 93 differentially expressed genes that participate in processes involved in muscle contraction, protein folding, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Immunohistochemical staining showed attenuated apoptosis in epithelial crypt cells of THC/SIV subjects. Our results indicate that chronic THC administration modulated duodenal T cell populations, favored a pro-Th2 cytokine balance, and decreased intestinal apoptosis. These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation. PMID:24400995

  2. Dissociable Effects of the Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and CP55940 on Pain-Stimulated Versus Pain-Depressed Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwilasz, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists produce reliable antinociception in most preclinical pain assays but have inconsistent analgesic efficacy in humans. This disparity suggests that conventional preclinical assays of nociception are not sufficient for the prediction of cannabinoid effects related to clinical analgesia. To extend the range of preclinical cannabinoid assessment, this study compared the effects of the marijuana constituent and low-efficacy cannabinoid agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the high-efficacy synthetic cannabinoid agonist 3-(2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl)-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol (CP55940) in assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid (1.8% in 1 ml/kg) stimulated a stretching response or depressed intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in separate groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats. THC (0.1–10 mg/kg) and CP55940 (0.0032–0.32 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked acid- stimulated stretching but only exacerbated acid-induced depression of ICSS at doses that also decreased control ICSS in the absence of a noxious stimulus. Repeated THC produced tolerance to sedative rate-decreasing effects of THC on control ICSS in the absence of the noxious stimulus but failed to unmask antinociception in the presence of the noxious stimulus. THC and CP55940 also failed to block pain-related depression of feeding in rats, although THC did attenuate satiation-related depression of feeding. In contrast to the effects of the cannabinoid agonists, the clinically effective analgesic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen (1 mg/kg) blocked acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of both ICSS and feeding. The poor efficacy of THC and CP55940 to block acute pain-related depression of behavior in rats agrees with the poor efficacy of cannabinoids to treat acute pain in humans. PMID:22892341

  3. A comparative study on the concentrations of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCCOOH) in head and pubic hair.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Choi, Hwakyung; Lee, Sangki; Chung, Heesun; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-10-10

    In this study, the concentrations of 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCCOOH) in pubic, axillary and beard hair were measured and the correlation between the concentrations of THCCOOH in head and pubic hair from same cannabis users were evaluated. The papers on body hair analysis for THCCOOH were rarely found although police officers submit body hair as a complimentary specimen to forensic laboratories in case cannabis users had no hair. Head, pubic, axillary, and beard hair were collected. All hair samples were cut into 0.5mm segments and decontaminated with methanol, digested with 1 mL of 1M NaOH at 85 °C for 30 min and extracted in 2 mL of n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times after adding 1 mL of 0.1N sodium acetate buffer (pH = 4.5) and 200 μL of acetic acid followed by derivatization with 50 μL of PFPA and 25 μL of PFPOH for 30 min at 70 °C. The extracts were analyzed using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry operating in negative chemical ionization mode (GC/MS/MS-NCI). We determined the concentrations of THCCOOH in both pubic and head hair. The concentrations of THCCOOH in pubic hair were higher than those in head hair. We also evaluated the concentrations of THCCOOH in body hair (pubic, axillary and beard hair) and head hair according to the positive/negative urine test results. There was no statistically significant difference in the concentrations of THCCOOH in head and body hair according to urine results.

  4. Role of the endocannabinoid system in brain functions relevant for schizophrenia: an overview of human challenge studies with cannabis or ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jansma, J Martijn; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Ramsey, Nick F

    2014-07-03

    Accumulating evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, which signifies a potential application for this system in the treatment of this disorder. However, before new research can focus on potential treatments that work by manipulating the endocannabinoid system, it needs to be elucidated how this system is involved in symptoms of schizophrenia. Here we review human studies that investigated acute effects of cannabis or ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on brain functions that are implicated in schizophrenia. Results suggest that the impact of THC administration depends on the difficulty of the task performed. Impaired performance of cognitive paradigms is reported on more challenging tasks, which is associated with both activity deficits in temporal and prefrontal areas and a failure to deactivate regions of the default mode network. Comparable reductions in prefrontal activity and impairments in deactivation of the default mode network are seen in patients during performance of cognitive paradigms. Normal performance levels after THC administration demonstrated for less demanding tasks are shown to be related to either increased neural effort in task-specific regions ('neurophysiological inefficiency'), or recruitment of alternative brain areas, which suggests a change in strategy to meet cognitive demands. Particularly a pattern of performance and brain activity corresponding with an inefficient working memory system is consistently demonstrated in patients. These similarities in brain function between intoxicated healthy volunteers and schizophrenia patients provide an argument for a role of the endocannabinoid system in symptoms of schizophrenia, and further emphasize this system as a potential novel target for treatment of these symptoms.

  5. How Cannabis Causes Paranoia: Using the Intravenous Administration of ∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to Identify Key Cognitive Mechanisms Leading to Paranoia

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel; Dunn, Graham; Murray, Robin M.; Evans, Nicole; Lister, Rachel; Antley, Angus; Slater, Mel; Godlewska, Beata; Cornish, Robert; Williams, Jonathan; Di Simplicio, Martina; Igoumenou, Artemis; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Tunbridge, Elizabeth M.; Harrison, Paul J.; Harmer, Catherine J.; Cowen, Philip; Morrison, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Paranoia is receiving increasing attention in its own right, since it is a central experience of psychotic disorders and a marker of the health of a society. Paranoia is associated with use of the most commonly taken illicit drug, cannabis. The objective was to determine whether the principal psychoactive ingredient of cannabis—∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—causes paranoia and to use the drug as a probe to identify key cognitive mechanisms underlying paranoia. A randomized, placebo-controlled, between-groups test of the effects of intravenous THC was conducted. A total of 121 individuals with paranoid ideation were randomized to receive placebo, THC, or THC preceded by a cognitive awareness condition. Paranoia was assessed extensively via a real social situation, an immersive virtual reality experiment, and standard self-report and interviewer measures. Putative causal factors were assessed. Principal components analysis was used to create a composite paranoia score and composite causal variables to be tested in a mediation analysis. THC significantly increased paranoia, negative affect (anxiety, worry, depression, negative thoughts about the self), and a range of anomalous experiences, and reduced working memory capacity. The increase in negative affect and in anomalous experiences fully accounted for the increase in paranoia. Working memory changes did not lead to paranoia. Making participants aware of the effects of THC had little impact. In this largest study of intravenous THC, it was definitively demonstrated that the drug triggers paranoid thoughts in vulnerable individuals. The most likely mechanism of action causing paranoia was the generation of negative affect and anomalous experiences. PMID:25031222

  6. Simultaneous analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair without different sample preparation and derivatization by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; In, Sangwhan; Yang, Wonkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Choi, Hwakyung; Lee, Sangki; Chung, Heesun; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-07-15

    The present study describes a gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-negative ion chemical ionization assay (GC/MS/MS-NCI) for simultaneous analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in hair. Each hair sample, of approximately 20mg, was weighed and the sample was dissolved in 1ml of 1M sodium hydroxide (30min at 85°C) in the presence of THC-d(3) and THCCOOH-d(3). For the analysis of THC, hair samples were extracted with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times; acetic acid and sodium acetate buffer were added for the analysis of THCCOOH, and hair samples were re-extracted with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times. The extracts were then derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) and pentafluoropropanol (PFPOH). This method allowed the analysis of THC and THCCOOH using the GC/MS/MS-NCI assay. This method was also fully validated and applied to hair specimens (n=54) collected from known cannabis users whose urine test results were positive. The concentrations of THC and THCCOOH in hair ranged from 7.52 to 60.41ng/mg and from 0.10 to 11.68pg/mg, respectively. In this paper, we simultaneously measured THC and THCCOOH in human hair using GC/MS/MS-NCI without requiring different sample preparation and derivatization procedures. The analytical sensitivity for THCCOOH in hair was good, while that for THC in hair needs to be improved in further study.

  7. Lack of hippocampal CB1 receptor desensitization by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in aged mice and by low doses of JZL 184.

    PubMed

    Feliszek, Monika; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Zimmer, Andreas; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-06-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors may offer new therapeutic strategies, but the efficiency of CB1 receptor agonists may be impaired by tolerance development upon prolonged administration. We compared the influence of repeated administration of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) 10 mg/kg on the motility and on basal and CB1 receptor-stimulated (35)S-GTPγS binding of adolescent and aged mice. Moreover, we determined the influence of JZL 184 (which inhibits the 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2-AG, degrading enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) on (35)S-GTPγS binding and 2-AG levels of young adult mice. Mouse motility was tested in the open field. (35)S-GTPγS binding was studied in hippocampal membranes. THC and CP 55,940 were used as cannabinoid agonists in the behavioural and biochemical studies, respectively. 2-AG levels were quantified by liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring. The THC (10 mg/kg)-induced hypomotility was stronger in untreated than in THC-pretreated adolescent mice but similar in both treatment groups of aged mice. Basal and stimulated (35)S-GTPγS binding was decreased in membranes from THC-pretreated adolescent but not affected in membranes from aged mice. Treatment of young adult mice with JZL 184 (4, 10 and 40 mg/kg) for 14 days did not affect basal binding. Stimulated binding tended to be decreased by 25 % only in mice treated with JZL 184 (40 mg/kg). Hippocampal 2-AG level was increased by JZL 184 at 40 and 10 but not affected at 4 mg/kg. In conclusion, CB1 receptor tolerance does not occur in aged mice pretreated with THC and in young adult mice treated with a low dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL 184.

  8. Sex differences in anti-allodynic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-edema effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the rat.

    PubMed

    Craft, Rebecca M; Kandasamy, Ram; Davis, Seth M

    2013-09-01

    Cannabinoid agonists such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are more potent and/or efficacious antinociceptive agents in female than male rats using acute pain models. We tested the hypothesis that THC is more effective in females than males using a model of longer-lasting, inflammatory pain. THC's anti-allodynic, anti-hyperalgesic, and anti-edema effects were examined 1, 3, and 7 days after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the hind paw. Systemically administered THC (0.32-3.2mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.], same dose each day) was significantly more effective in females than males in attenuating CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but was also more sedative in females. When administered locally into the inflamed hind paw, THC (250-500 μg intraplantar, i.pl.) did not affect locomotor activity in either sex, yet produced greater anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects in females than males. Despite THC's greater anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects in females, both i.p. and i.pl. THC reduced hind paw thickness (edema) more in males. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of i.p. THC was blocked by the CB1 receptor-selective antagonist rimonabant in both sexes. Similarly, i.pl. rimonabant antagonized i.pl. THC's effects in both sexes; in contrast, the CB2 antagonist SR144528 significantly attenuated i.pl. THC's anti-allodynic effect only in females. Intraplantar SR144528 also antagonized i.pl. THC's anti-edema effect in males. This study suggests that cannabinoids may be better at reducing edema in males while being more effective against inflammatory pain in females. Furthermore, sex differences in THC's peripheral effects against inflammatory pain may be a result of activation of both types of cannabinoid receptors in females, in contrast to predominantly CB1 receptors in males.

  9. Modulation of gut-specific mechanisms by chronic δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol administration in male rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: a systems biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina, Patricia E; Amedee, Angela M; LeCapitaine, Nicole J; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter J; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; McGoey, Robin R; Auten, Matthew W; LaMotte, Lynn; Chandra, Lawrance C; Birke, Leslie L

    2014-06-01

    Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is an important site for HIV replication and inflammation that can impact disease progression. We used a systems approach to examine the duodenal immune environment in 4- to 6-year-old male rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVMAC251 after 17 months of chronic THC administration (0.18-0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily). Duodenal tissue samples excised from chronic THC- (N=4) and vehicle (VEH)-treated (N=4) subjects at ∼5 months postinoculation showed lower viral load, increased duodenal integrin beta 7(+)(β7) CD4(+) and CD8(+) central memory T cells, and a significant preferential increase in Th2 cytokine expression. Gene array analysis identified six genes that were differentially expressed in intestinal samples of the THC/SIV animals when compared to those differentially expressed between VEH/SIV and uninfected controls. These genes were identified as having significant participation in (1) apoptosis, (2) cell survival, proliferation, and morphogenesis, and (3) energy and substrate metabolic processes. Additional analysis comparing the duodenal gene expression in THC/SIV vs. VEH/SIV animals identified 93 differentially expressed genes that participate in processes involved in muscle contraction, protein folding, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Immunohistochemical staining showed attenuated apoptosis in epithelial crypt cells of THC/SIV subjects. Our results indicate that chronic THC administration modulated duodenal T cell populations, favored a pro-Th2 cytokine balance, and decreased intestinal apoptosis. These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation.

  10. Short-term exposure and long-term consequences of neonatal exposure to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and ibuprofen in mice.

    PubMed

    Philippot, Gaëtan; Nyberg, Fred; Gordh, Torsten; Fredriksson, Anders; Viberg, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Both Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and ibuprofen have analgesic properties by interacting with the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) systems, respectively. Evaluation of these analgesics is important not only clinically, since they are commonly used during pregnancy and lactation, but also to compare them with acetaminophen, with a known interaction with both CB1R and the COX systems. Short-term exposure of neonatal rodents to acetaminophen during the first weeks of postnatal life, which is comparable with a period from the third trimester of pregnancy to the first years of postnatal life in humans, induces long-term behavioral disturbances. This period, called the brain growth spurt (BGS) and is characterized by series of rapid and fundamental changes and increased vulnerability, peaks around postnatal day (PND) 10 in mice. We therefore exposed male NMRI mice to either THC or ibuprofen on PND 10. At 2 months of age, the mice were subjected to a spontaneous behavior test, consisting of a 60min recording of the variables locomotion, rearing and total activity. Mice exposed to THC, but not ibuprofen, exhibited altered adult spontaneous behavior and habituation capability in a dose-dependent manner. This highlights the potency of THC as a developmental neurotoxicant, since a single neonatal dose of THC was enough to affect adult cognitive function. The lack of effect from ibuprofen also indicates that the previously seen developmental neurotoxicity of acetaminophen is non-COX-mediated. These results might be of importance in future research as well as in the ongoing risk/benefit assessment of THC.

  11. Chemical Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of an Ester Prodrug of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Poly (Ethylene Oxide) Matrices: Effect of Formulation Additives

    PubMed Central

    Thumma, Sridhar; Majumdar, Soumyajit; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Gul, Waseem; Repka, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to stabilize a novel hemiglutarate ester prodrug of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymeric matrices produced by hot-melt fabrication, for systemic delivery of THC through the oral transmucosal route. For this purpose, the influence of pH modifiers and antioxidants employed as stabilizing agents in these matrices was investigated. Based on the stability studies, two final formulations were made, and the stability of the active was assessed in these systems. In addition, the bioadhesive properties of PEO matrices were studied as a function of bioadhesive polymer type and concentration, contact time, drug loading and wetting time. Of all of the polymers investigated, bioadhesion was highest with Carbopol® 971p. Bioadhesion increased with bioadhesive polymer concentration and wetting time to a certain level beyond which there was no further contribution. Both the contact time and drug loading influenced the bioadhesion. Severe degradation of the prodrug was observed during storage, even at room temperature (75% at the end of 3 months). Incorporation of the stabilizing agents in the PEO matrices reduced the degradation of the prodrug considerably. Citric acid was the most effective of all of the pH modifiers studied. Among the various antioxidants utilized, degradation was observed least in presence of BHT and ascorbic acid. Only 7.6% and 8.2% of prodrug degraded in these matrices, respectively, as compared to the PEO only matrices (59.4%) at the end of 3 months at 25 °C/60% RH. The prodrug was very stable in both of the final formulations at the end of the 3 months at 40 °C/75% RH. PMID:18652884

  12. Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol during Adolescence Differentially Modulates Striatal CB1 Receptor Expression and the Acute and Chronic Effects on Learning in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Weed, Peter F; Filipeanu, Catalin M; Ketchum, Myles J; Winsauer, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic administration of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence would (1) modify any sex-specific effects of THC on learning and (2) affect the development of tolerance to THC as an adult. Male and female rats received daily injections of saline or 5.6 mg/kg of THC from postnatal day 35-75, yielding four groups (female/saline, female/THC, male/saline, and male/THC). Rats were then trained on a procedure that assayed both learning and performance behavior and administered 0.32-18 mg/kg of THC acutely as adults (experiment 1). THC produced rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in both sexes; however, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the rate-decreasing effects. Rats were then chronically administered 10 mg/kg of THC (experiment 2). Rats that received THC during adolescence developed tolerance to the rate-decreasing effects more slowly and less completely than did rats that received saline; in addition, females developed tolerance to the error-increasing effects of THC slower than males did. Western blot analysis of brain tissue indicated long-term changes in hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) levels despite levels that were indistinguishable immediately after chronic treatment during adolescence. Striatal CB1R levels were increased in adult rats that received THC during adolescence; hippocampal CB1R levels varied by sex. In summary, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the acute and chronic effects of THC, and chronic administration of THC during adolescence produced long-term changes in CB1R levels that correlated with decreased tolerance development to the rate-decreasing effects of THC.

  13. How cannabis causes paranoia: using the intravenous administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to identify key cognitive mechanisms leading to paranoia.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Daniel; Dunn, Graham; Murray, Robin M; Evans, Nicole; Lister, Rachel; Antley, Angus; Slater, Mel; Godlewska, Beata; Cornish, Robert; Williams, Jonathan; Di Simplicio, Martina; Igoumenou, Artemis; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Tunbridge, Elizabeth M; Harrison, Paul J; Harmer, Catherine J; Cowen, Philip; Morrison, Paul D

    2015-03-01

    Paranoia is receiving increasing attention in its own right, since it is a central experience of psychotic disorders and a marker of the health of a society. Paranoia is associated with use of the most commonly taken illicit drug, cannabis. The objective was to determine whether the principal psychoactive ingredient of cannabis-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-causes paranoia and to use the drug as a probe to identify key cognitive mechanisms underlying paranoia. A randomized, placebo-controlled, between-groups test of the effects of intravenous THC was conducted. A total of 121 individuals with paranoid ideation were randomized to receive placebo, THC, or THC preceded by a cognitive awareness condition. Paranoia was assessed extensively via a real social situation, an immersive virtual reality experiment, and standard self-report and interviewer measures. Putative causal factors were assessed. Principal components analysis was used to create a composite paranoia score and composite causal variables to be tested in a mediation analysis. THC significantly increased paranoia, negative affect (anxiety, worry, depression, negative thoughts about the self), and a range of anomalous experiences, and reduced working memory capacity. The increase in negative affect and in anomalous experiences fully accounted for the increase in paranoia. Working memory changes did not lead to paranoia. Making participants aware of the effects of THC had little impact. In this largest study of intravenous THC, it was definitively demonstrated that the drug triggers paranoid thoughts in vulnerable individuals. The most likely mechanism of action causing paranoia was the generation of negative affect and anomalous experiences.

  14. Development of a simple and sensitive HPLC-UV method for the simultaneous determination of cannabidiol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan C M; Sabri, Akmal; Fischer, Peter M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2015-10-10

    There has been increased interest in the medical use of cannabinoids in recent years, particularly in the predominant natural cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The aim of the current study was to develop a sensitive and reliable method for the quantification of CBD and THC in rat plasma. A combination of protein precipitation using cold acetonitrile and liquid-liquid extraction using n-hexane was utilised to extract CBD and THC from rat plasma. Samples were then evaporated and reconstituted in acetonitrile and 30 μL was injected into an HPLC system. Separation was achieved using an ACE C18-PFP 150 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 μm column at 55 °C with isocratic elution using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-water (62:38, v/v) at 1 mL/min for 20 min. Both cannabinoids, as well as the internal standard (4,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, DDT) were detected at 220 nm. Our new method showed linearity in the range of 10-10,000 ng/mL and a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 10 ng/mL for both cannabinoids, which is comparable to previously reported LC-MS/MS methods. Inter- and intra-day precision and accuracy were below 15% RSD and RE, respectively. To demonstrate the suitability of the method for in vivo studies in rats, the assay was applied to a preliminary pharmacokinetic study following IV bolus administration of 5 mg/kg CBD or THC. In conclusion, a simple, sensitive, and cost-efficient HPLC-UV method for the simultaneous determination of CBD and THC has been successfully developed, validated and applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats.

  15. Surinabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, inhibits Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced central nervous system and heart rate effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E; Roy, Christine; Ferron, Geraldine; Turpault, Sandrine; Poitiers, Franck; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Zuurman, Lineke; Erwich, Frank A S; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-01-01

    Aim Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and associated risk factors. Surinabant is a high affinity CB1 antagonist in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of inhibition by surinabant of CNS effects and heart rate induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans. Methods This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, four period six sequence crossover study. Thirty healthy young male occasional cannabis users (<1 per week) were included. A single oral dose of surinabant (5, 20 or 60 mg) or placebo was administered followed 1.5 h later by four intrapulmonary THC doses (2, 4, 6 and 6 mg) or vehicle, administered at 1 h intervals. The wash-out period was 14–21 days. Subjective and objective pharmacodynamic (PD) measurements were performed. A population PK–PD model for THC and surinabant quantified PK and PD effects. Results Surinabant 20 and 60 mg inhibited all THC-induced PD effects in a similar range for both doses with inhibition ratios ranging from 68.3% (95% CI = 32.5, 104.2; heart rate) to 91.1% (95% CI = 30.3, 151.8; body sway). IC50 ranged from 22.0 ng ml−1 [relative standard error (RSE) = 45.2%; body sway] to 58.8 ng ml−1 (RSE = 44.2%; internal perception). Surinabant 5 mg demonstrated no significant effects. Conclusions The dose-related inhibition by surinabant, without any effect of its own, suggests that this compound behaves as a CB1 receptor antagonist in humans at these concentrations. A single surinabant dose between 5 to 20 mg and above was able to antagonize THC-induced effects in humans. PMID:23278647

  16. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-Hydroxy-THC, and 11-Nor-9-carboxy-THC Plasma Pharmacokinetics during and after Continuous High-Dose Oral THC

    PubMed Central

    Schwilke, Eugene W.; Schwope, David M.; Karschner, Erin L.; Lowe, Ross H.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis and an active cannabinoid pharmacotherapy component. No plasma pharmacokinetic data after repeated oral THC administration are available. METHODS Six adult male daily cannabis smokers resided on a closed clinical research unit. Oral THC capsules (20 mg) were administered every 4–8 h in escalating total daily doses (40–120 mg) for 7 days. Free and glucuronidated plasma THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC COOH) were quantified by 2-dimensional GC-MS during and after dosing. RESULTS Free plasma THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations 19.5 h after admission (before controlled oral THC dosing) were mean 4.3 (SE 1.1), 1.3 (0.5), and 34.0 (8.4) μg/L, respectively. During oral dosing, free 11-OH-THC and THCCOOH increased steadily, whereas THC did not. Mean peak plasma free THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations were 3.8 (0.5), 3.0 (0.7), and 196.9 (39.9) μg/L, respectively, 22.5 h after the last dose. Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of 264 cannabinoid specimens yielded statistically significant increases in THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations (P < 0.001), but conjugated concentrations were underestimated owing to incomplete enzymatic hydrolysis. CONCLUSIONS Plasma THC concentrations remained >1 μg/L for at least 1 day after daily cannabis smoking and also after cessation of multiple oral THC doses. We report for the first time free plasma THC concentrations after multiple high-dose oral THC throughout the day and night, and after Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. These data will aid in the interpretation of plasma THC concentrations after multiple oral doses. PMID:19833841

  17. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol alone and in combination on damage, inflammation and in vitro motility disturbances in rat colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jamontt, JM; Molleman, A; Pertwee, RG; Parsons, ME

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cannabis is taken as self-medication by patients with inflammatory bowel disease for symptomatic relief. Cannabinoid receptor agonists decrease inflammation in animal models of colitis, but their effects on the disturbed motility is not known. (-)-Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to interact with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in behavioural studies, but it remains to be established if these cannabinoids interact in vivo in inflammatory disorders. Therefore the effects of CBD and THC alone and in combination were investigated in a model of colitis. Experimental approach: The 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis in rats was used to assess damage, inflammation (myeloperoxidase activity) and in vitro colonic motility. Sulphasalazine was used as an active control drug. Key results: Sulphasalazine, THC and CBD proved beneficial in this model of colitis with the dose–response relationship for the phytocannabinoids showing a bell-shaped pattern on the majority of parameters (optimal THC and CBD dose, 10 mg·kg−1). THC was the most effective drug. The effects of these phytocannabinoids were additive, and CBD increased some effects of an ineffective THC dose to the level of an effective one. THC alone and in combination with CBD protected cholinergic nerves whereas sulphasalazine did not. Conclusions and implications: In this model of colitis, THC and CBD not only reduced inflammation but also lowered the occurrence of functional disturbances. Moreover the combination of CBD and THC could be beneficial therapeutically, via additive or potentiating effects. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00831.x PMID:20590574

  18. Ocular hypotension, ocular toxicity, and neurotoxicity in response to marihuana extract and cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, B K; Brown, R E; Craig, C R

    1984-01-01

    Marihuana extract containing 21.3% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (100 micrograms/hr), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (20 micrograms/hr), cannabidiol (20 micrograms/hr), or the polyethylene glycol vehicle (1 microliter/hr) was delivered topically to cat eyes via osmotic minipumps over a 9-day period. Intraocular pressure differences between treated and untreated eyes of cats receiving marihuana extract remained 3-4 mmHg lower than those for vehicle controls, while differential values for the delta 9-THC-treated group remained reduced by 3-5 mmHg; data for these two groups did not differ statistically. Pressure differences between treated and untreated eyes of cats receiving cannabidiol were likewise 3-4 mmHg lower than values for controls. Ocular toxicity after delta 9-THC, consisting of conjunctival erythema and chemosis as well as corneal opacification, was quite severe. Although these changes also occurred after marihuana extract, their intensity was much reduced. In contrast, no ocular toxicity became apparent during administration of cannabidiol. While marihuana extract and delta 9-THC produced a dose-related increase in the appearance of 8-13 Hz polyspike discharges in the electrocorticograms of rats, both polyethylene glycol and cannabidiol lacked this effect. These results indicate that the ocular and central effects of marihuana extract and delta 9-THC are qualitatively similar. In addition, it appears that the ocular hypotensive effect produced by cannabidiol is relatively dissociable from both the ocular toxicity and the neurotoxicity associated with marihuana extract.

  19. Highly sensitive quantification of unconjugated 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a cannabis user's hair using micropulverized extraction.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We previously developed a simple and highly sensitive analytical method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in spiked hair using micropulverized extraction (MPE) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Using this method, we were able to quantify THC-COOH at 0.2pg/mg, which is the cut-off level recommended by the Society of Hair Testing. However, it was impossible to prove the validity of the method and the presence of THC-COOH conjugated with glucuronide in hair because we did not have authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the cut-off levels at that time. In this study, the previously developed method was verified using recently obtained hair from a cannabis user. The concentrations of THC-COOH quantified using the method were 0.36±0.01pg/mg without hydrolyzation for glucuronide and 0.49±0.05pg/mg with hydrolyzation after MPE, whereas the concentration quantified using the conventional alkaline dissolution and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionization was 0.50±0.02pg/mg. The results proved that THC-COOH could be extracted completely from authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the recommended cut-off level using MPE. In addition, MPE with and without hydrolyzation, unlike alkaline dissolution of hair, enabled the measurement of the percentage of the conjugate form in total THC-COOH. The percentage of conjugated THC-COOH in hair measured using the MPE was approximately 26%, which was greatly different from previously reported data (>75%). The discrimination between conjugated and unconjugated compounds in hair is important to understand the mechanism of drug uptakes into hair. More data obtained with our simple and highly sensitive method from the hair of cannabis users would help to understand the relationship of concentrations between THC-COOH and its conjugate in hair.

  20. Simultaneous quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol in oral fluid by microflow-liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Lee, Dayong; Lendoiro, Elena; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-07-05

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary target in oral fluid (OF) for detecting cannabis intake. However, additional biomarkers are needed to solve interpretation issues, such as the possibility of passive inhalation by identifying 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), and determining recent cannabis smoking by identifying cannabidiol (CBD) and/or cannabinol (CBN). We developed and comprehensively validated a microflow liquid chromatography (LC)-high resolution mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of THC, THCCOOH, CBD and CBN in OF collected with the Oral-Eze(®) and Quantisal™ devices. One milliliter OF-buffer solution (0.25mL OF and 0.5mL of Oral-Eze buffer, 1:3 dilution, or 0.75mL Quantisal buffer, 1:4 dilution) had proteins precipitated, and the supernatant subjected to CEREX™ Polycrom™ THC solid-phase extraction (SPE). Microflow LC reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 10mM ammonium acetate pH 6 and acetonitrile over 10min. We employed a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer, with compounds identified and quantified by targeted-MSMS experiments. The assay was linear 0.5-50ng/mL for THC, CBD and CBN, and 15-500pg/mL for THCCOOH. Intra- and inter-day and total imprecision were <10.8%CV and bias 86.5-104.9%. Extraction efficiency was 52.4-109.2%, process efficiency 12.2-88.9% and matrix effect ranged from -86 to -6.9%. All analytes were stable for 24h at 5°C on the autosampler. The method was applied to authentic OF specimens collected with Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices. This method provides a rapid simultaneous quantification of THCCOOH and THC, CBD, CBN, with good selectivity and sensitivity, providing the opportunity to improve interpretation of cannabinoid OF results by eliminating the possibility of passive inhalation and providing markers of recent cannabis smoking.

  1. THC (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol) Exerts Neuroprotective Effect in Glutamate-affected Murine Primary Mesencephalic Cultures Through Restoring Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Anti-apoptosis Involving CB1 Receptor-dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Krewenka, Christopher; Radad, Khaled; Kranner, Barbara; Huber, Alexandra; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Miller, Ingrid; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD) or related disorders, are an increasing societal and economic burden worldwide. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is discussed as a neuroprotective agent in several in vitro and in vivo models of brain injury. However, the mechanisms by which THC exhibits neuroprotective properties are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated neuroprotective mechanisms of THC in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary murine mesencephalic cultures, as a culture model for PD. Glutamate was administered for 48 h with or without concomitant THC treatment. Immunocytochemistry staining and resazurin assay were used to evaluate cell viability. Furthermore, superoxide levels, caspase-3 activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined to explore the mode of action of this compound. THC protected dopaminergic neurons and other cell types of primary dissociated cultures from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, THC significantly counteracted the glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and apoptosis. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, concentration-dependently blocked the protective effect of THC in primary mesencephalic cultures. In conclusion, THC exerts anti-apoptotic and restores mitochondrial membrane potential via a mechanism dependent on CB1 receptor. It strengthens the fact that THC has a benefit on degenerative cellular processes occurring, among others, in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases by slowing down the progression of neuronal cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Pharmacological modulation of neuropathic pain-related depression of behavior: effects of morphine, ketoprofen, bupropion and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol on formalin-induced depression of intracranial self-stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Leitl, Michael D; Negus, S Stevens

    2016-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is often associated with behavioral depression. Intraplantar formalin produces sustained, neuropathy-associated depression of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. This study evaluated pharmacological modulation of formalin-induced ICSS depression. Rats with intracranial electrodes targeting the medial forebrain bundle responded for electrical brain stimulation in an ICSS procedure. Bilateral intraplantar formalin administration depressed ICSS for 14 days. Morphine (0.32-3.2 mg/kg), ketoprofen (0.1-10 mg/kg), bupropion (3.2-32 mg/kg), and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; 0.32-3.2 mg/kg) were evaluated for their effectiveness to reverse formalin-induced depression of ICSS. Drug effects on formalin-induced mechanical allodynia were evaluated for comparison. Morphine and bupropion reversed both formalin-induced ICSS depression and mechanical allodynia, and effects on ICSS were sustained during repeated treatment. Ketoprofen failed to reverse either formalin effect. THC blocked mechanical allodynia, but decreased ICSS in control rats and exacerbated formalin-induced depression of ICSS. The failure of ketoprofen to alter formalin effects suggests that formalin effects result from neuropathy rather than inflammation. The effectiveness of morphine and bupropion to reverse formalin effects agrees with other evidence that these drugs block pain-depressed behavior in rats and relieve neuropathic pain in humans. The effects of THC suggest general behavioral suppression and do not support the use of THC to treat neuropathic pain.

  3. Ultra-sensitive measurements of 11-Nor-δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid by microflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a benchtop quadrupole/orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang; Kozak, Marta; Nimkar, Subodh

    2012-09-18

    Oral fluid has been gaining more acceptance as the alternative matrix for forensic toxicology. Currently, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is used as the primary target for detecting cannabis use in oral fluid. Meanwhile, THC carboxylic acid (THCA) in oral fluid is reported as a more reliable marker for cannabis abuse as its presence does not come from passive exposure. An analytical method for simultaneous quantitation of THC and THCA will be efficient for toxicology laboratories. THCA quantitation is challenging due to its very low concentration in oral fluid. Recently reported liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based methods achieved sufficient sensitivity but involved complex sample preparation procedures. We aimed to develop a sensitive LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantitation of THC and THCA in oral fluid with low-flow liquid chromatography and a Q Exactive mass spectrometer, using offline sample preparation of oral fluid followed by microflow LC with online sample cleanup. The total runtime of the method was 12.5 min. The method had a lower limit of quantitation of 7.5 pg/mL and was linear from 7.5 to 300 pg/mL for THCA. The intra- and interbatch precision of the method ranged from 3.3% to 9.3% for THC and THCA.

  4. Genetic moderation of the effects of cannabis: catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) affects the impact of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on working memory performance but not on the occurrence of psychotic experiences.

    PubMed

    Tunbridge, Elizabeth M; Dunn, Graham; Murray, Robin M; Evans, Nicole; Lister, Rachel; Stumpenhorst, Katharina; Harrison, Paul J; Morrison, Paul D; Freeman, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Cannabis use can induce cognitive impairments and psychotic experiences. A functional polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val(158)Met) appears to influence the immediate cognitive and psychotic effects of cannabis, or ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its primary psychoactive ingredient. This study investigated the moderation of the impact of experimentally administered THC by COMT. Cognitive performance and psychotic experiences were studied in participants without a psychiatric diagnosis, using a between-subjects design (THC vs. placebo). The effect of COMT Val(158)Met genotype on the cognitive and psychotic effects of THC, administered intravenously in a double-blind, placebo-controlled manner to 78 participants who were vulnerable to paranoia, was examined. The results showed interactive effects of genotype and drug group (THC or placebo) on working memory, assayed using the Digit Span Backwards task. Specifically, THC impaired performance in COMT Val/Val, but not Met, carriers. In contrast, the effect of THC on psychotic experiences, measured using the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) positive dimension, was unaffected by COMT genotype. This study is the largest to date examining the impact of COMT genotype on response to experimentally administered THC, and the first using a purely non-clinical cohort. The data suggest that COMT genotype moderates the cognitive, but not the psychotic, effects of acutely administered THC.

  5. On-line SPE LC-MS/MS for the quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its two major metabolites in human peripheral blood by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    König, Stefan; Aebi, Beat; Lanz, Stephan; Gasser, Martina; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A universal and robust analytical method for the determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and two of its metabolites Δ9-(11-OH)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-Δ9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in human whole blood was developed and validated for use in forensic toxicology. Protein precipitation, integrated solid phase extraction and on-line enrichment followed by high-performance liquid chromatography separation and detection with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer were combined. The linear ranges used for the three cannabinoids were from 0.5 to 20 ng/mL for THC and 11-OH-THC and from 2.5 to 100 ng/mL for THC-COOH, therefore covering the requirements for forensic use. Correlation coefficients of 0.9980 or better were achieved for all three analytes. No relevant hydrolysis was observed for THC-COOH glucuronide with this procedure--in contrast to our previous GC-MS procedure, which obviously lead to an artificial increase of the THC-COOH concentration due to the hydrolysis of the glucuronide-conjugate occurring at high pH during the phase-transfer catalyzed methylation step.

  6. Cannabinoids excite dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmentum and substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    French, E D; Dillon, K; Wu, X

    1997-02-10

    Extracellular recordings were used to determine the effects of cannabinoids on the activity of dopamine neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). Systemic administration of the natural psychoactive cannabinoid delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and the synthetic cannabimimetic aminoalkylindole WIN 55,212-2 produced dose-dependent increases in firing rate and burst firing in both neuronal populations. These effects appear to be specific as the non-psychoactive cannabidiol and the inactive enantiomer WIN 55,212-3 failed to alter either parameter of neuronal excitability. Furthermore, dopamine neurons in the VTA were more sensitive than those in the SNC to the stimulatory actions of delta 9-THC. These results may provide a mechanism by which psychoactive cannabinoids increase extracellular dopamine levels in mesolimbic and striatal tissues, and thereby contribute to the reinforcing effects of marijuana.

  7. Electroencephalographic correlates of marihuana-induced euphoria.

    PubMed

    Lukas, S E; Mendelson, J H; Benedikt, R

    1995-02-01

    The present study was conducted to determine if there is a neurophysiological correlate of marihuana-induced good effects or euphoria. Three groups of 6 male occasional marihuana smokers were prepared for electroencephalographic (EEG) recording and smoked either placebo or marihuana cigarettes containing 1.26% or 2.53% delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) in a controlled laboratory setting. Using a continuously available non-verbal joystick device and a questionnaire, subjects reported changes in their subjective mood state while EEG activity was continuously recorded. Subjects reported multiple episodes of intense good effects or euphoria during the first 15 min after marihuana. These episodes of euphoria occurred while plasma delta 9-THC levels were rapidly rising. EEG alpha power during these discrete episodes of euphoria was significantly higher suggesting that these transient EEG changes may reflect a neurophysiological correlate of the reinforcing effects of marihuana.

  8. Effects of cannabidiol on schizophrenia-like symptoms in people who use cannabis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Celia J A; Curran, H Valerie

    2008-04-01

    Cannabis contains various cannabinoids, two of which have almost opposing actions: Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) is psychotomimetic, whereas cannabidiol (CBD) has antipsychotic effects. Hair samples were analysed to examine levels of Delta9-THC and CBD in 140 individuals. Three clear groups emerged: ;THC only', ;THC+CBD' and those with no cannabinoid in hair. The THC only group showed higher levels of positive schizophrenia-like symptoms compared with the no cannabinoid and THC+CBD groups, and higher levels of delusions compared with the no cannabinoid group. This provides evidence of the divergent properties of cannabinoids and has important implications for research into the link between cannabis use and psychosis.

  9. Cannabinoid Modulation of Functional Connectivity within Regions Processing Attentional Salience

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  10. [Drug discrimination properties and cytotoxicity of the cannabinoid receptor ligands].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2012-06-01

    The worldwide distribution of smokable herbal mixtures called "Spice" that contain synthetic cannabinoids with a pharmacological activity similar to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) has been reported. The synthetic cannabinoids induce behavior and have biochemical properties similar to naturally occurring cannabinoids such as delta 9-THC. In drug discrimination procedures, animal behavior is differentially reinforced depending on the presence or absence of specific drug stimuli. This review seeks to establish an animal model to serve as a discriminative stimulus of the synthetic cannabinoids, to determine whether this discriminative stimulus is identical to that of delta 9-THC. Much data have been obtained in drug discrimination experiments with various synthetic cannabinoids. In the discriminative study, synthetic cannabinoids such as CP-55,940 and WIN-55,212-2 were substituted for delta 9-THC in rats trained to discriminate delta 9-THC from the vehicle. These discriminative effects of synthetic cannabinoids were antagonized by CB1 antagonist SR-141,716A. The discriminative effects of synthetic cannabinoids may overlap with the delta 9-THC cue mediated by CB1 receptors. In in vitro study using NG 108-15 cell lines, synthetic cannabinoids have produced strong cytotoxicities that were suppressed by pretreatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with caspase inhibitors suppressed these synthetic-cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicities in NG 108-15 cells. These findings indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards NG 108-15 cells is mediated by the CB1 receptors and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the cytotoxicities induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, synthetic cannabinoid abuse could be a health hazard for humans.

  11. Endocannabinoid signaling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachel I; Nicoll, Roger A

    2002-04-26

    The primary psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), affects the brain mainly by activating a specific receptor (CB1). CB1 is expressed at high levels in many brain regions, and several endogenous brain lipids have been identified as CB1 ligands. In contrast to classical neurotransmitters, endogenous cannabinoids can function as retrograde synaptic messengers: They are released from postsynaptic neurons and travel backward across synapses, activating CB1 on presynaptic axons and suppressing neurotransmitter release. Cannabinoids may affect memory, cognition, and pain perception by means of this cellular mechanism.

  12. Endocannabinoids regulate interneuron migration and morphogenesis by transactivating the TrkB receptor.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Paul; Dobszay, Marton B; Wang, Xinyu; Spano, Sabrina; Ledda, Fernanda; Sousa, Kyle M; Schulte, Gunnar; Ernfors, Patrik; Mackie, Ken; Paratcha, Gustavo; Hurd, Yasmin L; Harkany, Tibor

    2005-12-27

    In utero exposure to Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the active component from marijuana, induces cognitive deficits enduring into adulthood. Although changes in synaptic structure and plasticity may underlie Delta(9)-THC-induced cognitive impairments, the neuronal basis of Delta(9)-THC-related developmental deficits remains unknown. Using a Boyden chamber assay, we show that agonist stimulation of the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor (CB(1)R) on cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons induces chemotaxis that is additive with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced interneuron migration. We find that Src kinase-dependent TrkB receptor transactivation mediates endocannabinoid (eCB)-induced chemotaxis in the absence of BDNF. Simultaneously, eCBs suppress the BDNF-dependent morphogenesis of interneurons, and this suppression is abolished by Src kinase inhibition in vitro. Because sustained prenatal Delta(9)-THC stimulation of CB(1)Rs selectively increases the density of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons in the hippocampus in vivo, we conclude that prenatal CB(1)R activity governs proper interneuron placement and integration during corticogenesis. Moreover, eCBs use TrkB receptor-dependent signaling pathways to regulate subtype-selective interneuron migration and specification.

  13. Cannabinoid findings in children hair - what do they really tell us? An assessment in the light of three different analytical methods with focus on interpretation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A concentrations.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Hastedt, Martin; Jacobsen-Bauer, Andrea; Pragst, Fritz; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-05-01

    Hair analysis for drugs and drugs of abuse is increasingly applied in child protection cases. To determine the potential risk to a child living in a household where drugs are consumed, not only can the hair of the parents be analyzed but also the hair of the child. In the case of hair analysis for cannabinoids, the differentiation between external contamination and systemic uptake is particularly difficult, since the drug is quite often handled extensively prior to consumption (e.g. when preparing a joint) and smoke causes a further risk for an external contamination. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the non-psychoactive biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is a suitable marker for external contamination since it is not incorporated into the hair matrix through the bloodstream in relevant amounts. In the presented study, hair samples from 41 children, 4 teenagers, and 34 drug-consuming parents were analyzed for THCA-A, THC and cannabinol (CBN) applying methanolic extraction and a fully validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method (Method 1). For comparison, a part of the samples was also analyzed applying alkaline hydrolysis followed by liquid/liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-M)S (Method 2), or by headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) (Method 3). Furthermore, 458 seized marihuana samples and 180 seized hashish samples were analyzed for the same cannabinoids by gas-chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). In all but one of the hair samples, the concentration of THCA-A was higher than the concentration of THC and in 14 cases no THC could be detected despite the presence of THCA-A, suggesting that in almost all cases a significant external contamination had occurred. Within-family comparison showed a higher THCA-A/THC ratio in hair of children than of their consuming caregivers. Mean and median of this ratio of all

  14. On-line solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for high throughput analysis of 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María del Mar Ramírez; Wille, Sarah M R; Samyn, Nele; Wood, Michelle; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; De Boeck, Gert

    2009-07-15

    A simple, rapid and highly sensitive method for the analysis of THC-COOH in urine, using automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS/MS), is developed and fully validated according to international guidelines. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Atlantis dC(18) column with an isocratical gradient, ensuring the elution of THC-COOH within 4.1 min. The total process time was 6 min and 500 microL of sample was required. SPE using C(8) cartridges was highly effective, reproducible and led to significant decreases in the interferences present in the matrix. The method showed an excellent intra- and inter-assay precision (relative standard deviation (RSD) <7% and bias <13%) for four external quality control (QC) samples and three 'in house' QCs. Responses were linear over the investigated range (r(2)>0.99, 5-200 microg/L). Limits of quantification (LOQ) and detection (LOD) were determined to be 5 micro/L and 0.25 microg/L, respectively. Furthermore, the analyte and the processed samples were demonstrated to be stable. Moreover, no carryover was observed after the analysis of high concentrated urine samples (5000 microg/L THC-COOH)). The method was subsequently applied to authentic samples previously screened by a routine immunoassay method.

  15. Improved gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in hair using mechanical pulverization and bead-assisted liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cheong, Jae Chul; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2011-03-20

    A gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric (GC-NCI-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in human hair. After decontamination, hair samples were weighed (25mg), mechanically pulverized with a bead mill, and incubated in 0.7 mL of 1.0M sodium hydroxide at 95 °C for 30 min. Bead-assisted liquid-liquid extraction was performed with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v), a method developed in our laboratory. The extract was evaporated to dryness, derivatized with pentafluoropropanol and pentafluoropropionic anhydride, and analyzed by GC-MS/MS in the negative ion chemical ionization mode using methane as the reagent gas. The linear ranges were 0.05-10.0 pg/mg for THC-COOH with the coefficient of determination (r(2) = 0.9976). The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 1.7 and 13.8%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracies were -4.8 to 10.0% and -3.9 to 3.8%, respectively. The limit of detection and quantification were 0.015 and 0.05 pg/mg, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 79.4-87.1%. The results indicate that the proposed method is simple, rapid, accurate, and precise for determination of THC-COOH in hair. The method identified THC-COOH in hair specimens from suspected marijuana abusers.

  16. Simultaneous LC-MS/MS determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine for comparing pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Kettner, Mattias; Laschke, Matthias W; Schlote, Julia; Peters, Benjamin; Bregel, Dietmar; Menger, Michael D; Maurer, Hans H; Ewald, Andreas H; Schmidt, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    A series of new synthetic cannabinoids (SC) has been consumed without any toxicological testing. For example, pharmacokinetic data have to be collected from forensic toxicological case work and/or animal studies. To develop a corresponding model for assessing such data, samples of controlled pig studies with two selected SC (JWH-210, RCS-4) and, as reference, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) should be analyzed as well as those of human cases. Therefore, a method for determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, THC, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine samples is presented. Specimens were analyzed by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and multiple-reaction monitoring with three transitions per compound. Full validation was carried out for the pig specimens and cross-validation for the human specimens concerning precision and bias. For the pig studies, the limits of detection were between 0.05 and 0.50 ng/mL in serum and whole blood and between 0.05 and 1.0 ng/mL in urine, the lower limits of quantification between 0.25 and 1.0 ng/mL in serum and 0.50 and 2.0 ng/mL in whole blood and urine, and the intra- and interday precision values lower than 15% and bias values within ±15%. The applicability was tested with samples taken from a pharmacokinetic pilot study with pigs following intravenous administration of a mixture of 200 μg/kg body mass dose each of JWH-210, RCS-4, and THC. The cross-validation data for human serum, whole blood, and urine showed that this approach should also be suitable for human specimens, e.g., of clinical or forensic cases.

  17. Rapid and robust confirmation and quantification of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in urine by column switching LC-MS-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, Gabriele; Floris, Ivan; Piccinotti, Alberto; Tameni, Silvia; Polettini, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    A method for the rapid and robust confirmation of 11-nor-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) in urine involving basic hydrolysis with NaOH and direct injection of the hydrolysate in a column-switching LC-MS-MS system was developed and validated. THCA-d3 was used as internal standard. Detection was performed in negative-ion mode by monitoring the transitions from the [M-CO(2) ]- ion m/z 299.2→245.2 and and m/z 299.2→191.1 that were found to provide a better signal-to-noise ratio than the transition from the pseudomolecular ion at m/z 343. The high sensitivity of detection enabled the injection of a small volume (10 µl) of the NaOH hydrolysate which, together with the applied column switching system, proved to confer ruggedness to the method and to avoid the deterioration of the instrumental apparatus despite the large amount of inorganic ions in the hydrolysate. The LLOQ was established at 5 ng/ml, and the LLOD was calculated as 0.2 ng/ml (S/N =3). The method was submitted to thorough validation including evaluation of the calibration range (5-500 ng/ml), accuracy and precision, matrix effects, overall process efficiency, autosampler stability, carryover and cross-talk, and 10-times reduction of sample volume (0.1 ml). Proof of applicability was obtained by direct comparison with the reference GC-MS method in use in the lab (the R(2) between the two methods was 0.9951).

  18. Effect of cannabis on glutamate signalling in the brain: A systematic review of human and animal evidence.

    PubMed

    Colizzi, Marco; McGuire, Philip; Pertwee, Roger G; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    Use of cannabis or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol9-THC), its main psychoactive ingredient, is associated with psychotic symptoms or disorder. However, the neurochemical mechanism that may underlie this psychotomimetic effect is poorly understood. Although dopaminergic dysfunction is generally recognized as the final common pathway in psychosis, evidence of the effects of Δ9-THC or cannabis use on dopaminergic measures in the brain is equivocal. In fact, it is thought that cannabis or Δ9-THC may not act on dopamine firing directly but indirectly by altering glutamate neurotransmission. Here we systematically review all studies examining acute and chronic effects of cannabis or Δ9-THC on glutamate signalling in both animals and man. Limited research carried out in humans tends to support the evidence that chronic cannabis use reduces levels of glutamate-derived metabolites in both cortical and subcortical brain areas. Research in animals tends to consistently suggest that Δ9-THC depresses glutamate synaptic transmission via CB1 receptor activation, affecting glutamate release, inhibiting receptors and transporters function, reducing enzyme activity, and disrupting glutamate synaptic plasticity after prolonged exposure.

  19. Simultaneous Quantification of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Tetrahydrocannabinol, Cannabidiol and Cannabinol in Oral Fluid by MicroFlow-Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Lee, Dayong; Lendoiro, Elena; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary target in oral fluid (OF) for detecting cannabis intake. However, additional biomarkers are needed to solve interpretation issues, such as the possibility of passive inhalation by identifying 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), and determining recent cannabis smoking by identifying cannabidiol (CBD) and/or cannabinol (CBN). We developed and comprehensively validated a microflow liquid chromatography (LC)–high resolution mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of THC, THCCOOH, CBD and CBN in OF collected with the Oral-Eze® and Quantisal™ devices. One mL OF-buffer solution (0.25mL OF and 0.5mL of Oral-Eze buffer,1:3 dilution, or 0.75mL Quantisal buffer, 1:4 dilution) had proteins precipitated, and the supernatant subjected to CEREX™ Polycrom™ THC solid-phase extraction (SPE). Microflow LC reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 10mM ammonium acetate pH 6 and acetonitrile over 10 min. We employed a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer, with compounds identified and quantified by targeted-MSMS experiments. The assay was linear 0.5–50 ng/mL for THC, CBD and CBN, and 15–500 pg/mL for THCCOOH. Intra- and inter-day and total imprecision were <10.8%CV and bias 86.5–104.9%. Extraction efficiency was 52.4–109.2%, process efficiency 12.2– 88.9% and matrix effect ranged from −86 to −6.9%. All analytes were stable for 24h at 5°C on the autosampler. The method was applied to authentic OF specimens collected with Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices. This method provides a rapid simultaneous quantification of THCCOOH and THC, CBD, CBN, with good selectivity and sensitivity, providing the opportunity to improve interpretation of cannabinoid OF results by eliminating the possibility of passive inhalation and providing markers of recent cannabis smoking. PMID:23726246

  20. Preliminary observation with dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Neff, Guy W; O'Brien, Christopher B; Reddy, K Rajender; Bergasa, Nora V; Regev, Arie; Molina, Enrique; Amaro, Rafael; Rodriguez, Miguel J; Chase, VeEtta; Jeffers, Lennox; Schiff, Eugene

    2002-08-01

    Pruritus due to cholestatic liver disease can be particularly difficult to manage and frequently is intractable to a variety of medical therapies. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) for intractable cholestatic related pruritus (ICRP) that has failed conventional (and unconventional) remedies. Three patients were evaluated for plasmapheresis because of ICRP. All 3 patients had previously been extensively treated with standard therapies for ICRP including: diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, cholestyramine, rifampicin, phenobarbital, doxepin, naltrexone, UV therapy, and topical lotions. Even multiple courses of plasmapheresis were performed without any benefit for the intractable pruritus. All patients reported significant decreases in their quality of life, including lack of sleep, depression, inability to work, and suicidal ideations. All patients were started on 5 mg of delta-9-THC (Marinol) at bedtime. All 3 patients reported a decrease in pruritus, marked improvement in sleep, and eventually were able to return to work. Resolution of depression occurred in two of three. Side effects related to the drug include one patient experiencing a disturbance in coordination. Marinol dosage was decreased to 2.5 mg in this patient with resolution of symptoms. The duration of antipruritic effect is approximately 4-6 hrs in all three patients suggesting the need for more frequent dosing. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol may be an effective alternative in patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus.

  1. Different mechanisms for dopaminergic excitation induced by opiates and cannabinoids in the rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Melis, M; Gessa, G L; Diana, M

    2000-08-01

    1. The mechanism underlying morphine and cannabinoid-induced excitation of meso-accumbens and nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons was investigated by extracellular single unit recording techniques coupled with antidromic activation from the nucleus accumbens and striatum respectively, in unanesthetized rats. 2. The intravenous administration of cumulative doses (1-4 mg/kg) of morphine, dose-dependently increased the firing rate of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens and neostriatum, while the same doses inhibited the activity of pars reticulata neurons of the substantia nigra. Both effects were antagonized by naloxone (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) but not by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.). 3. The intravenous administration of cumulative doses (0.125-0.5 mg/kg) of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) also increased the firing rate of meso-accumbens and nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons; this effect was antagonized by SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.), but not by naloxone. 4. Furthermore, nor delta9-THC up to a dose of 1 mg/kg, maximally effective in stimulating dopamine neurons, neither SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.) at a dose able to reverse the stimulatory effect of delta9, THC on dopamine cells, did alter the activity of SNr neurons. 5. The results indicate that morphine and delta9-THC activate dopaminergic neurons through distinct receptor-mediated mechanisms; morphine may act by removing the inhibitory input from substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons (an effect mediated by mu-opioid receptors). Alternatively, the delta9-THC-induced excitation of dopaminergic neurons seems to be mediated by CB1 cannabinoid receptors, while neither mu-opioid receptors nor substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons are involved.

  2. Separate and combined effects of gabapentin and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans discriminating [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Wesley, Michael J; Kelly, Thomas H; Hays, Lon R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine a potential mechanism of action of gabapentin to manage cannabis-use disorders by determining the interoceptive effects of gabapentin in cannabis users discriminating [INCREMENT]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([INCREMENT]-THC) using a pharmacologically selective drug-discrimination procedure. Eight cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral [INCREMENT]-THC from placebo and then received gabapentin (600 and 1200 mg), [INCREMENT]-THC (5, 15, and 30 mg), and placebo alone and in combination. Self-report, task performance, and physiological measures were also collected. [INCREMENT]-THC served as a discriminative stimulus, produced positive subjective effects, elevated heart rate, and impaired psychomotor performance. Both doses of gabapentin substituted for the [INCREMENT]-THC discriminative stimulus and engendered subjective and performance-impairing effects that overlapped with those of [INCREMENT]-THC when administered alone. When administered concurrently, gabapentin shifted the discriminative-stimulus effects of [INCREMENT]-THC leftward/upward, and combinations of [INCREMENT]-THC and gabapentin generally produced larger effects on cannabinoid-sensitive outcomes relative to [INCREMENT]-THC alone. These results suggest that one mechanism by which gabapentin might facilitate cannabis abstinence is by producing effects that overlap with those of cannabinoids.

  3. Current status of cannabis treatment of multiple sclerosis with an illustrative case presentation of a patient with MS, complex vocal tics, paroxysmal dystonia, and marijuana dependence treated with dronabinol.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Rosse, Richard B; Connor, Julie M; Burket, Jessica A; Murphy, Mary E; Fox, Fiona J

    2008-05-01

    Pain, spasticity, tremor, spasms, poor sleep quality, and bladder and bowel dysfunction, among other symptoms, contribute significantly to the disability and impaired quality of life of many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Motor symptoms referable to the basal ganglia, especially paroxysmal dystonia, occur rarely and contribute to the experience of distress. A substantial percentage of patients with MS report subjective benefit from what is often illicit abuse of extracts of the Cannabis sativa plant; the main cannabinoids include delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and cannabidiol. Clinical trials of cannabis plant extracts and synthetic delta9-THC provide support for therapeutic benefit on at least some patient self-report measures. An illustrative case is presented of a 52-year-old woman with MS, paroxysmal dystonia, complex vocal tics, and marijuana dependence. The patient was started on an empirical trial of dronabinol, an encapsulated form of synthetic delta9-THC that is usually prescribed as an adjunctive medication for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. The patient reported a dramatic reduction of craving and illicit use; she did not experience the "high" on the prescribed medication. She also reported an improvement in the quality of her sleep with diminished awakenings during the night, decreased vocalizations, and the tension associated with their emission, decreased anxiety and a decreased frequency of paroxysmal dystonia.

  4. Fungal biotransformation of cannabinoids: potential for new effective drugs.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sanjai

    2009-03-01

    Phytocannabinoids from the plant Cannabis sativa induce a variety of physiological and pharmacological responses in living systems, including anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, anti-ulcer and antitumor activities. The discovery of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 led to the development of agonists and antagonists of these receptors for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Nabilone, a synthetic derivative of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), which is the main natural psychotropic constituent of C sativa, was approved by the US FDA for the treatment of nausea and as an anti-emetic for patients undergoing chemotherapy. Delta9-THC and related cannabinoids are involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways; thus, reducing or removing the psychotropic effects of these compounds would enhance their therapeutic spectra. Compound synthesis and qualitative SAR studies are time-consuming activities; however, microbes are effectively the most inventive synthetic chemists because of their metabolic plasticity. This review discusses the potential of C sativa mycoflora, which is pathogenic as well as endophytic, to remove the psychotropic effects of Delta9-THC and related cannabinoids, and describes the development of a model system for the rapid and cost-effective commercial production of cannabinoids through fermentation pathways.

  5. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research.

  6. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  7. Volga Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea     View ... appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax ... include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping ...

  8. Mutation of putative GRK phosphorylation sites in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) confers resistance to cannabinoid tolerance and hypersensitivity to cannabinoids in mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Daniel J; Davis, Brian J; Kearn, Chris S; Marcus, David; Cook, Alex J; Wager-Miller, Jim; Straiker, Alex; Myoga, Michael H; Karduck, Jeffrey; Leishman, Emma; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Bradshaw, Heather B; Selley, Dana E; Mackie, Ken

    2014-04-09

    For many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), desensitization has been proposed as a principal mechanism driving initial tolerance to agonists. GPCR desensitization typically requires phosphorylation by a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) and interaction of the phosphorylated receptor with an arrestin. In simple model systems, CB1R is desensitized by GRK phosphorylation at two serine residues (S426 and S430). However, the role of these serine residues in tolerance and dependence for cannabinoids in vivo was unclear. Therefore, we generated mice where S426 and S430 were mutated to nonphosphorylatable alanines (S426A/S430A). S426A/S430A mutant mice were more sensitive to acutely administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), have delayed tolerance to Δ(9)-THC, and showed increased dependence for Δ(9)-THC. S426A/S430A mutants also showed increased responses to elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids. CB1R desensitization in the periaqueductal gray and spinal cord following 7 d of treatment with Δ(9)-THC was absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Δ(9)-THC-induced downregulation of CB1R in the spinal cord was also absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from S426A/S430A mice showed enhanced endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and reduced agonist-mediated desensitization of DSE. These results indicate that S426 and S430 play major roles in the acute response to, tolerance to, and dependence on cannabinoids. Additionally, S426A/S430A mice are a novel model for studying pathophysiological processes thought to involve excessive endocannabinoid signaling such as drug addiction and metabolic disease. These mice also validate the approach of mutating GRK phosphorylation sites involved in desensitization as a general means to confer exaggerated signaling to GPCRs in vivo.

  9. The effects of cannabinoids on serum cortisol and prolactin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Braley, Gabriel; Pittman, Brian; Cooper, Thomas; Perry, Edward; Krystal, John; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit substances, and there is growing interest in the therapeutic applications of cannabinoids. While known to modulate neuroendocrine function, the precise acute and chronic dose-related effects of cannabinoids in humans are not well-known. Furthermore, the existing literature on the neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids is limited by small sample sizes (n=6–22), heterogeneous samples with regard to cannabis exposure (lumping users and nonusers), lack of controlling for chronic cannabis exposure, differing methodologies, and limited dose–response data. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) was hypothesized to produce dose-related increases in plasma cortisol levels and decreases in plasma prolactin levels. Furthermore, relative to controls, frequent users of cannabis were hypothesized to show altered baseline levels of these hormones and blunted Δ-9-THC-induced changes of these hormones. Materials and methods Pooled data from a series of laboratory studies with multiple doses of intravenous Δ-9-THC in healthy control subjects (n=36) and frequent users of cannabis (n=40) was examined to characterize the acute, chronic, and acute on chronic effects of cannabinoids on plasma cortisol and prolactin levels. Hormone levels were measured before (baseline) and 70 min after administration of each dose of Δ-9-THC. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models with +70 min hormonal levels as the dependant variable and baseline hormonal level as the covariate. Results At socially relevant doses, Δ-9-THC raised plasma cortisol levels in a dose-dependent manner but frequent users showed blunted increases relative to healthy controls. Frequent users also had lower baseline plasma prolactin levels relative to healthy controls. Conclusions These group differences may be related to the development of tolerance to the neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids. Alternatively, these results may reflect inherent differences

  10. Excretion of cannabinoids in urine after ingestion of cannabis seed oil.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, T; Sager, F; Brenneisen, R

    1997-09-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) quantitation of 25 cannabis sed oils determined delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations from 3 to 1500 micrograms/g oil. In a pilot study, the morning urine of six volunteers who had ingested 11 or 22 g of the oil, which contained the highest THC content (1500 micrograms/g), was collected for six days. The urine samples were screened by immunoassay, and the content of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-THC (THCCOOH) was determined by GC-MS. Urine samples were found cannabis positive for up to six days with THCCOOH-equivalent concentrations up to 243 ng/mL. by the Abuscreen OnLine immunoassay and THCCOOH contents from 5 to 431 ng/mL by the GC-MS method. All subjects reported THC-specific psychotropic effects.

  11. (+)-Cannabidiol analogues which bind cannabinoid receptors but exert peripheral activity only.

    PubMed

    Fride, Ester; Feigin, Cfir; Ponde, Datta E; Breuer, Aviva; Hanus, Lumír; Arshavsky, Nina; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2004-12-15

    Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and (-)-cannabidiol are major constituents of the Cannabis sativa plant with different pharmacological profiles: (-)-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, but not (-)-cannabidiol, activates cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and induces psychoactive and peripheral effects. We have tested a series of (+)-cannabidiol derivatives, namely, (+)-cannabidiol-DMH (DMH-1,1-dimethylheptyl-), (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH, (+)-7-OH- cannabidiol, (+)-7-COOH- cannabidiol and (+)-7-COOH-cannabidiol-DMH, for central and peripheral (intestinal, antiinflammatory and peripheral pain) effects in mice. Although all (+)-cannabidiols bind to cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, only (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH was centrally active, while all (+)-cannabidiol analogues completely arrested defecation. The effects of (+)-cannabidiol-DMH and (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH were partially a