Science.gov

Sample records for 900-mile sea voyage

  1. Voyager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of the Voyager Expanded Learning programs. Initially begun with hands-on, activity-based learning experiences centered around academic themes designed to pique children's interest and motivate them to learn, Voyager has expanded from elementary after- and summer-school programs to include K-8 programs designed for…

  2. Explaining the modern mortality decline: what can we learn from sea voyages.

    PubMed

    Haines, R; Shlomowitz, R

    1998-04-01

    During the past two decades, scholars have attempted to quanify the mortality at sea of a large number of seaborne populations. We now have estimates of death rates associated with over 13,000 voyages between 1497 and the First World War. These include voyages of Portuguese and Dutch travellers to Asian destinations; African slaves, European convicts, and free emigrants to the Americas; British convicts to Australia; British government-assisted emigrants to South Africa and Australia; and African, Indian, Chinese, and Pacific Islander indentured labourers to various destinations in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean regions. Whereas the death rate on slave voyages did not decline over time, the death rate of young adults and older children on non-slave voyages plummeted in the early-to-middle nineteenth century, preceding the modern mortality decline on land. Yet, the infant death rate of babies who embarked, or who were born at sea, although steadily declining, remained very much higher than infant mortality on land. The reduction in infant maritime mortality, which lagged well behind that of voyaging adults and children, thus mirrors the difficulty in reducing infant death rates on land. This paper surveys the recent literature on mortality at sea, drawing implications for our understanding of the modern mortality decline on land. PMID:11620153

  3. Chronicles of the Sea: The History and Literature of Man's Voyages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderer, Lawrence C.; Lacy, Richard

    In spring 1984, an interdisciplinary course on the history and literature of man's voyages and relationship with the sea was introduced at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College (JSRCC). The course was team taught from the perspectives of the social sciences and English departments, incorporating fiction and non-fiction sources related to…

  4. Captain Cook's beer: the antiscorbutic use of malt and beer in late 18th century sea voyages.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Brett J

    2003-01-01

    The custom of allowing British seamen the regular use of fermented liquor is an old one. Ale was a standard article of the sea ration as early as the fourteenth century. By the late eighteenth century, beer was considered to be at once a food (a staple beverage and essential part of the sea diet), a luxury (helping to ameliorate the hardship and irregularity of sea life) and a medicine (conducive to health at sea). In particular, beer and its precursors, wort and malt, were administered with the aim of preventing and curing scurvy. This paper examines the use of malt and beer during late eighteenth century British sea voyages, particularly their use as antiscorbutic agents, focusing on James Cook's three voyages during the period 1768-1780. Cook administered sweet wort (an infusion of malt), beer (prepared from an experimental, concentrated malt extract), and spruce beer (prepared mainly from molasses), among many other items, in his attempts to prevent and to cure scurvy. Despite the inconclusive nature of his own experiments, he reported favourably after his second voyage (1772-1775) on the use of wort as an antiscorbutic sea medicine (for which purpose it is now known to be useless). Cook thereby lent credibility to erroneous medical theories about scurvy, helping to perpetuate the use of ineffective treatments and to delay the discovery of a cure for the disorder. PMID:12810402

  5. Metagenomic sequencing reveals altered metabolic pathways in the oral microbiota of sailors during a long sea voyage

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiwei; Zhang, Ze; Liu, Cuihua; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Dianrong; Qu, Jia; An, Huaijie; Xiong, Ming; Zhu, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2015-01-01

    Seafaring is a difficult occupation, and sailors face higher health risks than individuals on land. Commensal microbiota participates in the host immune system and metabolism, reflecting the host's health condition. However, the interaction mechanisms between the microbiota and the host's health condition remain unclear. This study reports the influence of long sea voyages on human health by utilising a metagenomic analysis of variation in the microbiota of the buccal mucosa. Paired samples collected before and after a sea-voyage were analysed. After more than 120 days of ocean sailing, the oral microbial diversity of sailors was reduced by approximately 5 fold, and the levels of several pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pneumonia) increased. Moreover, 69.46% of the identified microbial sequences were unclassified microbiota. Notably, several metabolic pathways were dramatically decreased, including folate biosynthesis, carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid pathways. Clinical examination of the hosts confirmed the identified metabolic changes, as demonstrated by decreased serum levels of haemoglobin and folic acid, a decreased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, and increased levels of triglycerides, cholesterol and homocysteine, which are consistent with the observed microbial variation. Our study suggests that oral mucosal bacteria may reflect host health conditions and could provide approaches for improving the health of sailors. PMID:26154405

  6. Metagenomic sequencing reveals altered metabolic pathways in the oral microbiota of sailors during a long sea voyage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiwei; Zhang, Ze; Liu, Cuihua; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Dianrong; Qu, Jia; An, Huaijie; Xiong, Ming; Zhu, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2015-01-01

    Seafaring is a difficult occupation, and sailors face higher health risks than individuals on land. Commensal microbiota participates in the host immune system and metabolism, reflecting the host's health condition. However, the interaction mechanisms between the microbiota and the host's health condition remain unclear. This study reports the influence of long sea voyages on human health by utilising a metagenomic analysis of variation in the microbiota of the buccal mucosa. Paired samples collected before and after a sea-voyage were analysed. After more than 120 days of ocean sailing, the oral microbial diversity of sailors was reduced by approximately 5 fold, and the levels of several pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pneumonia) increased. Moreover, 69.46% of the identified microbial sequences were unclassified microbiota. Notably, several metabolic pathways were dramatically decreased, including folate biosynthesis, carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid pathways. Clinical examination of the hosts confirmed the identified metabolic changes, as demonstrated by decreased serum levels of haemoglobin and folic acid, a decreased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, and increased levels of triglycerides, cholesterol and homocysteine, which are consistent with the observed microbial variation. Our study suggests that oral mucosal bacteria may reflect host health conditions and could provide approaches for improving the health of sailors. PMID:26154405

  7. C-IMAGE Teachers at Sea Maiden Voyages: Promoting Authentic Scientific Research in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hine, A. C.; Greely, T.; Lodge, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Integrated Modeling & Analysis of Gulf Ecosystems (C-IMAGE) is one of eight consortia participating in the BP/Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. C-IMAGE is a comprehensive research consortium of 13 national and international universities tasked with evaluating the environmental impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (DWH) on coastal ecosystems, the water column and the sea floor. The associated C-IMAGE research cruises provide a unique opportunity for Florida's K12 science educators to participate in the data collection and collaboration process alongside marine scientists as a member of the scientific crew. The mission of the C-IMAGE cruises is to help to answer several fundamental questions about the DWH event and subsequent impacts on the plankton population, reef and fish communities and the microbial communities. Deep sea sediment samples, plankton and fishes collected during these expeditions are the data sources. Sampling activities include the use of the SIPPER plankton sampler, multi-core sediment system and long line surveys to assess fish health. While at sea teachers participate in the at sea research and serve as the ship to shore communicator via social media (FB, Twitter, daily blogs) and LIVE video conferencing with formal and informal classrooms. Marine scientists, post-docs and graduate students participating in the C-IMAGE cruises collaborate with the teacher on board to communicate the science, technology and life at sea experiences to educational and general audiences. Upon return to shore, teachers will translate their At Sea learning experience to understandable inquiry-based lessons about the science and technology encompassing the northern Gulf of Mexico ecology, the DWH event and subsequent impacts. Lessons developed from the cruises will inform a future series of C-IMAGE Teacher Professional Developments during Phase 2 of Outreach activities. The results from three Gulf of Mexico expeditions (Aug-Nov) will be

  8. Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A NASA News Release is presented which contains the following: (1) general release; (2) two views of Voyager 2 flight past Jupiter; (3) Voyager mission summary; (4) Voyager 1 science results; (5) Jupiter science objectives; (6) Jupiter the planet and its satellites; (7) Voyager experiments; (8) planet comparison; (9) a list of Voyager science investigators and (10) the Voyager team.

  9. Voyager backgrounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft and experiments are described. The spacecraft description includes the structure and configuration, communications systems, power supplies, computer command subsystems, and the science platform. The experiments discussed are investigations of cosmic rays, low-energy charged particles, magnetic fields, and plasma waves, along with studies in radio astronomy photopolarimetry. The tracking and data acquisition procedures for the missions are presented.

  10. NASA Facts: Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A news release on NASA's Voyager project is presented. The spacecraft, science instrumentation, experiments and a mission profile are described. A drawing identifying Voyager's major components and instrumentation was included along with diagrams showing the path of Voyager 1 (JST trajectory) past Jupiter, and the path of Voyager 2 (JXT trajectory) during its encounter with Jupiter. An exercise for student involvement was also provided.

  11. Voyager's decade of wonder

    SciTech Connect

    Mclaughlin, W.I. )

    1989-07-01

    The development and implementation of the Voyager missions are reviewed. The interplanetary missions preceding Voyager are discussed, focusing on the technological development leading up to the Voyager spacecraft. The main results from Voyager observations of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus are outlined. Also, consideration is given to the prospects for observations of Neptune.

  12. Voyager - Humanity's Farthest Journey

    NASA Video Gallery

    After 33 years, NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft are still going strong and still sending home information. This video features highlights of the Voyager journeys to the outer planets, and looks at t...

  13. Voyager - 35 Years Later

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video drops in on mission control for NASA's Voyager spacecraft asVoyager 1 sends back data from the far reaches of our solar system.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech    › Voyager's mission site

  14. Constraining back-arc basin formation in the eastern Coral Sea: preliminary results from the ECOSAT voyage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seton, M.; Williams, S.; Mortimer, N. N.; Meffre, S.; Moore, J.; Micklethwaite, S.; Zahirovic, S.

    2013-12-01

    The eastern Coral Sea region is an underexplored area at the northeastern corner of the Australian plate, where long-lived interaction between the Pacific and Australian plate boundaries has resulted in an intricate assemblage of deep oceanic basins and ridges, continental fragments and volcanic products. A paucity of marine geophysical and geological data from this complex region has resulted in the lack of a clear conceptual framework to describe its formation, ultimately affecting our understanding of the connection between the plate boundaries of the SW Pacific and SE Asia. In particular, the tectonic relationship between two back-arc basins, the Santa Cruz and d'Entrecasteaux Basins, and the South Rennell Trough, has yet to be resolved. In October-November, 2012, we collected 6,200 km of marine magnetic, 6,800 km of gravity and over 13,600 km2 of swath bathymetry data from the eastern Coral Sea onboard the RV Southern Surveyor. A complementary dredging program yielded useful samples from 14 seafloor sites. Our preliminary geochemical interpretation of the dredge samples obtained from the South Rennell Trough reveal volcanic rocks resembling MORB or BABB-type basalts, similar in composition to the recently re-analysed and dated ORSTOM dredges from the area that yielded ~28 Ma MORB-like basalts. Swath bathymetry profiles from the Santa Cruz Basin reveal that the South Rennell Trough extends into this basin, with seafloor spreading fabric being parallel to the trough. Preliminary analysis of the three full and four partial new magnetic anomaly profiles across the Santa Cruz Basin, coupled with limited existing profiles, reveals that the basin may have formed between Chrons 13-18 (~32-38 Ma), with an extinct spreading ridge along the inferred continuation of the South Rennell Trough, consistent with ORSTOM age dates. Our results suggest that the South Rennell Trough is an extinct southwestward propagating spreading ridge, which may have initiated along a pre

  15. Voyage of Discovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    These animations show NASA's Voyager spacecraft encountering Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune on their grand tour through the solar system. The artist's renderings were made based on navigationa...

  16. 46 CFR 180.10 - Applicability to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Applicability to vessels on an international voyage. 180... Applicability to vessels on an international voyage. A vessel on an international voyage subject to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, (SOLAS) must meet the requirements in subchapter...

  17. Voyager at Uranus: 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The voyager 2 spacecraft begins its initial observations of Uranus November 4, 1985, and makes its final observation February 25, 1996. The data from the infrared interfermometer spectrometer, photopolarimeters, plasma wave, plasma detecter, and ultraviolet spectrometer will be processed to add a large block of infermation to the small amount already known. The trajectory of Voyager 2 is also discussed.

  18. Voyage to Jupiter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4) "Science and Scientsts" (listing 11…

  19. Voyager at Neptune: 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Voyager mission has taken advantage of a rare planetary alignment that occurs at intervals of about 175 years and affords an extraordinary opportunity: a grand tour by a single spacecraft of the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Voyager 2 will fly past Nepture and its large moon Triton on August 24, 1989. The discovery of Neptune, along with its current history is discussed. The imaging challenges, tracking and data acquisition, and the Voyager spacecraft are explained. Data will be gathered on the ring arcs of Neptune, the atmosphere and surface of Neptune, Triton, and Nereid (the smaller moon).

  20. Voyage to Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalrymple, M.

    1985-01-01

    Preparations being made for the Voyager 2's encounter with the seventh planet, Uranus are discussed. Research activities involved with the methane in Uranus' atmosphere and its absorption of photons of sunlight are discussed.

  1. The Voyager magnetometer boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft magnetometer experiment utilizes two sensors on a deployable boom. The boom is an Astromast. The implementation of the Astromast into the Voyager design is described along with the hardware used to hold, latch, and deploy the mast and the tests to demonstrate damping, deployment, and alignments. Several problems encountered are discussed and their solutions are given. Flight deployment and preliminary alignment results are presented. Finally, the design is evaluated in retrospect.

  2. Voyages to Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Voyager mission to Saturn is explained in detail. A history of Saturn observations from ancient times to the present is given. The Voyager spacecraft and their instruments are described. An overview of planetary astronomy is presented. The text is supplemented by numerous black and white and color photographs. The Saturn satellites are discussed in detail, and preliminary pictorial maps of the satellites are given.

  3. Voyager: Neptune Encounter Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Voyager encounter data are presented in computer animation (CA) and real (R) animation. The highlights include a view of 2 full rotations of Neptune. It shows spacecraft trajectory 'diving' over Neptune and intercepting Triton's orbit, depicting radiation and occulation zones. Also shown are a renegade orbit of Triton and Voyager's encounter with Neptune's Magnetopause. A model of the spacecraft's complex maneuvers during close encounters of Neptune and Triton is presented. A view from Earth of Neptune's occulation experiment is is shown as well as a recreation of Voyager's final pass. There is detail of Voyager's Image Compensation technique which produces Voyager images. Eighteen images were produced on June 22 - 23, 1989, from 57 million miles away. A 68 day sequence which provides a stroboscopic view - colorization approximates what is seen by the human eye. Real time images recorded live from Voyager on 8/24/89 are presented. Photoclinometry produced the topography of Triton. Three images are used to create a sequence of Neptune's rings. The globe of Neptune and 2 views of the south pole are shown as well as Neptune rotating. The rotation of a scooter is frozen in images showing differential motion. There is a view of rotation of the Great Dark Spot about its own axis. Photoclinometry provides a 3-dimensional perspective using a color mosaic of Triton images. The globe is used to indicate the orientation of Neptune's crescent. The east and west plumes on Triton are shown.

  4. Voyager 2 Observes Energetic Electrons

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon ...

  5. Two Voyagers to Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    The pages which follow may be taken as a celebration of the impending encounter of Voyager 2 with Saturn and are a pointer to the richness of data likely to be gathered in the next few days and weeks. Although there may be some to whom the work of these two remarkable spacecraft will be proof of how even more remarkable would have been the Grand Tour of the Solar System planned in the 1960s but executed only in the form of the two Voyagers, to most people the encounters with Jupiter and Saturn will seem exciting enough for the time being. Yet there are Uranus and Neptune to come. This group of scientific articles includes some of the first detailed attempts to make sense of last year's Voyager 1 observations of Saturn-and Nature acknowledges its debt to Dr G. E. Hunt of University College, London for having helped to recruit these articles and to give shape to the ground they cover. The scope is necessarily restricted, for there is hardly a branch of planetary astronomy which has not been changed in some way by the data from Voyager 1-and which is not about to be changed again.

  6. NASA Facts, Voyager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This document is one of a series of publications of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on facts about the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. This NASA mission consists of two unmanned Voyager spacecrafts launched in August and September of 1977, and due to arrive at Jupiter in 1979. An account of the scientific equipment…

  7. Voyager Outreach Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) video presents a collection of the best videos that have been published of the Voyager mission. Computer animation/simulations comprise the largest portion of the video and include outer planetary magnetic fields, outer planetary lunar surfaces, and the Voyager spacecraft trajectory. Voyager visited the four outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The video contains some live shots of Jupiter (actual), the Earth's moon (from orbit), Saturn (actual), Neptune (actual) and Uranus (actual), but is mainly comprised of computer animations of these planets and their moons. Some of the individual short videos that are compiled are entitled: The Solar System; Voyage to the Outer Planets; A Tour of the Solar System; and the Neptune Encounter. Computerized simulations of Viewing Neptune from Triton, Diving over Neptune to Meet Triton, and Catching Triton in its Retrograde Orbit are included. Several animations of Neptune's atmosphere, rotation and weather features as well as significant discussion of the planet's natural satellites are also presented.

  8. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  9. Triton - Voyager's finale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of the Neptunian satellite Triton by the Voyager 2 is described with interpretations of the object's nature and composition. The orbit, seasonal cycle, and southern-hemisphere solstice are described, and the composition of the satellite is discussed. Triton's mass and radius are known, and the objects is made up of about 70 percent rock and organics and 30 percent ice by mass. Triton's interior is warm and geologically active considering its distance from the sun, and large amounts of frozen methane and nitrogen are theorized to contribute to the object's high reflectivity. Also noted in the Voyager color images are creeping ice, cryogenic lava, and dark streaks on the south polar cap from nitrogen gas leaks driven by a type of greenhouse effect. Triton represents a class of satellite that has not been observed previously: a moon-sized body in a retrograde inclined orbit from the class of objects that coalesced to form Neptune.

  10. Voyager 1 'Blue Movie'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the original Voyager 'Blue Movie' (so named because it was built from Blue filter images). It records the approach of Voyager 1 during a period of over 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storms shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  11. Aspects of Voyager photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Schafer, Francis J.; Jordan, Raymond; Howington, Annie-Elpis

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986, Voyager 2 took a series of pictures of Uranus and its satellites with the Imaging Science System (ISS) on board the spacecraft. Based on six stereo images from the ISS narrow-angle camera, a topographic map was compiled of the Southern Hemisphere of Miranda, one of Uranus' moons. Assuming a spherical figure, a 20-km surface relief is shown on the map. With three additional images from the ISS wide-angle camera, a control network of Miranda's Southern Hemisphere was established by analytical photogrammetry, producing 88 ground points for the control of multiple-model compilation on the AS-11AM analytical stereoplotter. Digital terrain data from the topographic map of Miranda have also been produced. By combining these data and the image data from the Voyager 2 mission, perspective views or even a movie of the mapped area can be made. The application of these newly developed techniques to Voyager 1 imagery, which includes a few overlapping pictures of Io and Ganymede, permits the compilation of contour maps or topographic profiles of these bodies on the analytical stereoplotters.

  12. The Voyager Interstellar Mission.

    PubMed

    Rudd, R P; Hall, J C; Spradlin, G L

    1997-01-01

    The Voyager Interstellar Mission began on January 1, 1990, with the primary objective being to characterize the interplanetary medium beyond Neptune and to search for the transition region between the interplanetary medium and the interstellar medium. At the start of this mission, the two Voyager spacecraft had already been in flight for over twelve years, having successfully returned a wealth of scientific information about the planetary systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, and the interplanetary medium between Earth and Neptune. The two spacecraft have the potential to continue returning science data until around the year 2020. With this extended operating lifetime, there is a high likelihood of one of the two spacecraft penetrating the termination shock and possibly the heliopause boundary, and entering interstellar space before that time. This paper describes the Voyager Interstellar Mission--the mission objectives, the spacecraft and science payload, the mission operations system used to support operations, and the mission operations strategy being used to maximize science data return even in the event of certain potential spacecraft subsystem failures. The implementation of automated analysis tools to offset and enable reduced flight team staffing levels is also discussed. PMID:11540770

  13. Voyager 1 examines Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the Voyager mission to Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Uranus is presented. Scientific instruments onboard the spacecraft are described as well as methods used for their calibration and evaluation during the cruise phase of the mission. Experiments to be performed cover the following areas: imaging science, radio science, cosmic rays, ultraviolet spectroscopy, photopolarimetry, planetary radio astronomy, magnetic fields, low-energy charged particles, plasma science, and infrared radiometry and spectroscopy. A list of the satellites of Jupiter and their diameters, distances, and periods is included.

  14. Voyages Home: "The Wanderer"&"The Odyssey." Thematic Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekula, Diane

    Sophie and Cody in "The Wanderer" (Sharon Creech) share the duties of recording their journey to an ancestor's birth land. The strong bond of family and accomplishments through the voyage home personified the embodiment of an adventurer. For Sophie and Cody, close family bonds were forged and washed clean by the sea. Odysseus, the protagonist in…

  15. Voyager 1: Encounter with Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the Voyager is presented along with samples of the nearly 19,000 photographs returned by Voyager 1 spacecraft at the midpoint of its 38-month mission to Jupiter and Saturn. Particular emphasis is given to color photographs of the Great Red Spot, and the surface features of the Gallilean satellites.

  16. Gigapan Voyage for Robotic Recon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Susan Y.; Moorse, Theodore Fitzgerald; Park, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Gigapan Voyage (GV) is a self-contained remotely-operable Gigapan capturing system that is currently being developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. Gigapan Voyage was primarily designed to be integrated onto Johnson Space Center s Lunar Electric Rovers (LER). While on LER, Gigapan Voyage was used by scientists and astronauts during the 2009 and 2010 Desert RATS field tests. The concept behind Gigapan Voyage is to merge all the sub-components of the commercial GigaPan system into an all-in-one system that can capture, stitch, and display Gigapans in an automated way via a simple web interface. The GV system enables NASA to quickly and easily add remote-controlled Gigapan capturing capability onto rovers with minimal integration effort. Key Words: Geology, NASA, Black Point Lava Flow, Robot, K10, LER, Gigapan Voyage, Desert RATS, Intelligent Robotics Group

  17. Amalthea. [Voyager observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager images have revealed Amalthea to be an irregular object 270 x 165 x 150 km in size. The spin period is probably synchronous with the orbital period of 11.9 hr, with the long axis pointing toward Jupiter. The satellite's surface is heavily scarred by impact craters, the largest of which has a diameter of 90 km (comparable to the mean radius of the satellite). Amalthea is very dark (reflectance about 5-6%) and very red, but isolated bright spots (reflectance up to 20%) occur. The spectrum of these bright spots is less red and may show an absorption feature near 0.6 micron. It is likely that the surface of Amalthea has been severely altered by its environment and by contamination from Io (especially by sulfur). It may, therefore, be very difficult to obtain definitive information on the composition of the intrinsic Amalthea material from remote sensing measurements.

  18. Amalthea - Voyager imaging results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Davies, M.; Morrison, D.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager images of Amalthea are presented, which reveal an irregular satellite in synchronous rotation relative to Jupiter with dimensions of 270 x 165 x 150 km. The surface appears scarred by large craters and sharp ridges to indicate a history of cosmic battering. Amalthea'a normal surface reflectance is 5-6% with a very red color and a mean opposition angle magnitude of +14. The phase coefficient between phase angles of 0.8 and 42 deg of 0.042 + or - 0.004 mag/deg indicates that the phase integral does not exceed 0.3 and the Bond Albedo is less than 0.02. Several prominent bright spots of 10-50 km across occur on local slopes and ridges, have albedos several times higher than the background, and have a greenish color where the spectrum bends down beyond 0.56 microns.

  19. Voyager photometry of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B.; Veverka, J.

    1983-01-01

    The photometric properties of Europa are derived through an analysis of 90 Voyager images with 3-143 deg phase angles in the spectral range from 0.34 to 0.58 microns. It is noted that, at small phase angles, the disk-integrated phase curve shows almost no evidence of an opposition effect. The scattering properties of Europa in general, and of the bright plain and dark mottled terrain types, cannot be represented by a lunar-like photometric law, although an equation which is a linear superposition of a lunar-like scattering law and a Lambert component provides an adequate and simple representation of scattering properties. The plains are photometrically more homogeneous than the mottled terrain, and these two terrain types exhibit an average normal reflectance of 0.71 on both leading and trailing hemispheres and of 0.60 on leading and 0.48 on trailing hemispheres, respectively.

  20. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... voyage No. 1 having the prefixed designation NSA and followed by the General Agents' abbreviated designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change with... General Agent shall affix his abbreviated designation and initial voyage numbers, as NSA-13/XYZ-1....

  1. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... voyage No. 1 having the prefixed designation NSA and followed by the General Agents' abbreviated designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change with... General Agent shall affix his abbreviated designation and initial voyage numbers, as NSA-13/XYZ-1....

  2. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... voyage No. 1 having the prefixed designation NSA and followed by the General Agents' abbreviated designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change with... General Agent shall affix his abbreviated designation and initial voyage numbers, as NSA-13/XYZ-1....

  3. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... voyage No. 1 having the prefixed designation NSA and followed by the General Agents' abbreviated designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change with... General Agent shall affix his abbreviated designation and initial voyage numbers, as NSA-13/XYZ-1....

  4. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... voyage No. 1 having the prefixed designation NSA and followed by the General Agents' abbreviated designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change with... General Agent shall affix his abbreviated designation and initial voyage numbers, as NSA-13/XYZ-1....

  5. Voyager EUV and FUV observations

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J.B.

    1984-11-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 ultraviolet spectrometers are sensitive over the wavelength range 500 to 1700 A. In the extreme ultraviolet (EUV), at wavelengths shortward of the Lyman limit (912 A), Voyager observations detected emission from three out of a sample of 11 nearly hot DA white dwarfs. These observations imply very low HI column densities in the directions of the three stars detected. In the far ultraviolet (FUV), at wavelengths between 912 and 1200 A, Voyager observations of O and B stars can be used to study interstellar reddening at the shortest wavelengths and to provide useful estimates of interstellar H2 column densities.

  6. Jupiter and the Voyager mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.

    1980-01-01

    In 1977, the United States launched two unmanned Voyager spacecraft that were to take part in an extensive reconnaissance of the outer planets over a 12-year period visiting the environs of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Their first encounter was with the complex Jupiter planetary system 400 million miles away. Sweeping by Jupiter and its five moons in 1979, the two spacecraft have sent back to Earth an enormous amount of data that will prove to be vital in understanding our solar system. Voyager 1 is scheduled to fly past Saturn on November 13 of this year; Voyager 2, in August of the following year. 

  7. Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

  8. Voyager Encounters Saturn: Scientific Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Observations generated by Voyager 1's encounter with Saturn are disclosed. Atmospheric conditions, the rings, new moons and the five inner moons are described. Titan, Hyperion and Iapetus are discussed in detail, as is Saturn's magnetosphere.

  9. The Voyager 2 Neptune encounter

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T. )

    1989-10-01

    The findings made by the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter are reviewed. Data on the bowshock, magnetic field, magnetosphere, rings, plasma sheet, aurora, moons, and dust of Neptune are discussed. Findings made concerning Triton are summarized.

  10. Voyager to the Seventh Planet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Presents recent findings obtained by the Voyager 2 mission on Uranus. Updates information on the planet's moons, rings, atmosphere, and magnetic field. Illustrations and diagrams of selected aspects of Uranus are included. (ML)

  11. Voyager Observations of the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Decker, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Voyager 2 has been observing plasma in the heliosheath since 2007. This paper presents the most recent data through 106 AU. The plasma flows at Voyager 2 have maintained a constant average speed throughout the heliosheath but have turned significantly. Flow angles are over 60 degrees in the azimuthal (RT) plane and 30 degrees in the meridional (RN) plane. Most of the plasma is moving around the side of the heliosphere. Average densities and temperatures have remained constant since an increase in 2011. This flow pattern is very different from that observed at Voyager 1 by the LECP partlcle instrument. We compare flows at Voyager 2 derived from the particle and plasma in the RT plane by the plasma and LECP instruments and find generally good agreement.

  12. Triumph of the Voyager mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    It had been a long, productive trip. Launched in 1977, the two Voyager spacecraft had visited three giant planets, a dozen major Moons, three ring systems with thousands of rings composed of a myriad of tiny Moonlets. The spacecraft had returned 5 trillion bits of data and over 100,000 photographs. The last encounter in our Solar System by Voyager 2 with Neptune was to be a spectacular finale to the 12-year drama. 

  13. NASA's Arctic Voyage 2010

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's first oceanographic research expedition left Alaska on June 15, 2010. The ICESCAPE mission will head into the Arctic to study sea ice and the changing ocean ecosystem. Listen to the scientis...

  14. Voyager encounters Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-05-01

    Scientific discoveries and observations of the November 11-13, 1980 Voyager 1 Saturn flyby and the resulting theories are presented. The basic appearance of the Saturn atmosphere is similar to that of Jupiter, but its features are made less clear by a much thicker haze layer above the visible clouds. The greatest wind speeds (more than 1600 km per hour) occur at the equator. Temperatures near the cloud tops range from -305 to -294 F, with the coolest temperature near the center of the equatorial zone. Auroral emissions were observed near the poles, and auroral-type emissions in the ultraviolet were also seen near the illuminated limbs of the planet. Radio emissions indicate that the body of the planet and its magnetosphere rotate every 10 hours 39 minutes 26 seconds. A, B, and C rings were observed to consist of hundreds of ringlets, a few of which are elliptical in shape, and a further explanation of the D, E, and F rings is given. Each of the recently discovered moons was photographed, but only S-10 and S-11 had large enough diameters in the images to permit their shapes to be determined. Data on Saturn's inner and outer moons are presented, and special attention is given to Titan. Saturn's magnetosphere extends nearly a million miles inward from the planet toward the sun, and its charged particles are dragged along by the magnetic field and circle Saturn once every 10 hours 39 minutes.

  15. Médecine des voyages

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Définir la pratique de la médecine des voyages, présenter les éléments fondamentaux d’une consultation complète préalable aux voyages à des voyageurs internationaux et aider à identifier les patients qu’il vaudrait mieux envoyer en consultation auprès de professionnels de la médecine des voyages. Sources des données Les lignes directrices et les recommandations sur la médecine des voyages et les maladies liées aux voyages publiées par les autorités sanitaires nationales et internationales ont fait l’objet d’un examen. Une recension des ouvrages connexes dans MEDLINE et EMBASE a aussi été effectuée. Message principal La médecine des voyages est une spécialité très dynamique qui se concentre sur les soins préventifs avant un voyage. Une évaluation exhaustive du risque pour chaque voyageur est essentielle pour mesurer avec exactitude les risques particuliers au voyageur, à son itinéraire et à sa destination et pour offrir des conseils sur les interventions les plus appropriées en gestion du risque afin de promouvoir la santé et prévenir les problèmes médicaux indésirables durant le voyage. Des vaccins peuvent aussi être nécessaires et doivent être personnalisés en fonction des antécédents d’immunisation du voyageur, de son itinéraire et du temps qu’il reste avant son départ. Conclusion La santé et la sécurité d’un voyageur dépendent du degré d’expertise du médecin qui offre le counseling préalable à son voyage et les vaccins, au besoin. On recommande à ceux qui donnent des conseils aux voyageurs d’être conscients de l’ampleur de cette responsabilité et de demander si possible une consultation auprès de professionnels de la médecine des voyages pour tous les voyageurs à risque élevé.

  16. Voyager at Saturn, Act II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, J. K.

    1981-11-01

    Preliminary results of the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn are discussed. Following a review of the Voyager 2 mission, noting the jamming of the scan platform carrying most of the instruments just prior to encounter, attention is given to observations of ring structures including ringlets, spokes, kinks, Cassini's division and satellite resonance effects. Changes in the atmosphere of Saturn allowing cloud structures to be observed with greater contrast and clarity than during the Voyager 1 encounter are noted, and differences between the observed meteorology on Saturn and that on Jupiter are pointed out. Observations of the Saturn magnetic field, including an internal anomaly responsible for a radio pulse and plasma and neutral hydrogen toruses within the magnetosphere are presented along with detections of electromagnetic disturbances near the ring system. Consideration is finally given to Voyager 2 images and measurements of the Saturn satellites, which revealed a dense, orange-colored atmosphere attributed to an aerosol haze around Titan, the ancient cratered surface with an enormous rift on Tethys, evidence of at least five distinct evolutionary episodes on Enceladus, and the configuration of the highly contrasting forward and rear-facing sides of Iapetus. The potential for discoveries in the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus to take place four years hence is also indicated.

  17. The Voyager Neptune travel guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlhase, Charles (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Voyager mission to the giant outer planets of our solar system is described. Scientific highlights include interplanetary cruise, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and their vast satellite and ring systems. Detailed plans are provided for the August 1989 Neptune encounter and subsequent interstellar journey to reach the heliopause. As background, the elements of an unmanned space mission are explained, with emphasis on the capabilities of the spacecraft and the scientific sensors. Other topics include the Voyager Grand Tour trajectory design, deep-space navigation, and gravity-assist concepts. The Neptune flyby is animated through the use of computer-generated, flip-page movie frames that appear in the corners of the publication. Useful historical information is also presented, including facts associated with the Voyager mission. Finally, short summaries are provided to describe the major objectives and schedules for several space missions planned for the remainder of the 20th century.

  18. 46 CFR 80.15 - Ocean voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean voyage. 80.15 Section 80.15 Shipping COAST GUARD... REGISTRY § 80.15 Ocean voyage. An ocean voyage for the purposes of this part means: A voyage on any body of water seaward of the low water mark such as an ocean or arm thereof, other major bodies of water such...

  19. 46 CFR 80.15 - Ocean voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean voyage. 80.15 Section 80.15 Shipping COAST GUARD... REGISTRY § 80.15 Ocean voyage. An ocean voyage for the purposes of this part means: A voyage on any body of water seaward of the low water mark such as an ocean or arm thereof, other major bodies of water such...

  20. 46 CFR 80.15 - Ocean voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean voyage. 80.15 Section 80.15 Shipping COAST GUARD... REGISTRY § 80.15 Ocean voyage. An ocean voyage for the purposes of this part means: A voyage on any body of water seaward of the low water mark such as an ocean or arm thereof, other major bodies of water such...

  1. 46 CFR 80.15 - Ocean voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean voyage. 80.15 Section 80.15 Shipping COAST GUARD... REGISTRY § 80.15 Ocean voyage. An ocean voyage for the purposes of this part means: A voyage on any body of water seaward of the low water mark such as an ocean or arm thereof, other major bodies of water such...

  2. 46 CFR 80.15 - Ocean voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean voyage. 80.15 Section 80.15 Shipping COAST GUARD... REGISTRY § 80.15 Ocean voyage. An ocean voyage for the purposes of this part means: A voyage on any body of water seaward of the low water mark such as an ocean or arm thereof, other major bodies of water such...

  3. Improved downlink frequency calculations for Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricardo, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager 2 and her sister Voyager 1 were launched, respectively, in August and September 1977. The object of these spacecraft was to conduct exploratory investigations of the Jupiter and Saturn planetary systems and the interplanetary medium between Earth and Saturn. In April 1978 the Voyager 2 redundant receiver and the loop capacitor in the prime spacecraft receiver failed, leaving the Voyager Project with a major problem: how to communicate with the spacecraft and get the data back.

  4. Science at Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Mary Nied

    2001-01-01

    Describes a three-week inservice teacher education program that involves two sessions of preparatory classes ashore in nautical science and oceanography, and concludes with a nine-day sea voyage. (ASK)

  5. "Voyager": An Educational Card Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Ryan

    2003-01-01

    "Voyager" is an educational card game involving scientific satellites, developed for use in schools with children aged 9 to 13 years. The idea of the game is to improve pupils' knowledge about the large number of scientific satellites there are in space in a fun way, while also practising numeracy skills. Several copies of the game were produced…

  6. Voyager to Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Voyager mission to explore planets of the outer solar system is summarized. The mission schedule and profiles for encounters with Jupiter and Saturn, and possibly with Uranus and Pluto are included along with a description of the spacecraft and its trajectories. Scientific investigations to be made and the instruments carried are also discussed.

  7. The Voyage of the MIMI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbon, Sam; Hooper, Kristina

    1986-01-01

    The Voyage of MIMI is a major educational project housed at Bank Street College (New York) which is directed toward the development of extensive television, computer software, videodisc, and print materials for use in science and mathematics education in grades 5-7. The first series has been completed, and includes a 13-part dramatic television…

  8. Voyager - a mission for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Mark

    2012-12-01

    There may be no such thing as a "job for life" these days, but NASA's Voyager mission to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond has kept hundreds of scientists busy for as much as 35 years. Mark Williamson reveals how researchers stay motivated and scientifically productive during such a long-term project.

  9. Has Voyager 1 really crossed the heliopause?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft is currently in the vicinity of the heliopause, which separates the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium. There has been a precipitous decrease in particles accelerated in the heliosphere, and a substantial increase in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The evidence is unclear, however, as to whether Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause into the local interstellar medium, or remains within the heliosheath. In this paper we propose a test that will determine whether Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause: If Voyager 1 remains in the heliosheath, the high plasma densities must be due to compressed solar wind, with the consequence that Voyager 1 will encounter another current sheet, where the polarity of the magnetic field reverses. Voyager 1 observations can be used to predict that the next current sheet crossing is likely to occur during 2015. A prediction is also provided as to what the Voyager 2 plasma detector will measure in the next few years.

  10. Voyager program. Voyager 1 encounter at Jupiter, 5 March 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Highlights of Voyager 1 activity during the observatory and far-encounter phases are summarized. Daily sequence of events for the spacecraft during the period of greatest encounter activity (Feb. 26 through Mar. 7) the near-encounter phase is given. Times shown designate the time of signal reception at Deep Space Network stations. Events listed emphasize activities pertaining to the four remote sensing instruments on the scan platforms. However, the other 7 experiments will continuously collect data throughout the encounter period.

  11. Ariel at Voyager Closest Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This picture is part of the highest-resolution Voyager 2 imaging sequence of Ariel, a moon of Uranus about 1,300 kilometers (800 miles) in diameter. The clear-filter, narrow-angle image was taken Jan. 24, 1986, from a distance of 130,000 km (80,000 mi). The complexity of Ariel's surface indicates that a variety of geologic processes have occurred. The numerous craters, for example, are indications of an old surface bombarded by meteoroids over a long period. Also conspicuous at this resolution, about 2.4 km (1.5 mi), are linear grooves (evidence of tectonic activity that has broken up the surface) and smooth patches (indicative of deposition of material). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  12. The Voyager program at APL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, Barry H.; Keath, Edwin P.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of the structure and function of the Applied Physics Laboratory's low-energy charged particle (LECP) instrument used in NASA's Voyager program. The LECP experiment was designed to measure the intensity, energy spectra, composition, angular distributions, and spatial and temporal characteristics of ions and electrons that are encountered by the spacecraft. Scientific findings of previous planetary encounters are noted, and color energy-time spectrograms that summarize the LECP results at each planet are presented and analyzed. Some details of the encounter by Voyager 2 of Neptune are provided, noting that the characteristics of the trajectory that was used provided for close observation of Triton, observations of particle structures, and exploration of Neptune's polar cap. A schematic of Neptune's magnetosphere is provided and analyzed.

  13. Voyager 1: Encounter with Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1980-01-01

    The history of the Voyager Project is reviewed as well as known facts about Saturn and its satellites. Important results of encounters with Jupiter are summarized. Scientific objectives of the flyby of Saturn involve the planet's atmosphere, rings, and magnetic field interactions with the solar wind and satellites. The search for additional satellites, and various aspects of Titan, Rhea, Dione, Mimas, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Enceladas are also of interest. The instruments developed to obtain these goals are described.

  14. Take a Voyage of Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2008-01-01

    On December 27, 1831, the "H.M.S. Beagle" left Plymouth Harbor for a round-the-world voyage. On board was would-be botanist Charles Darwin, the best tour guide biology has ever known. In 2009, we will celebrate Darwin's 200th birthday and the 150th anniversary of "The Origin of Species" publication. What better way to prepare for this celebration…

  15. Voyager 1 Image of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Voyager 1 took this picture of Ganymede from a distance of 1.6 million miles. Ganymede is Jupiter's largest satellite with a radius of approximately 2600 kilometers, about 1.5 times that of Earth's Moon. Ganymede is the seventh and largest of Jupiter's known satellites and is the third of the Galilean moons. Discovered in 1610 by Galileo and Marius, Ganymede is the largest satellite in the Solar System. It was named after the Greek mythical character, Ganymede, a handsome Trojan boy that Zeus took to Olympus to be a cupbearer for the gods (one of the only humans in Greek mythology who became immortal). Ganymede is larger than Mercury but has only half Mercury's mass. It has a bulk density of only two grams per cubic centimeter, almost half that of Earth's Moon. Ganymede is most likely composed of a mixture of rock and ice. The long white filaments resemble rays associated with impacts on the lunar surface. The various colors of different regions probably represent differing surface materials. Several dots of a single color (blue, green, and orange) on the picture are the result of markings on the camera used for pointing determinations and are not physical markings. Voyager scientists discovered that Ganymede has its own magnetosphere embedded inside Jupiter's large one. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  16. Voyager 1 View of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Voyager 1 took this picture of Callisto during Voyager's approach to Jupiter's outer large satellite in 1979. Both Galileo and Marius discovered Callisto in 1610. In Greek mythology, Callisto was a nymph loved by Zeus and thus hated by Hera. Hera turned her into a bear, which Zeus placed in the heavens as the constellation Ursa Major. Voyager was 350,000 kilometers from Callisto and took this picture that shows features about seven kilometers wide across the surface. Callisto is a little smaller than Ganymede (Callisto is about the size of Mercury) and it seems that it is composed of a mixture of ice and rock (about 40 percent ice and 60 percent rock and iron). The darker color of Callisto (about half as reflective as Ganymede but still twice as bright as the Moon) implies that the upper surface is 'dirty ice' or water- rich rock frozen on Callisto's cold surface (approximately -243 Fahrenheit degrees at the equator). Callisto's atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide. Far more craters appear on the surface of Callisto than on the surface of Ganymede, leading scientists to believe that Callisto is the oldest of the Galilean satellites. Callisto could date back as far as four billion years ago and has remained relatively unchanged in the history of space.

  17. VOYAGER 1 NEAR THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, S. N.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    Recent observations from the Voyager 1 spacecraft show that it is sampling the local interstellar medium (LISM). This is quite surprising because no realistic, steady-state model of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the LISM gives an inner heliosheath width as narrow as ∼30 AU. This includes models that assume a strong redistribution of the ion energy to the tails in the pickup ion distribution function. We show that the heliopause (HP), which separates the SW from the LISM, is not a smooth tangential discontinuity, but rather a surface subject to Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities which can result in LISM material penetration deep inside the SW. We also show that the HP flanks are always subject to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The instabilities are considerably suppressed near the HP nose by the heliospheric magnetic field in steady-state models, but reveal themselves in the presence of solar cycle effects. We argue that Voyager 1 may be in one such instability region and is therefore observing plasma densities much higher than those in the pristine SW. These results may explain the early penetration of Voyager 1 into the LISM. They also show that there is a possibility that the spacecraft may start sampling the SW again before it finally leaves the heliosphere.

  18. Voyager observations of plasma in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Voyager 2 has been observing plasma in the heliosheath since August 2007. We present the most recent data which shows that the plasma speed has remained fairly constant while the flow direction has turned toward the heliotail, with flows about 60 degrees from the radial direction. The density has increased by a factor of two over the past year, possibly due to solar cycle changes as solar maximum approaches. The heliosheath remains a highly variable environment with changes in plasma parameters occurring on time scales of tens of minutes. These Voyager 2 data will be compared with the Voyager 1 observations, which show a very different speed profile than observed at Voyager 2.

  19. 46 CFR 185.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Voyage plan. 185.503 Section 185.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels...

  20. 46 CFR 185.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Voyage plan. 185.503 Section 185.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels...

  1. 46 CFR 185.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Voyage plan. 185.503 Section 185.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels...

  2. 46 CFR 185.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Voyage plan. 185.503 Section 185.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels...

  3. 46 CFR 185.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyage plan. 185.503 Section 185.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels...

  4. The Columbian Voyages in Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Louis R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the modern historical view of the Columbian voyages that recognizes both the positive and negative consequences of the contact. Describes the voyages as a boon to scientific knowledge, a key step in the development of world trade, and an ecological disaster. Acknowledges the role of India, Islam, and Iberian Jews. (DK)

  5. Voyager Sails into Market for Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2006-01-01

    This article reports how the Voyager Universal Literacy core program, which is sailing successively into the market for reading programs, has been the target of several speculations over its secrets of success. Use of the Voyager Universal Literacy program has since spread to 1,000 districts throughout the country since its introduction into the…

  6. Voyager Spacecraft During Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Two Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977 to explore the outer planets and some of their satellites. A prototype Voyager spacecraft is shown at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, as it successfully passed vibration tests which simulated the expected launch environment. The large parabolic antenna at the top is 3.7 meters in diameter and was used at both S-band and X-band radio frequencies for communicating with Earth over the great distances from the outer planets. The spacecraft received electrical power from three nuclear power sources (lower left). The shiny cylinder on the left side under the antenna contained a folded boom, which extended after launch to hold a magnetometer instrument thirteen meters away from the body of the spacecraft. The truss-like structure on the right side is the stowed instrument boom which supported three science instruments and a scan platform. The scan platform allowed the accurate pointing of two cameras and three other science instruments at Jupiter, Saturn, the rings of Saturn, Jupiter's moons, Saturn's moons, Uranus, moons of Uranus, and Neptune.

  7. Voyager Briefing: Expectations of the Neptune Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This NASA KSC video release presents a news briefing held Aug. 4, 1989 at NASA Headquarters three weeks after Voyager 2's official "encounter" with Neptune began. The video is comprised of two slide presentations followed by a short question and answer period. The press conference is moderated by Charles Redmond, (NASA Public Affairs), includes an introduction by Dr. Geoffrey A Briggs (Dir., Solar System Exploration Div.), and features Norman R. Haynes (Voyager Project Manager, JPL) and Dr. Edward C. Stone (Voyager Project Scientist, Cal Tech). Mr. Haynes' presentation centers on Voyager's history, engineering changes, and spacecraft trajectories while Dr. Stone presents the scientific aspects of Voyager, including the 11 scientific investigations planned for the mission, instruments used, and imaging techniques.

  8. Voyager Briefing: Expectations of the Neptune Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-08-01

    This NASA KSC video release presents a news briefing held Aug. 4, 1989 at NASA Headquarters three weeks after Voyager 2's official "encounter" with Neptune began. The video is comprised of two slide presentations followed by a short question and answer period. The press conference is moderated by Charles Redmond, (NASA Public Affairs), includes an introduction by Dr. Geoffrey A Briggs (Dir., Solar System Exploration Div.), and features Norman R. Haynes (Voyager Project Manager, JPL) and Dr. Edward C. Stone (Voyager Project Scientist, Cal Tech). Mr. Haynes' presentation centers on Voyager's history, engineering changes, and spacecraft trajectories while Dr. Stone presents the scientific aspects of Voyager, including the 11 scientific investigations planned for the mission, instruments used, and imaging techniques.

  9. Voyager II Encounter with Neptune: Voyager/Neptune Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The main focus of this lecture is to discuss the relative size of the planets, the formation of the solar system, details of atmospheric motion (atmospheric dynamics), the aspects of the magnetic fields, different ring systems, and the Triton satellite. The study evolves around the planets of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Their temperature and absorption properties of the ice are discussed. Two of the chemicals being absorbed by the ice are ammonia and methane. Also discussed are the belt and zonal circulation models, jet streams, plumes and clouds, magnetic fields, planetary rings, the pressure on Triton, the atmosphere of Titan, Callisto, Aria, Ganymede, Ariel, Miranda, Io, Europa, Amalthea, Rhea, Dione, Tethys, Enceladus, Mimas, Hyperion, Oberon, Titania, and Umbriel. The lecture also contained some computerized simulation and various images from Voyager.

  10. Voyager observations of Zeta Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carone, T. E.; Polidan, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Two Voyager observations of Zeta Tau, a well-known Be/shell star of spectral type B1 IVe and vsin(i) = 220 km/s, separated by 503 days are presented and discussed. The observations show that in the spectral region shortward of Lyman-alpha, the 950-1150 A flux increased by about 40 percent, while in the region longward of 1300 A the flux increased by about 30 percent. Changes in features at 975 A and at 1020 A also appear. The observed change in the continuum flux is probably associated with a change in the effective temperature of the underlying B star, though change in the ubiquitous Fe II lines cannot be ruled out as the cause. The line variations are consistent with IUE spectra of Zeta Tau taken during the same time period.

  11. Voyager 1 Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows the portion of Jupiter around the Great Red Spot as it swirls through more than 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storm shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  12. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.

    As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  13. The Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Judson, I.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R.

    1997-07-01

    With the growing presence of multimedia-enabled systems, one will see an integration of collaborative computing concepts into the everyday environments of future scientific and technical workplaces. Desktop teleconferencing is in common use today, while more complex desktop teleconferencing technology that relies on the availability of multipoint (greater than two nodes) enabled tools is now starting to become available on PCs. A critical problem when using these collaboration tools is the inability to easily archive multistream, multipoint meetings and make the content available to others. Ideally one would like the ability to capture, record, playback, index, annotate and distribute multimedia stream data as easily as one currently handles text or still image data. While the ultimate goal is still some years away, the Argonne Voyager project is aimed at exploring and developing media server technology needed to provide a flexible virtual multipoint recording/playback capability. In this article the authors describe the motivating requirements, architecture implementation, operation, performance, and related work.

  14. Voyages Through Time: Everything Evolves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tarter, J. C.; DeVore, E. K.; O'Sullivan, K. A.; Taylor, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    Evolutionary change is a powerful framework for studying our world and our place therein. It is a recurring theme in every realm of science: over time, the universe, the planet Earth, life, and human technologies all change, albeit on vastly different scales. Evolution offers scientific explanations for the age-old question, "Where did we come from?" In addition, historical perspectives of science show how our understanding has evolved over time. The complexities of all of these systems will never reveal a "finished" story. But it is a story of epic size, capable of inspiring awe and of expanding our sense of time and place, and eminently worthy of investigating. This story is the basis of Voyages Through Time. Voyages Through Time (VTT), provides teachers with not only background science content and pedagogy, but also with materials and resources for the teaching of evolution. The six modules, Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, Hominid Evolution, and Evolution of Technology, emphasize student inquiry, and promote the nature of science, as recommended in the NSES and BSL. The modules are unified by the overarching theme of evolution and the meta questions: "What is changing?" "What is the rate of change?" and "What is the mechanism of change?" Determination of student outcomes for the project required effective collaboration of scientists, teachers, students and media specialists. The broadest curricula students outcomes are 1) an enjoyment of science, 2) an understanding of the nature of science, especially the understanding of evidence and re-evaluation, and 3) key science content. The curriculum is being developed by the SETI Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, California Academy of Sciences, and San Francisco State University, and is funded by the NSF (IMD 9730693), with support form Hewlett-Packard Company, The Foundation for Microbiology, Combined Federated Charities, NASA Astrobiology Institute, and NASA Fundamental

  15. 46 CFR 42.05-45 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false International voyage. 42.05-45 Section 42.05-45 Shipping... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-45 International voyage. (a) The term international voyage as used in this part shall have the same meaning as the term international voyage in Article...

  16. 46 CFR 42.05-45 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false International voyage. 42.05-45 Section 42.05-45 Shipping... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-45 International voyage. (a) The term international voyage as used in this part shall have the same meaning as the term international voyage in Article...

  17. 46 CFR 42.05-45 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false International voyage. 42.05-45 Section 42.05-45 Shipping... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-45 International voyage. (a) The term international voyage as used in this part shall have the same meaning as the term international voyage in Article...

  18. 46 CFR 42.05-45 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false International voyage. 42.05-45 Section 42.05-45 Shipping... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-45 International voyage. (a) The term international voyage as used in this part shall have the same meaning as the term international voyage in Article...

  19. 46 CFR 42.05-45 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false International voyage. 42.05-45 Section 42.05-45 Shipping... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-45 International voyage. (a) The term international voyage as used in this part shall have the same meaning as the term international voyage in Article...

  20. Voyager 2 to make closest encounter with Saturn in August

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The planned Voyager 2 Saturn mission is described. Information about Saturn obtained from the Voyager 1 encounter is summarized. Data on the satellites and rings of Saturn are tabulated. The video programming schedule for the Voyager 2 Saturn encounter is given. The Voyager science team is listed.

  1. Climate windows for Polynesian voyaging to New Zealand and Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Ian D; Browning, Stuart A; Anderson, Atholl J

    2014-10-14

    Debate about initial human migration across the immense area of East Polynesia has focused upon seafaring technology, both of navigation and canoe capabilities, while temporal variation in sailing conditions, notably through climate change, has received less attention. One model of Polynesian voyaging observes that as tradewind easterlies are currently dominant in the central Pacific, prehistoric colonization canoes voyaging eastward to and through central East Polynesia (CEP: Society, Tuamotu, Marquesas, Gambier, Southern Cook, and Austral Islands) and to Easter Island probably had a windward capacity. Similar arguments have been applied to voyaging from CEP to New Zealand against prevailing westerlies. An alternative view is that migration required reliable off-wind sailing routes. We investigate the marine climate and potential voyaging routes during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), A.D. 800-1300, when the initial colonization of CEP and New Zealand occurred. Paleoclimate data assimilation is used to reconstruct Pacific sea level pressure and wind field patterns at bidecadal resolution during the MCA. We argue here that changing wind field patterns associated with the MCA provided conditions in which voyaging to and from the most isolated East Polynesian islands, New Zealand, and Easter Island was readily possible by off-wind sailing. The intensification and poleward expansion of the Pacific subtropical anticyclone culminating in A.D. 1140-1260 opened an anomalous climate window for off-wind sailing routes to New Zealand from the Southern Austral Islands, the Southern Cook Islands, and Tonga/Fiji Islands. PMID:25267611

  2. Climate windows for Polynesian voyaging to New Zealand and Easter Island

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Ian D.; Browning, Stuart A.; Anderson, Atholl J.

    2014-01-01

    Debate about initial human migration across the immense area of East Polynesia has focused upon seafaring technology, both of navigation and canoe capabilities, while temporal variation in sailing conditions, notably through climate change, has received less attention. One model of Polynesian voyaging observes that as tradewind easterlies are currently dominant in the central Pacific, prehistoric colonization canoes voyaging eastward to and through central East Polynesia (CEP: Society, Tuamotu, Marquesas, Gambier, Southern Cook, and Austral Islands) and to Easter Island probably had a windward capacity. Similar arguments have been applied to voyaging from CEP to New Zealand against prevailing westerlies. An alternative view is that migration required reliable off-wind sailing routes. We investigate the marine climate and potential voyaging routes during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), A.D. 800–1300, when the initial colonization of CEP and New Zealand occurred. Paleoclimate data assimilation is used to reconstruct Pacific sea level pressure and wind field patterns at bidecadal resolution during the MCA. We argue here that changing wind field patterns associated with the MCA provided conditions in which voyaging to and from the most isolated East Polynesian islands, New Zealand, and Easter Island was readily possible by off-wind sailing. The intensification and poleward expansion of the Pacific subtropical anticyclone culminating in A.D. 1140–1260 opened an anomalous climate window for off-wind sailing routes to New Zealand from the Southern Austral Islands, the Southern Cook Islands, and Tonga/Fiji Islands. PMID:25267611

  3. Voyager: Perils of advanced planning, 1960 - 1967

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Contract proposals; phased project planning; budgetary problems; Saturn 1 B-Centaur versus Saturn V; mission guidelines and management assignments; and the origins of the Voyager project are discussed.

  4. Voyager 1 Explores the "Magnetic Highway"

    NASA Video Gallery

    This set of animations show NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft exploring a new region in our solar system called the "magnetic highway." In this region, the sun's magnetic field lines are connected to int...

  5. Voyager 2 and the Uranian rings

    SciTech Connect

    Porco, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Voyager 2 data on the Uranian disk system are presented and examined. The disk system consists of nine narrow rings, ranging in width from a few km to about 100 km. The Uranian rings are eccentric, inclined to the planet's equatorial plane, and precessing. The Uranian ring characteristics detected in the Voyager data are described and compared with those of the Saturn rings. The origin and maintenance of the rings are discussed, and the particle distribution in the ring system is studied.

  6. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  7. Voyages Through Time: Everything Evolves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jane; Tarter, Jill; Devore, Edna; Pendleton, Yvonne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Burke, Meg

    2004-06-01

    The SETI Institute, the California Academy of Sciences, NASA Ames Research Center, and San Francisco State University have developed standards-based curriculum materials for a one-year high school integrated science course centered on the unifying theme of evolution. Scientists, teachers, curriculum writers, and media specialists are currently finalizing six modules that integrate astronomical, geological, and biological sciences as well as the history of science and technology. The sequence of lessons in each module is designed to promote students' understanding and skills as defined by the National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks for Science Literacy. The modules cover: Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, Hominid Evolution, and the Evolution of Technology. The core lessons for all six modules are provided via CD-ROM, including instructional guidelines, science background information, and additional resources (print, audiovisual, software, WWW sites, and databases). These products will be published as a complete set for use as a yearlong science course and will also be available as individual modules for use in discipline-based courses. Evolutionary change is a powerful framework for studying our world and our place therein. It is a story of epic size, capable of inspiring awe and of expanding our sense of time and place. This story is the basis of Voyages Through Time.

  8. Ancient voyaging and Polynesian origins.

    PubMed

    Soares, Pedro; Rito, Teresa; Trejaut, Jean; Mormina, Maru; Hill, Catherine; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Braid, Michelle; Clarke, Douglas J; Loo, Jun-Hun; Thomson, Noel; Denham, Tim; Donohue, Mark; Macaulay, Vincent; Lin, Marie; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Richards, Martin B

    2011-02-11

    The "Polynesian motif" defines a lineage of human mtDNA that is restricted to Austronesian-speaking populations and is almost fixed in Polynesians. It is widely thought to support a rapid dispersal of maternal lineages from Taiwan ~4000 years ago (4 ka), but the chronological resolution of existing control-region data is poor, and an East Indonesian origin has also been proposed. By analyzing 157 complete mtDNA genomes, we show that the motif itself most likely originated >6 ka in the vicinity of the Bismarck Archipelago, and its immediate ancestor is >8 ka old and virtually restricted to Near Oceania. This indicates that Polynesian maternal lineages from Island Southeast Asia gained a foothold in Near Oceania much earlier than dispersal from either Taiwan or Indonesia 3-4 ka would predict. However, we find evidence in minor lineages for more recent two-way maternal gene flow between Island Southeast Asia and Near Oceania, likely reflecting movements along a "voyaging corridor" between them, as previously proposed on archaeological grounds. Small-scale mid-Holocene movements from Island Southeast Asia likely transmitted Austronesian languages to the long-established Southeast Asian colonies in the Bismarcks carrying the Polynesian motif, perhaps also providing the impetus for the expansion into Polynesia. PMID:21295281

  9. Voyager planetary radio astronomy studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of nonthermal radio emission data obtained by the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) spectrometers on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft was performed. This PRA data provided unique insights into the radio emission characteristics of the outer planets because of PRA's unique spectral response below the terrestrial ionospheric plasma frequency and its unprecedented proximity to the source. Of those results which were documented or published, this final report surveys only the highlights and cites references for more complete discussions. Unpublished results for Uranus, Neptune, and theoretical Ionian current distributions are presented at greater length. The most important conclusion to be drawn from these observations is that banded spectral emission is common to the radio emission below 1-2 MHz observed from all four Jovian planets. In every case multiple spectral features evolve on time scales of seconds to minutes. To the extent these features drift in frequency, they appear never to cross one another. The Neptunian spectral features appear to drift little or not at all, their evolution consisting principally of waxing and waning. Since other evidence strongly suggests that most or all of this radio emission is occurring near the local magnetospheric electron cyclotron frequency, this implies that this emission preferentially occurs at certain continually changing planetary radii. It remains unknown why certain radii might be favored, unless radial electric field components or other means serve to differentiate radially the magnetospheric plasma density, particle energy vectors, or particle coherence. Calculation of the spatial distribution and intensity of the Io-generated magnetospheric currents are also presented; these currents may be limited principally by wave impedance and local field strengths.

  10. Miranda as seen by Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Flying by in early 1986, Voyager 2 captured this picture of Miranda, which enabled scientists to study this moon of Uranus in much greater detail than ever before. Discovered in 1948 by Gerard Peter Kuiper, Miranda is named for the daughter of the wily Prospero in Shakespeare's 'The Tempest.' It is the eleventh known satellite of Uranus and the innermost large moon of Uranus It was necessary that Voyager 2 passed by Miranda, not for scientific reasons, but simply for the gravity assist it needed to go on to Neptune. Due to the position of the entire Solar System, Miranda provided the energy to throw Voyager 2 to Neptune. Before Voyager, Miranda was largely ignored as it is not the largest moon and did not seem to have any other outstanding qualities. Fortunately, however, Voyager passed close enough to Miranda to provide scientists with fascinating photographs that captivated astronomers. About half ice and half rock, Miranda's surface has terraced layers that indicate both older and new surfaces coexisting. Since the mixing of ancient and recent surfaces is rare in planetary geology, scientists have postulated two explanations for the different ages of the numerous valleys and cliffs on Miranda. One theory is that Miranda could have shattered as many as five times and was then reassembled. Another hypothesis is that partly melted ice upwells forced new surfaces to emerge.

  11. Voyager Interactive Web Interface to EarthScope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Meertens, C. M.; Estey, L.; Weingroff, M.; Hamburger, M. W.; Holt, W. E.; Richard, G. A.

    2004-12-01

    Visualization of data is essential in helping scientists and students develop a conceptual understanding of relationships among many complex types of data and keep track of large amounts of information. Developed initially by UNAVCO for study of global-scale geodynamic processes, the Voyager map visualization tools have evolved into interactive, web-based map utilities that can make scientific results accessible to a large number and variety of educators and students as well as the originally targeted scientists. A portal to these map tools can be found at: http://jules.unavco.org. The Voyager tools provide on-line interactive data visualization through pre-determined map regions via a simple HTML/JavaScript interface (for large numbers of students using the tools simultaneously) or through student-selectable areas using a Java interface to a Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) engine. Students can access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales for the earth and other planets of the solar system. Students can also choose from a variety of base maps (satellite mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others) and can then add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays, for example coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, and observed and model plate motion, as well as deformation velocity vectors representing a compilation of over 5000 geodetic measurements from around the world. The related educational website, "Exploring our Dynamic Planet", (http://www.dpc.ucar.edu/VoyagerJr/jvvjrtool.html) incorporates background materials and curricular activities that encourage students to explore Earth processes. One of the present curricular modules is designed for high school students or introductory-level undergraduate non-science majors. The purpose of the module is for students to examine real data to investigate how plate

  12. Voyager Plasma Observations in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Voyager spacecraft are both more than 20 AU past the termination shock. The plasma experiment on Voyager 2 measures the plasma velocity, density, and temperature. This paper discusses the recent observations. The density increased in 2011 by a factor of 2 and in 2012 has remained at the higher level. The speed had been roughly constant since the TS but recently has started to decrease; the speed profile is very different from that at Voyager 1. The plasma at V2 continues to turn tailward. The V1 and V2 data will be compared, and we will discuss the magnetic flux which is conserved at V2 but not at V1.

  13. 15 CFR 970.2502 - Post voyage report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Pre-license Exploration § 970.2502 Post voyage report. Within 30 days of the conclusion of each exploration voyage, the United...

  14. 15 CFR 970.2502 - Post voyage report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Pre-license Exploration § 970.2502 Post voyage report. Within 30 days of the conclusion of each exploration voyage, the United...

  15. 46 CFR 185.280 - Official Logbook for foreign voyages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... wages due to a seaman who dies during the voyage and the gross amount of all deductions to be made from the wages; (ii) The sale of the property of a seaman who dies during the voyage, including a...

  16. 46 CFR 185.280 - Official Logbook for foreign voyages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... wages due to a seaman who dies during the voyage and the gross amount of all deductions to be made from the wages; (ii) The sale of the property of a seaman who dies during the voyage, including a...

  17. What's new, Voyager: The discoveries continue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Ellis D.

    1995-01-01

    The twin Voyager spacecraft, launched nearly two decades ago, continue to operate and are now searching for the edge of our solar system, the heliopause. Voyager's giant-planet flybys of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have provided data that are likely to remain the definitive data set for the foreseeable future and have led to many ongoing discoveries. As the spacecraft move toward the heliopause, they are also providing data on the structure of the heliosphere. This article discusses the discoveries resulting from the flyby and heliosphere data that have been made within the past five years.

  18. Voyager 1 May Have Crossed Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA's intrepid Voyager 1, launched in 1977, may have recently become the first spacecraft to at least temporarily cross the termination shock of the solar system and enter into the heliosheath. Or maybe not. Different teams of scientists recently published conflicting papers about whether the spacecraft has entered this realm. Either way, the scientists agree that Voyager 1 is crossing through unexplored territory and likely will become the first human'made object to cross the termination shock and enter the heliosheath on its way toward the heliopause and interstellar space.

  19. 46 CFR 46.05-20 - Great Lakes voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Great Lakes voyage. 46.05-20 Section 46.05-20 Shipping... VESSELS Definitions Used in This Part § 46.05-20 Great Lakes voyage. A Great Lakes voyage is any voyage from a United States port or place on the Great Lakes to another United States port or place on...

  20. 46 CFR 46.05-20 - Great Lakes voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Great Lakes voyage. 46.05-20 Section 46.05-20 Shipping... VESSELS Definitions Used in This Part § 46.05-20 Great Lakes voyage. A Great Lakes voyage is any voyage from a United States port or place on the Great Lakes to another United States port or place on...

  1. 46 CFR 46.05-10 - Foreign voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foreign voyage. 46.05-10 Section 46.05-10 Shipping COAST... VESSELS Definitions Used in This Part § 46.05-10 Foreign voyage. (a) A foreign voyage for the purpose of... jurisdiction of the United States and a port of a foreign country, its colonies, territories, or...

  2. 46 CFR 175.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 175.120 Section 175... 100 GROSS TONS) GENERAL PROVISIONS § 175.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with...

  3. 46 CFR 175.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 175.120 Section 175... 100 GROSS TONS) GENERAL PROVISIONS § 175.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with...

  4. 46 CFR 175.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 175.120 Section 175... 100 GROSS TONS) GENERAL PROVISIONS § 175.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with...

  5. 46 CFR 188.10-35 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false International voyage. 188.10-35 Section 188.10-35... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-35 International voyage. (a) This section describes those voyages which are considered to be “international voyages” for the purposes of...

  6. 46 CFR 175.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 175.120 Section 175... 100 GROSS TONS) GENERAL PROVISIONS § 175.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with...

  7. 46 CFR 188.10-35 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false International voyage. 188.10-35 Section 188.10-35... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-35 International voyage. (a) This section describes those voyages which are considered to be “international voyages” for the purposes of...

  8. 46 CFR 188.10-35 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false International voyage. 188.10-35 Section 188.10-35... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-35 International voyage. (a) This section describes those voyages which are considered to be “international voyages” for the purposes of...

  9. 46 CFR 114.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 114.120 Section 114... PROVISIONS § 114.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with the applicable requirements of SOLAS...

  10. 46 CFR 114.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 114.120 Section 114... PROVISIONS § 114.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with the applicable requirements of SOLAS...

  11. 46 CFR 188.10-35 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false International voyage. 188.10-35 Section 188.10-35... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-35 International voyage. (a) This section describes those voyages which are considered to be “international voyages” for the purposes of...

  12. 46 CFR 175.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 175.120 Section 175... 100 GROSS TONS) GENERAL PROVISIONS § 175.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with...

  13. 46 CFR 188.10-35 - International voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false International voyage. 188.10-35 Section 188.10-35... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-35 International voyage. (a) This section describes those voyages which are considered to be “international voyages” for the purposes of...

  14. 46 CFR 114.120 - Vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vessels on an international voyage. 114.120 Section 114... PROVISIONS § 114.120 Vessels on an international voyage. A mechanically propelled vessel that carries more than 12 passengers on an international voyage must comply with the applicable requirements of SOLAS...

  15. Enhancing Resilience in Youth through a 10-Day Developmental Voyage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayhurst, Jill; Hunter, John A.; Kafka, Sarah; Boyes, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the potential for resilience to be enhanced in a group of youth participating in a developmental voyage, and to identify the factors that contribute to increased resilience following the voyage. Two studies are reported. Study 1 revealed that voyage participants experienced increased resilience over the course…

  16. 15 CFR 970.2502 - Post voyage report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Post voyage report. 970.2502 Section 970.2502 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued....2502 Post voyage report. Within 30 days of the conclusion of each exploration voyage, the United...

  17. Voyager Reading Programs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Voyager Passport"[TM] is a supplemental reading intervention system for students in grades K-5. "Voyager Passport Reading Journeys"[TM] is a reading intervention program designed for adolescents who struggle with reading. The "Voyager Universal Literacy System"[R] is a K-3 reading program that includes a core reading curriculum; a progress…

  18. Data Announcement Bulletin: Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Jupiter Encounter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Available data on imaging, infrared spectroscopy and radiometry, triaxial fluxgate magnetometers, the multifilter photopolarimeter, planetary radio astronomy, and radio science is described. The Voyager experiments are listed, and it is indicated on which experiments data is available.

  19. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Preparations...

  20. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Preparations...

  1. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Preparations...

  2. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Preparations...

  3. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Preparations...

  4. The Voyager flights to Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The results of the mini-Grand Tour to Jupiter and Saturn by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are highlighted. Features of the spacecraft are depicted including the 11 instruments designed to probe the planets and their magnetic environments, the rings of Saturn, the fleets of satellites escorting the planets, and the interplanetary medium. Major scientific discoveries relating to these phenomena are summarized.

  5. Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.

    1990-01-01

    The results of Voyager 2 observations of Neptune are reviewed. Observations of Neptune's Great Dark Spot, rotation atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and satellites are discussed. Also, observations of Triton are considered, noting the presence of geyser activity on the satellite. Several photographs of features on both Neptune and Triton are presented.

  6. The Second Voyage of the Mimi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank Street Coll. of Education, New York, NY.

    This book includes 12 units that have been adapted from the television series "Voyage of the Mimi." Each unit includes the episode, an activity, and an expedition. The episodes introduce and accompany each episode of the television series. The activity is an extension of that episode which can be done in the classroom. Mapping skills, foreign…

  7. The Hemispheric Roots of the Columbian Voyages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Lynda N.

    1991-01-01

    Urges that the search for origins of European exploration extend to Africa and East Asia and their international trade. Cites contributions of India and the Arabs, Chinese, and Malaysians. Emphasizes the importance of mathematics, navigation, and sailing technology. Argues that without these contributions the European voyages would not have been…

  8. Voyager electronic parts radiation program, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Martin, K. E.; Price, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft is subject to radiation from external natural space, from radioisotope thermoelectric generators and heater units, and from the internal environment where penetrating electrons generate surface ionization effects in semiconductor devices. Methods for radiation hardening and tests for radiation sensitivity are described. Results of characterization testing and sample screening of over 200 semiconductor devices in a radiation environment are summarized.

  9. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. D.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment to Jupiter has confirmed and extended to higher zenomagnetic latitudes results from the identical experiment carried by Voyager 1. The kilometric emissions discovered by Voyager 1 often extended to 1 megahertz or higher on Voyager 2 and often consisted of negatively, or less frequently, positively drifting narrowband bursts. On the basis of tentative identification of plasma wave emissions similar to those detected by Voyager 1, the plasma torus associated with Io appeared somewhat denser to Voyager 2 than it did to Voyager 1. The paper reports on quasi-periodic sinusoidal or impulsive bursts in the broadcast band range of wavelengths (800 to 1800 kHz). A Faraday effect appears at decametric frequencies, which probably results from propagation of the radiation near its sources on Jupiter. Finally, the occurrence of decametric emission in homologous arc families is discussed.

  10. 46 CFR 42.30-30 - Enclosed seas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: December 16 to March 15. Summer: March 16 to December 15. (d) Sea of Japan. This sea south of the parallel... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Zones... November 30. (c) Mediterranean. This sea is included in the Summer Zones. (1) However, for vessels of...

  11. 46 CFR 42.30-30 - Enclosed seas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: December 16 to March 15. Summer: March 16 to December 15. (d) Sea of Japan. This sea south of the parallel... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Zones... November 30. (c) Mediterranean. This sea is included in the Summer Zones. (1) However, for vessels of...

  12. 46 CFR 42.30-30 - Enclosed seas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: December 16 to March 15. Summer: March 16 to December 15. (d) Sea of Japan. This sea south of the parallel... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Zones... November 30. (c) Mediterranean. This sea is included in the Summer Zones. (1) However, for vessels of...

  13. On whether or not voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.

    2014-07-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft is currently in the vicinity of the heliopause, which separates the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium. There has been a precipitous decrease in particles accelerated in the heliosphere, and a substantial increase in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), suggesting easy escape of the former across the heliopause, and entry of the latter. The question is, has Voyager 1 actually crossed the heliopause and is it now in the interstellar medium? We contend that the evidence is inconclusive. The direction of the magnetic field observed by Voyager 1 is unchanged from the direction of the heliospheric magnetic field, and different from the expected direction of the interstellar magnetic field. However, the plasma density, which is measured from observations of plasma waves, is similar to the expected interstellar density and much larger than the solar wind plasma density observed by Voyager 2 (which has a working plasma detector) at smaller heliocentric distances than Voyager 1. In this paper, an analytic model is presented that is based upon and is consistent with all Voyager observations, and in which the higher plasma densities measured by Voyager 1 are due simply to compressed solar wind. Thus both the magnetic field and the plasma density observations are consistent with Voyager 1 still remaining well within the heliosheath. The model has a simple test: Voyager 1 should encounter a magnetic sector boundary crossing, where the behavior of particles accelerated in the heliosphere and the GCRs will be different from what Voyager 1 is now observing.

  14. Voyager 1 encounters new region of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    Voyager 1, which left Earth in 1977 and is now about 10 billion miles away, has entered a region of space with strange anomalies, according to project scientist Ed Stone, former director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The spacecraft has encountered magnetic potholes and bumps-areas where the magnetic field of the heliosheath either nearly vanishes or doubles, respectively. It also has encountered `anomalous cosmic rays' that are less energetic, and thus less dangerous, than galactic cosmic rays. In addition, the solar wind in the heliosheath has been slower than scientists had expected, only about 54,700 kilometers per hour compared with the predicted 322,000-483,000 kilometers per hour. Voyager 1 is expected to reach the edge of the heliosheath in about 10 years.

  15. Satellite ephemerides for the Voyager Uranus encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; Standish, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    Uranian satellite ephemerides are needed by the Voyager project to support both navigation and acquisition of scientific data. This paper presents the approach being taken to develop the ephemerides and details the initial phase of the development. That phase involves the analytical modeling of the satellites' motion and the adjustment of the model to fit astronomical observations. The paper describes the model and gives the result of a fit to 71 years of observations.

  16. Fourier spectroscopy on planetary missions including Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    In the last dozen years spaceborne Fourier transform spectrometers have obtained infrared emission spectra of Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Titan as well as of the Galilean and other Saturnian satellites and Saturn's rings. Intercomparisons of the properties of planetary atmospheres and of the characteristics of solid surfaces are now feasible. The principles of remotely sensing the environment on a planetary body are dicussed. Special consideration is given to the most recent results obtained by the Voyager infrared investigation on the Saturn system.

  17. Planning the Voyager spacecraft's mission to Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plagemann, Stephen H.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the systems engineering process to the planning of the Voyager spacecraft mission is described. The Mission Planning Office prepared guidelines that controlled the use of the project and multimission resources and spacecraft consumables in order to obtain valuable scientific data at an acceptable risk level. Examples of mission planning which are concerned with the design of the Deep Space Network antenna, the uplink window for transmitting computer command subsystem loads, and the contingency and risk assessment functions are presented.

  18. Jupiter's Plasmasheet: Voyager and Galileo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Richardson, J. D.; Paterson, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    We have collated and, in some cases, re-analyzed the plasma data obtained by the Voyager 1 & 2 and Galileo spacecraft in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. We present the derived spatial and temporal variations in plasma density, temperature and velocity throughout the plasmasheet. We also use a simple model for density distribution with latitude to produce 3-D maps of plasmasheet properties and derive the flow of mass and energy in the magnetosphere.

  19. Ganymede - Comparison of Voyager and Galileo Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images demonstrate the dramatic improvement in the resolution of pictures that NASA's Galileo spacecraft is returning compared to previous images of the Jupiter system. The frame at left was taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft when it flew by in 1979, with a resolution of about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) per pixel. The frame at right showing the same area was captured by Galileo during its first flyby of Ganymede on June 27, 1996; it has a resolution of about 74 meters (243 feet) per pixel, more than 17 times better than that of the Voyager image. In the Voyager frame, line-like bright and dark bands can be seen but their detailed structure and origin are not clear. In the Galileo image, each band is now seen to be composed of many smaller ridges. The structure and shape of the ridges permit scientists to determine their origin and their relation to other terrains, helping to unravel the complex history of the planet-sized moon. In each of these frames, north is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead (about 77 degrees above the horizon). The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, 167 degrees west, is about 35 by 55 kilometers (25 by 34 miles). The image was taken June 27 when Galileo was 7,448 kilometers (4.628 miles) away from Ganymede. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  20. Voyager 2 Movie of Saturn's Moon: Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Voyager 2 took this photo sequence of Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles) away. The top image is the normal version and the bottom is an enhanced version to increase resolution. This sequence lasts 23.4 hours and contains 35 images. The early images were taken about 43 minutes apart, while the later ones are about 29 minutes apart. There are two significant gaps in the sequence: images 7 and 8 are separated by 2.3 hours and images 19 and 20 are separated by 2.8 hours.

    Because the sunlight is coming from the left, mountains and ridges can best be seen as they reflect the sunlight near the terminator (right side of Phoebe). Other intrinsically bright spots can be seen rotating across the whole disk. In this time-lapse sequence, Phoebe appears to be a lumpy spheroid with possible large mountains sometimes showing on the limb (left side of Phoebe). The photos show that Phoebe is about 220 kilometers (132 miles) in diameter. Its rotation period (length of day) was determined from this set of images to be 9.4 hours (see Thomas, P., et al, 'Phoebe: Voyager 2 Observations', Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 88, p. 8736, 1 November 1983).

    These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  1. View of Callisto from Voyager and Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    View of Callisto, most distant of the four large moons of Jupiter. This mosaic was prepared from images obtained by three spacecraft: Voyager 1 (left side), Galileo (middle), and Voyager 2 data (right side). The Voyager data were taken in 1979 but left a 'gap' centered at longitude 290 degrees in the trailing hemisphere of Callisto. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging system photographed this area on its second orbit around Jupiter on 9 September, 1996 Universal Time. The resolution of the Galileo data is 4.3 kilometers/pixel (2.7 miles), meaning that the smallest visible feature is about 12 kilometers (7 miles) across. North is to the top of the picture.

    Features of interest in the new Galileo data include a dark, smooth area in the northern latitudes (upper third) which appears to mantle older terrain. This could be dark ejecta from a small impact crater. Also visible is a fresh, sharp-rimmed crater some 90 km (56 miles) across named Igaluk (center left third of picture), and a bright zone in the south polar area (bottom of image) which could be an impact scar.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  2. Spectrophotometry of Io - Preliminary Voyager 1 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, L.; Johnson, T.; Kupferman, P.; Pieri, D.; Morrison, D.; Danielson, E.; Smith, B.; Veverka, J.; Sagan, C.; Cook, A.

    1980-01-01

    Multispectral images of Io acquired with the Voyager 1 narrow-angle camera agree with earth-based spectrophotometry to better than 10%. Although the surface materials have general spectral properties similar to various allotropes of sulfur, their ultraviolet (UV) reflectances are much higher. It is likely that varying amounts of SO2 frost mixed with or absorbed on sulfur-rich materials raises the UV reflectance. The possible association with large amounts of SO2 with low temperature forms of sulfur in the white patches on Io is consistent with Io surface models in which SO2 and S exist in thermally stable stratified zones.

  3. Sequencing Voyager II for the Uranus encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    The process of developing the programmed sequence of events necessary for the Voyager 2 spacecraft to return desired data from its Uranus encounter is discussed. The major steps in the sequence process are reviewed, and the elements of the Mission Sequence Software are described. The design phase and the implementation phase of the sequence process are discussed, and the Computer Command Subsystem architecture is examined in detail. The software's role in constructing the sequences and converting them into onboard programs is elucidated, and the problems unique to the Uranus encounter sequences are considered.

  4. Satellite ephemerides for the Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the latest fits of both analytical theory and numerically integrated Neptunian satellite orbits to Earth-based astrometric observations. Ephemerides based on the integrated orbits will be used by the Voyager project for pre-encounter planning and analysis until late 1988 when the final pre-encounter ephemerides will be produced. As a by-product of the orbit fits, new estimates of the Neptune mass, the second zonal harmonic of Neptune, and the pole orientation of Neptune are obtained. The theory and integrated orbits are compared with each other and with orbits obtained by previous investigators.

  5. Voyager imaging of Triton's clouds and hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rages, Kathy; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a detailed analysis of Voyager images of Triton obtained at the highest solar phase angles; these have been fit to Mie scattering models in order to obtain the mean particle sizes, number densities, and the vertical extent of the two different scattering components of the Triton atmosphere. The 0.001-0.01 optical depths of about 0.17 micron particles are vertically distributed with scale heights of about 10 km throughout Triton. A number of properties of the haze particles in question suggest that they are composed of photochemically produced gases which have condensed in the cold lower atmosphere of Triton.

  6. Getting Your Sea Legs

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Chen, Fu-Chen; Varlet, Manuel; Alcantara, Cristina; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2013-01-01

    Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning. PMID:23840560

  7. Going from lectures to expeditions: Creating a virtual voyage in undergraduate ocean science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D.; Garfield, N.; Locke, J.; Anglin, J.; Karl, H.; Edwards, B.

    2003-04-01

    The WWW provides for new collaborations in distributed learning in higher education. The lead author has developed a highly successful online course at the undergraduate level with an enrollment of more than 300 non-science majors each year, We are currently initiating a new focus for the course by emphasizing sea-going research, primarily in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, through the development of a virtual oceanographic voyage over the WWW. The "virtual voyage" courseware combines elements of experiential learning with anytime, anywhere access of the WWW to stimulate inquiry-based learning in the ocean sciences. The first leg of the voyage is currently being synthesized from contemporary ocean research sponsored by a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, including NSF, NOAA, and the USGS. The initial portion of this effort involves transforming portions of USGS Circular 1198, Beyond the Golden Gate -- Oceanography, Geology, Biology, and Environmental Issues in the Gulf of the Farallones, into an interactive expedition by which students participate as scientists aboard a research vessel departing from San Francisco. Virtual experiments on the voyage are patterned after research cruises over the past decade in two national marine sanctuaries and include the technologies of data acquisition and data analysis, as well as providing insight into the methodologies of working marine scientists. Real-time data for monitoring the marine environment are embedded into several modules; for example, students will analyze data from offshore buoys and satellite imagery to assess ocean conditions prior to departing from port. Multibeam sonar is used to create seafloor maps near the Golden Gate Bridge and sediment cores provide evidence of sea-level change in the region. Environmental studies in the region include locating canisters of low-level radioactive waste and assessing potential sites for the disposal for dredged materials from the San Francisco Bay. Upon completion

  8. Idealized Voyager Jovian magnetosphere shape and field

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, I.M. )

    1991-05-01

    A magnetic field arising from the Jovian equatorial sheet current deduced from Voyager 1 and 2 observations has been added to a planetary dipole field to provide a model of magnetic field inside the magnetopause. This internal field was used to calculate the magnetopause surface in a cyclic process. During each cycle, the surface was calculated, and the resulting field due to currents on the magnetopause was calculated for inclusion in the total field used to calculate the next-order surface. The resulting magnetopause is, as anticipated, flatter in shape than one resulting primarily from a dipole internal field source, but not dissimilar in overall height-to-width configuration to that of the magnetopause calculated for the larger inflated magnetopause observed by Pioneer 10. An array of magnetic field values for locations internal and external to the magnetopause due to currents on the surface has been computed by integrating over the entire magnetopause. A model for the total magnetospheric field of this semi-inflated magnetosphere has been constructed by adding this latter contribution to the internal source fields to obtain a global model of a semi-inflated Jovianlike magnetospheric field. The magnitude of the contribution of the surface currents to the total magnetic field in the region of the orbits of the Galilean satellites is calculated to be considerably larger for this Voyager model than for the Pioneer model.

  9. BrainVoyager--past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Rainer

    2012-08-15

    BrainVoyager started as a simple fMRI analysis tool in the mid 1990s; the software was primarily created to fulfill the needs of its author and his colleagues to analyze anatomical and functional MRI data in a way that would be most appropriate for their research questions in visual and auditory perception. More specifically, the software was designed with three major goals in mind. First, it should allow analyses that would exploit optimally the high-resolution information available in fMRI data. Second, it should integrate volume-based analysis and cortex-based analysis including the possibility to visualize topographic activation data on flattened cortex representations. Third, it should combine hypothesis testing with data-driven analysis including interactive visualization tools that would make it as easy as possible to look at and explore data. A fourth guiding principle was to develop a software package that fulfilled the author's preference for elegant user interfaces, beautiful visualizations and high-performance computing. These major guiding principles from the beginning of BrainVoyager development are still noticeable in the most recent incarnations of the software that has grown from a small fMRI analysis tool on the Windows platform to a comprehensive cross-platform multi-modal software package integrating (real-time) fMRI, DWI/DTI, (i)EEG, MEG, TMS and fNIRS analyses. PMID:22289803

  10. Voyager absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Forrester, W. T.; Shemansky, D. E.; Barry, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager observations in the 912-1200 A spectral region are used to indirectly intercompare absolute stellar spectrophotometry from previous experiments. Measurements of hot stars obtained by the Voyager 1 and 2 ultraviolet spectrometers show considerably higher 912-1200 A continuum fluxes than the recent observations of Brune et al. (1979) and Carruthers et al. (1981). The intercomparisons show all observations in basic agreement near 1200 A. The Carruthers et al. flux measurements are preferred down to 1050 A at which point the Voyager and Brune et al. values are respectively 60% higher and 60% lower. Below 1050 A the diasgreement among the observations becomes very large and the fluxes predicted by model atmospheres have been adopted. The pure hydrogen line-blanketed model atmosphere calculations of Wesemael et al. 1980) in comparison with Voyager observations of HZ 43 are used to adjust the Voyager calibration below 1050 A. This adjusted Voyager calibration, which is in good agreement with current model atmosphere fluxes for both early-type stars and DA white dwarfs, will be used for Voyager astronomical observations.

  11. Voyager 1 Jupiter Southern Hemisphere Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows a portion of Jupiter in the southern hemisphere over 17Jupiter days. Above the white belt, notice the series of atmospheric vortices headed west. Even these early approach frames show wild dynamics in the roiling environment south of the white belt. Notice the small tumbling white cloud near the center.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 17 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Blue filter around Feb. 1, 1979. The spacecraft was about 37 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  12. Color Voyager 2 Image Showing Crescent Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This image shows a crescent Uranus, a view that Earthlings never witnessed until Voyager 2 flew near and then beyond Uranus on January 24, 1986. This planet's natural blue-green color is due to the absorption of redder wavelengths in the atmosphere by traces of methane gas. Uranus' diameter is 32,500 miles, a little over four times that of Earth. The hazy blue-green atmosphere probably extends to a depth of around 5,400 miles, where it rests above what is believed to be an icy or liquid mixture (an 'ocean') of water, ammonia, methane, and other volatiles, which in turn surrounds a rocky core perhaps a little smaller than Earth.

  13. Voyager disk-integrated photometry of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Goguen, J.; Johnson, T. V.

    1990-01-01

    Hapke's (1981) photometric model has been combined with a plane-parallel thin atmospheric haze model to describe Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton, in the violet, blue, and green wavelength bands, in order to obtain estimates of Triton's geometric albedo, phase integral, and Bond albedo. Phase angle coverage in these filters ranging from about 12 to 159 deg was obtained by combining narrow- and wide-angle camera images. An upturn in the data at the highest phase angles observed can be explained by including scattering in a thin atmospheric haze layer with optical depths systematically decreasing with wavelength from about 0.06 in the violet to 0.03 for the green filter data.

  14. Voyager Photometry of Saturn's A Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dones, Luke; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Showalter, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Saturn's A Ring samples a wide range of dynamical environments, from the relatively unperturbed, optically thick inner region to the outer part of the ring, which contains numerous density waves. We analyze Voyager images of the A Ring to determine how the reflectivity of different radial regions varies with lighting and viewing geometry. We model our data with a classical radiative transfer code that includes the illumination of the rings by the Sun and Saturn. The particles in the inner and mid-A Ring have Bond albedos near 0.5 and are more backscattering than satellites of comparable albedo. The region outside the Encke Gap becomes progressively less backscattering with increasing radius. Particle properties change abruptly outside the Keeler Gap; particles here have an albedo near 0.6 and a Lambert-like phase function. In contrast with previous suggestions, the abundance of free, submicrometer "dust" is small throughout the entire A Ring; this conclusion holds even in the outermost A Ring, which is strongly perturbed by density waves. Models derived from low-phase data, assuming only macroscopic particles, correctly predict the highphase reflectivity of the outer A Ring and individual strong density waves in the mid-A Ring. However, the inner and mid-A Ring are typically darker at high phase by a factor of two than our models predict. This discrepancy may be due to the reduced multiple scattering from a layer in which the particles are more closely packed. We have also studied the quadrupole azimuthal brightness asymmetry of the A Ring. The asymmetry has a full amplitude of 35% in the mid-A Ring in low-phase Voyager 2 images. We present results on its behavior and possible implications for the structure of the rings. Finally, we compare our results with studies using other data sets to synthesize our current understanding of the nature of the A Ring.

  15. Uruk Sulcus Mosaic - Galileo over Voyager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo images of the Uruk Sulcus region on Ganymede (Latitude 11 N, Longitude: 170 W) is shown overlayed on the data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1979. North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left, nearly overhead. The area shown is about 120 by 110 kilometers (75 by 68 miles) in extent and the smallest features that can be discerned are 74 meters (243 feet) in size in the Galileo images and 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) in the Voyager data. The higher resolution Galileo images unveil the details of parallel ridges and troughs that are principal features in the brighter regions of Ganymede. High photometric activity (large light contrast at high spatial frequencies) of this ice-rich surface was such that the Galileo camera's hardware data compressor was pushed into truncating lines. The north-south running gap between the left and right halves of the mosaic is a result of line truncation from the normal 800 samples per line to about 540. The images were taken on 27 June, 1996 Universal Time at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4,628 miles) through the clear filter of the Galileo spacecraft's imaging system.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  16. Jules Verne Voyager, Jr: An Interactive Map Tool for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Meertens, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present an interactive, web-based map utility that can make new geological and geophysical results accessible to a large number and variety of users. The tool provides a user-friendly interface that allows users to access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales. The map tool, dubbed 'Jules Verne Voyager, Jr.', allows users to interactively create maps of a variety of study areas around the world. The utility was developed in collaboration with the UNAVCO Consortium for study of global-scale tectonic processes. Users can choose from a variety of base maps (including "Face of the Earth" and "Earth at Night" satellite imagery mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others), add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays (coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, etc.), and then superimpose both observed and model velocity vectors representing a compilation of 2933 GPS geodetic measurements from around the world. A remarkable characteristic of the geodetic compilation is that users can select from some 21 plates' frames of reference, allowing a visual representation of both 'absolute' plate motion (in a no-net rotation reference frame) and relative motion along all of the world's plate boundaries. The tool allows users to zoom among at least three map scales. The map tool can be viewed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/Earth. A more detailed version of the map utility, developed in conjunction with the EarthScope initiative, focuses on North America geodynamics, and provides more detailed geophysical and geographic information for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The ‘EarthScope Voyager’ can be accessed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/EarthScope. Because the system uses pre-constructed gif images and overlays, the system can rapidly create and display maps to a large number of users

  17. Erratum: Voyager Color Photometry of Saturn's Main Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Showalter, Mark R.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We correct a calibration error in our earlier analysis of Voyager color observations of Saturn's main rings at 14 deg phase angle and present thoroughly revised and reanalyzed radial profiles of the brightness of the main rings in Voyager G, V, and UV filters, and ratios of these brightnesses. These results are consistent with more recent HST results at 6 deg phase angle, once allowance is made for plausible phase reddening of the rings. Unfortunately, the Voyager camera calibration factors are simply not sufficiently well known for a combination of the Voyager and HST data to be used to constrain the phase reddening quantitatively. However, some interesting radial variations in reddening between 6-14 deg phase angles are hinted at. We update a ring-and-satellite color vs. albedo plot from Cuzzi and Estrada in several ways. The A and B rings are still found to be in a significantly redder part of color-albedo space than Saturn's icy satellites.

  18. IS VOYAGER 1 INSIDE AN INTERSTELLAR FLUX TRANSFER EVENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma wave observations from Voyager 1 have recently shown large increases in plasma density, to about 0.1 cm{sup –3}, consistent with the density of the local interstellar medium. However, corresponding magnetic field observations continue to show the spiral magnetic field direction observed throughout the inner heliosheath. These apparently contradictory observations may be reconciled if Voyager 1 is inside an interstellar flux transfer event—similar to flux transfer events routinely seen at the Earth's magnetopause. If this were the case, Voyager 1 remains inside the heliopause and based on the Voyager 1 observations we can determine the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field for the first time.

  19. Voyager: Exploratory Analysis via Faceted Browsing of Visualization Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wongsuphasawat, Kanit; Moritz, Dominik; Anand, Anushka; Mackinlay, Jock; Howe, Bill; Heer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    General visualization tools typically require manual specification of views: analysts must select data variables and then choose which transformations and visual encodings to apply. These decisions often involve both domain and visualization design expertise, and may impose a tedious specification process that impedes exploration. In this paper, we seek to complement manual chart construction with interactive navigation of a gallery of automatically-generated visualizations. We contribute Voyager, a mixed-initiative system that supports faceted browsing of recommended charts chosen according to statistical and perceptual measures. We describe Voyager's architecture, motivating design principles, and methods for generating and interacting with visualization recommendations. In a study comparing Voyager to a manual visualization specification tool, we find that Voyager facilitates exploration of previously unseen data and leads to increased data variable coverage. We then distill design implications for visualization tools, in particular the need to balance rapid exploration and targeted question-answering. PMID:26390469

  20. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, M.D.; Rucker, H.O.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field. 10 references.

  1. NASA Facts: Images of Saturn from Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Six color images of Saturn and four of her moons, acquired by Voyager 2, are presented. A brief narrative and explanatory captions, including explanations of the planet's atmosphere and rings, are presented.

  2. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Rucker, H. O.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field.

  3. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn; Holberg, Jay B.

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  4. 46 CFR 122.280 - Official logbook for foreign voyages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... seaman, the following information required by 46 U.S.C. 10702: (i) The wages due to a seaman who dies... the property of a seaman who dies during the voyage, including a statement of each article sold...

  5. The Voyager Spacecraft. [Jupiter-Saturn mission investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The configuration of the Voyager spacecraft is described as well as the subsystems for power, temperature control, attitude control, and propulsion. Major features of Jupiter and Saturn including their atmospheres, surfaces, and natural satellites are discussed. The 13 onboard experiments and their scientific objectives are explained. Other aspects covered include tracking, data acquisition, and the mission control and computing center. Members of the Voyager team and subcontractors are listed.

  6. Triton and Nereid astrographic observations from Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the reduced astrographic observations of Triton and Nereid derived from Voyager 2 imaging data. The data set contains 496 sets of spacecraft-centered fight ascension and declination observations and includes all of the observations used in Voyager encounter operations. The details of the conversion process from imaging to astrographic observations are given. The effect of using the astrographic rather than imaging form in ephemeris improvement is evaluated.

  7. Nick Sagan Reflects on Voyager 1 and the Golden Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-10-01

    When scientists confirmed on 12 September that NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft had entered interstellar space (Eos, 94(39), 339, doi:10.1002/2013EO390003), the probe was acknowledged as the first human-made object to travel into that realm. The probe and its twin, Voyager 2, each carry a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk, known as the Golden Record.

  8. Titan. [Voyager IRIS observation of satellite atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's satellite Titan is the second-largest in the solar system. Its dense atmosphere is mostly molecular nitrogen with an admixture of methane, a surface pressure of 1.5 bars and a surface temperature of 94K. The fundamental driving force in the long-term evolution of Titan's atmosphere is the photolysis of methane in the stratosphere to form higher hydrocarbons and aerosols. The current rate of photolysis and undersaturation of methane in the lower troposphere suggests the presence of a massive ethane-methane-nitrogen ocean. The ocean evolves to a more ethane-rich state over geologic time, driving changes in the atmospheric thermal structure. An outstanding issue concerning Titan's earliest history is the origin of atmospheric nitrogen: was it introduced into Titan as molecular nitrogen or ammonia? Measurement of the argon-to-nitrogen ratio in the present atmosphere provides a diagnostic test of these competing hypotheses. Many of the questions raised by the Voyager encounters about Titan and its atmosphere can be adequately addressed only by an entry probe, such as that planned for the Cassini mission.

  9. The helium abundance of Jupiter from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, D.; Conrath, B.; Flasar, F. M.; Hanel, R. A.; Kunde, V. G.; Chedin, A.; Scott, N.

    1980-01-01

    Full disk measurements recorded 31 days before the Voyager 1 encounter with Jupiter by the radiometer of the infrared instrument, IRIS, indicate a geometric albedo of 0.274 + or - 0.013. Combining this measurement with the Pioneer derived phase integral of 1.25 and our error estimate of 0.1 yields a Jovian Bond albedo of 0.343 + or - 0.032. Infrared spectra recorded at the same time by the Michelson interferometer, along with a model extrapolation to low wave numbers not covered by the instrument, yield a thermal emission of (1.359 + or - 0.014) .001 W cm to the (-2) power. As in the case of the albedo measurement, the quoted errors in the emission measurement reflect estimates of systematic effects and are uncertain while the random component is negligible. From these measurements the internal heat flux of Jupiter is estimated to be (5.444 + or - 0.425) .0001 W cm to the (-2) power, and the energy balance defined as the ratio of emitted thermal to absorbed solar energy is 1.668 + or - 0.085.

  10. New Voyager radio spectrograms of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.; Tsintikidis, D.

    1990-01-01

    New, high-resolution spectrograms of the Voyager-2 radio observations at Uranus were produced from the original, six-second Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data and these show a number of new features which were not obvious in previous versions. Among these new features are the detailed structure of the so-called broadband-bursty (b-bursty) emissions, unexpected sloping striations in the smooth high-frequency (SHF) component, and the overlap of these two components during the first rotation after closest approach. In addition, a slightly different planetary rotation rate from the b-bursty emissions, was found, and at the initial onset of the SHF component, what appears to be the shadow of a Uranian plasmasphere. These new spectrograms were prepared using a special dithering algorithm to show signal strengths as gray shadings, and the data were also manually cleaned to suppress noise and interference. This produced spectrograms of exceptional quality and certain details of their production on a stand-alone personal computer are also discussed.

  11. Voyager observations of Jovian millisecond radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy data collected over 30-day intervals centered on the two close encounters with Jupiter were utilized to study the characteristics of millisecond-duration radio bursts (s-bursts) at frequencies between 5 and 15 MHz. In this frequency range, s-bursts are found to occur almost independently of Central Meridian Longitude and to depend entirely on the phase of Io with respect to the observer's planetocentric line of sight. Individual bursts typically cover a total frequency range of about 1.5 to 3 MHz, and they are usually strongly circularly polarized. Most bursts in a particular s-burst storm will exhibit the same polarization sense (either right-hand or left-hand), and there is some evidence for a systematic pattern in which one polarizations sense is preferred over the other as a function of Io phase and Central Meridian Longitude. These data are all suggestive of a radio source that is located along the instantaneous Io flux tube and that extends over a linear dimension of 5000 km along the field lines in both the northern and southern Hemispheres.

  12. Voyager spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Voyager imaging system is described, noting that it is made up of a narrow-angle and a wide-angle TV camera, each in turn consisting of optics, a filter wheel and shutter assembly, a vidicon tube, and an electronics subsystem. The narrow-angle camera has a focal length of 1500 mm; its field of view is 0.42 deg and its focal ratio is f/8.5. For the wide-angle camera, the focal length is 200 mm, the field of view 3.2 deg, and the focal ratio of f/3.5. Images are exposed by each camera through one of eight filters in the filter wheel on the photoconductive surface of a magnetically focused and deflected vidicon having a diameter of 25 mm. The vidicon storage surface (target) is a selenium-sulfur film having an active area of 11.14 x 11.14 mm; it holds a frame consisting of 800 lines with 800 picture elements per line. Pictures of Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons are presented, with short descriptions given of the area being viewed.

  13. Voyager investigation of the cosmic diffuse background: Observations of rocket-studied locations with Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    Attachments to this final report include 2 papers connected with the Voyager work: 'Voyager Observations of Dust Scattering Near the Coalsack Nebula' and 'Search for the Intergalactic Medium'. An appendix of 12 one-page write-ups prepared in connection with another program, UVISI, is also included. The one-page write-ups are: (1) Sky survey of UV point sources to 600 times fainter than previous (TD-1) survey; (2) Diffuse galactic light: starlight scattered from dust at high galactic latitude; (3) Optical properties of interstellar grains; (4) Fluorescence of molecular hydrogen in the interstellar medium; (5) Line emission from hot interstellar medium and/or hot halo of galaxy; (6) Integrated light of distant galaxies in the ultraviolet; (7) Intergalactic far-ultraviolet radiation field; (8) Radiation from recombining intergalactic medium; (9) Radiation from re-heating of intergalactic medium following recombination; (10) Radiation from radiative decay of dark matter candidates (neutrino, etc.); (11) Reflectivity of the asteroids in the Ultraviolet; and (12) Zodiacal light.

  14. Disturbances observed near Ganymede by Voyager 2

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L.F.; Belcher, J.W.; Ness, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    We investigated disturbances in the field and particle environment observed by Voyager 2 as it passed near the Jovian moon Ganymede in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The plasma analyzer observed at least a dozen sharply bounded depressions in density (cavities). We estimated that they probably extended at least 20 RGAMMA along the ambient magnetic field lines (R/sub G/=2635 km is the radius of Ganymede) and between 2--50 R/sub G/ in the directions transverse to B. Depressions in the magnetic field strength of the order of 5% of the ambient field strength (60nT to 135nT) were observed at the boundaries of the cavities in more than half of the cases; they were probably produced by currents flowing transverse to B on the boundaries. In some cases, the magnetic field strength inside the cavities was a few percent higher than the ambient value. This gives an upper limit on ..beta..=nkT/(B/sup 2//8..pi..) outside the cavities, viz. Beta<0.2; inmost cases ..beta.. was appreciably smaller than this. The flux of >2.5 MeV protons was strongly anti-correlated with the plasma density, the flux being higher inside the cavities than outside. One possible mechanism for the production of these flux enhancements and the cavities themselves is a local, magnetic field-aligned electric field, E. It is possible that Ganymede is responsible for the energetic protons in the cavities, in which case vertical-bar E vertical-barapprox.50 mV/m. Such a localized source implies radial motions of the magnetospheric plasma with speeds of the order of a few hundred km/s. Such motions could be produced by long-wavelength, small-amplitude Alfven waves in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  15. Voyager 2 at neptune: imaging science results.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Soderblom, L A; Banfield, D; Barnet, C; Basilevsky, A T; Beebe, R F; Bollinger, K; Boyce, J M; Brahic, A; Briggs, G A; Brown, R H; Chyba, C; Collins, S A; Colvin, T; Cook, A F; Crisp, D; Croft, S K; Cruikshank, D; Cuzzi, J N; Danielson, G E; Davies, M E; De Jong, E; Dones, L; Godfrey, D; Goguen, J; Grenier, I; Haemmerle, V R; Hammel, H; Hansen, C J; Helfenstein, C P; Howell, C; Hunt, G E; Ingersoll, A P; Johnson, T V; Kargel, J; Kirk, R; Kuehn, D I; Limaye, S; Masursky, H; McEwen, A; Morrison, D; Owen, T; Owen, W; Pollack, J B; Porco, C C; Rages, K; Rogers, P; Rudy, D; Sagan, C; Schwartz, J; Shoemaker, E M; Showalter, M; Sicardy, B; Simonelli, D; Spencer, J; Sromovsky, L A; Stoker, C; Strom, R G; Suomi, V E; Synott, S P; Terrile, R J; Thomas, P; Thompson, W R; Verbiscer, A; Veverka, J

    1989-12-15

    Voyager 2 images of Neptune reveal a windy planet characterized by bright clouds of methane ice suspended in an exceptionally clear atmosphere above a lower deck of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia ices. Neptune's atmosphere is dominated by a large anticyclonic storm system that has been named the Great Dark Spot (GDS). About the same size as Earth in extent, the GDS bears both many similarities and some differences to the Great Red Spot of Jupiter. Neptune's zonal wind profile is remarkably similar to that of Uranus. Neptune has three major rings at radii of 42,000, 53,000, and 63,000 kilometers. The outer ring contains three higher density arc-like segments that were apparently responsible for most of the ground-based occultation events observed during the current decade. Like the rings of Uranus, the Neptune rings are composed of very dark material; unlike that of Uranus, the Neptune system is very dusty. Six new regular satellites were found, with dark surfaces and radii ranging from 200 to 25 kilometers. All lie inside the orbit of Triton and the inner four are located within the ring system. Triton is seen to be a differentiated body, with a radius of 1350 kilometers and a density of 2.1 grams per cubic centimeter; it exhibits clear evidence of early episodes of surface melting. A now rigid crust of what is probably water ice is overlain with a brilliant coating of nitrogen frost, slightly darkened and reddened with organic polymer material. Streaks of organic polymer suggest seasonal winds strong enough to move particles of micrometer size or larger, once they become airborne. At least two active plumes were seen, carrying dark material 8 kilometers above the surface before being transported downstream by high level winds. The plumes may be driven by solar heating and the subsequent violent vaporization of subsurface nitrogen. PMID:17755997

  16. Voyager 2 at Neptune: Imaging science results

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.A.; Croft, S.K.; Haemmerle, V.R.; Kargel, J.; Porco, C.C.; Strom, R.G. ); Soderblom, L.A.; Kirk, R.; Masursky, H.; McEwen, A.; Shoemaker, E.M. ); Banfield, D.; Danielson, G.E.; DeJong, E.; Howell, C.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Schwartz, J. ); Barnet, C.; Beebe, R.F.; Kuehn, D.I. ); Basilevsky, A.T. ); Bollinger, K.; Brown, R.H.; Collins, Crisp, D.; Goguen, J.; Hammel, H.; Hansen, C.J.; Johnson, T.V.; Owen, W.; Rudy, D.; Synnott, S.P.; Terrile, R.J. ); Boyce, J.M.; Briggs, G.A. ); Brahic, A.; Grenier, I.; Sicardy, B. ); Chyba, C.; Helfenstein, C.P.; Sagan, C.; Simonelli, D.; Thomas, P.; Thompson, W.R.; Veverka, J.; Verbiscer, A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca,

    1989-12-15

    Voyager 2 images of Neptune reveal a windy planet characterized by bright clouds of methane ice suspended in an exceptionally clear atmosphere above a lower deck of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia ices. Neptune's atmosphere is dominated by a large anticyclonic storm system that has been named the Great Dark Spot (GDS). About the same size as Earth in extent,the GDS bears both many similarities and some differences to the Great Red Spot of Jupiter. Neptune's zonal wind profile is remarkably similar to that of Uranus. Neptune has three major rings at radii of 42,000, 53,000, and 63,000 kilometers. The outer ring contains three higher density arc-like segments that were apparently responsible for most of the ground-based occultation events observed during the current decade. Like the rings of Uranus, the Neptune rings are composed of very dark material; unlike that of Uranus, the Neptune system is very dusty. Six new regular satellites were found, with dark surfaces and radii ranging from 200 to 25 kilometers. All lie inside the orbit of Triton and the inner four are located within the ring system. Triton is seen to be a differentiated body, with a radius of 1350 kilometers and a density of 2.1 grams per cubic centimeter; it exhibits clear evidence of early episodes of surface melting. A now rigid crust of what is probably water ice is overlain with a brilliant coating of nitrogen frost, slightly darkened and reddened with organic polymer material. Streaks of organic polymer suggest seasonal winds strong enough to move particles of micrometer size or larger, once they become airborne. At least two active plumes were seen, carrying dark material 8 kilometers above the surface before being transported downstream by high level winds. The plumes may be driven by solar heating and the subsequent violent vaporization of subsurface nitrogen.

  17. From convicts to colonists: the health of prisoners and the voyage to Australia, 1823-53.

    PubMed

    Foxhall, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    From 1815, naval surgeons accompanied all convict voyages from Britain and Ireland to the Australian colonies. As their authority grew, naval surgeons on convict ships increasingly used their medical observations about the health of convicts to make pointed and sustained criticisms of British penal reforms. Beyond their authority at sea, surgeons' journals and correspondence brought debates about penal reform in Britain into direct conversation with debates about colonial transportation. In the 1830s, naval surgeons' claims brought them into conflict with their medical colleagues on land, as well as with the colonial governor, George Arthur. As the surgeons continued their attempts to combat scurvy, their rhetoric changed. By the late 1840s, as convicts' bodies betrayed the disturbing effects of separate confinement as they boarded the convict ships, surgeons could argue convincingly that the voyage itself was a space that could medically, physically and spiritually reform convicts. By the mid-1840s, surgeons took the role of key arbiters of convicts' potential contribution to the Australian colonies. PMID:21584986

  18. From Convicts to Colonists: the Health of Prisoners and the Voyage to Australia, 1823 – 1853

    PubMed Central

    Foxhall, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    From 1815, naval surgeons accompanied all convict voyages from Britain and Ireland to the Australian colonies. As their authority grew, naval surgeons on convict ships increasingly used their medical observations about the health of convicts to make pointed and sustained criticisms of British penal reforms. Beyond their authority at sea, surgeons’ journals and correspondence brought debates about penal reform in Britain into direct conversation with debates about colonial transportation. In the 1830s, naval surgeons’ claims brought them into direct conflict with their medical colleagues on land, as well as with the colonial governor, George Arthur. As the surgeons continued their attempts to combat scurvy, their rhetoric changed. By the late 1840s, as convicts’ bodies betrayed the disturbing effects of separate confinement as they boarded the convict ships, surgeons could argue convincingly that the voyage itself was a space that could medically, physically, and spiritually reform convicts. By the mid 1840s, surgeons took the role of key arbiters of convicts’ potential contribution to the Australian colonies. PMID:21584986

  19. Infrared observations of the saturnian system from voyager 2.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R; Conrath, B; Flasar, F M; Kunde, V; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J; Samuelson, R; Cruikshank, D; Gautier, D; Gierasch, P; Horn, L; Ponnamperuma, C

    1982-01-29

    During the passage of Voyager 2 through the Saturn system, infrared spectral and radiometric data were obtained for Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, Tethys, Iapetus, and the rings. Combined Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observations of temperatures in the upper troposphere of Saturn indicate a seasonal asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres, with superposed small-scale meridional gradients. Comparison of high spatial resolution data from the two hemispheres poleward of 60 degrees latitude suggests an approximate symmetry in the small-scale structure, consistent with the extension of a symmetric system of zonal jets into the polar regions. Longitudinal variations of 1 to 2 K are observed. Disk- averaged infrared spectra of Titan show little change over the 9-month interval between Voyager encounters. By combining Voyager 2 temperature measurements with ground-based geometric albedo determinations, phase integrals of 0.91 +/- 0.13 and 0.89 +/- 0.09 were derived for Tethys and Enceladus, respectively. The subsolar point temperature of dark material on Iapetus must exceed 110 K. Temperatures (and infrared optical depths) for the A and C rings and for the Cassini division are 69 +/- 1 K (0.40 +/- 0.05), 85 +/- 1 K (0.10 +/- 0.03), and 85 +/- 2 K (0.07 +/- 0.04), respectively. PMID:17771275

  20. Voyager 2 observations of plasma in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Voyager 2 is now at 96 AU and provides the only direct observations of plasma in the heliosheath. I will present the most recent plasma observations and try to assimilate them with other Voyager measurements and observations at 1 AU. The heliosheath is highly variable on scales of tens of minutes in both plasma and magnetic field parameters. The distribution of plasma parameters is Gaussian; this enables us to determine flow directions as the flow angles approach the instrument cutoff. The plasma speeds observed at Voyager 2 remain well above those inferred at Voyager 1 at similar distances into the heliosheath. The Voyager 2 flows continue to divert toward the heliotail. The direction of flow is more in the T than N direction (using the RTN coordinate system). The density and temperature have decreased across the heliosheath until the beginning of 2011; since then the density has increased by a factor of 2 and the speed and temperature have also increased. These results will be compared to model predictions.

  1. In situ observations of interstellar plasma with Voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F

    2013-09-27

    Launched over 35 years ago, Voyagers 1 and 2 are on an epic journey outward from the Sun to reach the boundary between the solar plasma and the much cooler interstellar medium. The boundary, called the heliopause, is expected to be marked by a large increase in plasma density, from about 0.002 per cubic centimeter (cm(-3)) in the outer heliosphere, to about 0.1 cm(-3) in the interstellar medium. On 9 April 2013, the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument began detecting locally generated electron plasma oscillations at a frequency of about 2.6 kilohertz. This oscillation frequency corresponds to an electron density of about 0.08 cm(-3), very close to the value expected in the interstellar medium. These and other observations provide strong evidence that Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. PMID:24030496

  2. Characteristics of the Termination Shock: Insights from Voyager

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, A.C.; Stone, E.C.

    2005-08-01

    We examine the energy spectra obtained from the cosmic ray instrument on the Voyager 1 spacecraft during 2002/215 through 2005/60. We find that the energy spectra of protons below {approx}20 MeV often resemble two power laws with a relatively hard index at low energies and a softer index at higher energies. The point of intersection of the two power laws is {approx}3 MeV. Beginning in 2005, the low-energy index is typically -1.5, corresponding to a shock strength (compression ratio) of 2.5. We attribute these characteristics to a restricted region of the solar wind termination shock that is sporadically connected to the Voyager 1 spacecraft by the interplanetary magnetic field. The absence of significant spectral variability in 2005 suggests that Voyager 1 entered a region with minimal spatial gradients of the lowest energy ions.

  3. The Jovian magnetosphere - A post-Voyager view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    Results of observational and theoretical work presented at the Rice University Conference on the Physics of the Jovian Magnetosphere (February 27-29, 1980) are summarized and used to elucidate the post-Voyager status of the understanding of Jovian magnetosphere dynamics. Works considered treat earth-based and Voyager observations of the Io torus, decametric and kilometric radio emissions, corotation of magnetospheric plasma with the magnetic field, and theoretical studies of mechanisms of particle acceleration, diffusion and loss in the magnetosphere and interplanetary space. Issues remaining to be resolved by future research are also indicated, particularly questions of the discrepancy between plasma flow measurements obtained on the two plasma experiments on each Voyager spacecraft, and the localization of the source of torus plasma.

  4. Magnetic field studies at Jupiter by Voyager 2 - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 magnetic field experiment, for which the instrumentation is identical to that on Voyager 1, operated flawlessly throughout the second Jupiter encounter. The paper presents a brief overview of the results obtained to date on the Jovian magnetosphere, the bow shock, the magnetopause, and the extended magnetic tail. The results and the magnetic field geometry confirm the earlier conclusion from Voyager 1 that Jupiter has an enormous magnetic tail, approximately 300-400 Jupiter radii in diameter, trailing behind the planet with respect to the supersonic flow of the solar wind. Additional observations of the distortion of the inner magnetosphere by a concentrated plasma show a spatial merging of the equatorial magnetodisk current with the current sheet in the magnetic tail. Disturbances near Ganymede are discussed.

  5. Reconstruction of the Voyager 2 Neptune Encounter in the ICRF System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    The Neptunian system was visited by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in August of 1989. We have re-examined the Voyager mission taking advantage of improvements made in dynamical and observational modelling and data processing.

  6. Galileo Regio Mosaic - Galileo over Voyager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo images of the Galileo Regio region on Ganymede (Latitude 18 N, Longitude: 149 W) is shown overlayed on the data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1979. North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left, about 58 degrees above the horizon. The smallest features that can be discerned are about 80 meters (262 feet) in size in the Galileo images. These Galileo images show fine details of the dark terrain that makes up about half of the surface of the planet-sized moon. Ancient impact craters of various sizes and states of degradation testify to the great age of the terrain, dating back several billion years. The images reveal distinctive variations in albedo from the brighter rims, knobs, and furrow walls to a possible accumulation of dark material on the lower slopes, and crater floors. High photometric activity (large light contrast at high spatial frequencies) of this ice-rich surface was such that the Galileo camera's hardware data compressor was pushed into truncating lines. The north-south running gap between the left and right halves of the mosaic is a result of line truncation from the normal 800 samples per line to about 540. The images were taken on 27 June, 1996 Universal Time at a range of 7,580 kilometers (4,738 miles) through the clear filter of the Galileo spacecraft's imaging system. Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Voyager observations of the azimuthal brightness variations in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Cook, A. F., II; Barrey, R. T. F.; Roff, C. A.; Hunt, G. E.; De Rueda, H. B.

    1987-01-01

    The present Voyagers I and II measurements of Saturn A ring azimuthal brightness variations in reflected light are noted to be in general agreement with earth-based measurements. Voyager images of the rings in light transmitted through them also indicate the presence of these brightness variations, but with greater amplitude and an about 65-deg phase discrepancy with those seen in reflection. These differences in photometric behavior are qualitatively accounted for in terms of the widespread presence of particle wakes in the A ring.

  8. Performance model of the Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Voyager Multimedia Server is being developed in the Futures Lab of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. As a network-based service for recording and playing multimedia streams, it is important that the Voyager system be capable of sustaining certain minimal levels of performance in order for it to be a viable system. In this article, the authors examine the performance characteristics of the server. As they examine the architecture of the system, they try to determine where bottlenecks lie, show actual vs potential performance, and recommend areas for improvement through custom architectures and system tuning.

  9. The Voyager spacecraft /James Watt International Gold Medal Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacock, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Voyager Project background is reviewed with emphasis on selected features of the Voyager spacecraft. Investigations by the Thermo-electric Outer Planets Spacecraft Project are discussed, including trajectories, design requirements, and the development of a Self Test and Repair computer, and a Computer Accessed Telemetry System. The design and configuration of the spacecraft are described, including long range communications, attitude control, solar independent power, sequencing and control data handling, and spacecraft propulsion. The development program, maintained by JPL, experienced a variety of problems such as design deficiencies, and process control and manufacturing problems. Finally, the spacecraft encounter with Jupiter is discussed, and expectations for the Saturn encounter are expressed.

  10. Magnetic field studies at Jupiter by Voyager 2: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 magnetic field experiment is described and compared to the Voyager 1 experiment and data. The magnetosphere, the bow shock, the magnetopause, and the extended magnetic tail of Jupiter are discussed. Two crossings of the near equatorial current sheet were observed in the magnetosphere and its tail every 10 hour rotation period of the planet. A definitive mapping of the geometry and character of these enhanced plasma and depressed magnetic field regions is discussed. The interaction of the satellite Ganymede with the Jovian magnetosphere, which leads to disturbances as the Jovian magnetosphere corotates with the planet past the satellite is analyzed.

  11. An early sophisticated East Polynesian voyaging canoe discovered on New Zealand's coast

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Dilys A.; Irwin, Geoffrey J.; Sung, Yun K.

    2014-01-01

    The colonization of the islands of East Polynesia was a remarkable episode in the history of human migration and seafaring. We report on an ocean-sailing canoe dating from close to that time. A large section of a complex composite canoe was discovered recently at Anaweka on the New Zealand coast. The canoe dates to approximately A.D. 1400 and was contemporary with continuing interisland voyaging. It was built in New Zealand as an early adaptation to a new environment, and a sea turtle carved on its hull makes symbolic connections with wider Polynesian culture and art. We describe the find and identify and radiocarbon date the construction materials. We present a reconstruction of the whole canoe and compare it to another early canoe previously discovered in the Society Islands. PMID:25267657

  12. An early sophisticated East Polynesian voyaging canoe discovered on New Zealand's coast.

    PubMed

    Johns, Dilys A; Irwin, Geoffrey J; Sung, Yun K

    2014-10-14

    The colonization of the islands of East Polynesia was a remarkable episode in the history of human migration and seafaring. We report on an ocean-sailing canoe dating from close to that time. A large section of a complex composite canoe was discovered recently at Anaweka on the New Zealand coast. The canoe dates to approximately A.D. 1400 and was contemporary with continuing interisland voyaging. It was built in New Zealand as an early adaptation to a new environment, and a sea turtle carved on its hull makes symbolic connections with wider Polynesian culture and art. We describe the find and identify and radiocarbon date the construction materials. We present a reconstruction of the whole canoe and compare it to another early canoe previously discovered in the Society Islands. PMID:25267657

  13. 46 CFR 30.01-6 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 30.01... PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-6 Application to vessels on an international voyage. (a) Except as provided... vessel on an international voyage apply to a vessel that: (1) Is mechanically propelled and of at...

  14. 46 CFR 117.10 - Applicability to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability to vessels on an international voyage. 117.10 Section 117.10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER... international voyage. A vessel on an international voyage subject to the International Convention for Safety...

  15. 46 CFR 30.01-6 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 30.01... PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-6 Application to vessels on an international voyage. (a) Except as provided... vessel on an international voyage apply to a vessel that: (1) Is mechanically propelled and of at...

  16. 46 CFR 196.07-1 - Notice and reporting of casualty and voyage records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Notice and Reporting of Casualty and Voyage Records § 196.07-1 Notice and reporting of casualty and voyage records. The requirements for providing notice and reporting of marine... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice and reporting of casualty and voyage records....

  17. 46 CFR 185.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty. 185.220 Section 185.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.220 Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty....

  18. 46 CFR 185.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty. 185.220 Section 185.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.220 Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty....

  19. [The corvette "Nordstjernen's" voyage to the opening of the Suez Canal--naval medicine in 1869].

    PubMed

    Ongre, Aksel; Pettersen, Jan Sommerfelt; Munch, Johan Storm

    2002-06-30

    When the Norwegian corvette Nordstjernen was in the North Sea bound for Port Said to be present at the opening of the Suez Canal on 17 November 1869, an officer suffered a rupture of m. triceps brachii when he was drawn into the machinery during a storm. He was put ashore in Harwich; four days after the injury he was hospitalized in Colchester. The voyage was eventful in other ways too. Another officer died from typhoid fever in Ismailia. On the Swedish frigate Vanadis, also present at the opening of the Suez Canal, one of the doctors died from lung infection and was buried in Smyrna; a twelve-feet high column of white marble was taken from the ruins of Aesculap's temple and put on his grave. Denmark was represented by the frigate Sjaelland. During a storm in the North Sea, one seaman fell down on the deck from the foresail yard and suffered contusions and a fracture of the left clavicle. These cases illustrate challenges that faced our ancestors. The accident happened when the ship was in the Netherlands sector of the North Sea as we know it today. Today the Coast Guard could have arranged transport by helicopter and hospitalized the patient in about two hours. PMID:12555606

  20. Changes around Marduk between Voyager, and Galileo's first two orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Detail of changes around Marduk on Jupiter's moon Io as seen by Voyager 1 in 1979 (upper left) and NASA's Galileo spacecraft between June 1996 (lower left) and September 1996 (upper and lower right). The new dark red linear feature extending southeast from Marduk is about 250 kilometers long and may be a volcanic fissure. The flow-like feature at the bottom of the images is distinct in the Voyager data, indistinct in the June Galileo data, but distinct again in the September Galileo data. This may be due to the different lighting conditions rather than volcanic activity. The Voyager 1 image uses the green, blue, and violet filters. The upper right September 1996 image from Galileo uses the violet and green filters of the solid state imaging system aboard the Galileo spacecraft and a synthetic blue to simulate Voyager colors. The lower June and September, 1996 Galileo images use the imaging system's near-infrared (756 nm), green, and violet filters. North is to the top in all frames.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  1. Plasma observations near Neptune: Initial results for Voyager 2

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, J.W.; Bridge, H.S.; Coppi, B.; Gordon, G.S. Jr.; Lazarus, A.J.; McNutt, R.L. Jr.; Richardson, J.D.; Steinberg, J.T.; Sullivan, A.; Szabo, A.; Villanueva, L.; Zhang, M. ); Bagenal, F. ); Divers, O. ); Ogilvie, K.W.; Sittler, E.C. Jr. ); Siscoe, G.L. ); Eviatar, A. ); Vasyliunas, V.M. )

    1989-12-15

    The plasma science experiment on Voyager 2 made observations of the plasma environment in Neptune's magnetosphere and in the surrounding solar wind. Because of the large tilt of the magnetic dipole and fortuitous timing, Voyager entered Neptune's magnetosphere through the cusp region, the first cusp observations at an outer planet. Thus the transition from the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere observed by Voyager 2 was not sharp but rather appeared as a gradual decrease in plasma density and temperature. The maximum plasma density observed in the magnetosphere is inferred to be 1.4 per cubic centimeter (the exact value depends on the composition), the smallest observed by Voyager in any magnetosphere. The plasma has at least two components; light ions (mass, 1 to 5) and heavy ions (mass, 10 to 40), but more precise species identification is not yet available. Most of the plasma is concentrated in a plasma sheet or plasma torus and near closest approach to the planet. A likely source of the heavy ions is Triton's atmosphere or ionosphere, whereas the light ions probably escape from Neptune. The large tilt of Neptune's magnetic dipole produces a dynamic magnetosphere that changes configuration every 16 hours as the planet rotates.

  2. Plasma observations near neptune: initial results from voyager 2.

    PubMed

    Belcher, J W; Bridge, H S; Bagenal, F; Coppi, B; Divers, O; Eviatar, A; Gordon, G S; Lazarus, A J; McNutt, R L; Ogilvie, K W; Richardson, J D; Siscoe, G L; Sittler, E C; Steinberg, J T; Sullivan, J D; Szabo, A; Villanueva, L; Vasyliunas, V M; Zhang, M

    1989-12-15

    The plasma science experiment on Voyager 2 made observations of the plasma environment in Neptune's magnetosphere and in the surrounding solar wind. Because of the large tilt of the magnetic dipole and fortuitous timing, Voyager entered Neptune's magnetosphere through the cusp region, the first cusp observations at an outer planet. Thus the transition from the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere observed by Voyager 2 was not sharp but rather appeared as a gradual decrease in plasma density and temperature. The maximum plasma density observed in the magnetosphere is inferred to be 1.4 per cubic centimeter (the exact value depends on the composition), the smallest observed by Voyager in any magnetosphere. The plasma has at least two components; light ions (mass, 1 to 5) and heavy ions (mass, 10 to 40), but more precise species identification is not yet available. Most of the plasma is concentrated in a plasma sheet or plasma torus and near closest approach to the planet. A likely source of the heavy ions is Triton's atmosphere or ionosphere, whereas the light ions probably escape from Neptune. The large tilt of Neptune's magnetic dipole produces a dynamic magnetosphere that changes configuration every 16 hours as the planet rotates. PMID:17756003

  3. 33 CFR 164.80 - Tests, inspections, and voyage planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... breaking up larger tows; (B) For harbor-assist; (C) For assistance towing as defined by 46 CFR 10.103; (D... Captain of the Port (COTP). (2) If you think your towing vessel should be exempt from these voyage... approach, special conditions, and critical maneuvers; and (ix) Whether the towing vessel has...

  4. A Curriculum Review: The Voyage of the Mimi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    The curriculum package, "The Voyage of the Mimi," uses computer, videocassette, student text, and workbook for integrated study of the great whales and the impact of social actions on society and the environment. This review suggests that the package also offers many ancillary teaching opportunities. (CB)

  5. Overview of the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometry results through Jupiter encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.; Sandel, B. R.; Shemansky, D. E.; Smith, G. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Mcconnell, J. C.; Atreya, S. K.; Donahue, T. M.; Strobel, D. F.; Bertaux, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The observations of a number of objects by the Voyager EUV instruments are summarized. The summary is considered to demonstrate the wide ranging application of the EUV spectroscopy. It also marks an important step forward in spectrography and emphasizes the continuing importance of the search and discovery nature of spectroscopic techniques.

  6. A voyage to Mars: space radiation, aging, and nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions, such as a voyage to Mars, astronauts will be exposed to doses and types of radiation that are not experienced in low earth orbit where the space shuttle and International Space Station operate. Astronauts who participate in exploratory class missions outside the magne...

  7. Introducing Students to Darwin via the Voyage of HMS "Beagle"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swab, Janice C.

    2010-01-01

    I use the diary that Darwin wrote during the voyage of HMS Beagle and recent images of a few of the places he visited to illustrate some comparisons between Darwin's world and ours. For today's students, increasingly committed to environmental issues, this may be an especially promising way to introduce Darwin.

  8. The Voyages of Columbus: A Turning Point in World History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.; Nader, Helen

    The far-reaching and transforming interactions of the Old World and the New are known today as "the Columbian Exchange." Part 1 of this booklet is an introduction by John J. Patrick dealing with teaching about the voyages of Christopher Columbus. Part 2, "Columbus and Ecological Imperialism," by Alfred W. Crosby, provides an ecological perspective…

  9. Voyager: The grandest tour. The mission to the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A history and general accomplishments of the Voyager 1 and 2 missions to the outer planets are presented. Over the course of 12 years, these spacecraft drew back the curtain on nearly half the solar system. They brought into sharp focus the faces of the four giant outer planets - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - and their families of disparate moons. The Voyagers showed us unimagined worlds: frozen beauty in the rings of Saturn, and molten violence in the explosive sulfur volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io. They brought us close-ups of the florid and intricate storms of Jupiter itself. Voyager 2 went on to reveal the peculiarities of cockeyed Uranus and its equally skewed rings and moons. Then finally, Neptune, nearly invisible from earth, was unveiled in all its big, blue splendor, circled by shadowy rings and a bright pastel moon called Triton. Both Voyagers are headed toward the outer boundary of the solar system in search of the heliopause, the region where the sun's influence wanes and the beginning of interstellar space can be sensed.

  10. Voyager: The grandest tour. The mission to the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-04-01

    A history and general accomplishments of the Voyager 1 and 2 missions to the outer planets are presented. Over the course of 12 years, these spacecraft drew back the curtain on nearly half the solar system. They brought into sharp focus the faces of the four giant outer planets - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - and their families of disparate moons. The Voyagers showed us unimagined worlds: frozen beauty in the rings of Saturn, and molten violence in the explosive sulfur volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io. They brought us close-ups of the florid and intricate storms of Jupiter itself. Voyager 2 went on to reveal the peculiarities of cockeyed Uranus and its equally skewed rings and moons. Then finally, Neptune, nearly invisible from earth, was unveiled in all its big, blue splendor, circled by shadowy rings and a bright pastel moon called Triton. Both Voyagers are headed toward the outer boundary of the solar system in search of the heliopause, the region where the sun's influence wanes and the beginning of interstellar space can be sensed.

  11. Voyager 1 and 2 Atlas of Six Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Maps, compiled with data gathered primarily by Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, are presented which show the diversity among six of the Saturnian moons. Mimas and Enceladus are mapped in detail. Prelimary maps are given for the other four satellites. Diameter, density, albedo, and distance from mother planet, among much more data, is given for each moon.

  12. The Voyager 2 Encounter with the Uranian System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, E. C.; Miner, E. D.

    1986-01-01

    A series of 12 reports on the Voyager Two experiments in the Uranian system. Reports are included on: (1) imaging science; (2) photometry; (3) infrared; (4) ultraviolet; (5) radio science; (6) magnetic fields; (7) plasma; (8) charged particles; (9) magnetosphere (hot plasma and radiation); (10) radion observations; and (11) plasma waves. An…

  13. Energetic Particles at Voyager 1 in the Heliosheath and Voyager 2 in the Termination Foreshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R. B.; Krimigis, S. M.; Roelof, E. C.

    2007-05-01

    As of 2007.16, Voyager 1 (V1) is in the heliosheath (HSH), having moved radially outward 8 AU since crossing the termination shock (TS) at 94 AU in late 2004 (V1 is at 102 AU, N34° lat., 173° long.). Voyager 2 (V2) is upstream of the TS in its foreshock (TFS) region (V2 is at 82 AU, S27° lat., 216° long.). We discuss variations of intensities and angular distributions of ions >40 keV and electrons >30 keV measured by the LECP instruments on V1 and V2. Measurements made in the TFS region are characterized by large intensity variations, by factors >10, that occur over a range of time scales, from a few hours to tens of days. TFS ion angular distributions often show unidirectional, or beamlike, anisotropies consistent with propagation along the solar wind magnetic field from the source region (i.e., from the TS and the HSH) to the spacecraft under relatively weak-scattering conditions. Notable differences between the V1 and V2 data in the TFS include (1) ion beaming directions that are oppositely directed at the two spacecraft, which may result from the different locations of the two spacecraft relative to an asymmetric TS, and (2) the TFS ion energy spectrum at V2 extends down only to about 0.2 MeV, while that at V1 extends down to at least 0.04 MeV. Data from V1 taken in the HSH are characterized by high intensities of low-energy ions that remain fairly steady, varying by factors <2, and by anisotropies produced mainly by convection at the HSH plasma flow velocity. V1 was crossed by the TS as the shock moved radially inward in late 2004. As a result, conditions in the HSH at V1 were highly disturbed until about mid-2005. Thereafter, the plasma flow velocity V in the HSH, estimated by analysis of low-energy ion angular distributions, has shown mean speed ~ 70 km/s and direction angle ~ -35° to the radial, i.e., on average VR ~ 58 km/s and VT ~ -40 km/s (in RTN coordinates). Also, during the past six months, the energy spectrum at V1 of ions 0.04 to ~1 MeV shows

  14. The heliosphere neutrals composition: from Voyager UVS to IMAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jaffel, L.

    2015-12-01

    For the last 35 years, the Voyagers (V) 1 and 2 ultraviolet spectrometers (UVS) data harvest has covered heliosphere sky-background in-situ measurements, stellar spectrophotometry, and outer planets encounters. Their long and ongoing operation period overlaps with many current and past ultraviolet missions, offering unique opportunities for cross-calibration with other spectrometers. Here we revisit the Voyager UVS calibration to assess the intriguing 243% (V1) and 156% (V2) sensitivity enhancements recently proposed. Using the Saturn Lyman-α airglow, observed in-situ by both Voyagers, and remotely by IUE, we match the Voyager values to IUE, taking into account the shape of the Saturn and sky-background Lyman-α lines observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. For all known ranges of the interplanetary H I density, we show that the V1 and V2 UVS sensitivities at the Lyman-α channels cannot be enhanced by the amounts thus far proposed. Our prescription is to keep the original calibration of the Voyager UVS with an uncertainty that should not exceed 30%, making both instruments some of the most stable EUV/FUV spectrographs of the history of space exploration. This rich heritage from past and current space missions confirms that UV observations of the sky-background are a powerful lever for constraining the neutral composition and large structure of the heliosphere. It also points to the need in the future for fine Doppler-shift measurements and faint emissions detection in order to directly access the microphysical processes that drive the instant shape and composition of the heliosphere that is forced by the magnetized plasmas from solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Future deep space missions should thus include UV capabilities that make use of sensitive, high-resolution technology that allows achieving the highest throughput for extended light sources.

  15. COMPARISON OF PIONEER 10, VOYAGER 1, AND VOYAGER 2 ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH ANTI-SOLAR LYMAN-ALPHA BACKSCATTER SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fayock, B.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J. E-mail: garyp.zank@gmail.com

    2013-09-20

    Observations made by ultraviolet (UV) detectors on board Pioneer 10, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 can be used to analyze the distribution of neutral hydrogen throughout the heliosphere, including the interaction regions of the solar wind and local interstellar medium. Previous studies of the long-term trend of decreasing intensity with increasing heliocentric distance established the need for more sophisticated heliospheric models. Here we use state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) neutral models to simulate Lyman-alpha backscatter as would be seen by the three spacecrafts, exploiting a new 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code under solar minimum conditions. Both observations and simulations of the UV backscatter intensity are normalized for each spacecraft flight path at {approx}15 AU, and we focus on the slope of decreasing intensity over an increasing heliocentric distance. Comparisons of simulations with Voyager 1 Lyman-alpha data results in a very close match, while the Pioneer 10 comparison is similar due to normalization, but not considered to be in agreement. The deviations may be influenced by a low resolution of photoionization in the 3D MHD-neutral model, a lack of solar cycle activity in our simulations, and possibly issues with instrumental sensitivity. Comparing the slope of Voyager 2 and the simulated intensities yields an almost identical match. Our results predict a large increase in the Lyman-alpha intensity as the hydrogen wall is approached, which would signal an imminent crossing of the heliopause.

  16. Cinnarizine for Sea Sickness During a Remote Pacific Ocean Rescue Mission.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Regan F; Rush, Stephen C; Roland, J Thomas; Jethanamest, Daniel; Schwan, Christopher P; Kharon, Chetan U

    2015-01-01

    Motion sickness can be a limiting factor for sea and air missions. We report the experience of a Pararescue (PJ) team on a Pacific Ocean rescue mission in which motion sickness was prevalent. Cinnarizine, an antagonist of H1-histamine receptors, was used to treat affected PJs. We also report findings of a survey of PJs regarding motion sickness. A family of four on a disabled sailboat 900 miles off the coast of Mexico sent out a distress call because their 1-year-old daughter became severely ill with fever and diarrhea. Four PJs were deployed on a C-130, performed a free-fall parachute insertion into the ocean, and boarded the sailboat. All four PJs experienced onset of motion sickness at some point during the early part of the mission and symptoms persisted through the first 24 hours. Three PJs experienced ongoing nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and sensory imbalances. The captain of the sailboat offered the three sick PJs approximately 18mg of cinnarizine two or three times a day with relief of symptoms and improvement on operational effectiveness. A new, anonymous, voluntary survey of Air National Guard PJs and combat rescue officers revealed that 78.4% of Operators have experienced motion sickness at sea. We discuss the current theories on motion sickness, the effect of motion sickness on operational effectiveness, and research on treatment of motion sickness, including the medication cinnarizine. PMID:26125158

  17. VOYAGER 2 OBSERVES A LARGE DENSITY INCREASE IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J. D.; Wang, C. E-mail: cw@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2012-11-01

    Voyager 2 (V2) entered the heliosheath in 2007 August at roughly the same time solar minimum conditions were reaching the outer heliosphere. Soon after crossing the termination shock the solar wind density at Voyager decreased by a factor of two and the temperature decreased by a factor of three. At the beginning of 2011 the plasma density in the heliosheath began to increase and in mid-2012 it was up by more than a factor of two. The temperature rose by about 50% and the speed remained constant, although the flow direction continues to turn tailward. These changes may signal the end of solar minimum conditions at V2 in the heliosheath, although we do not understand why the speed did not decrease. The increased dynamic pressure has lead to an outward movement of the termination shock from its very compressed state at solar minimum.

  18. The Jovian nebula - A post-Voyager perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 1 carried a diverse collection of magnetospheric probes through the inner Jovian magnetosphere in March 1979. The ensuing data analysis and theoretical investigation provided a comprehensive description of the Jovian nebula, a luminous torus populated with newly released heavy ions drawn from Io's surface. Recent refinements in earth-based imaging instrumentation are used to extend the Voyager in situ picture in temporal and spatial coverage. An analysis of S III and S II forbidden-line optical emissions observed during the Jovian apparitions of 1981 through 1983 reveals three distinct torus components. Regularities have been identified in the ion partitioning and ion densities in the hot outer and inner tori, sharply defined radial structure is found in the plasma near Io, and the relative permanence of the cool inner torus is inferred. An extended cloud of neutral material is required as a source of fresh ions in the nebula.

  19. Voyager uplink planning in the interstellar mission era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linick, Susan H.; Weld, Kathryn R.

    1993-01-01

    The Voyager Project has entered its last phase of discovery--the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM). Because of the reduced scope of the project and a lower budget, new ways had to be developed to program two spacecraft with fewer people and to allow for some sequence development flexibility without additional risk. In the previous cruise era, it took a seven-person sequence team 12 weeks to develop a nominal eight week cruise sequence. Today it takes a three-person team six weeks to develop a 13 week sequence load. This paper will describe in detail the sequencing strategy which reduces the volume and frequency of sequence loads, and the new tools and processes developed which reduce the manual effort required to generate these sequences without adding risk.

  20. Voyager 2 observations of plasma in the heliosheath.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Belcher, J. W.; Tordella, D.; Fraternale, F.; Gallana, L.; Iovieno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Voyager 2 has observed the plasma in the heliosheath since 2007 from 84 to 109 AU. No signs of the stagnation region observed by Voyager 1 have been observed. Instead, the plasma speed have remained relatively constant and the flow has turned tailward. Latest results from 2015 show that the flow is about 80 degrees from radial, with most of the flow in the T direction (using RTN coordinates). Temperature and density averages have remained constant since increases observed in 2011. The plasma parameters are highly variable; we show the distributions of the variabillty with time. We also show compare variations in the magnetic field and plasma on short (few hour) time scales through 2012.

  1. Neptune's Wind Speeds Obtained by Tracking Clouds in Voyager Images.

    PubMed

    Hammel, H B; Beebe, R F; De Jong, E M; Hansen, C J; Howell, C D; Ingersoll, A P; Johnson, T V; Limaye, S S; Magalhaes, J A; Pollack, J B; Sromovsky, L A; Suomi, V E; Swift, C E

    1989-09-22

    Images of Neptune obtained by the narrow-angle camera of the Voyager 2 spacecraft reveal large-scale cloud features that persist for several months or longer. The features' periods of rotation about the planetary axis range from 15.8 to 18.4 hours. The atmosphere equatorward of -53 degrees rotates with periods longer than the 16.05-hour period deduced from Voyager's planetary radio astronomy experiment (presumably the planet's internal rotation period). The wind speeds computed with respect to this radio period range from 20 meters per second eastward to 325 meters per second westward. Thus, the cloud-top wind speeds are roughly the same for all the planets ranging from Venus to Neptune, even though the solar energy inputs to the atmospheres vary by a factor of 1000. PMID:17798743

  2. Voyager 1 Planetary Radio Astronomy Observations Near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. B.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported from the first low frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere. Dramatic new information was obtained both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and also because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio arcs, from above 30 MHz to about 1 MHz, occurred in patterns correlated with planetary longitude. A newly discovered kilometric wavelength radio source may relate to the plasma torus near Io's orbit. In situ wave resonances near closest approach define an electron density profile along the Voyager trajectory and form the basis for a map of the torus. Studies in progress are outlined briefly.

  3. Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy observations near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. D.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results from the first low-frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere are reported. Dramatic new information was obtained, both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio spectral arcs, from above 30 to about 1 MHz, occurred in patterns correlated with planetary longitude. A newly discovered kilometric wavelength radio source may relate to the plasma torus near Io's orbit. In situ wave resonances near closest approach define an electron density profile along the Voyager trajectory and form the basis for a map of the torus. Detailed studies are in progress and are outlined briefly.

  4. The galilean satellites and Jupiter: Voyager 2 imaging science results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Beebe, R.; Boyce, J.; Briggs, G.; Carr, M.; Collins, S.A.; Cook, A.F., II; Danielson, G.E.; Davies, M.E.; Hunt, G.E.; Ingersoll, A.; Johnson, T.V.; Masursky, H.; McCauley, J.; Morrison, D.; Owen, editors, Timothy W.; Sagan, C.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Strom, R.; Suomi, V.E.; Veverka, J.

    1979-01-01

    Voyager 2, during its encounter with the Jupiter system, provided images that both complement and supplement in important ways the Voyager 1 images. While many changes have been observed in Jupiter's visual appearance, few, yet significant, changes have been detected in the principal atmospheric currents. Jupiter's ring system is strongly forward scattering at visual wavelengths and consists of a narrow annulus of highest particle density, within which is a broader region in which the density is lower. On Io, changes are observed in eruptive activity, plume structure, and surface albedo patterns. Europa's surface retains little or no record of intense meteorite bombardment, but does reveal a complex and, as yet, little-understood system of overlapping bright and dark linear features. Ganymede is found to have at least one unit of heavily cratered terrain on a surface that otherwise suggests widespread tectonism. Except for two large ringed basins, Callisto's entire surface is heavily cratered. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  5. Voyager Saturn encounter attitude and articulation control experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, G.; Hill, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager attitude and articulation control system is designed for a three-axis stabilized spacecraft; it uses a biasable sun sensor and a Canopus Star Tracker (CST) for celestial control, as well as a dry inertial reference unit, comprised of three dual-axis dry gryos, for inertial control. A series of complex maneuvers was required during the first of two Voyager spacecraft encounters with Saturn (November 13, 1980); these maneuvers involved rotating the spacecraft simultaneously about two or three axes while maintaining accurate pointing of the scan platform. Titan and Saturn earth occulation experiments and a ring scattering experiment are described. Target motion compensation and the effects of celestial sensor interference are also considered. Failure of the CST, which required an extensive reevaluation of the star reference and attitude control mode strategy, is discussed. Results analyzed thus far show that the system performed with high accuracy, gathering data deeper into Saturn's atmosphere than on any previous planetary encounter.

  6. Voyager 2 Observes a Large Density Increase in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Wang, C.

    2012-11-01

    Voyager 2 (V2) entered the heliosheath in 2007 August at roughly the same time solar minimum conditions were reaching the outer heliosphere. Soon after crossing the termination shock the solar wind density at Voyager decreased by a factor of two and the temperature decreased by a factor of three. At the beginning of 2011 the plasma density in the heliosheath began to increase and in mid-2012 it was up by more than a factor of two. The temperature rose by about 50% and the speed remained constant, although the flow direction continues to turn tailward. These changes may signal the end of solar minimum conditions at V2 in the heliosheath, although we do not understand why the speed did not decrease. The increased dynamic pressure has lead to an outward movement of the termination shock from its very compressed state at solar minimum.

  7. Review of the NASA Voyager spacecraft polycarbonate capacitor failure incident

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, F. M.; Yen, S. P. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The premission failure of a Voyager spacecraft capacitor has prompted an investigation into the use of polycarbonate capacitors in high impedance circuits, during which capacitor failures were induced by thermal cycling together with extended periods at high temperature. Measurement of leakage path temperature coefficients indicates that there are two distinct leakage types whose mechanisms are complicated by movement within the capacitor during temperature changes. A novel system for pulse detection during capacitor burn-in and ramp testing has proven to be beneficial.

  8. Mapping the Galilean satellites of Jupiter with Voyager data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batson, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The four Galilean satellites of Jupiter are being mapped using image data from the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The maps are published at several scales and in several versions. Preliminary maps at 1:25,000,000-required for mission planning and preliminary science reports-were compiled within three weeks of data acquisition and have been published. Later maps incorporate Rand Corporation photogrammetric triangulations. - from Authors

  9. Voyager spacecraft radio observations of Jupiter: Initial cruise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Riddle, A. C.; Lecacheux, A.; Pearce, J. B.; Alexander, J. K.; Warwick, J. W.; Thieman, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Jupiter's low-frequency radio emission were detected by the planetary radio astronomy instruments onboard the two Voyager spacecraft. The emission is surprisingly similar in morphology but opposite in polarization to the high-frequency Jovian radio noise that were observed with ground-based telescopes for more than two decades. Several possible explanations for the behavior of the low-frequency emission are examined, but none of them is completely satisfactory.

  10. More Evidence that Voyager 1 Is Still in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2015-06-01

    The investigators of the Voyager mission currently exploring the heliosheath have concluded and announced that Voyager 1 (V1) has crossed the heliopause and is now in the interstellar medium. This conclusion is based primarily on the plasma wave observations of Gurnett et al., which reveal a plasma electron density that resembles the density expected in the local interstellar medium. Fisk & Gloeckler have disputed the conclusion that V1 has crossed the heliopause, pointing out that to account for all the V1 observations, particularly the magnetic field direction together with the density, it is necessary to conclude that the higher densities observed by Gurnett et al. are due to compressed solar wind. In this Letter it is shown that the model of Fisk & Gloeckler for the nose region of the heliosheath can account in detail for the intensity and spectral shape of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in the directions of V1 and Voyager 2 (V2). A key feature of the Fisk & Gloeckler model is the existence of a region in the heliosheath where the solar wind is compressed and heated, followed by a region where the solar wind is compressed but cold. The region of cold compressed solar wind provides a unique explanation for the low-energy IBEX observations, and since this is the region where V1 must now reside, the low-energy IBEX observations provide strong evidence that V1 is still in the heliosphere.

  11. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  12. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager-2 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Evans, D. R.; Romig, J. H.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Aubier, M.; Leblanc, Y.; Lecacheux, A.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager-2 planetry radio astronomy measurements obtained near Saturn are discussed. They indicate that Saturnian kilometric radiation is emitted by a strong, dayside source at auroral latitudes in the northern hemisphere and by a weaker (by more than an order of magnitude) source at complementary latitudes in the southern hemisphere. These emissions are variable both due to Saturn's rotation and, on longer time scales, probably due to influences of the solar wind and the satellite Dione. The Saturn electrostatic discharge bursts first discovered by Voyager-1 and attributed to emissions from the B-ring were again observed with the same broadband spectral properties and a 10(h)11(m) + or - 5(m) episodic recurrence period but with an occurrence frequency of only of about 30 percent of that detected with Voyager-1. During the crossing of the ring plane at a distance of 2.88 R sub S, an intense noise event is interpreted to be consequence of the impact/vaporization/ionization of charged micron-size G-ring particles distributed over a total vertical thickness of about 1500 km.

  13. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Evans, D. R.; Romig, J. H.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Aubier, M.; Leblanc, Y.; Lecacheux, A.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    Planetary radio astronomy measurements obtained by Voyager 2 near Saturn have added further evidence that Saturnian kilometric radiation is emitted by a strong dayside source at auroral latitudes in the northern hemisphere and by a weaker source at complementary latitudes in the southern hemisphere. These emissions are variable because of Saturn's rotation and, on longer time scales, probably because of influences of the solar wind and Dione. The electrostatic discharge bursts first discovered by Voyager 1 and attributed to emissions from the B ring were again observed with the same broadband spectral properties and an episodic recurrence period of about 10 hours, but their occurrence frequency was only about 30 percent of that detected by Voyager 1. While crossing the ring plane at a distance of 2.88 Saturn radii, the spacecraft detected an intense noise event extending to above 1 megahertz and lasting about 150 seconds. The event is interpreted to be a consequence of the impact, vaporization, and ionization of charged, micrometer-size G ring particles distributed over a vertical thickness of about 1500 kilometers.

  14. Extreme and far ultraviolet astronomy from Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    The instrumental characteristics, observational capabilities and scientific results of the Voyager 1 and 2 ultraviolet spectrometers are reviewed. These instruments provide current and ongoing access to low resolution spectra for a wide variety of astronomical sources in the 500 to 1700 A band. Observations of the brightest OB stars and hot subluminous stars as faint as V = 15 mag, are possible. In the EUV, at wavelengths shortward of 900 A, several new sources have been detected and a host of potential sources ruled out. In the far UV, particularly at wavelengths between 900 and 1200 A, Voyager is capable of observing a wide range of stellar and non-stellar sources. Such observations can often provide a valuable complement to IUE and other data sets at longer wavelengths. The Voyager spectrometers have proved remarkably stable photon counting instruments, capable of extremely long integration times. The long integration times, relatively large field of view, and location in the outer solar system also provide an ideal platform for observations of sources of faint diffuse emission, such as nebulae and the general sky background.

  15. Voyager observations in the outer heliosphere and interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, John D.

    2016-03-01

    The Voyager spacecraft are making the first direct plasma measurements of the heliosheath and interstellar medium. This paper discusses the differences in the heliosheath observations of Voyager 1 (V1) and Voyager 2 (V2), the V1 heliopause crossing, and observations of transient structures in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The heliosheath velocities at V1 are smaller than expected throughout the heliosheath and are zero in the stagnation region, which persists for 8 AU before the heliopause crossing. The V2 flow profile is very different from that at V1; the average speed stays constant at 145 km/s but the flow has turned over 60° from radial. The heliopause crossing region has numerous structures in cosmic rays, termination shock particles, and magnetic field so that the exact heliopause crossing point is still controversial. Solar transients drive shocks which propagate through the LISM, generate anisotropies and intensity changes in the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and excite plasma and radio waves.

  16. Jules Verne Voyager: A Web Interactive Tool for Comparative Planetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estey, L.; Pappalardo, R.; Meertens, C.

    2004-12-01

    A Web interactive map tool called "Jules Verne Voyager" was originally developed in 1999 by UNAVCO and continues to evolve. The Voyager tool can easily be used for comparative planetology studies by grades 8-14. Thematic mapping datasets, now totaling about 70 Gb, can be accessed by the tool and include global-scale maps of the inner solar system planets and moons, plus Jupiter and the Galilean moons. The map images are viewed on a Web browser created on demand by the server system. On the client-side, only a Java-enabled browser is required, and the Voyager Java applet runs well with common browsers like Netscape, Mozilla, Opera, and Internet Explorer. The applet sends a key-value pair URL to the http://jules.unavco.org server which queues incoming requests and sends them to a bank of computers dedicated to map image creation. The engine for map image creation makes use of the "Generic Mapping Tools" (GMT) software of Paul Wessel and Walter Smith, followed by image conversion of the GMT-created PostScript to GIF for raster image export and display back on the client browser. Because of the GMT-based engine on the server system, the student user can easily create the same type of images from real planetary data that researchers create. The tool also gives a student the ability to switch background datasets and overlay certain other thematic datasets, thus providing a minimal GIS capability. To our knowledge, the map tool has not yet formally been used in a 8-14 classroom environment, though informal use by students and teachers in these grades suggest that it would be well received. The server system is currently capable of handing a moderate level of requests that would result from classroom use; for example, as a system benchmark, over 800 Voyager images were created and served in about an hour during a DLESE 2003 annual meeting workshop. The Voyager map tool is being used by instructors in earth science and comparative planetology as a means to create customized

  17. Voyager electronic parts radiation program. Volume 2: Test requirements and procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Martin, K. E.; Price, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Documents are presented outlining the conditions and requirements of the test program. The Appendixes are as follows: appendix A -- Electron Simulation Radiation Test Specification for Voyager Electronic Parts and Devices, appendix B -- Electronic Piece-Part Testing Program for Voyager, appendix C -- Test Procedure for Radiation Screening of Voyager Piece Parts, appendix D -- Boeing In Situ Test Fixture, and appendix E -- Irradiate - Anneal (IRAN) Screening Documents.

  18. Exploring the brain, looking for thoughts: on Asimov's second Fantastic Voyage.

    PubMed

    Cassou-Noguès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate various concerns which appear in Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain. I will disregard his first voyage inside a human body in Fantastic Voyage I, which the author disavows as not being his own work. In contrast, the second voyage is intricate, suggesting problems drawn from a variety of sources. In a nutshell, Asimov's explorers enter the body of a comatose man in order to read his thoughts. The story can be related both to philosophical thought-experiments, such as those of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and of Herbert Feigl, as well as to personal anxieties peculiar to Asimov. PMID:21936209

  19. Energetic Particle Anisotropies at Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium and at Voyager 2 in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R. B.; Krimigis, S. M.; Hill, M. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    We describe angular variations of energetic ion and electron intensities measured by the Low Energy Charged Particle instruments on Voyager 1 in the very local interstellar medium, and for context, at Voyager 2 in the heliosheath. We emphasize measurements made in 2014-2015. At Voyager 1, now at 132 AU and 11 AU beyond the heliopause, intensities of low-energy ions and electrons and of anomalous cosmic rays remain at background levels. Galactic cosmic ray ions continue to show small departures from isotropy, with broad (0.3-0.5 year) episodes of intensity depletions of ions gyrating nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. Percentage intensity decreases during these depletions, relative to intensities of cosmic rays propagating along the field, peak at -7% in 2013.35, -3% in 2014.50, and at least -4% in 2015.60 (when the most recent data were examined). Two episodes in March-April 2013 and April-May 2014 when cosmic ray ion intensities showed small increases lasting 10-20 days indicate small energy boosts, produced possibly by magnetic disturbances from solar activity entering the interstellar medium [Gurnett et al., Ap. J. 2015]. During these two periods intensities of cosmic rays with pitch angles nearer 90 degrees were increased more than those with pitch angles nearer 0 and 180 degrees. At Voyager 2, now 24 AU beyond the termination shock, intensities of ions >30 keV and electrons >20 keV continue to recover in a step-like fashion from minima reached in early 2013. We reported previously that during the rapid initial recovery from these minima as particle intensities rose at Voyager 2, angular data for ions 30 keV to 30 MeV (i.e., including anomalous cosmic rays) showed strong and long lasting (about 4 months) net streaming away from the heliospheric nose toward the flank. A similar streaming episode lasting about 2 months occurred in early 2015, again during a period when intensities were rapidly increasing.

  20. Uranus' southern circulation revealed by Voyager 2: Unique characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2015-04-01

    Revised calibration and processing of 1600 images of Uranus by Voyager 2 revealed dozens of discrete features south of -45° latitude, where only a single feature was known from Voyager images and none has been seen since. Tracking of these features over five weeks defined the southern rotational profile of Uranus with high accuracy and no significant gap. The profile has kinks unlike previous profiles and is strongly asymmetric with respect to the northern profile by Sromovsky et al. (Sromovsky, L.A., Fry, P.M., Hammel, H.B., de Pater, I., Rages, K.A. [2012]. Icarus 220, 694-712). The asymmetry is larger than that of all previous data on jovian planets. A spot that included the South Pole off-center rotated with a period of 12.24 h, 2 h outside the range of all previous observations of Uranus. The region between -68° and -59° latitude rotated almost like a solid body, with a shear that was about 30 times smaller than typical shears on Uranus. At lower latitudes, features were sheared into tightly wound spirals as Voyager watched. The zone at -84° latitude was exceptionally bland; reflectivity variations were only 18 ppm, consistent with a signal-to-noise ratio estimated at 55,000. The low noise was achieved by smoothing over dozens of pixels per image and averaging 1600 images. The presented data set in eight filters contains rich information about temporal evolution and spectral characteristics of features on Uranus that will be the basis for further analysis.

  1. Microwave communications from outer planets - The Voyager Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brejcha, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper summarizes the Voyager Project, the mission objectives, and the spacecraft communications system required to meet the mission objectives. The primary emphasis of the mission is on comparative studies of the Jupiter and Saturn systems in the areas of: (1) the environment, atmosphere and body characteristics of the planets, and one or more of the satellites, (2) the nature of the recently discovered Jovian ring and the rings of Saturn, and (3) the interplanetary medium at increasing distances from the sun. The complexities and problems, such as power consumption, weight, and antenna pointing constraints are presented, along with a detailed description of the radio frequency and S/X-band antenna subsystems.

  2. Radio science experiment of Voyager-2 spacecraft occultation by Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, T.; Nishimura, T.; Takano, T.; Yamamoto, Z.; Yamada, M.; Shuto, K.; Saito, H.; Ichikawa, T.; Kawashima, N.; Mizuno, E.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-JPL and Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science collaborated at the Usuda Deep Space Center in the Voyager-2 Neptune occultation experiment. Phase information is extracted from the recorded data by means of a digital filter that can track the carrier frequency and narrow the filter bandwidth by up to 3 mHz. The results thus obtained can verify the phase-stability of the receiving system as a whole. Problems experienced by low-noise amplifiers were solved through the use of system redundancies.

  3. Planetary radio astronomy observations from voyager 1 near saturn.

    PubMed

    Warwick, J W; Pearce, J B; Evans, D R; Carr, T D; Schauble, J J; Alexander, J K; Kaiser, M L; Desch, M D; Pedersen, M; Lecacheux, A; Daigne, G; Boischot, A; Barrow, C H

    1981-04-10

    The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn electrostatic discharge, is unpolarized, extremely impulsive, loosely correlated with Saturn's rotation, and very broadband, appearing throughout the observing range of the experiment (20.4 kilohertz to 40.2 megahertz). Its sources appear to lie in the planetary rings. PMID:17783837

  4. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  5. The Jupiter system through the eyes of Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. A.; Soderblom, L. A.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Masursky, H.; Johnson, T. V.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Collins, S. A.; Hunt, G. E.; Carr, M. H.; Davies, M. E.; Morrison, D.

    1979-01-01

    The cameras aboard Voyager 1 have provided a closeup view of the Jupiter system, revealing heretofore unknown characteristics and phenomena associated with the planet's atmosphere and the surfaces of its five major satellites. On Jupiter itself, atmospheric motions - the interaction of cloud systems - display complex vorticity. On its dark side, lightening and auroras are observed. A ring was discovered surrounding Jupiter. The satellite surfaces display dramatic differences including extensive active volcanism on Io, complex tectonism on Ganymede and possibly Europa, and flattened remnants of enormous impact features on Callisto.

  6. Radio science experiment of Voyager-2 spacecraft occultation by Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Nishimura, T.; Takano, T.; Yamamoto, Z.; Yamada, M.; Shuto, K.; Saito, H.; Ichikawa, T.; Kawashima, N.; Mizuno, E.

    NASA-JPL and Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science collaborated at the Usuda Deep Space Center in the Voyager-2 Neptune occultation experiment. Phase information is extracted from the recorded data by means of a digital filter that can track the carrier frequency and narrow the filter bandwidth by up to 3 mHz. The results thus obtained can verify the phase-stability of the receiving system as a whole. Problems experienced by low-noise amplifiers were solved through the use of system redundancies.

  7. Voyager image processing at the Image Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jepsen, P. L.; Mosher, J. A.; Yagi, G. M.; Avis, C. C.; Lorre, J. J.; Garneau, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses new digital processing techniques as applied to the Voyager Imaging Subsystem and devised to explore atmospheric dynamics, spectral variations, and the morphology of Jupiter, Saturn and their satellites. Radiometric and geometric decalibration processes, the modulation transfer function, and processes to determine and remove photometric properties of the atmosphere and surface of Jupiter and its satellites are examined. It is exhibited that selected images can be processed into 'approach at constant longitude' time lapse movies which are useful in observing atmospheric changes of Jupiter. Photographs are included to illustrate various image processing techniques.

  8. Post Voyager comparisons of the interiors of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, M.; Reynolds, R. T.; Young, R.

    1990-01-01

    The recent Voyager flyby of Uranus and Neptune has provided refined values for the gravitational moments and rotation periods of those planets. Using these new parameters, models of the interiors of these planets show that their density distributions are very similar. This lends support to the conjecture that their compositions are similar as well. The models are indeed consistent with such a conjecture. The difference in the internal heat sources of these two planets may be due to the fact that heat transport from the interior of Uranus is inhibited by a statically stable interior.

  9. DETAIL OF PLAQUE COMMEMORATING THE JULY/ AUGUST 1958 VOYAGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE COMMEMORATING THE JULY/ AUGUST 1958 VOYAGE OF THE USS NAUTILUS (SSN-571) TO THE NORTH POLE. NOTE: THIS PLAQUE IS NOT LOCATED AT WHARFS S13-S19; IT IS AT THE SUBMARINE MEMORIAL PARK, ABOUT 1,000' SOUTH OF THE WHARFS. THE LOCATION AND ORIENTATION OF THIS PHOTO IS NOT SHOWN ON THE PHOTO KEY MAP - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Additional Piers and Quay Walls, S13 to S19, Northeast end of Magazine Loch, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Planetary radio astronomy observations during the Voyager 1 Titan flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigne, G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    During the Voyager 1 Titan flyby, unusual radio emissions were observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment in the 20- to 97-kHz frequency range. It is shown that Titan itself is not the source of the observed radio emission. The emission features are attributed to modification of the normal Saturn kilometric radiation by propagation effects in enhanced density structures within the Titan wake. Furthermore, spiky emissions observed in the magnetic wake of Titan are interpreted in terms of local electrostatic instabilities at the electron plasma frequency. From these measurements a range of electron densities in the wake region is derived, and the consistency of the results is discussed.

  11. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 1 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Evans, D. R.; Carr, T. D.; Schauble, J. J.; Alexander, J. K.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Pedersen, M.; Lecacheux, A.

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn electrostatic discharge, is unpolarized, extremely impulsive, loosely correlated with Saturn's rotation, and very broadband, appearing throughout the observing range of the experiment (20.4 kilohertz to 40.2 megahertz). Its sources appear to lie in the planetary rings.

  12. The jupiter system through the eyes of voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Soderblom, L A; Johnson, T V; Ingersoll, A P; Collins, S A; Shoemaker, E M; Hunt, G E; Masursky, H; Carr, M H; Davies, M E; Cook, A F; Boyce, J; Danielson, G E; Owen, T; Sagan, C; Beebe, R F; Veverka, J; Strom, R G; McCauley, J F; Morrison, D; Briggs, G A; Suomi, V E

    1979-06-01

    The cameras aboard Voyager 1 have provided a closeup view of the Jupiter system, revealing heretofore unknown characteristics and phenomena associated with the planet's atmosphere and the surfaces of its five major satellites. On Jupiter itself, atmospheric motions-the interaction of cloud systems-display complex vorticity. On its dark side, lightning and auroras are observed. A ring was discovered surrounding Jupiter. The satellite surfaces display dramatic differences including extensive active volcanismn on Io, complex tectonism on Ganymnede and possibly Europa, and flattened remnants of enormous impact features on Callisto. PMID:17800430

  13. The Jupiter system through the eyes of Voyager 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Johnson, T.V.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Collins, S.A.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Hunt, G.E.; Masursky, H.; Carr, M.H.; Davies, M.E.; Cook, A.F., II; Boyce, J.; Danielson, G.E.; Owen, editors, Timothy W.; Sagan, C.; Beebe, R.F.; Veverka, J.; Strom, R.G.; McCauley, J.F.; Morrison, D.; Briggs, G.A.; Suomi, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    The cameras aboard Voyager I have provided a closeup view of the Jupiter system, revealing heretofore unknown characteristics and phenomena associated with the planet's atmosphere and the surfaces of its five major satellites. On Jupiter itself, atmospheric motions-the interaction of cloud systems-display complex vorticity. On its dark side, lightning and auroras are observed. A ring was discovered surrounding Jupiter. The satellite surfaces display dramatic differences including extensive active volcanismn on Io, complex tectonism on Ganymnede and possibly Europa, and flattened remnants of enormous impact features on Callisto. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  14. Interagency telemetry arraying for Voyager-Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. W.; Brundage, W. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Kent, S. S.; Bartos, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The reception capability of the Deep Space Network (DSN) has been improved over the years by increasing both the size and number of antennas at each complex to meet spacecraft-support requirements. However, even more aperture was required for the final planetary encounters of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. This need was met by arraying one radio astronomy observatory with the DSN complex in the United States and another with the complex in Australia. Following a review of augmentation for the Uranus encounter, both the preparation at the National Radio Astronomy (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) and the Neptune encounter results for the Parkes-Canberra and VLA-Goldstone arrays are presented.

  15. Magnetic field experiment for Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Acuna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Ness, N. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field experiments of the Voyager program involve studies of the planetary fields of Jupiter, Saturn, possibly Uranus, and several satellites; the solar wind and satellite interactions with the planetary fields, as well as large- and micro-scale features of the interplanetary magnetic field will also be investigated. Dual low field and high field magnetometer systems with dynamic ranges of + or - 0.5 G and + or - 20 G respectively provide high reliability for the missions and permit the separation of the spacecraft and ambient fields. Quantization uncertainty, rms noise levels and data compaction schemes of the magnetometer systems are also mentioned.

  16. Radio propagation experiments in the outer solar system with Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. Leonard

    1987-01-01

    The outer solar system's planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, rings, and magnetic fields are under study in light of microwave telecommunications from the two Voyager spacecraft. The use of the hydrogen maser frequency standards on the ground, in conjunction with thermally controlled quartz oscillators aboard the spacecraft, ensures long coherence intervals and allows the application of novel signal processing methods. On this basis, studies of atmospheric structure and scintillation parameters, planetary ring structure, and magnetic control of small ionospheric irregularities have been undertaken; information concerning planetary evolution, composition, and dynamics is thereby obtained.

  17. Preliminary science results of Voyager 1 Saturn encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bane, D.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary science results of the Voyager 1 encounter of the planet Saturn are reported. On August 22, 1980, the spacecraft was 109 million km (68 million mi) from Saturn. Closest approach to Saturn took place on November 12, at 3:46 p.m. (PDT), when the spacecraft passed 126,000 km (78,000 mi) from the cloud tops. Measurements of the atmosphere, wind speed, radiation, six surrounding rings, and the planet's old and newly found satellites were recorded. The encounter ended December 15, 1980. The spacecraft took more than 17,500 photographs of Saturn and its satellites.

  18. Voyager and the origin of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prentice, A. J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A unified model for the formation of regular satellite systems and the planetary system is outlined. The basis for this modern Laplacian theory is that there existed a large supersonic turbulent stress arising from overshooting convective motions within the three primitive gaseous clouds which formed Jupiter, Saturn, and the Sun. Calculations show that if each cloud possessed the same fraction of supersonic turbulent energy, equal to about 5% of the cloud's gravitational potential energy, then the broad mass distribution and chemistry of all regular satellite and planetary systems can be simultaneously accounted for. Titan is probably a captured moon of Saturn. Several predictions about observations made by Voyager 2 at Saturn are presented.

  19. Far-ultraviolet extinction determined from Voyager data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Theodore P.; Allen, M. M.; Polidan, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the Voyager UV spectrometers are used to derive FUV extinction curves for 19 stars, using the pair-comparison method after the removal of the effects of line absorption due to H I and H2. It is shown that the FUV extinction rise continues to the limit of the data at about 925 A, supporting the theoretical prediction by Longo et al. (1989) that the FUV extinction continues to rise toward short wavelengths all the way to the Lyman limit at 912 A.

  20. Voyager radio science observations of Neptune and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Anderson, J. D.; Borutzki, S. E.; Campbell, J. K.; Kursinski, E. R.; Levy, G. S.; Lindal, G. F.; Lyons, J. R.; Wood, G. E.

    1989-12-01

    Voyager 2 undertook radio science investigations of the Neptune and Triton masses and densities, as well as of their atmospheric and ionospheric vertical structures, the atmospheric composition and low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, and ring material characteristics. Upon probing the atmosphere of Neptune to a pressure level of about 500,000 Pa, the effects of a methane cloud region and of ammonia absorption below the cloud have become apparent. The tenuous neutral atmosphere of Triton produced distinct signatures in the occultation data; it is inferred that the Triton atmosphere is controlled by water-pressure equilibrium with surface ices.

  1. 46 CFR 188.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... mandate, whose international relations are the responsibility of a contracting SOLAS 74 government, or... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 188... international voyage. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the regulations...

  2. 46 CFR 70.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., whose international relations are the responsibility of a contracting SOLAS 74 government, or which is... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 70.05... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-10 Application to vessels on an international voyage....

  3. 46 CFR 14.201 - Voyages upon which shipping articles are required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Voyages upon which shipping articles are required. 14.201 Section 14.201 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS Shipment of Merchant Mariners § 14.201 Voyages upon which shipping articles are required....

  4. 46 CFR 14.201 - Voyages upon which shipping articles are required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyages upon which shipping articles are required. 14.201 Section 14.201 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS Shipment of Merchant Mariners § 14.201 Voyages upon which shipping articles are required....

  5. 46 CFR 188.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 188... international voyage. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the regulations in this subchapter that apply to a vessel on an “international voyage” apply to a vessel that— (1)...

  6. 46 CFR 70.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 70.05... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-10 Application to vessels on an international voyage. (a... that apply to a vessel on an “international voyage” apply to a vessel that— (1) Is...

  7. 33 CFR 104.297 - Additional requirements-vessels on international voyages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Security Certificate (ISSC) as provided in 46 CFR § 2.01-25 is obtained for the vessel. This certificate... on international voyages. 104.297 Section 104.297 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 104.297 Additional requirements—vessels on international voyages. (a) An owner or operator of a...

  8. 78 FR 32008 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BOND VOYAGE; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BOND VOYAGE... of the vessel BOND VOYAGE is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``6-pack non-inspected harbor tours... and the vessel name in order for MARAD to properly consider the comments. Comments should also...

  9. Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune answered many questions about the 'blue' planet

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T. )

    1990-02-01

    Voyager 2 observations of Neptune from August 1989 are examined. Voyager 2 discovered 6 new moons around Neptune and collected information on the shape and composition of Neptune's rings. The spots and clouds detected in the planet's atmosphere are described. Consideration is given to Neptune's magnetic field and auroras.

  10. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Lick Jupiter-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A machine-readable version is described of the Lick Jupiter-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue (Klemola, Morabito Taraji 1978) prepared for purposes of determining up-to-date, reasonably accurate, equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations of Jovian satellites during the flyby.

  11. The Columbian Voyages, the Columbian Exchange, and Their Historians. Essays on Global and Comparative History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.

    The 500th anniversary of the Columbian discovery of America is upon us, and with it the obligation to assess existing interpretations of the significance of the voyage and establishment of permanent links between the Old and New Worlds. The traditional, or bardic, version of the Columbian voyages and their consequences was the product of narrative…

  12. 46 CFR 30.01-6 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... relations are the responsibility of a contracting SOLAS 74 government, or which is administered by the... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 30.01... PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-6 Application to vessels on an international voyage. (a) Except as...

  13. 46 CFR 188.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mandate, whose international relations are the responsibility of a contracting SOLAS 74 government, or... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 188... international voyage. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the regulations...

  14. 46 CFR 70.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., whose international relations are the responsibility of a contracting SOLAS 74 government, or which is... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 70.05... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-10 Application to vessels on an international voyage....

  15. 46 CFR 90.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 90.05-10 Section 90.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-10 Application to vessels on an international voyage. (a) Except for yachts and...

  16. Multifractal Structures Detected by Voyager 1 at the Heliospheric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, W. M.; Wawrzaszek, A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence.

  17. Plasma properties at the Voyager 1 crossing of the heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    2015-09-01

    In August 2012, Voyager 1 crossed the heliopause at a distance of 121.5 AU from the Sun. It is argued that the spacecraft entered a region in the outer heliosheath that had the characteristics of a plasma depletion layer. Observed plasma parameters at the heliopause, properties of plasma depletion layers, and some assumptions are used to derive a set of plasma parameters on both sides of the heliopause. Using the density, temperature, and magnetic field magnitude on each side, the corresponding plasma beta and Alfven Mach number (in the outer heliosheath) are derived. These plasma parameters are used to demonstrate that the plasma depletion process is occurring in the outer heliosheath adjacent to the heliopause and these parameters are used to determine if lower hybrid waves are generated locally and if magnetic reconnection is occurring locally at the location of the Voyager 1 crossing. Reconnection may not be an effective source of superthermal electrons at the heliopause, based on the small Alfven speeds there (VA ≤ 100 km/s) and an empirical connection between electron heating and Alfven speed found in inner solar system studies.

  18. MULTIFRACTAL STRUCTURES DETECTED BY VOYAGER 1 AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, W. M.; Burlaga, L. F. E-mail: anna.wawrzaszek@cbk.waw.pl

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence.

  19. Encounter with saturn: voyager 1 imaging science results.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Soderblom, L; Beebe, R; Boyce, J; Briggs, G; Bunker, A; Collins, S A; Hansen, C J; Johnson, T V; Mitchell, J L; Terrile, R J; Carr, M; Cook, A F; Cuzzi, J; Pollack, J B; Danielson, G E; Ingersoll, A; Davies, M E; Hunt, G E; Masursky, H; Shoemaker, E; Morrison, D; Owen, T; Sagan, C; Veverka, J; Strom, R; Suomi, V E

    1981-04-10

    As Voyager 1 flew through the Saturn system it returned photographs revealing many new and surprising characteristics of this complicated community of bodies. Saturn's atmosphere has numerous, low-contrast, discrete cloud features and a pattern of circulation significantly different from that of Jupiter. Titan is shrouded in a haze layer that varies in thickness and appearance. Among the icy satellites there is considerable variety in density, albedo, and surface morphology and substantial evidence for endogenic surface modification. Trends in density and crater characteristics are quite unlike those of the Galilean satellites. Small inner satellites, three of which were discovered in Voyager images, interact gravitationally with one another and with the ring particles in ways not observed elsewhere in the solar system. Saturn's broad A, B, and C rings contain hundreds of "ringlets," and in the densest portion of the B ring there are numerous nonaxisymmetric features. The narrow F ring has three components which, in at least one instance, are kinked and crisscrossed. Two rings are observed beyond the F ring, and material is seen between the C ring and the planet. PMID:17783827

  20. Shared Voyage: Learning and Unlearning from Remarkable Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Alexander; Post, Todd; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    Shared Voyage is about four remarkable projects: the Advanced Composition Explorer (NASA), the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (U.S. Air Force), the Pathfinder Solar-Powered Airplane (NASA), and the Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (U.S.Air Force). Each project is presented as a case study comprised of stories collected from key members of the project teams. The stories found in the book are included with the purpose of providing an effective learning source for project management, encouraging the unlearning of outdated project management concepts, and enhancing awareness of the contexts surrounding different projects. Significantly different from project concepts found in most project management literature, Shared Voyage highlights concepts like a will to win, a results-oriented focus, and collaboration through trust. All four project teams researched in this study applied similar concepts; however, they applied them differently, tailoring them to fit the context of their own particular projects. It is clear that the one best way approach which is still the prevailing paradigm in project management literature should be replaced by a new paradigm: Even though general project management principles exist, their successful application depends on the specifics of the situation.

  1. Encounter with Saturn: Voyager 1 imaging science results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.; Beebe, R.; Boyce, J.; Briggs, G.; Bunker, A.; Collins, S.A.; Hansen, C.J.; Johnson, T.V.; Mitchell, J.L.; Terrile, R.J.; Carr, M.; Cook, A.F., II; Cuzzi, J.; Pollack, James B.; Edward, Danielson G.; Ingersoll, A.; Davies, M.E.; Hunt, G.E.; Masursky, H.; Shoemaker, E.; Morrison, D.; Owen, editors, Timothy W.; Sagan, C.; Veverka, J.; Strom, R.; Suomi, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    As Voyager 1 flew through the Saturn system it returned photographs revealing many new and surprising characteristics of this complicated community of bodies. Saturn's atmosphere has numerous, low-contrast, discrete cloud features and a pattern of circulation significantly different from that of Jupiter. Titan is shrouded in a haze layer that varies in thickness and appearance. Among the icy satellites there is considerable variety in density, albedo, and surface morphology and substantial evidence for endogenic surface modification. Trends in density and crater characteristics are quite unlike those of the Galilean satellites. Small inner satellites, three of which were discovered in Voyager images, interact gravitationally with one another and with the ring particles in ways not observed elsewhere in the solar system. Saturn's broad A, B, and C rings contain hundreds of "ringlets," and in the densest portion of the B ring there are numerous nonaxisymmetric features. The narrow F ring has three components which, in at least one instance, are kinked and crisscrossed. Two rings are observed beyond the F ring, and material is seen between the C ring and the planet. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  2. Circadian rhythm of body temperature during prolonged undersea voyages.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, W P; Paine, M W; Fort, A

    1978-05-01

    Circadian rhythms of oral temperature were assessed in 12 watchkeepers during a prolonged submarine voyage and compared with a "standard" rhythm obtained from nonwatchkeepers ashore. Initially, the parameters of the rhythms were similar to those of the standard; however, among eight ratings working 4-h watches in a rapidly rotating cycle, considerable changes in the rhythms occurred as the voyage progressed, and concurrent alterations in sleep patterning were observed. The most characteristic change in the rhythm was a marked decline in its amplitude. In most subjects, the rhythm also tended to depart from its original circadian pattern; in at least one case, it effectively disintegrated. One subject's rhythm appeared to "free-run" with a period greater than 24 h. A strong circadian rhythm was maintained in only one of these eight subjects. In four officers whose watch times were at fixed hours, adaptation of the rhythm to unusual times of sleep occurred in 2 of 3 cases where the schedule demanded it. The results are discussed in relation to the design of optimal watchkeeping systems for submariners. PMID:655989

  3. Magnetic field studies at jupiter by voyager 2: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuna, M H; Lepping, R P; Burlaga, L F; Behannon, K W; Neubauer, F M

    1979-11-23

    Data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometers on Voyager 2 have yielded on inbound trajectory observations of multiple crossings of the bow shock and magnetosphere near the Jupiter-sun line at radial distances of 99 to 66 Jupiter radii (RJ) and 72 to 62 RJ, respectively. While outbound at a local hour angle of 0300, these distances increase appreciably so that at the time of writing only the magnetopause has been observed between 160 and 185 RJ. These results and the magnetic field geometry confirm the earlier conclusion from Voyager I studies that Jupiter has an enormous magnetic tail, approximately 300 to 400 RJ in diameter, trailing behind the planet with respect to the supersonic flow of the solar wind. Addi- tional observations of the distortion of the inner magnetosphere by a concentrated plasma show a spatial merging of the equatorial magnetodisk current with the cur- rent sheet in the magnetic tail. The spacecraft passed within 62,000 kilometers of Ganymede (radius = 2,635 kilometers) and observed characteristic fluctuations in- terpreted tentatively as being due to disturbances arising from the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Ganymede. PMID:17733916

  4. Antenna arraying of Voyager telemetry signals by symbol stream combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Rabkin, J.; Russell, M. D.; Siev, B.; Cooper, H. W.; Anderson, T. O.; Winter, P. U.

    1986-08-01

    Telemetry signals received from the Voyager 2 spacecraft at Deep Space Stations at Parkes and Canberra, Australia, on February 6, 1986, were combined by the method of symbol stream combining. This second demonstration of symbol stream combining followed the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) demonstration at Giacobini-Zinner encounter in September 1985. The Voyager demonstration was at a symbol rate of 43.2 ksymb/s, compared to 2 ksymb/s for ICE. Recording, playback, and combining at this higher rate were demonstrated. The average symbol signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the combined data was 2.84 dB, or 0.23 dB less than the sum of the SNRs of the two imput symbol streams. This 0.23 loss from ideal combining was due to use of 4-bit quantization of the input symbol stream and imperfect scaling. A practical implementation with 8-bit quantization could achieve combining losses of under 0.05 dB over a wide dynamic range of input signal levels.

  5. Vision and Voyages: Lessons Learned from the Planetary Decadal Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squyres, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    The most recent planetary decadal survey, entitled Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022, provided a detailed set of priorities for solar system exploration. Those priorities drew on broad input from the U.S. and international planetary science community. Using white papers, town hall meetings, and open meetings of the decadal committees, community views were solicited and a consensus began to emerge. The final report summarized that consensus. Like many past decadal reports, the centerpiece of Vision and Voyages was a set of priorities for future space flight projects. Two things distinguished this report from some previous decadals. First, conservative and independent cost estimates were obtained for all of the projects that were considered. These independent cost estimates, rather than estimates generated by project advocates, were used to judge each project's expected science return per dollar. Second, rather than simply accepting NASA's ten-year projection of expected funding for planetary exploration, decision rules were provided to guide program adjustments if actual funding did not follow projections. To date, NASA has closely followed decadal recommendations. In particular, the two highest priority "flagship" missions, a Mars rover to collect samples for return to Earth and a mission to investigate a possible ocean on Europa, are both underway. The talk will describe the planetary decadal process in detail, and provide a more comprehensive assessment of NASA's response to it.

  6. Magnetic field measurements at Jupiter by Voyagers 1 and 2: Daily plots of 48 second averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Silverstein, M. J.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 24 hour summary plots of the magnetic field, in 48-s average form, measured in the vicinity of Jupiter by the magnetometers onboard Voyagers 1 and 2 are presented. The Voyager 1 data cover the period from 27 February 1979 (day = 58) to 23 March (day = 82) inclusive, and the Voyager 2 data cover the period from 2 July 1979 (day = 183) to 14 August (day = 226) inclusive. Closest approach to the planet occurred on days 64 (AT 1205 UT) and 190 (AT 2230 UT) for Voyagers 1 and 2, respectively. Also included are: a description of the characteristics of the magnetometers, a brief description of the near-planet trajectories of the two spacecraft, a listing of the bow shock and magnetopause crossing times, and a bibliography containing Voyager-Jupiter related papers and reports.

  7. Voyager IRIS Measurements of Triton's Thermal Emission: Impllications for Pluto?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansberry, John A.; Spencer, John; Linscott, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    The New Horizons Pluto encounter data set includes unique observations obtained using the Radio Science experiment to measure the night-side thermal emission at centimeter wavelengths, well beyond the emission peak (in the 70 to 100 micron range). 26 years ago the Voyager 2 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) obtained spectra in the 30 - 50 micron wavelength range to try and detect thermal emission from Pluto's sibling, Triton. Conrath etal. (1989) analyzed 16 of the IRIS spectra of Triton's dayside and derived a weak limit of 36 K - 41 K. We have analysed those, and an additional 75 spectra, to refine the limits on the temperature of Triton's surface, and to explore diurnal differences in the thermal emission. Triton results from other Voyager instruments provide important constraints on our interpretation of the IRIS data, as do Spitzer measurements of Pluto's thermal emission.For unit-emissivity, average temperature is 34 K, inconsistent with the pressure of Triton's atmosphere (13 - 19 microbar), the presence of beta-phase nitrogen ice on the surface, and the likely presence ofwarm regions on the surface. The atmospheric pressure requires nitrogen ice temperatures of 37.4 K - 38.1 K, which in turn requires emissivity of 0.31--0.53. Such a low emissivity in this spectral region might be expected if the surface is dominated by nitrogen or methane ice. Averages of data subsets show evidence for brightness temperature variations across Triton's surface. Surprisingly, the data seem to indicate that Triton's nightside equatorial region was warmer than on the dayside.These Voyager results for Triton provide a useful context for interpreting New Horizons and ALMA observations of emission from Pluto in the sub-millimeter and centimeter region. JWST will be capable of detecting Triton's and Pluto's 10 - 28 micron thermal emission, although scattered light from Neptune may be an issue for the Triton. Combined with new capabilities of ALMA to measure the sub

  8. Magnetic reconnection physics in the solar wind with Voyager 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael L.

    2009-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the process by which the magnetic topology evolves in collisionless plasmas. This phenomenon is fundamental to a broad range of astrophysical processes such as stellar flares, magnetospheric substorms, and plasma accretion, yet it is poorly understood and difficult to observe in situ . In this thesis, the solar wind plasma permeating interplanetary space is treated as a laboratory for reconnection physics. I present an exhaustive statistical approach to the identification of reconnection outflow jets in turbulent plasma and magnetic field time series data. This approach has been automated and characterized so that the resulting reconnection survey can be put in context with other related studies. The algorithm is shown to perform similarly to ad hoc studies in the inner heliosphere. Based on this technique, I present a survey of 138 outflow jets for the Voyager 2 spacecraft mission, including the most distant in situ evidence of reconnection discovered to date. Reconnection in the solar wind is shown to be strongly correlated with stream interactions and with solar activity. The solar wind magnetic field is found to be reconnecting via large, quasi-steady slow- mode magnetohydrodynamic structures as far out as the orbit of Neptune. The role of slow-mode shocks is explored and, in one instance, a well-developed reconnection structure is shown to be in good agreement with the Petschek theory for fast reconnection. This is the first reported example of a reconnection exhaust that satisfies the full jump conditions for a stationary slow-mode shock pair. A complete investigation into corotating stream interactions over the Voyager 2 mission has revealed that detectable reconnection structure occurs in about 23% of forced, global-scale current sheets. Contrary to previous studies, I find that signatures of this kind are most likely to be observed for current sheets where the magnetic field shear and the plasma-b are high. Evidence has been found

  9. The Jovian hectometric radiation - an overview after the Voyager mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladreiter, H. P.; Leblanc, Y.

    1991-12-01

    The main characteristics and the inferred properties of the hectometric (HOM) radiation which was observed by IMP-6, RAE-1 and Voyager spacecraft are reviewed. This includes the occurrence of HOM in Jovian longitude, the strong beaming in latitude, the polarization properties, the local time effect, and the solar wind control of the emission. Like many radio emissions observed at the other magnetized planets, the hectometric components is likely to be generated in the R-X mode from sources in the northern and southern auroral zones. The emission is beamed along the surface of hollow cones and is possibly produced by the cyclotron maser mechanism. The HOM sources extend up to 7 R(J) (Jovian radii) along field lines near L = 20 in the auroral zone; they are distinct from the Io-controlled decametric (DAM) sources but are probably the extension of the non-Io DAM sources.

  10. The helium abundance of Saturn from Voyager measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, B. J.; Hanel, R. A.; Gautier, D.; Hornstein, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The helium abundance in the atmosphere of Saturn is obtained from Voyager measurements by two methods. The first method combines infrared spectra and vertical profiles derived from radio occultation measurements and yields a hydrogen mole fraction of q = 0.963 + or - 0.024 corresponding to a helium mass fraction of Y = 0.06 + or - 0.05. The estimated errors are primarily due to uncertainties in the radio occultation profile and in the abundance of methane, which contributes significantly to the mean molecular weight. The second method is based on the direct inversion of infrared spectra and yields values consistent with those from the first method; however, examination of the sensitivities of the two methods indicates that in the Saturnian case the first approach provides more accurate results. Comparison of the helium abundance of Saturn with that of Jupiter and the sun suggests that helium precipitation is significant in Saturn but may not have begun in Jupiter.

  11. Oberon - Color photometry from Voyager and its geological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Hillier, John; Weitz, Catherine; Veverka, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The surface of the Uranian satellite Oberon is characterized on the basis of ground-based and Voyager photometric observations. Disk-integrated phase-curve and disk-resolved data are presented in extensive tables, graphs, maps, and black-and-white and false-color images and discussed in terms of fits to the Hapke (1986) parameters, local variations in albedo and color, and their possible geological significance. It is found that most of the leading hemisphere is covered with dark materials like those in the crater floors, while the trailing hemisphere has patches of the dark material on a surface with a higher proportion of icy materials which are spectrally neutral.

  12. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.E.; Chenette, D.L.; Cummings, A.C.; Garrard, T.L.; Stone, E.C.; Schardt, A.W.; Trainor, J.H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F.B.

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the greater than or equal to 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more varible, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approx. 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  13. Amalthea - Implications of the temperature observed by Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature profile of Amalthea's surface layer is modeled as a function of location and time of day, assuming a triaxial ellipsoid shape and thermal properties similar to those of the lunar soil. Although the major heat source is direct insolation, temperatures are slightly increased by thermal radiation from Jupiter, sunlight reflected from the planet, and charged particle bombardment. Possible sources of error in the model are discussed in detail, including satellite shape effects, unusually low emissivity, uncommonly rough surface, abnormal thermal inertia, charged particle flux variability, and Joule heating. Voyager 1 IRIS observations suggest that the Amalthean surface has an emissivity near unity, but cannot put any useful limits on the thermal inertia of the Amalthean surface layer.

  14. Losing it in New Guinea: the voyage of HMS Rattlesnake.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jordan

    2005-06-01

    The voyage of the HMS Rattlesnake to New Guinea and the archipelago to the east of it could have achieved so much for science. 'Make sure of what you do', enthused British hydrographer Francis Beaufort to the Rattlesnake's commander Owen Stanley in 1848. 'Do not leave interesting questions to be answered at the next visit - give names to Capes and Islands...and bring yourself and your people back without quarrels'. But for some reason Stanley wavered. There were several scientists on board the Rattlesnake desperate to ask interesting questions of these uncharted islands. But these natural historians, and in particular a young Thomas Henry Huxley, found their ambitions thwarted by their increasingly edgy captain. PMID:15935857

  15. Studies of the interplanetary magnetic field: IMP's to Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    During the last two decades, spacecraft projects and individual experiments for which Frank McDonald was a leader have contributed very significantly to the current understanding of the structure of interplanetary space and the correlation between solar and interplanetary disturbances. Studies on the IMP, HELIOS, and Pioneer spin-stabilized spacecraft and the larger attitude-stabilized Voyager spacecraft have provided data sets from which the modern view of the heliosphere has evolved. That concept in which the inner solar system is shown to be dominated by individual streams associated with specific source regions on the Sun is illustrated. As these high-speed streams overtake the preexisting solar plasma, they coalesce and modify the characteristics so that at larger heliocentric distances, these disturbances appear as radially propagating concentric shells of compressed magnetic fields and enhanced fluctuations

  16. The voyager 2 encounter with the neptunian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Miner, E D

    1989-12-15

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the planned observations, and highlights of the results described in the 11 companion papers. Neptune's blue atmosphere has storm systems reminiscent of those in Jupiter's atmosphere. An optically thin methane ice cloud exists near the 1.5-bar pressure level, and an optically thick cloud exists below 3 bars. Neptune's magnetic field is highly tilted and offset from the planet's center; it rotates with a period of 16.11 hours. Two narrow and two broad rings circle the planet; the outermost of these rings has three optically thicker arc segments. Six new moons were discovered in circular prograde orbits, all well inside Triton's retrograde orbit. Triton has a highly reflective and geologically young surface, a thin nitrogen atmosphere, and at least two active geyser-like plumes. PMID:17755996

  17. The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptunian system

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, E.C.; Miner, E.D. )

    1989-12-15

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the planned observations, and highlights of the results described in the 11 companion papers. Neptune's blue atmosphere has storm systems reminiscent of those in Jupiter's atmosphere. An optically thin methane ice cloud exists near the 1.5-bar pressure level, and an optically thick cloud exists below 3 bars. Neptune's magnetic field is highly tilted and offset from the planet's center; it rotates with a period of 16.11 hours. Two narrow and two broad rings circle the planet; the outermost of these rings has three optically thicker arc segments. Six moons were discovered in circular prograde orbits, all well inside Triton's retrograde orbit. Triton has a highly reflective and geologically young surface, a thin nitrogen atmosphere, and at least two active geyser-like plumes.

  18. The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptunian system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Miner, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the planned observations, and highlights of the results described in the 11 companion papers. Neptune's blue atmosphere has storm systems reminiscent of those in Jupiter's atmosphere. An optically thin methane ice cloud exists near the 1.5-bar pressure level, and an optically thick cloud exists below 3 bars. Neptune's magnetic field is highly tilted and offset from the planet's center; it rotates with a period of 16.11 hours. Two narrow and two broad rings circle the planet; the outermost of these rings has three optically thicker arc segments. Six new moons were discovered in circular prograde orbits, all well inside Triton's retrograde orbit. Triton has a highly reflective and geologically young surface, a thin nitrogen atmosphere, and at least two active geyser-like plumes.

  19. Planetary radio astronomy receiver. [experiment on Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, G. J.; Peltzer, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The planetary radio astronomy (PRA) experiment on the Voyager spacecraft will measure the amplitude, spectrum, time variations, and polarization of radio emissions over a frequency range of 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz with the aid of the PRA receiver (PRAR) and two 10-m orthogonal monopoles. Sensitivity and dynamic range will allow observation of a wide range of Jovian emissions from near earth to encounter. This paper describes the system elements, including the preamp/attenuator/calibrator, the LF polarization discriminator, the four LF-IF amplifier stages, the HF polarization discriminator, the translation LO, the log-IF and detector, the frequency synthesizer, the data processor, control system, power supply, and antennas.

  20. Uranus photochemistry and prospects for Voyager 2 at Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    CH4 is the only photochemically active constituent in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune. NH3, H2O and H2S are all removed by condensation at pressures greater than 1.5 bars. Although the bulk mole fraction (about 2 percent) of CH4 is 20-30 times its solar value on both planets, it drops to its saturation limit (about 0.0001) at the Uranus tropopause, but remains high (about 2 percent) at the Neptune tropopause. This results in much greater mixing ratios of the product hydrocarbons in the stratosphere of Neptune. On both planets, the photolysis products of CH4 undergo condensation near the tropopause and the upper stratosphere. Voyager observations of the hydrocarbons at Uranus and those planned at Neptune are discussed, along with their implications for upper-atmospheric physics and thermochemistry.

  1. Voyager 2 in the uranian system: imaging science results.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Soderblom, L A; Beebe, R; Bliss, D; Boyce, J M; Brahic, A; Briggs, G A; Brown, R H; Collins, S A; Cook, A F; Croft, S K; Cuzzi, J N; Danielson, G E; Davies, M E; Dowling, T E; Godfrey, D; Hansen, C J; Harris, C; Hunt, G E; Ingersoll, A P; Johnson, T V; Krauss, R J; Masursky, H; Morrison, D; Owen, T; Plescia, J B; Pollack, J B; Porco, C C; Rages, K; Sagan, C; Shoemaker, E M; Sromovsky, L A; Stoker, C; Strom, R G; Suomi, V E; Synnott, S P; Terrile, R J; Thomas, P; Thompson, W R; Veverka, J

    1986-07-01

    Voyager 2 images of the southern hemisphere of Uranus indicate that submicrometersize haze particles and particles of a methane condensation cloud produce faint patterns in the atmosphere. The alignment of the cloud bands is similar to that of bands on Jupiter and Saturn, but the zonal winds are nearly opposite. At mid-latitudes (-70 degrees to -27 degrees ), where winds were measured, the atmosphere rotates faster than the magnetic field; however, the rotation rate of the atmosphere decreases toward the equator, so that the two probably corotate at about -20 degrees . Voyager images confirm the extremely low albedo of the ring particles. High phase angle images reveal on the order of 10(2) new ringlike features of very low optical depth and relatively high dust abundance interspersed within the main rings, as well as a broad, diffuse, low optical depth ring just inside the main rings system. Nine of the newly discovered small satellites (40 to 165 kilometers in diameter) orbit between the rings and Miranda; the tenth is within the ring system. Two of these small objects may gravitationally confine the e ring. Oberon and Umbriel have heavily cratered surfaces resembling the ancient cratered highlands of Earth's moon, although Umbriel is almost completely covered with uniform dark material, which perhaps indicates some ongoing process. Titania and Ariel show crater populations different from those on Oberon and Umbriel; these were probably generated by collisions with debris confined to their orbits. Titania and Ariel also show many extensional fault systems; Ariel shows strong evidence for the presence of extrusive material. About halfof Miranda's surface is relatively bland, old, cratered terrain. The remainder comprises three large regions of younger terrain, each rectangular to ovoid in plan, that display complex sets of parallel and intersecting scarps and ridges as well as numerous outcrops of bright and dark materials, perhaps suggesting some exotic

  2. Has the Sun Significantly Impacted Recent Voyager Observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Sun, W.; Detman, T. R.; Dryer, Ph. D., M.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Using our models HAFSS (HAF Source Surface) and HHMS-PI (Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System with Pickup Protons) we have been analyzing some of the recent (e.g., July 2012, etc.) solar events to determine if the effects of the events might be seen in the outer heliosphere, heliosheath, etc. Our analyses provide insights into the phenomena in these regions. Both models are three-dimensional (3D) time dependent simulations that use solar observations as input. HAFSS is a kinematic model. HHMS-PI is a numerical magnetohydrodynamic solar wind (SW) simulation model. Both HHMS-PI and HAFSS are ideally suited for these analyses since starting from the Sun they model the slowly evolving background SW and the impulsive, time-dependent events associated with solar activity (e.g., coronal mass ejections (CMEs). HHMS-PI/HAFSS make it possible to track interplanetary shocks as they propagate, interact, and evolve en route to various spacecraft (s/c) where they are observed. Our models have been used to reproduce s/c data from ACE to Ulysses, Cassini, and Voyagers 1 and 2. Our published results in refereed scientific journals showed that: a.) Our models naturally reproduce dynamic 3D spatially asymmetric effects observed throughout the heliosphere. b.) Pre-existing SW background conditions have a strong influence on the propagation of shock waves from solar events. c.) Time-dependence is a crucial aspect of interpreting s/c data. d.) Shock interactions resulting from multiple solar events lead to complicated time-series observations at individual s/c. We believe the answer to the question in the title of this abstract is: Yes, we do think the Sun has significantly impacted recent Voyager observations.

  3. Voyager 2 in the Uranian system: Imaging science results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Beebe, R.; Bliss, D.; Boyce, J.M.; Brahic, A.; Briggs, G.A.; Brown, R.H.; Collins, S.A.; Cook, A.F., II; Croft, S.K.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Danielson, G.E.; Davies, M.E.; Dowling, T.E.; Godfrey, D.; Hansen, C.J.; Harris, M. Camille; Hunt, G.E.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Krauss, R.J.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Owen, editors, Timothy W.; Plescia, J.B.; Pollack, James B.; Porco, C.C.; Rages, K.; Sagan, C.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Sromovsky, L.A.; Stoker, C.; Strom, R.G.; Suomi, V.E.; Synnott, S.P.; Terrile, R.J.; Thomas, P.; Thompson, W.R.; Veverka, J.

    1986-01-01

    Voyager 2 images of the southern hemisphere of Uranus indicate that submicrometersize haze particles and particles of a methane condensation cloud produce faint patterns in the atmosphere. The alignment of the cloud bands is similar to that of bands on Jupiter and Saturn, but the zonal winds are nearly opposite. At mid-latitudes (-70?? to -27??), where winds were measured, the atmosphere rotates faster than the magnetic field; however, the rotation rate of the atmosphere decreases toward the equator, so that the two probably corotate at about -20??. Voyager images confirm the extremely low albedo of the ring particles. High phase angle images reveal on the order of 10 2 new ringlike features of very low optical depth and relatively high dust abundance interspersed within the main rings, as well as a broad, diffuse, low optical depth ring just inside the main ring system. Nine of the newly discovered small satellites (40 to 165 kilometers in diameter) orbit between the rings and Miranda; the tenth is within the ring system. Two of these small objects may gravitationally confine the ?? ring. Oberon and Umbriel have heavily cratered surfaces resembling the ancient cratered highlands of Earth's moon, although Umbriel is almost completely covered with uniform dark material, which perhaps indicates some ongoing process. Titania and Ariel show crater populations different from those on Oberon and Umbriel; these were probably generated by collisions with debris confined to their orbits. Titania and Ariel also show many extensional fault systems; Ariel shows strong evidence for the presence of extrusive material. About half of Miranda's surface is relatively bland, old, cratered terrain. The remainder comprises three large regions of younger terrain, each rectangular to ovoid in plan, that display complex sets of parallel and intersecting scarps and ridges as well as numerous outcrops of bright and dark materials, perhaps suggesting some exotic composition.

  4. A Voyage through Scales - Water in terrestrial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial systems - a conglomerate that includes sediments, soils, and vegetation - are the third large compartment of our environment, besides the fluid systems atmosphere and ocean. All of them exhibit structures with a range of spatial and temporal scales that cover at least 9 orders of magnitude. There is a fundamental difference, however. For the fluid systems, structures and flow are one, with structures generated by the nonlinear nature of the flow and manifest in it. In contrast, the structures of terrestrial systems are predominantly formed by processes whose time scales are many orders of magnitude larger than those of the flow and transport within them. During our voyage, we will first consider the role of terrestrial systems in Earth's environmental machinery, will then stroll through their intricate multiscale architecture that covers some 14 orders of magnitude in space, and indeed also in time, have a short glimpse at the nature of the processes, predominantly the flow of water with just a nod to transport and interactions, and will finally formulate a key question: "Is an effective representation of processes in terrestrial systems possible, at a chosen scale of interest, and if so, how can it be gained?" There is no straight answer to this and we will visit several of its aspects - dissipative processes, representative and maximal averaging volumes, and time-scales -, will look at successes and failures, and will finally glance over to the working crews that attempt to blaze a way forward by dense observation networks, data assimilation, and high-performance computing. This voyage will be through Earth's terrestrial systems, with a focus on soils and porous media. It should also be informative for all who are facing nonlinear processes in hierarchically heterogeneous architectures.

  5. New Access and Analysis Tools for Voyager LECP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. E.; Hill, M. E.; Decker, R. B.; Cooper, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been returning unique scientific measurements since launching in 1977, most notably observations from the historic tour of the giant planets. As these spacecraft continue on their exit trajectories from the Solar system they have become an interstellar mission and have begun to probe the boundary between the heliosphere and the interstellar cloud and continue to make exciting discoveries. As the mission changed from one focused on discrete encounters to an open ended search for heliospheric boundaries and transitory disturbances, the positions and timing of which are not known, the data processing needs have changed. Open data policies and the push to draw data under the umbrella of emerging Virtual Observatories have added a data sharing component that was not a part of the original mission plans. We present our work in utilizing new, reusable software analysis tools to access legacy data in a way that leverages pre-existing data analysis techniques. We took an existing Applied Physics Laboratory application, Mission Independent Data Layer (MIDL) -- developed originally under a NASA Applied Information Research Program (AISRP) and subsequently used with data from Geotail, Cassini, IMP-8, ACE, Messenger, and New Horizons -- and applied it to Voyager data. We use the MIDL codebase to automatically generate standard data products such as daily summary plots and associated tabulated data that increase our ability to monitor the heliospheric environment on a regular basis. These data products will be publicly available and updated automatically and can be analyzed by the community using the ultra portable MIDL software launched from the data distribution website. The currently available LECP data will also be described with SPASE metadata and incorporated into the emerging Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO).

  6. Pioneer and voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and lattitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gazis, P.R.; Mihalov, J.D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A.J.; Smith, E.J.

    1989-03-01

    The Pioneer 10, 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft are well suited for exploring spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Between 1984 and 1986 Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 were located at nearly the same heliocentric distance (approx. =20 AU) and longitude but were widely separated in latitude; Pioneer 11 was at a heliographic latitude of greater than or equal to15/sup 0/ while Voyager 2 was near the solar equator. Pioneer 10 was located near the solar equator but at a considerably greater heliocentric distance (approx. =40 AU). IMP observations at 1 AU provide an inner heliosphere baseline.

  7. The fate of the bird specimens from Cook's voyages possessed by Sir Joseph Banks.

    PubMed

    Medway, David G

    2009-10-01

    Joseph Banks possessed the greater part of the zoological specimens collected on James Cook's three voyages round the world (1768-1780). In early 1792, Banks divided his zoological collection between John Hunter and the British Museum. It is probable that those donations together comprised most of the zoological specimens then in the possession of Banks, including such bird specimens as remained of those that had been collected by himself and Daniel Solander on Cook's first voyage, and those that had been presented to him from Cook's second and third voyages. The bird specimens included in the Banks donations of 1792 became part of a series of transactions during the succeeding 53 years which involved the British Museum, the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and William Bullock. It is a great pity that, of the extensive collection of bird specimens from Cook's voyages once possessed by Banks, only two are known with any certainty to survive. PMID:20014506

  8. Environment-induced electrostatic discharges as the cause of Voyager 1 power-on resets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, P.; Whittlesey, A. C.; Garrett, H. B.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft all experienced anomalous behavior during their encounters with Jupiter. In particular, the Voyager 1 spacecraft experienced 42 electrical circuitry designed to protect the on-board computer from power fluctuations. Given the diversity of instrumentation and frequency of the anomalies observed by Voyager 1 in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter, this set of data is particularly well suited as a case study. Although the nature of the anomalies clearly indicates a spacecraft-charging origin, the Voyager low-energy plasma data apparently imply absolute surface potentials of only a few tens of volts. It is thus difficult to explain the anomalies in terms of surface charging. The anomalies are, however, shown to be consistent with the hypothesis of internal charging of spacecraft parts and components.

  9. NASA Now: Space Science: Voyager’s Grand Tour of the Solar System

    NASA Video Gallery

    Planetary scientist Lou Mayo discusses what we’re learning from the Voyager missions, where the two spacecraft currently are located, and some of the incredible discoveries made on the long journ...

  10. Ephemerides of the Uranian satellites determined from earth-based astrometric and Voyager imaging observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; Lewis, G. D.; Riedel, J. E.; Roth, D. C.; Synnot, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    Uranian satellite ephemerides were needed by the Voyager project to support both navigation and acquisition of scientific data. This paper outlines the mathematical modeling approach taken to generate those ephemerides and discusses their pre-encounter development, real time updating, and post-encounter refinement. The results presented include the final set of model parameters which generate the ephemerides that best fit the Voyager optical data as well as the earth based observations of the satellites.

  11. Infrared images of Jupiter at 5-micrometer wavelength during the Voyager 1 encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, R. J.; Capps, R. W.; Backman, D. E.; Becklin, E. E.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Beichman, C. A.; Brown, R. H.; Westphal, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A coordinated program to observe Jupiter at high spatial resolution in the 5-micrometer wavelength region was undertaken to support Voyager 1 imaging and infrared radiation experiment targeting. Jupiter was observed over a 5-month period from Palomar and Mauna Kea observatories. The frequency of observations allowed the selection of interesting areas for closer Voyager examination and also provided good short-term monitoring of variations in cloud morphology. Significant global changes in the 5-micrometer distribution are seen over this time period.

  12. Vertical mixing and methane photochemistry in the atmosphere of Uranus: Analysis of Voyager UVS occultation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1991-01-01

    Extensive capabilities were developed in the analysis of ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) absorptive lightcurves. The application of these capabilities to the Voyager UVS data sets from Uranus and Neptune has provided significant findings regarding the stratospheres of these planets. In particular, the direct comparison between photochemical models and UVS measurements accomplished by these efforts is unique, and it helps to guarantee that the information returned by the Voyager 2 spacecraft is being used to the fullest extent possible.

  13. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude oil washing during a voyage... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing... § 157.10c(b)(2) shall ensure that each cargo tank that is crude oil washed during a voyage other than...

  14. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude oil washing during a voyage... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing... § 157.10c(b)(2) shall ensure that each cargo tank that is crude oil washed during a voyage other than...

  15. Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster valve assembly short pulse test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The short pulse width testing completed on the Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster value assemblies (T/VA's) and the disassembly and inspection of T/VA S/N 020 is reported. The purpose for performing the short pulse width testing on Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster valve assemblies (T/VA's) was to determine: (1) impulse bit versus electrical pulse width; (2) impulse bit variations versus electrical pulse width; and (3) whether the short pulses decrease thruster life.

  16. Synthetic Micro/Nanomachines and Their Applications: Towards 'Fantastic Voyage'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei

    The 1966 movie Fantastic Voyage captured the world's imagination, portraying a tiny submarine navigating through the human bloodstream and treating life-threatening medical conditions. My PhD research focuses on the synthetic nano/microscale machines to realize the Fantastic Voyage vision. Various biomedical and environmental areas would benefit from the developments of efficient fuel-free and fuel-driven nano/microscale machines. The polymer-based catalytic tubular microengine is synthesized using a template based electrodeposition method. The oxygen bubble propelled microengine harvests the energy from chemical fuels (such as H2O2) and displays very efficient propulsion. It can serve as an ideal platform for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. For example, lectin modified polyaniline based microengines can be used for selective bacteria (E. Coli) isolation from food, clinical and environmental samples; poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid)/Ni/Pt microengine itself provides the 'built in' glucose recognition capability for 'on-the-fly' capture, transport and release of yeast cells. A series of micromotors which can be self-propelled in natural environments without additional chemical fuels are developed, holding great promise for in vivo biomedical applications: the polyaniline/zinc microrockets display effective autonomous motion in extreme acidic environments (such as human stomach); the Al-Ga/Ti based Janus micromotor can be propelled by the hydrogen bubbles generated from the rapid aluminum and water reaction; alkanethiols modified seawater-driven Mg Janus micromotors, which utilize macrogalvanic corrosion and chloride pitting corrosion processes, can be used for environmental oil remediation. Magnetically powered nanoswimmers have attracted considerable attention due to their great biocompatibility. A high-speed magnetically-propelled nanowire swimmer which mimics swimming microorganisms by exploiting the flexible nanowire as artificial flagella

  17. Voyager 2 encounter with Ganymede's wake: hydromagnetic and electrodynamic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 2's passage through corotation wake region of Ganymede found disturbances in the energetic particle and magnetic field data. To explain the nature of disturbances, an investigation of the interaction of the Jovian plasma with Ganymede is carried out. A series of computer simulations, supported by appropriate theories, are made. Three different aspects of the interaction are studied: (i) A magnetic field model is proposed to describe Alfvenic disturbances caused by Ganymede. Numerical simulations show that the interaction of ensembles of ions with perturbed fields modulates the energies of the ions. The amount of modulation depends on the Alfven mach number of the ambient plasma, the ion energy, and the pitch angle of the ions. (ii) The electrodynamic processes associated with the plasma-Ganymede interaction and the plasma expansion into the cavity are simulated using a particle-in-cell method. The distribution of ions, potentials, ion and electron thermal and drift energies in the wake region are obtained. (iii) Using linear MHD theory, conditions for excitation and growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are investigated. Theoretical conditions for the existence of magnetosonic waves and transverse Alfven waves are also examined.

  18. Voyager photometry of surface features on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Veverka, J.

    1981-01-01

    Photometric properties of selected surface features on Ganymede and Callisto are studied, using Voyager images over phase angles from 10 to 124 deg, taken with a clear filter (effective wavelength of approximately 0.5 microns). Normal reflectances on Ganymede average 0.35 for the cratered terrain, and 0.44 for the grooved terrain; the ubiquitous cratered terrain on Callisto is 0.18. The photometric properties of these regions are described by a simple scattering function, where the function of the phase angle is qualitatively similar to that of the moon, i.e., concave upward. By contrast, bright craters on both satellites have functions of the phase angle which are concave downward. The scattering function is not Lambertian, and may be due to an admixture of a small amount of dark, opaque silicate grains with the frost deposits. The brightest craters on Callisto have reflectances which are 10% lower than the brightest craters on Ganymede, and both have similar scattering laws.

  19. Magnetic field experiment for Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Aluna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Ness, N. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment to be carried on the Voyager 1 and 2 missions consists of dual low field (LFM) and high field magnetometer (HFM) systems. The dual systems provide greater reliability and, in the case of the LFM's, permit the separation of spacecraft magnetic fields from the ambient fields. Additional reliability is achieved through electronics redundancy. The wide dynamic ranges of plus or minus 0.5G for the LFM's and plus or minus 20G for the HFM's, low quantization uncertainty of plus or minus 0.002 gamma in the most sensitive (plus or minus 8 gamma) LFM range, low sensor RMS noise level of 0.006 gamma, and use of data compaction schemes to optimize the experiment information rate all combine to permit the study of a broad spectrum of phenomena during the mission. Planetary fields at Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Uranus; satellites of these planets; solar wind and satellite interactions with the planetary fields; and the large-scale structure and microscale characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field are studied. The interstellar field may also be measured.

  20. UVS - Voyager 1 measurements in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quemerais, E.; Sandel, B. R.; Lallement, R.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The UVS spectrometer on Voyager 1 is still active. The only line still observed in the data is the HI Lyman alpha transition due to backscattering of solar photons on H atoms in the outer heliosphere. The bakground intensity corresponds to a few 10s of rayleigh. In 2003, movements of the V1 scan platforms were stopped and since then the line of sight of UVS has been pointing towards the same direction close to the upwind direction. Over the 2003-2010 period, IPH background data have been very constant and followed the variations of the solar illuminating flux at lyman alpha, smoothed by multiple scattering efftects between the sun and the outer heliosphere. However, a change of pattern started in 2011 and lasted until the end of 2013. Early measurements in early 2014 show a stabilization that need s to be confirmed in the next few months. We will present the UVS-V1 data, with special attention to possible instrumental effects linked to thermal changes.To explain the UVS observations, it is necessary to modify our current picture of the distribution of hydrogen atoms in the outer heliosphere. These new assumptions will have an impact on our understanding of the heliospheric interface.

  1. Voyager Observations of the Color of Saturn's Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Previously unreduced high resolution Voyager 2 images of Saturn's main rings are used to generate reflectivity (I/F) profiles as a function of radius. Ratios of profiles taken from green, violet, orange, and UV filter images are then produced. The I/F ratios are diagnostic of composition, and provide us with information on the rings' present state of compositional evolution. The rings are extremely reddish in color which suggests that they could not be pure water ice. The most likely candidates for the non-icy components are silicates and organics. The sources of these pollutants are of extreme importance in determining the compositional history of the rings. The radial profiles of ring color ratio exhibit several very interesting properties: (a) broad-scale, fairly smooth, color variations which are only weakly correlated with underlying ring structure (optical depth variations) across the outer C ring and inner B ring as well as the Cassini division region. These variations are probably consistent with ballistic transport; (b) fine-scale, noise-Like (but unquestionably real) color variations across at least the outer two-thirds of the B ring. Not only the "redness" but the spectral shape varies. These variations are currently unexplained. Groundbased spectroscopic observations should be pursued to study the implied compositional heterogeneities on at least the larger scales. This data set will be used for modeling of the color and composition of the main rings using ballistic transport and radiative transfer theories.

  2. Current Sheets in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1, 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    We identified all of the current sheets for which we have relatively complete and accurate magnetic field (B) data from Voyager 1 (V1) from days of year (DOYs) 1 to 331, 2009, which were obtained deep in the heliosheath between 108.5 and 111.8 AU. Three types of current sheets were found: (1) 15 proton boundary layers (PBLs), (2) 10 and 3 magnetic holes and magnetic humps, respectively, and (3) 3 sector boundaries. The magnetic field strength changes across PBL, and the profile B(t) is linearly related to the hyperbolic tangent function, but the direction of B does not change. For each of the three sector boundaries, B rotated in a plane normal to the minimum variance direction, and the component of B along the minimum variance direction was zero within the uncertainties, indicating that the sector boundaries were tangential discontinuities. The structure of the sector boundaries was not as simple as that for PBLs. The average thickness of magnetic holes and humps (approx.30 RL) was twice that of the PBLs (approx.15 RL). The average thickness of the current sheets associated with sector boundaries was close to the thickness of the PBLs. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that magnetic holes and humps are solitons, which are initiated by the mirror mode instability, and evolve by nonlinear kinetic plasma processes to pressure balanced structures maintained by magnetization currents and proton drift currents in the gradients of B.

  3. The helium abundance of Uranus from Voyager measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, B.; Hanel, R.; Gautier, D.; Marten, A.; Lindal, G.

    1987-01-01

    Voyager radio-occultation and IR spectroscopy measurements are combined to infer an He mole fraction in the upper troposphere of Uranus of 0.152 + or - 0.033; the corresponding mass fraction is Y = 0.262 + or - 0.048. This value is in agreement with recent estimates of the solar He abundance, suggesting that He differentiation has not occurred on Uranus. Comparisons with values previously obtained for Jupiter and Saturn imply that migration of He toward the core began long ago on Saturn and may also have recently begun on Jupiter. The protosolar He abundance inferred from the Uranus measurements and from recent solar evolutionary models is used along with an assumed primordial He mass fraction of 0.23-0.24 to estimate a 3-4-percent enrichment of He in the interstellar medium between the big bang and the origin of the solar system. The result is in agreement with galactic chemical evolution models which include a substantial decrease in D during the evolutionary process.

  4. Particles and fields measurements at Neptune with Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of measurements performed on the Voyager 2 spacecraft with the Neptune system on August 24-28, 1989 are summarized. These include measurements of the magnetic field, plasma, energetic and high energy particles, plasma waves and radio emissions, and additional information relating to UV emissions. The planetary magnetic field outside about 4 R(N) may be described by an offset, tilted, dipole of moment 0.133 Gauss-R(N) exp 3; inside that distance the field is dominated by higher order terms. Plasma densities are found to be generally low (about 5 exp -3/cu cm), except at magnetic equatorial crossings when densities are up to about 1/cu cm. A variety of plasma wave emissions were seen, including chorus, hiss, electroncyclotron waves, and upper hybrid resonance in the inner magnetosphere. The measured flux of soft electrons and ions over the polar region of about 2 x 10 exp -3 erg/sq cm sec results in an estimated power input of about 3 x 10 exp 7 W, which is substantially less than that at other planets.

  5. Jupiter's Atmospheric Temperatures: From Voyager IRIS to Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Flasar, F. Michael; Fisher, Brendan

    2004-01-01

    Retrievals run on Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer data obtained during the distant Jupiter flyby have been used to generate global temperature maps of the planet in the troposphere and stratosphere. Similar retrievals were performed on Voyager 1 IRIS data and have provided the first detailed IRIS map of the stratosphere. In both data sets, high latitude troposphere temperatures are presented for the first time, and the meridional gradients indicate the presence of circumpolar jets. Thermal winds were calculated for each data set and show strong vertical shears in the zonal winds at low latitudes. The temperatures retrieved from the two spacecraft were also compared with yearly ground-based data obtained over the intervening two decades. Tropospheric temperatures reveal gradual changes at low latitudes, with little obvious seasonal or short-term variation (Orton et al. 1994). Stratospheric temperatures show much more complicated behavior over short timescales, consistent with quasi-quadrennial oscillations at low latitudes, as suggested in prior analyses of shorter intervals of ground- based data (Orton et al. 1991, Friedson 1999). A scaling analysis indicates that meridional motions, mechanically forced by wave or eddy convergence, play an important role in modulating the temperatures and winds in the upper troposphere and stratosphere on seasonal and shorter time scales. At latitudes away from the equator, the mechanical forcing can be derived simply from a temporal record of temperature and its vertical derivative. Ground-based observations with improved vertical resolution and/or long-term monitoring from spacecraft are required for this purpose.

  6. Motions in Saturn's atmosphere - Observations before Voyager encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Lavega, A.

    1982-01-01

    A summary is presented of all the telescopic observations of the clouds in Saturn's atmosphere made before the Voyager encounters with the planet. Saturn exhibits a pattern of belts and zones like Jupiter. Over the past century, however, they have been practically constant in latitude and have not undergone significant change. Some dark and white spots with diameters of approximately 6,000 to 10,000 km have been observed, making it possible to ascertain the atmospheric rotational period. From these measurements, only a strong equatorial jet can be inferred. Whereas the most obvious features of Saturn are the great white spots with diameters of 20,000 km or more, only five outbursts have been detected since 1876. It is noted that corrected measurements have been obtained of the zonal velocities at different latitudes, with variations between 430 and -14 m/sec with respect to the magnetic rotation of the planet. A subatmospheric origin for the white spots is proposed; they are seen as arising from a temporary and local anisotropy in the internal heat source.

  7. Rocket exhaust plume impingement on the Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the conduction of the long-duration Voyager missions to the outer planets and the sophisticated propulsion systems required, it was necessary to carry out an investigation to avoid exhaust plume impingement problems. The rarefied gas dynamics literature indicates that, for most engineering surfaces, the assumption of diffuse reemission and complete thermal accommodation is warranted in the free molecular flow regime. This assumption was applied to an analysis of a spacecraft plume impingement problem in the near-free molecular flow regime and yielded results to within a few percent of flight data. The importance of a correct treatment of the surface temperature was also demonstrated. Specular reflection, on the other hand, was shown to yield results which may be unconservative by a factor of 2 or 3. It is pointed out that one of the most difficult portions of an exhaust plume impingement analysis is the simulation of the impinged hardware. The geometry involved must be described as accurately and completely as possible.

  8. Continuing the Search for the Heliosheath by Voyager 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.; Acuna, M. H.; McDonald, F. B.; Stone, E. C.

    2004-12-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft, V1, has measured the Heliospheric Magnetic Field (HMF) since launch in 1977. This covers more than a full 22 years solar magnetic cycle. V1 data shows that the HMF, on average, is well described by Parker's archimedean spiral structure out to 95 AU and 35 degrees north heliographic latitude if due account is made for time variations of the source HMF field strength and solar wind velocity. The V1 magnetic field observations do not provide any evidence for entry into or exit from a subsonic SW region such as the heliosheath is expected to be nor any crossings of the heliosphere-heliosheath interface, the Termination Shock (TS), as has been reported at 85 AU by Krimigis et al [2003]. Merged Interaction Regions or transient flows are identified by increased fields and associated decreases in the flux of >70 MeV/nuc cosmic rays which are then followed by a recovery of the CR flux. This CR-B relationship has been identified and studied since 1982 when V1 was at 11 AU. A study of magnetic field fluctuations, up to 0.26 Hz, in 2001-2004, shows periods of increases of the daily mean standard deviation, which is a direct measure of the energy in the magnetic field variations. We are unable to identify any coherent correlation of these periods with the reported TS and heliosheath crossings.

  9. Standing Alfven wave current system at Io - Voyager 1 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Neubauer, F. M.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-09-01

    The enigmatic control of the occurrence frequency of Jupiter's decametric emissions by the satellite Io has been explained theoretically on the basis of its strong electrodynamic interaction with the corotating Jovian magnetosphere leading to field-aligned currents connecting Io with the Jovian ionosphere. Direct measurements of the perturbation magnetic fields due to this current system were obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetic field experiment on Voyager 1 on March 5, 1979, when it passed within 20,500 km south of Io. An interpretation in the framework of Alfven waves radiated by Io leads to current estimates of 2.8 x 10 to the 6th A. A mass density of 7400-13,600 proton mass units/cu cm is derived, which compares very favorably with independent observations of the torus composition characterized by 7-9 proton mass units per electron for a local electron density of 1050-1500/cu cm. The power dissipated in the current system may be important for heating the Io heavy ion torus, inner magnetosphere, Jovian ionosphere, and possibly the ionosphere or even the interior of Io.

  10. The source of Jovian auroral hiss observed by Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Bagenal, F.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of auroral hiss obtained from the Voyager 1 encounter with Jupiter have been reanalyzed. The Jovian auroral hiss was observed near the inner boundary of the warm Io torus and has a low-frequency cutoff caused by propagation near the resonance cone. A simple ray tracing procedure using an offset tilted dipole of the Jovian magnetic field is used to determine possible source locations. The results obtained are consistent with two sources located symmetrically with respect to the centrifugal equator along an L shell (L approximately = 5.59) that is coincident with the boundary between the hot and cold regions of the Io torus and is located just inward of the ribbon feature observed from Earth. The distance of the sources from the centrifugal equator is approximately 0.58 +/- 0.01 R(sub J). Based on the similarity to terrestrial auroral hiss, the Jovian is auroral hiss is believed to be generated by beams of low energy (approximately tens to thousands of eV) electrons. The low-frequency cutoff of the auroral hiss suggests that the electrons are accelerated near the inferred source region, possibly by parallel electric fields similar to those existing in the terrestrial auroral regions. A field-aligned current is inferred to exist at L shells just inward of the plasma ribbon. A possible mechanism for driving this current is discussed.

  11. Voyaging on the Seas of Spirit: An Ongoing Journey towards Understanding Disability and Humanity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stienstra, Deborah; Ashcroft, Terri

    2010-01-01

    In an important article in "Disability & Society" Hughes argued that ontology is becoming a "live issue" in disability studies. Different sources, including non-western and aboriginal conceptions of disability and cosmology and the literature on philosophy, religion, palliative and healthcare, suggest that we are missing a critical aspect of…

  12. Using the 11-year Solar Cycle to Predict the Heliosheath Environment at Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    As Voyager 2 moves further into the heliosheath, the region of subsonic solar wind plasma in between the termination shock and the heliopause, it has observed an increase of the magnetic field strength to large values, all while maintaining magnetic flux conservation. Dr. Burlaga will present these observations in the 2015 AGU Fall meeting (abstract ID: 59200). The increase in magnetic field strength could be a signature of Voyager 2 approaching the heliopause or, possibly, due to solar cycle effects. In this work we investigate the role the 11-year solar cycle variations as well as magnetic dissipation effects have on the heliosheath environments observed at Voyager 1 and 2 using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from SOHO/SWAN and IPS data and solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27-day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database as presented in Michael et al. (2015). Since the model has already accurately matched the flows and magnetic field strength at Voyager 2 until 93 AU, we extend the boundary conditions to model the heliosheath up until Voyager 2 reaches the heliopause. This work will help clarify if the magnetic field observed at Voyager 2 should increase or decrease due to the solar cycle. We describe the solar magnetic field both as a dipole, with the magnetic and rotational axes aligned, and as a monopole, with magnetic field aligned with the interstellar medium to reduce numerical reconnection within the heliosheath, due to the removal of the heliospheric surrent sheet, and at the solar wind - interstellar medium interface. A comparison of the models allows for a crude estimation of the role that magnetic dissipation plays in the system and whether it allows for a better understanding of the Voyager 2 location in the heliosheath.

  13. COMPRESSIBLE 'TURBULENCE' OBSERVED IN THE HELIOSHEATH BY VOYAGER 2

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.co

    2009-09-20

    This paper describes the multiscale structure of the compressible 'turbulence' observed in the high-resolution (48 s) observations of the magnetic field strength B made by Voyager 2 (V2) in the heliosheath behind the termination shock from 2007 DOY 245.0-300.8 and in a unipolar region from 2008 DOY 2.9-75.6. The magnetic field strength is highly variable on scales from 48 s to several hours in both intervals. The distributions of daily averages and 48 s averages of B are lognormal in the post-termination shock (TS) region and Gaussian in the unipolar region, respectively. The amplitudes of the fluctuations were greater in the post-TS region than in the unipolar region, at scales less than several hours. The multiscale structure of the increments of B is described by the q-Gaussian distribution of nonextensive statistical mechanics on all scales from 48 s to 3.4 hr in the unipolar region and from 48 s to 6.8 hr in the post-TS region, respectively. The amplitudes of the fluctuations of increments of B are larger in the post-TS region than in the unipolar region at all scales. The probability density functions of the increments of B are non-Gaussian at all scales in the unipolar region, but they are Gaussian at the largest scales in the post-TS region. Time series of the magnitude and direction of B show that the fluctuations are highly compressive. The small-scale fluctuations are a mixture of coherent structures (semi-deterministic structures) and random structures, which vary significantly from day to day. Several types of coherent structures were identified in both regions.

  14. Voyager 1 in the foreshock, termination shock, and heliosheath.

    PubMed

    Decker, R B; Krimigis, S M; Roelof, E C; Hill, M E; Armstrong, T P; Gloeckler, G; Hamilton, D C; Lanzerotti, L J

    2005-09-23

    Voyager 1 (V1) began measuring precursor energetic ions and electrons from the heliospheric termination shock (TS) in July 2002. During the ensuing 2.5 years, average particle intensities rose as V1 penetrated deeper into the energetic particle foreshock of the TS. Throughout 2004, V1 observed even larger, fluctuating intensities of ions from 40 kiloelectron volts (keV) to >/=50 megaelectron volts per nucleon and of electrons from >26 keV to >/=350 keV. On day 350 of 2004 (2004/350), V1 observed an intensity spike of ions and electrons that was followed by a sustained factor of 10 increase at the lowest energies and lesser increases at higher energies, larger than any intensities since V1 was at 15 astronomical units in 1982. The estimated solar wind radial flow speed was positive (outward) at approximately +100 kilometers per second (km s(-1)) from 2004/352 until 2005/018, when the radial flows became predominantly negative (sunward) and fluctuated between approximately -50 and 0 km s(-1) until about 2005/110; they then became more positive, with recent values (2005/179) of approximately +50 km s(-1). The energetic proton spectrum averaged over the postshock period is apparently dominated by strongly heated interstellar pickup ions. We interpret these observations as evidence that V1 was crossed by the TS on 2004/351 (during a tracking gap) at 94.0 astronomical units, evidently as the shock was moving radially inward in response to decreasing solar wind ram pressure, and that V1 has remained in the heliosheath until at least mid-2005. PMID:16179469

  15. EVIDENCE FOR A SHOCK IN INTERSTELLAR PLASMA: VOYAGER 1

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com E-mail: william-kurth@uiowa.edu

    2013-11-20

    Voyager 1 (V1) observed electron plasma oscillations preceding a jump by a factor of 1.4 in the magnetic field intensity B near the end of 2012. The frequency of the electron plasma oscillations gives an electron density n{sub e}  = 0.05 cm{sup –3}, which implies that V1 was immersed in plasma from the interstellar medium. The last day on which plasma oscillations were observed is day 332, 2012, and the jump in the B was centered on day 335, 2012 after a data gap in the wave data. The close association between the electron plasma oscillations and the jump in B suggests a causal connection, such as that frequently observed between electron plasma oscillations and interplanetary shocks at 1 AU. Based on the observed parameters and the smooth profile of B(t), the jump in B appears to be associated with a weak, subcritical, laminar, low beta, quasi-perpendicular, resistive, collisionless shock. However, the width of the jump is of the order of 10{sup 4} times that expected for such a stationary shock at 1 AU. The large width of the jump in B might be the result of differences between the structure of shocks in the interstellar medium and the plasma near 1 AU. Alternatively, the subcritical resistive shock might have decayed during a few days after producing the plasma waves, leaving a broad profile in B(t) without significantly changing ambient parameters. Another possibility is that the jump in B is a pressure wave.

  16. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS OBSERVED BY VOYAGER 1 BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2014-11-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) was beyond the heliopause between 2013.00 and 2014.41, where it was making in situ observations of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The average azimuthal angle and elevation angle of the magnetic field B were (λ) = 292.°5 ± 1.°4 and (δ) = 22.°1 ± 1.°2, respectively. The angles λ and δ varied linearly at (1.°4 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1} and (–1.°1 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1}, respectively, suggesting that V1 was measuring the draped ISMF around the heliopause. The distributions of hourly averages of λ and δ were Gaussian distributions, with most probable values 292.°5 and 22.°1, and standard deviations (SDs) 1.°3 and 1.°1, respectively. The small SD indicates little or no turbulence transverse to B . An abrupt decrease in B from 0.50 nT on 2013/129.9 to 0.46 nT on 2013/130.6 was observed, possibly associated with a weak reverse shock or magnetoacoustic pressure wave following a burst of electron plasma oscillations. Between 2013/130.6 and 2013/365.3, (B) = 0.464 ± 0.009 nT, (λ) = 292.°6 ± 0.°8, and (δ) = 22.°1 ± 1.°1. The corresponding distribution of hourly averages of B was Gaussian with the most probable value 0.464 nT and σ = 0.009 nT. Since the uncertainty σ corresponds to the instrument and digitization noise, these observations provided an upper limit to the turbulence in the ISMF. The distributions of the hourly increments of B were Gaussian distributions with σ = 0.05 nT, 0.°4, and 0.°4, respectively, indicating that the V1 did not detect evidence of ''intermittent bursts'' of interstellar turbulence.

  17. Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nico; Grimberg, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time is a gravitational wave astronomy planetarium show in production by a collaboration of scientists, filmmakers, and artisits from the Center for Gravitational Wave Astonomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Montana State University (MSU). The project builds on the success of the interdisciplinary Celebrating Einstein collaboration. The artists and scientists who created the A Shout Across Time original film and the Black (W)hole immersive art installation for Celebrating Einstein are teaming with the Museum of the Rockies Taylor Planetarium staff and students to create a new full dome Digistar planetarium show that will be freely and widely distributed to planetaria in the US and abroad. The show uses images and animations filmed and collected for A Shout Across Time and for Black (W)hole as well as new images and animations and a new soundtrack composed and produced by the MSU School of Music to use the full capability of planetarium sound systems. The planetarium show will be narrated with ideas drawn from the Celebrating Einstein danced lecture on gravitational waves that the collaboration produced. The combination of products, resources, and team members assembled for this project allows us to create an original planetarium show for a fraction of the cost of a typical show. In addition, STEM education materials for G6-12 students and teachers will be provided to complement and support the show. This project is supported by the Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC), Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), and the American Physical Society (APS).

  18. Voyager 2 Color Image of Enceladus, Almost Full Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This color Voyager 2 image mosaic shows the water-ice-covered surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's icy moons. Enceladus' diameter of just 500 km would fit across the state of Arizona, yet despite its small size Enceladus exhibits one of the most interesting surfaces of all the icy satellites. Enceladus reflects about 90% of the incident sunlight (about like fresh-fallen snow), placing it among the most reflective objects in the Solar System. Several geologic terrains have superposed crater densities that span a factor of at least 500, thereby indicating huge differences in the ages of these terrains. It is possible that the high reflectivity of Enceladus' surface results from continuous deposition of icy particles from Saturn's E-ring, which in fact may originate from icy volcanoes on Enceladus' surface. Some terrains are dominated by sinuous mountain ridges from 1 to 2 km high (3300 to 6600 feet), whereas other terrains are scarred by linear cracks, some of which show evidence for possible sideways fault motion such as that of California's infamous San Andreas fault. Some terrains appear to have formed by separation of icy plates along cracks, and other terrains are exceedingly smooth at the resolution of this image. The implication carried by Enceladus' surface is that this tiny ice ball has been geologically active and perhaps partially liquid in its interior for much of its history. The heat engine that powers geologic activity here is thought to be elastic deformation caused by tides induced by Enceladus' orbital motion around Saturn and the motion of another moon, Dione.

  19. Voyager studies of the distant heliospheric magnetic fields and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.; Richardson, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Launched in 1977, the twin Voyager spacecraft (V1, V2) are exiting the heliosphere and each one is now well beyond the orbits of the planets. Careful studies have been made of the observed heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) and solar wind plasma over a full solar solar cycle through 2001. At that time, V1 was at a radial distance of 87 AU and heliographic latitude +35^o and V2 was at 69 AU and -26^o. These data have demonstrated that Parker's model of solar wind plasma flow and spatial structure of the solar originating field well describes these observations when due account of the temporal variations of the source field are taken into account by use of near-Earth observations at 1 AU. There has been continued study of the sector structure of the HMF delineating outward (outward) and inward (negative) directed fields. The Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) has thus been mapped to these distances and latitudes and its configuration shows agreement with predictions of the extrapolated solar surface magnetic field structure. Correlative studies with simultaneous cosmic ray observations have been conducted. All these data have helped delineate the manner in which solar originating disturbances such as shocks and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) evolve at great heliospheric distances. The solar wind speed as observed by V2 has been showing a slow but steady decrease down to an average of ˜390 km/sec at 65 AU. Sufficient energy is transferred from the pickup ions to the solar wind protons to produce a temperature increase outside ˜30 AU. The structure of the magnetic field has been identified as becoming multi-fractal beginning at ˜40 AU. The field at V1 is primarily azimuthal and in 2000--2001 was averaging ˜0.05 nT at 87 AU. This paper summarizes the magnetic field and solar plasma observations in the outer heliosphere.

  20. [Sun Simiao's voyage to Chu and Shu regions].

    PubMed

    Song, Zhenmin

    2014-07-01

    During the 4(th)-11(th) years of Zhenguan reign of the Tang Dynasty, Sun Simiao paid a voyage to the regions of Chu (now mostly the Hubei Province) and Shu (now Sichuan Province) for a total of 14 years. In the 4(th) year of Zhenguan, he went to treat the "hydropsy" of Li Gui, the King of Hanyang, hence, the record given as the 9(th) year of Zhenguan by Bei ji qian jin yao fang (Essential Prescriptions for Emergency Worth a Thousand Gold) is not correct. Later, he went to Jiangzhou (now Jiujiang city of Jiangxi Province) to treat Chen Shuping's, the King of Chenxiangdong beriberi due to wind-poisoning. In the 15(th) of July, the 5(th) year of Zhenguan, he himself suffered a swelling pain in his finger when travelling in Shu region, due to a poisonous sting, which was cured by rubbing with the juice from the root and stem of dendelion. In the 7(th) year of Zhenguan, he suffered a facial erysipelas due to over drinking when he was in Neijiang County which was treated by the mayor, Master Li, with various medications to no avail, which was eventually cured by himself. In the 10(th) year of Zhenguan, he treated the Governor of Zizhou Li Wenbo's consuming thirst. He also got a large amount of copper salts in the Counties of Xuanwu and Feiwu nearby. In the 17(th) year of Zhenguan or later, he processed the "Tai yi spiritual powder" in Wei's family of Shu County. After finishing the processing, he returned to Guanzhong (now Shaanxi) at certain period of "August of 17(th) year of Zhenguan", "January of 18(th) year of Zhenguan", or "January of 19(th) year of Zhenguan". PMID:25429884

  1. Electron distributions in the inner Jovian magnetosphere: Voyager 1 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, G.; Armstrong, T. P.

    1993-01-01

    Using several improvements in the analysis of the observations of the Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) experiment on Voyager 1, electron phase space densities in the inner Jovian magnetosphere (5 - 10 R(sub J) were first calculated at constant first and second invariants (represented by mu and K, respectively), based on the LECP measurements. The calculated electron phase space density profiles show that in the inner Jovian magnetosphere there exist evident time and longitude variations, energetic electron injections, and present radial transport and distributed losses. To study the radial and pitch angle diffusions of Jovian electrons, we have calculated the phase space densities in the K-L space. It is found that the electron population in the inner Jovian magnetosphere seems to consist of two components: electrons radially diffusing from a main external source and electrons generated from local sources. The radially diffusing electrons have a relatively time stationary and isotropic distribution, while the locally created electrons mainly concentrate around the equatorial plane and have relatively lower energies, in comparison with the inward diffusing electrons. Consequently, the sources of precipitation losses to the ionosphere must be primarily electrons transported from outer sources, and the major precipitations occur in the inner magnetosphere (L less than 7.5 R(sub J). In the inner Jovian magnetosphere (L = 5 to approximately 10 R(sub J)) it is estimated that for electrons with magnetic moment mu = 300 MeV/G, the diffusion coefficient D is roughly 10(exp -8) to approximately 10(exp -6) R(exp 2)(sub J)/s, and the lifetime against the diffusion losses is of the order of 10(exp 4) to approximately 10(exp 6) s.

  2. Observation of the multifractal spectrum in the heliosphere and the heliosheath by Voyager 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, W. M.; Wawrzaszek, A.; Carbone, V.

    2012-12-01

    We present first results of the multifractal scaling of the fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field strength as measured onboard Voyager 2 in the very distant heliosphere and even in the heliosheath. More specifically, the spectra observed by Voyager 2 in a wide range of heliospheric distances from 6 to 90 astronomical units (AU) are compared with those of Voyager 1 already analyzed between 7 and 107 AU. We focus on the singularity multifractal spectrum before and after crossing the termination heliospheric shock by Voyager 1 at 94 AU and Voyager 2 at 84 AU from the Sun. It is worth noting that the spectrum is prevalently right-skewed inside the whole heliosphere. Moreover, we have observed a change of the asymmetry of the spectrum at the termination shock, where the spectrum changes from (left-) right-skewed in the very distant heliosphere to the (right-) left-skewed or possibly symmetric spectrum in the heliosheath. We confirm that the degree of multifractality falls steadily with the distance from the Sun. In addition, the multifractal structure is apparently modulated by the solar activity, with a time shift of several years, corresponding to a distance of about 10 AU, resulting from the evolution of the whole heliosphere. Hence this basic result also brings significant additional support to some earlier claims suggesting that the solar wind termination shock is asymmetric.

  3. RADIAL VELOCITY ALONG THE VOYAGER 1 TRAJECTORY: THE EFFECT OF SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Borovikov, S. N.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2012-05-01

    As Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are approaching the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the solar wind (SW) and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-we expect new, unknown features of the heliospheric interface to be revealed. A seeming puzzle reported recently by Krimigis et al. concerns the unusually low, even negative, radial velocity components derived from the energetic ion distribution. Steady-state plasma models of the inner heliosheath (IHS) show that the radial velocity should not be equal to zero even at the surface of the HP. Here we demonstrate that the velocity distributions observed by Voyager 1 are consistent with time-dependent simulations of the SW-LISM interaction. In this Letter, we analyze the results from a numerical model of the large-scale heliosphere that includes solar cycle effects. Our simulations show that prolonged periods of low to negative radial velocity can exist in the IHS at substantial distances from the HP. It is also shown that Voyager 1 was more likely to observe such regions than Voyager 2.

  4. Propagation of transient shocks from 1 AU to the Voyagers during 2012-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression and rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. Starting from OMNI data at 1 AU, we present numerical simulations of such shocks in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. We analyze the shock properties such as strength, propagation speed, and inter-shock separation by enhancing the resolution locally with adaptive mesh refinement. We compare these results with the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Lastly, we perform timing tests on the fully 3-D propagation of solar transients through the termination shock and heliopause, and determine if the transient features observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 beyond the heliopause might correspond to particular solar transients observed at 1 AU.

  5. 33 CFR 164.80 - Tests, inspections, and voyage planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... breaking up larger tows; (B) For harbor-assist; (C) For assistance towing as defined by 46 CFR 10.103; (D... test of the steering-gear-control system; a test of the main steering gear from the alternative power... forecast weather, including visibility, wind, and sea state for the port of departure, all ports of...

  6. 33 CFR 164.80 - Tests, inspections, and voyage planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... breaking up larger tows; (B) For harbor-assist; (C) For assistance towing as defined by 46 CFR 10.103; (D... test of the steering-gear-control system; a test of the main steering gear from the alternative power... forecast weather, including visibility, wind, and sea state for the port of departure, all ports of...

  7. 33 CFR 164.80 - Tests, inspections, and voyage planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... breaking up larger tows; (B) For harbor-assist; (C) For assistance towing as defined by 46 CFR 10.103; (D... test of the steering-gear-control system; a test of the main steering gear from the alternative power... forecast weather, including visibility, wind, and sea state for the port of departure, all ports of...

  8. 33 CFR 164.80 - Tests, inspections, and voyage planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... breaking up larger tows; (B) For harbor-assist; (C) For assistance towing as defined by 46 CFR 10.103; (D... test of the steering-gear-control system; a test of the main steering gear from the alternative power... forecast weather, including visibility, wind, and sea state for the port of departure, all ports of...

  9. SkyServer Voyages Website - Using Big Data to Explore Astronomy Concepts in Formal Education Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Kate K.; Masters, Karen; Raddick, Jordan; Lundgren, Britt

    2015-08-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) web interface “SkyServer” has long included online educational materials designed to help students and the public discover the fundamentals of modern astronomy using real observations from the SDSS database. The newly launched SDSS Voyages website updates and expands these activities to reflect new data from subsequent generations of the survey, advances in web technology, and evolving practices in science education. Voyages provides access to quality astronomy, astrophysics, and engineering materials to educators seeking an inquiry approach to fundamental concepts. During this session we will provide an overview of the design and development of Skyserver Voyages and discuss ways to apply this resource at K-12 and university levels.

  10. The far-ultraviolet energy distribution of Sirius B from Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Wesemael, F.; Hubeny, I.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of Sirius obtained with the Voyager 2 ultraviolet spectrometer clearly reveal the presence of flux from the white dwarf Sirius B at wavelengths between 950 and 1100 A. These observations are in good agreement with all previous ultraviolet observations of Sirius B, and in particular with the IUE observations of Boehm-Vitense, Dettmann, and Kapranidis. A joint analysis of the Voyager 2 and IUE observations yields a temperature range of 26,000-28,000 K. A reexamination of current ultraviolet, visible, and X-ray observations produces good general agreement, but no single, mutually consistent, temperature for Sirius B. The Voyager 2 observations can be used to place a firm upper limit of 28,000 K on the temperature of Sirius B.

  11. The far-ultraviolet energy distribution of Sirius B from Voyager 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Wesemael, F.; Hubeny, I.

    1984-05-01

    Observations of Sirius obtained with the Voyager 2 ultraviolet spectrometer clearly reveal the presence of flux from the white dwarf Sirius B at wavelengths between 950 and 1100 A. These observations are in good agreement with all previous ultraviolet observations of Sirius B, and in particular with the IUE observations of Boehm-Vitense, Dettmann, and Kapranidis. A joint analysis of the Voyager 2 and IUE observations yields a temperature range of 26,000-28,000 K. A reexamination of current ultraviolet, visible, and X-ray observations produces good general agreement, but no single, mutually consistent, temperature for Sirius B. The Voyager 2 observations can be used to place a firm upper limit of 28,000 K on the temperature of Sirius B.

  12. Jupiter's Cloud Distribution Between the Voyager 1 and 2 Encounters: Results from 5-Micrometer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Terrile, R J; Capps, R W; Becklin, E E; Cruikshank, D P

    1979-11-23

    As part of a continuing effort of ground-based support for Voyager target selection, infrared images in the 5-micrometer wavelength region were acquired in preparation for the Voyager 2 flyby of Jupiter. Observations were made during May 1979 from the Palomar 5-meter telescope and the new 3-meter NASA Infrared Telescope Facility at Mauna Kea and are compared to previous observations. Variations seen in the 5-micrometer flux distribution suggest global patterns of clouding over of some Jovian belts and clearing ofothers. These data were used to predict the Jovian cloud distribution at the time of the Voyager 2 encounter in order to target the imaging and infrared experiments to areas free of high obscuring clouds. PMID:17733922

  13. The Voyager Universal Literacy System: Results from a Study of Kindergarten Students in Inner-City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frechtling, Joy A.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Silverstein, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of the Voyager Universal Literacy System[R] was designed to provide a rigorous assessment of the effectiveness of the program with beginning readers. Using a quasi-experimental design, researchers conducted a systematic evaluation of changes in 398 kindergarten students' command of early reading skills in 4 Voyager and 4 comparison…

  14. 46 CFR 14.301 - Paying off of merchant mariner during or after voyage upon which shipping articles are required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paying off of merchant mariner during or after voyage... HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS Discharge of Merchant Mariners § 14.301 Paying off of merchant mariner during or after voyage upon...

  15. 46 CFR 14.301 - Paying off of merchant mariner during or after voyage upon which shipping articles are required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Paying off of merchant mariner during or after voyage... HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS Discharge of Merchant Mariners § 14.301 Paying off of merchant mariner during or after voyage upon...

  16. 46 CFR 26.03-9 - Voyage plans for uninspected passenger vessels of at least 100 gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... passenger list before taking an uninspected passenger vessel of at least 100 gross tons on a Great Lake, an... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyage plans for uninspected passenger vessels of at... UNINSPECTED VESSELS OPERATIONS Special Operating Requirements § 26.03-9 Voyage plans for uninspected...

  17. Infrared observations of the saturnian system from voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R; Conrath, B; Flasar, F M; Kunde, V; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J; Samuelson, R; Herath, L; Allison, M; Cruikshank, D; Gautier, D; Gierasch, P; Horn, L; Koppany, R; Ponnamperuma, C

    1981-04-10

    During the passage of Voyager 1 through the Saturn system, the infrared instrument acquired spectral and radiometric data on Saturn, the rings, and Titan and other satellites. Infrared spectra of Saturn indicate the presence of H(2), CH(4), NH(3), PH(3), C(2)H(2), C(2)H(6), and possibly C(3)H(4) and C(3)H(8). A hydrogen mole fraction of 0.94 is inferred with an uncertainty of a few percent, implying a depletion of helium in the atmosphere of Saturn relative to that of Jupiter. The atmospheric thermal structure of Saturn shows hemisphere asymmetries that are consistent with a response to the seasonally varying insolation. Extensive small-scale latitudinal structure is also observed. On Titan, positive identifications of infrared spectral features are made for CH(4), C(2)H(2), C(2)H(4), C(2)H(6), and HCN; tentative identifications are made for C(3)H(4) and C(3)H(8). The infrared continuum opacity on Titan appears to be quite small between 500 and 600 cm(-1), implying that the solid surface is a major contributor to the observed emission over this spectral range; between 500 and 200 cm(-1) theopacity increases with decreasing wave number, attaining an optical thickness in excess of 2 at 200 cm(-1). Temperatures near the 1-millibar level are independent of longitude and local time but show a decrease of approximately 20 K between the equator and north pole, which suggests a seasonally dependent cyclostrophic zonal flow in the stratosphere of approximately 100 meters per second. Measurements of the C ring of Saturn yield a temperature of 85 +/- 1 K and an infrared optical depth of 0.09 +/- 0.01. Radiometer observations of sunlight transmitted through the ring system indicate an optical depth of 10(-1.3 +/-0.3) for the Cassini division. A phase integral of 1.02 +/- 0.06 is inferred for Rhea, which agrees with values for other icy bodies in the solar system. Rhea eclipse observations indicate the presence of surface materials with both high and low thermal inertias, the

  18. Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse photo sequence to monitor the active volcanos on Jupiter's moon Io following the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. This picture is one of about 200 images that will be used to generate a time lapse motion picture to illustrate Io's volcanic activity. On the bright limb, two of the plumes (P-5 & P-6) discovered in March by Voyager 1 are again visible. The plumes are spewing materials to a height of about 100 kilometers.

  19. Ephemerides of the major Neptunian satellites determined from earth-based astrometric and Voyager imaging observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; Lewis, G. D.; Owen, W. M.; Riedel, J. E.; Roth, D. C.; Synnott, S. P.; Taylor, A. H.

    1990-01-01

    The Voyager project used Neptunian satellite ephemerides to support both navigation and acquisition of scientific data. The development of postencounter ephemerides for the satellites Triton, Nereid, and 1989N1 is discussed. Primary results are the final set of model parameters which generate orbits that best fit both the earth-based satellite observations and data acquired by Voyager. The ephemerides are compared with those generated preencounter, and the accuracy of the final ephemerides is assessed. Mean orbital elements are also provided as a geometrical representation for the satellite orbits.

  20. The magnetic-anomaly model of the Jovian magnetosphere - A post-Voyager assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasyliunas, V. M.; Dessler, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Predictions previously put forth (Dessler and Vasyliunas, 1979) as tests for the magnetic-anomaly model (in which the anomalously weak magnetic field region in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter influences the outer Jovian magnetosphere by one or more plasma interaction processes) are reexamined in the light of Voyager and other recent observations. With regard to the prediction of a restricted longitude range of enhanced interaction between Io and Jupiter's ionosphere, the longitudinal asymmetries seen both in ground-based observations of sulfur emissions from the Io torus and in Voyager observations of Jovian auroral emissions are found to agree well with the predicted asymmetries.

  1. Gain, phase and frequency stability of DSS-42 and DSS-43 vor Voyage Uranus encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, A. G.; Levy, R.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretically rigorous definitions are derived of such parameters as RF signal path length, phase delay, and phase/frequency stability in a Cassegrainian antenna applicable to a narrow bandwidth channel, as well as algorithms for evaluating these parameters. This work was performed in support of the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Uranus in January 1986. The information was needed to provide Voyager/Uranus radio science researchers with a rotational basis for deciding the best strategy to operate the three antennas involved during the crucial 5-hour occultation period of the encounter. Such recommendations are made at the end of the article.

  2. Infrared images of jupiter at 5-micrometer wavelength during the voyager 1 encounter.

    PubMed

    Terrile, R J; Capps, R W; Backman, D E; Becklin, E E; Cruikshank, D P; Beichman, C A; Brown, R H; Westphal, J A

    1979-06-01

    A coordinated program to observe Jupiter at high spatial resolution in the 5-micrometer wavelength region was undertaken to support Voyager 1 imaging and infrared radiation experiment targeting. Jupiter was observed over a 5-month period from Palomar and Mauna Kea observatories. The frequency of observations allowed the selection of interesting areas for closer Voyager examination and also provided good short-term monitoring of variations in cloud morphology. Significant global changes in the 5-micrometer distribution are seen over this time period. PMID:17800441

  3. 46 CFR 109.103 - Requirements of the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements of the International Convention for Safety... Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974. No self-propelled unit of more than 500 gross tons may embark on an international voyage unless it is issued the appropriate Convention certificate as described...

  4. The deepwater demersal ichthyofauna of the western Coral Sea.

    PubMed

    Last, Peter R; Pogonoski, John J; Gledhill, Daniel C; White, William T; Walker, Chris J

    2014-01-01

    The highly diverse deepwater demersal ichthyofauna of the western Coral Sea was first systematically surveyed in two exploratory voyages in 1985 and 1986, and these fish assemblages have not been investigated at the same level since. Only recently have catch data and specimens, obtained from these first voyages almost 3 decades ago, been rigorously investigated and analysed. Some 393 species of fishes from 125 families were collected during the 1985 voyage which surveyed the northeastern Australian continental margin, and the Saumarez and Queensland Plateaus. A checklist of the species caught is provided. Levels of endemicity of deepwater fishes in the western Coral Sea are very high with about 50% of well-studied groups, such as sharks and rays, confined to this relatively small geographic region. A very high proportion of species caught during this voyage were either undescribed (78 species or 20%) or new Australian records (96 species or 24%) at the time of the survey. Another 68 species (17%) are the subject of further taxonomic investigation or are currently undergoing formal description. The fauna exhibits some intraregional differences in structure. Biogeographically informative fishes such as skates appear to be cryptically partitioned within the region, differing in composition to other Australian regions and those of French territories to the east. Strong depth-related partitioning of the fauna is also evident, and its structure follows zonation patterns observed across the wider Australian region. Given the high level of micro-endemicity and regional uniqueness of the fauna, there is a compelling argument for the existence of a faunal gyre in the Coral Sea.  New gap-filling surveys are needed to better define the structure of this fauna and determine its distribution. PMID:25543931

  5. THICKNESS OF THE HELIOSHEATH, RETURN OF THE PICK-UP IONS, AND VOYAGER 1'S CROSSING THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, K. C.; Giacalone, J.; Kota, J.; Czechowski, A.; Grzedzielski, S.; Hilchenbach, M.

    2010-08-01

    Using results of remote sensing by energetic neutral atoms from IBEX, SOHO/HSTOF, and Cassini/INCA, in situ measurements of {approx}40-4000 keV protons in the heliosheath (HS) from Low Energy Charged Particle on Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, and outputs from numerical modeling of the termination shock, we estimate L, the characteristic thickness of the HS in the 'upwind' direction ({+-}45{sup 0} in ecliptic longitude of the Nose at {lambda} = 255{sup 0}). A simple steady-state, internally consistent model gives L = 21 {+-} 6 AU for Voyager 1, L = 28 {+-} 8 AU for Voyager 2, and L = 25 {+-} 8 AU assuming that the same L value is valid for both spacecraft. We recognize that this is a very coarse cut at a very dynamic region of the heliosphere; but if the lower value L = 21 AU applies, one could expect Voyager 1 to cross the heliopause as early as late 2010.

  6. Titan's atmospheric composition: from Voyager to Cassini and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.

    2007-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere was revealed by the Voyager missions in the 80s. The trace composition was in particular inferred from infrared spectra by the V1/IRIS Spectrometer. ISO gave us an opportunity to further explore this exciting milieu in 1997 (Coustenis et al., 1998; 2003) and brought the discovery of new molecules : H2O and C6H6. Our understanding of Titan's atmospheric chemical composition has recently been enhanced by the data returned by the Cassini instruments. Spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard the Cassini spacecraft have been processed from the Titan flybys spanning three years now since SOI (Flasar et al., 2005; Teanby et al., 2006, Vinatier et al., 2006; Nixon et al., 2006; Coustenis et al., 2007). The spectra characterize various regions on Titan from 85°S to 80°N with a variety of emission angles. We have studied the emission observed in the CIRS detector arrays (covering the 10-1500 cm-1 spectral range with apodized resolutions of 2.54 or 0.53 cm-1). We have used temperature profiles retrieved from the inversion of the emission observed in the methane band at 1304 cm-1 and a line-by-line radiative transfer code to infer the abundances of the trace constituents and some of their isotopes in Titan's stratosphere (Coustenis et al., 2007a). The composite spectra show several signatures of previously identified molecules: hydrocarbons, nitriles, H2O and CO2. Besides these well-known trace species, a firm detection of benzene (C6H6) is provided by CIRS at 674 cm-1 and allows for the study of its latitudinal variations. No longitudinal variations were found for any of the gases. Information is retrieved on the meridional variations of the trace constituents and tied to predictions by dynamical-photochemical models (Hourdin et al., 2004; Lavvas et al., 2007). Molecules showing a significant enhancement at northern latitudes are the nitriles (HC3N, HCN) and the complex hydrocarbons (C4H2, C3H4). The D/H ratio on Titan was

  7. Voyager radio science observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Borutzki, S E; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Gresh, D L; Gurrola, E M; Hinson, D P; Kawashima, N; Kursinski, E R; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Lyons, J R; Marouf, E A; Rosen, P A; Simpson, R A; Wood, G E

    1989-12-15

    The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptune system included radio science investigations of the masses and densities of Neptune and Triton, the low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, the vertical structures of the atmospheres and ionospheres of Neptune and Triton, the composition of the atmosphere of Neptune, and characteristics of ring material. Demanding experimental requirements were met successfully, and study of the large store of collected data has begun. The initial search of the data revealed no detectable effects of ring material with optical depth tau [unknown] 0.01. Preliminary representative results include the following: 1.0243 x 10(26) and 2.141 x 10(22) kilograms for the masses of Neptune and Triton; 1640 and 2054 kilograms per cubic meter for their respective densities; 1355 +/- 7 kilometers, provisionally, for the radius of Triton; and J(2) = 3411 +/- 10(x 10(-6)) and J(4) = -26(+12)(-20)(x10(-6)) for Neptune's gravity field (J>(2) and J(4) are harmonic coefficients of the gravity field). The equatorial and polar radii of Neptune are 24,764 +/- 20 and 24,340 +/- 30 kllometers, respectively, at the 10(5)-pascal (1 bar) pressure level. Neptune's atmosphere was probed to a pressure level of about 5 x 10(5) pascals, and effects of a methane cloud region and probable ammonia absorption below the cloud are evident in the data. Results for the mixing ratios of helium and ammonia are still being investigated; the methane abundance below the clouds is at least 1 percent by volume. Derived temperature-pressure profiles to 1.2 x 10(5) pascals and 78 kelvins (K) show a lapse rate corresponding to "frozen" equilibrium of the para- and ortho-hydrogen states. Neptune's ionosphere exhibits an extended topside at a temperature of 950 +/- 160 K if H(+) is the dominant ion, and narrow ionization layers of the type previously seen at the other three giant planets. Triton has a dense ionosphere with a peak electron concentration of 46 x 10(9) per cubic meter at an

  8. New local interstellar spectra for protons, helium and carbon derived from PAMELA and Voyager 1 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisschoff, D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    With the cosmic ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere, the comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental data at lower energies is finally possible. Spectra for specifically protons, helium and carbon nuclei, computed by galactic propagation models, can now be compared with observations at low energies from Voyager 1 and at high energies from the PAMELA space detector at Earth. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 observations in the energy range of 6 MeV/nuc to 60 MeV/nuc, and the PAMELA spectrum above 50 GeV/nuc, using the GALPROP code, similarly to our previous study for Voyager 1 electrons. By varying the galactic diffusion parameters in the GALPROP plain diffusion model, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, and then including reacceleration, we compute spectra simultaneously for galactic protons, helium and carbon. We present new local interstellar spectra, with expressions for the energy range of 3 MeV/nuc to 100 GeV/nuc, which should be of value for solar modulation modeling.

  9. Voyager observations of the interaction of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Richardson, John D

    2013-05-01

    This paper provides a brief review and update on the Voyager observations of the interaction of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium. Voyager has found many surprises: (1) a new energetic particle component which is accelerated at the termination shock (TS) and leaks into the outer heliosphere forming a foreshock region; (2) a termination shock which is modulated by energetic particles and which transfers most of the solar wind flow energy to the pickup ions (not the thermal ions); (3) the heliosphere is asymmetric; (4) the TS does not accelerate anomalous cosmic rays at the Voyager locations; and (5) the plasma flow in the Voyagers 1 (V1) and 2 (V2) directions are very different. At V1 the flow was small after the TS and has recently slowed to near zero, whereas at V2 the speed has remained constant while the flow direction has turned tailward. V1 may have entered an extended boundary region in front of the heliopause (HP) in 2010 in which the plasma flow speeds are near zero. PMID:25685423

  10. 46 CFR 90.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a protectorate or mandate, whose international relations are the responsibility of a contracting... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 90.05... MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-10 Application to vessels on an...

  11. The evolution of the Voyager mission sequence software and trends for future mission sequence software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Robert N., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The historical background of the spacecraft sequence generation process as it is represented by the Voyager mission to the outer planets is discussed. Present plans for future sequencing methods are examined, including the emphasis on cutting costs and the contrast between the centralized and distributed systems for sequencing. The use of artificial intelligence in mission sequencing is addressed.

  12. 46 CFR 90.05-10 - Application to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application to vessels on an international voyage. 90.05... MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-10 Application to vessels on an international... section, the regulations in this subchapter that apply to a vessel on an “international voyage” apply to...

  13. Simultaneous calibrations of Voyager celestial and inertial attitude control systems in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahanshahi, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical description of the data reduction technique used to simultaneously calibrate the Voyager celestial and inertial attitude control subsystems is given. It is shown that knowledge of the spacecraft limit cycle motion, as measured by the celestial and the inertial sensors, is adequate to result in the estimates of a selected number of errors which adversely affect the spacecraft attitude knowledge.

  14. 46 CFR 281.3 - Method of commencing and terminating voyages and of determining idle status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Method of commencing and terminating voyages and of determining idle status. 281.3 Section 281.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS INFORMATION AND PROCEDURE REQUIRED UNDER...

  15. 46 CFR 281.3 - Method of commencing and terminating voyages and of determining idle status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Method of commencing and terminating voyages and of determining idle status. 281.3 Section 281.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS INFORMATION AND PROCEDURE REQUIRED UNDER...

  16. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing during a voyage. The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2),...

  17. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing during a voyage. The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2),...

  18. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing during a voyage. The master of a tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10(e), § 157.10a(a)(2),...

  19. 33 CFR 169.210 - Where during its international voyage must a ship transmit position reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... intention to enter a U.S. port or place under requirements in 33 CFR part 160, subpart C. (c) Coastal State... voyage must a ship transmit position reports? 169.210 Section 169.210 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY SHIP...

  20. 46 CFR 122.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty. 122.220 Section 122.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER... order books, radiograms sent and received, radio logs, crew and passenger lists and counts, articles...

  1. Voyager Universal Literacy System[R]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "Voyager Universal Literacy System"[R] is a core reading program designed to help students learn to read at or above grade level by the end of the third grade. This program uses strategies such as individual reading instruction, higher-level comprehension activities, problem solving, and writing. Students are also exposed to computer-based…

  2. 15 CFR 970.2501 - Notice of pre-license exploration voyages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Pre-license Exploration § 970.2501 Notice of pre-license exploration voyages. (a) General. Any United States... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of pre-license...

  3. 15 CFR 970.2501 - Notice of pre-license exploration voyages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Pre-license Exploration § 970.2501 Notice of pre-license exploration voyages. (a) General. Any United States... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of pre-license...

  4. The Voyage of the Beagle: Field Work Lessons from Charles Darwin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes Charles Darwin's letters to his family during his voyage on H.M.S. Beagle. Relates the information to the development of Darwin's professional identity and the degree to which the concepts, field methods, and research methods revealed in Darwin's personal correspondence are useful to students of educational administration. (MD)

  5. The Three Voyages of Edmond Halley in the Paramore: 1698-1701

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    On Thursday, October 20, 1698, a three-masted ship, captained by Edmond Halley with orders “to improve the knowledge of the Longitude and variations of the Compasse,” which he was to observe “with all the accuracy you can,” set sail from Deptford, England, on the first leg of the first voyage ever commissioned for strictly scientific purposes. Halley is now best known as an astronomer and for the comet that bears his name. However, his interests ranged over so many specialties that he is better described now by the 17th century title of “natural philosopher.” Among his various areas of study, the study of the earth took a major place, as shown by his many papers on the trade winds, the tides, and especially the magnetic field. This last interest led him to propose to the Royal Society that he make a voyage around the world “to discover what may be learnt … [of] the variations of the Magneticall Needle.” This ambitious undertaking was later scaled down to cover only the Atlantic Ocean, Halley made two voyages from 1698 to 1700, at one point reaching 52°S in his 52-foot vessel. As a tailpiece he made a third voyage in the summer and fall of 1701 to study the tides and tidal currents of the English Channel.

  6. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the lick Saturn-Voyager Reference Star Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog is described. The catalog was prepared in order to determine accurate equatorial coordinates for reference stars in a band of sky against which cameras of the Voyager spacecraft were aligned for observations in the region of Saturn during the flyby. Tape contents and characteristics are described and a sample listing presented.

  7. Albedo, internal heat, and energy balance of Jupiter, preliminary results of the Voyager infrared investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.; Conrath, B. J.; Herath, L. W.; Kunde, V. G.; Pirraglia, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The in flight calibration of the radiometer and the Michelson interferometer of the Voyager 1 infrared instrument is discussed. The calibrated full disk measurements are applied to derive values of the albedo, the thermal emission and the global energy balance of Jupiter.

  8. 46 CFR 180.10 - Applicability to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability to vessels on an international voyage. 180.10 Section 180.10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS General Provisions §...

  9. 46 CFR 180.10 - Applicability to vessels on an international voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applicability to vessels on an international voyage. 180.10 Section 180.10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS General Provisions §...

  10. Calibration of the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometers and the Composition of the Heliosphere Neutrals: Reassessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Holberg, J. B.

    2016-06-01

    The data harvest from the Voyagers’ (V 1 and V 2) Ultraviolet Spectrometers (UVS) covers encounters with the outer planets, measurements of the heliosphere sky-background, and stellar spectrophotometry. Because their period of operation overlaps with many ultraviolet missions, the calibration of V1 and V2 UVS with other spectrometers is invaluable. Here we revisit the UVS calibration to assess the intriguing sensitivity enhancements of 243% (V1) and 156% (V2) proposed recently. Using the Lyα airglow from Saturn, observed in situ by both Voyagers, and remotely by International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), we match the Voyager values to IUE, taking into account the shape of the Saturn Lyα line observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. For all known ranges of the interplanetary hydrogen density, we show that the V1 and V2 UVS sensitivities cannot be enhanced by the amounts thus far proposed. The same diagnostic holds for distinct channels covering the diffuse He i 58.4 nm emission. Our prescription is to keep the original calibration of the Voyager UVS with a maximum uncertainty of 30%, making both instruments some of the most stable EUV/FUV spectrographs in the history of space exploration. In that frame, we reassess the excess Lyα emission detected by Voyager UVS deep in the heliosphere, to show its consistency with a heliospheric but not galactic origin. Our finding confirms results obtained nearly two decades ago—namely, the UVS discovery of the distortion of the heliosphere and the corresponding obliquity of the local interstellar magnetic field (˜ 40^\\circ from upwind) in the solar system neighborhood—without requiring any revision of the Voyager UVS calibration.

  11. Calibration of the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometers and the Composition of the Heliosphere Neutrals: Reassessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Holberg, J. B.

    2016-06-01

    The data harvest from the Voyagers’ (V 1 and V 2) Ultraviolet Spectrometers (UVS) covers encounters with the outer planets, measurements of the heliosphere sky-background, and stellar spectrophotometry. Because their period of operation overlaps with many ultraviolet missions, the calibration of V1 and V2 UVS with other spectrometers is invaluable. Here we revisit the UVS calibration to assess the intriguing sensitivity enhancements of 243% (V1) and 156% (V2) proposed recently. Using the Lyα airglow from Saturn, observed in situ by both Voyagers, and remotely by International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), we match the Voyager values to IUE, taking into account the shape of the Saturn Lyα line observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. For all known ranges of the interplanetary hydrogen density, we show that the V1 and V2 UVS sensitivities cannot be enhanced by the amounts thus far proposed. The same diagnostic holds for distinct channels covering the diffuse He i 58.4 nm emission. Our prescription is to keep the original calibration of the Voyager UVS with a maximum uncertainty of 30%, making both instruments some of the most stable EUV/FUV spectrographs in the history of space exploration. In that frame, we reassess the excess Lyα emission detected by Voyager UVS deep in the heliosphere, to show its consistency with a heliospheric but not galactic origin. Our finding confirms results obtained nearly two decades ago—namely, the UVS discovery of the distortion of the heliosphere and the corresponding obliquity of the local interstellar magnetic field (∼ 40^\\circ from upwind) in the solar system neighborhood—without requiring any revision of the Voyager UVS calibration.

  12. Magnetic Reconnection in the Heliospheric Current Sheet: The Implications of the Different Environments Seen by the VoyagerSpacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisdak, M. M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic field abutting the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is primarily in the azimuthal direction, either east-to-west or west-to-east. Mis-alignment of the solar rotational and magnetic axesleads to the characteristic ballerina-skirt shape of the HCS and during the solar cycle there can be large excursions in the sheet's latitudinal extent. Voyager 2's observations of energetic electrondropouts are related to its crossing of this boundary. Magnetic reconnection is also thought to occur as the HCS compresses and narrows between the termination shock and the heliopause. Near theequator the two HCS field alignments are present in roughly equal amounts, while near the edges the distribution can be considerably skewed. This will lead to substantial differences in the environmentsof the two Voyager spacecraft since Voyager 1 is north of the equator, but firmly in the sector region, while Voyager 2 is south of the equator and skirting the edges of the sector region. We presentparticle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the consequences of the reconnection of asymmetric amounts of flux. In particular, we will discuss Voyager 2's remaining time in the heliosphere -- including theimplications for the solar wind velocity, energetic particle transport, and the expected structure of Voyager 2's heliopause crossing -- and compare it with the data collected from Voyager 1.

  13. My school voyages with PERSEUS - PERSEUS@SCHOOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermeli, Georgia; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Papatheodorou, George; Streftaris, Nikos; Ioakeimidis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    PERSEUS@SCHOOL is an international environmental education thematic school network which is inspired and supported by the European research project PERSEUS (Policy Oriented Marine Environmental Research in Southern European Seas_http://www.perseus-net.eu) which is funded by EU FP7 Theme "Ocean of Tomorrow" and it is coordinating by the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR). The overall scientific objectives of PERSEUS (FP7) research project are to identify the interacting patterns of natural and human-derived pressures on the Mediterranean and Black Seas, assess their impact on marine ecosystems and, using the objectives and principles of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive as a vehicle, to design an effective and innovative research governance framework based on solid scientific knowledge. This research governance framework will engage scientists, policy-makers and the public, thereby reaching a shared understanding and informed decision-making based on sound scientific knowledge. PERSEUS@SCHOOL network is coordinated by the Department of Environmental Education of the 1st Directorate of Secondary Education of Athens and aims to help and enhance environmental education, focusing on clean seas stewardship in schools. Educators along with marine scientists have a role in supporting and inspiring children to acquire the knowledge, skills and inspire their awareness to live and work as responsible and concerned citizens. For this purpose, the network has designed specific pedagogical activities for primary and secondary education - based on PERSEUS key thematic areas i.e. Marine biodiversity, Overfishing, Chemical Marine Pollution - Bioaccumulation - Health, Eutrophication in Marine Waters and Marine Litter. Complementary, two web-monitoring tools will be used by the network; the Jellyfish Spotting campaign and the Marine LitterWatch (MLW) app (Developed by EEA). A special emphasis is given to MLW app, as school students for first time will use it in order to

  14. Radial gradient of cosmic ray intensity from a comparative study of data from voyager 1 and 2 and IMP 8

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatgesan, D.; Decker, R.B.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1984-06-01

    Cosmic ray measurements obtained with integral detectors on Voyager 1 and 2 (E/sub p/> or approx. =70 MeV) moving toward the outer solar system and the earth-orbiting IMP 8 satellite (E/sub p/> or approx. =35 MeV) over the period late 1977 through mid-1982 are presented. During this period, Voyager 1 and 2 traversed the region from 1 to approx.13 AU and approx.10 AU, respectively, with little separation in heliolongitude; separation in heliolatitudde was also small (< or approx. =2/sup 0/) through the end of 1980, at which time the trajectory of Voyager 1 changed toward higher ecliptic latitudes.

  15. NASA Now Minute: Space Science: Voyager’s Grand Tour of the Solar System

    NASA Video Gallery

    Planetary scientist Lou Mayo discusses what we’re learning from theVoyager missions, where the two spacecraft are currently located andsome of the incredible discoveries made on the long journe...

  16. Telecommunications and data acquisition systems support for Voyager missions to Jupiter and Saturn, 1972-1981, prelaunch through Saturn encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traxler, M. R.; Beauchamp, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Deep Space Network has supported the Voyager Project for approximately nine years, during which time implementation, testing, and operational support was provided. Four years of this time involved testing prior to launch; the final five years included network operations support and additional network implementation. Intensive and critical support intervals included launch and four planetary encounters. The telecommunications and data acquisition support for the Voyager Missions to Jupiter and Saturn are summarized.

  17. Geology and Topography of Ra Patera, Io, in the Voyager era: Prelude to Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; McEwen, Alfred; Davies, A. G.; Davenport, Trevor; Jones, Kevin; Fessler, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Voyager era stereo images are used to map the geology and topography of Ra Patera (a major active volcanic center and possible site of sulfur eruptions on Io). The summit of Ra Patera reaches only approx.1 km above the surrounding plains. Pre-Voyager-era lava flows occur on slopes of 0.1-0.3 deg, comparable to the lunar mare. These flows were emplaced at either low viscosities, high eruption rates, or both. A 600- km-long ridged mountain unit (rising to approx. 8 km near Carancho Patera) forms a 60 by 90 km wide plateau approx. 0.5 km high 50 km east of Ra Patera. The new lava flows observed by Galileo flowed around the southern edge of this plateau.

  18. Search for the exit: Voyager 1 at heliosphere's border with the galaxy.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, S M; Decker, R B; Roelof, E C; Hill, M E; Armstrong, T P; Gloeckler, G; Hamilton, D C; Lanzerotti, L J

    2013-07-12

    We report measurements of energetic (>40 kiloelectron volts) charged particles on Voyager 1 from the interface region between the heliosheath, dominated by heated solar plasma, and the local interstellar medium, which is expected to contain cold nonsolar plasma and the galactic magnetic field. Particles of solar origin at Voyager 1, located at 18.5 billion kilometers (123 astronomical units) from the Sun, decreased by a factor of >10(3) on 25 August 2012, while those of galactic origin (cosmic rays) increased by 9.3% at the same time. Intensity changes appeared first for particles moving in the azimuthal direction and were followed by those moving in the radial and antiradial directions with respect to the solar radius vector. This unexpected heliospheric "depletion region" may form part of the interface between solar plasma and the galaxy. PMID:23811223

  19. Absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot subluminous stars from Voyager

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J.B.; Ali, B.; Carone, T.E.; Polidan, R.S. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1991-07-01

    Observations, obtained with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers, are presented of absolute fluxes for two well-known hot subluminous stars: BD + 28 deg 4211, an sdO, and G191 - B2B, a hot DA white dwarf. Complete absolute energy distributions for these two stars, from the Lyman limit at 912 A to 1 micron, are given. For BD + 28 deg 4211, a single power law closely represents the entire observed energy distribution. For G191 - B2B, a pure hydrogen model atmosphere provides an excellent match to the entire absolute energy distribution. Voyager absolute fluxes are discussed in relation to those reported from various sounding rocket experiments, including a recent rocket observation of BD + 28 deg 4211. 43 refs.

  20. Voyager 1 observes low-energy galactic cosmic rays in a region depleted of heliospheric ions.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Heikkila, B C; Lal, N; Webber, W R

    2013-07-12

    On 25 August 2012, Voyager 1 was at 122 astronomical units when the steady intensity of low-energy ions it had observed for the previous 6 years suddenly dropped for a third time and soon completely disappeared as the ions streamed away into interstellar space. Although the magnetic field observations indicate that Voyager 1 remained inside the heliosphere, the intensity of cosmic ray nuclei from outside the heliosphere abruptly increased. We report the spectra of galactic cosmic rays down to ~3 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon, revealing H and He energy spectra with broad peaks from 10 × 10(6) to 40 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon and an increasing galactic cosmic-ray electron intensity down to ~10 × 10(6) electron volts. PMID:23811227

  1. Voyager 2 observations of plasmas and flows out to 104 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J. D.; Decker, R. B. E-mail: robert.decker@apljhu.edu

    2014-09-10

    Voyager 2 has crossed through 20 AU of the heliosheath; assuming the same heliosheath thickness as at Voyager 1, it is now two-thirds of the way to the heliopause. The plasma data are generally of good quality, although the increasing flow angle of the plasma makes analysis more difficult. The average plasma speed has remained constant but the flow angles have increased to almost 60° in the RT plane and to almost 30° in the RN plane. The average density and thermal speed have been constant since a density increase observed in 2011. Comparison of V2 plasma flows derived from plasma science experiment (PLS) data and Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) proton anisotropies give good agreement except when heavy ion contributions or non-convective proton anisotropies are observed in the LECP data.

  2. A new estimate of interstellar helium parameters from measurements of Voyager 1/2 ultraviolet spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Bertaux, J. L.; Lallement, R.; Sandel, B. R.; Broadfoot, L.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the He I 58.4 nm interplanetary emisson collected by the UVS on board Voyager 1 and 2 were reduced and compared to a computer code model. This model predicts the distribution in the solar system of interstellar helim atoms at temperature T, flowing at velocity V and predicts also the emission by resoncance scattering of He I 58.4 nm solar photons. It is shown in the present study that the emissivity pattern of helim atoms illuminated by the sun can be well represented by several combinations of parameters (temperature, velocity, solar line width). The comparison of Voyager results and previous estimates of the helim temperatures leads to a temperature of 12000±2000K and a velocity of 24.5±0.5 km s-1.

  3. A new spectrum of Triton near the time of the Voyager encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    A 5200-10,000 A spectrum of Triton that was telescopically obtained during the summer of 1989, just before the Voyager II encounter with the Neptune system, exhibits a measurable 8900 A CH4 ice absorption band. A combination of these data with those of Voyager indicates that the absorption is caused solely by Triton surface CH4 ice. A Hapke-type model for the Triton spectrum (1) sets a 20-micron lower limit on the CH4 ice's mean grain size (although it is suspected that actual grain size is closer to 100 microns), and (2) indicates that CH4 ice is widely distributed on the southern-hemisphere surface of Triton.

  4. COMPARISON OF HELIOSPHERIC MODELS WITH OBSERVATIONS OF THE VOYAGER AND IBEX SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Grygorczuk, J.; Ben-Jaffel, L.

    2011-11-01

    Results of modeling the heliosphere are compared with observations of the Voyager spacecraft and the IBEX mission simultaneously. The MHD solutions are tested against observational data for different strengths and orientations of the local interstellar magnetic field (LIMF) used in the simulations for asymmetric magnetized solar wind flow. We show that the model reproduces approximately the position of the IBEX ribbon and the termination shock crossing distance for Voyager 2, when the LIMF vector lies in the proximity of the hydrogen deflection plane with the inclination angle to the local interstellar flow equal to 39 deg. {+-} 9 deg. and its magnitude is 2.4 {+-} 0.3 {mu}G. In ecliptic coordinates this solution corresponds to the LIMF vector pointing from (longitude, latitude) = (227 deg. {+-} 7 deg., 35 deg. {+-} 7 deg.).

  5. High electron mobility transistors - Mission accomplished for Voyager and Neptune encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duh, K. H. George; Adams, Barbara Craig

    1990-08-01

    The great commmunications success achieved in the Voyager 2-Neptune encounter can be in part attributed to the HEMT-based amplifiers used in the ground receivers for the mission, which ensured a low-noise performance of the receivers. This paper describes the HEMT history for the Voyager and Neptune encounter and points out the advantages of HEMTs over masers and FETs. It is shown that HEMTs have the lowest noise figures to date at frequencies up to 94 GHz. Moreover, at 44 and 60 GHz frequencies used for new military communications satellites, HEMT low-noise amplifier technology makes it possible to reduce noise by 1 to 2 dB of the FET levels.

  6. Jupiter Data Analysis Program: Analysis of Voyager wideband plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager plasma wave wideband frames from the Jovian encounters are analyzed. The 511 frames which were analyzed were chosen on the basis of low-rate spectrum analyzer data from the plasma wave receiver. These frames were obtained in regions and during times of various types of plasma or radio wave activity as determined by the low-rate, low-resolution data and were processed in order to provide high resolution measurements of the plasma wave spectrum for use in the study of a number of outstanding problems. Chorus emissions at Jupiter were analyzed. The detailed temporal and spectral form of the very complex chorus emissions near L = 8 on the Voyager 1 inbound passage was compared to both terrestrial chorus emissions as well as to the theory which was developed to explain the terrestrial waves.

  7. The near real time image navigation of pictures returned by Voyager 2 at Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Ian M.; Bachman, Nathaniel J.; Taber, William L.; Wang, Tseng-Chan; Acton, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a process for performing image navigation in near real time is described. The process was used to accurately determine the camera pointing for pictures returned by the Voyager 2 spacecraft at Neptune Encounter. Image navigation improves knowledge of the pointing of an imaging instrument at a particular epoch by correlating the spacecraft-relative locations of target bodies in inertial space with the locations of their images in a picture taken at that epoch. More than 8,500 pictures returned by Voyager 2 at Neptune were processed in near real time. The results were used in several applications, including improving pointing knowledge for nonimaging instruments ('C-smithing'), making 'Neptune, the Movie', and providing immediate access to geometrical quantities similar to those traditionally supplied in the Supplementary Experiment Data Record.

  8. Voyager 2 Observations of Plasmas and Flows out to 104 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Decker, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    Voyager 2 has crossed through 20 AU of the heliosheath; assuming the same heliosheath thickness as at Voyager 1, it is now two-thirds of the way to the heliopause. The plasma data are generally of good quality, although the increasing flow angle of the plasma makes analysis more difficult. The average plasma speed has remained constant but the flow angles have increased to almost 60° in the RT plane and to almost 30° in the RN plane. The average density and thermal speed have been constant since a density increase observed in 2011. Comparison of V2 plasma flows derived from plasma science experiment (PLS) data and Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) proton anisotropies give good agreement except when heavy ion contributions or non-convective proton anisotropies are observed in the LECP data.

  9. WHY ARE THE MAGNETIC FIELD DIRECTIONS MEASURED BY VOYAGER 1 ON BOTH SIDES OF THE HELIOPAUSE SO SIMILAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Grygorczuk, J.; Czechowski, A.; Grzedzielski, S.

    2014-07-10

    The solar wind carves a cavity in the interstellar plasma bounded by a surface, called the heliopause (HP), that separates the plasma and magnetic field of solar origin from those of interstellar origin. It is now generally accepted that in 2012 August Voyager 1 (V1) crossed that boundary. Unexpectedly, the magnetic fields on both sides of the HP, although theoretically independent of each other, were found to be similar in direction. This delayed the identification of the boundary as the HP and led to many alternative explanations. Here, we show that the Voyager 1 observations can be readily explained and, after the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) discovery of the ribbon, could even have been predicted. Our explanation relies on the fact that the Voyager 1 and undisturbed interstellar field directions (which we assume to be given by the IBEX ribbon center (RC)) share the same heliolatitude (∼34.°5) and are not far separated in longitude (difference ∼27°). Our result confirms that Voyager 1 has indeed crossed the HP and offers the first independent confirmation that the IBEX RC is in fact the direction of the undisturbed interstellar magnetic field. For Voyager 2, we predict that the difference between the inner and outer magnetic field directions at the HP will be significantly larger than that observed by Voyager 1 (∼30° instead of ∼20°), and that the outer field direction will be close to the RC.

  10. A Study of Saturn's E-Ring Particles Using the Voyager 1 Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsintikidis, D.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Barbosa, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    The flyby of Voyager 1 at Saturn resulted in the detection of a large variety of plasma waves, e.g., chorus, hiss, and electron cyclotron harmonics. Just before the outbound equator crossing, at about 6.1 R(sub s), the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument detected a strong, well-defined low-frequency enhancement. Initially it was suggested that plasma waves might be responsible for the spectral feature but more recently dust was suggested as at least a partial contributor to the enhancement. In this report we present evidence which supports the conclusion that dust contributes to the low-frequency enhancement. A new method has been used to derive the dust impact rate. The method relies mainly on the 16-channel spectrum analyzer data. The few wide band waveform observations available (which have been used to study dust impacts during the Voyager 2 ring plane crossing) were useful for calibrating the impact rate from the spectrum analyzer data. The mass and, hence, the size of the dust particles were also obtained by analyzing the response of the plasma wave spectrum analyzer. The results show that the region sampled by Voyager 1 is populated by dust particles that have rms masses of up to few times 10(exp -11) g and sizes of up to a few microns. The dust particle number density is on the order of 10(exp -3) m(exp 3). The optical depth of the region sampled by the spacecraft is 1.04 x 10(exp -6). The particle population is centered about 2500 km south of the equatorial plane and has a north-south thickness of about 4000 km. Possible sources of these particles are the moons Enceladus and Tethys whose orbits lie within the E-ring radial extent. These results are in reasonable agreement with photometric studies and numerical simulations.

  11. Interpretation of Voyager 1 data on low energy cosmic rays in galactic wind model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.; Seo, E. S.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The local interstellar energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays down to a few MeV/nucleon were directly measured in the experiment on the board of the Voyager 1 spacecraft. We suggest interpretation of these data based on our models of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and the diffusion in galactic wind where diffusion coefficient is determined by the cosmic ray streaming instability. The dependence of wind velocity on distance above the Galactic disk is determined.

  12. Selecting and implementing scientific objectives. [for Voyager 1 and 2 planetary encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. D.; Stembridge, C. H.; Doms, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    The procedures used to select and implement scientific objectives for the Voyager 1 and 2 planetary encounters are described. Attention is given to the scientific tradeoffs and engineering considerations must be addressed at various stages in the mission planning process, including: the limitations of ground and spacecraft communications systems, ageing of instruments in flight, and instrument calibration over long distances. The contribution of planetary science workshops to the definition of scientific objectives for deep space missions is emphasized.

  13. Carbon-14 dating of an iron bloom associated with the voyages of Sir Martin Frobisher

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, E.V.; Harbottle, G.; Stoenner, R.W. Washburn, W.; Olin, J.S.; Fitzhugh, W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper recounts the history of the iron bloom associated with the English Elizabethan explorer Sir Martin Frobisher who made 3 voyages to the North American mainland in the 1570's. Specifically the paper deals with the use of proportional counters in carbon-14 dating of the Frobisher iron bloom which is located at the Smithsonian Institution. The procedures for preparing the samples for counting are described. (KRM)

  14. What the Voyager infrared investigators hope to learn about the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Voyager infrared investigation uses a Michelson interferometer (IRIS) covering the spectral range from 200 to 3000 cm/1 (3.3 to 50 micrometers) and a bore sighted radiometer covering the range from 5000 to 25000 cm/1 (0.4 to 2 micrometers). The spectral resolution of the interferometer is 4.3 cm/1 and the field of view is 0.25 deg. Scientific results anticipated from the investigation of the Saturnian system are discussed.

  15. A 'private adventure'? John Herschel's Cape voyage and the production of the 'Cape Results'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskin, Steven William

    2002-07-01

    This dissertation considers the life of John Herschel (1792 1871) from the years 1833 to 1847. In 1833 Herschel sailed from London to Cape Town, southern Africa, to undertake (at his own expense) an astronomical exploration of the southern heavens, as well as a terrestrial exploration of the area around Cape Town. After his return to England in 1838, he was highly esteemed and became Britain's most recognized scientist. In 1847 his southern hemisphere astronomical observations were published as the Cape Results. The main argument of this dissertation is that Herschel's voyage, and the publication of the Cape Results, in addition to their contemporary scientific importance, were also significant for nineteenth-century politics and culture. This dissertation is a two-part dissertation. The first part is entitled “John Herschel's Cape Voyage: Private Science, Public Imagination, and the Ambitions of Empire”; and the second part, “The Production of the Cape Results.” In the first part it is demonstrated that the reason for Herschel's cultural renown was the popular notion that his voyage to the Cape was a project aligned with the imperial ambitions of the British government. By leaving England for one of its colonies, and pursuing there a significant scientific project, Herschel was seen in the same light as other British men of science who had also undertaken voyages of exploration and discovery. It is then demonstrated, in the second part of this work, that the production of the Cape Results, in part because of Herschel's status as Britain's scientific figurehead, was a significant political and cultural event. In addition to the narrow area of Herschel scholarship, this dissertation touches on other areas of research in the history of science as well: science and culture, science and empire, science and politics, and what has been called the “new” history of scientific books.

  16. Deep space network radio science system for Voyager Uranus and Galileo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, T. K.; Donivan, F. F.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is presented of major new requirements, challenges and conceptual designs for the DSN Radio Science System in the 1985 to 1988 period. The Voyager Uranus encounter is being supported with larger combined aperture, higher sample rate, and a centrally controlled network. The Galileo mission will be provided with a high resolution S-Band Faraday rotation detection capability and a high-stability Doppler system with X-Band uplink for gravitational wave search.

  17. Quantitative measurements of Jupiter, Saturn, their rings and satellites made from Voyager imaging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. A.; Bunker, A. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft cameras use selenium-sulfur slow scan vidicons to convert focused optical images into sensible electrical signals. The vidicon-generated data thus obtained are the basis of measurements of much greater precision than was previously possible, in virtue of their superior linearity, geometric fidelity, and the use of in-flight calibration. Attention is given to positional, radiometric, and dynamical measurements conducted on the basis of vidicon data for the Saturn rings, the Saturn satellites, and the Jupiter atmosphere.

  18. C-smithing of Voyager 2 non-imaging instrument pointing information at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Tseng-Chan; Acton, Charles H.; Underwood, Ian M.; Synnott, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a family of techniques, collectively called C-smithing, for improving spacecraft nonimaging instrument pointing knowledge is discussed. C-smithing studies using data from the Voyager 2 Uranus Encounter show that significant improvements in pointing knowledge for nonimaging instruments can be achieved with these techniques. This improved pointing information can be used to regenerate instrument viewing geometry parameters for the encounter, which can then be made available to science investigators.

  19. Constraints of solar flare particle transport models from anisotropy observations at Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1985-01-01

    In general a particle transport model for energetic solar flare particles contains a number of free parameters which are determined by fitting various features of observed particle events. Frequently the parameter values are not uniquely determined. In order to place tighter constraints on the models, the anisotropy of 1 and 25 MeV/nuc protons and helium nuclei were examined during the 22 November 1977 solar particle event using data from the LECP experiment on Voyager 1 at 1.6 AU. These observations were combined with the time intensity profiles at Voyager 1 and at 1 AU from ISEE-1 and IMP-8 to determine the magnitude and radial dependence of the interplanetary diffusion coefficient and the required injection duration at the sun. The first order anisotropy amplitudes for both 1 MeV and 25 MeV protons are observed to decrease from maximum values (approx. 1) during the event onset at Voyager 1 to values consistent with convection in the solar wind at about 3 days into the event decay phase. The intensity and anisotropy profiles at 1.6 AU are consistent with predictions of diffusive transport with a modest mean free path (lambda = approx. 0.1 AU).

  20. Summary of whistlers observed by Voyager 1 at Jupiter. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Strayer, B.D.; Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.

    1983-12-20

    We summarize the Voyager 1 observations of whistlers at Jupiter in order to provide a basis for further analyses of the density profile of the Io plasma torus as well as to support studies of atmospheric lightning at Jupiter. All the whistlers detected by Voyager 1 fell into three general regions in the torus at radial distances ranging between 5 and 6 R sub J. An analysis of the broadband wave amplitudes measured by the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument and estimates of the peak whistler amplitudes imply the grouping of whistlers was due to variations in the sensitivity of the receiver to whistlers and not to variations in the source or propagation paths of the whistlers. The whistler dispersions are presented in statistical form for each of the three groups of events and analyzed in view of the structure of the Io plasma torus as determined by plasma probe measurements. The results of these analyses give source locations for the whistlers at the foot of the magnetic field lines threading the torus in both hemispheres and over a range of longitudes.

  1. Jupiter's magnetopause, bow shock, and 10-hour modulated magnetosheath: Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    Fine scale magnetic field data from the Voyager 1 and 2 magnetopause and bow shock crossings at Jupiter were analyzed. Explicit models of the dawnside magnetopause and bow shock in Jupiter's orbital plane employ an axisymmetric parabola and hyperbola, respectively, and are determined separately for the encounters. A new phenomenon was discovered in the magnetosheath. It is manifested as (5 or) 10 hour quasi-periodic modulation of the direction of the magnetic field in the outbound magnetosheath, predominantly in the northward (N) and southward (S) directions. It was seen to occur during both encounters and appears most evident in Voyager 2 outbound observations, probably due to the extreme tailward extent of the Voyager 2 trajectory through the magnetosheath. The durations of the N to and from S transitions range from tens of minutes to approximately 3 hours. The directional variation of the field during these transitions is fairly well restricted to a plane parallel to the local model magnetopause location. These signatures may be due to magnetosheath field line draping modulated by the large scale motion of the magnetospheric plasma disk.

  2. Examination of the Voyager 2 Plasma Observations in the Vicinity of the Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W. R.

    2008-12-01

    We examine the plasma distributions obtained by the MIT plasma probe on Voyager 2 in 2007. These are the first plasma data obtained in the vicinity of the termination shock. The Voyager 2 plasma observations (Richardson et al., Nature, 454, July 2008,doi:10.10338, p.63) were somewhat surprising. Richardson et al. reported that following the termination shock crossing the solar wind flow did not become subsonic as expected. Rather Richardson et al. reported the solar wind flow slowed, but still remained supersonic. We examine some of the details of the MIT plasma data. We compare the plasma data with other in-situ spacecraft measurements. The results also are evaluated in terms of theoretical expectations. Our detailed analyses show that the time periods around the reported termination shock crossings are more complex and revealing than earlier believed. This work is sponsored by NASA Grant NNX08AE40G and by Carmel Research Center. We are grateful to John Richardson for providing the Voyager 2 MIT plasma data.

  3. Voyager observations of O(+6) and other minor ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villanueva, Louis; Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Steinberg, John T.

    1994-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) experiments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft began making measurements of the solar wind shortly after the two launches in the fall of 1977. In reviewing the data obtained prior to the Jupiter encounters in 1979, we have found that the large dynamic range of the PLS instrument generally allows a clean separation of signatures of minor ions (about 2.5% of the time) during a single instrument scan in energy per charge. The minor ions, most notably O(+6), are well separated from the protons and alpha particles during times when the solar wind Mach number (ratio of streaming speed to thermal speed) is greater than approximately 15. During the Earth to Jupiter cruise we find that the average ratio of alpha particle number density to that of oxygen is 66 +/- 7 (Voyager 1) and 71 +/- 17 (Voyager 2). These values are consistent with the value 75 +/- 20 inferred from the Ion Composition Instrument on ISEE 3 during the period spanning 1978 and 1982. We have inferred an average coronal temperature of (1.7 +/- 0.1) x 10(exp 6) K based on the ratio of O(+7) to O(+6) number densities. Our observations cover a period of increasing solar activity. During this time we have found that the alpha particle to proton number density ratio is increasing with the solar cycle, the oxygen to proton ratio increases, and the alpha particle to oxygen ratio remains relatively constant in time.

  4. Turbulence in the Heliosheath: spectral analysis from Voyager 1 and 2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternale, Federico; Gallana, Luca; Iovieno, Michele; Fosson, Sophie; Magli, Enrico; Opher, Merav; Richardson, John; Morgan, Rachel; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    The Voyager 2 spacecraft is traveling through the heliosheath, the outermost layer in heliosphere where the solar wind is slowed by the interstellar gas, while Voyager 1 has entered the local interstellar medium. The they are providing the fist in-situ measurement of plasma and magnetic fields in that regions. We focus on the differences between the energetic particle intensity variations seen by the Voyager 1 and 2 crafts that are crossing the sectored and the unipolar as well as the sectored heliosheath regions, respectively. We try to provide a spectral analysis of the full heliosheath, characterizing the plasma and magnetic field turbulence through the estimate of the spectral properties in the different frequency ranges. Signal reconstruction techniques are mandatory to reconstruct spectra due to extreme data sparsity (up to 97% missings in high resolution data beyond 80 AU). We use three different methods: correlation computation coupled with the maximum likelihood reconstruction, compress sensing and a genetic algorithm to estimate the gap influence on reconstructed spectra. These methods have been previously validated on 1979 data and synthetic hydrodynamics fluid turbulent fields. Results on power density, energy and helicity spectra will

  5. Distribution of Heavy Ions in the Jovian Magnetosphere from Re-Analysis of Voyager PLS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, L.; Bagenal, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Bodisch, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is populated with heavy ions produced by ionization of volcanic gases from Io. The 1979 flybys of the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft through the Jovian system provided in situ measurements of plasma properties by the Plasma Science (PLS) instruments. Re-analysis of the Voyager 1 and 2 PLS data, combined with constraints from EUV emissions, allow a more detailed description of the distribution of heavier ions throughout the entire Jovian magnetosphere. The PLS instrument on the Voyager spacecraft had a large angle of view, with 4 Faraday cups covering different portions of the sky. This allows for an accurate determination of the properties of the plasma, including density, temperature, and flow speed, assuming a convected Maxwellian distribution. We determine densities of S+, S++, S+++, O+, and O++ ions mapped out to 30 RJ. Because the instrument measures a current as a function of energy/charge, there is an ambiguity in the measurement of the density of the dominant species O+ and S++. To resolve this issue we use a chemistry model to constrain the relative amounts of these two species throughout the magnetosphere.

  6. On the latitudinal distribution of Titan's haze at the Voyager epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrao, A.; Roos-Serote, M.; Rannou, P.; Rages, K.; McKay, C.

    2002-09-01

    In this work, we re-analyse a total of 10 high phase angle images of Titan (2 from Voyager 1 and 8 from Voyager 2). The images were acquired in different filters of the Voyager Imaging Sub System in 1980 - 1981. We apply a model, developed and used by Rannou etal. (1997) and Cabane etal. (1992), that calculates the vertical (1-D) distribution of haze particles and the I/F radial profiles as a function of a series of parameters. Two of these parameters, the haze particle production rate (P) and imaginary refractive index (xk), are used to obtain fits to the observed I/F profiles at different latitudes. Differerent from previous studies is that we consider all filters simultaneously, in an attempt to better fix the parameter values. We also include the filter response functions, not considered previously. The results show that P does not change significantly as a function of latitude, eventhough somewhat lower values are found at high northern latitudes. xk seems to increase towards southern latitudes. We will compare our results with GCM runs, that can give the haze distribution at the epoch of the observations. Work financed by portuguese Foundation for Science and Tecnology (FCT), contract ESO/PRO/40157/2000

  7. The solar wind density spectrum near the Sun: Results from Voyager radio measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, W.A.; Liu, W. ); Harmon, J.K.; Martin, C.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Spacecraft radio propagation data are analyzed to estimate the solar wind density fluctuation power spectrum across five decades of spatial wave number. The data were from radio science observations made during superior conjunctions of the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecrafts in 1979 and 1980. These data were analyzed to yield the wave structure function, a statistic which is related to, but obtained more readily than, the spectrum itself. Structure functions were obtained from a total of 28 observations spanning the heliocentric distance range 7-22 R{sub S}. Each structure function was a composite of two shorter segments estimated, respectively, from phase scintillation and spectral broadening analyses. The composite structure functions tend to be steep (approximately Kolmogorov) at large scales (10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} km) and nearly always show some flattening at smaller scales (10-100 km). The inflection between the steep and flatter regions is abrupt and occurs at scales of 100-300 km. Most of the structure functions also show some turnover at the very smallest scales. These results are in excellent agreement with the spectral shape model proposed by Coles and Harmon (1989). A few transients were seen in the Voyager data which were characterized by an overall increase in power at large scales and a steeping of the structure function at small scales. These transients were similar in appearance to transients reported earlier from Arecibo spectral broadening observations.

  8. A report on SHARP (Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype) and the Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. G. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; James, M. L.; Lawson, D. L.; Porta, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    The development and application of the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP) for the operations of the telecommunications systems and link analysis functions in Voyager mission operations are presented. An overview is provided of the design and functional description of the SHARP system as it was applied to Voyager. Some of the current problems and motivations for automation in real-time mission operations are discussed, as are the specific solutions that SHARP provides. The application of SHARP to Voyager telecommunications had the goal of being a proof-of-capability demonstration of artificial intelligence as applied to the problem of real-time monitoring functions in planetary mission operations. AS part of achieving this central goal, the SHARP application effort was also required to address the issue of the design of an appropriate software system architecture for a ground-based, highly automated spacecraft monitoring system for mission operations, including methods for: (1) embedding a knowledge-based expert system for fault detection, isolation, and recovery within this architecture; (2) acquiring, managing, and fusing the multiple sources of information used by operations personnel; and (3) providing information-rich displays to human operators who need to exercise the capabilities of the automated system. In this regard, SHARP has provided an excellent example of how advanced artificial intelligence techniques can be smoothly integrated with a variety of conventionally programmed software modules, as well as guidance and solutions for many questions about automation in mission operations.

  9. Thermal imaging of Uranus: Upper-tropospheric temperatures one season after Voyager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Encrenaz, Therese; Leyrat, Cedric; Roe, Henry G.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Pantin, Eric

    2015-11-01

    We report on 18-25 μm thermal imaging of Uranus that took place between 2003 and 2011, a time span roughly one season after the thermal maps made by the Voyager-2 IRIS experiment in 1986. We re-derived meridional variations of temperature and para-H2 fraction from the Voyager experiment and compared these with the thermal images, which are sensitive to temperatures in the upper troposphere of Uranus around the 70-400 mbar atmospheric pressure range. The thermal images display a maximum of 3 K of equivalent temperature changes across the disk, and they are consistent with the temperature distribution measured by the Voyager IRIS experiment. This implies that there has been no detectable change of the meridional distribution of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric temperatures over a season. This is inconsistent with seasonally dependent radiative-convective-dynamical models and full global climate models that predict some variability with season if the effective temperature is meridionally constant. We posit that the effective temperature of Uranus could be meridionally variable, with the additional possibility that even the small temperature variations predicted by the GCMs are overestimated.

  10. New analysis of the Voyager UVS H Lyman-alpha emission of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffel, L. Ben; Prange, R.; Sandel, B. R.; Yelle, R. V.; Emerich, C.; Feng, D.; Hall, D. T.

    1995-01-01

    The limb to limb Lyman-alpha reflectivities observed with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instruments during the fly-by of Saturn are reanalyzed using a revised H Lyman-alpha sensitivity for the Voyager 1 instrument. The new sensitivity reconciles the measured intensities to those of Voyager 2 and gives a coherent set of data. To fit the UV airglow observations, four sources are considered: (1) H resonance and H2 Rayleigh scattering of solar Lyman-alpha radiation, (2) the interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation, (3) a possible internal source of unknown origin, (4) the possibility of atmospheric turbulence recently proposed to explain the Lyman-alpha bulge of Jupiter. The analysis supports neither a dominant collisional excitation source for the UV emissions nor the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence. The best fit, in terms of brightness but also in terms of shape of the limb to limb profile (that is to say independent on the absolute calibrations), is obtained for pure resonance and Rayleigh scattering of solar and interstellar wind line in an atmosphere enriched in atomic hydrogen up to three times the standard model. Influx of water from the rings of Saturn may provide a means for producing such enhanced H densities in the upper atmosphere.

  11. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  12. Bering Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Much of the Bering Sea is clear in this SeaWiFS image. The large expanse of bright aquamarine water is clearly visible. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  13. Bering Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The skies of the Bering Sea were relatively clear again in this SeaWiFS image showing a band of aquamarine colored water. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  14. Grant Proposal for the Continuation of the Voyager Interstellar Mission: LECP Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Ip, Wing-H.; Decker, Robert B.; Keath, Edwin P.; Mauk, Barry H.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Gloeckler, George; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    This proposal documents the plans of the Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) investigation team for participation in NASA's Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM) as the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft explore the outer reaches of the heliosphere and search for the termination shock and the heliopause. The proposal covers the four year period from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2000. The LECP instruments on Voyager 1 and 2 measure in situ intensities of charged particles with energies from about 30 keV to 100 MeV for ions, and about 20 keV to greater than 10 MeV for electrons. The instruments provide detailed spectral, angular, and compositional information about the particles. Composition is available for greater than 200 keV/nuc using multi-parameter measurements. Angular information is obtained by a mechanically scanned platform that rotates at various commanded rates. Measurements of low energy ion and electron intensities versus time and spatial location within the heliosphere contain an abundance of information regarding various transport and acceleration processes on both local (approx. 1 hr, approx. 0.01 AU) and global (approx. 11 yrs, approx. 100 AU) scales. The LECP instruments provide unique observations of such dynamical processes, and we anticipate that it will return critical information regarding the boundaries of the heliosphere. Several recent and exciting discoveries based on LECP measurements emphasize the important role that low energy charged particle distributions play in physical processes in the interplanetary medium. Yet, at the same time, these discoveries also underscore the fact that our understanding of processes in the outer heliosphere is, in most cases, incomplete, and in others, only rudimentary at best. Among the discoveries referred to above are the following: (1) Shocks: Examination of greater than 30 keV ion intensities have revealed: (a) a total absence of acceleration beyond only -100-200 keV at a strong transient shock in May 1991 at 35

  15. Factors influencing the en route survivorship and post-voyage growth of a common ship biofouling organism, Bugula neritina.

    PubMed

    Schimanski, Kate B; Piola, Richard F; Goldstien, Sharyn J; Floerl, Oliver; Grandison, Clare; Atalah, Javier; Hopkins, Grant A

    2016-09-01

    The likelihood that viable non-indigenous biofouling species will survive a voyage on a vessel is influenced by a range of factors, including the speed, duration, and route of the voyage and the amount of time the vessel spends in port. In this study, a land-based dynamic flow device was used to test the effect of recruit age, vessel speed and voyage duration on the survivorship and growth of the bryozoan Bugula neritina. In the experiment, one-week-old recruits had a higher likelihood (100%) of surviving voyages than older (one-month-old, 90%) or younger (one-day-old, 79%) recruits, but survival was not influenced by vessel speed (6 and 18 knots) or voyage duration (two and eight days). The results suggest that the non-indigenous species B. neritina can be effectively transferred at a range of ages but one-week-old recruits are more likely to survive the translocation process and survive in the recipient environment. PMID:27539565

  16. SEAC 2011 Stars and Stones: Voyages in Archaeoastronomy and Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, F.; Ribeiro, N.; Silva, F.; Campion, N.; Joaquinito, A.; Tirapicos, L.

    2015-05-01

    Since Prehistory the sky has always been integrated as part of the cosmovision of human societies. The sky played a fundamental role not only in the orientation in space, time organization, ritual practices or celestial divination but also as an element of power. Migrations and voyages are intrinsic to humankind, they opened the routes for cultural diffusion and trade, but also for power dominance. Following these routes is also to follow cultural diversity and how human societies met or clashed. The sky and astronomical phenomena provided the tools for time reckoning, calendar organization and celestial navigation that supported those voyages. Astronomy gives us today the capacity to reproduce the sky, opening a window through which we can glimpse how those societies perceived, integrated and manipulated the sky into their world-views and their myths and, ultimately, into their social organization. A voyage is always a meeting of different worlds and eventually a process to accept diversity and thus we challenged the participants of the 19th meeting of the European Society for Astronomy in Culture to present their papers in the form of a voyage or an encounter for the following topics: - Techniques of celestial navigation and orientation of the past. Astronomical navigation and nautical instruments in the XIVth, XVth and XVIth centuries; - Expressions of astronomical knowledge in architecture and monuments, rock art, archaeology and landscape. People migration, a meeting between different cultures; - History of astronomy. An encounter between different conceptions; - Astronomy and the Jesuits. A meeting between different worlds; - Astronomy in antiquity. A meeting between different knowledge; - Ethno-astronomy, Cultural Astronomy and myths, voyages in space and in time through different cultures; - To where is Archaeoastronomy voyaging? A round table about Archaeoastronomy, Cultural Astronomy and Education. The 19th meeting of the European Society for Astronomy in

  17. Radiation Transport of Heliospheric Lyman-alpha from Combined Cassini and Voyager Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, W.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Sandel, B.; Forrester, T.; Quemerais, E.; Moebius, E.; Esposito, L.; Stewart, I.; McClintock, W.; Jouchoux, A.; Colwell, J.; Izmodenov, V.; Malama, Y.; Shemansky, D.; Ajello, J.; Hansen, C.; Bzowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Heliospheric neutral hydrogen scatters solar Lyman-alpha radiation from the Sun with '27-day' intensity modulations observed near Earth due to the Sun's rotation combined with Earth's orbital motion. These modulations are increasingly damped in amplitude at larger distances from the Sun due to multiple scattering in the heliosphere, providing a diagnostic of the interplanetary neutral hydrogen density independent of instrument calibration. This paper presents Cassini data from 2003-2004 obtained downwind near Saturn at approximately 10 AU that at times show undamped '27-day' waves in good agreement with the single-scattering models of Pryor et al., 1992. Simultaneous Voyager 1 data from 2003- 2004 obtained upwind at a distance of 88.8-92.6 AU from the Sun show waves damped by a factor of -0.21. The observed degree of damping is interpreted in terms of Monte Carlo multiple-scattering calculations (e.g., Keller et al., 1981) applied to two heliospheric hydrogen two-shock density distributions (discussed in Gangopadhyay et al., 2006) calculated in the frame of the Baranov-Malama model of the solar wind interaction with the two-component (neutral hydrogen and plasma) interstellar wind (Baranov and Malama 1993, Izmodenov et al., 2001, Baranov and Izmodenov, 2006). We conclude that multiple scattering is definitely occurring in the outer heliosphere. Both models compare favorably to the data, using heliospheric neutral H densities at the termination shock of 0.085 cm(exp -3) and 0.095 cm(exp -3). This work generally agrees with earlier discussions of Voyager data in Quemerais et al., 1996 showing the importance of multiple scattering but is based on Voyager data obtained at larger distances from the Sun (with larger damping) simultaneously with Cassini data obtained closer to the Sun.

  18. Spectral Evolution of Anomalous Cosmic Rays at Voyager 1 beyond the Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.

    2015-05-01

    When the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the termination shock (TS) on 2004 December 16, the energy spectra of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) could not have been produced by steady-state diffusive shock acceleration. However, over the next few years, in the declining phase of the solar cycle, the spectra began to evolve into the expected power-law profile. Observations at the shock led to a broad range of alternative theories for ACR acceleration. In spite of that, in this work we show that the observations could be explained by assuming ACRs are accelerated at the TS. In this paper, we propose that the solar cycle had an important effect on the unrolling of the spectra in the heliosheath. To investigate the spectral evolution of ACRs, a magnetohydrodynamic background model with stationary solar-wind inner boundary conditions was used to model the transport of helium and oxygen ions. We used a backward-in-time stochastic integration technique where phase-space trajectories are integrated until the so-called “injection energy” is reached. Our simulation results were compared with Voyager 1 observations using three different diffusion models. It is shown that the spectral evolution of ACRs in the heliosheath at Voyager 1 could be explained by an increase in the source strength and an enhancement in diffusion as a result of a decrease of the turbulent correlation length in the declining phase of the solar cycle. At the same time, drift effects seem to have had a smaller effect on the evolution of the spectra.

  19. Voyager observations of the magnetic field in the heliosheath and the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper reviews observations of the magnetic field B in the heliosheath by Voyager 1 (V1) and Voyager 2 (V2) and the recent observations of the LISM by V1. The heliosheath is the region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The TS was identified by both V1 and V2, and the internal structure of the TS was determined by V2. The radial distance of the TS was 94 AU at V1 and 84 AU at V2, suggesting a global asymmetry of the heliosphere. The average direction of B in the heliosheath is that of the Parker spiral magnetic field, and non-periodic magnetic sectors were observed by V1 and V2. The heliosheath is disturbed and turbulent, particularly just behind the TS, and it is described by the multifractal spectrum, the q-correlation function and the q-Gaussian distribution. The multifractal spectrum in the heliosheath also varies with the solar cycle. Voyager 1 has been in the LISM since at least August 25, 2012, but the nature of the HP and the time of the HP crossing not been determined. The magnetic field direction is close to, but distinguishable from the Parker spiral magnetic field, and its departure from the Parker spiral magnetic field is slowly increasing with distance from the sun. A large pressure pulse and two shocks or pressure waves have been identified in the LISM, presumably generated inside the heliosphere and transmitted through the heliosheath and heliopause. The interstellar magnetic field lines are draped across the heliopause, and B is approximately 0.5 nT. The fluctuations of B are very small but turbulent on scales 1 day to 468 days, with a Kolmogorov spectrum and an injection scale of approximately 10 pc.

  20. Estimation of a genetically viable population for multigenerational interstellar voyaging: Review and data for project Hyperion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Cameron M.

    2014-04-01

    Designing interstellar starships for human migration to exoplanets requires establishing the starship population, which factors into many variables including closed-ecosystem design, architecture, mass and propulsion. I review the central issues of population genetics (effects of mutation, migration, selection and drift) for human populations on such voyages, specifically referencing a roughly 5-generation (c. 150-year) voyage currently in the realm of thought among Icarus Interstellar's Project Hyperion research group. I present several formulae as well as concrete numbers that can be used to help determine populations that could survive such journeys in good health. I find that previously proposed such populations, on the order of a few hundred individuals, are significantly too low to consider based on current understanding of vertebrate (including human) genetics and population dynamics. Population genetics theory, calculations and computer modeling determine that a properly screened and age- and sex-structured total founding population (Nc) of anywhere from roughly 14,000 to 44,000 people would be sufficient to survive such journeys in good health. A safe and well-considered Nc figure is 40,000, an Interstellar Migrant Population (IMP) composed of an Effective Population [Ne] of 23,400 reproductive males and females, the rest being pre- or post-reproductive individuals. This number would maintain good health over five generations despite (a) increased inbreeding resulting from a relatively small human population, (b) depressed genetic diversity due to the founder effect, (c) demographic change through time and (d) expectation of at least one severe population catastrophe over the 5-generation voyage.

  1. IBEX Observations provide strong Evidence that Voyager 1 is still in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    After plasma wave measurements by Voyager 1 (V1) revealed a surprisingly high value for the plasma electron density, a value close to that expected in the local interstellar medium, all principal investigators of the Voyager mission currently exploring the heliosheath suddenly reversed their position on the location of V1. They concluded unanimously, and NASA announced that V1 has crossed the heliopause and is now in local interstellar space. We have disputed this conclusion, pointing out that to account for all the V1 observations, particularly of the magnetic field direction together with the density, it is necessary to conclude that the higher densities observed by V1 are due to compressed solar wind. In this paper we show that our model for the nose region of the heliosheath can account in detail for the spectral shapes and intensities of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen (ENH) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) looking in the directions of V1 and Voyager 2 (V2). A key feature of our model is the existence of a region, the hot heliosheath, where the outward-moving solar wind is gradually compressed and thus heated, followed by a region, the cold heliosheath, where the solar wind is still compressed but now cold. It is the existence of this cold heliosheath, the region of cold but high-density solar wind, which provides a unique and simple explanation for the low-energy IBEX ENH differential intensities. Finally, since this cold heliosheath is the region where V1 must now reside, the low-energy IBEX observations provide strong evidence that V1 is still in the heliosphere.

  2. Saturn's upper atmosphere during the Voyager era: Reanalysis and modeling of the UVS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervack, Ronald J.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2015-09-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) solar and stellar occultation dataset represents one of the primary, pre-Cassini sources of information that we have on the neutral upper atmosphere of Saturn. Despite its importance, however, the full set of occultations has never received a consistent, nor complete, analysis, and the results derived from the initial analyses over thirty years ago left questions about the temperature and density profiles unanswered. We have reanalyzed all six of the UVS occultations (three solar and three stellar) to provide an up-to-date, pre-Cassini view of Saturn's upper atmosphere. From the Voyager UVS data, we have determined vertical profiles for H2, H, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6, as well as temperature. Our analysis also provides explanations for the two different thermospheric temperatures derived in earlier analyses (400-450 K versus 800 K) and for the unusual shape of the total density profile noted by Hubbard et al. (1997). Aside from inverting the occultation data to retrieve densities and temperatures, we have investigated the atmospheric structure through a series of photochemical models to infer the strength of atmospheric mixing and other physical and chemical properties of Saturn's mesopause region during the Voyager flybys. We find that the data exhibit considerable variability in the vertical profiles for methane, suggesting variations in vertical winds or the eddy diffusion coefficient as a function of latitude and/or time in Saturn's upper atmosphere. The results of our reanalysis will provide a useful baseline for interpreting new data from Cassini, particularly in the context of change over the past three decades.

  3. Voyager energetic particle observations at interplanetary shocks and upstream of planetary bow shocks - 1977-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 vehicles include instrumentation that makes comprehensive electron and ion measurements in several energy channels with good energy, temporal, and compositional resolution. Data gathered from 1977 to 1988, including observations downstream and upstream of four planetary bow shocks (earth, Saturn, Uranus, Jupiter) and numerous interplanetary shocks to about 30 AU, are analyzed in the context of the Fermi and shock drift acceleration models. Overall results indicate that electrons and ions observed upstream of planetary bow shocks have their source inside the parent magnetosphere, with first order Fermi acceleration playing a secondary role at best.

  4. Gravity field of the Saturnian system from Pioneer and Voyager tracking data

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.K.; Anderson, J.D.

    1989-05-01

    Doppler-tracking data and star-satellite imaging from the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used along with Pioneer 11 Doppler tracking data to study the gravity field of the Saturnian system. The present analysis has yielded improved values for the masses of Rhea, Titan, and Iapetus, and Saturn. The results are consistent with the findings of Null et al. (1981) and Nicholson and Porco (1988) for the Saturn zonal harmonic coefficients J2, J4, and J6. The ratio of the mass of the sun to the mass of the Saturnian system is found to be 3497.898 + or - 0.018 30 refs.

  5. A voyage to Mars: A challenge to collaboration between man and machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C.

    1991-01-01

    A speech addressing the design of man machine systems for exploration of space beyond Earth orbit from the human factors perspective is presented. Concerns relative to the design of automated and intelligent systems for the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions are largely based on experiences with integrating humans and comparable systems in aviation. The history, present status, and future prospect, of human factors in machine design are discussed in relation to a manned voyage to Mars. Three different cases for design philosophy are presented. The use of simulation is discussed. Recommendations for required research are given.

  6. Saturn's rings through a microscope - Particle size constraints from the Voyager PPS scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1990-01-01

    The Voyager-2 photopolarimeter PPS experiment obtained the highest resolution of any ring observation of Saturn, profiling the variation of optical depth in radial steps of about 100 meters. A detailed treatment of the PPS statistics is presented here, and it is shown how these statistics can be related to the particle size distribution. An expression for the excess noise in the scan due to large particles is obtained, and the observed noise is used to constrain the upper end of the size distribution through the rings. It is shown that the Cassini Division and the C Ring have the smallest proportion of large particles, while the A ring has the largest proportion.

  7. Radio occultation by Saturn's rings - Observations of structure and particle size with Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 1 radio occultation study of Saturn's rings gives detailed information regarding the rings' radial structure and particle sizes. Structure within the rings is mapped to a radial resolution of few hundred m in the tenuous parts of ring C and the Cassini Division, and few km over most of ring A. Fine resolution profiles reveal extremely sharp edges, very narrow gaps, and a host of wave phenomena. Particle size distributions obtained from occultation data within several ring regions are roughly consistent with an inverse cube power law with upper size cutoff in the 5 to 10 m radius range.

  8. An analysis of bending waves in Saturn's rings using Voyager radio occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresh, Donna L.; Rosen, Paul A.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Lissauer, Jack J.

    1986-01-01

    Three oscillatory features in the Voyager 1 radio occultation map of Saturn's rings have been identified as the 5:3, 7:4, and 4:2 spiral bending waves excited by the satellite Mimas. The observations are presented and the wave properties are investigated. It is found that the Mimas 7:4 wave is consistent with the linear theory of bending waves, while the Mimas 5:3 wave may not be. A detailed analysis of the Mimas 4:2 bending wave was not possible due to the large optical depth in the region in which it propagates.

  9. Triton's surface properties - A preliminary analysis from ground-based, Voyager photopolarimeter subsystem, and laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Lane, A. L.; Gibson, J.; Burrows, H.; Nelson, R. M.; Bliss, D.; Smythe, W.; Garkanian, V.; Wallis, B.

    1991-01-01

    The surface properties of Triton were investigated using data from the ground-based and Voyager photopolarimeter subsystem (PPS) observations of Triton's phase curve. The results indicate that Triton has a high single-scattering albedo (0.96 +/-0.01 at 0.75 micron) and an unusually compacted surface, possibly similar to that of Europa. Results also suggest that Triton's single-particle phase function and the macroscopically rough character of its surface are similar to those of most other icy satellites.

  10. Performance testing of thermoelectric generators including Voyager and LES 8/9 flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, L.; Stapfer, G.

    1979-01-01

    Several thermoelectric generators ranging in output power from 0.5 to 155 W have been completed or are undergoing testing at JPL. These generators represent a wide range of technologies, using Bi2Te3, PbTe and SiGe thermoelectric materials. Several of these generators are of a developmental type, such as HPG S/N2, and others are representative of Transit and Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) Technology. Representative flight performance data of LES 8/9 and Voyager RTG's are presented and compared with the DEGRA computer program based on the data observed from tests of SiGe couples, modules and MHW generators.

  11. Voyager 1 observations of the termination shock particles in the inner heliosheath at 122 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalov, S. V.; Alexashov, D. B.

    2016-07-01

    The sharp drop in fluxes of the termination shock particles observed by Voyager 1 in the inner heliosheath at distance of about 122 au from the Sun can be explained by factors, which are not related to the heliopause crossing as is now commonly believed. It is shown that the region of the heliosheath occupied by the current sheet can be considered as a reservoir for suprathermal charged particles accelerated at the termination shock. When a spacecraft crosses the boundary of this region in the latitudinal direction, fluxes of the suprathermal particles can vary by several orders of magnitude.

  12. The far ultraviolet reflection spectrum of Uranus - Results from the Voyager encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Doose, Lyn R.; Mcconnell, John C.; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1989-01-01

    The present analysis of the 1250-1700 A region Uranus spectrum obtained by Voyager's US spectrometer characterizes these observation results as due primarily to solar light reflected from an H2 Rayleigh and Raman scattering atmosphere with small but measurable hydrocarbon absorption. The hydrocarbon abundances obtained are substantially lower than those at comparable levels of the Saturn or Jupiter atmospheres; it is suggested, in one-dimensional terms, that this is due to diffusive separation, in conjunction with photochemical depletion caused by a very low eddy-diffusion coefficient. Strong latitudinal variations in the hydrocarbon abundances are suggested in the subsolar, polar stratosphere.

  13. DISCONNECTION FROM THE TERMINATION SHOCK: THE END OF THE VOYAGER PARADOX

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2012-10-10

    The most recent Voyager 1 observations show rapidly increasing galactic cosmic ray fluxes with simultaneously decreasing anomalous cosmic ray fluxes. While this has been suggested to somehow herald the imminent crossing of the heliopause, which bounds the heliosphere, we show that such observations should naturally arise from the heliosphere's global magnetic topology. For a blunt termination shock, there must be a region of magnetic flux, still inside the heliopause, but beyond the last magnetic connection point to the termination shock, with poorer access for the shock-accelerated anomalous cosmic rays and better access for the galactic cosmic rays entering the heliosphere.

  14. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  15. Implications of Voyager 1 observations beyond the heliopause for the local interstellar electron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Bisschoff, D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2014-10-20

    Cosmic-ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere finally allow the comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental data at lower energies. These computed spectra, based on galactic propagation models, can now be compared with observations at low energies by Voyager 1 and at high energies by the PAMELA space detector at Earth. This improves understanding of basic propagation effects and also provides solar modulation studies with reliable input spectra from 1 MeV to 100 GeV. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 electron observations in the energy range of 6-60 MeV, as well as the PAMELA electron spectrum above 10 GeV, using the GALPROP code. By varying the source spectrum and galactic diffusion parameters, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, we find local interstellar spectra that agree with both power-law spectra observed by Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause. The local interstellar spectrum between ∼1 MeV and 100 GeV indicates that it is the combination of two power laws, with E {sup –(1.45} {sup ±} {sup 0.15)} below ∼100 MeV and E {sup –(3.15} {sup ±} {sup 0.05)} above ∼100 MeV. A gradual turn in the spectral shape matching the power laws is found, between 2.0 ± 0.5) GeV and (100 ± 10) MeV. According to our simplified modeling, this transition is caused primarily by galactic propagation effects. We find that the intensity beyond the heliopause at 10 MeV is (350 ± 50) electrons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} MeV{sup –1}, decreasing to (50 ± 5) electrons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} MeV{sup –1} at 100 MeV.

  16. Thermal structure of Saturn from Voyager infrared measurements - Implications for atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrath, B. J.; Pirraglia, J. A.

    1983-02-01

    Saturn atmospheric temperatures at the 150-mbar level retrieved from Voyager IRIS measurements indicate the presence of small-scale meridional gradients which are approximately symmetric with respect to the equator, but are superposed on a large-scale hemispheric thermal asymmetry. Under the assumption that the retrieved values at this atmospheric level represent kinetic temperatures on a constant pressure surface, it is suggested that the small-scale structure is produced by a meridional circulation associated with the dissipative decay of the zonal winds with height, while the hemispheric asymmetry represents a thermal response to the seasonally varying insolation.

  17. The C/H ratio in Jupiter from the Voyager infrared investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, D.; Bezard, B.; Marten, A.; Baluteau, J. P.; Scott, N.; Chedin, A.; Kunde, K.; Hanel, R.

    1982-01-01

    From a selection Voyager IRIS spectra corresponding to cloud-free areas of Jupiter, the CH4/H2 volume ratio in the atmosphere of this planet has been determined to be equal to 0.00195 + or - 0.00022, which corresponds to 2.07 + or - 0.24 times the solar value of Lambert (C/H = 0.00047). The estimate of errors includes both instrument noise and systematic uncertainties. Implications of this result for the formation and evolution of Jupiter are discussed.

  18. C/H ratio in Jupiter from the Voyager infrared investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, D.; Bezard, B.; Marten, A.; Baluteau, J.P.; Scott, N.; Chedin, A.; Kunde, V.; Hanel, R.

    1982-06-15

    From a selection of Voyager IRIS spectra corresponding to cloud-free areas of Jupiter, we have determined the CH/sub 4//H/sub 2/ volume ratio in the atmosphere of this planet as equal to (1.95 +- 0.22)10/sup -3/ which corresponds to 2.07 +- 0.24 times the solar value of Lambert (C/H = 4.7 x 10/sup -4/). Estimate of errors includes both instrument noise and systematic uncertainties. Implications of this result on the formation and evolution of Jupiter are discussed.

  19. INTERPRETATION OF THE DISTURBANCE IN GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS OBSERVED ON VOYAGER 1 BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Jokipii, J. R.; Kóta, J.

    2014-10-10

    We present a possible explanation for the transient increase in the galactic cosmic ray flux observed by Voyager 1 (V1) beyond the heliopause, in 2013 March. We suggest that this disturbance may be caused by a propagating disturbance in the interstellar magnetic field, of heliospheric origin. A model in which a magnetic disturbance, propagating outward from the heliosphere into the very-local interstellar plasma, affects the galactic cosmic rays is presented. We also discuss the possibility that this event is related to the plasma-wave event observed some 25 days later by the PWS experiment on V1.

  20. Interstellar Dust Detected by Voyager 1 Over Heliocentric Radial Distances From 5 to 132 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Granroth, L.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma wave instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft can detect the impact of high velocity dust particles when they strike the spacecraft body. The impacts are recognizable by a characteristic voltage pulse that they produce in the wideband electric field waveform data. Although the wideband receiver on Voyager 2 is no longer working, Voyager 1 has been collecting wideband data for over 37 years, starting near the Jupiter flyby at 5 AU and continuing to the most recent data beyond 132 AU. During this time a persistent level of dust impacts have been detected at a rate of about 3 to 7 impacts/ hour. We interpret these impacts as being due to interstellar dust. Using the cross-sectional area of the spacecraft high-gain antenna, 10.75 m2, as the effective impact area, and the velocity of the spacecraft relative to the 26 km/s arrival velocity of the interstellar dust, this impact rate corresponds to a flux of about (0.75 to 1.65) x 10-4 m-2 s-1. Although we do not have good knowledge of the mass of the dust particles, this flux agrees well with the interstellar dust flux published by Grün et al. [1993] from the dust detector on the Ulysses spacecraft at 5 AU. The Ulysses dust instrument showed that the mass of the interstellar dust particles ranged from about 10-15 to 10-10 grams (roughly 0.1 to 10 μm). We presume that Voyager 1 is detecting these same particles. The heliocentric radial variation can be fit within the error bars by a constant flux of about 1.2 x 10-4 m-2s-1. However, the plot of the average count rates in 20 AU bins increases steadily from 10 to 100 AU, with a notable decrease beyond 100 AU, suggesting that there might be a slightly higher flux (by a factor of two) in the outer regions of the heliosphere than in the interstellar medium.

  1. Spatial irregularities in Jupiter's upper ionosphere observed by Voyager radio occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    Radio scintillations (at 3.6 and 13 cm) produced by scattering from ionospheric irregularities during the Voyager occultations are interpreted using a weak-scattering theory. Least squares solutions for ionospheric parameters derived from the observed fluctuation spectra yield estimates of (1) the axial ratio, (2) angular orientation of the anisotropic irregularities, (3) the power law exponent of the spatial spectrum of irregularities, and (4) the magnitude of the spatial variations in electron density. It is shown that the measured angular orientation of the anisotropic irregularities indicates magnetic field direction and may provide a basis for refining Jovian magnetic field models.

  2. Analysis of Voyager spectra of the beta Cephei star nu Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porri, A.; Stalio, R.; Ali, B.; Polidan, R. S.; Morossi, C.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager 500-1700 A spectrophotometric observations of the beta Cephei star nu Eri are presented and discussed. The Voyager observations were obtained in 1981 and cover six pulsation cycles of the star. These data are supplemented with a set of nine International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) SWP high-resolution observations covering one, earlier epoch, pulsation cycle. Light curves are derived from the Voyager data at 1055 and 1425 A. These light curves are found to be consistent in both shape and period with published optical curves. The 1055 A light curve also exhibits a phenomenon not seen in the optical curves: a small but highly significant systematic increase in the flux of the maximum light phases while maintaining a constant minimum light level over the interval of observation. Substantially larger errors in the longer wavelength data preclude discussion of this phenomenon in the 1425 A light curve. Examination of the far-UV continuum in nu Eri during this period shows that the color temperature is lower for the brighter maxima. Analysis of the far-UV continuum at maximum and minimum light yields an effective temperature difference between these two phases of 2200 + or - 750 K. Spectroscopically, three prominent features are seen in the Voyager data: a feature at 985 A mostly due to a blend of C III 977 A, H I Ly gamma 972 A, and N III 990 A; a feature at 1030 A due to H I Ly beta 1026 A and C II 1037 A; and the Si IV resonance doublet near 1400 A. A comparison of the 912-1700 A spectral region in nu Eri with a set of standard, i.e., nonpulsating stars, shows that nu Eri closely resembles the standard both in continuum shape and spectral line strengths with the possible exception of a slight flux excess between 912 and 975 A. The equivalent width of the 985 A feature is shown to vary in strength over the pulsation cycle in antiphase with the light curve and variations seen in the C IV 1548-1551 lines from the IUE data. This behavior of the 985 A feature is

  3. Pickup ion driven simulation of bulk properties of the outer heliosphere as compared to Voyager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Lauren

    Motivated by the development of a very general theoretical model describing the transport of turbulence and bulk flow of the solar wind throughout the heliosphere, we present a study of the bulk properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. This investigation involves the addition of pickup ion source terms to an existing simluation and a comparison to Voyager observations. Specifically, we focus on solar wind speed, density, and temperature. We present results that suggest that pickup ions are an integral part of bulk property behavior in the outer heliosphere, specifically in the radial speed and temperature profiles.

  4. Remote sensing of the magnetic moment of Uranus - Predictions for Voyager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.; Dessler, A. J.

    1985-03-01

    The current understanding of the power transfer mechanisms by which power is supplied to a planet's magnetosphere by the kinetic energy of planetary spin and the energy flux of the impinging solar wind is applied to the case of Uranus, in order to predict the detectability of radio and auroral emissions by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) and UV spectrometer (UVS) instruments of the Voyager spacecraft. The power available for the two energy transfer phenomena cited is a function of Uranus' magnetic moment, which is presently derived for each power source as a function of the date of first detection of radio emissions by the PRA or auroral emissions by the UVS.

  5. DSN radio science system design and testing for Voyager-Neptune encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, N. C.; Rebold, T. A.; Weese, J. F.

    1989-05-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) Radio Science System presently implemented within the Deep Space Network was designed to meet stringent requirements imposed by the demands of the Voyager-Neptune encounter and future missions. One of the initial parameters related to frequency stability is discussed. The requirement, specification, design, and methodology for measuring this parameter are described. A description of special instrumentation that was developed for the test measurements and initial test data resulting from the system tests performed at Canberra, Australia and Usuda, Japan are given.

  6. Reusable science tools for analog exploration missions: xGDS Web Tools, VERVE, and Gigapan Voyage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Cohen, Tamar; Allan, Mark; Deans, Matthew; Morse, Theodore; Park, Eric; Smith, Trey

    2013-10-01

    The Exploration Ground Data Systems (xGDS) project led by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center creates software tools to support multiple NASA-led planetary analog field experiments. The two primary tools that fall under the xGDS umbrella are the xGDS Web Tools (xGDS-WT) and Visual Environment for Remote Virtual Exploration (VERVE). IRG has also developed a hardware and software system that is closely integrated with our xGDS tools and is used in multiple field experiments called Gigapan Voyage. xGDS-WT, VERVE, and Gigapan Voyage are examples of IRG projects that improve the ratio of science return versus development effort by creating generic and reusable tools that leverage existing technologies in both hardware and software. xGDS Web Tools provides software for gathering and organizing mission data for science and engineering operations, including tools for planning traverses, monitoring autonomous or piloted vehicles, visualization, documentation, analysis, and search. VERVE provides high performance three dimensional (3D) user interfaces used by scientists, robot operators, and mission planners to visualize robot data in real time. Gigapan Voyage is a gigapixel image capturing and processing tool that improves situational awareness and scientific exploration in human and robotic analog missions. All of these technologies emphasize software reuse and leverage open source and/or commercial-off-the-shelf tools to greatly improve the utility and reduce the development and operational cost of future similar technologies. Over the past several years these technologies have been used in many NASA-led robotic field campaigns including the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS), the Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP), the K10 Robotic Follow-Up tests, and most recently we have become involved in the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) field experiments. A major objective of these joint robot and crew experiments is

  7. Far ultraviolet reflection spectrum of Uranus - Results from the Voyager encounter

    SciTech Connect

    Yelle, R.V.; Doose, L.R.; Mcconnell, J.C.; Strobel, D.F.

    1989-02-01

    The present analysis of the 1250-1700 A region Uranus spectrum obtained by Voyager's US spectrometer characterizes these observation results as due primarily to solar light reflected from an H2 Rayleigh and Raman scattering atmosphere with small but measurable hydrocarbon absorption. The hydrocarbon abundances obtained are substantially lower than those at comparable levels of the Saturn or Jupiter atmospheres; it is suggested, in one-dimensional terms, that this is due to diffusive separation, in conjunction with photochemical depletion caused by a very low eddy-diffusion coefficient. Strong latitudinal variations in the hydrocarbon abundances are suggested in the subsolar, polar stratosphere. 38 references.

  8. Development of a low expansion, composite antenna subreflector with a frequency selective surface. [for Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonier, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A Kevlar-49 epoxy, composite frequency-selective-surface subreflector was developed for the high gain antenna used on the Voyager spacecraft. The Kevlar-49 material was selected for this sandwich structure because a dielectric material was required, and the use of Kevlar-49 resulted in a composite sandwich with a low thermal coefficient of expansion and reduced weight over an equivalent fiberglass construction. A detailed description and the results of the development program are given and include the design requirements for the structure, the development testing of the materials that led to the final design configuration, and the processes used to fabricate this advanced composite spacecraft antenna component.

  9. Parkes radio science system design and testing for Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebold, T. A.; Weese, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Radio Science System installed at Parkes, Australia for the Voyager Neptune encounter was specified to meet the same stringent requirements that were imposed upon the Deep Space Network Radio Science System. The system design and test methodology employed to meet these requirements at Parkes are described, and data showing the measured performance of the system are presented. The results indicate that the system operates with a comfortable margin on the requirements. There was a minor problem with frequency-dependent spurious signals which could not be fixed before the encounter. Test results characterizing these spurious signals are included.

  10. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P.; Behannon, K.W.; Klein, L.W.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU have been used to investigate the large-scale structure of the IMF in the years 1977 to 1979, a period of increasing solar activity. This complements the Pioneer 10, 11 investigation between 1 and 8.5 AU during 1972--1976 when the sun was less active. In contrast to the good agreement of the Pioneer observations with the ideal field configuration of the Parker spiral model during near solar minimum conditions, the Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from that configuration. We attribute these deviations both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations was found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. The IMF sector structure was generally not well-developed during the period of this study. Notable differences were found between Voyager 1 and 2 observations. Differences in the region 1--2 AU are attributed to the substantially different latitudes of the two spacecraft during much of the period. Later differences are most likely associated with the fact that the Voyagers moved through the region between 4 and 5 AU at different times. Both Voyager 1 and 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of 'transverse' fluctuations in B that are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind although not necessarily implying the presence of them. The presence of convective structures, compressive modes, and/or a saturated instability of Alfven waves cannot be excluded by these Voyager results.

  11. Titan's atmosphere and hypothesized ocean - A reanalysis of the Voyager 1 radio-occultation and Iris 7. 7-micron data

    SciTech Connect

    Lellouch, E.; Coustenis, A.; Gautier, D.; Raulin, F.; Dubouloz, N.; Paris XII Universite, Creteil )

    1989-06-01

    Limiting profiles for the equatorial thermal structure of Titan in the 0-200 km altitude range are presently obtained by reanalyzing Voyager 1 radio-occultation refractivity profiles, taking mean molecular weight uncertainties into account. Spectra calculated from the IR thermal profiles in the CH{sub 4} nu(4) band at 7.7 microns are compared with Voyager IRIS observations in order to constrain both the abundances of major atmospheric components and the stratospheric temperatures. A nominal temperature and composition profile of Titan's atmosphere is given in the form of tabulated values between ground level and 200 km. 44 refs.

  12. Geometry of the Saturn system from the 3 July 1989 occultation of 28 SGR and Voyager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Elliot, J. L.; Matthews, Keith; Perkovic, Olga; Tollestrup, Eric; Harvey, Paul; Chanover, Nancy J.; Clark, Mary Ann; Dunham, Edward W.; Forrest, William; Harrington, Joseph; Pipher, Judith; Brahic, Andre; Grenier, Isabelle; Roques, Francoise; Arndt, Martina

    1993-06-01

    The pole direction and radius scale for the ring system of Saturn are presently determined by combining the July 3, 1989 observations of 28 Sgr's occultation by Saturn with Voyager 1 and 2 photopolarimeter occultation measurements. The computation of ring-orbit models is separately conducted via a sky-plane method and a solar system barycentric vector approach; the results obtained by both methods are in excellent agreement. If Voyager trajectory uncertainties are assumed to be negligible, these observations can be used to determine the precession rate of the pole of Saturn about the solar system's invariable pole.

  13. A phylogenetic hypothesis for Crocodylus (Crocodylia) based on mitochondrial DNA: evidence for a trans-Atlantic voyage from Africa to the New World.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Robert W; Hekkala, Evon R; Amato, George; Gatesy, John

    2011-07-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among extant species of Crocodylus (Crocodylia) have been inconsistently resolved by previous systematic studies. Here we used nearly complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes (∼16,200 base pairs) for all described Crocodylus species, eight of which are new to this study, to derive a generally well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus. Model-based analyses support monophyly of all Asian+Australian species and paraphyly of Crocodylus niloticus (Nile crocodile) with a monophyletic New World clade nested within this species. Wild-caught Nile crocodiles from eastern populations group robustly with the four New World species to the exclusion of Nile crocodiles from western populations, a result that is also favored by parsimony analyses and by various subpartitions of the overall mt dataset. The fossil record of Crocodylus extends back only to the Late Miocene, while the earliest fossils assigned to C. niloticus and to New World Crocodylus are Pliocene. Therefore, in combination with paleontological evidence, mt DNA trees imply a relatively recent migration of Crocodylus from Africa to the Americas, a voyage that would have covered hundreds of miles at sea. PMID:21459152

  14. Ganymede - Galileo Mosaic Overlayed on Voyager Data in Uruk Sulcus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo high-resolution images of the Uruk Sulcus region of Jupiter's moon Ganymede is shown within the context of an image of the region taken by Voyager 2 in 1979. The image shows details of parallel ridges and troughs that are the principal features in the brighter regions of Ganymede. The Galileo frames unveil the fine-scale topography of Ganymede's ice-rich surface, permitting scientists to develop a detailed understanding of the processes that have shaped Ganymede. Resolution of the Galileo images is 74 meters (243 feet) per pixel, while resolution of the Voyager image is 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) per pixel. In this view, north is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead. The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, longitude 168 degrees west, is about 120 by 110 kilometers (75 by 68 miles) in extent. The image was taken June 27 at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4,628 miles). The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  15. Voyager 1 explores the termination shock region and the heliosheath beyond.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Heikkila, B C; Lal, N; Webber, W R

    2005-09-23

    Voyager 1 crossed the termination shock of the supersonic flow of the solar wind on 16 December 2004 at a distance of 94.01 astronomical units from the Sun, becoming the first spacecraft to begin exploring the heliosheath, the outermost layer of the heliosphere. The shock is a steady source of low-energy protons with an energy spectrum approximately E(-1.41 +/- 0.15) from 0.5 to approximately 3.5 megaelectron volts, consistent with a weak termination shock having a solar wind velocity jump ratio r=2.6(-0.2)(+0.4). However, in contradiction to many predictions, the intensity of anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) helium did not peak at the shock, indicating that the ACR source is not in the shock region local to Voyager 1. The intensities of approximately 10-megaelectron volt electrons, ACRs, and galactic cosmic rays have steadily increased since late 2004 as the effects of solar modulation have decreased. PMID:16179468

  16. A Far-Ultraviolet Study of the Cygnus Loop Using the VOYAGER Ultraviolet Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancura, Olaf; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Holberg, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the Voyager 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometers to study the far-ultraviolet emissions from different types of shock waves in the Cygnus Loop. In the southeast and northern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR), we have measured the O(VI) lambda1035 surface brightness from the main blast wave. This value is several times below the average and more than one order of magnitude below the peak O(VI) brightness in the SNR as measured with Voyager. A simple blast wave model appears able to reproduce the observations in the southeast and the northern parts of the Cygnus Loop but can only account for 10%-15% of the total O(VI) emission from the Cygnus Loop. The brightest O(VI) and C(III) lambda977 emission is found coincident with optical filamentation and X-ray enhancements in the northeast. We interpret the observations in the northeast in terms of nonradiative and incomplete shocks whose surface area rises in the optical filamentary regions. We conclude that the bulk of the O(VI) emission from the Cygnus Loop arises from optically bright clouds within which intermediate-velocity (200 + 50 km/s) nonradiative and incomplete shocks are widespread.

  17. A new look at the saturn system: the voyager 2 images.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Soderblom, L; Batson, R; Bridges, P; Inge, J; Masursky, H; Shoemaker, E; Beebe, R; Boyce, J; Briggs, G; Bunker, A; Collins, S A; Hansen, C J; Johnson, T V; Mitchell, J L; Terrile, R J; Cook, A F; Cuzzi, J; Pollack, J B; Danielson, G E; Ingersoll, A P; Davies, M E; Hunt, G E; Morrison, D; Owen, T; Sagan, C; Veverka, J; Strom, R; Suomi, V E

    1982-01-29

    Voyager 2 photography has complemented that of Voyager I in revealing many additional characteristics of Saturn and its satellites and rings. Saturn's atmosphere contains persistent oval cloud features reminiscent of features on Jupiter. Smaller irregular features track out a pattern of zonal winds that is symmetric about Saturn's equator and appears to extend to great depth. Winds are predominantly eastward and reach 500 meters per second at the equator. Titan has several haze layers with significantly varying optical properties and a northern polar "collar" that is dark at short wavelengths. Several satellites have been photographed at substantially improved resolution. Enceladus' surface ranges from old, densely cratered terrain to relatively young, uncratered plains crossed by grooves and faults. Tethys has a crater 400 kilometers in diameter whose floor has domed to match Tethys' surface curvature and a deep trench that extends at least 270 degrees around Tethys' circumference. Hyperion is cratered and irregular in shape. Iapetus' bright, trailing hemisphere includes several dark-floored craters, and Phoebe has a very low albedo and rotates in the direction opposite to that of its orbital revolution with a period of 9 hours. Within Saturn's rings, the "birth" of a spoke has been observed, and surprising azimuthal and time variability is found in the ringlet structure of the outer B ring. These observations lead to speculations about Saturn's internal structure and about the collisional and thermal history of the rings and satellites. PMID:17771273

  18. Charles Darwin's beagle voyage, fossil vertebrate succession, and "the gradual birth & death of species".

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he collected and some of the extant fauna of South America before he returned to Britain. These comparisons, recorded in his correspondence, his diary and his notebooks during the voyage, were instances of a phenomenon that he later called the "law of the succession of types." Moreover, on the Beagle, he was following a geological research agenda outlined in the second volume of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology, which implies that paleontological data alone could provide an insight into the laws which govern the appearance of new species. Since Darwin claims in On the Origin of Species that fossil vertebrate succession was one of the key lines of evidence that led him to question the fixity of species, it seems certain that he was seriously contemplating transmutation during the Beagle voyage. If so, historians of science need to reconsider both the role of Britain's expert naturalists and the importance of the fossil vertebrate evidence in the development of Darwin's ideas on transmutation. PMID:20665232

  19. Turbulence in the solar wind: spectra from Voyager 2 data at 5 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternale, F.; Gallana, L.; Iovieno, M.; Opher, M.; Richardson, J. D.; Tordella, D.

    2016-02-01

    Fluctuations in the flow velocity and magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Solar System. These fluctuations are turbulent, in the sense that they are disordered and span a broad range of scales in both space and time. The study of solar wind turbulence is motivated by a number of factors all keys to the understanding of the Solar Wind origin and thermodynamics. The solar wind spectral properties are far from uniformity and evolve with the increasing distance from the sun. Most of the available spectra of solar wind turbulence were computed at 1 astronomical unit, while accurate spectra on wide frequency ranges at larger distances are still few. In this paper we consider solar wind spectra derived from the data recorded by the Voyager 2 mission during 1979 at about 5 AU from the sun. Voyager 2 data are an incomplete time series with a voids/signal ratio that typically increases as the spacecraft moves away from the sun (45% missing data in 1979), making the analysis challenging. In order to estimate the uncertainty of the spectral slopes, different methods are tested on synthetic turbulence signals with the same gap distribution as V2 data. Spectra of all variables show a power law scaling with exponents between -2.1 and -1.1, depending on frequency subranges. Probability density functions (PDFs) and correlations indicate that the flow has a significant intermittency.

  20. Determination of the position of Jupiter from radio metric tracking of Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Haw, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft flew by Jupiter on March 5, 1979. Spacecraft navigation was performed with radio tracking data from NASA's Deep Space Network. In the years since then, there has been a great deal of progress in the definition of celestial reference frames and in determining the orbit and orientation of the Earth. Using these improvements, the radio metric range and Doppler data acquired from the Voyager 1 spacecraft near its encounter with Jupiter have been reanalyzed to determine the plane-of-sky position of Jupiter with much greater accuracy than was possible at the time of the encounter. The position of Jupiter at the time of encounter has been determined with an accuracy of 40 nrad in right ascension and 140 nrad in declination with respect to the celestial reference frame defined by the International Earth Rotation Service. This position estimate has been done to improve the ephemeris of Jupiter prior to the upcoming encounter of the Galileo spacecraft with Jupiter.