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Sample records for 90k bionic ear

  1. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  2. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  3. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift. PMID:28243053

  4. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil.

    PubMed

    Tian, Weijun; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jiyue; Li, Ming; Ma, Yi; Cong, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  5. An ultra-low-power programmable analog bionic ear processor.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul; Salthouse, Christopher; Sit, Ji-Jon; Baker, Michael W; Zhak, Serhii M; Lu, Timothy K T; Turicchia, Lorenzo; Balster, Stephanie

    2005-04-01

    We report a programmable analog bionic ear (cochlear implant) processor in a 1.5-microm BiCMOS technology with a power consumption of 211 microW and 77-dB dynamic range of operation. The 9.58 mm x 9.23 mm processor chip runs on a 2.8 V supply and has a power consumption that is lower than state-of-the-art analog-to-digital (A/D)-then-DSP designs by a factor of 25. It is suitable for use in fully implanted cochlear-implant systems of the future which require decades of operation on a 100-mAh rechargeable battery with a finite number of charge-discharge cycles. It may also be used as an ultra-low-power spectrum-analysis front end in portable speech-recognition systems. The power consumption of the processor includes the 100 microW power consumption of a JFET-buffered electret microphone and an associated on-chip microphone front end. An automatic gain control circuit compresses the 77-dB input dynamic range into a narrower internal dynamic range (IDR) of 57 dB at which each of the 16 spectral channels of the processor operate. The output bits of the processor are scanned and reported off chip in a format suitable for continuous-interleaved-sampling stimulation of electrodes. Power-supply-immune biasing circuits ensure robust operation of the processor in the high-RF-noise environment typical of cochlear implant systems.

  6. Relationships among objective measures and speech perception in adult users of the HiResolution Bionic Ear.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jace; Kasulis, Heather

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe speech recognition performance for subjects using electrically evoked stapedial reflex thresholds (eSRT) based on programs with the HiResolution Bionic Ear system. A secondary goal was to evaluate the relationship of the electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAP) as measured with neural response imaging (NRI) relative to the subjects' most comfortable stimulation levels (M levels). M levels, eSRT and eCAP thresholds were measured in 19 postlinguistically deafened adults using either a CII or HiRes 90K cochlear implant. The results showed that eSRTs could be measured easily in a majority of subjects, whereas eCAPS were measured in all subjects. There were close agreements between eSRTs and M levels in the subjects' behaviorally based programs. In contrast, the correspondence between M levels and eCAP thresholds was not as strong. New programs were created with M levels based on the eSRTs for 11 subjects. Programs created using eSRTs as a guide for setting levels yielded better speech recognition than programs using conventional behavioural measures of M levels. These data indicate that individuals can obtain strong benefits from cochlear implants using programs with stimulation levels based on objective measures.

  7. Close-field electroporation gene delivery using the cochlear implant electrode array enhances the bionic ear.

    PubMed

    Pinyon, Jeremy L; Tadros, Sherif F; Froud, Kristina E; Y Wong, Ann C; Tompson, Isabella T; Crawford, Edward N; Ko, Myungseo; Morris, Renée; Klugmann, Matthias; Housley, Gary D

    2014-04-23

    The cochlear implant is the most successful bionic prosthesis and has transformed the lives of people with profound hearing loss. However, the performance of the "bionic ear" is still largely constrained by the neural interface itself. Current spread inherent to broad monopolar stimulation of the spiral ganglion neuron somata obviates the intrinsic tonotopic mapping of the cochlear nerve. We show in the guinea pig that neurotrophin gene therapy integrated into the cochlear implant improves its performance by stimulating spiral ganglion neurite regeneration. We used the cochlear implant electrode array for novel "close-field" electroporation to transduce mesenchymal cells lining the cochlear perilymphatic canals with a naked complementary DNA gene construct driving expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The focusing of electric fields by particular cochlear implant electrode configurations led to surprisingly efficient gene delivery to adjacent mesenchymal cells. The resulting BDNF expression stimulated regeneration of spiral ganglion neurites, which had atrophied 2 weeks after ototoxic treatment, in a bilateral sensorineural deafness model. In this model, delivery of a control GFP-only vector failed to restore neuron structure, with atrophied neurons indistinguishable from unimplanted cochleae. With BDNF therapy, the regenerated spiral ganglion neurites extended close to the cochlear implant electrodes, with localized ectopic branching. This neural remodeling enabled bipolar stimulation via the cochlear implant array, with low stimulus thresholds and expanded dynamic range of the cochlear nerve, determined via electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This development may broadly improve neural interfaces and extend molecular medicine applications.

  8. Bionic Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian Mannoor, Manu

    bionic systems: 1) Bionic Nanosensors: featuring bio-integrated graphene nanosensors for ubiquitous sensing, 2) Bionic Organs: featuring 3D printed bionic ears with three dimensionally integrated electronics and 3) Bionic Leaves: describing ongoing work in the direction of the creation of a bionic leaf enabled by the integration of plant derived photosynthetic functional units with electronic materials and components into a leaf-shaped hierarchical structure for harvesting photosynthetic bioelectricity.

  9. Informed parental consent for cochlear implantation of young deaf children: social and other considerations in the use of the 'bionic ear'.

    PubMed

    Hyde, M; Power, D

    2000-05-01

    This paper examines the social parameters surrounding the management of informed consent procedures for the parents of young deaf children for the surgical fitting of a cochlear implant ('bionic ear') to their child. Although most observers of this remarkable and well publicised medical development only see benefits in its use, the authors examine the nature of the conflict which has emerged between medical and media portrayals of the 'miracle' device and contrasting social, cultural and linguistic views of many Deaf people. The paper analyses the components of parental consent procedures for surgical implantation of their child, covering the risk-benefit analysis and, in particular, the information base that is provided for parents about the social construction of a 'Deaf life' by many Deaf people.

  10. Assessment of intracochlear electrode position and correlation with behavioural thresholds in CII and 90K cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Filipo, R; Mancini, P; Panebianco, V; Viccaro, M; Covelli, E; Vergari, V; Passariello, R

    2008-03-01

    The image quality of 64-MDCT provided excellent definition of the fine osseous structures and individual electrode contacts. Evaluation of electrode distances revealed a more focused stimulation for the Helix contacts, with better optimization of pulse width and frequency of stimulation. A multi-slice CT scan was performed postoperatively to evaluate electrode distance from the modiolus and variability of fitting parameters (M level) for two different types of cochlear implant electrode carriers, CII and 90K implants with 1J and Helix electrode carriers. The electrode's position in different cochlear implant (CI) electrodes, Advanced Bionics 90K 1J and Helix, was assessed postoperatively in 20 adult patients by means of a 64-MDCT scanner. Axial, coronal, and oblique 0.3 mm multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) were obtained and datasets were analyzed to assess the intracochlear position and distance from the surface of the electrodes to the bony edge of the modiolus. Patients' fitting characteristics were gathered at the time the CT was performed and correlated to intracochlear measurements. Determination of contact distances confirmed smaller average values for the Helix at the apex and medial segments. Helix electrodes were closer to the modiolus in all segments. Likewise, M level determination showed lower values for the Helix carrier, confirming a more focused stimulation and better optimization of pulse width and frequency of stimulation.

  11. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  12. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    Ear infection (middle ear) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff An ear infection (acute otitis media) is most often a bacterial or viral infection that affects the middle ear, the air-filled space behind the eardrum that ...

  13. Coming Soon: The Bionic Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the latest advancement in the development of prosthetic arms. Bionic researchers are making significant advances in creating more agile prosthetics that users can control via their own nervous system. The bionic arm, which is still under development, can not only execute complex, thought-controlled movements, but also can…

  14. Coming Soon: The Bionic Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the latest advancement in the development of prosthetic arms. Bionic researchers are making significant advances in creating more agile prosthetics that users can control via their own nervous system. The bionic arm, which is still under development, can not only execute complex, thought-controlled movements, but also can…

  15. Performance of the Harmony™ behind-the-ear processor with the first generation of Advanced Bionics™ implant systems.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Martina; Rottmann, Tobias; Lenarz, Thomas; Buechner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    When new cochlear implant (CI) sound processors are being introduced by the manufacturers, usually the newest generation implants benefit first from the new technology in order to release the full potential of the new hardware. Subsequently, for the Advanced Bionics system the Harmony behind-the-ear processor was only compatible to the newer generation implants, i.e. the CII and HiRes90K, at the time of market release. After further development of a new Digital Signal Processing code the Harmony could also support the first implant generation, the 'C1' (Clarion 1.0 and 1.2). This study reports on a field trial with a new sound processor designed to be used with older generation CIs from Advanced Bionics, focussing on ergonomic and performance benefits. Speech perception tests (Freiburger monosyllables, HSM sentence tests) were performed at a baseline appointment with the subject's clinical processor, followed by the fitting of the Harmony. After a 1 month take-home period the tests were repeated with the Harmony. Additionally, subjective evaluation through questionnaires and a structured interview were administered after upgrading to the sound processor 'C1 Harmony'. Adult users of Advanced Bionics C1 series CIs (n = 29) participated in this study. The new processor provided superior performance in many, though not all, of the speech recognition measurements. Subjective reports indicated certain practical benefits from the new processor, particularly for previous users of body-worn processors. Overall, 80% of the subjects preferred the new processor. The positive outcomes from this trial have resulted in the decision to make the new C1 Harmony processor available to all existing users of the early C1 devices.

  16. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Pierced Ears KidsHealth > For Kids > Pierced Ears Print A A ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  17. Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth > For Kids > Swimmer's Ear Print A ... continue How Do I Know if I Have Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear may start with some itching, ...

  18. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  19. [The bionic hand].

    PubMed

    Surke, Carsten; Ducommun Dit Boudry, Pascal; Vögelin, Esther

    2015-08-01

    The loss of the upper extremity implicates a grave insult in the life of the involved person. To compensate for the loss of function different powered prosthetic devices are available. Ever since their first development 70 years ago numerous improvements in terms of size, weight and wearing comfort have been developed, but issues regarding the control of upper extremity prostheses remain. Slow grasping speed, limited grip positions and especially failure to provide a sensory feedback limit the acceptance in patients. Recent developments are aimed to allow a more intuitive control of the prosthetic device and to provide a sensory feedback to the amputee. Targeted reinnervation reassignes existing muscles to different peripheral nerves thereby enabling them to fulfill alternate functions. Implanting electrodes into muscle bellies of the forearm allows a more accurate control of the prosthesis. Promising results are being achieved by implanting nerve electrodes by establishing bilateral communication between patient and prosthesis. The following review summarizes the current developments of bionic prostheses in the upper extremity.

  20. A Bionic Approach to Cardiovascular Regulation: Bionic Arterial Baroreflex System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    micromanometer and by stimulating celiac with the knowledge of system characteristics. succeeded in functionally identifying the native arterial...system was obtained. Similarly we recorded blood pressure while stimulating sympathetic nerves at the celiac ganglia randomly. We A BIONIC APPROACH TO...baroreflex was realized by stimulating the celiac ganglia according to the stimulation command. The stimulation command was calculated by convolving the

  1. Holographic cosmology from BIonic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Faizal, Mir; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we will use a BIonic solution for analyzing the holographic cosmology. A BIonic solution is a configuration of a D3-brane and an anti-D3-brane connected by a wormhole, and holographic cosmology is a recent proposal to explain cosmic expansion by using the holographic principle. In our model, a BIonic configuration will be produced by the transition of fundamental black strings. The formation of a BIonic configuration will cause inflation. As the D3-brane moves away from the anti-D3-brane, the wormhole will get annihilated, and the inflation will end with the annihilation of this wormhole. However, it is possible for a D3-brane to collide with an anti-D3-brane. Such a collision will occur if the distance between the D3-brane and the anti-D3-brane reduces, and this will create tachyonic states. We will demonstrate that these tachyonic states will lead to the formation of a new wormhole, and this will cause acceleration of the universe before such a collision.

  2. Design and validation of a 90K SNP genotyping assay for the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Iamartino, Daniela; Nicolazzi, Ezequiel L; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Reecy, James M; Fritz-Waters, Eric R; Koltes, James E; Biffani, Stefano; Sonstegard, Tad S; Schroeder, Steven G; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Negrini, Riccardo; Pasquariello, Rolando; Ramelli, Paola; Coletta, Angelo; Garcia, José F; Ali, Ahmad; Ramunno, Luigi; Cosenza, Gianfranco; de Oliveira, Denise A A; Drummond, Marcela G; Bastianetto, Eduardo; Davassi, Alessandro; Pirani, Ali; Brew, Fiona; Williams, John L

    2017-01-01

    The availability of the bovine genome sequence and SNP panels has improved various genomic analyses, from exploring genetic diversity to aiding genetic selection. However, few of the SNP on the bovine chips are polymorphic in buffalo, therefore a panel of single nucleotide DNA markers exclusive for buffalo was necessary for molecular genetic analyses and to develop genomic selection approaches for water buffalo. The creation of a 90K SNP panel for river buffalo and testing in a genome wide association study for milk production is described here. The genomes of 73 buffaloes of 4 different breeds were sequenced and aligned against the bovine genome, which facilitated the identification of 22 million of sequence variants among the buffalo genomes. Based on frequencies of variants within and among buffalo breeds, and their distribution across the genome, inferred from the bovine genome sequence, 90,000 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms were selected to create an Axiom® Buffalo Genotyping Array 90K. This 90K "SNP-Chip" was tested in several river buffalo populations and found to have ∼70% high quality and polymorphic SNPs. Of the 90K SNPs about 24K were also found to be polymorphic in swamp buffalo. The SNP chip was used to investigate the structure of buffalo populations, and could distinguish buffalo from different farms. A Genome Wide Association Study identified genomic regions on 5 chromosomes putatively involved in milk production. The 90K buffalo SNP chip described here is suitable for the analysis of the genomes of river buffalo breeds, and could be used for genetic diversity studies and potentially as a starting point for genome-assisted selection programmes. This SNP Chip could also be used to analyse swamp buffalo, but many loci are not informative and creation of a revised SNP set specific for swamp buffalo would be advised.

  3. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped ...

  4. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ear injury, avoid nose blowing and getting water in the injured ear. Treat ear infections right ... FDR Medical Services/Millard Fillmore Suburban Hospital, Buffalo, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  5. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... gross and useful. continue The Middle Ear: Good Vibrations After sound waves enter the outer ear, they ... take those sound waves and turn them into vibrations that are delivered to the inner ear. To ...

  6. Ear barotrauma

    MedlinePlus

    Barotitis media; Barotrauma; Ear popping - barotrauma; Pressure-related ear pain; Eustachian tube dysfunction - barotrauma ... The air pressure in the middle ear is most often the same as the air ... body. The Eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ...

  7. Ear Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... BMI Calculator myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Ear ProblemsEar problems are often caused by an infection. However, other conditions may also cause ear pain or discomfort. Follow this chart for more ...

  8. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? Print A A A Have you ever seen someone whose ear looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have ...

  9. EDITORIAL: Special issue on medical bionics Special issue on medical bionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; D, Ph

    2009-12-01

    neural prostheses in general. I would like to acknowledge our conference sponsors MiniFAB, National ICT Australia, School of Engineering University of Melbourne, Hearing CRC and the Bionic Ear Institute. Thanks to our conference participants, many of whom travelled great distances to be with us, the Scientific Advisory committee, the authors of the enclosed papers, the reviewers who ensured the publications were of high quality and the staff of IOP—particularly Jane Roscoe and Andrew Malloy—-who supported this conference from its outset and were instrumental in bringing this special section to fruition. Finally, I look forward to welcoming you to our next meeting scheduled for late 2012. Conference delegates

  10. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  11. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  12. "Bionic Woman" (2007): Gender, Disability and Cyborgs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Margaret M.; Bates, Benjamin R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a representation of overlapping categories of gender, disability and cyborgs in "Bionic Woman" (2007). The television show "Bionic Woman" (2007) is a popular culture representation that uniquely brings together these categories. Three themes emerged from an analysis of blogger discourse surrounding the show. The themes reveal…

  13. "Bionic Woman" (2007): Gender, Disability and Cyborgs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Margaret M.; Bates, Benjamin R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a representation of overlapping categories of gender, disability and cyborgs in "Bionic Woman" (2007). The television show "Bionic Woman" (2007) is a popular culture representation that uniquely brings together these categories. Three themes emerged from an analysis of blogger discourse surrounding the show. The themes reveal…

  14. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  15. Modulation in Tl2SeO4 in the temperature range 298-90 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fábry, Jan; Kopecký, Miloš; Kub, Jiří

    2010-10-01

    Synchrotron experiments have revealed a structural modulation in Thallium selenate, Tl2SeO4, in the temperature range 298-90 K. The modulation is manifested by the presence of the first-order satellites. In difference to the majority of β-K2SO4 compounds where the modulation takes place along the axis a (Pnma setting), the incommensurate modulation in Tl2SeO4 takes place along the b setting emphasizing exceptionality of Tl2SeO4 in this structural family. The modulation vector q = (0.0, 0.397(9), 0.0); the space group Pnma(0b0)000.

  16. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  17. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  18. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    ... water to drain. You may need to repeat irrigation several times. To avoid damaging your ear or ... who may remove the wax by: Repeating the irrigation attempts Suctioning the ear canal Using a small ...

  19. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  20. Ear tag

    MedlinePlus

    ... the opening of the ear are common in newborn infants. In most cases, these are normal. However, they ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Common Infant and Newborn Problems Ear Disorders Skin Conditions Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  1. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003340.htm Ear examination To use the sharing features on this page, ... ear References King EF, Couch ME. History, physical examination, and the preoperative evaluation. In: Flint PW, Haughey ...

  2. Super Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students design, construct, and test "super ears" to investigate sound and hearing. Students work in groups of three and explore how the outer ear funnels sound waves to the inner ear and how human hearing compares to that of other animals. (NB)

  3. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? A A A Have you ever seen ... looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have cauliflower ear. That sure is a funny name. Let's ...

  4. Study on a 10 W/90 K in-line pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ankuo; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yi Nong; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Kaixiang

    2012-12-01

    A Stirling-type in-line pulse tube cryocooler (PTC) has been designed, built and tested at Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (SITP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. This PTC prototype can obtain a low-noise cooling capacity of more than 10 W at around 90 K cold head temperature and is used for cooling a space-borne infrared photo detector. In order to achieve a highly efficient PTC, a simplified numerical simulation model has been established for design and optimization. The simulation results of the regenerator, pulse tube and inertance tube are analyzed in detail. Besides, some key parameters of the PTC are listed in the paper. The PTC's performances are tested at different operating frequencies from 42 Hz to 55 Hz and its reject temperature dependence is observed in the range of 290 K to 320 K. Furthermore, the map of the PTC's performance characteristics is presented.

  5. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  6. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs

    PubMed Central

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2015-01-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  7. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs.

    PubMed

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T

    2015-03-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  8. Isolation and functional analysis of chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Vourc'h, C; Binart, N; Chambraud, B; David, J P; Jérôme, V; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1989-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a 2652 bp derived from a chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp 90) genomic clone. This fragment contains 890 bp of the 5' flanking region and 1762 bp of structural gene sequence encoding the first 85 amino acids of the protein. The start site of transcription was determined by primer extension and RNase mapping. Two introns have been identified. The first intron presents two features in common with the unique intron of the hsp 83 of drosophila: its location just before the ATG initiation codon and its length of approximately 1.3 Kb. The 5' flanking region contains a TATAA element, a CCAAT box and several putative cis-regulatory elements that might account for the basal level of expression and developmental regulation of the gene. Functional analyses show that hsp 90 gene expression is constitutive and heat inducible and that a full heat shock response requires the cooperativity of two distinct blocks of overlapping heat shock response elements. Images PMID:2762125

  9. Isolation of a 90-kD Microtubule-Associated Protein from Tobacco Membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Marc, J.; Sharkey, D. E.; Durso, N. A.; Zhang, M.; Cyr, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The organization and function of microtubules in plant cells are important in key developmental events, including the regulation of directional cellulose deposition. Bridges connecting microtubules to each other and to membranes and other organelles have been documented by electron microscopy; however, the biochemical and molecular nature of these linkages is not known. We have partitioned proteins from a suspension culture of tobacco into cytosolic and membrane fractions, solubilized the membrane fraction with a zwitterionic detergent, and then used affinity chromatography and salt elution to isolate tubulin binding proteins. Dark-field microscopy of in vitro-assembled microtubules showed that the eluted proteins from both fractions induce microtubule bundling and, in the presence of purified tubulin, promote microtubule elongation. Gel electrophoresis of the eluted proteins revealed two distinct sets of polypeptides. Those in the membrane eluate included unique bands with apparent molecular masses of 98, 90, and 75 kD in addition to bands present in both eluates. The cytosolic eluate, in contrast, typically included relatively smaller proteins. The eluted proteins also bound to taxol-stabilized microtubules. Initial immunological characterization using monoclonal antibodies raised against the 90-kD polypeptide showed that it is colocalized in situ with cortical microtubules in tobacco protoplast ghosts. PMID:12239375

  10. Separation of an associated 90K heat shock protein from the glucocorticoid receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Diener, A.; Kirsch, T.; Grove, B.; Robertson, N.; Litwack, G.

    1986-05-01

    A 90K heat shock protein(HSP), observed to copurify with the glucocorticoid receptor(GR), can be separated from the complex by 2 methods, allowing investigation of the role of HSP on kinase activity that was previously reported to be inherent to purified activated GR. Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ stabilized unactivated rat hepatic GR complexes have been purified to >10,000-fold using a purification scheme that involves batchwise treatment of cytosol with phosphocellulose/DNAcellulose, elution from an affinity resin, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. Samples were subjected to 10-20% gradient SDS-PAGE. Proteins were transferred to nitrocellulose and blotted against monoclonal antibodies to GR(3A6), HSP or nonspecific IgM/G. Immunoblots indicated that HSP was separated from unactivated GR complexes at the affinity step prior to elution of GR with active steroid. GR eluted from the resin with /sup 3/H Triamcinolone acetonide or /sup 3/H Dexamethasone mesylate had an apparent M/sub r/ = 94-96,000 for the steroid binding subunit and is recognized by 3A6. Purification of GR minus the affinity step resulted in copurification of HSP throughout the procedure. However, after Sephadex G75 filtration and subsequent incubation at 25/sup 0/C, 30 min., HSP was separated from activated (DNA binding) GR on DEAE cellulose-52. HSP did not enhance or inhibit /sup 32/P incorporation of the 94K steroid binding subunit nor did it affect phosphorylation of histones by GR.

  11. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... or a respiratory infection such as a cold. Swimming in unclean water can lead to swimmer's ear. ... very well after it has gotten wet. Avoid swimming in polluted water. Use earplugs when swimming. Try ...

  12. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... you run the risk of getting infected ears. Metal Matters Your first earrings should have gold posts ( ... infection and swelling. Later, you may find some metals cause an allergic reaction. You're probably wondering ...

  13. Airplane Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe hearing loss Ringing in your ear (tinnitus) Spinning sensation (vertigo) Vomiting resulting from vertigo Bleeding from ... the back of the nasal cavity and the top of the throat meet (nasopharynx). When an airplane ...

  14. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cause of ear infections. Get your child’s vaccinations on time.Practice routine hand washing and avoid sharing food and drinks, especially if your child is exposed to large groups of kids in ...

  15. Ear Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Damage in Boxers (News) Which High School Sport Has the Most Concussions? Additional Content Medical News Ear Injury By Sam ... often... More News News HealthDay Which High School Sport Has the Most Concussions? WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Female soccer ...

  16. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  17. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News media ... who suffer from the most common type of ear infection, called middle ear infection or otitis media ( ...

  18. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  19. Better Ear Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Better Ear Health Better Ear Health Patient Health Information News ... often helpful to those with this condition. Swimmer’s Ear An infection of the outer ear structures caused ...

  20. Bionics and problems of instrument manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoylov, V. Y.

    1992-03-01

    A conference was organized by the following groups: The Academy of Sciences of the USSR, the Scientific Council for Complex Problem 'Cybernetics', the Ministry of Higher and Secondary Special Education of the USSR, the Ministry of the Radio Industry of the USSR, the Academy of Medical Science, and the All-Union Scientific and Technical Society. The main topic of the conference was instrumentation in the context of bionics.

  1. Foam ear protectors for burnt ears.

    PubMed

    Harries, C A; Pegg, S P

    1989-01-01

    Foam ear protectors were developed at the Royal Brisbane Hospital for use with selected patients with burns to the ears. The protectors assist in preventing pressure necrosis of the ear and damage to skin grafts. They permit visualization of the ears after grafting and allow the patient to sleep in a side-lying position if desired.

  2. Effects of Fluorination on the 90 K Superconductor Ba2RCu3O(7-delta) (R=Y,Eu; O

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-15

    a secondary amorphous phase. MATERIALS INDEX: superconductors, fluorine, copper, yttrium , barium Introduction The 90K superconductor, Ba2 yCU3O7...have about the same ionic radius (4) and a variety of metal oxyfluorides are known to exist (5). A recent report clams to have observed...reports (7,8,9) suggest that while solid state reaction methods do not yield oxyfluorides of the type Ba 2YCu3O1 Fy, the reaction of Ba 2YCu30-_4 with

  3. [Analogies and analogy research in technical biology and bionics].

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The procedural approaches of Technical Biology and Bionics are characterized, and analogy research is identified as their common basis. The actual creative aspect in bionical research lies in recognizing and exploiting technically oriented analogies underlying a specific biological prototype to indicate a specific technical application.

  4. Results of total hip arthroplasty using a bionic hip stem.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Sarler, Taras; Strahovnik, Andrej; Repše-Fokter, Alenka

    2015-06-01

    The trabecular-orientated bionic hip stem was designed to mimic the natural force transmission through the femur in total hip arthroplasty, resulting in supposedly longer prosthesis survivability. The aim of this study was to compare the second-generation bionic hip stem to a standard uncemented hip stem. A group of 18 patients (21 hips) who underwent total hip arthroplasty with a bionic stem (bionic group) was compared with a historic group of 12 patients (12 hips) treated with standard anatomic hip stem (control group). During the first year after the procedure, the densitometric measurements of the bone around the prosthesis were taken. Radiographic and clinical assessments were additionally performed preoperatively and at the three month, six month, one year and three year follow-ups in the bionic group. In the bionic group, one patient was revised for aseptic loosening and 16 patients (19 hips) were available to the final follow-up. A significant decrease of bone mineral density was found in Gruen zones 3, 4 and 5 in the bionic group, and in zone 7 in both groups. The bionic group had a significantly higher bone mineral density in Gruen zone 1 at the one year follow-up. At the final follow-up, all prostheses were radiologically stable in both groups. Provided that a good implant position is achieved, comparable short-term results can be obtained using a bionic stem. Still, a decrease of bone mineral density in Gruen zone 7 occurred in both groups. Further studies are required to determine survivability of the bionic stem.

  5. Nitrogen-Pressure Shifts in the v3 Band of Methane Measured at Several Temperatures between 300 and 90 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumuhimbise, Anthony T.; Hurtmans, Daniel; Mantz, Arlan W.; Mondelain, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere requires accurate knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters for the molecules investigated. Knowledge of the temperature dependence of these parameters is also essential if agreement, at the noise level, between calculated and experimental data is to be achieved. The authors recently published results of nitrogen broadening measurements in the v3 band of 12CH4 using the 5.37 m long absorption path length all-copper Herriott cell. The temperature dependent line parameters determined in the laboratory were applied to fit a portion of the atmospheric spectrum recorded with a balloon-borne remote sensing FTIR instrument, called the Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere, and operating in absorption against the sun. Since the authors had a relatively complete series of data for the P(9) transition in the v3 band of 12CH4, the A2 1 as well as the F2 1, F1 1 and A1 1 lines recorded at different pressures and at four temperatures between 300 and 90 K, we reanalyzed the data to derive pressure shift information at different temperatures. The temperatures for which data were collected and analyzed are 298, 140 and 90K. The high precision pressure shift data obtained here over a large range of temperature demonstrate the ability of our experimental arrangement to address specific questions on a given spectral window like in the balloon experiment or in a satellite project, for example.

  6. Nitrogen-Pressure Shifts in the v3 Band of Methane Measured at Several Temperatures between 300 and 90 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumuhimbise, Anthony T.; Hurtmans, Daniel; Mantz, Arlan W.; Mondelain, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere requires accurate knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters for the molecules investigated. Knowledge of the temperature dependence of these parameters is also essential if agreement, at the noise level, between calculated and experimental data is to be achieved. The authors recently published results of nitrogen broadening measurements in the v3 band of 12CH4 using the 5.37 m long absorption path length all-copper Herriott cell. The temperature dependent line parameters determined in the laboratory were applied to fit a portion of the atmospheric spectrum recorded with a balloon-borne remote sensing FTIR instrument, called the Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere, and operating in absorption against the sun. Since the authors had a relatively complete series of data for the P(9) transition in the v3 band of 12CH4, the A2 1 as well as the F2 1, F1 1 and A1 1 lines recorded at different pressures and at four temperatures between 300 and 90 K, we reanalyzed the data to derive pressure shift information at different temperatures. The temperatures for which data were collected and analyzed are 298, 140 and 90K. The high precision pressure shift data obtained here over a large range of temperature demonstrate the ability of our experimental arrangement to address specific questions on a given spectral window like in the balloon experiment or in a satellite project, for example.

  7. A High-Density Consensus Map of Common Wheat Integrating Four Mapping Populations Scanned by the 90K SNP Array

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Weie; He, Zhonghu; Gao, Fengmei; Liu, Jindong; Jin, Hui; Zhai, Shengnan; Qu, Yanying; Xia, Xianchun

    2017-01-01

    A high-density consensus map is a powerful tool for gene mapping, cloning and molecular marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding. The objective of this study was to construct a high-density, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based consensus map of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by integrating genetic maps from four recombinant inbred line populations. The populations were each genotyped using the wheat 90K Infinium iSelect SNP assay. A total of 29,692 SNP markers were mapped on 21 linkage groups corresponding to 21 hexaploid wheat chromosomes, covering 2,906.86 cM, with an overall marker density of 10.21 markers/cM. Compared with the previous maps based on the wheat 90K SNP chip detected 22,736 (76.6%) of the SNPs with consistent chromosomal locations, whereas 1,974 (6.7%) showed different chromosomal locations, and 4,982 (16.8%) were newly mapped. Alignment of the present consensus map and the wheat expressed sequence tags (ESTs) Chromosome Bin Map enabled assignment of 1,221 SNP markers to specific chromosome bins and 819 ESTs were integrated into the consensus map. The marker orders of the consensus map were validated based on physical positions on the wheat genome with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.69 (4D) to 0.97 (1A, 4B, 5B, and 6A), and were also confirmed by comparison with genetic position on the previously 40K SNP consensus map with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.84 (6D) to 0.99 (6A). Chromosomal rearrangements reported previously were confirmed in the present consensus map and new putative rearrangements were identified. In addition, an integrated consensus map was developed through the combination of five published maps with ours, containing 52,607 molecular markers. The consensus map described here provided a high-density SNP marker map and a reliable order of SNPs, representing a step forward in mapping and validation of chromosomal locations of SNPs on the wheat 90K array. Moreover, it can be

  8. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... burst. previous continue Signs of Hearing Loss or Balance Problems Ear injuries can affect kids differently. Some ... both ears, kids with ear injuries that affect balance may have symptoms like: falling or stumbling a ...

  9. Ear drainage culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An ear drainage culture is collected by placing a cotton swab gently in the ear canal. The sample is sent to the laboratory for testing to isolate and identify the type of organism causing the ear infection.

  10. Ears and Altitude

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ears and Altitude Ears and Altitude Patient Health Information ... uncomfortable feeling of fullness or pressure. Why do ears pop? Normally, swallowing causes a little click or ...

  11. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  12. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... burst. previous continue Signs of Hearing Loss or Balance Problems Ear injuries can affect kids differently. Some ... both ears, kids with ear injuries that affect balance may have symptoms like: falling or stumbling a ...

  13. The quest for the bionic arm.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2014-06-01

    The current state of research of upper extremity prosthetic devices is focused on creating a complete prosthesis with full motor and sensory function that will provide amputees with a near-normal human arm. Although advances are being made rapidly, many hurdles remain to be overcome before a functional, so-called bionic arm is a reality. Acquiring signals via nerve or muscle inputs will require either a reliable wireless device or direct wiring through an osseous-integrated implant. The best way to tap into the "knowledge" present in the peripheral nerve is yet to be determined. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  14. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  15. Bionic models for identification of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerget, O. M.

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes a clinical decision support system that processes biomedical data. For this purpose a bionic model has been designed based on neural networks, genetic algorithms and immune systems. The developed system has been tested on data from pregnant women. The paper focuses on the approach to enable selection of control actions that can minimize the risk of adverse outcome. The control actions (hyperparameters of a new type) are further used as an additional input signal. Its values are defined by a hyperparameter optimization method. A software developed with Python is briefly described.

  16. Bionic Concept Applied to Flow Slab Design of PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. T.; Chang, C. P.

    A character of fuel cell with high potency and low pollution was known well and considered as a new generation of power technology. In this study a novel design of flow slab addressed and originated from bionic concept will be applied to improve the performance of PEMFC. Simulation results executed at Re = 100 show that the bionic flow type will possess a better uniformity of velocity and lower pressure drop. Besides, the integral performance concerned at SDR and PDR will also show the bionic flow type to be an outstanding design. Hence, this novel flow design addressed will be useful to promotion of PEMFC.

  17. Detection of 90K/MAC-2BP in the seminal plasma of infertile males with accessory gland infection and the autoimmune pathogenetic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Caroppo, Ettore; Niederberger, Craig; Iacovazzi, Palma A; Correale, Mario; D'Amato, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate 90K/MAC-2BP, a glycoprotein member of the Scavenger Receptor Cystein Rich superfamily, in the seminal plasma of infertile male patients with male accessory gland infection in order to investigate a putative autoimmune pathogenesis. 90K seminal concentration and sperm parameters were evaluated in 50 patients with male accessory gland infection at baseline and after cycles of treatment with Levofluoxacin 500 mg daily for 15 days plus serratiopeptidase 10 mg daily for 30 days. Treatment was continued for up to 6 cycles in cases of persistant bacteriospermia and/or clinical and ejaculatory signs of the disease. Patients with persistant male accessory gland infection after 6 cycles were defined as nonresponders. The same parameters were evaluated at baseline and after a 2-month period in 30 healthy controls. Patients with male accessory gland infection showed impaired sperm parameters and had lower seminal 90K concentration compared to controls. After treatment, seminal 90K level significantly increased in patients compared to controls. Twenty-two patients responded to treatment (44%), while 28 were nonresponders (56%). No difference in pretreatment and posttreatment sperm parameters and seminal 90K was observed between the 2 subgroups. Thirteen patients (26%) had identifiable bacteriospermia: significantly less pretreatment seminal 90K was observed compared to patients without bacteriospermia. Seminal 90K is decreased in patients with male accessory gland infection, and may be restored by a treatment with quinolones. However, the clinical utility of a 90K assay in these patients remains uncertain, as its level is not predictive of response to treatment.

  18. Graphite Oxide to Graphene. Biomaterials to Bionics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brianna C; Murray, Eoin; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-12-09

    The advent of implantable biomaterials has revolutionized medical treatment, allowing the development of the fields of tissue engineering and medical bionic devices (e.g., cochlea implants to restore hearing, vagus nerve stimulators to control Parkinson's disease, and cardiac pace makers). Similarly, future materials developments are likely to continue to drive development in treatment of disease and disability, or even enhancing human potential. The material requirements for implantable devices are stringent. In all cases they must be nontoxic and provide appropriate mechanical integrity for the application at hand. In the case of scaffolds for tissue regeneration, biodegradability in an appropriate time frame may be required, and for medical bionics electronic conductivity is essential. The emergence of graphene and graphene-family composites has resulted in materials and structures highly relevant to the expansion of the biomaterials inventory available for implantable medical devices. The rich chemistries available are able to ensure properties uncovered in the nanodomain are conveyed into the world of macroscopic devices. Here, the inherent properties of graphene, along with how graphene or structures containing it interface with living cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerves and cells, are reviewed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the germs bother your outer ear, it's called swimmer's ear. The middle ear is a small pocket ... What's Hearing Loss? Taking Care of Your Ears Swimmer's Ear Perforated Eardrum What's Earwax? Contact Us Print ...

  20. Comparison of electrically evoked compound action potential thresholds and loudness estimates for the stimuli used to program the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Kyung; Brown, Carolyn J; Etler, Christine P; O'Brien, Sara; Chiou, Li-Kuei; Abbas, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, Cochlear Corporation introduced a cochlear implant (CI) to the market that was equipped with hardware that made it possible to record electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) from CI users of all ages. Over the course of the next decade, many studies were published that compared ECAP thresholds with levels used to program the speech processor of the Nucleus CI. In 2001 Advanced Bionics Corporation introduced the Clarion CII cochlear implant (the Clarion CII internal device is also known as the CII Bionic Ear). This cochlear implant was also equipped with a system that allowed measurement of the ECAP. While a great deal is known about how ECAP thresholds compare with the levels used to program the speech processor of the Nucleus CI, relatively few studies have reported comparisons between ECAP thresholds and the levels used to program the speech processor of the Advanced Bionics CI. To explore the relationship between ECAP thresholds and behavioral measures of perceptual dynamic range for the range of stimuli commonly used to program the speech processor of the Advanced Bionics CI. This prospective and experimental study uses correlational and descriptive statistics to define the relationship between ECAP thresholds and perceptual dynamic range measures. Twelve postlingually deafened adults participated in this study. All were experienced users of the Advanced Bionics CI system. ECAP thresholds were recorded using the commercially available SoundWave software. Perceptual measures of threshold (T-level), most comfortable level (M-level), and maximum comfortable level (C-level) were obtained using both "tone bursts" and "speech bursts." The relationship between these perceptual and electrophysiological variables was defined using paired t-tests as well as correlation and linear regression. ECAP thresholds were significantly correlated with the perceptual dynamic range measures studied; however, correlations were not strong. Analysis of

  1. Swimmer's Ear (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa) KidsHealth > For Parents > Swimmer's Ear (Otitis ... español Otitis del nadador (otitis externa) About Swimmer's Ear Otitis externa (OE) — commonly known as swimmer's ear — ...

  2. Measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of multi-layer insulation between 20 K and 90 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, Joseph A.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has the need to efficiently store cryogenic propellants in space for long periods of time. One method to improve storage efficiency is to use multi-layer insulation (MLI), a technique that minimizes the boiling rate due to radiation heat transfer. Typically, the thermal performance of MLI is determined by measuring the rate of evaporation of liquid nitrogen from a calibrated cryostat. The main limitation with this method is that testing conditions are restricted by the boiling temperature of the LN2, which may not match the requirements of the application. The Multi-Layer Insulation Thermal Conductivity Experiment (MIKE) at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is capable of measuring the effective thermal conductivity of MLI at variable boundary temperatures. MIKE uses cryo-refrigerators to control boundary temperatures in the calorimeter and a calibrated thermal link to measure the heat load. To make the measurements requested by NASA, MIKE needed to be recalibrated for the 20 K to 90 K range. Also, due to the expectation of a lower heat transfer rate, the heat load support rod material was changed to one with a lower thermal conductivity to ensure the temperature difference seen on the cold rod could be measurable at the estimated heat load. Presented are the alterations to MIKE including calibration data and heat load measurements on new load-bearing MLI supplied by NASA.

  3. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Origin of abrupt rise in deuteron NMR longitudinal relaxation times of protein methyl groups below 90 K.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Lipton, Andrew S

    2013-05-23

    In order to examine the origin of the abrupt change in the temperature dependence of (2)H NMR longitudinal relaxation times observed previously for methyl groups of L69 in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein at around 90 K (Vugmeyster et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4038-4039), we extended the measurements to several other methyl groups in the hydrophobic core. We show that, for all methyl groups, relaxation times experience a dramatic jump several orders of magnitude around this temperature. Theoretical modeling supports the conclusion that the origin of the apparent transition in the relaxation times is due to the existence of the distribution of conformers distinguished by their activation energy for methyl three-site hops. It is also crucial to take into account the differential contribution of individual conformers into overall signal intensity. When a particular conformer approaches the regime at which its three-site hop rate constant is on the order of the quadrupolar coupling interaction constant, the intensity of the signal due to this conformer experiences a sharp drop, thus changing the balance of the contributions of different conformers into the overall signal. As a result, the observed apparent transition in the relaxation rates can be explained without the assumption of an underlying transition in the rate constants. This work in combination with earlier results also shows that the model based on the distribution of conformers explains the relaxation behavior in the entire temperature range between 300 and 70 K.

  5. Origin of Abrupt Rise in Deuteron NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Times of Protein Methyl Groups Below 90 K

    SciTech Connect

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-05-23

    In order to examine the origin of the abrupt change in the temperature dependence of NMR longitudinal relaxation times observed earlier for methyl groups of L69 in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein at around 90 K (Vugmeyster et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4038), we extended the measurements to several other methyl groups in the hydrophobic core. We show that for all methyl groups, relaxation times experience a dramatic jump several orders of magnitude around this temperature. Theoretical modeling supports the conclusion that the origin of the apparent transition in the relaxation times is due to the existence of the distribution of conformers distinguished by their activation energy for methyl three-site hops. It is also crucial to take into account the differential contribution of individual conformers into overall signal intensity. When a particular conformer approaches the regime at which its three-site hops rate constant is on the order of the quadrupolar coupling interaction constant, the intensity of the signal due to this conformer experiences a sharp drop, thus changing the balance of the contributions of different conformers into the overall signal. As a result, the observed apparent transition in the relaxation rates can be explained without the assumption of an underlying transition in the rate constants. This work in combination with earlier results also shows that the model based on the distribution of conformers explains the relaxation behavior in the entire temperature range between 300-70 K.

  6. Measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of multi-layer insulation between 20 K and 90 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Joseph A.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    NASA has the need to efficiently store cryogenic propellants in space for long periods of time. One method to improve storage efficiency is to use multi-layer insulation (MLI), a technique that minimizes the boiling rate due to radiation heat transfer. Typically, the thermal performance of MLI is determined by measuring the rate of evaporation of liquid nitrogen from a calibrated cryostat. The main limitation with this method is that testing conditions are restricted by the boiling temperature of the LN{sub 2}, which may not match the requirements of the application. The Multi-Layer Insulation Thermal Conductivity Experiment (MIKE) at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is capable of measuring the effective thermal conductivity of MLI at variable boundary temperatures. MIKE uses cryo-refrigerators to control boundary temperatures in the calorimeter and a calibrated thermal link to measure the heat load. To make the measurements requested by NASA, MIKE needed to be recalibrated for the 20 K to 90 K range. Also, due to the expectation of a lower heat transfer rate, the heat load support rod material was changed to one with a lower thermal conductivity to ensure the temperature difference seen on the cold rod could be measurable at the estimated heat load. Presented are the alterations to MIKE including calibration data and heat load measurements on new load-bearing MLI supplied by NASA.

  7. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  8. On just noticeable difference for bionic eye.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; McCarthy, Chris; Barnes, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We propose to use Just Noticeable Difference (JND) as the principle in visualizing results for image processing modules for prosthetic vision. Current Bionic Eye hardware implants have limited levels of separately perceivable brightness (i.e., low dynamic range in visualizing images). Therefore, it is important to ensure that the critical contrast must remain perceivable by maintaining of visual differences in downsampled images with reduced dynamic range. JND provides a mathematical framework for these psychophysics events. An increase by 1 in JND space corresponds to the smallest detectable change in visual space (i.e., just noticeable). Combining this principle and the dynamic range constraint, we cast the visualization problem to a linear optimization problem, which enables us to generate optimal visualization images. We demonstrate the usefulness of this principle on visualizing ground-plane segmentation. Experiments show that the proposed principle effectively provides critical visual information at different dynamic ranges, and generates consistent results for image sequences.

  9. The Bionic Clicker Mark I & II.

    PubMed

    Magee, Elliott G; Ourselin, S; Nikitichev, Daniil; Vercauteren, T; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne

    2017-08-14

    In this manuscript, we present two 'Bionic Clicker' systems, the first designed to demonstrate electromyography (EMG) based control systems for educational purposes and the second for research purposes. EMG based control systems pick up electrical signals generated by muscle activation and use these as inputs for controllers. EMG controllers are widely used in prosthetics to control limbs. The Mark I (MK I) clicker allows the wearer to change the slide of a presentation by raising their index finger. It is built around a microcontroller and a bio-signals shield. It generated a lot of interest from both the public and research community. The Mark II (MK II) device presented here was designed to be a cheaper, sleeker, and more customizable system that can be easily modified and directly transmit EMG data. It is built using a wireless capable microcontroller and a muscle sensor.

  10. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the Mg2+-induced 90-kDa heat shock protein oligomers.

    PubMed

    Moullintraffort, Laura; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Nazabal, Alexis; Allegro, Diane; Giudice, Emmanuel; Zal, Franck; Peyrot, Vincent; Barbier, Pascale; Thomas, Daniel; Garnier, Cyrille

    2010-05-14

    The 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) is involved in the regulation and activation of numerous client proteins essential for diverse functions such as cell growth and differentiation. Although the function of cytosolic Hsp90 is dependent on a battery of cochaperone proteins regulating both its ATPase activity and its interaction with client proteins, little is known about the real Hsp90 molecular mechanism. Besides its highly flexible dimeric state, Hsp90 is able to self-oligomerize in the presence of divalent cations or under heat shock. In addition to dimers, oligomers exhibit a chaperone activity. In this work, we focused on Mg(2+)-induced oligomers that we named Type I, Type II, and Type III in increasing molecular mass order. After stabilization of these quaternary structures, we optimized a purification protocol. Combining analytical ultracentrifugation, size exclusion chromatography coupled to multiangle laser light scattering, and high mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, we determined biochemical and biophysical characteristics of each Hsp90 oligomer. We demonstrate that Type I oligomer is a tetramer, and Type II is an hexamer, whereas Type III is a dodecamer. These even-numbered structures demonstrate that the building brick for oligomerization is the dimer up to the Type II, whereas Type III probably results from the association of two Type II. Moreover, the Type II oligomer structure, studied by negative stain transmission electron microscopy tomography, exhibits a "nest-like" shape that forms a "cozy chaperoning chamber" where the client protein folding/protection could occur.

  11. Structure of Gd0.95Bi0.05Fe3(BO3)4 single crystals at 293 and 90 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, E. S.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Dudka, A. P.; Verin, I. A.; Artemov, V. V.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Gudim, I. A.; Frolov, K. V.; Lyubutin, I. S.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of GdFe3(BO3)4 single crystals has been studied by X-ray diffraction at 293 and 90 K. The crystals are grown from a flux in the Bi2Mo3O12-B2O3-Li2MoO4-Gd2O3-Fe2O3 system. The results of chemical analysis and structural study show that these crystals contain bismuth as an impurity. It is found that bismuth atoms are located at gadolinium sites in the structure. A decrease in the temperature is accompanied by a lowering of the symmetry from sp. gr. R32 (at 293 K) to sp. gr. P3121 (at 90 K). The presence of two types of iron chains with different geometries at 90 K promotes a change in the magnetic properties of these crystals with a decrease in the temperature.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies raised against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) G protein and a cellular 90 kDa protein neutralize IHNV infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Cho, W J; Do, J W; Kim, H J; Park, J W; Park, M A; Sohn, S G; Jeong, G; Hah, Y C

    1996-08-01

    Immune sera were obtained from four rainbow trout that had survived natural infection by infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and five monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared against a Korean isolate of IHNV, IHNV-PRT. These immune sera and MAbs were characterized in terms of IHNV-neutralizing properties and reactivity in Western blots with the viral proteins of IHNV-PRT. All five MAbs and four immune sera neutralized IHNV-PRT to various extents. Antibodies in these immune sera recognized two structural proteins of IHNV, G and M1, and one protein with a molecular mass of 90 kDa. Of the five MAbs, three (AB9, AF6 and AG6) recognized the IHNV G protein, and the other two (AB7 and BC2) recognized the 90 kDa protein. The 90 kDa protein was found to be a cellular protein constitutively expressed at low levels in fish cells and expression of this protein was augmented by infection with IHNV and heat shock. MAbs specific to four stress proteins, hsp60, hsp70, hsp90 and grp94, failed to bind to this 90 kDa protein. MAbs AB9 and AB7 reacted fairly broadly with six different IHNV strains. Together, these results indicate that (1) two IHNV proteins, G and M1, and a 90 kDa cellular protein are immunogenic, (2) G and the 90 kDa proteins contain neutralizing epitopes, and (3) the epitopes recognized by MAbs AB9 and AB7 are conserved among the six different IHNV strains.

  13. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the malleus, incus, and stapes that transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. The ... is a snail-shaped organ that converts sound vibrations from the middle ear into electrical signals. The ...

  14. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  15. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears. This is especially true if they use cotton swabs or dangerously sharp small objects, like hair ... all objects out of your ear canals — including cotton swabs — unless your doctor has told you it's ...

  16. Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Otoplasty — also known as cosmetic ear surgery — is a procedure to change the ... Society of Plastic Surgeons. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/Cosmetic-Procedures/Ear-Surgery.html. Accessed June 16, 2015. ...

  17. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  18. Ear surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Review Date 10/ ...

  19. A bionic eye actuated by ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; Li, Yuxiu; He, Qingsong; Song, Linlin; Dai, Zhendong

    2011-04-01

    This research was conducted with the aim of developing an energy-efficient, noiseless, movable bionic eye for use in bionic toys. This novel bionic eye is actuated by an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator. The overall size of the eye was 39 mm in length, 45 mm in width, and 45 mm in thickness. The experimental results revealed such a bionic eye design is feasible. This type of bionic eye is appropriate for use in toys and robots to increase their visual impact.

  20. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Healthy Water Home Ear Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Print- ... ear infections, swimmer's ear, and healthy swimming. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) What are the symptoms of swimmer's ...

  1. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be caused by many different types of bacteria or fungi. It usually develops in ears that are exposed to moisture. People who get OE often have been diving or swimming for long periods of time. This can bring infectious bacteria directly into the ear canal. Swimmer's ear occurs ...

  2. [The design of bionic left ventricular auxiliary pump].

    PubMed

    Jin, Henglin; Hu, Xiaobing; Du, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a novel design of bionic left ventricular auxiliary pump, and the characteristic is that elastic diaphragm of pump driven by hydraulic, having smooth, reliable blood supply, can prevent blood clots, can use the flow sensor, pressure sensor detection showing the blood pressure and blood volume at the inlet and outlet of the pump. The pump can go with heart rate synchronization or asynchronous auxiliary by the R wave of human body's ECG. The design goal is realization of bionic throb. Through the animal experiment, the blood pressure waveforms are close to expectations, stable flow can stroke according to the set value, which prove that the pump can meet the requirement for heart disease patients for bionic left ventricular assistant.

  3. Presenting Bionic: Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, K.

    2014-12-01

    Broader Impact plans are required of all NSF proposals. In 2011 the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, reconfirmed NSF's commitment to Broader Impacts in its task force report on the merit review system. At many institutions there are professionals that focus their work on supporting the Broader Impact work of researchers. This session will share the Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration (BIONIC) plan to create a professional network of individuals and offices committed to planning and carrying out effective Broader Impact programming. BIONIC is an NSF Research Coordination Network that is recommended for funding through the Biology Directorate. In this session we will share the goals of BIONIC, and the progress to date in reaching those goals (of which one aspect is the curating of effective Broader Impact initiatives).

  4. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; McKinzie, Audra A.; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  5. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-06-09

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  6. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  7. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  8. Bionic Propulsion on Water and Measurement of Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Liu; Si-yuan, Zhao; Shan-chao, Tu; Tian-yu, Zhu; Rong-xiang, Li

    Traditional propulsion fashion on water are propeller propulsion and jet propulsion, but the efficiency relatively low. Used by biological propulsion, after the last million years of evolution, the maximum utilization of its power. Bionic propulsion system designed in this paper consists of two large travel umbrella wing plate in reciprocating linear travel agencies, led by the reciprocating motion along the vertical, in the water under the influence of backward movement of the wing disk automatically open, resulting in the pull forward, the forward movement of the wing disk automatically shut down to reduce water resistance. This paper designs a bionic propulsion and drag model for the static test and measurement test propulsion.

  9. [Theory and practice of bionic cultivation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dahui; Huang, Luqi; Guo, Lanping; Shao, Aijuan; Chen, Meilan

    2009-03-01

    The bionic cultivation of medicinal plant is an ecological cultivation pattern, which is adopting ecological engineering and modern agricultural techniques to simulate the natural ecosystem of wild medicinal plant community, and has been given greater attention on the agriculture of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is also the cross subject that combines Chinese traditional medicine, agronomy, horticulture, ecology, agricultural engineering and management. Moreover, it has significant technology advantages of promoting the sustainable utilization of medicinal plant resources, improving the ecological environment and harmonizing man and nature. So it's important to develop the bionic cultivation of TCM.

  10. [Middle ear physiology].

    PubMed

    Ayerbe, I; Négrevergne, M; Ucelay, R; Sanchez Fernandez, J M

    1999-01-01

    The middle ear forms part of the sound transformer mechanism, together with the outer ear and the conducting system of the inner ear. An intermediate sensory organ, sensitive to acoustic vibration, and linked to the inner ear, the middle ear made its appearance during the period of adaptation of marine creatures to a terrestrial habitat; its presence is therefore a phylogenetic requirement. It is classical to ascribe three functions to the middle ear: the transmission of acoustic vibrations from the tympanic membrane to the cochlea, impedance matching between the air in the external auditary meatus and the labyrinthine fluids, and protection of the inner ear by means of the acoustic reflex. If the classical mechanical explanation has been able to explain its function, the conceptualization of its physiology in terms of energy allows an even better understanding, as well as providing and explanation for the paradoxes which arise in clinical practice when the classical model is used.

  11. Optimization of Programming Parameters in Children with the Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Baudhuin, Jacquelyn; Cadieux, Jamie; Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Maxson, Jerrica L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cochlear implants provide access to soft intensity sounds and therefore improved audibility for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Speech processor programming parameters, such as threshold or T-level, Input Dynamic Range (IDR) and microphone sensitivity, contribute to the recipient’s program and influence audibility. When soundfield thresholds obtained through the speech processor are elevated, programming parameters can be modified to improve soft sound detection. Adult recipients show improved detection for low-level sounds when T-levels are set at raised levels, and show better speech understanding in quiet when wider IDRs are used. Little is known about the effects of parameter settings on detection and speech recognition in children using today’s cochlear implant technology. Purpose The overall study aim was to assess optimal T-level, IDR and sensitivity settings in pediatric recipients of the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant. Research Design Two experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 examined the effects of two T-level settings on soundfield thresholds and detection of the Ling 6 Sounds. One program set Ts at 10% of M-levels and another at 10 current units (CUs) below the level judged as “soft”. Experiment 2 examined the effects of IDR and sensitivity settings on speech recognition in quiet and noise. Study Sample Participants were eleven children 7 to 17 years of age (mean 11.3) implanted with the Advanced Bionics High Resolution 90K or CII cochlear implant system and had speech recognition scores of 20% or greater on a monosyllabic word test. Data Collection and Analysis Two T-level programs were compared for detection of the Ling Sounds and frequency modulated (FM) tones. Differing IDR/sensitivity programs (50/0, 50/10, 70/0, 70/10) were compared using Ling and FM-tone detection thresholds, CNC words at 50 dB SPL, and HINT-C sentences at 65 dB SPL in the presence of four talker babble (+8 signal-to-noise ratio). Outcomes

  12. Optimization of programming parameters in children with the advanced bionics cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Baudhuin, Jacquelyn; Cadieux, Jamie; Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Maxson, Jerrica L

    2012-05-01

    Cochlear implants provide access to soft intensity sounds and therefore improved audibility for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Speech processor programming parameters, such as threshold (or T-level), input dynamic range (IDR), and microphone sensitivity, contribute to the recipient's program and influence audibility. When soundfield thresholds obtained through the speech processor are elevated, programming parameters can be modified to improve soft sound detection. Adult recipients show improved detection for low-level sounds when T-levels are set at raised levels and show better speech understanding in quiet when wider IDRs are used. Little is known about the effects of parameter settings on detection and speech recognition in children using today's cochlear implant technology. The overall study aim was to assess optimal T-level, IDR, and sensitivity settings in pediatric recipients of the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant. Two experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 examined the effects of two T-level settings on soundfield thresholds and detection of the Ling 6 sounds. One program set T-levels at 10% of most comfortable levels (M-levels) and another at 10 current units (CUs) below the level judged as "soft." Experiment 2 examined the effects of IDR and sensitivity settings on speech recognition in quiet and noise. Participants were 11 children 7-17 yr of age (mean 11.3) implanted with the Advanced Bionics High Resolution 90K or CII cochlear implant system who had speech recognition scores of 20% or greater on a monosyllabic word test. Two T-level programs were compared for detection of the Ling sounds and frequency modulated (FM) tones. Differing IDR/sensitivity programs (50/0, 50/10, 70/0, 70/10) were compared using Ling and FM tone detection thresholds, CNC (consonant-vowel nucleus-consonant) words at 50 dB SPL, and Hearing in Noise Test for Children (HINT-C) sentences at 65 dB SPL in the presence of four-talker babble (+8 signal

  13. [The white coat as a cape: doctors, superheroes and bionics].

    PubMed

    Engelberts, Connie E; Mevius, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    To study the relationship between doctors and comic books, cartoons, superheroes and bionic prosthetic organs. Descriptive survey. For this study, 341 doctors and medical students filled in a digital survey in the autumn of 2013. The questionnaire contained questions about comic books and cartoons, their superheroes, prosthetic organs and about bionic and non-bionic super powers. As a child more than half of the participants read comic books regularly or often, and most watched cartoons regularly or often. Now their childhood interest in this subject has mostly been lost. In their youth, Suske & Wiske were the favourite, and now it is Donald Duck. The number of doctors with a favourite superhero decreased as aged increased from 52% to 37%. The care givers entertain lively fantasies about having bionic superpowers. According to the participants, the idea doctor would have ultrasonic eyes and all sorts of other super senses. Ninety-one per cent thought that 'the development of prosthetic organs is not a waste of money'. If Batman and Superman come to blows, Catwoman wins.

  14. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  15. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C; Emerson, Robert W; Herr, Hugh M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  16. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C.; Emerson, Robert W.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work. PMID:26285201

  17. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections and Ear ... medio y colocación de tubos de ventilación Why Surgery? Many kids get middle ear infections (known as ...

  18. Resolution of two native monomeric 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Philippa J L; McKinzie, Audra A; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  19. Pathology of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Ida; Robbins, Kerri; Marsch, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The external ear is exposed to weathering and trauma; it also has sparse vascularity, making it prone to infection and disease. The external location of the cutaneous ear makes it easily visible for diagnosis and accessible for treatment. In this article, the authors focus on diseases of the ear that are most commonly encountered and may be subject to surgical and medical evaluation and/or treatment. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment for each disease entity are discussed. PMID:23115534

  20. Optimizing the Perception of Soft Speech and Speech in Noise with the Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant System

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Laura K.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Firszt, Jill B.; Finley, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to provide guidelines to optimize perception of soft speech and speech in noise for Advanced Bionics cochlear implant (CI) users. DESIGN Three programs differing in T-levels were created for ten subjects. Using the T-level setting that provided the lowest FM-tone, sound-field threshold levels for each subject, three additional programs were created with input dynamic range (IDR) settings of 50, 65 and 80 dB. STUDY SAMPLE Subjects were postlinguistically deaf adults implanted with either the Clarion CII or 90K CI devices. RESULTS Sound-field threshold levels were lowest with T-levels set higher than 10% of M-levels and with the two widest IDRs. Group data revealed significantly higher scores for CNC words presented at a soft level with an IDR of 80 dB and 65 dB compared to 50 dB. Although no significant group differences were seen between the three IDRs for sentences in noise, significant individual differences were present. CONCLUSIONS Setting Ts higher than the manufacturer’s recommendation of 10% of M-levels and providing IDR options can improve overall speech perception; however, for some users, higher Ts and wider IDRs may not be appropriate. Based on the results of the study, clinical programming recommendations are provided. PMID:21275500

  1. Optimizing the perception of soft speech and speech in noise with the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant system.

    PubMed

    Holden, Laura K; Reeder, Ruth M; Firszt, Jill B; Finley, Charles C

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to provide guidelines to optimize perception of soft speech and speech in noise for Advanced Bionics cochlear implant (CI) users. Three programs differing in T-levels were created for ten subjects. Using the T-level setting that provided the lowest FM-tone, sound-field threshold levels for each subject, three additional programs were created with input dynamic range (IDR) settings of 50, 65 and 80 dB. Subjects were postlinguistically deaf adults implanted with either the Clarion CII or 90K CI devices. Sound-field threshold levels were lowest with T-levels set higher than 10% of M-levels and with the two widest IDRs. Group data revealed significantly higher scores for CNC words presented at a soft level with an IDR of 80 dB and 65 dB compared to 50 dB. Although no significant group differences were seen between the three IDRs for sentences in noise, significant individual differences were present. Setting Ts higher than the manufacturer's recommendation of 10% of M-levels and providing IDR options can improve overall speech perception; however, for some users, higher Ts and wider IDRs may not be appropriate. Based on the results of the study, clinical programming recommendations are provided.

  2. In vivo estimates of the position of advanced bionics electrode arrays in the human cochlea.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Margaret W; Holden, Timothy A; Whiting, Bruce R; Voie, Arne H; Brunsden, Barry; Neely, J Gail; Saxon, Eugene A; Hullar, Timothy E; Finley, Charles C

    2007-04-01

    A new technique for determining the position of each electrode in the cochlea is described and applied to spiral computed tomography data from 15 patients implanted with Advanced Bionics HiFocus I, Ij, or Helix arrays. ANALYZE imaging software was used to register 3-dimensional image volumes from patients' preoperative and postoperative scans and from a single body donor whose unimplanted ears were scanned clinically, with micro computed tomography and with orthogonal-plane fluorescence optical sectioning (OPFOS) microscopy. By use of this registration, we compared the atlas of OPFOS images of soft tissue within the body donor's cochlea with the bone and fluid/ tissue boundary available in patient scan data to choose the midmodiolar axis position and judge the electrode position in the scala tympani or scala vestibuli, including the distance to the medial and lateral scalar walls. The angular rotation 0 degrees start point is a line joining the midmodiolar axis and the middle of the cochlear canal entry from the vestibule. The group mean array insertion depth was 477 degrees (range, 286 degrees to 655 degrees). The word scores were negatively correlated (r = -0.59; p = .028) with the number of electrodes in the scala vestibuli. Although the individual variability in all measures was large, repeated patterns of suboptimal electrode placement were observed across subjects, underscoring the applicability of this technique.

  3. Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing Page Content Article Body What is the best way to avoid infection after ear piercing? Ears may be pierced for cosmetic reasons ...

  4. Effectiveness of Ear Splint Therapy for Ear Deformities

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To present our experience with ear splint therapy for babies with ear deformities, and thereby demonstrate that this therapy is an effective and safe intervention without significant complications. Methods This was a retrospective study of 54 babies (35 boys and 19 girls; 80 ears; age ≤3 months) with ear deformities who had received ear splint therapy at the Center for Torticollis, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ajou University Hospital between December 2014 and February 2016. Before the initiation of ear splint therapy, ear deformities were classified with reference to the standard terminology. We compared the severity of ear deformity before and after ear splint therapy by using the physician's ratings. We also compared the physician's ratings and the caregiver's ratings on completion of ear splint therapy. Results Among these 54 babies, 41 children (58 ears, 72.5%) completed the ear splint therapy. The mean age at initiation of therapy was 52.91±18.26 days and the treatment duration was 44.27±32.06 days. Satyr ear, forward-facing ear lobe, Darwinian notch, overfolded ear, and cupped ear were the five most common ear deformities. At the completion of therapy, the final physician's ratings of ear deformities were significantly improved compared to the initial ratings (8.28±1.44 vs. 2.51±0.92; p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the physician's ratings and the caregiver's ratings at the completion of ear splint therapy (8.28±1.44 vs. 8.0±1.61; p=0.297). Conclusion We demonstrated that ear splint therapy significantly improved ear deformities in babies, as measured by quantitative rating scales. Ear splint therapy is an effective and safe intervention for babies with ear deformities. PMID:28289646

  5. A new aspect of single-layered cuprate superconductors — 90 K superconductors for Ca-doped Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizaki, R.; Yamamoto, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kadowaki, K.

    2012-12-01

    We found that the highest Tc (Tc max) of the superconductors in Bi-2201 phase was 80-90 K for the partially Ca substituted Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ for Sr. The superconductivity was confirmed to be bulk effect from a specific heat jump around Tc. By the findings the correlation between the structure and Tc max has been made clear and simple with respect to the distance between Cu and the apical oxygen for the single-layered cuprate superconductors in the hole doped system.

  6. Ear problems in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Che; Liu, Chia-Yu; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Tyrone

    2005-08-01

    Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear), otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane.

  7. Ear wax management.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Skye; Yau, Stephanie; Anderson, Daniel; Bennett, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Ear syringing is a very common practice among general practitioners (GPs). It is used by many as the treatment of choice for cerumen (ear wax), and is usually effective and safe. However, complications from syringing are an increasingly common reason for presentation to ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists and medico-legal complaints against GPs. The aim of this article is to provide GPs with the knowledge to safely manage cerumen. Ear wax is an important part of a normal functioning ear. It is mostly asymptomatic and requires no treatment. Softening ear drops may be necessary to help the ear fulfil its self-cleaning function, and should be considered first-line treatment. Syringing can be safely performed if this fails by taking a thorough history and examination to exclude contraindications, gaining patient consent and ensuring the appropriate use of equipment. Referral to an ENT clinic for manual removal with microsuctioning may be necessary in the event of contraindications, complications or failure.

  8. Research on the Integration of Bionic Geometry Modeling and Simulation of Robot Foot Based on Characteristic Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, G.; Zhu, H.; Xu, J.; Gao, K.; Zhu, D.

    2017-09-01

    The bionic research of shape is an important aspect of the research on bionic robot, and its implementation cannot be separated from the shape modeling and numerical simulation of the bionic object, which is tedious and time-consuming. In order to improve the efficiency of shape bionic design, the feet of animals living in soft soil and swamp environment are taken as bionic objects, and characteristic skeleton curve, section curve, joint rotation variable, position and other parameters are used to describe the shape and position information of bionic object’s sole, toes and flipper. The geometry modeling of the bionic object is established by using the parameterization of characteristic curves and variables. Based on this, the integration framework of parametric modeling and finite element modeling, dynamic analysis and post-processing of sinking process in soil is proposed in this paper. The examples of bionic ostrich foot and bionic duck foot are also given. The parametric modeling and integration technique can achieve rapid improved design based on bionic object, and it can also greatly improve the efficiency and quality of robot foot bionic design, and has important practical significance to improve the level of bionic design of robot foot’s shape and structure.

  9. Kinematic Structures Description of Bionic Hand Based on VF Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiancan; Bai, Pengying; Luo, Min; Gao, Meng; Zhan, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a method for describing kinematic structure of bionic hand based on VF (virtual finger) set. At first, a 20 DOFs (degrees of freedom) human hand kinematic model is built, which is expressed by five fingers’ kinematic chains consisting of kinematic pairs and symbols that represent geometric relationships of kinematic pairs’ axes. Based on the concept of VF, the hand fingers are divided into two types: VFAA having adduction/abduction motion and VFFE having flexion/extension motion. The concept of VF set comprising VFAAs and VFFEs is defined, human hand and six basic grasp postures are described by VF set. Then, the structures corresponding VFAA and VFFE are given according to active and passive forms of finger joints, and VFFE Structure-Base comprising 20 conventional structures is built. Based on VF set and the structures of VFAA and VFFE, VF sets and kinematic structures of several classic bionic hands are given.

  10. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  11. Nanobionics: the impact of nanotechnology on implantable medical bionic devices.

    PubMed

    Wallace, G G; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Wang, C

    2012-08-07

    The nexus of any bionic device can be found at the electrode-cellular interface. Overall efficiency is determined by our ability to transfer electronic information across that interface. The nanostructure imparted to electrodes plays a critical role in controlling the cascade of events that determines the composition and structure of that interface. With commonly used conductors: metals, carbon and organic conducting polymers, a number of approaches that promote control over structure in the nanodomain have emerged in recent years with subsequent studies revealing a critical dependency between nanostructure and cellular behaviour. As we continue to develop our understanding of how to create and characterise electromaterials in the nanodomain, this is expected to have a profound effect on the development of next generation bionic devices. In this review, we focus on advances in fabricating nanostructured electrodes that present new opportunities in the field of medical bionics. We also briefly evaluate the interactions of living cells with the nanostructured electromaterials, in addition to highlighting emerging tools used for nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation of the electrode-cellular interface.

  12. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    PubMed

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-07

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  13. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction.

  14. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction. PMID:28053309

  15. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor Review Date 8/5/2015 Updated by: Sumana Jothi ... Otolaryngology, NCHCS VA, SFVA, San Francisco, CA. Internal review and update on 09/01/2016 by David ...

  16. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... otitis (otomycosis), typically caused by Aspergillus niger or Candida albicans, is less common. Boils are usually caused ... form in the ear canal. Otomycosis caused by Candida albicans does not cause any visible fungi to ...

  17. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... US are prescribed for ear infections. Using an observation option could reduce antibiotic prescriptions annually by up ... to 2 years - for AOM with severe symptoms; observation is an option for AOM if non-severe. ...

  18. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paralysis of the face Inflammation around the brain ( epidural abscess ) or in the brain Damage to the part ... pubmed/23818543 . Read More Cholesteatoma Ear infection - acute Epidural abscess Mastoiditis Otitis Review Date 4/21/2015 Updated ...

  19. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... or fewer children. This can reduce your child's chances of getting a cold or other infection, and ...

  20. Bionic Design for Reducing Adhesive Resistance of the Ridger Inspired by a Boar's Head

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianqiao; Yan, Yunpeng; Chirende, Benard; Wu, Xuejiao; Wang, Zhaoliang

    2017-01-01

    The main feature of the boar's head used to root around for food is the front part, which is similar to the ridger in terms of function, load, and environment. In this paper, the boar's head was selected as the biological prototype for developing a new ridger. The point cloud of the head was captured by a 3D scanner, and then, the head surface was reconstructed using 3D coordinates. The characteristic curves of the front part of the boar's head were extracted, and then, five cross-sectional curves and one vertical section curve were fitted. Based on the fitted curves, five kinds of bionic ridgers were designed. The penetrating resistances of the bionic ridgers and traditional ridger were tested at different speeds in an indoor soil bin. The test results showed that bionic ridger B had the best penetrating resistance reduction ratio of 16.67% at 4.2 km/h velocity. In order to further evaluate the performance of the best bionic ridger (bionic ridger B), both the bionic ridger and traditional ridger were tested in a field under the same working conditions. The field results indicate that the bionic ridger reduces penetrating resistance by 6.91% compared to the traditional ridger, and the test results validate that the bionic ridger has an effect on reducing penetrating resistance. PMID:28757796

  1. Inner ear disturbances related to middle ear inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sone, Michihiko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inner and middle ear are connected mainly through round and oval windows, and inflammation in the middle ear cavity can spread into the inner ear, which might induce a disturbance. In cases with intractable otitis media, attention should also be paid to symptoms related to the inner ear. In this paper, middle ear inflammation and related inner ear disturbances are reviewed with a focus on representative middle ear diseases (such as acute otitis media, chronic otitis media, otitis media with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, eosinophilic otitis media, cholesteatoma with labyrinthine fistula, and reflux-related otitis media). Their clinical concerns are then discussed with reference to experimental studies. In these diseases, early diagnosis and adequate treatment are required to manage not only middle ear but also inner ear conditions. PMID:28303055

  2. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies.

  3. Listening to the Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher Alan

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics--termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models--that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus -frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  4. Listening to the ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics-termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models-that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Dimple Bionic Nonsmooth Surface on Tire Antihydroplaning

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haichao; Wang, Guolin; Ding, Yangmin; Yang, Jian; Zhai, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the idea that bionic nonsmooth surfaces (BNSS) reduce fluid adhesion and resistance, the effect of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure arranged in tire circumferential grooves surface on antihydroplaning performance was investigated by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The physical model of the object (model of dimple bionic nonsmooth surface distribution, hydroplaning model) and SST k − ω turbulence model are established for numerical analysis of tire hydroplaning. By virtue of the orthogonal table L16(45), the parameters of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure design compared to the smooth structure were analyzed, and the priority level of the experimental factors as well as the best combination within the scope of the experiment was obtained. The simulation results show that dimple bionic nonsmooth structure can reduce water flow resistance by disturbing the eddy movement in boundary layers. Then, optimal type of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure is arranged on the bottom of tire circumferential grooves for hydroplaning performance analysis. The results show that the dimple bionic nonsmooth structure effectively decreases the tread hydrodynamic pressure when driving on water film and increases the tire hydroplaning velocity, thus improving tire antihydroplaning performance. PMID:27018311

  6. How to Use Ear Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water. Gently clean your ear with a damp facecloth and then dry your ear. Warm the drops to near body temperature by holding the container in the palm of ...

  7. Fusion of the ear bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Ear anatomy Medical findings based on ear anatomy References House JW, Cunningham CD. Otosclerosis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  8. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... to the eardrum) and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  9. Shield Yourself from 'Swimmer's Ear'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_167094.html Shield Yourself From 'Swimmer's Ear' Water left behind after a swim can give ... season for the painful infection known as swimmer's ear, but it shouldn't spoil your fun if ...

  10. The red ear syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Red Ear Syndrome (RES) is a very rare disorder, with approximately 100 published cases in the medical literature. Red ear (RE) episodes are characterised by unilateral or bilateral attacks of paroxysmal burning sensations and reddening of the external ear. The duration of these episodes ranges from a few seconds to several hours. The attacks occur with a frequency ranging from several a day to a few per year. Episodes can occur spontaneously or be triggered, most frequently by rubbing or touching the ear, heat or cold, chewing, brushing of the hair, neck movements or exertion. Early-onset idiopathic RES seems to be associated with migraine, whereas late-onset idiopathic forms have been reported in association with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Secondary forms of RES occur with upper cervical spine disorders or temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. RES is regarded refractory to medical treatments, although some migraine preventative treatments have shown moderate benefit mainly in patients with migraine-related attacks. The pathophysiology of RES is still unclear but several hypotheses involving peripheral or central nervous system mechanisms have been proposed. PMID:24093332

  11. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  12. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  13. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... The outer ear or "pinna" forms when the baby is growing in the mother's womb. The growth of this ear part ...

  14. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  15. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... also can cause painful pressure changes in the middle ear, so a child may eat less than normal or have trouble ... There's no single best approach for treating all middle ear infections. In deciding how to manage your child's ear infection, your doctor will consider many things, ...

  16. The analysis of ear canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Gen

    In this thesis complex 3-D ear canal finite element models are simplified using transfer matrices to 1-D models. This simplification allows analysis on the sound propagation in the ear, which results in potentially using a non-invasive probe to determine the acoustical properties of the ear.

  17. Taking Care of Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... it to get better by itself. Tips for Swimmers Sometimes, swimming can lead to a case of swimmer's ear . That's when your outer ear gets infected, ... cause an infection. If you think you have swimmer's ear, your mom or dad needs to call ...

  18. Cell-bionics: tools for real-time sensor processing.

    PubMed

    Toumazou, Chris; Cass, Tony

    2007-08-29

    The accurate monitoring of the physiological status of cells, tissues and whole organisms demands a new generation of devices capable of providing accurate data in real time with minimal perturbation of the system being measured. To deliver on the promise of cell-bionics advances over the past decade in miniaturization, analogue signal processing, low-power electronics, materials science and protein engineering need to be brought together. In this paper we summarize recent advances in our research that is moving us in this direction. Two areas in particular are highlighted: the exploitation of the physical properties inherent in semiconductor devices to perform very low power on chip signal processing and the use of gene technology to tailor proteins for sensor applications. In the context of engineered tissues, cell-bionics could offer the ability to monitor the precise physiological state of the construct, both during 'manufacture' and post-implantation. Monitoring during manufacture, particularly by embedded devices, would offer quality assurance of the materials components and the fabrication process. Post-implantation monitoring would reveal changes in the underlying physiology as a result of the tissue construct adapting to its new environment.

  19. Neurologic evaluation of the ear.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laurie B

    2004-03-01

    Diseases of the ear often cause signs of neurologic dysfunction because of damage of peripheral nervous system structures associated with the middle and inner ear. Vestibular dysfunction, facial paralysis, Horner's syndrome, and hearing deficits are the most common neurologic deficits that accompany middle and inner ear disease. Differentiating these signs from disease of the central nervous system is crucial for an accurate diagnosis and prognosis but can be difficult. Understanding the normal anatomy of the ear and its association with the brain is crucial to interpretation of the neurologic examination. This article reviews neurologic dysfunction commonly associated with diseases of the ear and differentiating these signs from central disease.

  20. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  1. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-03-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  2. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The contralateral ear in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Sady Selaimen; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Rosito, Letícia Petersen Schmidt

    2016-07-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma has been extensively studied. Theories of cholesteatoma pathogenesis involving previous tympanic membrane retraction are the most widely accepted, but the contralateral ear in patients with cholesteatoma remains unstudied. This study aimed to investigate the contralateral ear in patients with cholesteatoma, and to determine whether the characteristics of it differ according to patient age and cholesteatoma growth patterns. This study was cross sectional. We evaluated 356 patients with middle ear cholesteatoma in at least one ear, and no history of surgery, between August 2000 and March 2013. Otoendoscopy was conducted on both the affected and the contralateral ear. They were classified as normal, tympanic membrane perforation, moderate to severe tympanic membrane retraction and cholesteatoma. The mean age of the patients was 32.77 years, and 53.1 % of the cohort were female. Only 34.8 % of the contralateral ears were normal. The most common abnormality was moderate to severe tympanic membrane retraction (41.6 %). Cholesteatoma was identified in 16 %. Children exhibited a greater frequency of tympanic membrane retractions, whereas adults exhibited a greater frequency of cholesteatoma. All of the contralateral ears in the anterior epitympanic group were normal, but otherwise there were no differences in the contralateral ear when we compared the cholesteatoma growth patterns. We conclude that patients diagnosed with acquired cholesteatoma of one ear are significantly more likely to exhibit abnormalities of the contralateral ear.

  4. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  5. The design of an asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanglong; Qin, Jie; Guo, Wei; Fang, Kuang

    2013-06-01

    Inspired by the wing vein of Lepidoptera, a designment of asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling is developed. Lepidoptera vein D was chosen to measure the angle of first and second branch level. Based on these regular patterns, an asymmetric bionic branching channel is designed in a 35 mm × 35 mm chip. Comparing with fractal-like branching channel, it provides a stronger heat transfer capability, lower pressure drop and lower flow resistance in the experiment.

  6. Biomechanical comparison of bionic, screw and Endobutton fixation in the treatment of tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Baozhi; Xu, Guohui; Song, Zhaohui; Cui, Huixian; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-02-01

    The two prevalent fixation methods in the treatment of syndesmosis injuries, the rigid screw fixation and flexible Endobutton fixation, are not without issues; thus, we have designed a novel bionic fixation method which combines the features of both rigid and flexible fixations. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the bionic fixation to the screw and Endobutton fixations. Six normal fresh-frozen legs from amputation surgery were used. After initial tests of intact syndesmosis, screw, bionic and Endobutton fixations were performed sequentially for each specimen. Axial loading as well as rotation torque were applied, in five different ankle positions: neutral position, dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, varus, and valgus. The displacement of the syndesmosis and the tibial strain were analysed using a biomechanical testing system. Whether receiving axial loading or rotation torque, in most situations (neutral position, dorsiflexion, varus, plantar flexion with low loading, valgus with high loading, internal and external rotation), the bionic group and Endobutton group had comparable displacements, and there was no significant difference among the intact, bionic, and Endobutton groups; whereas the displacements of the screw group were smaller than any of the other three groups. Results of the tibial strain were similar with that of the displacement. The bionic fixation at least equals the performance of Endobutton fixation; it also allows more physiologic movement of the syndesmosis when compared to the screw fixation and may serve as a viable option for the fixation of the tibiofibular syndesmosis.

  7. Expression and characterization of human FKBP52, an immunophilin that associates with the 90-kDa heat shock protein and is a component of steroid receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Peattie, D A; Harding, M W; Fleming, M A; DeCenzo, M T; Lippke, J A; Livingston, D J; Benasutti, M

    1992-01-01

    Using an FK506 affinity column to identify mammalian immunosuppressant-binding proteins, we identified an immunophilin with an apparent M(r) approximately 55,000, which we have named FKBP52. We used chemically determined peptide sequence and a computerized algorithm to search GenPept, the translated GenBank data base, and identified two cDNAs likely to encode the murine FKBP52 homolog. We amplified a murine cDNA fragment, used it to select a human FKBP52 (hFKBP52) cDNA clone, and then used the clone to deduce the hFKBP52 sequence (calculated M(r) 51,810) and to express hFKBP52 in Escherichia coli. Recombinant hFKBP52 has peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity that is inhibited by FK506 and rapamycin and an FKBP12-like consensus sequence that probably defines the immunosuppressant-binding site. FKBP52 is apparently common to several vertebrate species and associates with the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) in untransformed mammalian steroid receptor complexes. The putative immunosuppressant-binding site is probably distinct from the hsp90-binding site, and we predict that FKBP52 has different structural domains to accommodate these functions. hFKBP52 contains 12 protein kinase phosphorylation-site motifs and a potential calmodulin-binding site, implying that posttranslational phosphorylation could generate multiple isoforms of the protein and that calmodulin and intracellular Ca2+ levels could affect FKBP52 function. FKBP52 transcripts are present in a variety of human tissues and could vary in abundance and/or stability. Images PMID:1279700

  8. KU135, a Novel Novobiocin-Derived C-Terminal Inhibitor of the 90-kDa Heat Shock Protein, Exerts Potent Antiproliferative Effects in Human Leukemic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Shary N.; Shawgo, Mary E.; Matthews, Shawna B.; Lu, Yuanming; Donnelly, Alison C.; Szabla, Kristen; Tanol, Mehmet; Vielhauer, George A.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Matts, Robert L.; Blagg, Brian S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) assists in the proper folding of numerous mutated or overexpressed signal transduction proteins that are involved in cancer. Consequently, there is considerable interest in developing chemotherapeutic drugs that specifically disrupt the function of Hsp90. Here, we investigated the extent to which a novel novobiocin-derived C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor, designated KU135, induced antiproliferative effects in Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The results indicated that KU135 bound directly to Hsp90, caused the degradation of known Hsp90 client proteins, and induced more potent antiproliferative effects than the established N-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). Closer examination of the cellular response to KU135 and 17-AAG revealed that only 17-AAG induced a strong up-regulation of Hsp70 and Hsp90. In addition, KU135 caused wild-type cells to undergo G2/M arrest, whereas cells treated with 17-AAG accumulated in G1. Furthermore, KU135 but not 17-AAG was found to be a potent inducer of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis as evidenced, in part, by the fact that cell death was inhibited to a similar extent by Bcl-2/Bcl-xL overexpression or the depletion of apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (Apaf-1). Together, these data suggest that KU135 inhibits cell proliferation by regulating signaling pathways that are mechanistically different from those targeted by 17-AAG and as such represents a novel opportunity for Hsp90 inhibition. PMID:19741006

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the 90 kD heat shock family of protein sequences and an examination of the relationship among animals, plants, and fungi species.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S

    1995-11-01

    The heat shock protein (Hsp) sequences, because of their ubiquity and high degree of conservation, provide useful models for phylogenetic analysis. In this paper I have carried out a global alignment of all available sequences (a total of 31) for the 90-kD heat shock protein (Hsp90) family. The minimum amino acid identity that is seen between presently known Hsp90 homologs is about 40% over the entire length, indicating that it is a highly conserved protein. Based on the alignment, a number of signature sequences that either are distinctive of the Hsp90 family or that distinguish between the cytosolic and the endoplasmic reticular forms of Hsp90 have been identified. Detailed phylogenetic analyses based on Hsp90 sequences reported here strongly indicate that the cytosolic and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident forms of Hsp90 constitute paralogous gene families which arose by a gene duplication event that took place very early in the evolution of eukaryotic cells. A minimum of two additional gene duplication events, which took place at a later time, are required to explain the presence of two different forms of Hsp90 that are found in fungi and vertebrate species. In a consensus neighbor-joining bootstrap tree based on Hsp90 sequences, plants and animals species grouped together 989 times of 1,000 (a highly significant score), indicating a closer relationship between them as compared to fungi. A closer affiliation of plant and animal species was also observed in the maximum-parsimony tree, although the relationship was not significantly supported by this method. A survey of the recent literature on this subject indicates that depending on the protein sequence and the methods of phylogenetic analysis, the animal species are indicated as closer relatives to either plants or fungi with significant statistical support for both topologies. Thus the relationship among the animal, plant, and fungi kingdoms remains an unresolved issue at the present time.

  10. Demonstration of a combined filter to improve the field uniformity of a 90 kV superficial X-ray therapy machine for different treatment field sizes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Mills, J A

    1997-02-01

    The field uniformity of a superficial X-ray machine operating at 90 kV, 10 mA and filtered with a 1.1 mm aluminium beam hardening filter was investigated at a depth of 1 cm below the surface. Uniformity measurements were carried out using films and a densitometer to detect the relative absorbed dose across the field. Film dosimetry was assessed by comparison with ionization chamber dosimetry in a water tank. The original flat hardening aluminium filter was replaced by a combined, profiled filter to improve the uniformity across field sizes 20 cm, 5 cm and 2 cm diameter as well as hardening the beam. Flatness of the beam profile was improved for the 20 cm field size from +/-7.5% to +/-1.3% across the anode/cathode direction and from +/-7.9% to +/-4.7% in the anode/cathode direction. For the 5 cm field size the improvement was from +/-4% to +/-3% and from +/-5.3% to +/-3.6% and for 2 cm field size from +/-3.4% to +/-2.8% and from 10.5% to +/-9.7% in the same directions, respectively. Beam quality measurements were made and the original half-value-layer was reduced from 2.21 +/- 0.09 mm to 2.07 +/- 0.09 mm. The project demonstrated that it was possible to build a filter capable of flattening the beam profile for different sized applicators without significantly changing the penetrating ability of the beam.

  11. Interaction of glucocorticosteroid receptor and wild-type or mutated 90-kDa heat shock protein coexpressed in baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Cadepond, F; Binart, N; Chambraud, B; Jibard, N; Schweizer-Groyer, G; Segard-Maurel, I; Baulieu, E E

    1993-11-15

    Coexpression of the human glucocorticosteroid receptor (hGR) and chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein alpha (chsp90) in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells is a system that provides a large quantity of wild-type chsp90-hGR complexes able to bind hormone ([3H]triamcinolone acetonide; TA), sedimenting at 8 S, and displaceable to 11 S by BF4 and D7 alpha anti-chsp90 monoclonal antibodies. Thus, we were able to examine the effects of selective chsp90 mutations on hetero-oligomeric complex formation. Two deletions involved hydrophilic regions, A between amino acids 221 and 290 and B between amino acids 530 and 581, and the third, Z, removed a central leucine heptad repeat region (amino acids 392-419). When these chsp90 mutants were expressed, the lack of displacement of [3H]TA receptor complexes on sucrose gradient by specific chsp90 antibodies was consistent with the formation of [3H]TA receptor complexes containing only endogenous insect hsp90. By using an immunoadsorption method and sedimentation analysis, we found that the deletion of region A precluded the interaction of chsp90 with the hGR, while B and Z deletions led to formation of abnormal complexes with the hGR, which displayed large forms (> 10 S), were unable to bind hormone, and apparently formed only small amounts of tightly bound nuclei hGR upon in vivo hormone treatment. As a whole, the data are consistent with distinct roles of hsp90 regions in hGR function.

  12. Ego-motion based on EM for bionic navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Wang, L. J.; Liu, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Researches have proved that flying insects such as bees can achieve efficient and robust flight control, and biologists have explored some biomimetic principles regarding how they control flight. Based on those basic studies and principles acquired from the flying insects, this paper proposes a different solution of recovering ego-motion for low level navigation. Firstly, a new type of entropy flow is provided to calculate the motion parameters. Secondly, EKF, which has been used for navigation for some years to correct accumulated error, and estimation-Maximization, which is always used to estimate parameters, are put together to determine the ego-motion estimation of aerial vehicles. Numerical simulation on MATLAB has proved that this navigation system provides more accurate position and smaller mean absolute error than pure optical flow navigation. This paper has done pioneering work in bionic mechanism to space navigation.

  13. Bionic intraocular lens with variable focus and integrated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Xiang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a bionic accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for ophthalmic surgery. The designed lens has a solid-liquid mixed integrated structure, which mainly consists of a support ring, elastic membrane, rigid lens, and optical liquid. The lens focus can be adjusted through the deformation of the lens front surface when compressed. The integrated structure of the IOL is presented, as well as a detailed description of the lens materials and fabrication process. Images under different radial pressures are captured, and the lens deformation process, accommodating range, density, and optical property are analyzed. The designed lens achieves a 14.6 D accommodating range under a radial pressure of 51.4 mN and a 0.24 mm alteration of the lens outer radius. The deformation property of the lens matches well with the characteristic of the eye and shows the potential to help patients fully recover their vision accommodation ability after the cataract surgery.

  14. Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-09-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.

  15. Medicalization: Current Concept and Future Directions in a Bionic Society

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a “bionic society”. PMID:22654387

  16. Psychosocial Impact of the Bionic Pancreas During Summer Camp

    PubMed Central

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Hessler, Danielle; Polonsky, William H.; Fisher, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of the bionic pancreas (BP) was assessed among children attending diabetes camp. Methods: Nineteen children were randomly assigned for 5 days to the BP condition and 5 days to the control condition in a crossover design. Results: Significant reductions in hypoglycemic fear and regimen burden were found. Children felt less burdened or worried about diabetes and felt freer to do things they enjoyed while using the BP. Children wished the BP responded to out of range numbers faster and expressed annoyance about carrying around the necessary equipment. Conclusions: Children may experience improved psychosocial outcomes following use of BP while expressing key areas of user concern. Future studies in less controlled environments with larger sample sizes can determine if these findings are generalizable to other groups. PMID:26993252

  17. Ear syringing: minimising the risks.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sara

    2008-05-01

    The patient, 61 years of age, saw the general practitioner for a repeat prescription for her blood pressure medication. During the consultation, the patient mentioned that she had some discomfort in her left ear. The GP examined the patient's ears and noted that both external auditory canals were blocked by wax. He recommended that the patient have her ears syringed and arranged for the practice nurse to perform the procedure. The GP did not see the patient again.

  18. The ear: Diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaud, J.; Jardin, C.; Rosen, L.

    1986-01-01

    This is an English translation of volume 17-1 of Traite de radiodiagnostic and represents a reasonably complete documentation of the diseases of the temporal bone that have imaging manifestations. The book begins with chapters on embryology, anatomy and radiography anatomy; it continues with blood supply and an overview of temporal bone pathology. Subsequent chapters cover malformations, trauma, infections, tumors, postoperative changes, glomus tumors, vertebasilar insufficiency, and facial nerve canal lesions. A final chapter demonstrates and discusses magnetic resonance images of the ear and cerebellopontine angle.

  19. Inhibition of heat shock protein (molecular weight 90 kDa) attenuates proinflammatory cytokines and prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Aditya; Catalano, Donna; Lim, Arlene; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2012-05-01

    Endotoxin-mediated proinflammatory cytokines play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic liver diseases. Heat shock protein 90 (molecular weight, 90 kDa) (hsp90) functions as an important chaperone of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling and is required for the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that inhibition of hsp90 would prevent LPS-induced liver injury by decreasing proinflammatory cytokines. C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with an hsp90 inhibitor, 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), and LPS. Parameters of liver injury, proinflammatory cytokines, and associated mechanisms were studied by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Inhibition of hsp90 by 17-DMAG prevented LPS-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase activity and significantly reduced serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) protein as well as messenger RNA (mRNA) in liver. Enhanced DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) and induction of target gene heat shock protein 70 (molecular weight, 70 kDa) confirmed hsp90 inhibition in liver. 17-DMAG treatment decreased cluster of differentiation 14 mRNA and LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) DNA binding without affecting Toll-like receptor 4 mRNA in liver. Mechanistic studies revealed that 17-DMAG-mediated inhibition of TNFα showed no effect on LPS-induced NFκB promoter-driven reporter activity, but significantly decreased TNFα promoter-driven reporter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that 17-DMAG enhanced HSF1 binding to the TNFα promoter, but not the IL-6 promoter, suggesting HSF1 mediated direct inhibition of TNFα, but not IL-6. We show that HSF1 indirectly regulates IL-6 by the induction of another transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3. Inhibition of HSF1, using small interfering RNA, prevented 17-DMAG-mediated down

  20. Distinct regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 by 90-kDa heat-shock protein in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Norie; Nemoto, Takayuki; Satoh, Shinya; Maruta, Toyoaki; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Chosa, Etsuo; Wada, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways via insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 play crucial roles in health, diseases, and therapeutics (i.e., longevity, tumorigenesis, and neuroprotection). The 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) is an emerging target molecule of therapeutics, Hsp90 inhibitors being promising against various diseases (e.g., cancer, brain and cardiac ischemia, and neurodegenerative diseases). Much remains, however, unknown whether Hsp90 could regulate insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 signaling pathways. In cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, we observed that 24-h treatment with 1 microM geldanamycin (an inhibitor of Hsp90) decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 level, while increasing insulin receptor substrate-2 level; besides, geldanamycin lowered phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, and Raf-1 levels, without changing extracellular signal-regulated kinase and its upstream kinase levels. Chronic (>or=12h) treatment with 0.1-10 microM Hsp90 inhibitor (geldanamycin, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin, herbimycin A, and radicicol) decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 level by approximately 66%, while increasing insulin receptor substrate-2 level by approximately 160%. These effects of geldanamycin (IC(50) 155 nM, EC(50) 177 nM) and 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (IC(50) 310 nM, EC(50) 260 nM) were time- and concentration-dependent. Geldanamycin-induced decrease of insulin receptor substrate-1 was attenuated by lactacystin, beta-lactone or MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), but not by calpastatin (calpain inhibitor) or leupeptin (lysosome inhibitor); geldanamycin did not affect heteroprotein complex formation between insulin receptor substrate-1 or -2 and Hsp90. Geldanamycin-induced increase of insulin receptor substrate-2 was prevented by cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Geldanamycin lowered insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA level by approximately 39%, while raising insulin

  1. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  2. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bony tumor of the ear canal Images Ear anatomy References Nicolai P, Castelnuovo P. Benign tumors of the sinonasal tract. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  3. Beware of dogs licking ears.

    PubMed

    Godey, B; Morandi, X; Bourdinière, J; Heurtin, C

    1999-10-09

    A patient with right-sided chronic purulent otorrhoea developed meningitis due to Pasteurella multocida transmitted by a dog that frequently licked his ear. We suggest that patients with a perforated tympanic membrane should avoid being licked on their ears by animals.

  4. Pathogenesis of middle ear adhesions.

    PubMed

    Cayé-Thomasen, P; Hermansson, A; Tos, M; Prellner, K

    1996-04-01

    Middle ear adhesions are well-known to the ear surgeon, although data on etiology, pathogenesis, and significance are lacking in current literature. This study on experimental acute otitis media presents histopathological data on these aspects. Pneumococci were inoculated in the right middle ear bulla of 25 rats; the left ear served as control. At days 4, 8, 16, 90, and 180, respectively, 5 rats were decapitated, and the bullae were removed, opened, and stained with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)/alcian blue. The entire middle ear mucosae were dissected from the bone, embedded as whole mounts in colophonium chambers, and examined by light microscopy. Representative parts of the mucosae were sectioned and examined in the same way. All inoculated ears from day 8 and later (20 in total), contained mucosal adhesions of various sizes, shapes, and locations. None were found in control ears. The site of predilection for the development of adhesions was the hypotympanum, followed by the anterior epitympanum, the attic, the drum, the interossicular spaces, and the tubal orifice. Based on present histopathological findings, we conclude that the middle ear adhesion is a pathological phenomenon caused by infection, and we propose a six-stage hypothesis of pathogenesis: 1. Localized epithelial rupture; 2. Prolapse of subepithelial tissue; 3. Epithelialization of the prolapse; resulting in a polypous/fold-like prominence; 4. Growth and elongation of the prominence; 5. Fusion of the end/tip of the prominence with another part of the mucosa; 6. Formation of an adhesion.

  5. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  6. Wax blockage in the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. Sometimes the ... wax than can be easily excreted out the ear. This extra wax may harden within the ear ...

  7. Bionic Design for Mars Sampling Scoop Inspired by Himalayan Marmot Claw

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cave animals are often adapted to digging and life underground, with claw toes similar in structure and function to a sampling scoop. In this paper, the clawed toes of the Himalayan marmot were selected as a biological prototype for bionic research. Based on geometric parameter optimization of the clawed toes, a bionic sampling scoop for use on Mars was designed. Using a 3D laser scanner, the point cloud data of the second front claw toe was acquired. Parametric equations and contour curves for the claw were then built with cubic polynomial fitting. We obtained 18 characteristic curve equations for the internal and external contours of the claw. A bionic sampling scoop was designed according to the structural parameters of Curiosity's sampling shovel and the contours of the Himalayan marmot's claw. Verifying test results showed that when the penetration angle was 45° and the sampling speed was 0.33 r/min, the bionic sampling scoops' resistance torque was 49.6% less than that of the prototype sampling scoop. When the penetration angle was 60° and the sampling speed was 0.22 r/min, the resistance torque of the bionic sampling scoop was 28.8% lower than that of the prototype sampling scoop. PMID:28127229

  8. Bionic Design for Mars Sampling Scoop Inspired by Himalayan Marmot Claw.

    PubMed

    Xue, Long; Zhang, Rong Rong; Zong, Wei; Song, Jia Feng; Zou, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Cave animals are often adapted to digging and life underground, with claw toes similar in structure and function to a sampling scoop. In this paper, the clawed toes of the Himalayan marmot were selected as a biological prototype for bionic research. Based on geometric parameter optimization of the clawed toes, a bionic sampling scoop for use on Mars was designed. Using a 3D laser scanner, the point cloud data of the second front claw toe was acquired. Parametric equations and contour curves for the claw were then built with cubic polynomial fitting. We obtained 18 characteristic curve equations for the internal and external contours of the claw. A bionic sampling scoop was designed according to the structural parameters of Curiosity's sampling shovel and the contours of the Himalayan marmot's claw. Verifying test results showed that when the penetration angle was 45° and the sampling speed was 0.33 r/min, the bionic sampling scoops' resistance torque was 49.6% less than that of the prototype sampling scoop. When the penetration angle was 60° and the sampling speed was 0.22 r/min, the resistance torque of the bionic sampling scoop was 28.8% lower than that of the prototype sampling scoop.

  9. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  10. Factors leading to chronic middle ear disease.

    PubMed

    Canty, A A; Prestwood, U; Dugdale, A E; Lewis, A N

    1975-05-10

    In an Australian Aboriginal community, 65% of all people examined had clinical evidence of pathology in the ear drum or middle ear, but active ear disease was found mainly in children. In most people, both ears showed similar clinical changes. Clinical nutritional status and hygienic factors did not correlate with the presence of ear disease. Some families had significantly more ear disease than did others, suggesting that there is some as yet unidentified familial factor.

  11. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... will finish by inserting a small metal or plastic tube into the hole in the eardrum. Afterward, ... air into the middle ear. Other substances, including water, may sometimes enter through the tube, but this ...

  12. Outcomes in Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides several advantages compared with traditional binocular microscopy, including a wide-field view, improved resolution with high magnification, and visual access to hidden corridors of the middle ear. Although binocular microscopic-assisted surgical techniques remain the gold standard for most otologists, EES is slowly emerging as a viable alternative for performing otologic surgery at several centers in the United States and abroad. In this review, we evaluate the current body of literature regarding EES outcomes, summarize our EES outcomes at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and compare these results with data for microscopic-assisted otologic surgery.

  13. A Bionic Camera-Based Polarization Navigation Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daobin; Liang, Huawei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Navigation and positioning technology is closely related to our routine life activities, from travel to aerospace. Recently it has been found that Cataglyphis (a kind of desert ant) is able to detect the polarization direction of skylight and navigate according to this information. This paper presents a real-time bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor. This sensor has two work modes: one is a single-point measurement mode and the other is a multi-point measurement mode. An indoor calibration experiment of the sensor has been done under a beam of standard polarized light. The experiment results show that after noise reduction the accuracy of the sensor can reach up to 0.3256°. It is also compared with GPS and INS (Inertial Navigation System) in the single-point measurement mode through an outdoor experiment. Through time compensation and location compensation, the sensor can be a useful alternative to GPS and INS. In addition, the sensor also can measure the polarization distribution pattern when it works in multi-point measurement mode. PMID:25051029

  14. A bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daobin; Liang, Huawei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-07-21

    Navigation and positioning technology is closely related to our routine life activities, from travel to aerospace. Recently it has been found that Cataglyphis (a kind of desert ant) is able to detect the polarization direction of skylight and navigate according to this information. This paper presents a real-time bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor. This sensor has two work modes: one is a single-point measurement mode and the other is a multi-point measurement mode. An indoor calibration experiment of the sensor has been done under a beam of standard polarized light. The experiment results show that after noise reduction the accuracy of the sensor can reach up to 0.3256°. It is also compared with GPS and INS (Inertial Navigation System) in the single-point measurement mode through an outdoor experiment. Through time compensation and location compensation, the sensor can be a useful alternative to GPS and INS. In addition, the sensor also can measure the polarization distribution pattern when it works in multi-point measurement mode.

  15. Biomimetic approaches to bionic touch through a peripheral nerve interface.

    PubMed

    Saal, Hannes P; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art prosthetic hands nearly match the dexterity of the human hand, and sophisticated approaches have been developed to control them intuitively. However, grasping and dexterously manipulating objects relies heavily on the sense of touch, without which we would struggle to perform even the most basic activities of daily living. Despite the importance of touch, not only in motor control but also in affective communication and embodiment, the restoration of touch through bionic hands is still in its infancy, a shortcoming that severely limits their effectiveness. Here, we focus on approaches to restore the sense of touch through an electrical interface with the peripheral nerve. First, we describe devices that can be chronically implanted in the nerve to electrically activate nerve fibers. Second, we discuss how these interfaces have been used to convey basic somatosensory feedback. Third, we review what is known about how the somatosensory nerve encodes information about grasped objects in intact limbs and discuss how these natural neural codes can be exploited to convey artificial tactile feedback. Finally, we offer a blueprint for how these codes could be implemented in a neuroprosthetic device to deliver rich, natural, and versatile tactile sensations. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Research on anti crack mechanism of bionic coupling brake disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lifeng; Yang, Xiao; Zheng, Lingnan; Wu, Can; Ni, Jing

    2017-09-01

    According to the biological function of fatigue resistance possessed by biology, this study designed a Bionic Coupling Brake Disc (BCBD) which can inhibit crack propagation as the result of improving fatigue property. Thermal stress field of brake disc was calculated under emergency working condition, and circumferential and radial stress field which lead to fatigue failure of brake disc were investigated simultaneously. Results showed that the maximum temperature of surface reached 890°C and the maximum residual tensile stress was 207 Mpa when the initial velocity of vehicle was 200 km/h. Based on the theory of elastic plastic fracture mechanics, the crack opening displacement and the crack front J integrals of the BCBD and traditional brake disc (TBD) with pre-cracking were calculated, and the strength of crack front was compared. Results revealed the growth behavior of fatigue crack located on surface of brake disc, and proved the anti fatigue resistance of BCBD was better, and the strength of crack resistance of BCBD was much stronger than that of TBD. This simulation research provided significant references for optimization and manufacturing of BCBD.

  17. Research on the Bionics Design of Automobile Styling Based on the Form Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aili, Zhao; Long, Jiang

    2017-09-01

    From the heritage of form gene point of view, this thesis has analyzed the gene make-up, cultural inheritance and aesthetic features in the evolution and development of forms of brand automobiles and proposed the bionic design concept and methods in the automobile styling design. And this innovative method must be based on the form gene, and the consistency and combination of form element must be maintained during the design. Taking the design of Maserati as an example, the thesis will show you the design method and philosophy in the aspects of form gene expression and bionic design innovation for the future automobile styling.

  18. Bionic Tactile Sensor for Near-Range Search, Localisation and Material Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Volker; Krause, André F.; Neitzel, Matthias; Lange, Oliver; Reimann, Bert

    Insects use their antennae (feelers) as near range sensors for orientation, object localisation and communication. Here, we use the stick insect antenna as a paragon for an actively moved tactile sensor. Our bionic sensor uses vibration signals from contact events for obstacle localisation and classification of material properties. It is shown how distance is coded by salient peaks in the frequency spectrum, and how the damping time constants can be exploited to distinguish between eight objects made of a range of materials. Thus, we demonstrate application of bionic principles for non-visual, reliable, near-range object localisation and material classification that is suitable for autonomous exploratory robots.

  19. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... up of invisible waves of energy, causes these vibrations. Every time you hear a sound, the various ... When the eardrum vibrates, the ossicles amplify these vibrations and carry them to the inner ear. The ...

  20. Ototoxicity (Ear Poisoning) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speech or Language Development Speech-Language Therapy Physical Therapy Hearing Evaluation in Children The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse Eardrum Injuries What's Hearing Loss? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Going to the Audiologist Hearing ...

  1. Deformity of Ears and Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. C.

    1965-01-01

    Ten children with gross deformity of the external ear were observed. In six the facial bones were underdeveloped on the same side as the deformed ear. In all six there was a congenital abnormality of the kidney or upper urinary tract, usually on the same side as the deformed ear. In addition there were usually other associated congenital defects in each case. In the remaining four children the facial bones appeared normal, and pyelography showed no abnormality of the urinary tract. In these four children there were no other associated defects. These observations emphasize the importance of investigating the urinary tract in children with gross deformity of the external ear, especially where there is an associated underdevelopment of the facial bones. PMID:14317453

  2. Classification of Newborn Ear Malformations and their Treatment with the EarWell Infant Ear Correction System.

    PubMed

    Daniali, Lily N; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Shell, Cheryl; Trovato, Matthew; Ha, Richard; Byrd, H Steve

    2017-03-01

    A single practice's treatment protocol and outcomes following molding therapy on newborn ear deformations and malformations with the EarWell Infant Ear Correction System were reviewed. A classification system for grading the severity of constricted ear malformations was created on the basis of anatomical findings. A retrospective chart/photograph review of a consecutive series of infants treated with the EarWell System from 2011 to 2014 was undertaken. The infants were placed in either deformation or malformation groups. Three classes of malformation were identified. Data regarding treatment induction, duration of treatment, and quality of outcome were collected for all study patients. One hundred seventy-five infant ear malformations and 303 infant ear deformities were treated with the EarWell System. The average age at initiation of treatment was 12 days; the mean duration of treatment was 37 days. An average of six office visits was required. Treated malformations included constricted ears [172 ears (98 percent)] and cryptotia [three ears (2 percent)]. Cup ear (34 ears) was considered a constricted malformation, in contrast to the prominent ear deformity. Constricted ears were assigned to one of three classes, with each subsequent class indicating increasing severity: class I, 77 ears (45 percent); class II, 81 ears (47 percent); and class III, 14 ears (8 percent). Molding therapy with the EarWell System reduced the severity by an average of 1.2 points (p < 0.01). Complications included minor superficial excoriations and abrasions. The EarWell System was shown to be effective in eliminating or reducing the need for surgery in all but the most severe malformations. Therapeutic, IV.

  3. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  8. Approaches to Inflight Ear Oximetry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    of arterial oxygen saturation. For centri- fuge experiments the floe,! ett-Packard ear oximeter, Model 47201A, has been successfully used both at...These difficulties are perhaps even more significant with respect to inflight experimental use. The difficulties are: 1. The bloodless ear is not truly...available (9), and a number of papers on both the clini- cal use (10-17) and the experimental use (1, 2, 18) of this equipment have been published since its

  9. Ear candles--efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Seely, D R; Quigley, S M; Langman, A W

    1996-10-01

    Ear candles are a popular and inexpensive alternative health treatment advocated for cerumen removal. A hollow candle is burned with one end in the ear canal with the intent of creating negative pressure and drawing cerumen from the ear. If effective, significant savings could result from the use of ear candles. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of this alternative method for cerumen management. Tympanometric measurements in an ear canal model demonstrated that ear candles do not produce negative pressure. A limited clinical trial (eight ears) showed no removal of cerumen from the external auditory canal. Candle wax was actually deposited in some. A survey of 122 otolaryngologists identified 21 ear injuries resulting from ear candle use. Ear candles have no benefit in the management of cerumen and may result in serious injury.

  10. Study on quantitative relation between characteristics of striature bionic coupling unit and wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, striature bionic coupling units of different characteristics were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with striature bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that there is a relationship between weight loss and the area of striature bionic coupling units and α: Δm = Δm0 - 0.0212S × cos α - 0.0241S × sin α.

  11. Cosmological dynamics of D-BIonic and DBI scalar field and coincidence problem of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panpanich, Sirachak; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Mizuno, Shuntaro

    2017-05-01

    We study the cosmological dynamics of a D-BIonic and Dirac-Born-Infeld scalar field, which is coupled to matter fluid. For the exponential potential and the exponential couplings, we find a new analytic scaling solution yielding the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Since it is shown to be an attractor for some range of the coupling parameters, the density parameter of matter fluid can be the observed value, as in the coupled quintessence with a canonical scalar field. Contrary to the usual coupled quintessence, where the value of the matter coupling giving the observed density parameter is too large to satisfy the observational constraint from the cosmic microwave background, we show that the D-BIonic theory can give a similar solution with a much smaller value of matter coupling. As a result, together with the fact that the D-BIonic theory has a screening mechanism, the D-BIonic theory can solve the so-called coincidence problem as well as the dark energy problem.

  12. Auto-bionics – a new paradigm in Regenerative Medicine and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafian, Hutan; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Summary The concept of bionics represents the development of engineering and technology based on natural biological systems. Traditional applications of bionics in healthcare include artificial bionic organs which can be used to replace, mimic and even enhance biological function when compared to native organic equivalents (so-called ‘Exo-bionics’). Recently there has been a new wave of bio-inspired treatments that act through the reorganisation of the existing biological organs in an individual to enhance physiology. Here the technology does not replace biological tissue, but augments function by tissue reorganization and modification – so-called ‘Auto-bionics’. Examples include the Ross (Pulmonary Autograft) Procedure, Cardiomyoplasty, Skeletal-Muscle-Ventricles, Graciloplasty and Metabolic Gastric-Bypass (gastrointestinal rearrangement to modulate hormone release and treat diabetes). These procedures will have an increased role in reconstructive strategies and the treatment of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Auto-bionics can enhance physiological function beyond normality in some cases and represents a new era in bio-inspired versatility. PMID:20210587

  13. Experimental Study of Reciprocating Friction between Rape Stalk and Bionic Nonsmooth Surface Units.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng; Li, Yaoming; Xu, Lizhang

    2015-01-01

    Background. China is the largest producer of rape oilseed in the world; however, the mechanization level of rape harvest is relatively low, because rape materials easily adhere to the cleaning screens of combine harvesters, resulting in significant cleaning losses. Previous studies have shown that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens restrain the adhesion of rape materials, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Objective. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and bionic nonsmooth metal surface was examined. Methods. The short-time Fourier transform method was used to discriminate the stable phase of friction signals and the stick-lag distance was defined to analyze the stable reciprocating friction in a phase diagram. Results. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and metal surface is a typical stick-slip friction, and the bionic nonsmooth metal surfaces with concave or convex units reduced friction force with increasing reciprocating frequency. The results also showed that the stick-lag distance of convex surface increased with reciprocating frequency, which indicated that convex surface reduces friction force more efficiently. Conclusions. We suggest that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens, especially with convex units, restrain the adhesion of rape materials more efficiently compared to the smooth surface cleaning screens.

  14. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  15. Influence of Cycle Temperature on the Wear Resistance of Vermicular Iron Derivatized with Bionic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-11-01

    Depending on their applications, such as in brake discs, camshafts, etc., the wear behavior of vermicular iron is influenced by the thermal cycling regime. The failure of a working part during its service life is a consequence of both thermal fatigue and wear. Previously, the wear and thermal fatigue resistance properties of vermicular iron were separately investigated by researchers, rather than a study combining these two factors. In the present work, the effect of cycle temperature on the wear resistance of specimens with bionic units processed by laser has been investigated experimentally. The wear behavior pre- and post-thermal cycling has also been investigated, and the influence of different cycle temperatures on the wear resistance is discussed. The results indicate that the thermal cycling regime brought about negative influences with varying degrees, on the material properties, such as the microstructures, micro-hardness, cracks, and oxidation resistance properties. All these factors synergistically reduced the wear resistance of vermicular iron. In particular, the negative influence apparently increased with an increase in cycle temperature. Nevertheless, the post-thermal-cycle wear resistance of the specimens with bionic units was superior to those without bionic units. Hence, the laser bionic process is an effective way to improve the performance of vermicular iron in combined thermal cycling and wear service conditions.

  16. Experimental Study of Reciprocating Friction between Rape Stalk and Bionic Nonsmooth Surface Units

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zheng; Li, Yaoming; Xu, Lizhang

    2015-01-01

    Background. China is the largest producer of rape oilseed in the world; however, the mechanization level of rape harvest is relatively low, because rape materials easily adhere to the cleaning screens of combine harvesters, resulting in significant cleaning losses. Previous studies have shown that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens restrain the adhesion of rape materials, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Objective. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and bionic nonsmooth metal surface was examined. Methods. The short-time Fourier transform method was used to discriminate the stable phase of friction signals and the stick-lag distance was defined to analyze the stable reciprocating friction in a phase diagram. Results. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and metal surface is a typical stick-slip friction, and the bionic nonsmooth metal surfaces with concave or convex units reduced friction force with increasing reciprocating frequency. The results also showed that the stick-lag distance of convex surface increased with reciprocating frequency, which indicated that convex surface reduces friction force more efficiently. Conclusions. We suggest that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens, especially with convex units, restrain the adhesion of rape materials more efficiently compared to the smooth surface cleaning screens. PMID:27034611

  17. Real-ear output measures of ear level fluency devices.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Andrew; Butler, Alyson K; Jones, Sherri M; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure real-ear aided and saturated responses of SpeechEasy™ devices and compare responses while devices delivered altered auditory feedback (AAF) and non-altered feedback (NAF). A repeated measures quasi-experimental design was employed. Ten people fitted with completely-in-the-canal or open fit behind-the-ear devices participated. Probe microphone measures were obtained with speech, and 17 chirp stimuli presented at 75 dB and 85 dB SPL, respectively. Measurements were compared with devices delivering AAF (i.e. delayed and frequency shifted) versus NAF. Maximum outputs were approximately 100-105 dB SPL in the 2000-4000 Hz range. Statistically significant differences in device SPL output as a function of device setting (AAF vs. NAF) were found for seven chirp stimuli (p <.05) when levels were sampled at points that were not temporally aligned with the output chirps but not for speech stimulus (p = .17). Device output varied across individuals and with open fit devices dominated by ear canal resonance effects. Real-ear aided responses were equivalent with speech input when devices delivered AAF and NAF. Real-ear saturated responses were not, however, comparable between AAF and NAF settings and may be underestimated if AAF delay is not accounted for.

  18. Bionic baroreceptor corrects postural hypotension in rats with impaired baroreceptor.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kazuya; Ide, Tomomi; Tobushi, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Onitsuka, Ken; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Fujino, Takeo; Saku, Keita; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2012-09-04

    Impairment of the arterial baroreflex causes orthostatic hypotension. Arterial baroreceptor sensitivity degrades with age. Thus, an impaired baroreceptor plays a pivotal role in orthostatic hypotension in most elderly patients. There is no effective treatment for orthostatic hypotension. The aims of this investigation were to develop a bionic baroreceptor (BBR) and to verify whether it corrects postural hypotension. The BBR consists of a pressure sensor, a regulator, and a neurostimulator. In 35 Sprague-Dawley rats, we vascularly and neurally isolated the baroreceptor regions and attached electrodes to the aortic depressor nerve for stimulation. To mimic impaired baroreceptors, we maintained intracarotid sinus pressure at 60 mm Hg during activation of the BBR. Native baroreflex was reproduced by matching intracarotid sinus pressure to the instantaneous pulsatile aortic pressure. The encoding rule for translating intracarotid sinus pressure into stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve was identified by a white noise technique and applied to the regulator. The open-loop arterial pressure response to intracarotid sinus pressure (n=7) and upright tilt-induced changes in arterial pressure (n=7) were compared between native baroreceptor and BBR conditions. The intracarotid sinus pressure-arterial pressure relationships were comparable. Compared with the absence of baroreflex, the BBR corrected tilt-induced hypotension as effectively as under native baroreceptor conditions (native, -39±5 mm Hg; BBR, -41±5 mm Hg; absence, -63±5 mm Hg; P<0.05). The BBR restores the pressure buffering function. Although this research demonstrated feasibility of the BBR, further research is needed to verify its long-term effect and safety in larger animal models and humans.

  19. Outpatient Glycemic Control with a Bionic Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manasi; Magyar, Kendra L.; McKeon, Katherine; Goergen, Laura G.; Balliro, Courtney; Hillard, Mallory A.; Nathan, David M.; Damiano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The safety and effectiveness of automated glycemic management have not been tested in multiday studies under unrestricted outpatient conditions. METHODS In two random-order, crossover studies with similar but distinct designs, we compared glycemic control with a wearable, bihormonal, automated, “bionic” pancreas (bionic-pancreas period) with glycemic control with an insulin pump (control period) for 5 days in 20 adults and 32 adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The automatically adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitor to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. RESULTS Among the adults, the mean plasma glucose level over the 5-day bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg per deciliter (7.7 mmol per liter), and the mean percentage of time with a low glucose level (<70 mg per deciliter [3.9 mmol per liter]) was 4.8%. After 1 day of automatic adaptation by the bionic pancreas, the mean (±SD) glucose level on continuous monitoring was lower than the mean level during the control period (133±13 vs. 159±30 mg per deciliter [7.4±0.7 vs. 8.8±1.7 mmol per liter], P<0.001) and the percentage of time with a low glucose reading was lower (4.1% vs. 7.3%, P = 0.01). Among the adolescents, the mean plasma glucose level was also lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (138±18 vs. 157±27 mg per deciliter [7.7±1.0 vs. 8.7±1.5 mmol per liter], P = 0.004), but the percentage of time with a low plasma glucose reading was similar during the two periods (6.1% and 7.6%, respectively; P = 0.23). The mean frequency of interventions for hypoglycemia among the adolescents was lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (one per 1.6 days vs. one per 0.8 days, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS As compared with an insulin pump, a wearable, automated, bihormonal, bionic pancreas improved mean glycemic levels, with less frequent hypoglycemic episodes, among both

  20. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa - a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis. PMID:26785845

  1. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  2. Tuning in the bullfrog ear.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, E R

    1988-01-01

    When electrical resonances were observed in acoustic sensory cells of lower vertebrates, the hearing research community was presented with the exciting possibility that tuning in the ears of those animals might be explained directly in terms of familiar molecular devices. It is reported here that in the frog sacculus, where electrical resonances have been observed in isolated hair cells, the effects of those resonances are completely obscured in the tuning properties of the sacculus in the intact ear. This observation has important implications not only for students of the ear, but for reductionist biologists in general. All of the dynamic properties of a system of connected, bidirectional processes are consequences of all of those processes at once; in such a system, the properties of an experimentally isolated subsystem may be totally obscured in the operation of the system as a whole. PMID:3258166

  3. Development of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Tanya T

    2015-06-01

    The vertebrate inner ear is a sensory organ of exquisite design and sensitivity. It responds to sound, gravity and movement, serving both auditory (hearing) and vestibular (balance) functions. Almost all cell types of the inner ear, including sensory hair cells, sensory neurons, secretory cells and supporting cells, derive from the otic placode, one of the several ectodermal thickenings that arise around the edge of the anterior neural plate in the early embryo. The developmental patterning mechanisms that underlie formation of the inner ear from the otic placode are varied and complex, involving the reiterative use of familiar signalling pathways, together with roles for transcription factors, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix components. In this review, I have selected highlights that illustrate just a few of the many recent discoveries relating to the development of this fascinating organ system.

  4. A 90 kDa fragment of filamin A promotes Casodex-induced growth inhibition in Casodex-resistant androgen receptor positive C4-2 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Kreisberg, J I; Bedolla, R G; Mikhailova, M; deVere White, R W; Ghosh, P M

    2007-09-06

    Prostate tumors are initially dependent on androgens for growth, but the majority of patients treated with anti-androgen therapy progress to androgen-independence characterized by resistance to such treatment. This study investigates a novel role for filamin A (FlnA), a 280 kDa cytoskeletal protein (consisting of an actin-binding domain (ABD) followed by 24 sequential repeats), in androgen-independent (AI) growth. Full-length FlnA is cleaved to 170 kDa (ABD+FlnA1-15) and 110 kDa fragments (FlnA16-24); the latter is further cleaved to a 90 kDa fragment (repeats 16-23) capable of nuclear translocation and androgen receptor (AR) binding. Here, we demonstrate that in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, the cleaved 90 kDa fragment is localized to the nucleus, whereas in its AI subline C4-2, FlnA failed to cleave and remained cytoplasmic. Transfection of FlnA16-24 cDNA in C4-2 cells restored expression and nuclear localization of 90 kDa FlnA. Unlike LNCaP, C4-2 cells proliferate in androgen-reduced medium and in the presence of the AR-antagonist Casodex. They also exhibit increased Akt phosphorylation compared to LNCaP, which may contribute to their AI phenotype. Nuclear expression of 90 kDa FlnA in C4-2 cells decreased Akt phosphorylation, prevented proliferation in androgen-reduced medium and restored Casodex sensitivity. This effect was inhibited by constitutive activation of Akt indicating that FlnA restored Casodex sensitivity in C4-2 cells by decreasing Akt phosphorylation. In addition, FlnA-specific siRNA which depleted FlnA levels, but not control siRNA, induced resistance to Casodex in LNCaP cells. Our results demonstrate that expression of nuclear FlnA is necessary for androgen dependence in these cells.

  5. [Inheritance of notched ears in Highland cattle].

    PubMed

    Scheider, A; Schmidt, P; Distl, O

    1994-10-01

    The present study describes an anomaly of the pinna of the ear and its distribution in Highland Cattle. The investigation is based on a questionnaire survey in farms in Bavaria keeping robust breeds and on registering data in 15 selected farms. In the year 1991, there were registered 548 Highland stud book cows in 108 farms. In four herds animals of the breed Highland Cattle were observed which showed crop ears. Always both ears were affected and this ear defect could be already observed in newborn calves. Crop ears appeared in very different forms. In some cases only small changes of the external ear could be recognized, in more severe cases, grooves in the external ear could be found and in the most severe case, the external ear was totally deformed and drastically reduced in size. In one herd, 45 animals out of the progeny of 46 of one affected breeding bull showed crop ears. The pedigrees indicated that this defect of the ear pinna is inherited and a single autosomal gene with nearly additive (incomplete dominant) action may be involved. Homozygote recessive animals are free from crop ears, animals homozygote for the mutated allele carry totally deformed external ears and heterozygote animals do not show as severe forms of crop ears as homozygote ones.

  6. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery for Middle Ear Cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Glikson, Eran; Yousovich, Ruth; Mansour, Jobran; Wolf, Michael; Migirov, Lela; Shapira, Yisgav

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical parameters, outcomes, and complications of transcanal endoscopic ear surgeries for middle ear cholesteatoma. Retrospective study. Tertiary university-affiliated medical center. Adult patients (age >18) who underwent transcanal endoscopic ear surgeries for cholesteatoma, between March 2009 and March 2015. Transcanal endoscopic surgery was indicated when the cholesteatoma did not extend posterior to the anterior limb of the lateral semicircular canal. Rigid endoscopes 4 and 2.7 mm in diameter, 0, 30, 45, and 70 degrees were used with angled picks, suction, and forceps.Preoperative assessment included high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones and/or non echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and pure-tone audiometry. Residual or recurrent disease was diagnosed by clinical examination and/or magnetic resonance imaging findings consistent with cholesteatoma. Intra- and postoperative complications, pre- and postoperative audiometric results were recorded. Sixty operations (56 patients, mean age = 43.6) were included.Six operations (10%) were performed under local anesthesia. The most common sites of cholesteatoma involvement were: posterior epitympanum (n = 51, 91%), anterior epitympanum (n = 19, 33.9%), posterior mesotympanum (n = 13, 23.2%), and sinus tympani (n = 11, 19.6%). Intraoperative ossicular chain reconstruction was performed in 18 (30%) cases.Our overall residual and recurrence rates were 10% (n = 6) and 8.3% (n = 5), respectively, with mean duration of follow up of 35 months. The most common sites of residual disease were the mastoid cavity/antrum (n = 3, 50%), tympanic cavity, and posterior mesotympanum. Overall minor and major complication rates were 16.6 and 6%, respectively. Transcanal endoscopic ear surgery was found to be an acceptable and safe technique for the exposure and eradication of middle ear and/or attic cholesteatoma.

  7. How to Use Ear Drops Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. 2 Gently clean your ear with a damp facecloth and then dry your ear. 3 Warm the drops to near body temperature by holding the container in the palm of ...

  8. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media is an inflammation or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs when there is ... which causes production of fluid or pus. Chronic otitis media occurs when the eustachian tube becomes blocked ...

  9. Inner Ear Drug Delivery for Auditory Applications

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Erin E. Leary; Mescher, Mark J.; Sewell, William F.; Tao, Sarah L.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Many inner ear disorders cannot be adequately treated by systemic drug delivery. A blood-cochlear barrier exists, similar physiologically to the blood-brain barrier, which limits the concentration and size of molecules able to leave the circulation and gain access to the cells of the inner ear. However, research in novel therapeutics and delivery systems has led to significant progress in the development of local methods of drug delivery to the inner ear. Intratympanic approaches, which deliver therapeutics to the middle ear, rely on permeation through tissue for access to the structures of the inner ear, whereas intracochlear methods are able to directly insert drugs into the inner ear. Innovative drug delivery systems to treat various inner ear ailments such as ototoxicity, sudden sensorineural hearing loss, autoimmune inner ear disease, and for preserving neurons and regenerating sensory cells are being explored. PMID:18848590

  10. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  11. Tympanoplasty on only hearing ears.

    PubMed

    Tos, M; Falbe Hansen, J

    1975-10-01

    The methods, results, and indications for operation on only hearing ears are discussed on the basis of 13 patients operated upon for chronic otitis media and its sequelae. Although good results were obtained, with an air-bone gas closure within 15 dB. in 77 per cent, this should not serve as propaganda for the general use of surgery on only hearing ears. On the other hand, they show that surgery on only hearing ears should not be rejected a priori and that on certain indications and under c ertain circumstanc es it may be carried out with minimal risk of aggravating the hearing loss. In most of the patients the indication for surgery was a progressing cholesteatoma, in some cases the sequelae of otitis, either in the form of myringoplasty or type II tympanoplasty, and one patient had the operation on a vital indication. To avoid postoperative exacerbation of the hearing, the patients must be strictly selected, the ears have to be pretreated conservatively, the Eustachian tube must be passable, the operation must be carried out by the most experienced otosurgeon, and thoroughly tested, very gentle operative methods must be used.

  12. Mechanics of the frog ear

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Pim; Mason, Matthew J.; Schoffelen, Richard L. M.; Narins, Peter M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.

    2010-01-01

    The frog inner ear contains three regions that are sensitive to airborne sound and which are functionally distinct. (1) The responses of nerve fibres innervating the low-frequency, rostral part of the amphibian papilla (AP) are complex. Electrical tuning of hair cells presumably contributes to the frequency selectivity of these responses. (2) The caudal part of the AP covers the mid-frequency portion of the frog's auditory range. It shares the ability to generate both evoked and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions with the mammalian cochlea and other vertebrate ears. (3) The basilar papilla functions mainly as a single auditory filter. Its simple anatomy and function provide a model system for testing hypotheses concerning emission generation. Group delays of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) from the basilar papilla are accounted for by assuming that they result from forward and reverse transmission through the middle ear, a mechanical delay due to tectorial membrane filtering and a rapid forward and reverse propagation through the inner ear fluids, with negligible delay. PMID:20149854

  13. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  14. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    PubMed

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  15. The caecilian ear: further observations.

    PubMed Central

    Wever, E G; Gans, C

    1976-01-01

    The structure of the ear is examined in two species of caecilians, Ichthyophis glutinosus and I. orthoplicatus, and the sensitivity to aerial sounds is assessed in terms of the electrical potentials of the cochlea. The results are in general agreement with previous reports on other caecilian species. Images PMID:1068485

  16. Ear dominance and telephone sales.

    PubMed

    Furnham, A; Richardson, S; Miller, T

    1997-10-01

    In a field study, three equally sized sales teams used on of three head-sets--left, right, both ears--for a day's selling of insurance by telephone. This had no effect on sales. In a retrospective study of records, daily sales performance including the percentage conversion rate for sales divided by the number of calls and the number and duration of calls was related to preference for type of head-set. Sales were markedly influenced by the choice of head-set. People who chose to wear the left earpiece significantly out sold the others wearing right and stereohead-sets. Neither the number of incoming calls nor the time spent on the telephone were influenced by the choice of head-set. When sales are analysed in terms of individual differences in personal preference for type of head-set, those who chose the left ear had an advantage. Forced use of the left, versus right ear or both ears for one day had no effect.

  17. Adenomatous tumors of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Stanley; Koss, Shira

    2015-04-01

    Adenomatous tumors are an uncommon cause of a middle ear mass. Clinical findings may be nonspecific, leading to difficulties in differentiation from other middle ear tumors. Controversy also exists whether to classify middle ear adenoma and carcinoid as separate neoplasms, or alternatively within a spectrum of the same pathologic entity. Most adenomatous middle ear tumors are indolent in behavior, with a benign histologic appearance and slowly progressive growth. The mainstay of treatment is complete surgical resection, which affords the greatest likelihood of cure.

  18. Ear Recognition Based on Gabor Features and KFDA

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhichun

    2014-01-01

    We propose an ear recognition system based on 2D ear images which includes three stages: ear enrollment, feature extraction, and ear recognition. Ear enrollment includes ear detection and ear normalization. The ear detection approach based on improved Adaboost algorithm detects the ear part under complex background using two steps: offline cascaded classifier training and online ear detection. Then Active Shape Model is applied to segment the ear part and normalize all the ear images to the same size. For its eminent characteristics in spatial local feature extraction and orientation selection, Gabor filter based ear feature extraction is presented in this paper. Kernel Fisher Discriminant Analysis (KFDA) is then applied for dimension reduction of the high-dimensional Gabor features. Finally distance based classifier is applied for ear recognition. Experimental results of ear recognition on two datasets (USTB and UND datasets) and the performance of the ear authentication system show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:24778595

  19. Ear recognition based on Gabor features and KFDA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Mu, Zhichun

    2014-01-01

    We propose an ear recognition system based on 2D ear images which includes three stages: ear enrollment, feature extraction, and ear recognition. Ear enrollment includes ear detection and ear normalization. The ear detection approach based on improved Adaboost algorithm detects the ear part under complex background using two steps: offline cascaded classifier training and online ear detection. Then Active Shape Model is applied to segment the ear part and normalize all the ear images to the same size. For its eminent characteristics in spatial local feature extraction and orientation selection, Gabor filter based ear feature extraction is presented in this paper. Kernel Fisher Discriminant Analysis (KFDA) is then applied for dimension reduction of the high-dimensional Gabor features. Finally distance based classifier is applied for ear recognition. Experimental results of ear recognition on two datasets (USTB and UND datasets) and the performance of the ear authentication system show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  1. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  2. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print A A A en ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  3. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? A A A en español ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  4. Handedness and Preferred Ear for Telephoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephen M.

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationship between handedness and preferred ear for telephoning in 140 college students. Increased degree of sinistrality was associated with increased tendency to use left ear for telephoning. Found tendency to pick up telephone receiver with preferred hand and hold earpiece to ipsilateral ear. Results may relate to reports of reduced…

  5. LDV measurement of bird ear vibrations to determine inner ear impedance and middle ear power flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyshondt, Pieter G. G.; Pires, Felipe; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures in birds and mammals is affected by the fluids in the inner ear (IE) that are present behind the oval window. In this study, the aim was to gather knowledge of the acoustic impedance of the IE in the ostrich, to be able to determine the effect on vibrations and power flow in the single-ossicle bird middle ear for future studies. To determine the IE impedance, vibrations of the ossicle were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the acoustic regime, vibrations were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer and electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle. The impedance of the inner ear could be determined by means of a simple RLC model in series, which resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20.1012 Pa/m3, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652.106 Pa s2/m3, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57.109 Pa s/m. The measured impedance is found to be considerably smaller than what is found for the human IE.

  6. Effects of setting angle on performance of fish-bionic wind wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. S.; Yang, Z. X.; Song, L.; Chen, Q.; Li, Y. B.; Chen, W.

    2016-08-01

    With the energy crisis and the increasing environmental pollutionmore and more efforts have been made about wind power development. In this paper, a new type of vertical axis named the fish-bionic wind wheel was proposed, and the outline of wind wheel was constructed by curve of Fourier fitting and polynomial equations. This paper attempted to research the relationship between the setting angle and the wind turbine characteristics by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results showed that the setting angle of the fish-bionic wind wheel has some significant effects on the efficiency of the wind turbine, Within the range of wind speed from 13m/s to 15m/s, wind wheel achieves the maximum efficiency when the setting angle is at 37 degree. The conclusion will work as a guideline for the improvement of wind turbine design.

  7. Towards Extending Forward Kinematic Models on Hyper-Redundant Manipulator to Cooperative Bionic Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Lakhal, Othman; Merzouki, Rochdi

    2017-01-01

    Forward Kinematics is a stepping stone towards finding an inverse solution and subsequently a dynamic model of a robot. Hence a study and comparison of various Forward Kinematic Models (FKMs) is necessary for robot design. This paper deals with comparison of three FKMs on the same hyper-redundant Compact Bionic Handling Assistant (CBHA) manipulator under same conditions. The aim of this study is to project on modeling cooperative bionic manipulators. Two of these methods are quantitative methods, Arc Geometry HTM (Homogeneous Transformation Matrix) Method and Dual Quaternion Method, while the other one is Hybrid Method which uses both quantitative as well as qualitative approach. The methods are compared theoretically and experimental results are discussed to add further insight to the comparison. HTM is the widely used and accepted technique, is taken as reference and trajectory deviation in other techniques are compared with respect to HTM. Which method allows obtaining an accurate kinematic behavior of the CBHA, controlled in the real-time.

  8. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  9. Ear drops for the removal of ear wax.

    PubMed

    Burton, M J; Dorée, C J

    2003-01-01

    Problems attributed to the accumulation of wax (cerumen) are one of the most common reasons for people to present to their general practitioners with ear trouble (Sharp 1990). Treatment for this condition often involves use of a wax softening agent (cerumenolytic) in order to disperse the cerumen and reduce the need for syringing, or to facilitate syringing should it prove necessary, but there is no consensus on the effectiveness of the wide variety of cerumenolytics in use. To assess the effectiveness of ear drops (cerumenolytics) for the removal of symptomatic ear wax. We searched the Cochrane ENT Group Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 1, 2003), and MEDLINE and EMBASE up to March 2003. Reference lists of all trials were also manually searched. We identified all randomised controlled trials (with or without blinding) in which a cerumenolytic was evaluated in comparison with either no treatment, a placebo, or other cerumenolytics in participants with hard or impacted ear wax, and in which the proportion of participants with sufficient clearance of the external canal to make further mechanical clearance unnecessary (primary outcome measure) was stated or calculable. The full text articles of all the retrieved trials of possible relevance were reviewed by the two reviewers and the inclusion criteria applied independently. Any differences in opinion about which studies to include in the review were resolved by discussion. Trials were graded for methodological quality using the Cochrane approach. Data extraction was performed in a standardised manner by one reviewer and rechecked by the other reviewer, and where necessary investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Meta-analysis was neither possible nor considered appropriate because of the heterogeneity of the treatments, treatment amounts and durations, trial procedures, and scoring systems. A narrative overview of the results is therefore presented. Eight

  10. Middle ear pathology can affect the ear-canal sound pressure generated by audiologic earphones.

    PubMed

    Voss, S E; Rosowski, J J; Merchant, S N; Thornton, A R; Shera, C A; Peake, W T

    2000-08-01

    To determine how the ear-canal sound pressures generated by earphones differ between normal and pathologic middle ears. Measurements of ear-canal sound pressures generated by the Etymtic Research ER-3A insert earphone in normal ears (N = 12) were compared with the pressures generated in abnormal ears with mastoidectomy bowls (N = 15), tympanostomy tubes (N = 5), and tympanic-membrane perforations (N = 5). Similar measurements were made with the Telephonics TDH-49 supra-aural earphone in normal ears (N = 10) and abnormal ears with mastoidectomy bowls (N = 10), tympanostomy tubes (N = 4), and tympanic-membrane perforations (N = 5). With the insert earphone, the sound pressures generated in the mastoid-bowl ears were all smaller than the pressures generated in normal ears; from 250 to 1000 Hz the difference in pressure level was nearly frequency independent and ranged from -3 to -15 dB; from 1000 to 4000 Hz the reduction in level increased with frequency and ranged from -5 dB to -35 dB. In the ears with tympanostomy tubes and perforations the sound pressures were always smaller than in normal ears at frequencies below 1000 Hz; the largest differences occurred below 500 Hz and ranged from -5 to -25 dB. With the supra-aural earphone, the sound pressures in ears with the three pathologic conditions were more variable than those with the insert earphone. Generally, sound pressures in the ears with mastoid bowls were lower than those in normal ears for frequencies below about 500 Hz; above about 500 Hz the pressures showed sharp minima and maxima that were not seen in the normal ears. The ears with tympanostomy tubes and tympanic-membrane perforations also showed reduced ear-canal pressures at the lower frequencies, but at higher frequencies these ear-canal pressures were generally similar to the pressures measured in the normal ears. When the middle ear is not normal, ear-canal sound pressures can differ by up to 35 dB from the normal-ear value. Because the pressure level

  11. Dynamic model and performance analysis of landing buffer for bionic locust mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Sheng; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Chen, Ke-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The landing buffer is an important problem in the research on bionic locust jumping robots, and the different modes of landing and buffering can affect the dynamic performance of the buffering process significantly. Based on an experimental observation, the different modes of landing and buffering are determined, which include the different numbers of landing legs and different motion modes of legs in the buffering process. Then a bionic locust mechanism is established, and the springs are used to replace the leg muscles to achieve a buffering effect. To reveal the dynamic performance in the buffering process of the bionic locust mechanism, a dynamic model is established with different modes of landing and buffering. In particular, to analyze the buffering process conveniently, an equivalent vibration dynamic model of the bionic locust mechanism is proposed. Given the support forces of the ground to the leg links, which can be obtained from the dynamic model, the spring forces of the legs and the impact resistance of each leg are the important parameters affecting buffering performance, and evaluation principles for buffering performance are proposed according to the aforementioned parameters. Based on the dynamic model and these evaluation principles, the buffering performances are analyzed and compared in different modes of landing and buffering on a horizontal plane and an inclined plane. The results show that the mechanism with the ends of the legs sliding can obtain a better dynamic performance. This study offers primary theories for buffering dynamics and an evaluation of landing buffer performance, and it establishes a theoretical basis for studies and engineering applications.

  12. Intelligent fuzzy-neural pattern generation and control of a quadrupedal bionic inspection robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfeddine, D.; Bulgakov, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents a case study on ‘single leg single step’ pattern generation and control of quadrupedal bionic robot movement using intelligent fuzzy-neural approaches. The aim is to set up a flip-flop mechanical configuration allowing the robot to move one step forward. The same algorithm can be integrated to develop a full trajectory pattern as an interconnected task of global path planning for autonomous quadrupedal robots.

  13. Bionic reconstruction to restore hand function after brachial plexus injury: a case series of three patients.

    PubMed

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Roche, Aidan D; Salminger, Stefan; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hofer, Christian; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-30

    Brachial plexus injuries can permanently impair hand function, yet present surgical reconstruction provides only poor results. Here, we present for the first time bionic reconstruction; a combined technique of selective nerve and muscle transfers, elective amputation, and prosthetic rehabilitation to regain hand function. Between April 2011, and May 2014, three patients with global brachial plexus injury including lower root avulsions underwent bionic reconstruction. Treatment occurred in two stages; first, to identify and create useful electromyographic signals for prosthetic control, and second, to amputate the hand and replace it with a mechatronic prosthesis. Before amputation, the patients had a specifically tailored rehabilitation programme to enhance electromyographic signals and cognitive control of the prosthesis. Final prosthetic fitting was applied as early as 6 weeks after amputation. Bionic reconstruction successfully enabled prosthetic hand use in all three patients. After 3 months, mean Action Research Arm Test score increased from 5·3 (SD 4·73) to 30·7 (14·0). Mean Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure score improved from 9·3 (SD 1·5) to 65·3 (SD 19·4). Mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score improved from 46·5 (SD 18·7) to 11·7 (SD 8·42). For patients with global brachial plexus injury with lower root avulsions, who have no alternative treatment, bionic reconstruction offers a means to restore hand function. Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research & Economy, and European Research Council Advanced Grant DEMOVE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [APPLICATION OF THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING ON MANUFACTURING BIONIC SCAFFOLDS OF SPINAL CORD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yisheng; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Xuyi; Chen, Chong; Tu, Yue; Zhang, Sai; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    To fabricate the bionic scaffolds of rat spinal cord by combining three dimensional (3D) printer and 3D software, so as to lay the foundation of theory and technology for the manufacture of scaffolds by using biomaterials. Three female Sprague Dawley rats were scanned by 7.0T MRI to obtain the shape and position data of the cross section and gray matter of T8 to T10 spinal cord. Combined with data of position and shape of nerve conduction beam, the relevant data were obtained via Getdata software. Then the 3D graphics were made and converted to stereolithography (STL) format by using SolidWorks software. Photosensitive resin was used as the materials of spinal cord scaffolds. The bionic scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printer. MRI showed that the section shape of T8 to T10 segments of the spinal cord were approximately oval with a relatively long sagittal diameter of (2.20 ± 0.52) mm and short transverse diameter of (2.05 ± 0.24) mm, and the data of nerve conduction bundle were featured in the STL format. The spinal cord bionic scaffolds of the target segments made by 3D printer were similar to the spinal cord of rat in the morphology and size, and the position of pores simulated normal nerve conduction of rat spinal cord. Spinal cord scaffolds produced by 3D printer which have similar shape and size of normal rat spinal cord are more bionic, and the procedure is simple. This technology combined with biomaterials is also promising in spinal cord repairing after spinal cord injury.

  15. Design and Analysis of Bionic Cutting Blades Using Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Yang, Yuwang; Guo, Li; Chen, Donghui; Sun, Hongliang; Tong, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Praying mantis is one of the most efficient predators in insect world, which has a pair of powerful tools, two sharp and strong forelegs. Its femur and tibia are both armed with a double row of strong spines along their posterior edges which can firmly grasp the prey, when the femur and tibia fold on each other in capturing. These spines are so sharp that they can easily and quickly cut into the prey. The geometrical characteristic of the praying mantis's foreleg, especially its tibia, has important reference value for the design of agricultural soil-cutting tools. Learning from the profile and arrangement of these spines, cutting blades with tooth profile were designed in this work. Two different sizes of tooth structure and arrangement were utilized in the design on the cutting edge. A conventional smooth-edge blade was used to compare with the bionic serrate-edge blades. To compare the working efficiency of conventional blade and bionic blades, 3D finite element simulation analysis and experimental measurement were operated in present work. Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the bionic serrate-edge blades showed better performance in cutting efficiency.

  16. Design and Analysis of Bionic Cutting Blades Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo; Yang, Yuwang; Guo, Li; Chen, Donghui; Sun, Hongliang; Tong, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Praying mantis is one of the most efficient predators in insect world, which has a pair of powerful tools, two sharp and strong forelegs. Its femur and tibia are both armed with a double row of strong spines along their posterior edges which can firmly grasp the prey, when the femur and tibia fold on each other in capturing. These spines are so sharp that they can easily and quickly cut into the prey. The geometrical characteristic of the praying mantis's foreleg, especially its tibia, has important reference value for the design of agricultural soil-cutting tools. Learning from the profile and arrangement of these spines, cutting blades with tooth profile were designed in this work. Two different sizes of tooth structure and arrangement were utilized in the design on the cutting edge. A conventional smooth-edge blade was used to compare with the bionic serrate-edge blades. To compare the working efficiency of conventional blade and bionic blades, 3D finite element simulation analysis and experimental measurement were operated in present work. Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the bionic serrate-edge blades showed better performance in cutting efficiency. PMID:27019583

  17. Symmetrical optical imaging system with bionic variable-focus lens for off-axis aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    A bionic variable-focus lens with symmetrical layered structure was designed to mimic the crystalline lens. An optical imaging system based on this lens and with a symmetrical structure that mimics the human eye structure was proposed. The refractive index of the bionic variable-focus lens increases from outside to inside. The two PDMS lenses with a certain thickness were designed to improve the optical performance of the optical imaging system and minimise the gravity effect of liquid. The paper presents the overall structure of the optical imaging system and the detailed description of the bionic variable-focus lens. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity, the surface curvatures of the rear PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change in the focal length. The focal length range of the optical imaging system was 20.71-24.87 mm. The optical performance of the optical imaging system was evaluated by imaging experiments and analysed by ray tracing simulations. On the basis of test and simulation results, the optical performance of the system was quite satisfactory. Off-axis aberrations were well corrected, and the image quality was greatly improved.

  18. Bionic cardiology: exploration into a wealth of controllable body parts in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Bionic cardiology is the medical science of exploring electronic control of the body, usually via the neural system. Mimicking or modifying biological regulation is a strategy used to combat diseases. Control of ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation by selective vagal stimulation, suppression of ischemia-related ventricular fibrillation by vagal stimulation, and reproduction of neurally commanded heart rate are some examples of bionic treatment for arrhythmia. Implantable radio-frequency-coupled on-demand carotid sinus stimulators succeeded in interrupting or preventing anginal attacks but were replaced later by coronary revascularization. Similar but fixed-intensity carotid sinus stimulators were used for hypertension but were also replaced by drugs. Recently, however, a self-powered implantable device has been reappraised for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. Closed-loop spinal cord stimulation has successfully treated severe orthostatic hypotension in a limited number of patients. Vagal nerve stimulation is effective in treating heart failure in animals, and a small-size clinical trial has just started. Simultaneous corrections of multiple hemodynamic abnormalities in an acute decompensated state are accomplished simply by quantifying fundamental cardiovascular parameters and controlling these parameters. Bionic cardiology will continue to promote the development of more sophisticated device-based therapies for otherwise untreatable diseases and will inspire more intricate applications in the twenty-first century.

  19. Technique for correction of lop ear.

    PubMed

    Elsahy, N I

    1990-04-01

    Various techniques of correction of lop ear have been described. Minor lop ear deformity can easily be corrected with simple excision of the overhanging auricular cartilage. Moderate and severe lop ear deformities, on the other hand, are more difficult to correct because there is actual reduction in size of the upper third of the ear in addition to the overhanging auricular cartilage. The purpose of this paper was to present a new technique used to correct the moderate lop ear deformity. In addition to excising the overhanging cartilage, I rotate a cartilage flap from the anthelix upward where the missing superior crus was supposed to be. This flap increases the vertical height of the ear and creates a new superior crus. I applied this technique on three cases of moderate lop ear deformities with good results.

  20. High-sensitive and high-efficient biochemical analysis method using a bionic electronic eye in combination with a smartphone-based colorimetric reader system.

    PubMed

    Kaiqi Su; Quchao Zou; Ning Hu; Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Bionic electronic eye (Bionic e-Eye), a developed smartphone-based colorimetric reader system, consists of smartphone or pad (iPhone 4s or iPad 3) as detection instrument and portable accessory as illumination provider, integrating with a wide-angle lens, a piece of lowest-power electro luminescent and a custom-made dark hood. A 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) was positioned on the electro luminescent and Bionic e-Eye captures the detection images by the back camera of smartphone. Being similar to human visual system, the hue, saturation and value (HSV, also called hex cone model) color model was employed in image processing algorithm of Bionic e-Eye. Optimized system dimension was determined by the system steadiness experiment of different photograph distances. Moreover, the commercially available BCA protein assay and CCK8 cell number assay were carried out to evaluate this Bionic e-Eye. Analytical performance of Bionic e-Eye had the better precision, higher sensitivity than microtiter plate reader (MTPR) and previous smartphone-based colorimetric reader for both two assays. Also, Bionic e-Eye using optical image detection had simultaneous and synchronous working mode, while MPTR using machine moving detection had asynchronous working mode in high throughput detection. Therefore, Bionic e-Eye will be an ideal point-of-care (POC) colorimetric detection device in the field of clinical application, industrial quality control, environment monitoring, and food assessment.

  1. Dominantly-inherited lop ears.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander K C; Kong, Albert Y F; Robson, W Lane M; McLeod, D Ross

    2007-10-01

    We describe a four-generation Chinese family that included five members who had an isolated bilateral lop ear anomaly. The presentation suggested a dominant mode of inheritance. The absence of male-to-male transmission does not exclude an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance. Since the phenotypic anomaly of the male proband was no more severe than the affected female members, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is most likely. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  2. The War of Jenkins’ Ear

    PubMed Central

    Graboyes, Evan M.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 1731, Spanish sailors boarded the British brig Rebecca off the coast of Cuba and sliced off the left ear of its captain, Robert Jenkins. This traumatic auriculectomy was used as a pretext by the British to declare war on Spain in 1739, a conflict that is now known as the War of Jenkins’ Ear. Here, we examine the techniques available for auricular repair at the time of Jenkins’ injury and relate them to the historical events surrounding the incident. Methods Review of relevant original published manuscripts and monographs. Results Surgeons in the mid-18th century did not have experience with repair of traumatic total auriculectomies. Some contemporary surgeons favored auricular prostheses over surgical treatment. Methods for the reconstruction of partial defects were available, and most authors advocated a local post-auricular flap instead of a free tissue transfer. Techniques for repair of defects of the auricle lagged behind those for repair of the nose. Conclusion Limitations in care of traumatic auricular defects may have intensified the significance of Jenkins’ injury and helped lead to the War of Jenkins’ Ear, but conflict between Britain and Spain was probably unavoidable due to their conflicting commercial interests in the Caribbean. PMID:23444484

  3. Superconductivity above 90 K in the square-planar compound system ABa2Cu3O(6 + x) with A = Y, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Er, and Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Wang, Y. Q.; Gao, L.; Huang, Z. J.

    1987-01-01

    Superconductivity has been found in the 90-K range in ABa2Cu3O(6 + x) with A = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Er, and Lu in addition to Y. The results suggest that the unique square-planar Cu atoms, each surrounded by four or six oxygen atoms, are crucial to the superconductivity of oxides in general. In particular, the high Tc of ABa2Cu3O(6 + x) is attributed mainly to the quasi-two-dimensional assembly of the CuO2-Ba-CuO(2 + x)Ba-CuO2 layers sandwiched between two A layers, with particular emphasis in the CuO(2 + x) layers. Higher-Tc oxides are predicted for compounds with bigger assemblies of CuO2 layers coupled by Ba layers.

  4. Superconductivity above 90 K in the square-planar compound system ABa2Cu3O(6 + x) with A = Y, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Er, and Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Wang, Y. Q.; Gao, L.; Huang, Z. J.

    1987-01-01

    Superconductivity has been found in the 90-K range in ABa2Cu3O(6 + x) with A = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Er, and Lu in addition to Y. The results suggest that the unique square-planar Cu atoms, each surrounded by four or six oxygen atoms, are crucial to the superconductivity of oxides in general. In particular, the high Tc of ABa2Cu3O(6 + x) is attributed mainly to the quasi-two-dimensional assembly of the CuO2-Ba-CuO(2 + x)Ba-CuO2 layers sandwiched between two A layers, with particular emphasis in the CuO(2 + x) layers. Higher-Tc oxides are predicted for compounds with bigger assemblies of CuO2 layers coupled by Ba layers.

  5. Dynamic bending of bionic flexible body driven by pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs) for spinning gait of quadruped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jingtao; Yu, Huangying; Wang, Tianmiao

    2016-01-01

    The body of quadruped robot is generally developed with the rigid structure. The mobility of quadruped robot depends on the mechanical properties of the body mechanism. It is difficult for quadruped robot with rigid structure to achieve better mobility walking or running in the unstructured environment. A kind of bionic flexible body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which is composed of one bionic spine and four pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs). This kind of body imitates the four-legged creatures' kinematical structure and physical properties, which has the characteristic of changeable stiffness, lightweight, flexible and better bionics. The kinematics of body bending is derived, and the coordinated movement between the flexible body and legs is analyzed. The relationship between the body bending angle and the PAM length is obtained. The dynamics of the body bending is derived by the floating coordinate method and Lagrangian method, and the driving force of PAM is determined. The experiment of body bending is conducted, and the dynamic bending characteristic of bionic flexible body is evaluated. Experimental results show that the bending angle of the bionic flexible body can reach 18°. An innovation body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which has the characteristic of flexibility and achieve bending by changing gas pressure of PAMs. The coordinated movement of the body and legs can achieve spinning gait in order to improve the mobility of quadruped robot.

  6. An intron-containing glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase gene encodes the dominant 90 kDa component of the cellulosome of the anaerobic fungus Piromyces sp. strain E2.

    PubMed Central

    Steenbakkers, Peter J M; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Goossen, Harry J A M; van Lierop, Erik M H M; van der Drift, Chris; Vogels, Godfried D; Mowbray, Sherry L; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2002-01-01

    The cellulosome produced by Piromyces sp. strain E2 during growth on filter paper was purified by using an optimized cellulose-affinity method consisting of steps of EDTA washing of the cellulose-bound protein followed by elution with water. Three dominant proteins were identified in the cellulosome preparation, with molecular masses of 55, 80 and 90 kDa. Treatment of cellulose-bound cellulosome with a number of denaturing agents was also tested. Incubation with 0.5% (w/v) SDS or 8 M urea released most cellulosomal proteins, while leaving the greater fraction of the 80, 90 and 170 kDa components. To investigate the major 90 kDa cellulosome protein further, the corresponding gene, cel9A, was isolated, using immunoscreening and N-terminal sequencing. Inspection of the cel9A genomic organization revealed the presence of four introns, allowing the construction of a consensus for introns in anaerobic fungi. The 2800 bp cDNA clone contained an open reading frame of 2334 bp encoding a 757-residue extracellular protein. Cel9A includes a 445-residue glycoside hydrolase family 9 catalytic domain, and so is the first fungal representative of this large family. Both modelling of the catalytic domain as well as the activity measured with low level expression in Escherichia coli indicated that Cel9A is an endoglucanase. The catalytic domain is succeeded by a putative beta-sheet module of 160 amino acids with unknown function, followed by a threonine-rich linker and three fungal docking domains. Homology modelling of the Cel9A dockerins suggested that the cysteine residues present are all involved in disulphide bridges. The results presented here are used to discuss evolution of glycoside hydrolase family 9 enzymes. PMID:12071852

  7. Allergic rhinitis and ear pain in flight.

    PubMed

    Ohrui, Nobuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Tong, Andrew; Iwata, Masashi; Nakamura, Akio; Ohashi, Koichiro

    2005-10-01

    Ear pain is the most common physiologic incident in hypobaric chamber training in the Japan Air Self-Defense Force, and the incidence of ear pain has been gradually increasing. There has been a concomitant increase in the incidence of allergic rhinitis in Japan. We hypothesized that the increased incidence of ear pain may be due to the increased incidence of eustachian tube dysfunction associated with allergic rhinitis. To explore whether there is an association between allergic rhinitis and ear pain experienced in hypobaric chamber training. We examined 9 years of training records and noted whether there was a seasonal influence on the occurrence of ear pain in 7047 trainees. In addition, we studied the prevalence of allergic rhinitis among trainees during a representative training year using a questionnaire method, noting association between allergic rhinitis and the occurrence of ear pain. Comprehensive review of training records showed 429 (6.1%) of 7047 trainees complained of ear pain. Ear pain occurred more often in spring than the other 3 seasons. The questionnaire data showed 202 (23.0%) of 878 trainees had allergic rhinitis. Trainees with allergic rhinitis complained of ear pain more often in the spring than trainees without allergic rhinitis. Active allergic rhinitis is closely associated with the occurrence of ear pain in hypobaric chamber training. A similar phenomenon might occur in an actual flight. Special attention should be paid to not only common cold but also allergic rhinitis in both hypobaric chamber training and actual flights.

  8. Ear canal dynamic motion as a source of power for in-ear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2013-02-01

    Ear canal deformation caused by temporomandibular joint (jaw joint) activity, also known as "ear canal dynamic motion," is introduced in this paper as a candidate source of power to possibly recharge hearing aid batteries. The geometrical deformation of the ear canal is quantified in 3D by laser scanning of different custom ear moulds. An experimental setup is proposed to measure the amount of power potentially available from this source. The results show that 9 mW of power is available from a 15 mm3 dynamic change in the ear canal volume. Finally, the dynamic motion and power capability of the ear canal are investigated in a group of 12 subjects.

  9. CT appearances of external ear canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, P N; Francis, I S; Wareing, M J; Cox, T C

    1997-09-01

    External ear canal cholesteatoma (EECC) is rare in ear, nose and throat (ENT) practice. Two cases, one bilateral, are described. Computed tomography demonstrates the extent of bony involvement. Erosion of the external canal should not be overlooked when reviewing CT of the petrous bone in cases of discharge from the ear. EECC may necessitate surgery and delay in the diagnosis of EECC can result in progressive bony destruction.

  10. Listening to Nature's orchestra with peculiar ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, David D.

    2003-04-01

    Insects use hearing for the crucial tasks of communicating with conspecifics and avoiding predators. Although all are based on the same acoustic principles, the diversity of insect ears is staggering and instructive. For instance, a South African grasshopper demonstrates that hearing conspecific calls is possible over distances 1 km with ears that do not have tympana. Actually, these creatures have six pairs of ears that play different roles in behavior. In numerical contrast, praying mantises have just a single ear in the ventral midline. The ear is very effective at detecting ultrasonic bat cries. However, the bioacoustics of sound transduction by two tympana facing each other in a deep, narrow slit is a puzzle. Tachinid flies demonstrate that directional hearing at 5 kHz is possible with a pair of ears fused together to give a total size of 1 mm. The ears are under the fly's chin. Hawk moths have their ears built into their mouthparts and the tympanum is more like a hollow ball than the usual membrane. As an apt last example, cicada ears are actually part of the orchestra: their tympana function both in sound reception and sound production.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Inner Ear Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Doris K.; Kelley, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is a structurally complex vertebrate organ built to encode sound, motion, and orientation in space. Given its complexity, it is not surprising that inner ear dysfunction is a relatively common consequence of human genetic mutation. Studies in model organisms suggest that many genes currently known to be associated with human hearing impairment are active during embryogenesis. Hence, the study of inner ear development provides a rich context for understanding the functions of genes implicated in hearing loss. This chapter focuses on molecular mechanisms of inner ear development derived from studies of model organisms. PMID:22855724

  12. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  13. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  14. Milestones in the History of Ear Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Alexander; Nicoló, Marion San

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction of ear deformities has been challenging plastic surgeons since centuries. However, it is only in the 19th century that reports on partial and total ear reconstruction start increasing. In the quest for an aesthetically pleasing and natural-looking result, surgeons worked on the perfect framework and skin coverage. Different materials and flap techniques have evolved. Some were abandoned out of frustration, while others kept evolving over the years. In this article, we discuss the milestones in ear reconstruction-from ancient times to early attempts in Western civilization to the key chapters of ear reconstruction in the 20th century leading to the current techniques.

  15. Development and Integration of the Ear.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jennifer C; Tucker, Abigail S

    2015-01-01

    The perception of our environment via sensory organs plays a crucial role in survival and evolution. Hearing, one of our most developed senses, depends on the proper function of the auditory system and plays a key role in social communication, integration, and learning ability. The ear is a composite structure, comprised of the external, middle, and inner ear. During development, the ear is formed from the integration of a number of tissues of different embryonic origin, which initiate in distinct areas of the embryo at different time points. Functional connections between the components of the hearing apparatus have to be established and maintained during development and adulthood to allow proper sound submission from the outer to the middle and inner ear. This highly organized and intimate connectivity depends on intricate spatiotemporal signaling between the various tissues that give rise to the structures of the ear. Any alterations in this chain of events can lead to the loss of integration, which can subsequently lead to conductive hearing loss, in case of outer and middle ear defects or sensorineural hearing loss, if inner ear structures are defective. This chapter aims to review the current knowledge concerning the development of the three ear compartments as well as mechanisms and signaling pathways that have been implicated in the coordination and integration process of the ear.

  16. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  17. Study on the Impact Resistance of Bionic Layered Composite of TiC-TiB2/Al from Al-Ti-B4C System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Liang, Yunhong; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Xiujuan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical property and impact resistance mechanism of bionic layered composite was investigated. Due to light weight and high strength property, white clam shell was chosen as bionic model for design of bionic layered composite. The intercoupling model between hard layer and soft layer was identical to the layered microstructure and hardness tendency of the white clam shell, which connected the bionic design and fabrication. TiC-TiB2 reinforced Al matrix composites fabricated from Al-Ti-B4C system with 40 wt. %, 50 wt. % and 30 wt. % Al contents were treated as an outer layer, middle layer and inner layer in hard layers. Pure Al matrix was regarded as a soft layer. Compared with traditional homogenous Al-Ti-B4C composite, bionic layered composite exhibited high mechanical properties including flexural strength, fracture toughness, compressive strength and impact toughness. The intercoupling effect of layered structure and combination model of hard and soft played a key role in high impact resistance of the bionic layered composite, proving the feasibility and practicability of the bionic model of a white clam shell. PMID:28773827

  18. Study on the Impact Resistance of Bionic Layered Composite of TiC-TiB₂/Al from Al-Ti-B₄C System.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Liang, Yunhong; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Xiujuan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-08-20

    Mechanical property and impact resistance mechanism of bionic layered composite was investigated. Due to light weight and high strength property, white clam shell was chosen as bionic model for design of bionic layered composite. The intercoupling model between hard layer and soft layer was identical to the layered microstructure and hardness tendency of the white clam shell, which connected the bionic design and fabrication. TiC-TiB₂ reinforced Al matrix composites fabricated from Al-Ti-B₄C system with 40 wt. %, 50 wt. % and 30 wt. % Al contents were treated as an outer layer, middle layer and inner layer in hard layers. Pure Al matrix was regarded as a soft layer. Compared with traditional homogenous Al-Ti-B₄C composite, bionic layered composite exhibited high mechanical properties including flexural strength, fracture toughness, compressive strength and impact toughness. The intercoupling effect of layered structure and combination model of hard and soft played a key role in high impact resistance of the bionic layered composite, proving the feasibility and practicability of the bionic model of a white clam shell.

  19. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward.

  20. Real-time processing of EMG signals for bionic arm purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olid Dominguez, Ferran; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is connected with the problem of prostheses, that have always been a necessity for the human being. Bio-physiological signals from muscles, electromyographic signals have been collected, analyzed and processed in order to implement a real-time algorithm which is capable of differentiation of two different states of a bionic hand: open and closed. An algorithm for real-time electromyographic signal processing with almost no false positives is presented and it is explained that in bio-physiological experiments proper signal processing is of great importance.

  1. Measurement of the Temperature Dependence of Line Mixing and Pressure Broadening Parameters between 296 and 90 K in the v3 band of 12CH4 and their Influence on Atmospheric Methane Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondelain, Didier; Payan, Sebastien; Deng, Wenping; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Hurtmans, Daniel; Mantz, Arlan W.

    2007-01-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of the nitrogen broadening, narrowing and line-mixing coefficients of four lines of the P9 manifold in the v3 band of 12CH4 for atmospheric purposes. The data were collected using our tunable diode laser (TDL) spectrometer with active wavenumber control coupled to a newly developed cold Herriott cell with a path length of 5.37 m and a temperature uniformity of better than 0.01 K along the cell. We recorded and analyzed spectra recorded at sample temperature between 90 K and room temperature. We have investigate the influence of our new results in the inversion model used to retrieve methane profiles from atmospheric spectra; our new results make it possible to retrieve significantly more precise methane profiles. The atmospheric spectra we utilized were obtained by several of us with a balloon-born Fourier Transform infrared experiment in a limb configuration. Differences up to 7% on the retrieved volume mixing ratio were found compared to an inversion model using only HITRAN04 spectroscopic parameters.

  2. Measurement of the Temperature Dependence of Line Mixing and Pressure Broadening Parameters between 296 and 90 K in the v3 band of 12CH4 and their Influence on Atmospheric Methane Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondelain, Didier; Payan, Sebastien; Deng, Wenping; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Hurtmans, Daniel; Mantz, Arlan W.

    2007-01-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of the nitrogen broadening, narrowing and line-mixing coefficients of four lines of the P9 manifold in the v3 band of 12CH4 for atmospheric purposes. The data were collected using our tunable diode laser (TDL) spectrometer with active wavenumber control coupled to a newly developed cold Herriott cell with a path length of 5.37 m and a temperature uniformity of better than 0.01 K along the cell. We recorded and analyzed spectra recorded at sample temperature between 90 K and room temperature. We have investigate the influence of our new results in the inversion model used to retrieve methane profiles from atmospheric spectra; our new results make it possible to retrieve significantly more precise methane profiles. The atmospheric spectra we utilized were obtained by several of us with a balloon-born Fourier Transform infrared experiment in a limb configuration. Differences up to 7% on the retrieved volume mixing ratio were found compared to an inversion model using only HITRAN04 spectroscopic parameters.

  3. FT-IR spectra of 90 K films of simple, mixed, and double clathrate hydrates of trimethylene oxide, methyl chloride, carbon dioxide, tetrahydrofuran, and ethylene oxide containing decoupled D/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Fleyfel, F.; Devlin, J.P.

    1988-02-11

    The spectroscopic investigation of clathrate hydrates prepared by using low-temperature thin-film techniques has been extended to several new gases. These gases have included a highly polar gas (trimethylene oxide or TMO) the simple hydrate of which grows readily from a vapor beam at 120 K, a slightly less polar gas (methyl chloride) the simple hydrate of which grows if the vapor beam is incident onto a crystalline clathrate hydrate base at 125 K, and a nonpolar gas (carbon dioxide) which apparently can only be enclathrated as the mixed hydrate by using a highly polar help gas (e.g., ethylene oxide (EtO)). These structure I hydrates as well as the structure II hydrate of tetrahydrofuran have been prepared under conditions of temperature/base-doping such that no mobile protons exist during the deposit. As a result, it has been possible to isolate intact D/sub 2/O molecules in the water network of the crystalline hydrates. The guest-molecule spectra, all obtained at 90 K, show (a) the apparent generality of the rule that guest-molecule stretching-mode frequencies decrease with an increase in cage size and (b) that the effective size of the structure I small cage increases as the size of the molecule occupying the large cage increases.

  4. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  8. Stem Cell Therapy for the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, perception of sound, motion, and balance is mediated through mechanosensory hair cells located within the inner ear. In mammals, hair cells are only generated during a short period of embryonic development. As a result, loss of hair cells as a consequence of injury, disease, or genetic mutation, leads to permanent sensory deficits. At present, cochlear implantation is the only option for profound hearing loss. However, outcomes are still variable and even the best implant cannot provide the acuity of a biological ear. The recent emergence of stem cell technology has the potential to open new approaches for hair cell regeneration. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of inner ear stem cell research from a viewpoint of its clinical application for inner ear disorders to illustrate how complementary studies have the potential to promote and refine stem cell therapies for inner ear diseases. The review initially discusses our current understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate hair cell formation from inner ear progenitors during normal development. Subsequent sections discuss the possible use of endogenous inner ear stem cells to induce repair as well as the initial studies aimed at transplanting stem cells into the ear. PMID:22514095

  9. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  10. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  11. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  12. Core collapse supernova remnants with ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Aldana; Soker, Noam

    2017-06-01

    We study the morphologies of core collapse supernova remnants (CCSNRs) and find that about third of CCSNRs in our sample have two opposite 'ears' protruding from their main shell. We assume that the ears are formed by jets, and argue that these properties are compatible with the expectation from the explosion jet feedback mechanism. Based on previous studies of ears in CCSNRs and the similarity of some ears to those found in planetary nebulae, we assume that the ears are inflated by jets that are launched during the explosion, or a short time after it. Under simple geometrical assumptions, we find that the extra kinetic energy of the ears is in the range of 1-10 per cent of the explosion energy. As not all of the kinetic energy of the jets ends in the ears, we estimate that the typical kinetic energy in the jets that inflated the ears, under our assumptions, is about 5-15 per cent of the explosion energy. This study supports a serious consideration of jet-driven core-collapse supernova mechanisms.

  13. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is…

  14. The ability to listen with independent ears.

    PubMed

    Gallun, Frederick J; Mason, Christine R; Kidd, Gerald

    2007-11-01

    In three experiments, listeners identified speech processed into narrow bands and presented to the right ("target") ear. The ability of listeners to ignore (or even use) conflicting contralateral stimulation was examined by presenting various maskers to the target ear ("ipsilateral") and nontarget ear ("contralateral"). Theoretically, an absence of contralateral interference would imply selectively attending to only the target ear; the presence of interference from the contralateral stimulus would imply that listeners were unable to treat the stimuli at the two ears independently; and improved performance in the presence of informative contralateral stimulation would imply that listeners can process the signals at both ears and keep them separate rather than combining them. Experiments showed evidence of the ability to selectively process (or respond to) only the target ear in some, but not all, conditions. No evidence was found for improved performance due to contralateral stimulation. The pattern of interference found across experiments supports an interaction of stimulus-based factors (auditory grouping) and task-based factors (demand for processing resources) and suggests that listeners may not always be able to listen to the "better" ear even when it would be beneficial to do so.

  15. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is…

  16. Cutaneous lesions of the external ear

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Sand, Daniel; Brors, Dominik; Altmeyer, Peter; Mann, Benno; Bechara, Falk G

    2008-01-01

    Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation. PMID:18261212

  17. Microbiomes of the normal middle ear and ears with chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Minami, Shujiro B; Mutai, Hideki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Horii, Arata; Oishi, Naoki; Wasano, Koichiro; Katsura, Motoyasu; Tanaka, Fujinobu; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Fujii, Masato; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to profile and compare the middle ear microbiomes of human subjects with and without chronic otitis media. Prospective multicenter cohort study. All consecutive patients undergoing tympanoplasty surgery for chronic otitis media or ear surgery for conditions other than otitis media were recruited. Sterile swab samples were collected from the middle ear mucosa during surgery. The variable region 4 of the 16S rRNA gene in each sample were amplified using region-specific primers adapted for the Illumina MiSeq sequencer (Illumina, CA, USA)). The sequences were subjected to local blast and classified using Metagenome@KIN (World Fusion, Tokyo, Japan). In total, 155 participants were recruited from seven medical centers. Of these, 88 and 67 had chronic otitis media and normal middle ears, respectively. The most abundant bacterial phyla on the mucosal surfaces of the normal middle ears were Proteobacteria, followed by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The children and adults with normal middle ears differed significantly in terms of middle ear microbiomes. Subjects with chronic otitis media without active inflammation (dry ear) had similar middle ear microbiomes as the normal middle ears group. Subjects with chronic otitis media with active inflammation (wet ear) had a lower prevalence of Proteobacteria and a higher prevalence of Firmicutes than the normal middle ears. The human middle ear is inhabited by more diverse microbial communities than was previously thought. Alteration of the middle ear microbiome may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media with active inflammation. 2b. Laryngoscope, 127:E371-E377, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Numerical analysis of ossicular chain lesion of human ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingxi; Li, Sheng; Sun, Xiuzhen

    2009-04-01

    Lesion of ossicular chain is a common ear disease impairing the sense of hearing. A comprehensive numerical model of human ear can provide better understanding of sound transmission. In this study, we propose a three-dimensional finite element model of human ear that incorporates the canal, tympanic membrane, ossicular bones, middle ear suspensory ligaments/muscles, middle ear cavity and inner ear fluid. Numerical analysis is conducted and employed to predict the effects of middle ear cavity, malleus handle defect, hypoplasia of the long process of incus, and stapedial crus defect on sound transmission. The present finite element model is shown to be reasonable in predicting the ossicular mechanics of human ear.

  19. Direct measurement of middle ear pressure through the eustachian tube.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Hayashi, M; Honjo, I

    1987-01-01

    We report a method for measuring middle ear pressure through the eustachian tube. We used a 1-mm-diameter micro-tip catheter pressure transducer (Mikro-tip) and inserted this into the tympanic cavity through the eustachian tube. In preliminary studies, we measured four normal ears, two ears with tubal dysfunction, one ear with a dry perforation and 13 ears with otitis media with effusion (OME). Among those ears with OME, three showed negative middle ear pressure, three slight positive pressure and one normal pressure. These findings suggest that our transtubal method is reliable and useful for measuring middle ear pressure.

  20. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    PubMed

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level.

  1. [Application of bionic technology to speciation analysis and bioavailability assessment of nickel in transgenic soybean].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hui; Li, Shun-Xing; Mou, Yang; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Li, Yan-Cai; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Na-Yan; Xie, He-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The safety of transgenic food has been paid the most attention to by the public and scientists. Trace metal bioavailability could provide information for safety assessment of transgenic food. The critical functional digestion and absorption in the gastrointestinal tract were simulated by bionic gastrointestinal digestion, metabolism of gut microbiota, and bionic biomembrane adsorption with liposome and then used for the pretreatment of transgenic and general soybeans. Ni speciation in the chyme was defined as affinity-liposome and water soluble Ni. Nickel bioavailability was assessed by the content of affinity-liposome Ni. Water soluble Ni was the main species of nickel complex in the chyme. Nickel bioavailability was 4.1% for transgenic soybean and 3.3% for general soybean, which could be enhanced by gastrointestinal digestion and metabolism of gut microbiota. After transgene, nickel bioavailability was increased 24% but the content of affinity-liposome Ni was 122.3 ng x g(-1) for transgenic soybean, just as 36% as that of general soybean.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamics for Bionic Oscillating Hydrofoil Based on Panel Method.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang; Liu, Yanjun; Zhang, Muqun; Ding, Hongpeng

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics model based on the Slender-Body theory is proposed from the bionic movement of real fish. The Panel method is applied to the hydrodynamic performance analysis innovatively, with the Gauss-Seidel method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations additionally, to evaluate the flexible deformation of fish in swimming accurately when satisfying the boundary conditions. A physical prototype to mimic the shape of tuna is developed with the revolutionized technology of rapid prototyping manufacturing. The hydrodynamic performance for rigid oscillating hydrofoil is analyzed with the proposed method, and it shows good coherence with the cases analyzed by the commercial software Fluent and the experimental data from robofish. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic performance of coupled hydrofoil, which consisted of flexible fish body and rigid caudal fin, is analyzed with the proposed method. It shows that the caudal fin has great influence on trailing vortex shedding and the phase angle is the key factor on hydrodynamic performance. It is verified that the shape of trailing vortex is similar to the image of the motion curve at the trailing edge as the assumption of linear vortex plane under the condition of small downwash velocity. The numerical analysis of hydrodynamics for bionic movement based on the Panel method has certain value to reveal the fish swimming mechanism.

  3. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamics for Bionic Oscillating Hydrofoil Based on Panel Method

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics model based on the Slender-Body theory is proposed from the bionic movement of real fish. The Panel method is applied to the hydrodynamic performance analysis innovatively, with the Gauss-Seidel method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations additionally, to evaluate the flexible deformation of fish in swimming accurately when satisfying the boundary conditions. A physical prototype to mimic the shape of tuna is developed with the revolutionized technology of rapid prototyping manufacturing. The hydrodynamic performance for rigid oscillating hydrofoil is analyzed with the proposed method, and it shows good coherence with the cases analyzed by the commercial software Fluent and the experimental data from robofish. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic performance of coupled hydrofoil, which consisted of flexible fish body and rigid caudal fin, is analyzed with the proposed method. It shows that the caudal fin has great influence on trailing vortex shedding and the phase angle is the key factor on hydrodynamic performance. It is verified that the shape of trailing vortex is similar to the image of the motion curve at the trailing edge as the assumption of linear vortex plane under the condition of small downwash velocity. The numerical analysis of hydrodynamics for bionic movement based on the Panel method has certain value to reveal the fish swimming mechanism. PMID:27578959

  4. Wear properties of compact graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by deep laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Na; Wang, Cheng-tao; Lin, Peng-yu; Ren, Lu-quan

    2010-08-01

    By simulating the cuticles of some soil animals, the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) processed by laser remelting gets a conspicuous improvement. In order to get a further anti-wear enhancement of CGI, a new method of deep laser cladding was used to process bionic units. By preplacing grooves then filling with WC powders and laser cladding, the bionic units had a larger dimension in depth and higher microhardness. Fe powder with different proportions from 30% (wt.) to 60% (wt.) was added into WC before laser processing for a good incorporation with CGI substrate. The improved laser cladding units turned out to induce higher wear resistance in comparison with laser remelting ones. The depth of the layer reached up to 1 mm. The results of dry sliding wear tests indicated that the specimen processed by laser cladding has a remarkable improvement than the ones processed by laser remelting. It should be noted that the wear mass loss was essentially dependent on the increase in WC proportion.

  5. Numerical simulations and vorticity dynamics of self-propelled swimming of 3D bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, ZhiQiang; Wu, ChuiJie

    2012-02-01

    Numerical simulations and the control of self-propelled swimming of three-dimensional bionic fish in a viscous flow and the mechanism of fish swimming are carried out in this study, with a 3D computational fluid dynamics package, which includes the immersed boundary method and the volume of fluid method, the adaptive multi-grid finite volume method, and the control strategy of fish swimming. Firstly, the mechanism of 3D fish swimming was studied and the vorticity dynamics root was traced to the moving body surface by using the boundary vorticity-flux theory. With the change of swimming speed, the contributions of the fish body and caudal fin to thrust are analyzed quantitatively. The relationship between vortex structures of fish swimming and the forces exerted on the fish body are also given in this paper. Finally, the 3D wake structure of self-propelled swimming of 3D bionic fish is presented. The in-depth analysis of the 3D vortex structure in the role of 3D biomimetic fish swimming is also performed.

  6. Research of bionic design on tools with rostrum of cyrtotrachelus bugueti guer (coleoptera: curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Shun; Li, Longhai; Tong, Jin; Li, Mo

    2016-12-09

    To improve the torsional resistance capability of multilayered composite pipes, a bionic design was presented based on the rostrum of Cyrtotrachelus Bugueti Guer. Morphology and mechanical properties of the weevil's rostrum were studied. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was employed to observe the macro-/microstructure and inner structure. Nanoindentation was carried out to measure the elastic modulus and the hardness of the biological materials. Based on the structure of rostrum, a mathematical model of multilayered biomimetic pipe was established with the statistical methods. Then, the 3D biomimetic cylinder was built and the torsional resistance capability was analyzed using the finite element analysis. From the SEM and nanoindentation, it was found that the rostrum is a cylindrical hollow multilayered structure composed by three materials. In the transverse section of rostrum, the materials' moduli are 3.07, 3.15, and 8.64 GPa, the hardness are 172.71, 125.32, and 278.99 MPa, respectively. In the longitudinal section, the moduli are 3.01, 4.35, and 7.66 GPa, the hardness are157.46, 149.15, and 253.51 MPa, respectively. The results of simulation showed that the distributional type of lamination has a significant effect on the torsional resistance capability of multilayered structure. The biomimetic structure, which imitates the lamination of rostrum, is superior in the aspect of torsional resistance compared with the nonlaminated or uniform laminated structure. Additionally, the bionic method is feasible and efficient.

  7. A salient information processing system for bionic eye with application to obstacle avoidance.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Ashley; Li, Yi; Barnes, Nick

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a visual processing system for bionic eye with a focus on obstacle avoidance. Bionic eye aims at restoring the sense of vision to people living with blindness and low vision. However, current hardware implant technology limits the image resolution of the electrical stimulation device to be very low (e.g., 100 electrode arrays, which is approx. 12 × 9 pixels). Therefore, we need a visual processing unit that extracts salient information in an unknown environment for assisting patients in daily tasks such as obstacle avoidance. We implemented a fully portable system that includes a camera for capturing videos, a laptop for processing information using a state-of-the-art saliency detection algorithm, and a head-mounted display to visualize results. The experimental environment consists of a number of objects, such as shoes, boxes, and foot stands, on a textured ground plane. Our results show that the system efficiently processes the images, effectively identifies the obstacles, and eventually provides useful information for obstacle avoidance.

  8. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer

    PubMed Central

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level. PMID:26826485

  9. Investigation into the efficiency of different bionic algorithm combinations for a COBRA meta-heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedova, Sh; Semenkin, E.

    2017-02-01

    Previously, a meta-heuristic approach, called Co-Operation of Biology-Related Algorithms or COBRA, for solving real-parameter optimization problems was introduced and described. COBRA’s basic idea consists of a cooperative work of five well-known bionic algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization, the Wolf Pack Search, the Firefly Algorithm, the Cuckoo Search Algorithm and the Bat Algorithm, which were chosen due to the similarity of their schemes. The performance of this meta-heuristic was evaluated on a set of test functions and its workability was demonstrated. Thus it was established that the idea of the algorithms’ cooperative work is useful. However, it is unclear which bionic algorithms should be included in this cooperation and how many of them. Therefore, the five above-listed algorithms and additionally the Fish School Search algorithm were used for the development of five different modifications of COBRA by varying the number of component-algorithms. These modifications were tested on the same set of functions and the best of them was found. Ways of further improving the COBRA algorithm are then discussed.

  10. Effects of middle-ear disorders on power reflectance measured in cadaveric ear canals

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Gabrielle R.; Horton, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Reflectance measured in the ear canal offers a noninvasive method to monitor the acoustic properties of the middle ear, and few systematic measurements exist on the effects of various middle-ear disorders on the reflectance. This work utilizes a human cadaver-ear preparation and a mathematical middle-ear model to both measure and predict how power reflectance ℛ is affected by the middle-ear disorders of static middle-ear pressures, middle-ear fluid, fixed stapes, disarticulated incudo-stapedial joint, and tympanic-membrane perforations. Design ℛ was calculated from ear-canal pressure measurements made on human-cadaver ears in the normal condition and five states: (1) positive and negative pressure in the middle-ear cavity, (2) fluid-filled middle ear, (3) stapes fixed with dental cement, (4) incudo-stapedial joint disarticulated, and (5) tympanic-membrane perforations. The middle-ear model of Kringlebotn (1988) was modified to represent the middle-ear disorders. Model predictions are compared to measurements. Results For a given disorder, the general trends of the measurements and model were similar. The changes from normal in ℛ, induced by the simulated disorder, generally depend on frequency and the extent of the disorder (except for the disarticulation). Systematic changes in middle-ear static pressure (up to ± 300 daPa) resulted in systematic increases in ℛ. These affects were most pronounced for frequencies up to 1000 to 2000 Hz. Above about 2000 Hz there were some asymmetries in behavior between negative and positive pressures. Results with fluid in the middle-ear air space were highly dependent on the percentage of the air space that was filled. Changes in ℛ were minimal when a smaller fraction of the air space was filled with fluid, and as the air space was filled with more saline, ℛ increased at most frequencies. Fixation of the stapes generally resulted in a relatively small low-frequency increase in ℛ. Disarticulation of the

  11. Internally coupled ears in living mammals.

    PubMed

    Mason, Matthew J

    2016-10-01

    It is generally held that the right and left middle ears of mammals are acoustically isolated from each other, such that mammals must rely on neural computation to derive sound localisation cues. There are, however, some unusual species in which the middle ear cavities intercommunicate, in which case each ear might be able to act as a pressure-difference receiver. This could improve sound localisation at lower frequencies. The platypus Ornithorhynchus is apparently unique among mammals in that its tympanic cavities are widely open to the pharynx, a morphology resembling that of some non-mammalian tetrapods. The right and left middle ear cavities of certain talpid and golden moles are connected through air passages within the basicranium; one experimental study on Talpa has shown that the middle ears are indeed acoustically coupled by these means. Having a basisphenoid component to the middle ear cavity walls could be an important prerequisite for the development of this form of interaural communication. Little is known about the hearing abilities of platypus, talpid and golden moles, but their audition may well be limited to relatively low frequencies. If so, these mammals could, in principle, benefit from the sound localisation cues available to them through internally coupled ears. Whether or not they actually do remains to be established experimentally.

  12. Ear cleaning: the UK and US perspective.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Tim; Cole, Lynette K

    2004-04-01

    Ear cleaning helps maintain the normal otic environment and is important in the treatment of otitis. Over cleaning, however, may trigger otitis through maceration of the epidermal lining. Simple manual cleaning is useful for routine cleansing but doesn't remove tightly adherent debris. Bulb syringes are more vigorous but may damage the ear in inexperienced hands. Devices using mains water pressure or dental machines are also available. Thorough cleaning of the ear canals and middle ear cavity can only be achieved by retrograde flushing using specially adapted catheters, feeding tubes or video otoscopes under anaesthesia. Myringotomy, inspection and cleaning of the middle should be performed if the tympanic membrane appears abnormal. There are a wide variety of cleaning fluids available. Ceruminolytics soften and dissolve cerumen to facilitate cleaning. Surfactants emulsify debris, breaking it up and keeping it in solution. Astringents dry the ear canal surface, preventing maceration. Maintaining a low pH and incorporating antimicrobial agents can inhibit microbial proliferation and glucocorticoids can be used to reduce inflammation. Adverse effects and contraindications following ear cleaning can include maceration, contact reactions, otitis media, ear canal avulsion, vestibular syndrome, Horner's syndrome, facial nerve paralysis and deafness. Care should be exercised in selecting cleaning fluids if the tympanic membranes are ruptured.

  13. A novel technique for fabricating an ear prosthesis in a patient with congenital ear deformity.

    PubMed

    Mardani, Mohammad Ali; Aminian, Gholamreza; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Hutchins, Stephen W; Head, John S

    2013-08-01

    Microtia is one of the forms of ear loss and deformity. A prosthesis that is simple to apply, and which has adequate suspension and acceptable aesthetics, can be useful in the rehabilitation of patients with this deficit and can improve the social and psychological effects of patients with ear amputation. The aim of this article was to describe a novel technique for fabricating ear prosthesis in a patient with congenital ear deformity. This method involves a novel method to produce an ear prosthesis using clips that were located within the layers of the final silicone ear. This study demonstrated ease of use and acceptance by the patient. Design and fabrication of silicone ear prosthesis via this new method of suspension could also be suitable for provision to children with ear microtia who are not yet suitable for surgery or would not be suited to other methods of suspension. The new method of suspension demonstrated that this approach could be used to provide low cost and acceptable silicone ear prosthesis for patients with microtia and partial ear amputation.

  14. Surgical Management of Ear Diseases in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Csomos, Rebecca; Bosscher, Georgia; Mans, Christoph; Hardie, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Otitis externa and media are frequently diagnosed disorders in rabbits and are particularly common in lop-eared breeds because of the specific anatomy of the ear canal. Medical management for otitis externa and media often provides only a temporary improvement in clinical signs. Surgery by means of partial or total ear canal ablation (PECA or TECA) combined with lateral bulla osteotomy (LBO) represents a feasible approach that is well tolerated and provides a good clinical outcome. Short-term complications associated with PECA/TECA-LBO include facial nerve paralysis and vestibular disease.

  15. [Ear keloid and clinical research progress].

    PubMed

    Du, Guangyuan; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Keloid refers to the damaged skin due to excessive fibroblast proliferation. Ear is one predilection site. The pathogenesis of ear keloid is not very clear, and the treatment is also varied. Surgery, postoperative radiotherapy and laser treatment, steroid hormones, pressure therapy are the basic treatment methods. Integrated application of a variety of treatments, classification research and new materials using revealed the prospect for the treatment of the disease. This thesis reviews literature about ear keloid in recent 10 years, and introduces this disease and clinical research progress.

  16. Inner ear malformations: a practical diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Mazón, M; Pont, E; Montoya-Filardi, A; Carreres-Polo, J; Más-Estellés, F

    Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss is a major cause of disability; although inner ear malformations account for only 20-40% of all cases, recognition and characterization will be vital for the proper management of these patients. In this article relevant anatomy and development of inner ear are surveyed. The role of neuroimaging in pediatric sensorineural hearing loss and cochlear preimplantation study are assessed. The need for a universal system of classification of inner ear malformations with therapeutic and prognostic implications is highlighted. And finally, the radiological findings of each type of malformation are concisely described and depicted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a crucial role in the characterization of inner ear malformations and allow the assessment of the anatomical structures that enable the selection of appropriate treatment and surgical approach. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser. PMID:28163460

  18. Mozart ear: diagnosis, treatment, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Ken; Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Saito, Tamotsu; Isogai, Noritaka; Mori, Hiromasa; Itani, Yoshihito

    2011-11-01

    Mozart ear is a congenital auricular deformity, which is mainly characterized by a bulging appearance of the anterosuperior portion of the auricle, a convexly protruded cavum conchae, and a slit-like narrowing of the orifice of the external auditory meatus. It is said to be uncommon, and because no one has yet fully described neither the disease nor the treatment, the concept of Mozart ear has not been unified. This report describes a case of a 13-year-old girl presented with an unusual congenital deformity which showed the features of Mozart ear. It is an extremely rare deformity that only about 4 clinical cases have been reported in medical literature thereby a treatment method has not been fully discussed. For surgical correction of our cases, we excised deformed conchal cartilage, turned it over, regrafted, and maintained a cosmetically positive result. We also reviewed and described the origin, current concept, and treatment method of Mozart ear.

  19. Design Factors and Use of Ear Protection*

    PubMed Central

    Rice, C. G.; Coles, R. R. A.

    1966-01-01

    The problems of protecting the ear against hazardous noise are the subject of a general review, supported where relevant by data from the authors' own researches. Ear protectors are classified into two main types−plugs and muffs—and the general principles of their function and limitations are stated. Examples of representative ear protectors are given in more detail, with particular respect to their relative merits and pure-tone attenuation characteristics. The effects of earplugs on speech communication are considered and the relationships between pure-tone attenuation and protection against continuous noise are discussed in some detail. The results of temporary threshold shift (T.T.S.) reduction studies of the efficiency of V.51R and Selectone-K earplugs in protecting against reverberant and non-reverberant impulsive noises are presented. The design requirements of ear protectors and some of the problems created by them are also outlined. Images PMID:5946129

  20. Hearing mechanics: a fly in your ear.

    PubMed

    Bechstedt, Susanne; Howard, Jonathon

    2008-09-23

    Recent work suggests that the auditory organ of Drosophila may serve as an excellent model system for understanding the complex mechanical signal processing that takes place in sensory hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear.

  1. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser.

  2. Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Andrew K; Gillespie, Lisa N

    2012-01-01

    Bionic devices electrically activate neural populations to partially restore lost function. Of fundamental importance is the functional integrity of the targeted neurons. However, in many conditions the ongoing pathology can lead to continued neural degeneration and death that may compromise the effectiveness of the device and limit future strategies to improve performance. The use of drugs that can prevent nerve cell degeneration and promote their regeneration may improve clinical outcomes. In this paper we focus on strategies of delivering neuroprotective drugs to the auditory system in a way that is safe and clinically relevant for use in combination with a cochlear implant. The aim of this approach is to prevent neural degeneration and promote nerve regrowth in order to improve outcomes for cochlear implant recipients using techniques that can be translated to the clinic. PMID:23186937

  3. Drug delivery to the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Andrew K.; Gillespie, Lisa N.

    2012-12-01

    Bionic devices electrically activate neural populations to partially restore lost function. Of fundamental importance is the functional integrity of the targeted neurons. However, in many conditions the ongoing pathology can lead to continued neural degeneration and death that may compromise the effectiveness of the device and limit future strategies to improve performance. The use of drugs that can prevent nerve cell degeneration and promote their regeneration may improve clinical outcomes. In this paper we focus on strategies of delivering neuroprotective drugs to the auditory system in a way that is safe and clinically relevant for use in combination with a cochlear implant. The aim of this approach is to prevent neural degeneration and promote nerve regrowth in order to improve outcomes for cochlear implant recipients using techniques that can be translated to the clinic.

  4. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section...

  6. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  7. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  8. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  9. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  11. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  12. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  13. Ultrasound-guided Greater Auricular Nerve Block for Emergency Department Ear Laceration and Ear Abscess Drainage.

    PubMed

    Flores, Stefan; Herring, Andrew A

    2016-04-01

    Adequate emergency department (ED) anesthesia for painful ear conditions, such as ear lacerations or ear abscesses, can be challenging. Much of the sensory innervation of the ear is supplied from the anterior and posterior branches of the greater auricular nerve (GAN). The GAN is a branch of the superficial cervical plexus, which arises from the C2/C3 spinal roots. The GAN innervation includes most of the helix, antihelix, the lobule, and the skin over the mastoid process and parotid gland. Anesthesia of the GAN is commonly performed in emergency medicine as part of a landmark-based ear "ring" block. Recently, a selective ultrasound-guided GAN block has been described. We report the first cases of ultrasound-guided greater auricular nerve block (UGANB) successfully performed in the ED as the sole procedural anesthesia for both an ear laceration and abscess drainage. In addition, we review the relevant anatomy and technical details of the procedure. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Our cases suggest that UGANB is a potentially effective nerve block for ED management of acute ear pain related to procedures involving the tail of the helix and the lobule, such as ear lacerations or ear abscess incision and drainage. Advantages include real-time visualization of the GAN that may increase block success and the decreased volume of local anesthetic required for a block. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Damage to the middle ear and the inner ear in underwater divers.

    PubMed

    Money, K E; Buckingham, I P; Calder, I M; Johnson, W H; King, J D; Landolt, J P; Laufer, J; Ludman, H

    1985-03-01

    Postmortem human tissue from recently deceased divers was processed histologically to assess any inner and middle ear damage that could have resulted from the effects of pressure during diving. The following new findings are particularly noteworthy. In one diver, ascent while breath holding resulted in the rupture of the ear drum and blood in the middle ear, in addition to pulmonary barotrauma. In a second diver, following inner ear decompression sickness, new bone growth, similar to that described earlier in experimental studies with the squirrel monkey, was observed in the arms of one of the semicircular canals. These observations are further confirmation that otologic disorders can be a serious threat to divers.

  15. Inheritance of ear wax types, ear lobe attachment and tongue rolling ability.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Gonzalez, L; Lisker, R

    1982-01-01

    The mode of inheritance of ear wax type, ear lobe attachment and tongue rolling ability were studied in 77 families with a total of 293 children. The results clearly showed that the dry ear wax type and the attached ear lobe type represent the homozygous state for two pairs of autosomal recessive genes. The evidence for the same being true regarding the lack of ability to roll the tongue was less conclusive in our material, but this could be due to difficulties in communication between the examined individuals and the examiners.

  16. [PREPARATION OF BIONIC COLLAGEN-HEPARIN SULFATE SPINAL CORD SCAFFOLD WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINT TECHNOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renkun; Tu, Yue; Zhao, Mingliang; Chen, Chong; Liang Haiqian; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Sai; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-08-01

    To prepare bionic spinal cord scaffold of collagen-heparin sulfate by three-dimensional (3-D) printing, and provide a cell carrier for tissue engineering in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Collagen- heparin sulfate hydrogel was prepared firstly, and 3-D printer was used to make bionic spinal cord scaffold. The structure was observed to measure its porosity. The scaffold was immersed in simulated body fluid to observe the quality change. The neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from fetal rat brain cortex of 14 days pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: in group A, the scaffold was co-cultured with rat NSCs for 7 days to observe cell adhesion and morphological changes; in group B, the NSCs were cultured in 24 wells culture plate precoating with poly lysine. MTT assay was used to detect the cell viability, and immunofluorescence staining was used to identify the differentiation of NSCs. Bionic spinal cord scaffold was fabricated by 3-D printer successfully. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation revealed the micro porous structure with parallel and longitudinal arrangements and with the porosity of 90.25% ± 2.15%. In vitro, the value of pH was not changed obviously. After 8 weeks, the scaffold was completely degraded, and it met the requirements of tissue engineering scaffolds. MTT results showed that there was no significant difference in absorbence (A) value between 2 groups at 1, 3, and 7 days after culture (P > 0.05). There were a lot of NSCs with reticular nerve fiber under light microscope in 2 groups; the cells adhered to the scaffold, and axons growth and neurosphere formation were observed in group A under SEM at 7 days after culture. The immunofluorescence staining observation showed that NSCs could differentiated into neurons and glial cells in 2 groups; the differentiation rate was 29.60% ± 2.68% in group A and was 10.90% ± 2.13% in group B, showing significant difference (t = 17.30, P = 0

  17. [Effects of pressure bionic culture on the morphology of corneal endothelium cells].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jin; Liang, Ling-ling; Hu, Xiao-qin; Zhou, Shi-you; Chen, Jia-qi; Xing, Zheng-mao

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effect of pressure bionic culture on the morphology and function of rabbit corneal endothelial cells. Corneal endothelial cells were separated and purified by tearing apart the descemet and digesting with trypsin and EDTA, then cultured in the plate. The cells were divided into two groups: group A were cultured under atmosphere; cells exposed to 2 kPa (14.66 mm Hg) pressure in vitro was group B; the morphology and growth pattern of cells were observed by inverted microscope; cells origin were identified by neuron-specific enolase immunoassay. Cellular changes in the structure were observed by HE staining and scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) analysis. Cells activity was detected by flow cytometry. NSE antibody of the primary corneal endothelial cells was positive without corneal epithelial cells and corneal stroma cells. Two groups of cells were cultured for 120-144 h respectively, the morphology was flat, polygon, most of cells were hexagon and abundant cytoplasms in group B (pressure bionic culture), but in group A, the cells size was not uniform and there were much granules in the cytoplasm. There was no difference in the time of formation of monolayer in two groups. SEM showed that cells exposed to pressure connected tightly and the surface was rich in microvilli, extended foot processes and attached to the substrate tightly, while cells cultured under atmosphere with more off-chip. In group B, Annexin-FITC/PI detection of apoptosis showed cell survival rate was 98.2%, early apoptosis rate was 0.7%, late apoptosis rate was 1.0%, death rate was 0.1%; the corresponding data were 92.2%, 5.2%, 2.3%, and 0.3% in group A, respectively; There was statistically significant difference between the two groups (χ(2) = 594.0, P < 0.01). After cultured for 96 h, the expression of ZO-1 protein in cells exposed to pressure was higher than those in control. The biological activity of endothelial cells is regulated positively by

  18. Binaural versus better-ear listening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpaci, Jacob W.; Durlach, N. I.; Colburn, H. Steven

    2003-04-01

    Advantages of binaural over monaural hearing in noisy environments are reduced when the monaural stimulation is derived from the monaural signal with the better signal-to-noise ratio (better-ear listening). In the reported experiments, conducted in a soundproof room with two speakers and a custom-designed, noise-cancellation headset, speech intelligibility in the presence of interference was measured for both binaural and better-ear configurations. The headset, which incorporated two microphones (located at the two ears) and two insert earphones, was used to present binaural stimulation or better-ear (better-microphone) monaural stimulation. Although the results varied significantly with the locations of the target and interference sources, the advantage of binaural listening over better-ear listening was no more than a few dB. In addition to reporting the data obtained in these experiments, relations to previous work on better-ear listening and CROS hearing aids, as well as to current work on cochlear implants, are discussed. [Work supported by NIDCD (00100).

  19. Inner ear extension of vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; Di Trapani, Giuseppe; Khrais, Tarek; Sanna, Mario

    2003-09-01

    Inner ear extension of vestibular schwannomas (VSs) is a rare finding but has important clinical implications. This report reviews the treatment options and presents the experience of the Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza, Italy, in this field. Case report and literature review. Five cases of VSs with inner ear extension were surgically removed. In all of them, the cochlea was partially or completely invaded by the lesion. In 4 cases, the inner ear extension was preoperatively identified on magnetic resonance imaging, and the surgical removal was planned through a transotic approach. In the last case, the cochlear invasion was not detected preoperatively, and the lesion was removed during a second surgery performed to seal a cerebrospinal fluid fistula. VSs with inner ear extension should be distinguished from pure intralabyrinthine schwannomas because of differences in clinical significance. Cochlear involvement is more frequent than vestibular involvement and is often accompanied by a dead ear. Dead ear caused by small VSs should alert the surgeon to the possibility of a cochlear extension. The presence of an intracochlear involvement requires the adoption of an approach that allows control of the cochlear turns, and we found the transotic approach to be the most suitable. Undetected cochlear extensions that are left in place may grow with time.

  20. Down-regulation of cell surface insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by inhibitor of 90-kDa heat-shock protein family: endoplasmic reticulum retention of monomeric insulin receptor precursor with calnexin in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Seiji; Yokoo, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Minami, Shin-Ichi; Onitsuka, Toshio; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-10-01

    Treatment (>/=6 h) of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with geldanamycin (GA) or herbimycin A (HA), an inhibitor of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) family, decreased cell surface (125)I-insulin binding. The effect of GA was concentration (EC(50) = 84 nM)- and time (t(1/2) = 8.5 h)-dependent; GA (1 microM for 24 h) lowered the B(max) value of (125)I-insulin binding by 80%, without changing the K(d) value. Western blot analysis showed that GA (>/=3 h) lowered insulin receptor (IR) level by 83% (t(1/2) = 7.4 h; EC(50) = 74 nM), while raising IR precursor level by 100% (t(1/2) = 7.9 h; EC(50) = 300 nM). Pulse-label followed by reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that monomeric IR precursor (~190 kDa) developed into the homodimeric IR precursor (approximately 380 kDa) and the mature alpha(2)beta(2) IR (~410 kDa) in nontreated cells, but not in GA-treated cells; in GA-treated cells, the homodimerization-incompetent form of monomeric IR precursor was degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot analysis showed that IR precursor was associated with calnexin (CNX) to a greater extent in GA-treated cells, compared with nontreated cells. GA had no effect on IR mRNA levels and internalization rate of cell surface IRs. In GA-treated cells, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was attenuated by 77%, with no change in IRS-1 level. Thus, inhibition of the Hsp90 family by GA or HA interrupts homodimerization of monomeric IR precursor in the ER and increases retention of monomeric IR precursor with CNX; this event retards cell surface expression of IR and attenuates insulin-induced activation of IRS-1.

  1. Alternative RNA Processing of Topoisomerase IIα in Etoposide-Resistant Human Leukemia K562 Cells: Intron Retention Results in a Novel C-Terminal Truncated 90-kDa Isoform.

    PubMed

    Kanagasabai, Ragu; Serdar, Lucas; Karmahapatra, Soumendrakrishna; Kientz, Corey A; Ellis, Justin; Ritke, Mary K; Elton, Terry S; Yalowich, Jack C

    2017-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase IIα (TOP2α) is a prominent target for anticancer drugs whose clinical efficacy is often limited by chemoresistance. Using antibody specific for the N-terminal of TOP2α, immunoassays indicated the existence of two TOP2α isoforms, 170 and 90 kDa, present in K562 leukemia cells and in an acquired etoposide (VP-16)-resistant clone (K/VP.5). TOP2α/90 expression was dramatically increased in etoposide-resistant K/VP.5 compared with parental K562 cells. We hypothesized that TOP2α/90 was the translation product of novel alternatively processed pre-mRNA, confirmed by 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, polymerase chain reaction, and sequencing. TOP2α/90 mRNA includes retained intron 19, which harbors an in-frame stop codon, and two consensus poly(A) sites. The processed transcript is polyadenylated. TOP2α/90 mRNA encodes a 90,076-Da translation product missing the C-terminal 770 amino acids of TOP2α/170, replaced by 25 unique amino acids through translation of the exon 19/intron 19 read-through. Immunoassays, utilizing antisera raised against these unique amino acids, confirmed that TOP2α/90 is expressed in both cell types, with overexpression in K/VP.5 cells. Immunodetection of complex of enzyme-to-DNA and single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assays demonstrated that K562 cells transfected with a TOP2α/90 expression plasmid exhibited reduced etoposide-mediated TOP2α-DNA covalent complexes and decreased etoposide-induced DNA damage, respectively, compared with similarly treated K562 cells transfected with empty vector. Because TOP2α/90 lacks the active site tyrosine (Tyr(805)) of full-length TOP2α, these results strongly suggest that TOP2α/90 exhibits dominant-negative properties. Further studies are underway to characterize the mechanism(s) by which TOP2α/90 plays a role in acquired resistance to etoposide and other TOP2α targeting agents. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Comparative inhibition by hard and soft metal ions of steroid-binding capacity of renal mineralocorticoid receptor cross-linked to the 90-kDa heat-shock protein heterocomplex.

    PubMed Central

    Galigniana, M D; Piwien-Pilipuk, G

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the inhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo of several metal ions on aldosterone binding to the rat kidney mineralocorticoid receptor with the purpose of assessing possible toxic effects of those ions on sodium retention, as well as to obtain information on receptor structural requirements for ligand binding. For the assays in vitro, the inhibitory effects of 20 metal ions were analysed on steroid-binding capacity for renal receptor cross-linked to 90-kDa heat-shock protein (hsp90) by pretreatment with dimethyl pimelimidate. Cross-linking prevented the artifactual dissociation of hsp90 (and, consequently, the loss of steroid binding) from the mineralocorticoid receptor due to the presence of high concentrations of salt in the incubation medium. Cross-linked heterocomplex showed no difference in ligand specificity and affinity with respect to native receptor, but increased stability upon thermal- or ionic-strength-induced destabilization was observed. Treatments in vitro with metal ions in the range 10(-8)-10(-1) M resulted in a differential inhibitory effect for each particular ion on aldosterone binding. Using the negative logarithm of metal concentration for 50% inhibition, the ions could be correlated with their Klopman hardness constants. The analysis of this relationship led us to postulate three types of reaction: with thiol, imidazole and carboxyl groups. The essential role played by these residues in steroid binding was confirmed by chemical modification of cysteines with dithionitrobenzoic acid, histidines with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acidic amino acids with Woodward's reagent (N-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulphonate). Importantly, the toxic effects of some metal ions were also observed by treatments in vivo of adrenalectomized rats on both steroid-binding capacity and aldosterone-dependent sodium-retaining properties. We suggest that those amino acid residues are involved in the activation process of the mineralocorticoid receptor upon

  3. Hemocompatibility research on the micro-structure surface of a bionic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xia; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhou, Ming; Cai, Lan

    2014-01-01

    In order to study how the geometric parameters and shape of the micro-structure surface of a bionic heart valve affects hemocompatibility, mastoid micro-structures with different periodic space were fabricated using a femtosecond laser on a polyurethane (PU) surface. The apparent contact angles of droplets on the micro-structure surfaces were measured to characterize their wettability. Then a series of blood compatibility experiments, including platelet adhesion, dynamic coagulation and hemolysis were completed. The experimental results showed that the micro-structure on the biomaterial surface helped improve its hydrophobicity and hemocompatibility. Also, the periodic space affected not only the hydrophobicity but also the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial. With the increasing of the periodic space, the apparent contact angle increased, the number of platelet adhesion decreased, the dynamic clotting time became longer and the hemolysis ratio reduced. In addition, the shape of the micro-structure also affected the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial.

  4. Contact pressure distribution of chemical mechanical polishing based on bionic polishing pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xing, Xue-Ling; Lu, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Liao-Yuan

    2010-12-01

    In order to improve the uniformity of the contact pressure distribution of chemical mechanical polishing, based on the Winkler foundation principle of mechanics and phyllotaxis theory of biology, a kind of stannum fixed abrasive pad with bionic surface texture has been designed, and the contact mechanism and ANSYS model have been established. By the calculating and analysis of contact pressure distribution on polishing wafer, the contact pressure distribution and the effects of the geometrical and physical parameters polishing pad on the contact pressure distributions have been obtained. The results show that the horizontal effect of the polishing pad is very small, the uniformity of contact pressure distribution can be improved, and there are the phyllotactic parameters which make the contact pressure distribution more uniformity.

  5. The potential of the second sight system bionic eye implant for partial sight restoration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yvonne Hsu-Lin; Fukushige, Eka; Da Cruz, Lyndon

    2016-07-01

    Second Sight System bionic eye implant, a commercially available visual prosthesis developed by Second Sight Medical Products, has been implanted in over 125 patients with outer retinal dystrophies such as retinitis pigmentosa. The system has gained regulatory approval in both the USA and Europe, and aims to restore vision by electrical stimulation of the nerve cells of the inner retina. In this review, we present the safety profile of this implant from the international clinical trial and discuss the nature and levels of improvement in visual function achieved by patients implanted with the system. Expert commentary: Future developments for the system will be explored following the discussion of the current usefulness of the device, its limitation as and the areas in which further development is necessary.

  6. Acquired ear canal cholesteatoma in congenital aural atresia/stenosis.

    PubMed

    Casale, Garrett; Nicholas, Brian D; Kesser, Bradley W

    2014-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of external auditory canal (EAC) stenosis in patients with congenital aural atresia (CAA) and the prevalence of acquired ear canal cholesteatoma in patients with EAC stenosis and to identify risk factors that may predict the presence of ear canal cholesteatoma in those patients. Retrospective chart review. University tertiary referral center. Patients with EAC stenosis with and without acquired ear canal cholesteatoma were identified from the medical records of 673 patients (770 ears) with CAA. Demographic data, symptoms at presentation, and audiometric data were compared between those with and those without cholesteatoma to identify the risk factors for the presence of ear canal cholesteatoma. Of the 770 ears evaluated, 101 (13.1%) were found to have at least 1 stenotic ear canal. Of this group of 101 ears with canal stenosis, 18 of 94 ears (7 ears were missing data; 19.1%) had a concurrent cholesteatoma, with 1 patient having bilateral cholesteatomas. Demographic, clinical, and audiometric parameters showed that only female sex was associated with a higher rate of ear canal cholesteatoma. Within the cholesteatoma group, right ears in female patients and left ears in male patients predominated. Approximately 1 in 5 patients with congenital aural stenosis were found to have ear canal cholesteatoma. Female sex is a risk factor; basic audiometric parameters provide no diagnostic utility in distinguishing ears with cholesteatoma from those without cholesteatoma.

  7. A new time-adaptive discrete bionic wavelet transform for enhancing speech from adverse noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Sumithra; Duraisamy, Prakash; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2012-04-01

    Automatic speech processing systems are widely used in everyday life such as mobile communication, speech and speaker recognition, and for assisting the hearing impaired. In speech communication systems, the quality and intelligibility of speech is of utmost importance for ease and accuracy of information exchange. To obtain an intelligible speech signal and one that is more pleasant to listen, noise reduction is essential. In this paper a new Time Adaptive Discrete Bionic Wavelet Thresholding (TADBWT) scheme is proposed. The proposed technique uses Daubechies mother wavelet to achieve better enhancement of speech from additive non- stationary noises which occur in real life such as street noise and factory noise. Due to the integration of human auditory system model into the wavelet transform, bionic wavelet transform (BWT) has great potential for speech enhancement which may lead to a new path in speech processing. In the proposed technique, at first, discrete BWT is applied to noisy speech to derive TADBWT coefficients. Then the adaptive nature of the BWT is captured by introducing a time varying linear factor which updates the coefficients at each scale over time. This approach has shown better performance than the existing algorithms at lower input SNR due to modified soft level dependent thresholding on time adaptive coefficients. The objective and subjective test results confirmed the competency of the TADBWT technique. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is also evaluated for speaker recognition task under noisy environment. The recognition results show that the TADWT technique yields better performance when compared to alternate methods specifically at lower input SNR.

  8. A bio-inspired test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Xu, Lei; Fu, Qiang; Yuan, Gang

    2013-04-01

    Recently, prosthetic knees in the developing stage are usually tested by installing them on amputees' stumps directly or on above-knee prostheses (AKPs) test platforms. Although amputees can fully provide the actual motion state of the thigh, immature prosthetic knees may hurt amputees. For AKPs test platforms, it just can partly simulate the actual motion state of the thigh with limitation of the motion curve of the thigh, the merits or demerits of newly developed bionic above-knee prosthetic knees cannot be accessed thoroughly. Aiming at the defects of two testing methods, this paper presents a bio-inspired AKPs test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees. The proposed bio-inspired AKPs test system is composed of a AKPs test platform, a control system, and a bio-inspired system. The AKPs test platform generates the motion of the thigh simulation mechanism (TSM) via two screw pairs with servo motors. The bio-inspired system includes the tester and the bio-inspired sensor wore by the tester. The control system, which is inspired by the bio-inspired system, generates the control command signal to move the TSM of the AKPs test platform. The bio-inspired AKPs test system is developed and experimentally tested with a commercially available prosthetic knee. The research results show that the bio-inspired AKPs test system can not only ensure the safety of the testers, but also track all kinds of the actual motion state of the thigh of the testers in real time.

  9. Structure and function of the mammalian middle ear. I: Large middle ears in small desert mammals.

    PubMed

    Mason, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Many species of small desert mammals are known to have expanded auditory bullae. The ears of gerbils and heteromyids have been well described, but much less is known about the middle ear anatomy of other desert mammals. In this study, the middle ears of three gerbils (Meriones, Desmodillus and Gerbillurus), two jerboas (Jaculus) and two sengis (elephant-shrews: Macroscelides and Elephantulus) were examined and compared, using micro-computed tomography and light microscopy. Middle ear cavity expansion has occurred in members of all three groups, apparently in association with an essentially 'freely mobile' ossicular morphology and the development of bony tubes for the middle ear arteries. Cavity expansion can occur in different ways, resulting in different subcavity patterns even between different species of gerbils. Having enlarged middle ear cavities aids low-frequency audition, and several adaptive advantages of low-frequency hearing to small desert mammals have been proposed. However, while Macroscelides was found here to have middle ear cavities so large that together they exceed brain volume, the bullae of Elephantulus are considerably smaller. Why middle ear cavities are enlarged in some desert species but not others remains unclear, but it may relate to microhabitat. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  10. Prolonged Radiant Exposure of the Middle Ear during Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Dedmon, Matthew M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Cohen, Michael S; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides a high-resolution, wide-field view of the middle ear compared with the conventional operating microscope, reducing the need for a postauricular incision or mastoidectomy. Our group has shown in cadaveric human temporal bone studies that radiant energy from the endoscope tip can quickly elevate temperatures of the tympanic cavity. Elevated temperatures of the middle ear are associated with acute auditory brainstem response shifts in animal models. In EES, proposed methods to decrease middle ear temperature include frequent removal of the endoscope and the use of suction to rapidly dissipate heat; however, the routine application of such cooling techniques remains unknown. Herein, we aim to quantify the duration that the tympanic cavity is typically exposed to the endoscope during routine endoscopic middle ear surgery. We find that the tympanic cavity is exposed to the endoscope without a cooling mechanism for a prolonged period of time.

  11. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  12. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  13. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui Ren, Luquan; Liang, Yunhong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  14. Passive and active middle ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Besides eradication of chronic middle ear disease, the reconstruction of the sound conduction apparatus is a major goal of modern ear microsurgery. The material of choice in cases of partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is the autogenous ossicle. In the event of more extensive destruction of the ossicular chain diverse alloplastic materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, plastics or composits are used for total reconstruction. Their specialised role in conducting sound energy within a half-open implant bed sets high demands on the biocompatibility as well as the acoustic-mechanic properties of the prosthesis. Recently, sophisticated titanium middle ear implants allowing individual adaptation to anatomical variations are widely used for this procedure. However, despite modern developments, hearing restoration with passive implants often faces its limitations due to tubal-middle-ear dysfunction. Here, implantable hearing aids, successfully used in cases of sensorineural hearing loss, offer a promising alternative. This article reviews the actual state of affairs of passive and active middle ear implants. PMID:22073102

  15. Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact hair cells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature that emerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a large variety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements.

  16. Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact hair cells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature that emerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a large variety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements.

  17. Assessment of Ear Disorders Using Power Reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Rosowski, John J.; Shahnaz, Navid; Voss, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of various pathologies on power reflectance (PR) and absorbance measured in human adults. The pathologies studied include those affecting the tympanic membrane, the middle-ear ossicles, the middle-ear cavity, the inner ear, and intracranial pressure. Interesting pathology-induced changes in PR that are statistically significant have been reported. Nevertheless, because measurements of PR obtained from normal-hearing subjects have large variations and some pathology-induced changes are small, it can be difficult to use PR alone for differential diagnosis. There are, however, common clinical situations without reliable diagnostic methods that can benefit from PR measurements. These conditions include ears with a normal-appearing tympanic membrane, aerated middle-ear cavity and unknown etiology of conductive hearing loss. PR measurements in conjunction with audiometric measurements of air-bone gap have promise in differentiating among stapes fixation, ossicular discontinuity and superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Another possible application is to monitor an individual for possible changes in intracranial pressure. Descriptions of mechanisms affecting PR change and utilization of PR measurements in clinical scenarios are presented. PMID:23900180

  18. [Imaging and audiology analysis of the congenital inner ear malformations].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bao; Lin, Shaolian; Lin, Youhui; Fang, Zheming; Ye, Shengnan; Zhang, Rong

    2015-11-01

    To investigate imaging and audiology features of temporal bone and analyze the classification and prevalence of inner ear abnormalities in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Children who were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss were examined by high resolution CT and the inner ear fluid of MRI. And each chart was retrospectively reviewed to determine the imaging and audiology features. There were 125 patients(232 ears) found with inner ear malformation in 590 children with SNHL. About 21.71% of the inner ear malformation occurred in severe and profound hearing loss ears, and 12.85% occurred in r moderate hearing loss ears. The inner ear malformation rate in normal hearing ears were 13.59%. CT and MRI examinations of temporal bone are important diagnostic tools to indentify inner ear malformations. Inner ear malformations are almost bilateral and hearing loss are profoud. Cochleo-vestibular malformations and large vestibular aqueduct are the 2 most frequent deformities. Among the children with SNHL, deformity rate in the severe and profound hearing loss ears is higher than that in moderate hearing loss ear. Inner ear malformations can exist in people with normal hearing.

  19. Bilateral Meniere's disease assessed by an inner ear test battery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Hsuan; Young, Yi-Ho

    2015-03-01

    An inner ear test battery may suggest bilateral involvement and aid in 'grading' of potential disease in a patient with actively symptomatic Meniere's disease (MD). This study applied an inner ear test battery in patients with bilateral MD to map the inner ear deficits in each ear. From 2009 to 2012, 100 (20%) of 498 MD patients were diagnosed with bilateral involvement, which was defined as established MD in one ear, and the opposite ear had inner ear symptoms combined with documented hearing loss. Each patient underwent audiometry, and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), cervical VEMP (cVEMP), and caloric tests. Grading of inner ear deficits was based on the number of abnormal results in the inner ear test battery. Of 100 patients with bilateral MD, 54% had the same grade and 46% had different grades in their 2 ears. On the other hand, based on four-tone average, 79% had the same Meniere stage and 21% had different stages in their two ears. The difference between ears with asymmetric grades (46%) and ears with asymmetric stages (21%) accounts for 25% of bilateral MD patients, which may be caused by the saccular hydrops in the opposite ear.

  20. [Study on the acid hydrolysis, fiber remodeling and bionics mineralization of rat tail tendon collagen type Ⅰ].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Zhang, Chun; Guo, Qiaofeng

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To produce bionic bone material that is consistent with human bone in chemical composition and molecular structure using rat tail tendon collagen type Ⅰ. Methods: The type Ⅰcollagen derived from rat tail was extracted by acetic acid to form collagen fibers. The reconstructed collagen fibers were placed in the mineralized solution to mimic bone mineralization for 2-6 days. Bone mineralization was observed by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction.Results: Collagen fibers with characteristic D-Band structure were reconstructed by using rat tail tendon collagen type Ⅰ extracted with acid hydrolysis method. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that calcium hydroxyapatite precursor infiltrated into the collagen fibers, and the collagen fibers were partially mineralized after 2 days of mineralization; the collagen fibers were completely mineralized and bionic bone material of typeⅠ collagen/calcium hydroxyapatite was formed after 6 days of mineralization.Conclusion: The collagen type Ⅰ can be extracted from rat tail tendon by acid hydrolysis method, and can be reformed and mineralized to form the bionic bone material which mimics human bone in chemical composition and the molecular structure.

  1. Effects of bionic units on the fatigue wear of gray cast iron surface with different shapes and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-kai; Lu, Shu-chao; Song, Xi-bin; Zhang, Haifeng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-03-01

    To improve the fatigue wear resistance of gray cast iron (GCI), GCI samples were modified by a laser to imitate the unique structure of some soil animals alternating between soft and hard phases; the hard phase resists the deformation and the soft phase releases the deformation. Using the self-controlled fatigue wear test method, the fatigue wear behaviors of treated and untreated samples were investigated and compared experimentally. The results show that the bionic non-smooth surface obtains a beneficial effect on improving the fatigue wear resistance of a sample, and the fatigue wear resistance of the bionic sample assembled with reticulate units (60°+0°), whose mass loss was reduced by 62%, was superior to the others. Meanwhile, a finite element (FE) was used to simulate the compression and the distributions of strain and stress on the non-smooth surface was inferred. From these results, we understood that the functions of the bionic unit such as reducing strain and stress, and also obstructing the closure and propagation of cracks were the main reasons for improving the fatigue wear property of GCI.

  2. Endoscopic anatomy of the pediatric middle ear.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, otologists have aimed to produce a clean, dry, safe ear with the best possible hearing result. More recently, "less invasively" has been added to this list of goals. The development of small-diameter, high-quality rigid endoscopes and high-definition video systems has made totally endoscopic, transcanal surgery a reality in adult otology and a possibility in pediatric otology. This article reviews the anatomy of the pediatric middle ear and its surrounding airspaces and structures based on the work of dozens of researchers over the past 50 years. It will focus on the developmental changes in ear anatomy from birth through the first decade, when structure and function change most rapidly. Understanding the limits and possibilities afforded by new endoscopic technologies, the pediatric otologist can strive for results matching or exceeding those achieved by more invasive surgical approaches.

  3. [Bone Conduction and Active Middle Ear Implants].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Thomas, J P; Dazert, S

    2016-05-01

    The majority of patients with moderate to severe hearing loss can be supplied with conventional hearing aids depending on severity and cause for hearing loss in a satisfying way. However, some patients either do not benefit enough from conventional hearing aids or cannot wear them due to inflammatory reactions and chronic infections of the external auditory canal or due to anatomical reasons. For these patients there are fully- and semi-implantable middle ear and bone conduction implants available. These devices either directly stimulate the skull (bone conduction devices), middle ear structures (active middle ear implants) or the cochlea itself (direct acoustic stimulation). Patients who failed surgical hearing rehabilitation or do not benefit from conventional hearing aids may achieve a significant better speech understanding and tremendous improvement in quality of life by implantable hearing devices with careful attention to the audiological and anatomical indication criteria. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Precise individualized armature for ear reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenhouse, Raymond J.; Chen, Xiaoming

    1991-04-01

    The cosmetic result of an ear restored surgically or via prosthetics is dependent on the surgeon''s ability to carve a precise cartilage armature at the time of surgery or the prosthetist''s ability to sculpt in wax an exact duplicate of the patient''s " missing" ear. Introducing CAD/CAM technology into the process benefits the esthetic outcome of these procedures. By utilizing serial section information derived from CAT MRI or moulage techniques a mirrorimage of the patient''s " donor" ear is generated. The resulting earform data is then used for the design of a cartilage armature produced by multi-axis milling or to produce by stereolithography a model which serves as the basis for a prosthesis.

  5. Endoscopic ear surgery - a complement to microscopic ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Preyer, S

    2017-01-01

    Wullstein, the founder of modern microscopic ear surgery, already used an oto-endoscope intraoperatively. However, it is only after the recent development of modern video-endoscopy with high-definition, 4K, and 3‑dimensional imaging that endoscopically guided surgery of the middle ear is gaining some importance. Key ventilation routes like the isthmus tympani and the epitympanic diaphragm can be visualized far better using an endoscope than with a microscope. Going through the external meatus, surgery of middle ear pathologies is possible without external incision. This type of primary endoscopic ear surgery has to be distinguished from secondary endoscopic ear surgery, where standard microscopic ear surgery is supplemented by endoscopic surgery. Having to hold the endoscope in one hand, surgery has to be performed single-handedly, which is awkward. In cases of extensive bone removal or excessive bleeding, the view through the endoscope lens is obscured; therefore; the endoscope cannot fully substitute the microscope. It is, however, an interesting adjunct to microscopic ear surgery.

  6. Middle ear cholesteatoma in 11 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Greci, Valentina; Travetti, Olga; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Lombardo, Rocco; Giudice, Chiara; Banco, Barbara; Mortellaro, Carlo M.

    2011-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a rare condition in dogs with chronic otitis. Otorrhea, otodinia, and pain on temporomandibular joint palpation are the most common clinical signs. Neurological abnormalities are often detectable. Computed tomography reveals the presence of an expansive and invasive unvascularized lesion involving the tympanic cavity and the bulla, with little or no contrast enhancement after administration of contrast mediu. Video-otoscopy may detect pearly growth or white/yellowish scales in the middle ear cavity. Surgery is the only therapy but is associated with a high risk of recurrence. PMID:22131579

  7. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  8. Systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and reconstructive ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Carlin, W V; Lesser, T H; John, D G; Fielder, C; Carrick, D G; Thomas, P L; Hill, S

    1987-12-01

    This paper reports a multicentre, controlled, blind, prospective, randomized study into the use of prophylactic systemic antibiotics in myringoplasty surgery. Seventy-one individuals were clinically and bacteriologically assessed both preoperatively, and for a period of 8 weeks postoperatively. The results showed that antibiotic prophylaxis did not eradicate bacterial pathogens already present in preoperative ears, nor did it prevent their development during the postoperative period. The observation that an ear was wet or dry gave no indication of the actual presence or absence of pathogenic organisms.

  9. Modeling of sound transmission from ear canal to cochlea.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Reeves, Brian P; Wang, Xuelin

    2007-12-01

    A 3-D finite element (FE) model of the human ear consisting of the external ear canal, middle ear, and cochlea is reported in this paper. The acoustic-structure-fluid coupled FE analysis was conducted on the model which included the air in the ear canal and middle ear cavity, the fluid in the cochlea, and the middle ear and cochlea structures (i.e., bones and soft tissues). The middle ear transfer function such as the movements of tympanic membrane, stapes footplate, and round window, the sound pressure gain across the middle ear, and the cochlear input impedance in response to sound stimulus applied in the ear canal were derived and compared with the published experimental measurements in human temporal bones. The frequency sensitivity of the basilar membrane motion and intracochlear pressure induced by sound pressure in the ear canal was predicted along the length of the basilar membrane from the basal turn to the apex. The satisfactory agreements between the model and experimental data in the literature indicate that the middle ear function was well simulated by the model and the simplified cochlea was able to correlate sound stimulus in the ear canal with vibration of the basilar membrane and pressure variation of the cochlear fluid. This study is the first step toward the development of a comprehensive FE model of the entire human ear for acoustic-mechanical analysis.

  10. [An ear thermometer based on infrared thermopiles sensor].

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyuan; Qian, Mingli

    2013-09-01

    According to the development of body temperature measurement mode, an ear thermometer with infrared thermopiles sensor is designed for body thermometry Compared with oral thermometer, the accuracy of ear thermometer is acceptable.

  11. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recurrent tinnitus, whether the sound is perceived in one ear, both ears, or in the head. Note (3): Do not evaluate objective tinnitus (in which the sound is audible to other people and has a definable cause...

  12. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recurrent tinnitus, whether the sound is perceived in one ear, both ears, or in the head. Note (3): Do not evaluate objective tinnitus (in which the sound is audible to other people and has a definable cause...

  13. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recurrent tinnitus, whether the sound is perceived in one ear, both ears, or in the head. Note (3): Do not evaluate objective tinnitus (in which the sound is audible to other people and has a definable cause...

  14. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity ... self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, and ...

  15. Acoustics of the human middle-ear air space.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Cara E; Voss, Susan E

    2005-08-01

    The impedance of the middle-ear air space was measured on three human cadaver ears with complete mastoid air-cell systems. Below 500 Hz, the impedance is approximately compliance-like, and at higher frequencies (500-6000 Hz) the impedance magnitude has several (five to nine) extrema. Mechanisms for these extrema are identified and described through circuit models of the middle-ear air space. The measurements demonstrate that the middle-ear air space impedance can affect the middle-ear impedance at the tympanic membrane by as much as 10 dB at frequencies greater than 1000 Hz. Thus, variations in the middle-ear air space impedance that result from variations in anatomy of the middle-ear air space can contribute to inter-ear variations in both impedance measurements and otoacoustic emissions, when measured at the tympanic membrane.

  16. Decline in Kids' Ear Infections Linked to Pneumococcal Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_167649.html Decline in Kids' Ear Infections Linked to Pneumococcal Vaccine The shots are ... MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- American kids' ear infections dropped threefold over 10 years, compared to ...

  17. Modeling Ear-Canal Acoustics, Incorporating Visco-Thermal Effects and the Influence of the Middle Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowdy, Lauren E.; Withnell, Robert H.

    2011-11-01

    The ear canal, below about 6 kHz, is well described by a uniform cylinder (sound propagates predominantly as plane waves) with the middle ear being a non-rigid termination. A non-rigid termination can be viewed as altering, as a function of frequency, the acoustic length and radius of the cylinder. It is generally assumed that sound transmission in the ear canal over this frequency range is lossless. This paper presents a method for calculating the influence of visco-thermal losses and the middle ear on ear canal acoustics. The acoustic input impedance was derived from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal and then a nonlinear least-square-fit to the data with a one-dimensional model incorporating visco-thermal losses generated length, radius, and middle ear impedance parameters. It was found that a rigid wall assumption for visco-thermal calculations was insufficient to account for damping in the ear canal. The properties of the ear canal wall (not being a rigid, low-friction surface), incorporated into visco-thermal losses as a scaling factor, provided a better fit to the data. Viscous and thermal losses were both found to affect sound propagation in the ear canal, viscous losses being more significant, altering the acoustic input impedance of the ear primarily in the region of the standing wave frequency. The model data suggests that the middle ear influences ear canal acoustics up to about 3 kHz.

  18. Effects of ear canal static pressure on the dynamic behaviour of outer and middle ear in newborns.

    PubMed

    Aithal, Venkatesh; Kei, Joseph; Driscoll, Carlie; Murakoshi, Michio; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigated the effect of ear canal pressure on the dynamic behaviour of the outer and middle ear in newborns with and without a conductive condition using the sweep frequency impedance (SFI) technology. A test battery consisting of automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) and 1000-Hz tympanometry (HFT) was performed on 122 ears of 86 healthy newborns and 10 ears of 10 newborns with a conductive condition (failed TEOAE and HFT). The dynamic behaviour of the outer and middle ear, when the pressure applied to the ear canal was varied from 200 to -200daPa, was evaluated in terms of the sound pressure level (SPL) in the ear canal, resonance frequency (RF) and displacement (ΔSPL). Application of either a positive or negative static pressure to the ear canal of healthy newborns increased the resonance frequency of the outer (RF1) and middle ear (RF2), but decreased the displacements of the outer (ΔSPL1) and middle ear (ΔSPL2). Positive static pressures resulted in lower SPL while negative static pressures resulted in higher SPL than that at ambient pressure (0daPa). At -200daPa, more than 90% of ears showed signs of collapsed ear canal. The dynamic behaviour under various positive and negative static pressures for newborn ears with a conductive condition indicated similar pattern of SPL, RF1 and ΔSPL1 responses for the outer ear as per healthy ears, but abnormal responses for the middle ear. While both positive and negative pressures applied to the ear canal have the same effect of stiffening the outer and middle ear, negative pressure of up to -200daPa resulted in more than 90% of ears with a collapsed ear canal. The results of the present study do not only offer useful clinical information for differentiating healthy ears from ears with a conductive condition, but also provide information on the maturation aspects of the outer and middle ear in newborns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  19. Middle Ear Implantable Hearing Devices: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, David S.; Young, Jadrien A.; Wanna, George B.; Glasscock, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Hearing loss affects approximately 30 million people in the United States. It has been estimated that only approximately 20% of people with hearing loss significant enough to warrant amplification actually seek assistance for amplification. A significant interest in middle ear implants has emerged over the years to facilitate patients who are noncompliant with conventional hearing aides, do not receive significant benefit from conventional aides, or are not candidates for cochlear implants. From the initial studies in the 1930s, the technology has greatly evolved over the years with a wide array of devices and mechanisms employed in the development of implantable middle ear hearing devices. Currently, these devices are generally available in two broad categories: partially or totally implantable using either piezoelectric or electromagnetic systems. The authors present an up-to-date overview of the major implantable middle ear devices. Although the current devices are largely in their infancy, indications for middle ear implants are ever evolving as promising studies show good results. The totally implantable devices provide the user freedom from the social and practical difficulties of using conventional amplification. PMID:19762429

  20. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Getting Teens to Read with Their Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fues, Marianne Cole

    2009-01-01

    Audiobooks have been around for years in various formats, like cassette tapes and CDs. This article describes a new type of audiobook on the market which is generating an interest in "reading." The device, called Playaway, is the size of a MP3 player and comes with a lanyard and ear buds. Buttons on the back of the player control the…

  2. Play It by Ear. Hearing Conservation Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Dianne R.

    This curriculum was designed to help teachers teach their fourth-grade students about hearing and the effects of loud noises on hearing. The program describes the human ear and how it works, explains the health effects of noise, and offers ways for students to protect their hearing from unsafe noise levels. Students are taught how hearing is…

  3. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  4. Getting Teens to Read with Their Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fues, Marianne Cole

    2009-01-01

    Audiobooks have been around for years in various formats, like cassette tapes and CDs. This article describes a new type of audiobook on the market which is generating an interest in "reading." The device, called Playaway, is the size of a MP3 player and comes with a lanyard and ear buds. Buttons on the back of the player control the…

  5. Keep Your Ear-Lids Open.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrington, Gary

    1994-01-01

    This article suggests that the development of listening skills should extend to the "soundscape" of nonspeech acoustical information. It presents a model for effective aural processing, identifies categories of information obtained from nonverbal sound, and explores "ear-tuning" or listening exercises that use sound to glean…

  6. Optimum management of the discharging ear.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, J; Bickerton, R C

    1992-02-01

    Discharge from the ear can be the result of many disease processes. The ear may discharge blood, pus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or wax. Keratosis obturans, stenosis of the external meatus and benign tumours of the external meatus all lead to wax build-up, which may cause recurrent attacks of otitis externa. Malignant tumours, such as basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and tumours of ceruminous gland origin may also present with discharge. Tumours should be excluded by submitting all material removed from the external canal for histological examination. Single or multiple abscesses (known as furuncles) may occur in the hair follicles in the skin of the external acoustic meatus (EAM). Compulsive scratching, hearing aids and foreign bodies placed in the ear predispose to otitis externa, which is also often associated with infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and faecal organisms. Management may be with aluminium acetate 14%, topical antibiotic/steroid drops, a gauze wick soaked with icthammol 10% in glycerin or polymyxin B sulphate--neomycin sulphate--hydrocortisone acetate cream placed into the EAM and replaced every 24 to 48 hours, or systemic antibiotics according to severity. Malignant (necrotising) otitis externa causes progressive destruction of the temporal bone, and cranial nerve palsies (usually facial first). Treatment is limited debridement of infected bone, accompanied by intravenous aminoglycosides, and local antibiotic treatment and aural cleanout or oral ciprofloxacin. Middle ear conditions causing discharge include acute otitis media, infected grommets, traumatic perforations and chronic suppurative otitis media, as well as tumours of the ear canal skin and middle ear, radiation-induced otitis externa and osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone, tuberculosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, spontaneous or post-traumatic CSF leaks, Wegeners granulomatosis and immune deficiency states. Topical application of aminoglycoside

  7. Role of skeletal muscle in ear development.

    PubMed

    Rot, Irena; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Costain, Willard J; Hong, Paul; Tafra, Robert; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Mrduljas-Djujic, Natasa; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Kablar, Boris

    2017-03-08

    The current paper is a continuation of our work described in Rot and Kablar, 2010. Here, we show lists of 10 up- and 87 down-regulated genes obtained by a cDNA microarray analysis that compared developing Myf5-/-:Myod-/- (and Mrf4-/-) petrous part of the temporal bone, containing middle and inner ear, to the control, at embryonic day 18.5. Myf5-/-:Myod-/- fetuses entirely lack skeletal myoblasts and muscles. They are unable to move their head, which interferes with the perception of angular acceleration. Previously, we showed that the inner ear areas most affected in Myf5-/-:Myod-/- fetuses were the vestibular cristae ampullaris, sensitive to angular acceleration. Our finding that the type I hair cells were absent in the mutants' cristae was further used here to identify a profile of genes specific to the lacking cell type. Microarrays followed by a detailed consultation of web-accessible mouse databases allowed us to identify 6 candidate genes with a possible role in the development of the inner ear sensory organs: Actc1, Pgam2, Ldb3, Eno3, Hspb7 and Smpx. Additionally, we searched for human homologues of the candidate genes since a number of syndromes in humans have associated inner ear abnormalities. Mutations in one of our candidate genes, Smpx, have been reported as the cause of X-linked deafness in humans. Our current study suggests an epigenetic role that mechanical, and potentially other, stimuli originating from muscle, play in organogenesis, and offers an approach to finding novel genes responsible for altered inner ear phenotypes.

  8. Middle Ear Barotrauma in Student Pilots.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jung Heob; Cho, Kyoung Rai

    2017-04-01

    The present study reports the clinical features of middle ear barotrauma in student pilots in the Republic of Korea Air Force. The authors reviewed medical records of student pilots with barotrauma. The grade of barotrauma was assigned using Teed's classification. This study included nasal symptoms, endoscopic findings of the nasal cavity, and clinical course (duration, recurrence). The relationship between middle ear barotrauma and the nasal airway was also evaluated. There were 57 cases in 51 pilots included. There were 49 cases (86.0%) that showed unilateral disease and 4 subjects experienced relapse. Two subjects (3.9%) had chronic rhinosinusitis and four subjects (7.8%) had allergic rhinitis. Ear fullness was reported in all cases, while hearing loss and persistent ear pain were reported in 3 cases (5.3%) and 19 cases (33.3%), respectively. Stuffy nose (26 cases, 45.6%) and rhinorrhea (24 cases, 42.1%) were relatively common. Most cases were Grade 0 (23 cases, 40.3%) or Grade III (27 cases, 47.4%) according to Teed's classification. Septal deviation was observed in 12 cases (21.0%), while turbinate hypertrophy was seen in 53 cases (93.0%) and increased nasal discharge in 33 cases (57.9%). The grade of barotrauma varied significantly according to the severity of turbinate hypertrophy and nasal discharge. The mean duration of disease was 6.8 d. Nasal symptoms and endoscopic findings showed some association with the grade and duration of barotrauma. Most cases resolved within a week; however, barotrauma showed persistence or relapse in some cases.Sohn JH, Cho KR. Middle ear barotrauma in student pilots. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):406-412.

  9. Is Ear Candling a Safe Way to Remove Earwax?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear candling can also lead to: Deposits of candle wax in the ear canal Burns to the face, ... can take to safely and effectively remove the wax. With Charles W. Beatty, M.D. References Don't get burned: Stay away from ear candles. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda. ...

  10. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software....

  11. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software....

  12. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software....

  13. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  15. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  16. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  17. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  18. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  19. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  20. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  1. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  2. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about ear tube surgery; Tympanostomy - what to ask your doctor; Myringotomy - what to ask your doctor ... Why does my child need ear tubes? Can we try other treatments? What are the risks of the surgery? Is it safe to wait before getting ear ...

  3. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  4. Naturopathic treatment for ear pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sarrell, E Michael; Cohen, Herman Avner; Kahan, Ernesto

    2003-05-01

    Otitis media is 1 of the most frequent diseases of early infancy and childhood and 1 of the most common reasons for children to visit a physician. In the past 2 decades, there has been a substantial increase in the diagnosis of otitis media worldwide. In the United States, 93% of all children have had at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by 7 years of age. Otalgia is the hallmark of AOM. Most affected children either complain of earache or manifest behavior that the parents interpret as indicating ear pain. Treatment of the ear pain early in the course of AOM decreases both parental anxiety and the child's discomfort and accelerates the healing process. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naturopathic versus traditional treatment for the management of otalgia commonly associated with AOM in children. The study was designed as a double-blind trial in an outpatient community clinic. A total of 171 children who were aged 5 to 18 years and had otalgia and clinical findings associated with middle-ear infection were studied. The children were randomly assigned to receive treatment with Naturopathic Herbal Extract Ear Drops (NHED) or anesthetic ear drops, with or without amoxicillin. On enrollment, the children were assigned by computer-numbered randomization to receive NHED (contents: allium sativum, verbascum thapsus, calendula flores, hypericum perfoliatum, lavender, and vitamin E in olive oil) 5 drops 3 times daily, alone (group A) or together with a topical anesthetic (amethocaine and phenazone in glycerin) 5 drops 3 times daily (group B), or oral amoxicillin 80 mg/kg/d (maximum 500 mg/dose) divided into 3 doses with either NHED 5 drops 3 times daily (group C) or topical anesthetic 5 drops 3 times daily (group D). A double-blind design was used, and all ear drops were placed in identical bottles. Treatment was initiated by the nurse in all cases. A single physician (M.S.) evaluated and treated all of the patients

  5. Bionics and Biocybernetics Bibliography, Biodynamics and Bioengineering Division 1959-1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Pathway in the Frog Corneal Reflex", Experimental Neurology, Vol. 7, pp 224- 239, 1963 M-45 S. Winogard, J.D. Cowan, "Reliable Computation in the...T.J. Moore, "Speech Analysis as the Ear Sees It: Aural Topography ", Proceedings of Conference on Speech Communications and Processing, 1967, AFAMRL

  6. Advanced bionics thin lateral and Helix II electrodes: a temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Charles G; Roland, Peter S; Kuzma, Janusz

    2005-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the insertional properties of two cochlear implant electrodes recently developed by Advanced Bionics Corporation. Anatomic study using human cadaveric temporal bones. The electrode prototypes we tested are the Thin Lateral and Helix II arrays, which incorporate features designed to minimize insertional trauma. A total of eight electrodes (4 of each prototype) were evaluated after insertion into freshly fixed temporal bones. The electrodes were inserted by way of standard cochleostomies, and the specimens were subsequently dissected to assess electrode position, insertion depth, and intracochlear trauma. Quantitative data regarding insertion depths and contact distances from the modiolus are presented for all electrodes tested. The mean insertion depths were 368 degrees for the Thin Lateral electrodes, which are designed to approximate the lateral cochlear wall, and 436 degrees for the Helix II electrodes, which occupy a more medial position in the scala tympani. No evidence of insertional trauma was observed with either electrode. The ease of insertion and absence of trauma were confirmed during additional trials in which electrode behavior was directly observed during insertion into previously opened cochleas. Both electrodes performed favorably in our human temporal bone trials, and both arrays appear promising for clinical use, especially in patients with residual hearing in whom atraumatic insertion is an important objective.

  7. Research on the image fusion and target extraction based on bionic compound eye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaowei; Hao, Qun; Song, Yong; Wang, Zihan; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Shiyu

    2015-08-01

    People attach more and more importance to bionic compound eye due to its advantages such as small volume, large field of view and sensitivity to high-speed moving objects. Small field of view and large volume are the disadvantages of traditional image sensor and in order to avoid these defects, this paper intends to build a set of compound eye system based on insect compound eye structure and visual processing mechanism. In the center of this system is the primary sensor which has high resolution ratio. The primary sensor is surrounded by the other six sensors which have low resolution ratio. Based on this system, this paper will study the target image fusion and extraction method by using plane compound eye structure. This paper designs a control module which can combine the distinguishing features of high resolution image with local features of low resolution image so as to conduct target detection, recognition and location. Compared with traditional ways, the way of high resolution in the center and low resolution around makes this system own the advantages of high resolution and large field of view and enables the system to detect the object quickly and recognize the object accurately.

  8. Bionic optical imaging system with aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia-Wei; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Liang, Dan

    2016-02-01

    A bionic optical imaging system with an aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens was designed and fabricated. The entire system mainly consisted of a doublet lens, a solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, a connecting part, and a CCD imaging device. To mimic the structure of the crystalline lens, the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens, a polymethyl methacrylate lens, and the liquid of ethyl silicone oil. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity using a microinjector, the curvatures of the front and rear surfaces of the PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change of focal length. The overall structure of the system was presented, as well as a detailed description of the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, material, and fabrication process. Under different injection volumes, the deformation of the PDMS lens was measured and simulated, pictures were captured, and the optical performance was analyzed in simulations and experiments. The focal length of the system ranged from 25.05 to 14.61 mm, and the variation of the diopter was 28.5D, which was larger than that of the human eye.

  9. Unifying inflation with late-time acceleration by a BIonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Rahaman, Farook; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Capozziello, Salvatore; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain

    2015-07-01

    We propose a cosmological model that unifies inflation, deceleration and acceleration phases of expansion history by a BIonic system. At the beginning, there are k black fundamental strings that transited to the BIon configuration at a given corresponding point. Here, two coupled universes, brane and antibrane, are created interacting each other through a wormhole and inflate. With decreasing temperature, the energy of this wormhole flows into the universe branes and leads to inflation. After a short time, the wormhole evaporates, the inflation ends and a deceleration epoch starts. By approaching the brane and antibrane universes together, a tachyon is born, grows and causes the creation of a new wormhole. At this time, the brane and antibrane universes result connected again and the late-time acceleration era of the universe begins. We compare our model with previous unified phantom models and observational data obtaining some cosmological parameters like temperature in terms of time. We also find that deceleration parameter is negative during inflation and late-time acceleration epochs, while it is positive during the deceleration era. This means that the model is consistent, in principle, with cosmological observations.

  10. Multicentre evaluation of music perception in adult users of Advanced Bionics cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Adams, Doris; Ajimsha, Khalid Mohamed; Barberá, Manuel Tomás; Gazibegovic, Dzemal; Gisbert, Javier; Gómez, Justo; Raveh, Eyal; Rocca, Christine; Romanet, Philipe; Seebens, Yvonne; Zarowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    To document musical listening and enjoyment in recipients of Advanced Bionics cochlear implants (CIs) and to compare musical perception in those using early coding strategies with subjects using the newer HiRes and HiRes 120 strategies. A questionnaire was completed by 136 adult subjects, including questions on the ability to identify specific musical features. The subjects were in three groups: those using early coding strategies (n = 29), HiRes (n = 59), and HiRes 120 (n = 48), and results were compared with a group of 84 normally hearing (NH) subjects. Of the CI users, 79% reported listening to music. The NH group rated listening frequency and enjoyment higher than the CI users. Thirty-five users reported that they sang and this group had significantly higher overall performance. There were no significant differences in overall perception of specific musical features among the strategy groups, though some individual questions showed significantly higher performance in the HiRes 120 users. Users of current CI technology show a high level of musical appreciation, though still significantly less than NH subjects. Frequency of listening and enjoyment were significantly correlated and active participation in musical activities, specifically singing, resulted in significantly higher overall performance scores.

  11. Bionic approach for the prevention of exit-site infections of percutaneous devices.

    PubMed

    Großhauser, Johannes; Reiter, Katja; Große-Siestrup, Christian; Kikhney, Judith; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Affeld, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Exit-site infections remain one of the main complications for percutaneous devices, such as catheters for peritoneal dialysis or drivelines for ventricular assist devices. Many efforts have been made to create a biological seal, yet without long-term success. This study investigates a new kind of percutaneous device which is coated with an extricable polymeric membrane. The bionic approach applies the naturally outwards directed growth of skin structures to technology: by pulling the protective membrane it slowly grows out of the body and a developing sulcus is exposed to dry air and an infection is avoided. In a feasibility study this kind of device was shown to reduce the rate of infection. To further investigate these devices, they were implanted in the skin of goats and observed for a period of more than 500 days. The membranes were pulled with a force of up to 2 N and the resulting movement was recorded. When being pulled, the membranes moved 0.4-0.9 mm per week, showing that the application of a continuously acting, defined force on the protective membrane causes the desired slow movement.

  12. Wear resistance of machine tools' bionic linear rolling guides by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiqiang; Liu, Botao; Guo, Zhengcai

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve the rolling wear resistance (RWR) of linear rolling guides (LRG) as well as prolong the life of machine tools, various shape samples with different units spaces ranged from 1 to 5 mm are designed through the observation of animals in the desert and manufactured by laser cladding. Wear resistance tests reproducing closely the real operational condition are conducted by using a homemade linear reciprocating wear test machine, and wear resistance is evaluated by means of weight loss measurement. Results indicate that the samples with bionic units have better RWR than the untreated one, of which the reticulate treated sample with unit space 3 mm present the best RWR. More specifically, among the punctuate treated samples, the mass loss increases with the increase of unit space; among the striate treated samples, the mass loss changes slightly with the increase of unit space, attaining a minimum at the unit space of 4 mm; among the reticulate treated samples, with the increase of unit space, the mass loss initially decreases, but turns to increase after reaching a minimum at the unit space of 3 mm. Additionally, the samples with striate shape perform better wear resistance than the other shape groups on the whole. From the ratio value of laser treated area to contacted area perspective, that the samples with ratio value between 0.15 and 0.3 possess better wear resistance is concluded.

  13. Investigation on 3D t wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.-X.; Tan, G.-K.; Lai, G.-J.

    2012-10-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field, using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV). The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution. The study was performed in a water channel. A robot fish model was designed and built. The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method, with twelve stretched wires. The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom, mainly in carangiform mode, by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively. The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner, measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices. Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs, allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field. Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained. The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish, including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings", allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  14. Effects of laser parameters on the geometrical characteristics of peg-shaped bionic coupling unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Liang, Yunhong; Yan, Qiongqiong; Ren, Luquan

    2014-12-01

    Peg-shaped bionic coupling unit (PBCU) processed by pulse laser is effective in anti-adhesion, anti-drag, anti-wear and anti-fatigue application. To obtain desired structural and morphological characteristics of the PBCU for industrial manufacturing, selection of proper processing parameters gradually becomes a growing important problem. Traditionally, the procedure of parameter selecting is often cost-plus and time-consuming. In this work, a statistical analysis of fabricating PBCU on the surface of medium carbon steel was conducted. The laser processing parameters utilized in the experiment and analysis are peak power 4-8 kW, pulse duration 6-16 ms and defocusing amount 6-10 mm. A series of mathematical models regarding the relationship between geometrical characteristics of PBCU and laser processing parameters were developed and checked. The results indicate that the developed models can be adequately used to control the structural and morphological characteristics of PBCU within the scope of analysis. Based on the models, the formation mechanism of the structural and morphological characteristics under different laser parameters were analyzed and discussed.

  15. Elective amputation and bionic substitution restore functional hand use after critical soft tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Aszmann, Oskar C.; Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D.; Salminger, Stefan; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hruby, Laura A.; Pittermann, Anna; Hofer, Christian; Amsuess, Sebastian; Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Critical soft tissue injuries may lead to a non-functional and insensate limb. In these cases standard reconstructive techniques will not suffice to provide a useful outcome, and solutions outside the biological arena must be considered and offered to these patients. We propose a concept which, after all reconstructive options have been exhausted, involves an elective amputation along with a bionic substitution, implementing an actuated prosthetic hand via a structured tech-neuro-rehabilitation program. Here, three patients are presented in whom this concept has been successfully applied after mutilating hand injuries. Clinical tests conducted before, during and after the procedure, evaluating both functional and psychometric parameters, document the benefits of this approach. Additionally, in one of the patients, we show the possibility of implementing a highly functional and natural control of an advanced prosthesis providing both proportional and simultaneous movements of the wrist and hand for completing tasks of daily living with substantially less compensatory movements compared to the traditional systems. It is concluded that the proposed procedure is a viable solution for re-gaining highly functional hand use following critical soft tissue injuries when existing surgical measures fail. Our results are clinically applicable and can be extended to institutions with similar resources. PMID:27721419

  16. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  17. Bionic design for surface optimization combining hydrophilic and negative charged biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Ran, Fen; Song, Haiming; Niu, Xiaoqin; Yang, Aimei; Nie, Shengqiang; Wang, Lingren; Li, Jie; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-06-01

    While polyethersulfone (PES) membrane represents a promising option for blood purification, the blood compatibility must be dramatically enhanced to meet today's ever-increasing demands for many emerging application. In this study, we report a bionic design for optimization and development of a modified PES membrane combining hydrophilic and negative charged biological macromolecules on its surface. The hydrophilic and ionic charged biological macromolecules sulfonated poly(styrene)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly-(styrene) (PSSMSS) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly-(vinyl pyrrolidone) were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and used together to modify PES membranes by blending method. A hydrophilic membrane surface with negative charged surface coating was obtained, imitating the hydrophilic and negatively charged structure feature of heparin. The modified PES membranes showed suppressed platelet adhesion, and a prolonged blood clotting time, and thereby improved blood compatibility. In addition, the blood clotting time of the modified membranes increased with the blended PSSMSS amounts increment, indicating that both the hydrophilic and negative charged groups play important roles in improving the blood compatibility of PES membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of the n_TOF EAR-2 neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Le Naour, C.; Durán, I.; Casarejos, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, J. I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Rout, P. C.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    The experimental area 2 (EAR-2) at CERNs neutron time-of-flight facility (n_TOF), which is operational since 2014, is designed and built as a short-distance complement to the experimental area 1 (EAR-1). The Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) monitor experiment was performed to characterize the beam pro↓le and the shape of the neutron 'ux at EAR-2. The prompt γ-flash which is used for calibrating the time-of-flight at EAR-1 is not seen by PPAC at EAR-2, shedding light on the physical origin of this γ-flash.

  19. Ear candles: a triumph of ignorance over science.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2004-01-01

    Ear candles are hollow tubes coated in wax which are inserted into patients' ears and then lit at the far end. The procedure is used as a complementary therapy for a wide range of conditions. A critical assessment of the evidence shows that its mode of action is implausible and demonstrably wrong. There are no data to suggest that it is effective for any condition. Furthermore, ear candles have been associated with ear injuries. The inescapable conclusion is that ear candles do more harm than good. Their use should be discouraged.

  20. Structures that Contribute to Middle-Ear Admittance in Chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, John J.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Songer, Jocelyn E.

    2009-01-01

    We describe measurements of middle-ear input admittance in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) before and after various manipulations that define the contributions of different middle-ear components to function. The chinchilla’s middle-ear air spaces have a large effect on the low-frequency compliance of the middle ear, and removing the influences of these spaces reveals a highly admittant tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Measurements of the admittance of the air spaces reveal that the high-degree of segmentation of these spaces has only a small effect on the admittance. Draining the cochlea further increases the middle-ear admittance at low frequencies and removes a low-frequency (less than 300 Hz) level dependence in the admittance. Spontaneous or sound-driven contractions of the middle-ear muscles in deeply anesthetized animals were associated with significant changes in middle-ear admittance. PMID:16944166

  1. Diseases of the middle ear in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Minovi, Amir; Dazert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Middle ear diseases in childhood play an important role in daily ENT practice due to their high incidence. Some of these like acute otitis media or otitis media with effusion have been studied extensively within the last decades. In this article, we present a selection of important childhood middle ear diseases and discuss the actual literature concerning their treatment, management of complications and outcome. Another main topic of this paper deals with the possibilities of surgical hearing rehabilitation in childhood. The bone-anchored hearing aid BAHA® and the active partially implantable device Vibrant Soundbridge® could successfully be applied for children. In this manuscript, we discuss the actual literature concerning clinical outcomes of these implantable hearing aids. PMID:25587371

  2. A Rare Case of Petrified Ear

    PubMed Central

    Buikema, Kathryn E.; Adams, Erin G.

    2012-01-01

    Calcification or ossification of the auricle, also referred to as petrified ear, is a rare diagnosis in dermatology. In medical literature, it has most often been attributed to trauma, hypothermia and frostbite, or hypercalcemia secondary to a metabolic or endocrine disorder, such as Addison's disease. Here, we report the clinical and radiologic findings of a 79-year-old African American male whose unilateral petrified auricle was an incidental finding. He had a preceding history of hyperparathyroidism and subsequent hypercalcemia treated with a subtotal parathyroidectomy three years prior to presentation. In addition to laboratory analysis, a history and physical examination was performed which revealed no other signs of hypercalcemia. Radiologic studies demonstrated partial ossification of the external auricular cartilage on the left side. The patient was diagnosed with the rare occurrence of a petrified ear. In light of this case, we provide a discussion concerning the possible etiologies of this diagnosis including appropriate patient evaluation and possible treatment recommendations. PMID:23259082

  3. Mouse Middle Ear Ion Homeostasis Channels and Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lisa M.; DeGagne, Jacqueline M.; Kempton, J. Beth; Hausman, Frances; Trune, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis The middle ear contains homeostatic mechanisms that control the movement of ions and fluids similar to those present in the inner ear, and are altered during inflammation. Background The normal middle ear cavity is fluid-free and air-filled to allow for effective sound transmission. Within the inner ear, the regulation of fluid and ion movement is essential for normal auditory and vestibular function. The same ion and fluid channels active in the inner ear may have similar roles with fluid regulation in the middle ear. Methods Middle and inner ears from BALB/c mice were processed for immunohistochemistry of 10 specific ion homeostasis factors to determine if similar transport and barrier mechanisms are present in the tympanic cavity. Examination also was made of BALB/c mice middle ears after transtympanic injection with heat-killed Haemophilus influenza to determine if these channels are impacted by inflammation. Results The most prominent ion channels in the middle ear included aquaporins 1, 4 and 5, claudin 3, ENaC and Na+,K+-ATPase. Moderate staining was found for GJB2, KCNJ10 and KCNQ1. The inflamed middle ear epithelium showed increased staining due to expected cellular hypertrophy. Localization of ion channels was preserved within the inflamed middle ear epithelium. Conclusions The middle ear epithelium is a dynamic environment with intrinsic mechanisms for the control of ion and water transport to keep the middle ear clear of fluids. Compromise of these processes during middle ear disease may underlie the accumulation of effusions and suggests they may be a therapeutic target for effusion control. PMID:22720014

  4. Reconstruction of the burned nose and ear.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S L

    2000-01-01

    Patients who have survived thermal injuries to the face suffer from severe disfigurement. When the nose and ear are involved, the resulting deformities are immediately obvious to all who see the patient. This level of injury results in a self-imposed confinement; the patients never leave their homes. It is therefore important that we plastic surgeons know, understand, and use all options available to improve our patients' appearance and ultimately their mental and physical well being.

  5. Scaling of the mammalian middle ear.

    PubMed

    Nummela, S

    1995-05-01

    This study considers the general question how animal size limits the size and information receiving capacity of sense organs. To clarify this in the case of the mammalian middle ear, I studied 63 mammalian species, ranging from a small bat to the Indian elephant. I determined the skull mass and the masses of the ossicles malleus, incus and stapes (M, I and S), and measured the tympanic membrane area, A1. The ossicular mass (in mg) is generally negatively allometric to skull mass (in g), the regression equation for the whole material (excluding true seals) being y = 1.373 x(0.513). However, for very small mammals the allometry approaches isometry. Within a group of large mammals no distinct allometry can be discerned. The true seals (Phocidae) are exceptional by having massive ossicles. The size relations within the middle ear are generally rather constant. However, the I/M relation is slightly positively allometric, y = 0.554 x(1.162). Two particularly isometric relations were found; the S/(M + I) relation for the ossicles characterized by the regression equation y = 0.054 x(0.993), and the relation between a two-dimensional measure of the ossicles and the tympanic membrane ares, (M + I)2/3 /A1. As in isometric ears the sound energy collected by the tympanic membrane is linearly related to its area, the latter isometry suggests that, regardless of animal size, a given ossicular cross-sectional area is exposed to a similar sound-induced stress. Possible morphological middle ear adaptations to particular acoustic environments are discussed.

  6. Ear Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/languages/earinfections.html Other topics A-Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Ear Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali ( ...

  7. Taste and olfaction in middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Ciofalo, Andrea; Zambetti, Giampietro; Romeo, Martina; Vestri, Anna Rita; Iannella, Giannicola; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess pre- and postoperative taste ability in patients undergoing middle ear surgery for otosclerosis or chronic otitis media. Olfactory function was also evaluated to rule out taste deficits due to concomitant nasal pathology. All patients underwent ear, nose, and throat examination, otomicroscopy, nasal endoscopy, anterior rhinomanometry, taste testing, and olfactory testing. Patients were evaluated at 1 to 5 days preoperatively (T0), and at 1 (T1), 6 (T6), and 12 (T12) months postoperatively. Both groups of patients experienced worsening of the mean taste threshold postoperatively. This phenomenon was more serious in poststapedotomy patients. Follow-up showed progressive improvement in both groups. All values of olfactory testing were within the normal range for otosclerosis patients. Patients with chronic otitis media showed variable postoperative findings. Chorda tympani function can be negatively affected by middle ear surgery. Deficits may be more marked in stapedotomy patients than in those undergoing tympanoplasty. Postoperative recovery of taste is satisfactory, although with different timelines for the 2 types of pathology. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Why Do Elephants Flap Their Ears?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Moise; Jiji, Latif; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that a 4200 kg elephant generates as much as 5.12 kW of heat. How the elephant dissipates its metabolic heat and regulates its body temperature has been investigated during the past seven decades. Findings and conclusions differ sharply. The high rate of metabolic heat coupled with low surface area to volume ratio and the absence of sweat glands eliminate surface convection as the primary mechanism for heat removal. Noting that the elephant ears have high surface area to volume ratio and an extensive vascular network, ear flapping is thought to be the principal thermoregulatory mechanism. A computational and experimental program is carried out to examine flow and heat transfer characteristics. The ear is modeled as a uniformly heated oscillating rectangular plate. Our computational work involves a three-dimensional time dependent CFD code with heat transfer capabilities to obtain predictions of the flow field and surface temperature distributions. This information was used to design an experimental setup with a uniformly heated plate of size 0.2m x 0.3m oscillating at 1.6 cycles per second. Results show that surface temperature increases and reaches a steady periodic oscillation after a period of transient oscillation. The role of the vortices shed off the plate in heat transfer enhancement will be discussed.

  9. Morphology of the seagull's inner ear.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A; Tsao, P

    1986-01-01

    The morphology of the seagull ear was investigated and found to be generally similar to that of other Aves. Several specific outer middle and inner ear features were found to be sufficiently different as to be remarkable. Most notably, the dual membranes of the external auditory meatus: one, a collecting (and possibly amplifying and reflecting) parabolic membrane chamber situated immediately anterior to the slightly deeper tympanic membrane. The convex tympanic membrane attaches a cartilagenous extracolumella and a thick osseous columella, which is less thin and fragile than that observed in domestic fowl of comparable body size. The columella footplate and round window are completely covered with a second middle ear membrane which apparently serves as an H2O seal and hydrostatic pressure matcher. The short, hard seagull cochlea houses an elaborate basilar papilla which contains thousands of short and tall hair cells, each with a systematic arrangement of stereocilia bundles. In the seagull, the length of the basilar papilla and the length, width, and number of stereocilia, features which affect the transduction process and frequency resolution, are different from those reported for certain other Aves.

  10. Finite-element analysis of middle-ear pressure effects on static and dynamic behavior of human ear.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Cheng, Tao; Gan, Rong Z

    2007-08-01

    A finite-element analysis for static behavior of middle ear under variation of the middle-ear pressure was conducted in a 3D model of human ear by combining the hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin material model and geometry nonlinearity. An empirical formula was then developed to calculate material parameters of the middle-ear soft tissues as the stress-dependent elastic modulus relative to the middle-ear pressure. Dynamic behavior of the middle ear in response to sound pressure in the ear canal was predicted under various positive and negative middle-ear pressures. The results from static analysis indicate that a positive middle ear pressure produces the static displacements of the tympanic membrane (TM) and footplate more than a negative pressure. The dynamic analysis shows that the reductions of the TM and footplate vibration magnitudes under positive middle-ear pressure are mainly determined by stress dependence of elastic modulus. The reduction of the TM and footplate vibrations under negative pressure was caused by both the geometry changes of middle-ear structures and the stress dependence of elastic modulus.

  11. Theory of forward and reverse middle-ear transmission applied to otoacoustic emissions in infant and adult ears

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Abdala, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand why otoacoustic emission (OAE) levels are higher in normal-hearing human infants relative to adults. In a previous study, distortion product (DP) OAE input/output (I/O) functions were shown to differ at f2=6 kHz in adults compared to infants through 6 months of age. These DPOAE I/O functions were used to noninvasively assess immaturities in forward/reverse transmission through the ear canal and middle ear [Abdala, C., and Keefe, D. H., (2006). J. Acoust Soc. Am. 120, 3832–3842]. In the present study, ear-canal reflectance and DPOAEs measured in the same ears were analyzed using a scattering-matrix model of forward and reverse transmission in the ear canal, middle ear, and cochlea. Reflectance measurements were sensitive to frequency-dependent effects of ear-canal and middle-ear transmission that differed across OAE type and subject age. Results indicated that DPOAE levels were larger in infants mainly because the reverse middle-ear transmittance level varied with ear-canal area, which differed by more than a factor of 7 between term infants and adults. The forward middle-ear transmittance level was −16 dB less in infants, so that the conductive efficiency was poorer in infants than adults. PMID:17348521

  12. Do Swiftlets have an ear for echolocation? The functional morphology of Swiftlets' middle ears.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Henri A; Gea, Stefan; Maas, Steve; Bout, Ron G; Dirckx, Joris J J; Decraemer, Willem F; Povel, G David E

    2007-03-01

    The Oilbird and many Swiftlet species are unique among birds for their ability to echolocate. Echolocaters may benefit from improved hearing sensitivity. Therefore, morphological adaptations to echolocation might be present in echolocating birds' middle ears. We studied the functional morphology of the tympano-ossicular chain of seven specimens of four echolocating Swiftlet species and one specimen each of five non-echolocating species. Three dimensional (3D) reconstructions were made from micro-Computer-Tomographic (muCT) scans. The reconstructions were used in functional morphological analyses and model calculations. A two dimensional (2D) rigid rod model with fixed rotational axes was developed to study footplate output-amplitudes and to describe how changes in the arrangement of the tympano-ossicular chain affect its function. A 3D finite element model was used to predict ossicular-chain movement and to investigate the justification of the 2D approach. No morphological adaptations towards echolocation were found in the middle-ear lever system or in the mass impedance of the middle ear. A wide range of middle-ear configurations result in maximum output-amplitudes and all investigated species are congruent with these predicted best configurations. Echolocation is unlikely to depend on adaptations in the middle ear tympano-ossicular chain.

  13. Middle-ear velocity transfer function, cochlear input immittance, and middle-ear efficiency in chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer function HV between stapes velocity VS and sound pressure near the tympanic membrane PTM is a descriptor of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME). The ME power transmission efficiency (MEE), the ratio of sound power entering the cochlea to power entering the middle ear, was computed from HV measured in seven chinchilla ears and previously reported measurements of ME input admittance YTM and ME pressure gain GMEP [Ravicz and Rosowski, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437–2454 (2012); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208–2223 (2013)] in the same ears. The ME was open, and a pressure sensor was inserted into the cochlear vestibule for most measurements. The cochlear input admittance YC computed from HV and GMEP is controlled by a combination of mass and resistance and is consistent with a minimum-phase system up to 27 kHz. The real part Re{YC}, which relates cochlear sound power to inner-ear sound pressure, decreased gradually with frequency up to 25 kHz and more rapidly above that. MEE was about 0.5 between 0.1 and 8 kHz, higher than previous estimates in this species, and decreased sharply at higher frequencies. PMID:24116422

  14. Sham Control Methods Used in Ear-Acupuncture/Ear-Acupressure Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Yang, Angela Weihong; Zhang, Anthony Lin; May, Brian H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Ear-acupuncture/ear-acupressure (EAP) has been used for a range of health conditions with numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating its efficacy and safety. However, the design of sham interventions in these RCTs varied significantly. This study systematically reviewed RCTs on EAP for all clinical conditions involving a number of sham EAPs as a control intervention. The review is guided by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions 5.1.0 and investigated the types and differences of sham EAP interventions. Four electronic English databases (The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL®) and two Chinese databases (CQVIP, CNKI) were searched in December 2012 and 55 published RCTs comparing real and sham EAP for any clinical condition were included. Characteristics of participants, real and sham interventions, and outcomes were extracted. Four types of sham methods were identified. Among the 55 RCTs, 25 studies involved treatment on nonspecific ear acupoints as the sham method; seven studies used nonacupoints on the ear; nine studies selected placebo needles or placebo ear-acupressure on the same ear acupoints for the real treatment; 10 studies employed pseudo-intervention; and five studies combined two of the above methods to be the sham control. Other factors of treatment such as number of points, treatment duration, and frequency also varied greatly. Risk of bias assessment suggests that 32 RCTs were “high risk” in terms of participants blinding, and 45 RCTs were “high risk” in terms of personnel blinding. Meta-analysis was not conducted due to the high clinical heterogeneity across included studies. No relationship was found between the sham designs and efficacy outcomes, or between the sham types and dropout rate. No solid conclusion of which design is the most appropriate sham control of EAP could be drawn in this review. PMID:24138333

  15. Bionic Modeling of Knowledge-Based Guidance in Automated Underwater Vehicles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-24

    bugs and their foraging movements are heard by the sound of rustling leaves or rhythmic wing beats . ASYMMETRY OF EARS The faces of owls have captured... sound source without moving. The barn owl has binaural and monaural cues as well as cues that operate in relative motion when either the target or the...owl moves. Table 1 lists the cues. 7 TM No. 87- 2068 fTable 1. Sound Localization Parameters Used by the Barn Owl I BINAURAL PARAMETERS: 1. the

  16. Design and development of a ferroelectric micro photo detector for the bionic eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    Driven by no effective therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age Related Macular Degeneration, artificial vision through the development of an artificial retina that can be implanted into the human eye, is being addressed by the Bionic Eye. This dissertation focuses on the study of a photoferroelectric micro photo detector as an implantable retinal prosthesis for vision restoration in patients with above disorders. This implant uses an electrical signal to trigger the appropriate ocular cells of the vision system without resorting to wiring or electrode implantation. The research work includes fabrication of photoferroelectric thin film micro detectors, characterization of these photoferroelectric micro devices as photovoltaic cells, and Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling of the photoferroelectrics and their device-neuron interface. A ferroelectric micro detector exhibiting the photovoltaic effect (PVE) directly adds electrical potential to the neuron membrane outer wall at the focal adhesion regions. The electrical potential then generates a retinal cell membrane potential deflection through a newly developed Direct-Electric-Field-Coupling (DEFC) model. This model is quite different from the traditional electric current model because instead of current directly working on the cell membrane, the PVE current is used to generate a localized high electric potential in the focal adhesion region by working together with the anisotropic high internal impedance of ferroelectric thin films. General electrodes and silicon photodetectors do not have such anisotropy and high impedance, and thus they cannot generate DEFC. This mechanism investigation is very valuable, because it clearly shows that our artificial retina works in a way that is totally different from the traditional current stimulation methods.

  17. Effects of ear-canal pressurization on middle-ear bone- and air-conduction responses

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Kenji; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Kim, Namkeun; Du, Yu; Puria, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In extremely loud noise environments, it is important to not only protect one’s hearing against noise transmitted through the air-conduction (AC) pathway, but also through the bone-conduction (BC) pathways. Much of the energy transmitted through the BC pathways is concentrated in the mid-frequency range around 1.5–2 kHz, which is likely due to the structural resonance of the middle ear. One potential approach for mitigating this mid-frequency BC noise transmission is to introduce a positive or negative static pressure in the ear canal, which is known to reduce BC as well as AC hearing sensitivity. In the present study, middle-ear ossicular velocities at the umbo and stapes were measured using human cadaver temporal bones in response to both BC and AC excitations, while static air pressures of ±400 mm H2O were applied in the ear canal. For the maximum negative pressure of −400 mm H2O, mean BC stapes-velocity reductions of about 5–8 dB were observed in the frequency range from 0.8 to 2.5 kHz, with a peak reduction of 8.6(± 4.7) dB at 1.6 kHz. Finite-element analysis indicates that the peak BC-response reduction tends to be in the mid-frequency range because the middle-ear BC resonance, which is typically around 1.5–2 kHz, is suppressed by the pressure-induced stiffening of the middle-ear structure. The measured data also show that the BC responses are reduced more for negative static pressures than for positive static pressures. This may be attributable to a difference in the distribution of the stiffening among the middle-ear components depending on the polarity of the static pressure. The characteristics of the BC-response reductions are found to be largely consistent with the available psychoacoustic data, and are therefore indicative of the relative importance of the middle-ear mechanism in BC hearing. PMID:19944139

  18. Chinchilla middle-ear admittance and sound power: high-frequency estimates and effects of inner-ear modifications.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2012-10-01

    The middle-ear input admittance relates sound power into the middle ear (ME) and sound pressure at the tympanic membrane (TM). ME input admittance was measured in the chinchilla ear canal as part of a larger study of sound power transmission through the ME into the inner ear. The middle ear was open, and the inner ear was intact or modified with small sensors inserted into the vestibule near the cochlear base. A simple model of the chinchilla ear canal, based on ear canal sound pressure measurements at two points along the canal and an assumption of plane-wave propagation, enables reliable estimates of Y(TM,) the ME input admittance at the TM, from the admittance measured relatively far from the TM. Y(TM) appears valid at frequencies as high as 17 kHz, a much higher frequency than previously reported. The real part of Y(TM) decreases with frequency above 2 kHz. Effects of the inner-ear sensors (necessary for inner ear power computation) were small and generally limited to frequencies below 3 kHz. Computed power reflectance was ~0.1 below 3.5 kHz, lower than with an intact ME below 2.5 kHz, and nearly 1 above 16 kHz.

  19. Chinchilla middle-ear admittance and sound power: High-frequency estimates and effects of inner-ear modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The middle-ear input admittance relates sound power into the middle ear (ME) and sound pressure at the tympanic membrane (TM). ME input admittance was measured in the chinchilla ear canal as part of a larger study of sound power transmission through the ME into the inner ear. The middle ear was open, and the inner ear was intact or modified with small sensors inserted into the vestibule near the cochlear base. A simple model of the chinchilla ear canal, based on ear canal sound pressure measurements at two points along the canal and an assumption of plane-wave propagation, enables reliable estimates of YTM, the ME input admittance at the TM, from the admittance measured relatively far from the TM. YTM appears valid at frequencies as high as 17 kHz, a much higher frequency than previously reported. The real part of YTM decreases with frequency above 2 kHz. Effects of the inner-ear sensors (necessary for inner ear power computation) were small and generally limited to frequencies below 3 kHz. Computed power reflectance was ∼0.1 below 3.5 kHz, lower than with an intact ME below 2.5 kHz, and nearly 1 above 16 kHz. PMID:23039439

  20. Estimation of the age and amount of brown rice plant hoppers based on bionic electronic nose use.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Zhou, Zhiyan; Lu, Huazhong; Luo, Xiwen; Lan, Yubin; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yanfang

    2014-09-29

    The brown rice plant hopper (BRPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stal), is one of the most important insect pests affecting rice and causes serious damage to the yield and quality of rice plants in Asia. This study used bionic electronic nose technology to sample BRPH volatiles, which vary in age and amount. Principal component analysis (PCA), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), probabilistic neural network (PNN), BP neural network (BPNN) and loading analysis (Loadings) techniques were used to analyze the sampling data. The results indicate that the PCA and LDA classification ability is poor, but the LDA classification displays superior performance relative to PCA. When a PNN was used to evaluate the BRPH age and amount, the classification rates of the training set were 100% and 96.67%, respectively, and the classification rates of the test set were 90.67% and 64.67%, respectively. When BPNN was used for the evaluation of the BRPH age and amount, the classification accuracies of the training set were 100% and 48.93%, respectively, and the classification accuracies of the test set were 96.67% and 47.33%, respectively. Loadings for BRPH volatiles indicate that the main elements of BRPHs' volatiles are sulfur-containing organics, aromatics, sulfur-and chlorine-containing organics and nitrogen oxides, which provide a reference for sensors chosen when exploited in specialized BRPH identification devices. This research proves the feasibility and broad application prospects of bionic electronic noses for BRPH recognition.

  1. Effect of counterface roughness on the friction of bionic wall-shaped microstructures for gecko-like attachments.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Haytam; Cohen, Yossi

    2017-08-04

    Hairy adhesive systems involved in gecko locomotion have drawn the interest of many researchers regarding the development of bionic solutions for fast and reversible adhesive technologies. To date, despite extensive efforts to design gecko-inspired adhesive surfaces, adhesion and friction capacities are often evaluated using smooth and rigid counterfaces, in general glass, whereas most natural and artificial surfaces inevitably have a certain level of roughness. For that reason, in this study experiments tested the effects of the substrate roughness on the friction of bionic wale-shaped microstructures for gecko-like attachments. To this end, 12 substrates with different isotropic roughness were prepared using the same Epoxy material. Friction force was measured under various normal loads. It was concluded that classical roughness parameters, considered separately, are not appropriate to explain roughness-related variations in friction force. This has led us to develop a new integrative roughness parameter that combines characteristics of the surface. The parameter is capable of classifying the obtained experimental results in a readable way. An analytical model based on the experimental results has been developed to predict the variation of the friction force as a function of counterface roughness and applied normal load.

  2. Electrical ear acupuncture reduces histamine-induced itch (alloknesis).

    PubMed

    Kesting, Marco Rainer; Thurmüller, Petra; Hölzle, Frank; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Holland-Letz, Tim; Stücker, Markus

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess an objective measure for the outcome of ear acupuncture, we evaluated the effect of electrical ear acupuncture on areas of histamine-induced alloknesis in 32 healthy volunteers. In a first assessment 5 min after histamine application on both volar forearms, 16 subjects received right ear and 16 left ear acupuncture. Immediately before and 5 min after acupuncture, alloknesis areas on both forearms were planimetrically evaluated. A second assessment was carried out 4 weeks later with the same patients. They underwent histamine application once more, but received no acupuncture. Alloknesis areas were then compared with reference to time, assessment and therapy side. Forearms relating to ipsilateral acupuncture showed significantly reduced or even no alloknesis areas after therapy. On the contralateral sides and during the "non-acupuncture" assessment 4 weeks later, alloknesis areas were significantly enlarged compared with sides ipsilateral to right and left ear acupuncture. Hence, results verify the effects of electrical ear acupuncture by objective measures.

  3. Management of blast ear injuries in mass casualty environments.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Nnaemeka

    2011-11-01

    To establish a management pathway for blast ear injuries in mass casualty environments and to review the management of ear injuries caused by blast. Relevant literature search on blast injury was performed through MEDLINE. Comprehensive review of management of blast injuries of the ear was undertaken. There was an overview of the pathophysiology of blast and detailed discussion of management of injuries of the external, middle, and inner ear. With any ear symptoms or injury, the patient should be referred to the otolaryngologist for further management. The management of blast injury should ensure detection at an early stage, potentially life-threatening cases in mass casualty situations and ensuring that subtle injuries affecting the ear are not missed.

  4. Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Bionic Urethra Using Cell Sheet Technology and Labeling By Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide for Full-Thickness Urethral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shukui; Yang, Ranxin; Zou, Qingsong; Zhang, Kaile; Yin, Ting; Zhao, Weixin; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gao, Guo; Fu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Urethral strictures remain a reconstructive challenge, due to less than satisfactory outcomes and high incidence of stricture recurrence. An “ideal” urethral reconstruction should establish similar architecture and function as the original urethral wall. We fabricated a novel tissue-engineered bionic urethras using cell sheet technology and report their viability in a canine model. Small amounts of oral and adipose tissues were harvested, and adipose-derived stem cells, oral mucosal epithelial cells, and oral mucosal fibroblasts were isolated and used to prepare cell sheets. The cell sheets were hierarchically tubularized to form 3-layer tissue-engineered urethras and labeled by ultrasmall super-paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO). The constructed tissue-engineered urethras were transplanted subcutaneously for 3 weeks to promote the revascularization and biomechanical strength of the implant. Then, 2 cm length of the tubularized penile urethra was replaced by tissue-engineered bionic urethra. At 3 months of urethral replacement, USPIO-labeled tissue-engineered bionic urethra can be effectively detected by MRI at the transplant site. Histologically, the retrieved bionic urethras still displayed 3 layers, including an epithelial layer, a fibrous layer, and a myoblast layer. Three weeks after subcutaneous transplantation, immunofluorescence analysis showed the density of blood vessels in bionic urethra was significantly increased following the initial establishment of the constructs and was further up-regulated at 3 months after urethral replacement and was close to normal level in urethral tissue. Our study is the first to experimentally demonstrate 3-layer tissue-engineered urethras can be established using cell sheet technology and can promote the regeneration of structural and functional urethras similar to normal urethra. PMID:28744331

  5. Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Bionic Urethra Using Cell Sheet Technology and Labeling By Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide for Full-Thickness Urethral Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shukui; Yang, Ranxin; Zou, Qingsong; Zhang, Kaile; Yin, Ting; Zhao, Weixin; Shapter, Joseph G; Gao, Guo; Fu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Urethral strictures remain a reconstructive challenge, due to less than satisfactory outcomes and high incidence of stricture recurrence. An "ideal" urethral reconstruction should establish similar architecture and function as the original urethral wall. We fabricated a novel tissue-engineered bionic urethras using cell sheet technology and report their viability in a canine model. Small amounts of oral and adipose tissues were harvested, and adipose-derived stem cells, oral mucosal epithelial cells, and oral mucosal fibroblasts were isolated and used to prepare cell sheets. The cell sheets were hierarchically tubularized to form 3-layer tissue-engineered urethras and labeled by ultrasmall super-paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO). The constructed tissue-engineered urethras were transplanted subcutaneously for 3 weeks to promote the revascularization and biomechanical strength of the implant. Then, 2 cm length of the tubularized penile urethra was replaced by tissue-engineered bionic urethra. At 3 months of urethral replacement, USPIO-labeled tissue-engineered bionic urethra can be effectively detected by MRI at the transplant site. Histologically, the retrieved bionic urethras still displayed 3 layers, including an epithelial layer, a fibrous layer, and a myoblast layer. Three weeks after subcutaneous transplantation, immunofluorescence analysis showed the density of blood vessels in bionic urethra was significantly increased following the initial establishment of the constructs and was further up-regulated at 3 months after urethral replacement and was close to normal level in urethral tissue. Our study is the first to experimentally demonstrate 3-layer tissue-engineered urethras can be established using cell sheet technology and can promote the regeneration of structural and functional urethras similar to normal urethra.

  6. Epiphyseal, vertebral, and ear (EVE) dysplasia: a new syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, J.; Cormier-Daire, V.; Journeau, P.; Mussat, P.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the association of epiphyseal, vertebral, and ear dysplasia in two sisters with normal stature and psychomotor development born to distantly related, healthy parents. This distinctive association has not been reported previously and is likely to represent a new condition with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. For this syndrome, we propose the acronym EVE standing for epiphyseal, vertebral, and ear dysplasia.


Keywords: epiphyseal; verterbal; and ear (EVE) dysplasia; new syndrome PMID:10424819

  7. The development of the mammalian outer and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Neal; Thompson, Hannah

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian ear is a complex structure divided into three main parts: the outer; middle; and inner ear. These parts are formed from all three germ layers and neural crest cells, which have to integrate successfully in order to form a fully functioning organ of hearing. Any defect in development of the outer and middle ear leads to conductive hearing loss, while defects in the inner ear can lead to sensorineural hearing loss. This review focuses on the development of the parts of the ear involved with sound transduction into the inner ear, and the parts largely ignored in the world of hearing research: the outer and middle ear. The published data on the embryonic origin, signalling, genetic control, development and timing of the mammalian middle and outer ear are reviewed here along with new data showing the Eustachian tube cartilage is of dual embryonic origin. The embryonic origin of some of these structures has only recently been uncovered (Science, 339, 2013, 1453; Development, 140, 2013, 4386), while the molecular mechanisms controlling the growth, structure and integration of many outer and middle ear components are hardly known. The genetic analysis of outer and middle ear development is rather limited, with a small number of genes often affecting either more than one part of the ear or having only very small effects on development. This review therefore highlights the necessity for further research into the development of outer and middle ear structures, which will be important for the understanding and treatment of conductive hearing loss. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  8. Review of congenital inner ear abnormalities on CT temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Yiin, R S Z; Tang, P H; Tan, T Y

    2011-09-01

    The aetiology of profound hearing loss in children is complex and multifactorial. Congenital inner ear abnormality is a major cause of hearing loss in children. CT temporal bone imaging is the modality of choice in the investigation of hearing loss. Recognising the congenital abnormalities of the inner ear guides the clinician's management of the condition. This pictorial essay illustrates the congenital abnormalities of the inner ear on high resolution CT temporal bone images and correlation with developmental arrest during embryology.

  9. Does helmet therapy influence the ear shift in positional plagiocephaly?

    PubMed

    Kluba, Susanne; Schreiber, Robert; Kraut, Wiebke; Meisner, Christoph; Reinert, Siegmar; Krimmel, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Helmet therapy is widely accepted in the treatment of severe positional plagiocephaly. The improvement of the cranial asymmetry under therapy is evident, but parents are also concerned about the ear shift. Our study investigated the influence of helmet therapy on the position of the ears and analyzed the reliability of clinical observations regarding cranial asymmetry and ear shift. Three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry of 80 infants with severe positional plagiocephaly was performed before and after helmet therapy. The cranial vault asymmetry index (CVAI) and ear shift were measured and statistically compared. The correlation between the change of CVAI and ear shift was investigated. Three surgeons visually evaluated the treatment results on three-dimensional images independently with a standard questionnaire. The results were compared with the three-dimensional measurements. Sixty infants had a relevant initial ear shift. Under therapy, the shift was improved significantly by a mean of 29.8% (P < 0.001). Twenty infants with an initial straight ear line statistically deteriorate under therapy (P < 0.0001). We found no strong linear correlation between the changes of the CVAI and the ear shift. Analysis of the questionnaire revealed a good correlation between the clinical impression and three-dimensional measurements for the head asymmetry, whereas observations regarding changes in the ear shift were not reliable. Helmet treatment significantly improves an initial malposition of the external ear in infants with positional plagiocephaly. A severe ear shift can be associated with a moderate CVAI and vice versa. In contrast to the CVAI, small changes of the ear shift cannot be evaluated reliably by clinical investigation.

  10. On hearing with more than one ear: lessons from evolution

    PubMed Central

    Schnupp, Jan W H; Carr, Catherine E

    2011-01-01

    Although ears capable of detecting airborne sound have arisen repeatedly and independently in different species, most animals that are capable of hearing have a pair of ears. We review the advantages that arise from having two ears and discuss recent research on the similarities and differences in the binaural processing strategies adopted by birds and mammals. We also ask how these different adaptations for binaural and spatial hearing might inform and inspire the development of techniques for future auditory prosthetic devices. PMID:19471267

  11. [Recurrent meningitis in inner ear malformations].

    PubMed

    Claros, Pedro; Matusialk, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Authors present two cases of children with reccurent meningitis and unilateral deafness. Implemented diagnostics (CT, NMR, ABR) revealed one side inner ear congenital malformation in one case and anterior fossa bony defect accompanied by labirynthine deformation in the other case. The presence of perilymphatic fistulae in oval and round windows and cerebrospinal fluid leakage has been confirmed in both cases during surgery. Carefull obliteration of the Eustachian tube and both windows has been performed. Non- complicated postoperative course (2 months and 6 years - respectively) has prooved the effectiveness of applied treatment.

  12. Direct demonstration of gas diffusion into the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Levy, D; Herman, M; Luntz, M; Sadé, J

    1995-03-01

    The gas composition of the middle ear differs from that of air, and resembles the gas composition of mixed venous blood. This observation suggests the existence of a bi-directional route for gas diffusion between the middle ear and blood. In an attempt to demonstrate this route in a direct way, we tracheotomized guinea pigs in such a way that they breathed freon-22 directly into the distal part of their tracheostomy. The proximal part of the trachea was sealed so that air by-passed the oropharynx and nasopharynx, thus preventing freon-22 from making contact with the eustachian tube orifice. At the same time middle ear gases were monitored with a mass spectrometer, through a measuring probe which was inserted into a hole in the bulla. The appearance of freon-22 in all middle ears--after 8 min on the average--demonstrated direct gas diffusion from the blood into the middle ear, since freon-22 could reach the middle ear only from the blood stream, i.e., by diffusion. Differences in gas diffusion rates into and from the middle ear may therefore play a role in regulating middle ear gas economy, and therefore in middle ear pressure.

  13. Otosclerosis associated with type B-1 inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, A; Dispenza, F; Aggarwal, N; Russo, A

    2010-06-01

    Malformations of bony inner ear are rare anomalies occurring in approximately 20% of patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss is usually associated with abnormalities of the external and middle ear. Recent reports of patients with lateral semicircular canal malformations indicate inner ear malformations to be associated with sensorineural or conductive hearing loss. Differential diagnosis of conductive hearing loss should include otosclerosis, isolated ossicular deformities, inner ear anomalies or a combination of these. In this report, a case is described with right vestibule-lateral semicircular canal dysplasia presenting at our centre with bilateral otosclerosis.

  14. The effects of fibrin tissue adhesive on the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Katzke, D; Pusalkar, A; Steinbach, E

    1983-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of fibrin glue ('Tissucol', Immuno Pty. Ltd.) in the middle and inner ear. Small amounts of the adhesive were used in 36 operations performed on 18 rabbits. The light microscopic examination of these ears four, eight and 12 weeks after surgery showed that the adhesive was well tolerated and that it did not have any toxic effect on the middle ear or membranous labyrinth. The fibrin tissue adhesive can therefore safely be used to facilitate reconstructive middle-ear surgery and, with the aid of fascia, also for the closure of labyrinthine fistulae; or to achieve a definite seal of oval window niche after stapes surgery.

  15. Incorporating anthropometry into design of ear-related products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bor-Shong

    2008-01-01

    To achieve mass customization and collaborative product design, human factors and ergonomics should play a key development role. The purpose of this study was to provide product designers with the anthropometic dimensions of outer ears for different demographic data, including gender and age. The second purpose was to compare the dimensions of various ear-related products (i.e., earphone, bluetooth earphone and ear-cup earphone) with the anthropometic database and recommend appropriate solutions for design. Two hundred subjects aged 20-59 was selected for this study and divided into four age stratifications. Further, three different dimensions of the outer ear (i.e., the earhole length, the ear connection length and the length of the pinna) were measured by superimposed grid photographic technique. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to investigate the effects of gender, and age on ear dimensions. The results showed that all ear dimensions had significant gender effects. A comparison between the anthropometric dimensions and those of current products revealed that most current ear-related products need to be redesigned using anthropometric data. The shapes of earhole and pinna are not circular. Consequently, ear products need to be elongated so that users may feel more comfortably and not have the product slip off easily.

  16. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McGinness, Sam; Coleman, Hedley; Varikatt, Winny; da Cruz, Melville

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours. PMID:27429819

  17. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm.

  18. Integration of acoustic and electric hearing is better in the same ear than across ears.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Galvin, John J; Wang, Xiaosong

    2017-10-02

    Advances in cochlear implant (CI) technology allow for acoustic and electric hearing to be combined within the same ear (electric-acoustic stimulation, or EAS) and/or across ears (bimodal listening). Integration efficiency (IE; the ratio between observed and predicted performance for acoustic-electric hearing) can be used to estimate how well acoustic and electric hearing are combined. The goal of this study was to evaluate factors that affect IE in EAS and bimodal listening. Vowel recognition was measured in normal-hearing subjects listening to simulations of unimodal, EAS, and bimodal listening. The input/output frequency range for acoustic hearing was 0.1-0.6 kHz. For CI simulations, the output frequency range was 1.2-8.0 kHz to simulate a shallow insertion depth and the input frequency range was varied to provide increasing amounts of speech information and tonotopic mismatch. Performance was best when acoustic and electric hearing was combined in the same ear. IE was significantly better for EAS than for bimodal listening; IE was sensitive to tonotopic mismatch for EAS, but not for bimodal listening. These simulation results suggest acoustic and electric hearing may be more effectively and efficiently combined within rather than across ears, and that tonotopic mismatch should be minimized to maximize the benefit of acoustic-electric hearing, especially for EAS.

  19. Magnetically driven middle ear ossicles for optical measurement of vibrations in an ear with opened eardrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, John; Von Unge, Magnus; Dirckx, Joris

    2012-06-01

    Vibrations of the middle ear ossicles are easily measured by means of laser vibrometry. However, exposing the ossicles requires the removal of the eardrum, with the result that the ossicles can no longer be stimulated acoustically. To overcome this we devised a new set up in which the ossicles can be driven magnetically. After measuring the response of the eardrum to an acoustic signal, we then remove the eardrum and attach a small magnet to the exposed manubrium (the part of the first auditory ossicle, the malleus, which is normally attached to the eardrum). An electromagnetic excitation coil is then used to drive the magnet, and the output to the coil adjusted until the vibration of the manubrium, as measured by the vibrometer, matches that measured in response to the acoustic signal. Such a set-up has uses in research on middle ear mechanics, such as the measurement of non-linearities in their response, as well as applications in the diagnosis of middle ear conditions such as the fixation of the ossicles by otosclerosis, or in chronic otitis media. We describe our set up in which the vibrometer unit is attached to a surgical microscope, offering accurate positioning of the laser beam. We discuss the viability of our method and its future potential by presenting some measurements on artificially fixated ears.

  20. Influence of middle ear pressure alteration and middle ear effusion on vibration characteristics of human tympanic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasche, Norbert; Hoermann, Karl; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Bernecker, Frank; Barton, Thomas G.

    1995-05-01

    A laser doppler vibrometer was used to measure the motion of a simple middle ear model and tympanic membrane vibrations of human temporal bone specimen. Different pathological conditions were simulated: Increasing or decreasing middle ear pressure to defined levels create a situation similar to a barootitis. Additionally the middle ear cavities were partially or totally filled with fluids of different viscosities. Characteristic changes of the vibration patterns were detected: With increasing pressure difference between middle ear and atmosphere the vibration amplitudes decreased. In middle ear effusions diminished amplitudes were obtained, depending on the fluid-occupied volume within the tympanic cavity. The vibration pattern was not influenced by differences in the viscosity of the effusion. Therefore a preoperative examination of a patient with middle ear effusions by laser doppler vibrometer offers no predictive aspect to the decision whether a ventilation tube should be inserted or not.

  1. Effect of the middle ear reflex on sound transmission to the inner ear of rat.

    PubMed

    Pilz, P K; Ostwald, J; Kreiter, A; Schnitzler, H U

    1997-03-01

    The effect of the acoustic middle ear reflex (MER) was quantified using electrodes chronically implanted in the middle ears of rats. Cochlear microphonics (CM) and middle ear muscle EMG were measured under light Ketamin anesthesia after stimulation with tone pulses of 5-20 kHz ranging between 75 and 120 dB SPL. With increasing intensity, the CM measured before the onset of the MER increased to a maximum amplitude and then decreased with higher SPLs. At 10 kHz this maximum was reached at 95 dB SPL, for other stimulus frequencies at higher SPLs. After a latency of 10-20 ms, CM to 10 kHz stimuli of 80-95 dB SPL were decreased by the attenuating action of the MER. The lowest threshold of the MER was also measured at 10 kHz (77 dB SPL in the mean). To stimuli greater than 100 dB SPL after a latency of 6-10 ms, the CM amplitude was increased. That this CM increase to intense stimuli is caused by the action of the MER was confirmed by control experiments such as cutting the tendons of the middle ear muscles. The CM decrease to stimuli below 100 dB SPL, as well as the increase to very intense stimuli, can be explained by sound attenuation caused by the MER, together with the nonlinear dependence of CM amplitude on stimulus level. The observed shift of the maxima of the CM input-output function by the MER to higher stimulus levels probably indicates an increase of the dynamic range of the ear.

  2. Wearable ear EEG for brain interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Eric D.; Walker, Nicholas; Danko, Amanda S.

    2017-02-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) measuring electrical activity via electroencephalogram (EEG) have evolved beyond clinical applications to become wireless consumer products. Typically marketed for meditation and neu- rotherapy, these devices are limited in scope and currently too obtrusive to be a ubiquitous wearable. Stemming from recent advancements made in hearing aid technology, wearables have been shrinking to the point that the necessary sensors, circuitry, and batteries can be fit into a small in-ear wearable device. In this work, an ear-EEG device is created with a novel system for artifact removal and signal interpretation. The small, compact, cost-effective, and discreet device is demonstrated against existing consumer electronics in this space for its signal quality, comfort, and usability. A custom mobile application is developed to process raw EEG from each device and display interpreted data to the user. Artifact removal and signal classification is accomplished via a combination of support matrix machines (SMMs) and soft thresholding of relevant statistical properties.

  3. Topical antibiotic ear drops: are they safe?

    PubMed

    Pappas, S; Nikolopoulos, T P; Korres, S; Papacharalampous, G; Tzangarulakis, A; Ferekidis, E

    2006-09-01

    A discharging ear is a very common condition for the general practitioner and the ENT surgeon. Oral and intravenous antibiotics have potential complications, are costly, and exhibit increasing resistance. This study explores the advantages and disadvantages of all common otic preparations and compares effectiveness, safety, cost and complication rates. In chronic otitis media (chronic discharging ears), topical antibiotics seem to be the treatment of choice by comparison with oral or intravenous antibiotics. Cultures and antibiograms do not correspond directly to clinical efficacy, as laboratory determination of resistance does not take into account the high concentration of antibiotics in local preparations. It is safer to use quinolone drops as a first-line treatment, but it is still possible to use short courses of other drops if quinolones are either unavailable or contraindicated (e.g. allergy), or when bacteria are resistant to them. However, in such a situation, a round window membrane involved in an established inflammatory process and therefore less permeable to the passage of topical preparations is the preferred setting, as ototoxicity is a potential complication, especially in the case of gentamicin, in which case patients should be warned accordingly.

  4. Vibrations in the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Rafał; Szymański, Marcin; Warmiński, Jerzy; Zadrozniak, Marek; Morshed, Kamal

    2011-12-01

    Middle ear surgery techniques can improve hearing destroyed by disease, but results of treatment are difficult to predict. Therefore, researchers use a Laser Doppler Vibrometer to measure vibrations of human middle ear ossicles. Measurements of ossicular chain vibrations are performed on fresh human temporal bone specimens using Laser Doppler Vibrometer. Vibrations of stapes are recorded in 3 cases: 1) for intact ossicular chain, 2) when incus long process is removed, and 3) after long process reconstruction with bone cement. A typical analysis of transfer function is completed by other methods applied in dynamics. Measurements and analysis of stapes vibrations in case of intact and damaged ossicular chain show regular and irregular behavior which can be recognize with the help of phase portraits, recurrence plots, correlation dimension, and Hurst and Lyapunov exponents. The long process reconstruction with bone cement gives good results in improving hearing. Recurrence plots, and Lyapunov and Hurst exponents used in the study complete information obtained from transfer function and can be employed to enrich the classical approach to ossicular chain vibrations.

  5. Middle ear function in sinonasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bakhshaee, Mehdi; Ardakani, Hossein Payedar; Ghazizadeh, Amir Hossain; Movahed, Rahman; Jarahi, Lida; Rajati, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Nasal airway patency has long been considered a major factor in ear health. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sinonasal polyposis on middle ear and eustachian tube (ET) functionality. Forty-four individuals with polyposis, 23 with non-polyposis nasal obstruction, and 23 healthy controls were enrolled. Demographic, clinical and imaging data of all participants were collected and ET function tests and audiologic tests were performed. Hearing loss (p = 0.02), flat tympanogram (p = 0.02), disturbed Toynbee and Valsalva tests (p = 0.01), and the prevalence of allergy (p = 0.04) and purulent nasal discharge (p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the polyposis group than the other groups. Regression analysis revealed that infection and allergy have more important roles in ET function than the nasal obstruction. Polyposis could impede ET function; however, it is probably not because of its obstructive nature, but because of the associated increased risk of infection.

  6. [European Portuguese EARS test battery adaptation].

    PubMed

    Alves, Marisa; Ramos, Daniela; Oliveira, Graça; Alves, Helena; Anderson, Ilona; Magalhães, Isabel; Martins, Jorge H; Simões, Margarida; Ferreira, Raquel; Fonseca, Rita; Andrade, Susana; Silva, Luís; Ribeiro, Carlos; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A utilização de instrumentos de avaliação em saúde adequados é fundamental na gestão da prestação de cuidados. A escassez, em Portugal, de instrumentos específicos para a avaliação do desempenho de crianças utilizadoras de implantes cocleares motivou o trabalho de tradução e de adaptação da bateria de testes EARS (Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech) para o português europeu. Esta bateria de testes é hoje um dos instrumentos mais comummente utilizados por equipas de (re)habilitação de crianças surdas com implantes cocleares em todo o mundo. O objetivo a atingir com a validação do EARS foi fornecer às equipas de (re)habilitação um instrumento que permita: (i) monitorizar a evolução individual da reabilitação; (ii) gerir um programa de (re)habilitação de acordo com resultados objetivos, comparáveis entre diferentes equipas de (re)habilitação; (iii) obter dados comparáveis comequipas internacionais; e (iv) melhorar a adesão e a motivação da família e restantes profissionais no ambulatório.Material e Métodos: No processo de tradução e de adaptação da bateria de testes, os procedimentos adotados foram os seguintes: (i) tradução da versão inglesa para português europeu por um tradutor profissional; (ii) revisão dessa tradução realizada por um painel de especialistas constituído por otorrinolaringologistas, terapeutas da fala e técnicos de audiologia; (iii) adaptação dos estímulos de teste pela equipa de terapeutas da fala; e (iv) nova revisão por parte do painel de especialistas.Resultados: São apresentados, para cada um dos instrumentos que compõem a bateria EARS, as adaptações introduzidas, conciliando as características e os objetivos originais dos instrumentos com as particularidades linguísticas e culturais da população portuguesa.Discussão: São discutidas as dificuldades encontradas durante o processo de tradução e de adaptação e as soluções adotadas. São feitas

  7. Probing the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome for biological function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The senses of hearing and balance depend upon mechanoreception, a process that originates in the inner ear and shares features across species. Amphibians have been widely used for physiological studies of mechanotransduction by sensory hair cells. In contrast, much less is known of the genetic basis of auditory and vestibular function in this class of animals. Among amphibians, the genus Xenopus is a well-characterized genetic and developmental model that offers unique opportunities for inner ear research because of the amphibian capacity for tissue and organ regeneration. For these reasons, we implemented a functional genomics approach as a means to undertake a large-scale analysis of the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome through microarray analysis. Results Microarray analysis uncovered genes within the X. laevis inner ear transcriptome associated with inner ear function and impairment in other organisms, thereby supporting the inclusion of Xenopus in cross-species genetic studies of the inner ear. The use of gene categories (inner ear tissue; deafness; ion channels; ion transporters; transcription factors) facilitated the assignment of functional significance to probe set identifiers. We enhanced the biological relevance of our microarray data by using a variety of curation approaches to increase the annotation of the Affymetrix GeneChip® Xenopus laevis Genome array. In addition, annotation analysis revealed the prevalence of inner ear transcripts represented by probe set identifiers that lack functional characterization. Conclusions We identified an abundance of targets for genetic analysis of auditory and vestibular function. The orthologues to human genes with known inner ear function and the highly expressed transcripts that lack annotation are particularly interesting candidates for future analyses. We used informatics approaches to impart biologically relevant information to the Xenopus inner ear transcriptome, thereby addressing the

  8. Day and night glycaemic control with a bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steven J; Hillard, Mallory A; Balliro, Courtney; Magyar, Kendra L; Selagamsetty, Rajendranath; Sinha, Manasi; Grennan, Kerry; Mondesir, Debbie; Ehklaspour, Laya; Zheng, Hui; Damiano, Edward R; El-Khatib, Firas H

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The safety and efficacy of continuous, multiday, automated glycaemic management has not been tested in outpatient studies of preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of a bihormonal bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in this population of patients in an outpatient setting. Methods In this randomised, open-label, crossover study, we enrolled preadolescent children (aged 6–11 years) with type 1 diabetes (diagnosed for ≥1 year) who were on insulin pump therapy, from two diabetes camps in the USA. With the use of sealed envelopes, participants were randomly assigned in blocks of two to either 5 days with the bionic pancreas or conventional insulin pump therapy (control) as the first intervention, followed by a 3 day washout period and then 5 days with the other intervention. Study allocation was not masked. The autonomously adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. Conventional insulin pump therapy was administered by the camp physicians and other clinical staff in accordance with their established protocols; participants also wore a CGM device during the control period. The coprimary outcomes, analysed by intention to treat, were mean CGM-measured glucose concentration and the proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L, on days 2–5. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02105324. Findings Between July 20, and Aug 19, 2014, 19 children with a mean age of 9·8 years (SD 1·6) participated in and completed the study. The bionic pancreas period was associated with a lower mean CGM-measured glucose concentration on days 2–5 than was the control period (7·6 mmol/L [SD 0·6] vs 9·3 mmol/L [1·7]; p=0·00037) and a lower proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L on

  9. Day and night glycaemic control with a bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steven J; Hillard, Mallory A; Balliro, Courtney; Magyar, Kendra L; Selagamsetty, Rajendranath; Sinha, Manasi; Grennan, Kerry; Mondesir, Debbie; Ehklaspour, Laya; Zheng, Hui; Damiano, Edward R; El-Khatib, Firas H

    2016-03-01

    The safety and efficacy of continuous, multiday, automated glycaemic management has not been tested in outpatient studies of preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of a bihormonal bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in this population of patients in an outpatient setting. In this randomised, open-label, crossover study, we enrolled preadolescent children (aged 6-11 years) with type 1 diabetes (diagnosed for ≥1 year) who were on insulin pump therapy, from two diabetes camps in the USA. With the use of sealed envelopes, participants were randomly assigned in blocks of two to either 5 days with the bionic pancreas or conventional insulin pump therapy (control) as the first intervention, followed by a 3 day washout period and then 5 days with the other intervention. Study allocation was not masked. The autonomously adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. Conventional insulin pump therapy was administered by the camp physicians and other clinical staff in accordance with their established protocols; participants also wore a CGM device during the control period. The coprimary outcomes, analysed by intention to treat, were mean CGM-measured glucose concentration and the proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L, on days 2-5. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02105324. Between July 20, and Aug 19, 2014, 19 children with a mean age of 9·8 years (SD 1·6) participated in and completed the study. The bionic pancreas period was associated with a lower mean CGM-measured glucose concentration on days 2-5 than was the control period (7·6 mmol/L [SD 0·6] vs 9·3 mmol/L [1·7]; p=0·00037) and a lower proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L on days 2-5 (1·2% [SD 1·1] vs 2·8% [1·2

  10. Preventing Cauliflower Ear with a Modified Tie-Through Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Robert J.; Hough, David O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a quick, simple tie-through suture technique (in which a collodion packing is secured to the auricle with two buttons) for preventing cauliflower ear following external ear trauma in wrestlers and boxers. The technique ensures constant compression; multiple treatments for fluid reaccumulation are rarely necessary. (SM)

  11. Alternative Ear-Canal Measures Related to Absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Stephen T.; Stenfelt, Stefan; Schairer, Kim S.

    2013-01-01

    Several alternative ear-canal measures are similar to absorbance in their requirement for prior determination of a Thévenin-equivalent sound source. Examples are (1) sound intensity level (SIL), (2) forward-pressure level (FPL), (3) time-domain ear-canal reflectance (TDR), and (4) cochlear reflectance (CR). These four related measures are similar to absorbance in their utilization of wide-band stimuli and their focus on recording ear-canal sound pressure. The related measures differ from absorbance in how the ear-canal pressure is analyzed and in the type of information that is extracted from the recorded response. SIL and FPL have both been shown to be better as measures of sound level in the ear canal compared to sound pressure level (SPL) because they reduced calibration errors due to standing waves in studies of behavioral thresholds and otoacoustic emissions. TDR may be used to estimate ear-canal geometry and may have the potential to assess middle-ear pathology. CR reveals information about the inner ear that is similar to what is provided by other types of otoacoustic emissions and may have theoretical advantages that strengthen its interpretation. PMID:23900185

  12. Preventing Cauliflower Ear with a Modified Tie-Through Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Robert J.; Hough, David O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a quick, simple tie-through suture technique (in which a collodion packing is secured to the auricle with two buttons) for preventing cauliflower ear following external ear trauma in wrestlers and boxers. The technique ensures constant compression; multiple treatments for fluid reaccumulation are rarely necessary. (SM)

  13. [The progress of inner ear malformation in radiological research].

    PubMed

    Kong, Dehua; Fu, Kuang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear malformations are anomalies linking to development insults at different periods of embryogenesis,which are common causes of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The evaluation of pediatric sensorineural hearing loss mostly depends on high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, which can excellently depict the temporal bones and inner ear malformations.

  14. Congenital inner ear malformations without sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Kumiko; Horiguchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2008-03-01

    It has been reported that normal hearing is rare in patients with severe inner ear vestibular malformations [Kokai H, Oohashi M, Ishikawa K, Harada K, Hiratsuka H, Ogasawara M et al. Clinical review of inner ear malformation. J Otolaryngol Jpn 2003;106(10):1038-44; Schuknecht HF. Mondini dysplasia. A clinical pathological study. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 1980;89(Suppl. 65):1-23; Jackler RK, Luxford WM, House WF. Congenital malformations of the inner ear: a classification based on embryogenesis. Laryngoscope 1987;97:2-14; Phelps PD. Congenital lesions of the inner ear, demonstrated by tomography. Arch Otolaryngol 1974;100:11-8]. A 37-year-old woman had combined dysplasia of the posterior and lateral semicircular canals (PSCC, LSCC) with normal cochlear development and normal hearing in both ears. She had complained of dizziness for 8 months. High resolution computed tomography (CT) showed hypogenesis of the bony labyrinth in both ears. Bilateral PSCC and LSCC dysplasia and dilatation of the vestibule were detected. Magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) revealed that the deformity of the PSCC was more severe than the LSCC. Although the caloric test of the left ear elicited no nystagmus and there was reduced response in the right ear, the horizontal vestibulo-occular reflex (VOR) was present. Her dizzy sensation disappeared within 3 months without special treatment. The dizziness attack might have been caused by a temporary breakdown of her peripheral vestibular system.

  15. Gain affected by the interior shape of the ear canal.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Cheng, Wei-De

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the correlation of gain distribution and the interior shape of the human external ear canal. Cross-sectional study of gain measurement at the first bend and second bend. Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University. There were 15 ears in patients aged between 20 and 30 years (8 men/7 women) with normal hearing and middle ears. Stimulus frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz were based on the standard clinical hearing test. Measurements closer to the tympanic membrane and the positions at the first and second bends were confirmed by using otoscope. Real ear measurement to analyze the canal resonance in human external ears was adopted. This study found that gain at stimulus frequencies of 4000 Hz was affected by the interior shape of the ear canal (P < .005), particularly at the first and second bends, whereas gain was only affected by the length of the ear canal for stimulus frequencies of 2000 Hz (P < .005). This study found that gain was affected not only by the length of the external auditory canal (EAC) but also by the interior shape of the EAC significantly. The findings of this study may have potential clinical applications in canalplasty and congenital aural atresia surgery and may be used to guide surgeries that attempt to reshape the ear canal to achieve more desirable hearing outcomes.

  16. Single-stage autologous ear reconstruction for microtia.

    PubMed

    Kasrai, Leila; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K; Fisher, David M

    2014-03-01

    The authors have been using the Nagata technique since 2002. In this review of 100 consecutive ear reconstructions, the authors present technique modifications that have evolved over this period that have contributed to improved auricular contour and that now allow for auricular reconstruction in a single stage. This study is a retrospective review of a prospectively acquired database. The series is restricted to primary reconstructions performed for congenital microtia. Photographs of 10 consecutive patients are presented to demonstrate the results of the technique. Surgical complication rates are discussed. One hundred ear reconstructions were performed in 96 patients. There were 75 primary cases of congenital microtia. Twenty-four ears underwent a two-stage reconstruction, and 51 ears were reconstructed with a Nagata stage I procedure or a single-stage reconstruction. There was a gradual shift in technique, with a trend to perform fewer Nagata stage II outsetting procedures and more single-stage reconstructions. In patients who underwent an ear reconstruction in two stages, the surgical complication rate was 22 percent. In the last 40 consecutive ear reconstructions since abandoning the two-stage approach, the surgical complication rate is now 15 percent. A modification of Nagata's technique of autologous ear reconstruction for microtia is described. Modifications of the three-dimensional framework address the contour of the inferior crus and control tragal projection and position. Inclusion of a projection block and recruitment of retroauricular skin allow for symmetric projection of the ear in a single stage. Therapeutic, IV.

  17. Long-eared owls nesting in Badlands National Park

    Treesearch

    Deborah D. Paulson; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1985-01-01

    Long-eared Owls nest at high densities locally over the Great Plains where suitable habitat is limited (Bent 1938), yet , according to Whitney et al. (1978), this species is rare to uncommon in South Dakota. Especially west of the Missouri River, few nesting records have been reported. This paper reports the occurrence of Long-eared Owls in the Badlands National Park...

  18. Major evolutionary transitions and innovations: the tympanic middle ear

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    One of the most amazing transitions and innovations during the evolution of mammals was the formation of a novel jaw joint and the incorporation of the original jaw joint into the middle ear to create the unique mammalian three bone/ossicle ear. In this review, we look at the key steps that led to this change and other unusual features of the middle ear and how developmental biology has been providing an understanding of the mechanisms involved. This starts with an overview of the tympanic (air-filled) middle ear, and how the ear drum (tympanic membrane) and the cavity itself form during development in amniotes. This is followed by an investigation of how the ear is connected to the pharynx and the relationship of the ear to the bony bulla in which it sits. Finally, the novel mammalian jaw joint and versatile dentary bone will be discussed with respect to evolution of the mammalian middle ear. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity’. PMID:27994124

  19. Coupling of earphones to human ears and to standard coupler.

    PubMed

    Cirić, Dejan G; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2006-10-01

    A standardized acoustical coupler should enable the calibration of audiometric earphones which ensures that the hearing thresholds determined in the audiometric measurement are independent of the earphone type. This requires that the coupler approximates the average human ear closely. Nevertheless, the differences among earphones as well as between human ears and the coupler affect the results of the audiometric measurements inducing uncertainty. As the mentioned differences are related to the coupling of different earphones to human ears and to a standardized coupler, the effects of this coupling are investigated by measuring the transfer functions from input voltage of the earphone terminals to the pressure at the ear canal entrance in two situations: open and blocked canals. Since the "ear canal entrance" is not well-defined for the coupler, transfer function measurements in the coupler were carried out in a similar way but at different depths. In order to describe and compare the earphone couplings, the pressure divisions at the entrance of the ear canal are calculated from the measured transfer functions. The results indicate that significant difference appears among sound pressures generated in different individuals' ears. Also, the earphone couplings to human ears and to the coupler differ considerably.

  20. Coupling of earphones to human ear and to coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciric, Dejan; Hammershoi, Dorte

    2004-05-01

    The use of a standardized acoustical coupler should enable a calibration of audiometric earphones which ensures that the thresholds determined in the audiometry will be independent of the earphone type. This requires that the coupler approximates the average human ear closely. Nevertheless, the differences among earphones as well as between human ears and the coupler affect the results of audiometric measurements inducing uncertainty. The influence of these differences is examined by investigating the coupling of different earphones to human ears and to the standardized coupler. This is done by measurement of the transfer functions from input voltage of the earphone terminals to the entrance of the ear canal in two situations: (1) open, and (2) blocked. Similar measurements were carried out with the coupler, but since the ``ear-canal entrance'' is not well-defined for the coupler, the mentioned measurements were done at different depths in the coupler. The earphone's coupling to (i) human ears and to (ii) the coupler, described in terms of the pressure division at the entrance of the ear canal, were compared. The results indicate that the coupling to the human ear and the coupling to the standardized coupler differ.

  1. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  2. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  3. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  4. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  5. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  6. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  7. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  8. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  9. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium....

  10. Inner ear contribution to bone conduction hearing in the human.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Bone conduction (BC) hearing relies on sound vibration transmission in the skull bone. Several clinical findings indicate that in the human, the skull vibration of the inner ear dominates the response for BC sound. Two phenomena transform the vibrations of the skull surrounding the inner ear to an excitation of the basilar membrane, (1) inertia of the inner ear fluid and (2) compression and expansion of the inner ear space. The relative importance of these two contributors were investigated using an impedance lumped element model. By dividing the motion of the inner ear boundary in common and differential motion it was found that the common motion dominated at frequencies below 7 kHz but above this frequency differential motion was greatest. When these motions were used to excite the model it was found that for the normal ear, the fluid inertia response was up to 20 dB greater than the compression response. This changed in the pathological ear where, for example, otosclerosis of the stapes depressed the fluid inertia response and improved the compression response so that inner ear compression dominated BC hearing at frequencies above 400 Hz. The model was also able to predict experimental and clinical findings of BC sensitivity in the literature, for example the so called Carhart notch in otosclerosis, increased BC sensitivity in superior semicircular canal dehiscence, and altered BC sensitivity following a vestibular fenestration and RW atresia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia involving the ear from gout: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Kelly A; Garcia-Albea, Victoria; Goldberg, Lynne J

    2014-01-01

    The ear is a characteristic location for deposition of uric acid in patients with gout. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia has not been described in this location. We report three patients with tophaceous gout on the ear whose biopsies exhibited epidermal hyperplasia mimicking squamous cell carcinoma, in order to call attention to this potential diagnostic pitfall.

  12. Ear length and kidney function decline after kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Katavetin, Pisut; Watanatorn, Salin; Townamchai, Natavudh; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat

    2016-11-01

    The preservation of kidney function after kidney donation depends on the kidney reserve - the potential of the remaining kidney to boost their function after loss of the other kidney. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, size and shape of the external ears are examined to evaluate the person's kidney health. We hypothesized that ear size might be a practical yet overlooked marker of kidney reserve. Fifty kidney transplantation donors were participated in this study. The length and width of both ears of all participants were measured during one of the post-donation visits. Pre-donation serum creatinine and post-donation serum creatinine as well as other relevant parameters (age, sex, weight, height, etc.) of the participants were extracted from medical records. The estimated GFR was calculated from serum creatinine, age and sex using the CKD-EPI equation. Ear length negatively associated with %GFR decline after kidney donation. For every 1 cm increase in ear length, it was associated with 5.7% less GFR decline after kidney donation (95% Confidence Interval 0.2 to 11.3, P = 0.04). Ear width, as well as age, sex, body weight, height, body mass index, and pre-donation eGFR did not significantly associate with the GFR decline. Our findings support the notion of Traditional Chinese Medicine that ear morphology may be associated with kidney health and suggest that ear length might be a useful predictor of kidney function decline after kidney donation.

  13. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  14. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  15. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  16. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  17. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  18. CT of adenomas of the middle ear and mastoid cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Van Thong Ho; Rao, V.J.; Mikaelian, D.O.

    1996-03-01

    A case of mixed type adenoma of the middle ear and mastoid is presented in which CT showed complete opacification of the middle ear and mastoid air cells with bulging of the tympanic membrane but without ossicular or bony destruction. 7 refs., 1 figs.

  19. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... device includes the esophageal dilator; tracheal bistour (a long, narrow surgical knife); tracheal dilator; tracheal hook; laryngeal injection set; laryngeal knife; laryngeal saw; laryngeal trocar...; wire ear loop; microrule; mirror; mobilizer; ear, nose, and throat punch; ear, nose and throat...

  20. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... device includes the esophageal dilator; tracheal bistour (a long, narrow surgical knife); tracheal dilator; tracheal hook; laryngeal injection set; laryngeal knife; laryngeal saw; laryngeal trocar...; wire ear loop; microrule; mirror; mobilizer; ear, nose, and throat punch; ear, nose and throat...