Science.gov

Sample records for 910-kda class-2 pepc

  1. NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand Safety Note

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J W

    1998-05-21

    The NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand is to be used in the building 432. Building 432 is being used to test components and processes for NIF. The test stand is to be bolted to the floor. The test stand provides a platform from which the PEPC kinematic repeatability and vibrational characteristics of the PEPC LRU can be tested. The test stand will allow user access to the LRU to install instrumentation and to make adjustments to the kinematics. The mechanical test stand is designed to hold the 1700 lb. PEPC LRU.

  2. Mechanical Engineering Safety Note PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.

    2001-08-26

    The PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly consists of a spreader bar that will be attached to the PEPC Cell Housing or the Midplane Transportation Fixture during operation. While in use in the OAB (Optics Assembly Building), the Spreader Bar Assembly will be manipulated by the NOID (New Optics Insertion Device). The other critical components of the assembly are the three angular contact bearing swivels that attach the spreader bar to the lifting mechanism and the corner clamps which are used to capture the Cell Housing.

  3. Evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants: Implications for the evolution of CAM in orchids.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zheng, Bao-Qiang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene is the key enzyme in CAM and C4 photosynthesis. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC family was performed using sequences from 60 available published plant genomes, the Phalaenopsis equestris genome and RNA-Seq of 15 additional orchid species. The PEPC family consists of three distinct subfamilies, PPC-1, PPC-2, and PPC-3, all of which share a recent common ancestor in chlorophyte algae. The eudicot PPC-1 lineage separated into two clades due to whole genome duplication (WGD). Similarly, the monocot PPC-1 lineage also divided into PPC-1M1 and PPC-1M2 through an ancient duplication event. The monocot CAM- or C4-related PEPC originated from the clade PPC-1M1. WGD may not be the major driver for the performance of CAM function by PEPC, although it increased the number of copies of the PEPC gene. CAM may have evolved early in monocots, as the CAM-related PEPC of orchids originated from the monocot ancient duplication, and the earliest CAM-related PEPC may have evolved immediately after the diversification of monocots, with CAM developing prior to C4. Our results represent the most complete evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants to date and particularly elucidate the origin of PEPC in orchids. PMID:26493226

  4. Light-regulated and cell-specific methylation of the maize PEPC promoter

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, Ben J.; Woodfield, Helen; Wanchana, Samart; Bruskiewich, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing PEPC expression in maize remain to be fully defined. Differential methylation of a region in the PEPC promoter has been shown to correlate with transcript accumulation, however, to date, investigations into the role of DNA methylation in maize PEPC expression have relied on the use of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Bisulphite sequencing was used here to provide a single-base resolution methylation map of the maize PEPC promoter. It is shown that four cytosine residues in the PEPC promoter are heavily methylated in maize root tissue. In leaves, de-methylation of these cytosines is dependent on illumination and is coincident with elevated PEPC expression. Furthermore, light-regulated de-methylation of these cytosines occurs only in mesophyll cells. No methylation was discovered in the 0.6 kb promoter required for mesophyll-specific expression indicating that cytosine methylation is not required to direct the cell-specificity of PEPC expression. This raises interesting questions regarding the function of the cell-specific cytosine de-methylation observed in the upstream region of the PEPC promoter. PMID:22143916

  5. Identification and phylogeny of putative PEPC genes in three toxin-producing Karenia (Dinophyta) species.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Darcie E; Campbell, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Dense blooms of toxin-producing Karenia brevis increase local surface ocean pH through CO2 uptake. To identify genes that may contribute to bloom-related environmental pH and pCO2 changes, transcriptomes with RNA from K. brevis Wilson cultures that had been acclimated to low CO2 (250 ppm) or recent CO2 (350 ppm) pCO2 levels were assembled. Among the annotated transcripts were PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK enzymes found in the model C4 carbon fixation pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated that the enzymatic activity of PEPC, PPDK, and/or PEPCK in some algae species, including marine diatoms, is influenced by variations in dissolved inorganic carbon. We found significantly similar PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK enzymes in the transcriptomes of K. brevis and two sister species Karenia papilionacea, and Karenia mikimotoi. One or more isoforms of PEPC were also identified in the transcriptomes of thirty additional photosynthetic phytoplankton species from nine phyla. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with neighbor joining and maximum likelihood techniques to characterize the evolutionary relationship among phytoplankton, terrestrial plant C4, and terrestrial plant C3 PEPC sequences. Based on the nucleotide trees constructed during this study, the Karenia PEPC transcripts were more closely related to the terrestrial C4 genes than the terrestrial C3 genes. Furthermore, PEPC phylogeny among phytoplankton closely resembles phylogenetic trees constructed with ribosomal RNA. This study confirmed that the toxin-producing dinoflagellates K. brevis, K. mikimotoi, and K. papilionacea express putative PEPC, PEPCK, and PPDK transcripts. PMID:27136041

  6. Cloning of PEPC-1 from a C4 halophyte Suaeda aralocaspica without Kranz anatomy and its recombinant enzymatic activity in responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Wang, Lu; Lan, Haiyan

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme of C4 photosynthetic pathway and plays an important biochemical role in higher plants and micro organisms. To gain understanding of the role of PEPC in stress adaptation in plant, we cloned PEPC gene from Suaeda aralocaspica, a C4 species without Kranz anatomy, and performed a series of experiments with PEPC gene expressed in Escherichia coli under various abiotic stresses. Results showed that, based on the homology cloning and 5'-RACE technique, the full-length cDNA sequence of PEPC (2901 bp) from S. aralocaspica was obtained, which shares the typical conserved domains to documented PEPCs and was identified as PEPC-1 in accord to the reported partial sequence (ppc-1) in S. aralocaspica. qRT-PCR analysis revealed the expression patterns of PEPC-1 and PEPC-2 (known as ppc-2, another plant type of PEPC) in S. aralocaspica, suggesting that PEPC-1 was up-regulated during seed germination and under NaCl stress, and presented higher level in chlorenchyma than other tissues, which were significantly different with PEPC-2. Afterwards, PEPC-1 was recombinant in E. coli (pET-28a-PEPC) and expressed as an approximate 110 kDa protein. Under various abiotic stresses, the recombinant E. coli strain harboring with PEPC-1 showed significant advantage in growth at 400-800 mmol L(-1) NaCl, 10-20% PEG6000, 25 and 30 °C lower temperature, 50-200 μmol L(-1) methyl viologen, and pH 5.0 and 9.0 condition, compared to control. Further analysis of the enzymatic characteristics of the recombinant PEPC-1 suggests that it was the higher enzyme activity of PEPC-1 which might confer the stress tolerance to E. coli. We speculate that over expression of PEPC-1 is probably related to regulation of oxaloacetate (OAA) in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in E. coli, which may contribute to further understanding of the physiological function of PEPC in S. aralocaspica. PMID:26777251

  7. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO(2) fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO(2) fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g(-1) DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (delta(13)C values of -13 and -11 per thousand for starch and malate compared to -11 per thousand of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (-17 per thousand and -14 per thousand) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g(-1) DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1-3 mg C g(-1) DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in delta(13)C values (from -17 per thousand in the evening to -12 per thousand in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export. PMID:20159885

  8. Investigation of Class 2b Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2002-04-03

    The popularity of trucks in the class 2 category--that is, those with a 6,000 to 10,000 pounds (lbs) gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)--has increased since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine vehicles in the upper portion of the class 2 weight range (designated as vehicle class 2b) and to assess their impact. Vehicles in class 2b (8,500-10,000 lbs GVWR) include pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and large vans (i.e., not minivans). Oak Ridge National Laboratory researched each individual truck model to determine which models were class 2b trucks and arrived at four methodologies to derive sales volumes. Two methods--one for calendar year and one for model year sales--were recommended for producing believable and reliable results. The study indicates that 521,000 class 2b trucks were sold in calendar year 1999--6.4% of sales of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Eighty-two percent of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were pickups; one third of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were diesel. There were 5.8 million class 2b trucks on the road in 2000, which amounts to 7.8% of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Twenty-four percent of the class 2b truck population is diesel. Estimates show that class 2b trucks account for 8% of annual miles traveled by trucks under 10,000 lbs and 9% of fuel use. Data on class 2b trucks are scarce. As the Tier 2 standards, which apply to passenger vehicles in the 8,500-10,000 lb GVWR category, become effective, additional data on class 2b trucks may become available--not only emissions data, but data in all areas. At the moment, distinguishing class 2b trucks from class 2 trucks in general is a substantial task requiring data on an individual model level.

  9. Pyramiding expression of maize genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) synergistically improve the photosynthetic characteristics of transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, HuiFang; Xu, WeiGang; Wang, HuiWei; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Qi, XueLi; Zhang, Lei; Li, ChunXin; Hua, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Using particle bombardment transformation, we introduced maize pepc cDNA encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ppdk cDNA encoding pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) into the C3 crop wheat to generate transgenic wheat lines carrying cDNA of pepc (PC lines), ppdk (PK lines) or both (PKC lines). The integration, transcription, and expression of the foreign genes were confirmed by Southern blot, Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Q-RT-PCR results indicated that the average relative expression levels of pepc and ppdk in the PKC lines reached 10 and 4.6, respectively, compared to their expressions in untransformed plants (set to 1). The enzyme activities of PEPC and PPDK in the PKC lines were 4.3- and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in the untransformed control. The maximum daily net photosynthetic rates of the PKC, PC, and PK lines were enhanced by 26.4, 13.3, and 4.5%, respectively, whereas the diurnal accumulations of photosynthesis were 21.3, 13.9, and 6.9%, respectively, higher than in the control. The Fv/Fm of the transgenic plants decreased less than in the control under high temperature and high light conditions (2 weeks after anthesis), suggesting that the transgenic wheat transports more absorbed light energy into a photochemical reaction. The exogenous maize C4-specific pepc gene was more effective than ppdk at improving the photosynthetic performance and yield characteristics of transgenic wheat, while the two genes showed a synergistic effect when they were transformed into the same genetic background, because the PKC lines exhibited improved photosynthetic and physiological traits. PMID:24595619

  10. Deployment of a class 2 tensegrity boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul; Solari, Soren; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    Tensegrity structures are special truss structures composed of bars in compression and cables in tension. Most tensegrity structures under investigation, to date, have been of Class 1, where bars do not touch. In this article, however, we demonstrate the hardware implementation of a 2 stage symmetric Class 2 tensegrity structure, where bars do connect to each other at a pivot. The open loop control law for tendon lengths to accomplish the desired geometric reconfiguration are computed analytically. The velocity of the structure's height is chosen and reconfiguration is accomplished in a quasi-static manner, ignoring dynamic effects. The main goal of this research was to design, build, and test the capabilities of the Class 2 structure for deployment concepts and to further explore the possibilities of multiple stage structures using the same design and components.

  11. Regulation of pepc gene expression in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its effects on cyclic electron flow around photosystem I and tolerances to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Peng-Peng; Shi, Ding-Ji; Mi, Hua-Ling; Zhu, Jia-Cheng; Huang, Xi-Wen; He, Pei-Min

    2015-05-01

    Since pepc gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) has been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and other cyanobacteria, the effects of pepc gene expression on photosynthesis have not been reported yet. In this study, we constructed mutants containing either upregulated (forward) or downregulated (reverse) pepc gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Results from real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Western blot and enzymatic analysis showed that PEPCase activity was significantly reduced in the reverse mutant compared with the wild type, and that of the forward mutant was obviously increased. Interestingly, the net photosynthesis in both the reverse mutant and the forward mutant were higher than that of the wild type, but dark respiration was decreased only in the reverse mutant. The absorbance changes of P700 upon saturation pulse showed the photosystem I (PSI) activity was inhibited, as reflected by Y(I), and Y(NA) was elevated, and dark reduction of P700(+) was stimulated, indicating enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI in the reverse mutant. Additionally, the reverse mutant photosynthesis was higher than that of the wild type in low temperature, low and high pH, and high salinity, and this implies increased tolerance in the reverse mutant through downregulated pepc gene. PMID:25040477

  12. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO2 fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO2 fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g−1 DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (δ13C values of –13 and –11‰ for starch and malate compared to –11‰ of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (–17‰ and –14‰) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g−1 DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1–3 mg C g−1 DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in δ13C values (from –17‰ in the evening to –12‰ in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export. PMID:20159885

  13. Optimization of class 2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns the optimal mass-to-stiffness ratio design of class-2 tensegrity towers. For different loading scenarios, the procedure seeks the topology and geometry of the structure that yields an optimal design satisfying common constraints. The domain of feasible tensegrity geometries is defined by imposing tensegrity equilibrium conditions on both unloaded and loaded structure. Remaining constraints include strength constraints for all elements of the structure and buckling constraints for bars. The symmetry of the design is imposed by restricting the domain of geometric variables and element parameters. The static response of the structure is computed by using a nonlinear large displacement model. The problem is cast in the form of a nonlinear program. The influence of material parameters on the optimal shape of the structure is investigated.

  14. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... watertight doors at the entrance to shaft tunnels need not be counted. If Class 2 doors are allowed under paragraph (c) of this section, the doors at the entrance to shaft tunnels may also be Class 2....

  15. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... watertight doors at the entrance to shaft tunnels need not be counted. If Class 2 doors are allowed under paragraph (c) of this section, the doors at the entrance to shaft tunnels may also be Class 2....

  16. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  17. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  18. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  19. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  20. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  1. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door...

  2. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door...

  3. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door...

  4. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes. PMID:26712095

  5. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class 2 lamps. 20.9 Section 20.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.9 Class 2 lamps. (a) Safety. (1) Unless special features of the lamp...

  6. Moufang loops of class 2 and cubic forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tim

    2000-03-01

    We classify finite Moufang loops which are centrally nilpotent of class 2 in terms of certain cubic forms, concentrating on small Frattini Moufang loops, or SFMLs, which are Moufang loops L with a central subgroup Z of order p such that L/Z is an elementary abelian p-group. (For example, SFM 2-loops are precisely the class of code loops, in the sense of Griess.)More specifically, we first show that the nuclearly-derived subloop (normal associator subloop) of a Moufang loop of class 2 has exponent dividing 6. It follows that the subloop of elements of p-power order is associative for p > 3. Next, we show that if L is an SFML, then L/Z has the structure of a vector space with a symplectic cubic form. We then show that every symplectic cubic form is realized by some SFML and that two SFMLs are isomorphic in a manner preserving the central subgroup Z if and only if their symplectic cubic spaces are isomorphic up to scalar multiple. Consequently, we also obtain an explicit characterization of isotopy in SFM 3-loops. Finally, we extend many of our results to all finite Moufang loops of class 2.

  7. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials. PMID:26568975

  8. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  9. 7 CFR 30.37 - Class 2; fire-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. 30.37 Section 30... Grades § 30.37 Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. (a) Type 21. That kind of fire-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Fire-cured, or Dark-fired, produced principally in the Piedmont and...

  10. 7 CFR 30.37 - Class 2; fire-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. 30.37 Section 30... Grades § 30.37 Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. (a) Type 21. That kind of fire-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Fire-cured, or Dark-fired, produced principally in the Piedmont and...

  11. 7 CFR 30.37 - Class 2; fire-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. 30.37 Section 30... Grades § 30.37 Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. (a) Type 21. That kind of fire-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Fire-cured, or Dark-fired, produced principally in the Piedmont and...

  12. 7 CFR 30.37 - Class 2; fire-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. 30.37 Section 30... Grades § 30.37 Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. (a) Type 21. That kind of fire-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Fire-cured, or Dark-fired, produced principally in the Piedmont and...

  13. 7 CFR 30.37 - Class 2; fire-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. 30.37 Section 30... Grades § 30.37 Class 2; fire-cured types and groups. (a) Type 21. That kind of fire-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Fire-cured, or Dark-fired, produced principally in the Piedmont and...

  14. Sequence, structural and evolutionary relationships between class 2 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, S; Härtlein, M; Leberman, R

    1991-01-01

    Class 2 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which include the enzymes for alanine, aspartic acid, asparagine, glycine, histidine, lysine, phenylalanine, proline, serine and threonine, are characterised by three distinct sequence motifs 1,2 and 3 (reference 1). The structural and evolutionary relatedness of these ten enzymes are examined using alignments of primary sequences from prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources and the known three dimensional structure of seryl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli. It is shown that motif 1 forms part of the dimer interface of seryl-tRNA synthetase and motifs 2 and 3 part of the putative active site. It is further shown that the seven alpha 2 dimeric synthetases can be subdivided into class 2a (proline, threonine, histidine and serine) and class 2b (aspartic acid, asparagine and lysine), each subclass sharing several important characteristic sequence motifs in addition to those characteristic of class 2 enzymes in general. The alpha 2 beta 2 tetrameric enzymes (for glycine and phenylalanine) show certain special features in common as well as some of the class 2b motifs. In the alanyl-tRNA synthetase only motif 3 and possibly motif 2 can be identified. The sequence alignments suggest that the catalytic domain of other class 2 synthetases should resemble the antiparallel domain found in seryl-tRNA synthetase. Predictions are made about the sequence location of certain important helices and beta-strands in this domain as well as suggestions concerning which residues are important in ATP and amino acid binding. Strong homologies are found in the N-terminal extensions of class 2b synthetases and in the C-terminal extensions of class 2a synthetases suggesting that these putative tRNA binding domains have been added at a later stage in evolution to the catalytic domain. Images PMID:1852601

  15. Novel Insights about Class 2 Integrons from Experimental and Genomic Epidemiology▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Piñeiro, Silvia; Centrón, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    In order to contribute to the knowledge of the architecture and epidemiology of class 2 integrons, we performed a class 2 integron molecular survey in which we analyzed 726 isolates in two bacterial populations from environmental and nonepidemiologically related clinical samples, respectively, collected from 1982 to 2007. We recovered the intI2 gene from 130 of 726 isolates, most of which were clinical isolates, and only 1 (a psychrophilic Pseudomonas sp.) was from a water sample. Unlike the widespread distribution of class 1 integrons within Gram-negative bacilli, only Acinetobacter baumannii and Enterobacter cloacae harbored class 2 integrons at a high frequency in our collection. Class 2 integrons with six novel cassette arrays were documented. Characterization of the transposition module of Tn7, the genetic platform in which class 2 integrons have always been reported, showed tns modules with a mosaic genetic structure. A bioinformatic analysis performed with the tns genes present in sequence databases, the finding of intI2 not associated with tns genes, and the genetic examination of novel tns-like genes found in three isolates indicated the possibility of the independent evolution of the two components related to horizontal gene transfer, the class 2 integrons and the Tn7 transposons. PMID:19917745

  16. Depressurization-induced gas production from Class 1 and Class 2hydrate deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Kowalsky, Michael

    2006-05-12

    Class 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) underlain by a two-phase zone involving mobile gas. Such deposits are further divided to Class 1W (involving water and hydrate in the HBL) and Class 1G (involving gas and hydrate in the HBL). In Class 2 deposits, a mobile water zone underlies the hydrate zone. Methane is the main hydrate-forming gas in natural accumulations. Using TOUGH-FX/HYDRATE to study the depressurization-induced gas production from such deposits, we determine that large volumes of gas could be readily produced at high rates for long times using conventional technology. Dissociation in Class 1W deposits proceeds in distinct stages, but is continuous in Class 1G deposits. Hydrates are shown to contribute significantly to the production rate (up to 65 percent and 75 percent in Class 1W and 1G, respectively) and to the cumulative volume of produced gas (up to 45 percent and 54 percent in Class 1W and 1G, respectively). Large volumes of hydrate-originating CH4 could be produced from Class 2 hydrates, but a relatively long lead time would be needed before gas production (which continuously increases over time) attains a substantial level. The permeability of the confining boundaries plays a significant role in gas production from Class 2 deposits. In general, long-term production is needed to realize the full potential of the very promising Class 1 and Class 2 hydrate deposits.

  17. Discovery and Functional Characterization of Diverse Class 2 CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Shmakov, Sergey; Abudayyeh, Omar O; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Semenova, Ekaterina; Minakhin, Leonid; Joung, Julia; Konermann, Silvana; Severinov, Konstantin; Zhang, Feng; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-11-01

    Microbial CRISPR-Cas systems are divided into Class 1, with multisubunit effector complexes, and Class 2, with single protein effectors. Currently, only two Class 2 effectors, Cas9 and Cpf1, are known. We describe here three distinct Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems. The effectors of two of the identified systems, C2c1 and C2c3, contain RuvC-like endonuclease domains distantly related to Cpf1. The third system, C2c2, contains an effector with two predicted HEPN RNase domains. Whereas production of mature CRISPR RNA (crRNA) by C2c1 depends on tracrRNA, C2c2 crRNA maturation is tracrRNA independent. We found that C2c1 systems can mediate DNA interference in a 5'-PAM-dependent fashion analogous to Cpf1. However, unlike Cpf1, which is a single-RNA-guided nuclease, C2c1 depends on both crRNA and tracrRNA for DNA cleavage. Finally, comparative analysis indicates that Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems evolved on multiple occasions through recombination of Class 1 adaptation modules with effector proteins acquired from distinct mobile elements. PMID:26593719

  18. CLASS2: accurate and efficient splice variant annotation from RNA-seq reads.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Florea, Liliana

    2016-06-01

    Next generation sequencing of cellular RNA is making it possible to characterize genes and alternative splicing in unprecedented detail. However, designing bioinformatics tools to accurately capture splicing variation has proven difficult. Current programs can find major isoforms of a gene but miss lower abundance variants, or are sensitive but imprecise. CLASS2 is a novel open source tool for accurate genome-guided transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq reads based on the model of splice graph. An extension of our program CLASS, CLASS2 jointly optimizes read patterns and the number of supporting reads to score and prioritize transcripts, implemented in a novel, scalable and efficient dynamic programming algorithm. When compared against reference programs, CLASS2 had the best overall accuracy and could detect up to twice as many splicing events with precision similar to the best reference program. Notably, it was the only tool to produce consistently reliable transcript models for a wide range of applications and sequencing strategies, including ribosomal RNA-depleted samples. Lightweight and multi-threaded, CLASS2 requires <3GB RAM and can analyze a 350 million read set within hours, and can be widely applied to transcriptomics studies ranging from clinical RNA sequencing, to alternative splicing analyses, and to the annotation of new genomes. PMID:26975657

  19. CLASS2: accurate and efficient splice variant annotation from RNA-seq reads

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Florea, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of cellular RNA is making it possible to characterize genes and alternative splicing in unprecedented detail. However, designing bioinformatics tools to accurately capture splicing variation has proven difficult. Current programs can find major isoforms of a gene but miss lower abundance variants, or are sensitive but imprecise. CLASS2 is a novel open source tool for accurate genome-guided transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq reads based on the model of splice graph. An extension of our program CLASS, CLASS2 jointly optimizes read patterns and the number of supporting reads to score and prioritize transcripts, implemented in a novel, scalable and efficient dynamic programming algorithm. When compared against reference programs, CLASS2 had the best overall accuracy and could detect up to twice as many splicing events with precision similar to the best reference program. Notably, it was the only tool to produce consistently reliable transcript models for a wide range of applications and sequencing strategies, including ribosomal RNA-depleted samples. Lightweight and multi-threaded, CLASS2 requires <3GB RAM and can analyze a 350 million read set within hours, and can be widely applied to transcriptomics studies ranging from clinical RNA sequencing, to alternative splicing analyses, and to the annotation of new genomes. PMID:26975657

  20. Nematode and Arthropod Genomes Provide New Insights into the Evolution of Class 2 B1 GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João C. R.; Félix, Rute C.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes. PMID:24651821

  1. Preferential carriage of class 2 integrons in Acinetobacter baumannii CC113 and novel singletons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, M S; Montaña, S; Cassini, M; Centrón, D

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the distribution of integrons associated with multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates around the world remains incomplete. The association between the class 1 and 2 integron A. baumannii-positive isolates (n = 60), recovered since 1982 from 11 Argentinean hospitals, and the circulating lineages, was investigated. While class 2 integrons were highly significantly associated with clonal lineage CC113B/CC79P (P = 0·009) and novel singletons (P = 0·001), class 1 integrons were found not to be associated with CC109B/CC1P or other lineages. The study reveals a differential distribution of class 2 integrons in lineages, and suggests that the prevalence of intI2 in Argentina is related to the emergence of novel singletons in recent years and to the abundance of CC113B/CC79P, which has been the local dominant lineage for several decades. PMID:25697643

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Zhang, Keni

    2008-05-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of approximal contacts in Class 2 composite resin restorations: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Charbeneau, G T; Gregory, W A; Dennison, J B

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate and reproducible intraoral method of measuring the distance between two teeth, and to conduct a clinical pilot study of the effect of placement of a class 2 posterior resin restoration upon this intertooth dimension. A Kaman Sciences KD-2611 noncontact displacement measuring system with a 1U unshielding sensor, based upon the variable resistance of eddy current, was used for the intraoral measurement. Seven patients requiring conservative interproximal restorations (initial placements or replacements) on the premolars were selected. Addition silicone impressions were taken of the posterior quadrants from which low-fusing metal (Cerrolow-136) casts were made. Composite resin copings constructed on modified rubber dam clamps were fabricated for the restoration and adjacent teeth upon these metal casts. Aluminum targets and Plexiglas holders for the sensor were attached to the bow of the rubber dam clamp with light-activated composite resin. Quantitative measurements of intertooth distance were made preoperatively, postoperatively, and at one-week and 4 1/2-month recalls after placement of class 2 composite resin restorations for 11 teeth. Four unrestored premolars served as a control. The data were tabulated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The results indicated that the mean postoperative intercoping distance for restored teeth increased after a multiple wedging technique had been applied during restorative procedure. At the one-week recall, these distances had decreased. The 4 1/2-month measurements showed a further decrease with an average loss of 15 microns from the preoperative baseline. PMID:2639320

  4. Complex structure of a bacterial class 2 histone deacetylase homologue with a trifluoromethylketone inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Tine Kragh; Hildmann, Christian; Riester, Daniel; Wegener, Dennis; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Ficner, Ralf

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of HDAH FB188 in complex with a trifluoromethylketone at 2.2 Å resolution is reported and compared to a previously determined inhibitor complex. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as attractive targets in anticancer drug development. To date, a number of HDAC inhibitors have been developed and most of them are hydroxamic acid derivatives, typified by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Not surprisingly, structural information that can greatly enhance the design of novel HDAC inhibitors is so far only available for hydroxamic acids in complex with HDAC or HDAC-like enzymes. Here, the first structure of an enzyme complex with a nonhydroxamate HDAC inhibitor is presented. The structure of the trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitor 9,9,9-trifluoro-8-oxo-N-phenylnonanamide in complex with bacterial FB188 HDAH (histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes strain FB188) has been determined. HDAH reveals high sequential and functional homology to human class 2 HDACs and a high structural homology to human class 1 HDACs. Comparison with the structure of HDAH in complex with SAHA reveals that the two inhibitors superimpose well. However, significant differences in binding to the active site of HDAH were observed. In the presented structure the O atom of the trifluoromethyl ketone moiety is within binding distance of the Zn atom of the enzyme and the F atoms participate in interactions with the enzyme, thereby involving more amino acids in enzyme–inhibitor binding.

  5. Measurement and analysis of magnetic field variation during a class 2b flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K.

    1978-01-01

    A digital analysis of high-time-resolution videomagnetograms taken during a class 2b flare that occurred at 60 deg east is reported. The data were obtained at the Big Bear Observatory and calibrated by a Mt. Wilson magnetogram. Changes of weak magnetic fields (less than 100 G) with an amplitude of 30% to 100% have been detected over 55% of the optical flare region, apparently taking place at the initial phase of the flare. Statistical considerations suggest a real flare association with most of these changes. H-alpha observations show that large changes took place over the footpoints of heavily inclined structures like penumbral fibrils, while smaller changes took place over the plage region. An apparent polarity reversal was found at the feet of erupted fibrils. Based on force-free field calculations these changes can be reasonably explained as a transformation of the current-carrying fields to potential fields which produced large changes in the field-line inclination and rotation.

  6. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  7. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  8. Class 1 and class 2 integrons in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli from poultry in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavicchio, Lara; Dotto, Giorgia; Giacomelli, Martina; Giovanardi, Davide; Grilli, Guido; Franciosini, Maria Pia; Trocino, Angela; Piccirillo, Alessandra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of class 1 and 2 integrons in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) from poultry in northern Italy. Strains were tested for phenotypic resistance to aminoglycosides and sulphonamides, and the association between the presence of integrons and the resistance to these antimicrobials was evaluated. A total of 299 isolates (158 from turkeys, 110 from broilers, and 31 from layer hens) were collected from 200 industrial farms. Antimicrobial susceptibility test by the disk diffusion method was performed in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. All strains were screened for the presence of class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR and sequencing. About 55% of APEC contained integrons (class 1, 49.8%; class 2, 10.4%). Different variants of the aadA (5 variants) and the dfrA (4 variants) genes, encoding for streptomycin and trimethoprim resistance respectively, were detected in integron-positive isolates. Less common gene cassettes, such as sat, estX, and orfF, were also identified. Fifteen and 4 gene cassette arrays were found among class 1 and 2 integrons, respectively. High levels of resistance were observed for triple sulphonamides (79.3%), streptomycin (67.2%), and sulfamethoxazole combined with trimethoprim (62.2%), whereas resistance against gentamycin (16.7%), kanamycin (14.7%), and apramycin 3.0%) was low. Integron positivity was significantly higher in isolates phenotypically resistant to aminoglycosides (63.6% vs. 37.8%, P<0.001) and sulfonamides (64.1% vs. 21.1%, P<0.001) than in susceptible ones. Integron-borne aminoglycoside and sulfonamide resistance in APEC represents a concern for the poultry industry in Italy, since they are among the most commonly used antimicrobials in poultry therapy. PMID:25840964

  9. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    2000-04-30

    This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small independent producer to identify

  10. 32 CFR 1630.26 - Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study preparing for the ministry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study... study preparing for the ministry. In accord with part 1639 of this chapter any registrant shall be... direction of a recognized church or religious organization; and (b) Who is satisfactorily pursuing a...

  11. 32 CFR 1630.26 - Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study preparing for the ministry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study... study preparing for the ministry. In accord with part 1639 of this chapter any registrant shall be... direction of a recognized church or religious organization; and (b) Who is satisfactorily pursuing a...

  12. 32 CFR 1630.26 - Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study preparing for the ministry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study... study preparing for the ministry. In accord with part 1639 of this chapter any registrant shall be... direction of a recognized church or religious organization; and (b) Who is satisfactorily pursuing a...

  13. 32 CFR 1630.26 - Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study preparing for the ministry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study... study preparing for the ministry. In accord with part 1639 of this chapter any registrant shall be... direction of a recognized church or religious organization; and (b) Who is satisfactorily pursuing a...

  14. 32 CFR 1630.26 - Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study preparing for the ministry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class 2-D: Registrant deferred because of study... study preparing for the ministry. In accord with part 1639 of this chapter any registrant shall be... direction of a recognized church or religious organization; and (b) Who is satisfactorily pursuing a...

  15. ROAD CLASS 2 TRANSPORTATION DIGITAL LINE GRAPHS FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT (MAIA) STUDY AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a geographic information system (GIS) coverage of the state and county highways (Class 2 Roads) for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) Project region. The coverage was produced using US Geological...

  16. Trace Element Analysis as an Exploration Tool for Unconfined Class 2 Hydrate Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. D.; Max, M. P.; Osegovic, J. P.; Brazel, L.; Tatro, S.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrate system analysis, analogous to hydrocarbon system analysis, is based on confirming significant gas flux, suitable thickness of hydrate stability zone, and suitably porous and permeable hydrate 'trap' beds in which economically significant hydrate crystallization may take place. Unconfined Class 2 hydrate deposits, which form by crystallization of dissolved natural gas in more porous and permeable sediments whose pore fluids may vent from the seafloor carry the dissolved rejected material. Analysis of superficial pore or vent water may provide a sensitive means of suggesting whether the water was once associated with hydrate crystallization. The rejection of dissolved ions and compounds during carbon dioxide hydrate precipitation on a chilled surface was determined to quantify the reject rate of specific materials from the hydrate matrix. Seawater and seawater doped with boric acid (H3BO3, MW 61.83 g/mol) and sodium borate decahydrate (Na2B4O7*10H2O, MW 381.37 g/mol) were used as crystallization solvents. Initial boron concentrations ranged from 4.1 to 27mg/L. Hydrate formation occurred with significant rejection of boron from the hydrate matrix, increasing the concentration in the crystallizing fluid. The initial boron concentration level did not affect the rejection efficiency, determined by comparing the initial concentration of boron to the concentration in the hydrate melt water. In addition to boron, naturally occurring calcium and magnesium concentration levels were also studied and showed a similar concentration reduction. Our experiments have shown that non-ionic dissolved species that occur in sediment pore water, in which hydrate may form, are rejected and concentrated during hydrate formation. The measurement of NaCl may provide a clue to the water having once been involved in subjacent hydrate formation, but other species that do not have additional crystallization opportunities in the sediment may be better clues to the extent of a hydrate

  17. A class 2 weight assessment for the implementation of commonality and preliminary structural designs for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Tom; Dragush, George; Hendrich, Louis; Hensley, Doug; Morgan, Louise; Oxendine, Charles; Remen, John; Robinson, Terry; Russell, Mark; Swift, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of commonality objectives are determined. Commonality is discussed in terms of weight penalties that increase the take-off weight of several members of the family of airplanes. Preliminary designs of fuselage structural members and a discussion of weight penalties due to implementation of common fuselage structure throughout the family is examined. Wing torque box designs are discussed along with structural weight penalties incurred. A landing gear design study is contained along with the weight penalties that a common gear system will impose. Implementation of common power plants throughout the family and the weight penalties that occur are discussed. The weight penalties imposed by commonality on all the airplanes in the family are summarized. Class 2 breakdowns are also presented. The feasibility of commonality based on a percentage of take-off weight increase over the Class 2 baseline weights is then assessed.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance markers of class 1 and class 2 integron-bearing Escherichia coli from irrigation water and sediments.

    PubMed

    Roe, Matthew T; Vega, Everardo; Pillai, Suresh D

    2003-07-01

    Municipal and agricultural pollution affects the Rio Grande, a river that separates the United States from Mexico. Three hundred and twenty-two Escherichia coli isolates were examined for multiple antibiotic resistance phenotypes and the prevalence of class 1 and class 2 integron sequences. Thirty-two (10%) of the isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Four (13%) of these isolates contained class 1-specific integron sequences; one isolate contained class 2 integron-specific sequences. Sequencing showed that the class 1 integron-bearing strain contained two distinct gene cassettes, sat-1 and aadA. Although three of the four class 1 integron-bearing strains harbored the aadA sequence, none of the strains was phenotypically resistant to streptomycin. These results suggest that integron-bearing E. coli strains can be present in contaminated irrigation canals and that these isolates may not express these resistance markers. PMID:12890322

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance Markers of Class 1 and Class 2 Integron-bearing Escherichia coli from Irrigation Water and Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Matthew T.; Vega, Everardo

    2003-01-01

    Municipal and agricultural pollution affects the Rio Grande, a river that separates the United States from Mexico. Three hundred and twenty-two Escherichia coli isolates were examined for multiple antibiotic resistance phenotypes and the prevalence of class 1 and class 2 integron sequences. Thirty-two (10%) of the isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Four (13%) of these isolates contained class 1–specific integron sequences; one isolate contained class 2 integron–specific sequences. Sequencing showed that the class 1 integron–bearing strain contained two distinct gene cassettes, sat-1 and aadA. Although three of the four class 1 integron–bearing strains harbored the aadA sequence, none of the strains was phenotypically resistant to streptomycin. These results suggest that integron-bearing E. coli strains can be present in contaminated irrigation canals and that these isolates may not express these resistance markers. PMID:12890322

  20. Erythromycin esterase gene ere(A) is located in a functional gene cassette in an unusual class 2 integron.

    PubMed

    Biskri, Latefa; Mazel, Didier

    2003-10-01

    The gene ere(A) of the plasmid pIP1100 is larger than originally reported and is organized as an integron gene cassette. The ere(A) gene cassette carries its own promoter and is propagated by a class 2 integron with an insertion sequence element, IS1, inserted upstream of the intI2 gene. The mobility of the ere(A) cassette has been demonstrated. PMID:14506050

  1. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T. )

    1991-11-15

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by {gamma} interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out.

  2. Development and Implementation of a Battery-Electric Light-Duty Class 2a Truck including Hybrid Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmeyer, Phillip J.

    This dissertation addresses two major related research topics: 1) the design, fabrication, modeling, and experimental testing of a battery-electric light-duty Class 2a truck; and 2) the design and evaluation of a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) for this and other vehicles. The work begins with the determination of the truck's peak power and wheel torque requirements (135kW/4900Nm). An electric traction system is then designed that consists of an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine, two-speed gearbox, three-phase motor drive, and LiFePO4 battery pack. The battery pack capacity is selected to achieve a driving range similar to the 2011 Nissan Leaf electric vehicle (73 miles). Next, the demonstrator electric traction system is built and installed in the vehicle, a Ford F150 pickup truck, and an extensive set of sensors and data acquisition equipment is installed. Detailed loss models of the battery pack, electric traction machine, and motor drive are developed and experimentally verified using the driving data. Many aspects of the truck's performance are investigated, including efficiency differences between the two-gear configuration and the optimal gear selection. The remainder focuses on the application of battery/ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (HESS) to electric vehicles. First, the electric truck is modeled with the addition of an ultracapacitor pack and a dc/dc converter. Rule-based and optimal battery/ultracapacitor power-split control algorithms are then developed, and the performance improvements achieved for both algorithms are evaluated for operation at 25°C. The HESS modeling is then extended to low temperatures, where battery resistance increases substantially. To verify the accuracy of the model-predicted results, a scaled hybrid energy storage system is built and the system is tested for several drive cycles and for two temperatures. The HESS performance is then modeled for three variants of the vehicle design, including the

  3. Randomized Phase II Trial of High-Dose Melatonin and Radiation Therapy for RPA Class 2 Patients With Brain Metastases (RTOG 0119)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Lawrence . E-mail: Berklb@moffitt.usf.edu; Berkey, Brian; Rich, Tyvin; Hrushesky, William; Gallagher, Michael; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; McGarry, Ronald C.; Suh, John; Mehta, Minesh

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-dose melatonin for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 2 patients with brain metastases improved survival over historical controls, and to determine if the time of day melatonin was given affected its toxicity or efficacy. RTOG 0119 was a phase II randomized trial for this group of patients. Methods and Materials: RTOG RPA Class 2 patients with brain metastases were randomized to 20 mg of melatonin, given either in the morning (8-9 AM) or in the evening (8-9 PM). All patients received radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) in the afternoon. Melatonin was continued until neurologic deterioration or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival time. Neurologic deterioration, as reflected by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, was also measured. Results: Neither of the randomized groups had survival distributions that differed significantly from the historic controls of patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. The median survivals of the morning and evening melatonin treatments were 3.4 and 2.8 months, while the RTOG historical control survival was 4.1 months. Conclusions: High-dose melatonin did not show any beneficial effect in this group of patients.

  4. Bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes from developing castor oil seeds interact in vivo and associate with the surface of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Khuu, Nicholas; Howard, Alexander S M; Mullen, Robert T; Plaxton, William C

    2012-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from developing castor oil seeds (COS) exists as two distinct oligomeric isoforms. The typical class-1 PEPC homotetramer consists of 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits, whereas the allosterically desensitized 910-kDa class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from the association of class-1 PEPC with 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. The in vivo interaction and subcellular location of COS BTPC and PTPC were assessed by imaging fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged PEPCs in tobacco suspension-cultured cells. The BTPC-FP mainly localized to cytoplasmic punctate/globular structures, identified as mitochondria by co-immunostaining of endogenous cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of respiration with KCN resulted in proportional decreases and increases in mitochondrial versus cytosolic BTPC-FP, respectively. The FP-PTPC and NLS-FP-PTPC (containing an appended nuclear localization signal, NLS) localized to the cytosol and nucleus, respectively, but both co-localized with mitochondrial-associated BTPC when co-expressed with BTPC-FP. Transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled developing COS revealed that BTPC and PTPC are localized at the mitochondrial (outer) envelope, as well as the cytosol. Moreover, thermolysin-sensitive BTPC and PTPC polypeptides were detected on immunoblots of purified COS mitochondria. Overall, our results demonstrate that: (i) COS BTPC and PTPC interact in vivo as a class-2 PEPC complex that associates with the surface of mitochondria, (ii) BTPC's unique and divergent intrinsically disordered region mediates its interaction with PTPC, whereas (iii) the PTPC-containing class-1 PEPC is entirely cytosolic. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-associated class-2 PEPC facilitates rapid refixation of respiratory CO(2) while sustaining a large anaplerotic flux to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons withdrawn for biosynthesis. PMID:22404138

  5. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas: Near term, Class 2. [Annual report], September 18, 1994--October 1, 1995. Draft.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the progress during the first year of Budget period 1 of the near term Class 2 project entitled ``Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas``. Two examples of advanced technologies developed as part of this project are highlighted along with the use of the Internet to transfer these technologies. The two advanced technologies are a spread-sheet petrophysical analysis and reservoir evaluation (PfEFFER), and a petrophysical/seismic approach to well logs (pseudoseismic). Work continues on multi-disciplinary reservoir characterization at the demonstration site. The potential for incremental primary recovery is being evaluated using the improved reservoir characterization to target infill drilling and evaluate the potential of a horizontal well. The impact of successful incremental primary recovery from sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity Mississippian reservoirs such as are present at the Schaben demonstration site would be significant for Kansas and the US.

  6. Insights into the mechanism of oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate catalysed by human class 2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: a QM/MM free energy study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Silva, José Rogério A; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2015-07-21

    The dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) enzyme catalyzes the unique redox reaction in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. In this reaction, the oxidation of dihydroorotate (DHO) to orotate (OA) and reduction of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor is catalysed by DHOD. The class 2 DHOD, to which the human enzyme belongs, was experimentally shown to follow a stepwise mechanism but the data did not allow the determination of the order of bond-breaking in a stepwise oxidation of DHO. The goal of this study is to understand the reaction mechanism at the molecular level of class 2 DHOD, which may aid in the design of inhibitors that selectively impact the activity of only certain members of the enzyme family. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of oxidation of DHO to OA in human DHOD was studied using a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) approach and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy barriers calculated reveal that the mechanism in human DHOD occurs via a stepwise reaction pathway. In the first step, a proton is abstracted from the C5 of DHO to the deprotonated Ser215 side chain. Whereas, in the second step, the transfer of the hydride or hydride equivalent from the C6 of DHO to the N5 of FMN, where free energy barrier calculated by the DFT/MM level is 10.84 kcal mol(-1). Finally, a residual decomposition analysis was carried out in order to elucidate the influence of the catalytic region residues during DHO oxidation. PMID:26087682

  7. [Characterization of class 1 and class 2 integron gene cassettes in Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine cultures: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Çopur Çiçek, Ayşegül; Sandallı, Cemal; Budak, Emine Esra; Yağmur, Gülhan; Çizmeci, Zeynep; Ak, Sibel; Balcı, Pervin Özlem; Şay Coşkun, Safiye Umut; Ay Altıntop, Yasemin; Fırat, Mehmet; Sarı, Fatma; Çalışkan, Ahmet; Yıldız, Nazan; Sancaktar, Metin; Özgümüş, Osman Birol

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from both nosocomial and community acquired urinary tract infections. Although there are many studies from different centers concerning the antibiotic susceptibility of E.coli isolates in Turkey, the studies are quite few about class 1 and class 2 integron cassettes in clinical E.coli isolates from urinary samples. The aim of the study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility and the carriage of integron gene cassettes in E.coli strains isolated from urinary samples. A total of 626 E.coli strains isolated from urine cultures in microbiology laboratories located at 10 provinces from different regions of Turkey (Denizli, Ankara, Kayseri, Niğde, Şanlıurfa, Kahramanmaras, Tokat, Malatya, Konya and Trabzon) between June 2011-June 2012 were included in the study. The identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates were studied by conventional methods as well as Vitek® 2 Compact (bioMérieux, France) and BD Phoenix™ 100 (Becton Dickinson, USA) systems. The antibiotic susceptibilities of all the isolates were retested by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations in the main center of the study in order to achive the standardization. The presence of integrons was detected with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method by using specific primers targeting class 1 (intI1) and class 2 (intI2) integrase gene regions. After integron amplification the samples were cloned and subjected to DNA sequencing. When the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates were evaluated, the highest resistance was observed against most commonly used empirical antibiotics namely ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) with the mean rate of 58.6% (range: 43.8%-73.2%) and 41.2% (range: 35.4%-45.8%), respectively. The most effective antibiotics detected against the isolates were imipenem and amikacin with the lowest resistance rates of 0.2% (range: 0%-1.1%) and 0.6% (range: 0

  8. M2/M1 ratio of tumor associated macrophages and PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with class 1 and class 2 molecular profiles.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Martina C; Bergstrom, Chris; Wells, Jill R; Höller, Tobias; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages have been found to be negative predictors of outcome in patients with uveal melanoma. In particular, recent studies point toward a disease-progressing role of proangiogenic M2 macrophages in melanomas with monosomy 3. Although most studies implicate a protective effect of PPAR-gamma activation in tumors, PPAR-gamma has also been shown to promote the polarization of M1 macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. The purpose of this investigation was first, to characterize the phenotype of tumor infiltrating macrophages and second, to study PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with molecular gene expression profile as prognostic predictors for patients' outcome. Twenty specimens from patients with uveal melanoma were analyzed for clinical and histologic tumor characteristics. The molecular RNA profile (class 1 or class 2) was commercially determined. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the specimens were dual labeled for CD68 and CD163. CD68 + CD163- M1 macrophages and CD68 + CD163+ M2 macrophages were analyzed in ten high power fields sparing macrophage-poor areas and a mean value was calculated for each tumor. The tumors were immunostained for von Willebrand factor and the micro vascular density (MVD) was analyzed according to Foss. To assess the proliferative rate of each tumor, Ki67 expression was evaluated in ten high power fields followed by calculation of a mean value. Expression of PPAR-gamma was evaluated using a score from 0 (no staining) to 3 (tumor entirely stained). Statistical analysis and a respective correlation were made between histologic characteristics, molecular profile, type of tumor infiltrating macrophages (M1 vs. M2), MVD, proliferative rate, and PPAR-gamma expression. Our results showed a correlation between the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages and the molecular profile with a ratio of approximately 1 corresponding to molecular class 1 and a ratio of approximately 2 corresponding to molecular class 2 (p = 0.01). The ratio of M2/M1

  9. An introduction to the design and fabrication progress of a megawatt class 2G HTS motor for the ship propulsion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heejong; Kim, Yeong-Chun; Park, Heui-Joo; Yu, In-Keun; Park, Minwon

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the design and fabrication progress of a megawatt class 2G high temperature superconductor (HTS) motor for the ship propulsion application at Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction. The purpose of this 2G HTS propulsion motor is to launch the business area for marine applications such as surface ship, submarine, merchant ship etc. The principles and interpretation of the magnetic field for 2G HTS motor and permanent magnet type motors are similar on the basis of 3D design and production. The most important component of an HTS motor is the rotor, which is composed of HTS coil, non-ferrous metal, torque disk, damper, and hollow shaft. A HTS rotor using hastelloy-based 2G HTS coils was designed and built. Open-circuit and short-circuit characteristics of the superconducting motor were investigated and compared with the analysis results at reduced excitation to verify the design. Preliminary testing of a 2G HTS motor has been conducted at a few hundred kilowatts as per the design. Through these results, we anticipate that most of the design criteria can be satisfied. However, we have faced several issues during the testing of the motor and these issues need to be resolved in order to take the design further.

  10. Murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T-helper class 2 cells (CRTh2).

    PubMed

    Boehme, Stefen A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Chen, Edward P; Ly, Tai Wei; Kawakami, Yuko; Bacon, Kevin B

    2009-06-01

    Mast cells are bone marrow-derived effector cells that can initiate inflammatory responses to infectious organisms or allergens by releasing a multitude of pro-inflammatory factors including prostaglandin (PG) D(2). We demonstrate that primary murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) express the PGD(2) receptor; chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T(h) class 2 cells (CRT(h)2). Activation of CRT(h)2 on BMMC by PGD(2) or the CRT(h)2-specific agonist, 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin D(2) (DK-PGD(2)), resulted in signaling response including Ca(2+) mobilization and phosphorylation of the p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) kinases. Phosphorylation of the ERKs could be blocked by pertussis toxin, as well as a small molecule antagonist of CRT(h)2, Compound A. Activation of CRT(h)2 on BMMC also resulted in the up-regulation of CD23 and CD30 on the cell surface, as well as CD62L shedding. Finally, PGD(2) and DK-PGD(2) induced the migration of BMMC in vitro and in vivo in response to an intra-dermal DK-PGD(2) injection. Both these processes were inhibited by the CRT(h)2 antagonist. These results raise the possibility that the functional consequences of the PGD(2)-CRT(h)2 interaction on mast cells may be relevant in allergic inflammation. PMID:19346259

  11. Assistance to state underground injection control programs and the oil and gas industry with class 2 injection well data management and technology transfer. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Paque, M.J.

    1995-11-23

    The Underground Injection Practices Research Foundation (UIPRF) administered a grant project funded by the US Department of Energy relating to Class 2 injection well operations in various primacy and direct implementation states throughout the country. This effort provided substantial benefits to state regulatory agencies and oil and gas producing companies. It enhanced the protection of the environment through the protection of ground water resources and improved oil and gas production operations within affected states. This project involved the following accomplishment: (1) Completed the design and installation of the only comprehensive, fully relational PC-Based Oil and Gas regulatory data management system (the Risk Based Data Management System) in the country. Additionally, training and data conversion was conduced and the RBDMS User`s Guide and the RBDMS Administrator`s Guide were completed. (2) State wide Area-Of-Review (AOR) workshop were held in California and Oklahoma and a national three-day workshop was held in Kansas City, Missouri where 24 state oil and gas agencies were represented.

  12. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas near term Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--March 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1998-04-01

    This annual report describes progress during the second year of the project entitled {open_quotes}Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas{close_quotes}. This project funded under the Department of Energy`s Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, several tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated. These include: (1) a new approach to subsurface visualization using electric logs ({open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{open_quotes}); (2) a low-cost easy-to-use spreadsheet log analysis software (PfEFFER); and (3) an extension of the BOAST-3 computer program for full field reservoir simulation. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). These results include an outline of the reservoir description based on available and newly acquired data and reservoir simulation results. Detailed information is available on-line through the Internet. Based on the reservoir simulation, three infill wells will be drilled to validate the reservoir description and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies. The demonstration phase of the project has just begun and will be presented in the next annual report.

  13. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Mechanisms Responsible for the Superior Stability of Hybrid Class 1/Class 2 CO2 Sorbents: A New Class 4 Category.

    PubMed

    Wilfong, Walter Christopher; Kail, Brian W; Jones, Christopher W; Pacheco, Carlos; Gray, McMahan L

    2016-05-25

    Hybrid Class 1/Class 2 supported amine CO2 sorbents demonstrate superior performance under practical steam conditions, yet their amine immobilization and stabilization mechanisms are unclear. Uncovering the interactions responsible for the sorbents' robust features is critical for further improvements and can facilitate practical applications. We employ solid state (29)Si CP-MAS and 2-D FSLG (1)H-(13)C CP HETCOR NMR spectroscopies to probe the overall molecular interactions of aminosilane/silica, polyamine [poly(ethylenimine), PEI]/silica, and hybrid aminosilane/PEI/silica sorbents. A unique, sequential impregnation sorbent preparation method is executed in a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) setup to decouple amine binding mechanisms at the amine-silica interface from those within bulk amine layers. These mechanisms are correlated with each sorbents' resistance to accelerated liquid H2O and TGA steam treatments (H2O stability) and to oxidative degradation (thermal stability). High percentages of CO2 capture retained (PCR) and organic content retained (OCR) values after H2O testing of N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl)ethylenediamine (TMPED)/PEI and (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS)/PEI hybrid sorbents are associated with a synergistic stabilizing effect of the amine species observed during oxidative degradation (thermal gravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry, TGA-DSC). Solid state NMR spectroscopy reveals that the synergistic effect of the TMPED/PEI mixture is manifested by the formation of hydrogen-bonded PEI-NH2···NH2-TMPED and PEI-NH2···HO-Si/O-Si-O (TMPED, T(2)) linkages within the sorbent. DRIFTS further determines that PEI enhances the grafting of TMPED to silica and that PEI is dispersed among a stable network of polymerized TMPED in the bulk, utilizing H-bonded linkages. These findings provide the scientific basis for establishing a Class 4 category for aminosilane/polyamine/silica hybrid sorbents

  14. Evaluation of materials proposed for the construction of the plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) on beamlet

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.; Robb, C.; DeYoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1992-11-01

    The proposed upgrade of the NOVA laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employs a multipass architecture that requires an optical switch to emit the laser light at the appropriate fluence. This Pockels cell-based optical switch does not use traditional ring or thin-film electrodes because of the large aperture and high fluence of the laser system. Rather, it uses a plasma electrode Pockels cell with a KD*P crystal as the electro-optical medium. A discharge plasma is formed on each side of the electro-optic crystal and high voltage is applied across the crystal through the plasma electrode to initiate optical switching. In October 1991 we began evaluating materials suggested for the large aperture plasma electrode optical switch. Previous experiments suggested that switching performance could be significantly affected by the deterioration of cell materials. The final prototype switch tested used polyethylene for the switch body, Mykroy for the mid-plane and a silicone vulcanite to encapsulate the KD*P crystal. The encapsulant easily compensated for the effect of assembling the optical switch and we measured no strain-induced birefringence in the crystal after encapsulation. Oxygen was eventually added to the plasma to react with the sputtered carbon from the cathode and produce a gaseous effluent. As an added benefit, the production of ozone absorbed most of the ultra violet radiation affecting the encapsulant. All the materials tested decomposed and produced volatiles, although we have seen no change in the damage threshold of exposed optical surfaces tested to date. The following is an evaluation of the recommended materials for major cell components using published manufacturers data, experimental results from our Material Evaluation Apparatus, and outgassing performance and sputtering data produced at the Laboratory`s Vacuum Process Lab.

  15. Possible Domain Formation In PE/PC Bilayers Containing High Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Matthew; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol is a significant component of animal cell membranes, and its presence has the effects of not only adding rigidity to the lipid bilayer, but also leading to the formation of lipid domains. Two other lipids of interest are phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which constitutes about 45 percent of the phospholipids found in human nervous tissues, and phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is found in every cell of the human body. The maximum solubility of cholesterol is the highest mole fraction of cholesterol that the lipid bilayer can retain, at which point cholesterol begins to precipitate out to form cholesterol monohydrate crystals. We have measured the maximum solubility of cholesterol in mixtures of 16:0-18:1PE and 16:0-18:1PC using a new light scattering technique, which utilizes the anisotropic nature of light scattering by cholesterol crystals. This new method is highly accurate and reproducible. Our results show that the maximum solubility of cholesterol increases linearly as a function of the molar ratio POPC/(POPE+POPC), which suggests possible domain formation in mixtures of PE and PC containing maximum amount of cholesterol.

  16. Metabolic engineering of Rhizopus oryzae: Effects of overexpressing pyc and pepc genes on fumaric acid biosynthesis from glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumaric acid, a dicarboxylic acid used as a food acidulant and in manufacturing synthetic resins, can be produced from glucose in fermentation by Rhizopus oryzae. However, the fumaric acid yield is limited by the co-production of ethanol and other byproducts. To increase fumaric acid production, ove...

  17. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... disconnected. (e) Chlorine cargo tank motor vehicles shall be shipped only when equipped: (1) With a gas mask... Research Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for chlorine service; and (2) With...

  18. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... record of the cargo tank pressure and ambient (outside) temperature: (1) At the start of each trip, (2... temperature and pressure of the liquid must be reduced by a manually controlled release of vapor; and (2)...

  19. Open-loop control of class-2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns open-loop control laws for reconfiguration of tensegrity towers. By postulating the control strategy as an equilibrium tracking control, very little control energy is required. Several different reconfiguration scenarios are possible for different string connectivity schemes. This includes unit radius control, twist angle control and truncation parameter control. All these control laws allow a nonuniform distribution of the control parameters among units. By defining a wave--like reference signal and injecting it in the open--loop control law, we demonstrate the concept of self--propelled tensegrity structure that are capable of locomotion.

  20. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... a motor vehicle as follows: (i) The vehicle must have an open body equipped with a suitable rack or... the emergency discharge control requirements in § 173.315(n) of this subchapter must carry on...

  1. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... must have an open body equipped with a suitable rack or support having a means to hold the cylinder... § 173.315(n) of this subchapter must carry on or within the cargo tank motor vehicle written...

  2. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prevent unauthorized and unsafe opening of the compartments in a mine. (c) Locks or seals (battery). The battery shall be enclosed in a locked or sealed container that will prevent exposure of live terminals. (d) Temperature of lamp. The temperature of the lamp under conditions of use shall not be such that a person...

  3. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... prevent unauthorized and unsafe opening of the compartments in a mine. (c) Locks or seals (battery). The battery shall be enclosed in a locked or sealed container that will prevent exposure of live terminals. (d... battery shall be of high-grade design and materials, comparable to the specially recommended...

  4. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contact, except enclosures requiring glass, in which case glass-to-metal joints are permitted. Gaskets, if... paris are not acceptable as material for gaskets. For enclosures having an unoccupied volume (air...

  5. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contact, except enclosures requiring glass, in which case glass-to-metal joints are permitted. Gaskets, if... paris are not acceptable as material for gaskets. For enclosures having an unoccupied volume (air...

  6. Class 2: An Expert System for Student Classification. Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Joseph M.; And Others

    The paper describes an approach to developing systematic procedures for identifying handicapped children that leads to rational decisions regarding placement. An expert system is described which involves the user in a dialogue on data regarding individual children; this dialogue is similar in many ways to a consultation with an expert. After…

  7. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cryogenic liquid in a package exceeding 450 L (119 gallons) of water capacity shall avoid unnecessary delays... unloading to assure that they are of sound quality, without obvious defects detectable through visual... power equipment. (o) Daily test of off-truck remote shut-off activation device. For a cargo tank...

  8. 32 CFR 1639.6 - Considerations relevant to granting or denying claims for Class 2-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must include the following: (1) A statement from a church or religious organization that the registrant... church, religious organization, or school detailed information in order to determine whether or not the theological or divinity school is in fact a recognized school or whether or not the church or...

  9. 32 CFR 1639.6 - Considerations relevant to granting or denying claims for Class 2-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must include the following: (1) A statement from a church or religious organization that the registrant... church, religious organization, or school detailed information in order to determine whether or not the theological or divinity school is in fact a recognized school or whether or not the church or...

  10. 32 CFR 1639.6 - Considerations relevant to granting or denying claims for Class 2-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must include the following: (1) A statement from a church or religious organization that the registrant... church, religious organization, or school detailed information in order to determine whether or not the theological or divinity school is in fact a recognized school or whether or not the church or...

  11. 32 CFR 1639.6 - Considerations relevant to granting or denying claims for Class 2-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must include the following: (1) A statement from a church or religious organization that the registrant... church, religious organization, or school detailed information in order to determine whether or not the theological or divinity school is in fact a recognized school or whether or not the church or...

  12. 32 CFR 1639.6 - Considerations relevant to granting or denying claims for Class 2-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must include the following: (1) A statement from a church or religious organization that the registrant... church, religious organization, or school detailed information in order to determine whether or not the theological or divinity school is in fact a recognized school or whether or not the church or...

  13. [Research on shallow-shelf carbonate (Class 2) reservoirs]. Quarterly report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brashear, J.P.

    1992-11-02

    The purpose of this contract is to provide technical and analytical support services for TORIS at BPO. The discussion of the work performed is organized by task order. The objective of task order 1 is to support the BPO TORIS Program Coordinator in the maintenance, operations, enhancement, and applications of the data bases, models, and hardware of TORIS on the BPO computer. Objective of task order 2 is to support BPO management in following: analyzing, interpreting, and reporting on trends in the oil and gas industry; and technical assistance in the areas of environmental health and safety and quality control for quality assurance procedures. Accomplishments for this quarter are described.

  14. Aviation Structural Mechanic, Second Class, 2-13. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become aviation structural mechanics (second class). The course materials consist of five pamphlets covering the structural maintenance and repair of aircraft. The first pamphlet…

  15. Aviation Structural Mechanic, First Class, 2-12. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become aviation structural mechanics (first class). The course materials consist of three pamphlets. The first pamphlet covers aircraft maintenance management, records, and reports…

  16. 49 CFR 173.116 - Class 2-Assignment of hazard zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and less than or equal to 1000 ppm. C LC50 greater than 1000 ppm and less than or equal to 3000 ppm. D LC50 greater than 3000 ppm or less than or equal to 5000 ppm. (b) The criteria specified in...

  17. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from the Green Alga Selenastrum minutum1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Plaxton, William C.; Turpin, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Two isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) with very different regulatory properties were partially purified from the green alga Selenastrum minutum. They were designated PEPC1 and PEPC2. PEPC1 showed sigmoidal kinetics with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) whereas PEPC2 exhibited a typical Michaelis-Menten response. The S0.5(PEP) of PEPC1 was 2.23 millimolar. This was fourfold greater than the S0.5(PEP) of PEPC2, which was 0.57 millimolar. PEPC1 was activated more than fourfold by 2.0 millimolar glutamine and sixfold by 2.0 millimolar dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) at a subsaturating PEP concentration of 0.625 millimolar. In contrast, PEPC2 showed only 8% and 52% activation by glutamine and DHAP, respectively. The effects of glutamine and DHAP were additive. PEPC1 was more sensitive to inhibition by glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and aspartate than PEPC2. Both isoforms were equally inhibited by malate. All of these metabolites affected only the S0.5(PEP) not the Vmax. The regulatory properties of S. minutum PEPC in vitro are discussed in terms of (a) increased rates of dark carbon fixation (shown to be catalyzed predominantly by PEPC) and (b) changes in metabolite levels in vivo during enhanced NH4+ assimilation. Finally, a model is proposed for the regulation of PEPC in vivo in relation to its role in replenishing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates consumed in NH4+ assimilation. PMID:16667617

  18. Purification and characterization of high- and low-molecular-mass isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Kinetic, structural and immunological evidence that the green algal enzyme is distinct from the prokaryotic and higher plant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Rivoal, J; Plaxton, W C; Turpin, D H

    1998-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme in the supply of carbon skeletons for the assimilation of nitrogen by green algae. Two PEPC isoforms with respective native molecular masses of 400 (PEPC1) and 650 (PEPC2) kDa have been purified from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 cc1883 (Chlorophyceae). SDS/PAGE, immunoblot and CNBr peptide-mapping analyses indicate the presence of the same 100 kDa PEPC catalytic subunit in both isoforms. PEPC1 is a homotetramer, whereas PEPC2 seems to be a complex between the PEPC catalytic subunit and other immunologically unrelated polypeptides of 50-70 kDa. Kinetic analyses indicate that these PEPC isoforms are (1) differentially regulated by pH, (2) activated by glutamine and dihydroxyacetone phosphate and (3) inhibited by glutamate, aspartate, 2-oxoglutarate and malate. These results are consistent with the current model for the regulation of anaplerotic carbon fixation in green algae, and demonstrate that green algal PEPCs are uniquely regulated by glutamine. Several techniques were used to assess the structural relationships between C. reinhardtii PEPC and the higher plant or prokaryotic enzyme. Immunoblot studies using anti-(green algal or higher plant PEPC) IgGs suggested that green algal (C. reinhardtii, Selenastrum minutum), higher plant (maize, banana fruit, tobacco) and prokaryotic (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Escherichia coli) PEPCs have little or no immunological relatedness. Moreover, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the C. reinhardtii PEPC subunit did not have significant similarity to the highly conserved corresponding region in enzymes from higher plants, and CNBr cleavage patterns of green algal PEPCs were distinct from those of higher plant and cyanobacterial PEPCs. These results point to significant evolutionary divergence between green algal, higher plant and prokaryotic PEPCs. PMID:9512480

  19. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  20. Inactivation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by the Binding to Chloroplast Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Xian; Wedding, Randolph T.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) purified from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves associates with maize leaf chloroplast membrane in vitro. The binding of PEPC to the membrane results in enzyme inactivation. A protein isolated from a maize leaf chloroplast membrane preparation inactivated PEPC. Treatment with membrane preparation or with partially purified inactivating protein accelerates PEPC inactivation at low temperature (4°C). Interaction of PEPC with chloroplast membrane or inactivating protein may inactivate the enzyme by influencing dissociation of the enzyme active tetramer. PMID:16652972

  1. Abiotic stresses affecting water balance induce phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase expression in roots of wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    González, María-Cruz; Sánchez, Rosario; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2003-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in CO(2) fixation in C4 and CAM plants. In C3 plants, PEPC is widely expressed in most organs; however, its function is not yet clearly established. With the aim of providing clues on the function of PEPC in C3 plants, we have analyzed its pattern of expression in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. Roots showed almost double the level of PEPC activity of shoots. Further analysis of PEPC expression in roots by in situ localization techniques showed a high accumulation of PEPC transcripts and polypeptides in meristematic cells, whereas in the rest of the root PEPC localized preferentially to the vascular tissue. Treatment with NaCl and LiCl induced PEPC expression in roots. Similarly, other abiotic stresses affecting water status, such as drought or cold, induced PEPC expression. Induction was root-specific except for the cold treatment, which also induced PEPC in shoots, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, hypoxia, which does not affect water balance, did not promote any induction of PEPC expression. These results suggest an important role for this enzyme in the adaptation of plants to environmental changes. PMID:12687366

  2. Jasmonic acid is a downstream component in the modulation of somatic embryogenesis by Arabidopsis Class 2 phytoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Mohamed M.; Wally, Owen S. D.; Elhiti, Mohamed; El-Shanshory, Adel; Reddy, Dhadi S.; Hill, Robert D.; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the beneficial effect of suppression of the Arabidopsis phytoglobin 2 gene, PGB2, on somatic embryogenesis occurs through the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) within the embryogenic cells originating from the cultured explant. NO activates the expression of Allene oxide synthase (AOS) and Lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2), genes encoding two key enzymes of the jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthetic pathway, elevating JA content within the embryogenic tissue. The number of embryos in the single aos1-1 mutant and pgb2-aos1-1 double mutant declined, and was not rescued by increasing levels of NO stimulating embryogenesis in wild-type tissue. NO also influenced JA responses by up-regulating PLANT DEFENSIN 1 (PDF1) and JASMONATE-ZIM-PROTEIN (JAZ1), as well as down-regulating MYC2. The NO and JA modulation of MYC2 and JAZ1 controlled embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of JAZ1 or suppression of MYC2 promoted the formation of somatic embryos, while repression of JAZ1 and up-regulation of MYC2 reduced the embryogenic performance. Sustained expression of JAZ1 induced the transcription of several indole acetic acid (IAA) biosynthetic genes, resulting in higher IAA levels in the embryogenic cells. Collectively these data fit a model integrating JA in the PGB2 regulation of Arabidopsis embryogenesis. Suppression of PGB2 increases JA through NO. Elevated levels of JA repress MYC2 and induce JAZ1, favoring the accumulation of IAA in the explants and the subsequent production of somatic embryos. PMID:26962208

  3. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-Advanced High Power Rockets— (a) At any altitude where clouds or obscuring phenomena of more than five...) Into any cloud; (d) Between sunset and sunrise without prior authorization from the FAA; (e) Within...

  4. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-Advanced High Power Rockets— (a) At any altitude where clouds or obscuring phenomena of more than five...) Into any cloud; (d) Between sunset and sunrise without prior authorization from the FAA; (e) Within...

  5. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-Advanced High Power Rockets— (a) At any altitude where clouds or obscuring phenomena of more than five...) Into any cloud; (d) Between sunset and sunrise without prior authorization from the FAA; (e) Within...

  6. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-Advanced High Power Rockets— (a) At any altitude where clouds or obscuring phenomena of more than five...) Into any cloud; (d) Between sunset and sunrise without prior authorization from the FAA; (e) Within...

  7. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-Advanced High Power Rockets— (a) At any altitude where clouds or obscuring phenomena of more than five...) Into any cloud; (d) Between sunset and sunrise without prior authorization from the FAA; (e) Within...

  8. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... cryogenic gas, compressed gas in solution, asphyxiant gas and oxidizing gas). For the purpose of this... °F). (f) Compressed gas in solution. A compressed gas in solution is a non-liquefied compressed...

  9. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cryogenic gas, compressed gas in solution, asphyxiant gas and oxidizing gas). For the purpose of this... °F). (f) Compressed gas in solution. A compressed gas in solution is a non-liquefied compressed gas... mass or more flammable components and the chemical heat of combustion is 30 kJ/g or more; (2)...

  10. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cryogenic gas, compressed gas in solution, asphyxiant gas and oxidizing gas). For the purpose of this... °F). (f) Compressed gas in solution. A compressed gas in solution is a non-liquefied compressed gas...% by mass or more flammable components and the chemical heat of combustion is 30 kJ/g or more; (2)...

  11. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... kPa (14.7 psia) of pressure (a material which has a boiling point of 20 °C (68 °F) or less at 101.3... pressure of 101.3 kPa (14.7 psia) (a material which has a boiling point of 20 °C (68 °F) or less at 101.3 k... gas having a boiling point colder than -−90 °C (−130 °F) at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psia) absolute. A...

  12. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mass or more flammable components and the chemical heat of combustion is 30 kJ/g or more; (2) An... and the heat of combustion is less than 20 kJ/g. (3) Aerosols not meeting the provisions of paragraphs... chemical heat of combustion must be determined in accordance with the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria...

  13. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- near term -- Class 2. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. General overview--progress is reported for the period from 1 April 1995 to 30 June 1995. Work in this quarter has concentrated on reservoir characterization with the initiation of technology transfer. Difficulties still remain in the drilling of the final two wells. Some preliminary work on reservoir characterization has been completed, and related technology transfer has been initiated.

  14. In vitro-in vivo correlation of the effect of supersaturation on the intestinal absorption of BCS Class 2 drugs.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Haruki; Hasegawa, Tsubasa; Yamamoto, Mari; Matsui, Rie; Masaoka, Yoshie; Kataoka, Makoto; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro method for evaluating the effect of supersaturation on oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs in vivo. Albendazole, dipyridamole, gefitinib, and ketoconazole were used as model drugs. Supersaturation of each drug was induced by diluting its stock solution by fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) (solvent-shift method), then dissolution and precipitation profile of the drug was observed in vitro. The crystalline form of the precipitate was checked by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). For comparison, control suspension was prepared by suspending a drug powder directly into FaSSIF (powder-suspending method). In vivo intestinal absorption of the drug was observed in rats by determined the plasma concentration after intraduodenal administration of drug suspensions. For all drugs, suspensions prepared by solvent-shift method showed significantly higher dissolved concentration in vitro than that prepared by powder-suspending method, clearly indicated the induction of supersaturation. DSC analysis revealed that crystalline form of the precipitate profoundly affects the extent and the duration of supersaturation. A rat in vivo study confirmed that the supersaturation of these drugs increased the fraction absorbed from the intestine, which corresponded well to the in vitro dissolution and precipitation profile of drugs except for ketoconazole. For ketoconazole, an in vivo absorption study was performed in rats pretreated with 1-aminobenzotriazole, a potent inhibitor of CYP mediated metabolism. CYP inhibition study suggested that the high luminal concentration of ketoconazole caused by supersaturation saturated the metabolic enzymes and further increased the systemic exposure of the absorbed drug. The additional effects of supersaturation on the absorption of ketoconazole are consistent with previous studies in humans under differing gastric pH conditions. In conclusion, effects of supersaturation on the intestinal absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs could be predicted from in vitro dissolution and a precipitation study. However if supersaturation affects the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs, such as a first-pass metabolism, a combination with in vivo study should be required to evaluate its impact on oral bioavailability. PMID:24460473

  15. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Identified as a Key Enzyme in Erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum Carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Watson, David G.; Breitling, Rainer; Coombs, Graham H.; Müller, Sylke

    2014-01-01

    Phospoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is absent from humans but encoded in the Plasmodium falciparum genome, suggesting that PEPC has a parasite-specific function. To investigate its importance in P. falciparum, we generated a pepc null mutant (D10Δpepc), which was only achievable when malate, a reduction product of oxaloacetate, was added to the growth medium. D10Δpepc had a severe growth defect in vitro, which was partially reversed by addition of malate or fumarate, suggesting that pepc may be essential in vivo. Targeted metabolomics using 13C-U-D-glucose and 13C-bicarbonate showed that the conversion of glycolytically-derived PEP into malate, fumarate, aspartate and citrate was abolished in D10Δpepc and that pentose phosphate pathway metabolites and glycerol 3-phosphate were present at increased levels. In contrast, metabolism of the carbon skeleton of 13C,15N-U-glutamine was similar in both parasite lines, although the flux was lower in D10Δpepc; it also confirmed the operation of a complete forward TCA cycle in the wild type parasite. Overall, these data confirm the CO2 fixing activity of PEPC and suggest that it provides metabolites essential for TCA cycle anaplerosis and the maintenance of cytosolic and mitochondrial redox balance. Moreover, these findings imply that PEPC may be an exploitable target for future drug discovery. PMID:24453970

  16. Developmental and molecular physiological evidence for the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in rapid cotton fibre elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Rong; Wang, Lu; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Cotton fibres are hair-like single-cells that elongate to several centimetres long after their initiation from the ovule epidermis at anthesis. The accumulation of malate, along with K+ and sugars, is thought to play an important role in fibre elongation through osmotic regulation and charge balance. However, there is a lack of evidence for or against such an hypothesis. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme responsible for the synthesis of malate. The potential role of PEPC in cotton fibre elongation is examined here. Developmentally, PEPC activity was higher at the rapid elongation phase than that at the slow elongation stage. Genotypically, PEPC activity correlated positively with the rate of fibre elongation and the final fibre length attained. Importantly, suppression of PEPC activity by LiCl that reduces its phosphorylation status decreased fibre length. To examine the molecular basis underlying PEPC activity, two cDNAs encoding PEPC, GhPEPC1 and 2, were cloned, which represents the major PEPC genes expressed in cotton fibre. RT-PCR analyses revealed that GhPEPC1 and 2 were highly expressed at the rapid elongation phase but weakly at the slow-to-terminal elongation period. In situ hybridization detected mRNA of GhPEPC1 and 2 in 1 d young fibres but not in the ovule epidermis prior to fibre initiation. Collectively, the data indicate that cotton fibre elongation requires high activity of PEPC, probably through the expression of the GhPEPC1 and 2 genes. PMID:19815688

  17. Nitrogen-Dependent Carbon Fixation by Picoplankton In Culture and in the Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey Smith; Marguerite W. Coomes; Thomas E. Smith

    2005-04-30

    The pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, was isolated and sequenced. PEPC is an anaplerotic enzyme, but it may also contribute to overall CO2 fixation through β-carboxylation reactions. A consensus sequence generated by aligning the pepc genes of Anabaena variabilis, Anacystis nidulans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 was used to design two sets of primers that were used to amplify segments of Synechococcus PCC 7002 pepc. In order to isolate the gene, the sequence of the PCR product was used to search for the pepc nucleotide sequence from the publicly available genome of Synechococcus PCC 7002. At the time, the genome for this organism had not been completed although sequences of a significant number of its fragments are available in public databases. Thus, the major challenge was to find the pepc gene among those fragments and to complete gaps as necessary. Even though the search did not yield the complete gene, PCR primers were designed to amplify a DNA fragment using a high fidelity thermostable DNA polymerase. An open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 2988 base pairs coding for 995 amino acids was found in the 3066 bp PCR product. The pepc gene had a GC content of 52% and the deduced protein had a calculated molecular mass of 114,049 Da. The amino acid sequence was closely related to that of PEPC from other cyanobacteria, exhibiting 59-61% identity. The sequence differed significantly from plant and E. coli PEPC with only 30% homology. However, comparing the Synechococcus PCC 7002 sequence to the recently resolved E. coli PEPC revealed that most of the essential domains and amino acids involved in PEPC activity were shared by both proteins. The recombinant Synechococcus PCC 7002 PEPC was expressed in E. coli.

  18. Analysis and elucidation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Dineshbabu, Gnanasekaran; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) a cytosolic enzyme of higher plants is also found in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated that there are several isoforms of PEPC belonging to C3; C3/C4 and C4 groups but, the evolution of PEPC in cyanobacteria is not yet understood. The present study opens up an opportunity to understand the isoforms and functions of PEPC in cyanobacteria. The variations observed in PEPC among lower and higher orders of cyanobacteria, suggests convergent evolution of PEPC. There is a specific PEPC phosphorylation residue 'serine' at the N-terminus and PEPC determinant residue 'serine' at the C-terminal that facilitates high affinity for substrate binding. These residues were unique to higher orders of cyanobacteria, but, not in lower orders and other prokaryotes. The different PEPC forms of cyanobacteria were investigated for their kinetic properties with phosphoenolpyruvate as the substrate and the findings corroborated well with the in silico findings. In vitro enzymatic study of cyanobacteria belonging to three different orders demonstrated the role of aspartate as an allosteric effector, which inhibited PEPC by interacting with the highly conserved residues in the active site. The differences in mode of inhibition among the different order, thus, give a fair picture about the cyanobacterial PEPCs. The higher orders appear to possess the sequence coordinates and functionally conserved residues similar to isoforms of C4 type higher plants, whereas isoforms of PEPC of the lower orders did not resemble either that of C3 or C4 plants. PMID:25586080

  19. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Phosphorylation by Metabolites and Abscisic Acid during the Development and Germination of Barley Seeds1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Ana-Belén; Alvarez, Rosario; Cochereau, Ludivine; Vidal, Jean; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Echevarría, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    During barley (Hordeum vulgare) seed development, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity increased and PEPC-specific antibodies revealed housekeeping (103-kD) and inducible (108-kD) subunits. Bacterial-type PEPC fragments were immunologically detected in denatured protein extracts from dry and imbibed conditions; however, on nondenaturing gels, the activity of the recently reported octameric PEPC (in castor [Ricinus communis] oil seeds) was not detected. The phosphorylation state of the PEPC, as judged by l-malate 50% inhibition of initial activity values, phosphoprotein chromatography, and immunodetection of the phosphorylated N terminus, was found to be high between 8 and 18 d postanthesis (DPA) and during imbibition. In contrast, the enzyme appeared to be in a low phosphorylation state from 20 DPA up to dry seed. The time course of 32/36-kD, Ca2+-independent PEPC kinase activity exhibited a substantial increase after 30 DPA that did not coincide with the PEPC phosphorylation profile. This kinase was found to be inhibited by l-malate and not by putative protein inhibitors, and the PEPC phosphorylation status correlated with high glucose-6-phosphate to malate ratios, thereby suggesting an in vivo metabolic control of the kinase. PEPC phosphorylation was also regulated by photosynthate supply at 11 DPA. In addition, when fed exogenously to imbibing seeds, abscisic acid significantly increased PEPC kinase activity. This was further enhanced by the cytosolic protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide but blocked by protease inhibitors, thereby suggesting that the phytohormone acts on the stability of the kinase. We propose that a similar abscisic acid-dependent effect may contribute to produce the increase in PEPC kinase activity during desiccation stages. PMID:18753284

  20. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.T.

    2011-01-15

    In the second paper of this series, we evaluate two additional well designs for production from permafrost-associated (PA) hydrate deposits. Both designs are within the capabilities of conventional technology. We determine that large volumes of gas can be produced at high rates (several MMSCFD) for long times using either well design. The production approach involves initial fluid withdrawal from the water zone underneath the hydrate-bearing layer (HBL). The production process follows a cyclical pattern, with each cycle composed of two stages: a long stage (months to years) of increasing gas production and decreasing water production, and a short stage (days to weeks) that involves destruction of the secondary hydrate (mainly through warm water injection) that evolves during the first stage, and is followed by a reduction in the fluid withdrawal rate. A well configuration with completion throughout the HBL leads to high production rates, but also the creation of a secondary hydrate barrier around the well that needs to be destroyed regularly by water injection. However, a configuration that initially involves heating of the outer surface of the wellbore and later continuous injection of warm water at low rates (Case C) appears to deliver optimum performance over the period it takes for the exhaustion of the hydrate deposit. Using Case C as the standard, we determine that gas production from PA hydrate deposits increases with the fluid withdrawal rate, the initial hydrate saturation and temperature, and with the formation permeability.

  1. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term -- Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--October 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report represents a summary of the progress during the first year of Budget period 1 of the project. Two examples of advanced technologies developed as part of this project are highlighted along with the use of the Internet to transfer these technologies. The two advanced technologies are a spread-sheet petrophysical analysis and reservoir evaluation (PfEFFER), and a petrophysical/seismic approach to well logs (pseudoseismic). Work continues on multi-disciplinary reservoir characterization at the demonstration site. The potential for incremental primary recovery is being evaluated using the improved reservoir characterization to target infill drilling and evaluate the potential of a horizontal well. The impact of demonstrating additional incremental primary recovery from sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity Mississippian reservoirs would be significant for Kansas and the US.

  2. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas - near term -- Class 2. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile petroleum. Specific reservoirs targeted are the Schaben Field in Ness County and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County.

  3. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stem vascular tissue suggests a role for invertase in cell wall cellulose synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were transformed with two constructs: (1) a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter isolated from alfalfa nodules (PEPC-4) fused to GUS; and (2) PEPC-4 fused with sucrose synthase (SUS) isolated from alfalfa nodules. Histochemical staining for GUS in st...

  4. Program for Enlightened and Productive Creativity Illustrated with a Moire Patterns Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuk, Keun Cheol; Cramond, Bonnie

    2006-01-01

    Combining both the Western perspective of creativity as productivity and the Eastern perspective of creativity as enlightenment, a Program for Enlightened and Productive Creativity (PEPC) for teaching inquiry was devised. The PEPC describes stages through which a student is guided to solve a problem using increasingly complex observation, inquiry,…

  5. Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells for the Beamlet and NIF lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.; DeYoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1994-05-01

    We describe Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) for the Beamlet laser and the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. These PEPCs, together with passive polarizers, function as large aperture (> 35 {times} 35 cm{sup 2}) optical switches enabling the design of high-energy (> 5 kJ), multipass laser amplifiers. In a PEPC, plasma discharges form on both sides of a thin (1 cm) electro-optic crystal (KDP). These plasma discharges produce highly conductive and transparent electrodes that facilitate rapid (< 100 ns) and uniform charging of the KDP up to the half-wave voltage (17 kV) and back to zero volts. We discuss the operating principles, design, and optical performance of the Beamlet PEPC and briefly discuss our plans to extend PEPC technology for the NIF.

  6. Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells for the Beamlet and NIF lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.; De Yoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1994-11-01

    The authors describe Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) for the Beamlet laser and the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. These PEPCs, together with passive polarizers, function as large aperture (>35 x 35 cm{sup 2}) optical switches enabling the design of high-energy (>5 kJ), multipass laser amplifiers. In a PEPC, plasma discharges form on both sides of a thin (1 cm) electro-optic crystal (KDP). These plasma discharges produce highly conductive and transparent electrodes that facilitate rapid (<100 ns) and uniform charging of the KDP up to the half-wave voltage (17 kV) and back to zero volts. The authors discuss the operating principles, design, and optical performance of the Beamlet PEPC and briefly discuss their plans to extend PEPC technology for the NIF.

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase in Tobacco Leaves Is Activated by Light in a Similar but Not Identical Way as in Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chollet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported the partial purification of a Ca2+- independent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein-serine/threonine kinase (PEPC-PK) from illuminated leaves of N-sufficient tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants (Y.-H. Wang, R. Chollet [1993] FEBS Lett 328: 215-218). We now report that this C3 PEPC-kinase is reversibly light activated in vivo in a time-dependent manner. As the kinase becomes light activated, the activity and L-malate sensitivity of its target protein increases and decreases, respectively. The light activation of tobacco PEPC-PK is prevented by pretreatment of detached leaves with various photosynthesis and cytosolic protein-synthesis inhibitors. Similarly, specific inhibitors of glutamine synthetase block the light activation of tobacco leaf PEPC-kinase under both photorespiratory and nonphotorespiratory conditions. This striking effect is partially and specifically reversed by exogenous glutamine, whereas it has no apparent effect on the light activation of the maize (Zea mays L.) leaf kinase. Using an in situ "activity-gel" phosphorylation assay, we have identified two major Ca2+-independent PEPC-kinase catalytic polypeptides in illuminated tobacco leaves that have the same molecular masses (approximately 30 and 37 kD) as found in illuminated maize leaves. Collectively, these results indicate that the phosphorylation of PEPC in N-sufficient leaves of tobacco (C3) and maize (C4) is regulated through similar but not identical light-signal transduction pathways. PMID:12226305

  8. In Vivo and in Vitro Phosphorylation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Wheat Seeds during Germination.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, L.; Gonzalez, M. C.; Cejudo, F. J.; Vidal, J.; Echevarria, C.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was detected in the aleurone endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) seeds, and specific anti-Sorghum C4 PEPC polyclonal anti-bodies cross-reacted with 103- and 100-kD polypeptides present in dry seeds and seeds that had imbibed; in addition, a new, 108-kD polypeptide was detected 6 h after imbibition. The use of specific anti-phosphorylation-site immunoglobulin G (APS-IgG) identified the presence of a phosphorylation motif equivalent to that found in other plant PEPCs studied so far. The binding of this APS-IgG to the target protein promoted changes in the properties of seed PEPC similar to those produced by phosphorylation, as previously shown for the recombinant Sorghum leaf C4 PEPC. In desalted seed extracts, an endogenous PEPC kinase activity catalyzed a bona fide phosphorylation of the target protein, as deduced from the immunoinhibition of the in vitro phosphorylation reaction by the APS- IgG. In addition, the major, 103-kD PEPC polypeptide was also shown to be radiolabeled in situ 48 h after imbibition in [32P]orthophosphate. The ratio between optimal (pH 8) and suboptimal (pH 7.3 or 7.1) PEPC activity decreased during germination, thereby suggesting a change in catalytic rate related to an in vivo phosphorylation process. These collective data document that the components needed for the regulatory phosphorylation of PEPC are present and functional during germination of wheat seeds. PMID:12226309

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants. Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis. PMID:25588735

  10. PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL SUBSYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P; Hinz, A; Zacharias, R; Ollis, C; Fulkerson, E; Mchale, B; Runtal, A; Bishop, C

    2007-07-27

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem is a key component of the National Ignition Facility, enabling the laser to employ an efficient four-pass main amplifier architecture. PEPC relies on a pulsed power technology to initiate and maintain plasma within the cells and to provide the necessary high voltage bias to the cells nonlinear crystals. Ultimately, nearly 300 high-voltage, high-current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron-switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a complete NIF) has been commissioned and is operating on a routine basis, supporting laser shot operations. Another cluster has been deployed, awaiting final commissioning. Activation and commissioning of new hardware continues to progress in parallel, driving toward a goal of completing the PEPC subsystem in late 2007.

  11. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Feria, Ana-Belén; Ni, Hong; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110 kDa and 107 kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460 kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme's feedback inhibition by L-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell's immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon-nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  12. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  13. Structural and functional analysis of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene from the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7.

    PubMed Central

    Inui, M; Dumay, V; Zahn, K; Yamagata, H; Yukawa, H

    1997-01-01

    The ppc gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), from Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7 was cloned and sequenced. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 42 bp upstream of the ppc initiation codon. An R. palustris No. 7 PEPC-deficient strain showed a slower doubling time compared with the wild-type strain either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark, when pyruvate was used as a carbon source. PMID:9244286

  14. Photoelectric properties of film heterostructures based on poly-N-Epoxypropylcarbazole and merocyanine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidenko, N. A.; Ishchenko, A. A.; Korotchenkov, O. A.; Mokrinskaya, E. V.; Podolian, A. O.; Studzinsky, S. L.; Tonkopieva, L. S.

    2012-10-01

    Heterostructures comprising a merocyanine dye (M1) film deposited onto a poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC) film have been created, and their photoconducting, photodielectric, and photovoltaic properties have been studied. The PEPC/M1 heterostructures exhibit the photodiode and photoelectric converter properties. It is concluded that the p- n junction in these heterostructures is ensured by the hole character of conductivity in the polymer and the bipolar conductivity of the deposited dye film.

  15. Pulsed Power Aspects of the NIF Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A F; Barbosa, F; Fulkerson, E S

    2005-06-09

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) embodies technology essential to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Together with a thin-film polarizer, PEPC functions as an optical switch for the main amplifier cavity, allowing optical pulses to be trapped, and then released, and enabling NIF to take advantage of the attendant gain and cost-savings. Details of the genesis, development, and prototyping of the PEPC are well documented. After moving from its laboratory setting to the NIF facility, PEPC--via its performance during the two-year NIF Early Light (NEL) campaign and its ongoing operation during facility build-out--has proven to be a fully functional system. When complete, NIF will accommodate 192 beams, capable of delivering 1.8 MJ to a fusion target. Forty-eight Plasma Electrode Pockels--driven by nearly 300 high-power, high-voltage pulse generators--will support this complement of beams. As deployed, PEPC is a complex association of state-of-the-art optics; low-voltage and high-voltage electronics; and mechanical, gas, and vacuum subsystems--all under computer control. In this paper, we briefly describe each of these elements, but focus on the pulse power aspects of the PEPC system.

  16. Involvement of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the light-dependent up-regulation of sorghum leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Monreal, José Antonio; López-Baena, Francisco Javier; Vidal, Jean; Echevarría, Cristina; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2010-01-01

    The photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C4-PEPC) is regulated by phosphorylation by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PEPC-k). In Digitaria sanguinalis mesophyll protoplasts, this light-mediated transduction cascade principally requires a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a Ca2+-dependent step. The present study investigates the cascade components at the higher integrated level of Sorghum bicolor leaf discs and leaves. PEPC-k up-regulation required light and photosynthetic electron transport. However, the PI-PLC inhibitor U-73122 and inhibitors of calcium release from intracellular stores only partially blocked this process. Analysis of [32P]phosphate-labelled phospholipids showed a light-dependent increase in phospholipase D (PLD) activity. Treatment of leaf discs with n-butanol, which decreases the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) by PLD, led to the partial inhibition of the C4-PEPC phosphorylation, suggesting the participation of PLD/PA in the signalling cascade. PPCK1 gene expression was strictly light-dependent. Addition of neomycin or n-butanol decreased, and a combination of both inhibitors markedly reduced PPCK1 expression and the concomitant rise in PEPC-k activity. The calcium/calmodulin antagonist W7 blocked the light-dependent up-regulation of PEPC-k, pointing to a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) integrating both second messengers, calcium and PA, which were shown to increase the activity of sorghum CDPK. PMID:20410319

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase intrinsically located in the chloroplast of rice plays a crucial role in ammonium assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Chisato; Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Takuya; Taniguchi, Yojiro; Murayama, Seiji; Kusano, Miyako; Saito, Kazuki; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme of primary metabolism in bacteria, algae, and vascular plants, and is believed to be cytosolic. Here we show that rice (Oryza sativa L.) has a plant-type PEPC, Osppc4, that is targeted to the chloroplast. Osppc4 was expressed in all organs tested and showed high expression in the leaves. Its expression in the leaves was confined to mesophyll cells, and Osppc4 accounted for approximately one-third of total PEPC protein in the leaf blade. Recombinant Osppc4 was active in the PEPC reaction, showing Vmax comparable to cytosolic isozymes. Knockdown of Osppc4 expression by the RNAi technique resulted in stunting at the vegetative stage, which was much more marked when rice plants were grown with ammonium than with nitrate as the nitrogen source. Comparison of leaf metabolomes of ammonium-grown plants suggested that the knockdown suppressed ammonium assimilation and subsequent amino acid synthesis by reducing levels of organic acids, which are carbon skeleton donors for these processes. We also identified the chloroplastic PEPC gene in other Oryza species, all of which are adapted to waterlogged soil where the major nitrogen source is ammonium. This suggests that, in addition to glycolysis, the genus Oryza has a unique route to provide organic acids for ammonium assimilation that involves a chloroplastic PEPC, and that this route is crucial for growth with ammonium. This work provides evidence for diversity of primary ammonium assimilation in the leaves of vascular plants. PMID:20194759

  18. Transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by phosphorus deficiency in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Koizumi, Nozomu; Sato, Fumihiko

    2003-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which catalyses the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate using HCO(3)(-) to generate oxaloacetic acid, is an important enzyme in the primary metabolism of plants. Although the PEPC genes (ppc) comprise only a small gene family, the function of each gene is not clear, except for roles in C(4) photosynthesis and CAM. Three PEPC genes (Nsppc1-3) from the C(3) plant Nicotiana sylvestris were used to investigate their roles and regulation in a C(3) plant, and their regulation by phosphorus depletion in particular. First, the induction of PEPC by phosphorus depletion was confirmed. Next, Nsppc1 was determined to be mainly responsive to phosphorus deficiency at the transcriptional level. Further studies using transgenic tobacco harbouring a chimeric gene consisting of the 2.0 kb promoter region of Nsppc1 and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter showed that PEPC is transcriptionally induced. It was also found that sucrose had a synergistic effect on the induction of PEPC by phosphorus deficiency. A series of transgenic tobacco containing 5'-deletion mutants of Nsppc1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed that the -539 to -442 bp Nsppc1 promoter region, relative to the translation start site, was necessary for the response to phosphorus deficiency. Gain-of-function analysis using a construct containing three tandem repeats of the -539 to -442 bp region confirmed that this region was sufficient to induce the phosphorus-deficiency response in tobacco. PMID:12598567

  19. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  20. Design and performance of the beamlet optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.W.; DeYoreo, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments are typically designed with large apertures (>30 cm) to keep the fluence below the damage threshold of the various optical components. Until recently, no optical switch technology could be scaled to the aperture size, aperture shape (square), and switching speed required for the next generation of ICF drivers. This step is critical: The Beamlet multipass amplifier cavity uses a full-aperture optical switch to trap the laser pulse within the cavity and to divert the pulse out of the cavity when it reaches the required energy. By rotating the polarization of the beam, a Pockels cell in the switch controls whether the beam is transmitted through, or reflected from, the polarizer. In this article the authors describe an optical switch technology that does scale to the required aperture size and shape for Beamlet and the porposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, and can employ a thin crystal. This switch consists of a thin-film polarizer and a plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC), the latter originally invented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the 1980s and under further development since 1991. After discussing the PEPC concept, they present the design and optical performance of a 32 x 32 cm{sup 2} prototype PEPC, including discussions of the crystals, the PEPC assembly, the vacuum and gas system, and the high-voltage pulsers. Then they describe the performance of the 37 x 37 cm{sup 2} PEPC construced specifically for the Beamlet laser. Finally, they discuss important technology issues that arose during PEPC development: cathode sputtering, cathode heating, nonuniformities in the switching profile, switch-pulse leakage current, and an estimate of the plasma density and temperature produced during PEPC operation.

  1. Reciprocal Control of Anaplerotic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by in Vivo Monoubiquitination and Phosphorylation in Developing Proteoid Roots of Phosphate-Deficient Harsh Hakea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al3+, Fe3+, and Ca2+ phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme’s activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  2. Reciprocal control of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by in vivo monoubiquitination and phosphorylation in developing proteoid roots of phosphate-deficient harsh hakea.

    PubMed

    Shane, Michael W; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Plaxton, William C

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Ca(2+) phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme's activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  3. Purification and characterization of a novel phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from banana fruit.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R D; Plaxton, W C

    1995-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from ripened banana (Musa cavendishii L.) fruits has been purified 127-fold to apparent homogeneity and a final specific activity of 32 mumol of oxaloacetate produced/min per mg of protein. Non-denaturing PAGE of the final preparation resolved a single protein-staining band that co-migrated with PEPC activity. Polypeptides of 103 (alpha-subunit) and 100 (beta-subunit) kDa, which stain for protein with equal intensity and cross-react strongly with anti-(maize leaf PEPC) immune serum, were observed following SDS/PAGE of the final preparation. CNBr cleavage patterns of the two subunits were similar, but not identical, suggesting that these polypeptides are related, but distinct, proteins. The enzyme's native molecular mass was estimated to be about 425 kDa. These data indicate that in contrast to the homotetrameric PEPC from most other sources, the banana fruit enzyme exists as an alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramer. Monospecific rabbit anti-(banana PEPC) immune serum effectively immunoprecipitated the activity of the purified enzyme. Immunoblotting studies established that the 100 kDa subunit did not arise via proteolysis of the 103 kDa subunit after tissue extraction, and that the subunit composition of banana PEPC remains uniform throughout the ripening process. PEPC displayed a typical pH activity profile with an alkaline optimum and activity rapidly decreasing below pH 7.0. Enzymic activity was absolutely dependent on the presence of a bivalent metal cation, with Mg2+ or Mn2+ fulfilling this requirement. The response of the PEPC activity to PEP concentration and to various effectors was greatly influenced by pH and glycerol addition to the assay. The enzyme was activated by hexose-monophosphates and potently inhibited by malate, succinate, aspartate and glutamate at pH 7.0, whereas the effect of these metabolites was considerably diminished or completely abolished at pH 8.0. The significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is

  4. Deregulation of feedback inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase for improved lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Frank, Doinita; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) controls the metabolic flux distribution of anaplerotic pathways. In this study, the feedback inhibition of Corynebacterium glutamicum PEPC was rationally deregulated, and its effect on metabolic flux redistribution was evaluated. Based on rational protein design, six PEPC mutants were designed, and all of them showed significantly reduced sensitivity toward aspartate and malate inhibition. Introducing one of the point mutations (N917G) into the ppc gene, encoding PEPC of the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum LC298, resulted in ∼37% improved lysine production. In vitro enzyme assays and (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis showed ca. 20 and 30% increases in the PEPC activity and corresponding flux, respectively, in the mutant strain. Higher demand for NADPH in the mutant strain increased the flux toward pentose phosphate pathway, which increased the supply of NADPH for enhanced lysine production. The present study highlights the importance of allosteric regulation on the flux control of central metabolism. The strategy described here can also be implemented to improve other oxaloacetate-derived products. PMID:24334667

  5. Contribution of C3 carboxylation to the circadian rhythm of carbon dioxide uptake in a Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Tomasz P; Lüttge, Ulrich E

    2003-05-01

    During the endogenous circadian rhythm of carbon dioxide uptake in continuous light by a Crassula cean acid metabolism plant, Kalanchoë daigremontiana, the two carboxylating enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), are active simultaneously, although, until now, only the role of PEPC in generating the rhythm has been acknowledged. According to the established model, the rhythm is primarily regulated at the PEPC activity level, modulated by periodic compartmentation of its inhibitor, malate, in the vacuole and controlled by tension/relaxation of the tonoplast. However, the circadian accumulation of malic acid (the main indicator of PEPC activity) dampened significantly within the first few periods without affecting the rhythm's amplitude. Moreover, the amount of malate accumulated during a free-running oscillation was several-fold lower than the amount expected if PEPC were the key carboxylating enzyme, based on a 1:1 stoichiometry of CO(2) and malate. Together with the observation that rates of CO(2) uptake under continuous light were higher than in darkness, the evidence shows that C(3) carboxylation greatly contributes to the generation of rhythmic CO(2) uptake in continuous light in this 'obligate' CAM plant. Because the shift from predominantly CAM to predominantly C(3) carboxylation is smooth and does not distort the trajectory of the rhythm, its control probably arises from a robust network of oscillators, perhaps also involving stomata. PMID:12709493

  6. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  7. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+). PMID:24594398

  8. Performance of large-aperture optical switches for high-energy inertial-confinement fusion lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.; Atherton, L.J.

    1995-08-20

    We describe the design and performance of large-aperture ({lt}30 cm {times} 30 cm) optical switches that have demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, active switching of a high-energy ({lt}5 kJ) optical pulse in an inertial-confinement fusion laser. These optical switches, which consist of a plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) and a passive polarizer, permit the design of efficient, multipass laser amplifiers. In a PEPC, plasma discharges on the faces of a thin (1-cm) electro-optic crystal (KDP or KD{bold |}P) act as highly conductive and transparent electrodes. These plasma electrodes facilitate rapid ({lt}100 ns) and uniform charging of the crystal to the half-wave voltage and discharging back to 0 V. We discuss the operating principles, design, optical performance, and technical issues of a 32 cm {times} 32 cm prototype PEPC with both KDP and KD{bold |}P crystals, and a 37 cm {times} 37 cm PEPC with a KDP crystal for the Beamlet laser. This PEPC recently switched a 6-kJ, 3-ns pulse in a four-pass cavity.

  9. Origin and Reticulate Evolutionary Process of Wheatgrass Elymus trachycaulus (Triticeae: Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongwei; Wu, Panpan; Wu, Dexiang; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    To study origin and evolutionary dynamics of tetraploid Elymus trachycaulus that has been cytologically defined as containing StH genomes, thirteen accessions of E. trachycaulus were analyzed using two low-copy nuclear gene Pepc (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) and Rpb2 (the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II), and one chloroplast region trnL–trnF (spacer between the tRNA Leu (UAA) gene and the tRNA-Phe (GAA) gene). Our chloroplast data indicated that Pseudoroegneria (St genome) was the maternal donor of E. trachycaulus. Rpb2 data indicated that the St genome in E. trachycaulus was originated from either P. strigosa, P. stipifolia, P. spicata or P. geniculate. The Hordeum (H genome)-like sequences of E. trachycaulus are polyphyletic in the Pepc tree, suggesting that the H genome in E. trachycaulus was contributed by multiple sources, whether due to multiple origins or introgression resulting from subsequent hybridization. Failure to recovering St copy of Pepc sequence in most accessions of E. trachycaulus might be caused by genome convergent evolution in allopolyploids. Multiple copies of H-like Pepc sequence from each accession with relative large deletions and insertions might be caused by either instability of Pepc sequence in H- genome or incomplete concerted evolution. Our results highlighted complex evolutionary history of E. trachycaulus. PMID:25946188

  10. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  11. Shared origins of a key enzyme during the evolution of C4 and CAM metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Monica; Osborne, Colin P.; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sage, Rowan F.; Hibberd, Julian M.; Kelly, Steven; Covshoff, Sarah; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hancock, Lillian; Edwards, Erika J.

    2014-01-01

    CAM and C4 photosynthesis are two key plant adaptations that have evolved independently multiple times, and are especially prevalent in particular groups of plants, including the Caryophyllales. We investigate the origin of photosynthetic PEPC, a key enzyme of both the CAM and C4 pathways. We combine phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding PEPC with analyses of RNA sequence data of Portulaca, the only plants known to perform both CAM and C4 photosynthesis. Three distinct gene lineages encoding PEPC exist in eudicots (namely ppc-1E1, ppc-1E2 and ppc-2), one of which (ppc-1E1) was recurrently recruited for use in both CAM and C4 photosynthesis within the Caryophyllales. This gene is present in multiple copies in the cacti and relatives, including Portulaca. The PEPC involved in the CAM and C4 cycles of Portulaca are encoded by closely related yet distinct genes. The CAM-specific gene is similar to genes from related CAM taxa, suggesting that CAM has evolved before C4 in these species. The similar origin of PEPC and other genes involved in the CAM and C4 cycles highlights the shared early steps of evolutionary trajectories towards CAM and C4, which probably diverged irreversibly only during the optimization of CAM and C4 phenotypes. PMID:24638902

  12. Photoperiodism and crassulacean acid metabolism : I. Immunological and kinetic evidences for different patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms in photoperiodically inducible and non-inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Müller, D; Kluge, M; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Plants of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb and Sedum morganianum E. Walth. were grown under controlled photoperiodic conditions under either short or long days. Gaz exchange measurements confirmed that in K. blossfeldiana Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was photoperiodically inducible and that S. morganianum performed CAM independently of photoperiod. With K. blossfeldiana, a comparison of catalytic and regulatory properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) from short-day and long-day grown plants showed differences, but not with S. morganianum. Ouchterlony double diffusion tests and immunotitration experiments (using a S. morganianum PEPC antibody) established that CAM is induced in K. blossfeldiana-but not in S. morganianum-through the synthesis of a new PEPC isoform; this form shows an immunological behavior different from that prevailing under non-inductive conditions and can be considered as specific for CAM performance. PMID:24276159

  13. Metabolite Control Overrides Circadian Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase and CO(2) Fixation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Borland; Hartwell; Jenkins; Wilkins; Nimmo

    1999-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) catalyzes the primary fixation of CO(2) in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Flux through the enzyme is regulated by reversible phosphorylation. PEPc kinase is controlled by changes in the level of its translatable mRNA in response to a circadian rhythm. The physiological significance of changes in the levels of PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and the involvement of metabolites in control of the kinase was investigated by subjecting Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves to anaerobic conditions at night to modulate the magnitude of malate accumulation, or to a rise in temperature at night to increase the efflux of malate from vacuole to cytosol. Changes in CO(2) fixation and PEPc kinase activity reflected those in kinase mRNA. The highest rates of CO(2) fixation and levels of kinase mRNA were observed in leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment for the first half of the night and then transferred to ambient air. In leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment overnight and transferred to ambient air at the start of the day, PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and activity, the phosphorylation state of PEPc, and fixation of atmospheric CO(2) were significantly higher than those for control leaves for the first 3 h of the light period. A nighttime temperature increase from 19 degrees C to 27 degrees C led to a rapid reduction in kinase mRNA and activity; however, this was not observed in leaves in which malate accumulation had been prevented by anaerobic treatment. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a high concentration of malate reduces both kinase mRNA and the accumulation of the kinase itself. PMID:10557237

  14. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene via NO and Ca(2+).

    PubMed

    Qian, Baoyun; Li, Xia; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Pingbo; Ren, Chengang; Dai, Chuanchao

    2015-03-01

    We determined the effects of endogenous nitric oxide and Ca(2+) on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) under drought. In this study, seedlings were subjected to PEG 6000 treatments using PC and wild type (WT; Kitaake). The results showed that, compared with WT, PC had higher relative water content (RWC) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under drought. During a 2-day re-watering treatment, Pn recovered faster in PC than in WT. Further analyses showed that, under the drought treatment, the amount of endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) increased in WT mainly via NADPH oxidase. While in PC, the endogenous nitric oxide (NO) content increased via nitrate reductase and nitric oxide synthase on day 2 of the drought treatment and day 1 of the re-watering treatment. After 2 days of drought treatment, PC also showed higher PEPC activity, calcium content, phospholipase D (PLD) activity, C4-pepc and NAC6 transcript levels, and protein kinase activity as compared with PC without treatment. These changes did not occur in WT. Correlation analysis also proved NO associated with these indicators in PC. Based on these results, there was a particular molecular mechanism of drought tolerance in PC. The mechanism is related to the signaling processes via NO and Ca(2+) involving the protein kinase and the transcription factor, resulted in up-regulation of PEPC activity and its gene expression, such as C4pepc. Some genes encode antioxidant system, cu/zn-sod as well, which promote antioxidant system to clear MDA and superoxide anion radical, thereby conferring drought tolerance. PMID:25460871

  15. Improved oxidative tolerance in suspension-cultured cells of C4-pepctransgenic rice by H2O2 and Ca(2+) under PEG-6000.

    PubMed

    Qian, Baoyun; Li, Xia; Liu, Xiaolong; Wang, Man

    2015-06-01

    To understand the molecular responses of PC (Overexpressing the maize C4-pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)), to drought stress at cell level, we analyzed changes in the levels of signaling molecules (hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), calcium ion (Ca(2+)), and nitric oxide (NO)) in suspension-cultured PC and wild-type (WT) rice (Oryza sativa L.) cell under drought stress induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-6000). Results demonstrated that PC improved drought tolerance by enhancing antioxidant defense, retaining higher relative water content, survival percentages, and dry weight of cells. In addition, PEPC activity in PC under PEG treatment was strengthened by addition of H2O2 inhibitor, dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and NO synthesis inhibitor, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), respectively, while that in PC was weakened by addition of free calcium chelator, ethylene glycol-bis(b-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium channel outflow inhibitor, ruthenium red (RR) + plasma membrane channel blocker La(NO3)3, but EGTA + RR did not. Results also showed that NO and Ca(2+) was lying downstream of H2O2 in drought-induced signaling. Calcium ion was also involved in the expression of C4-pepc in PC. These results suggested that PC could improve oxidative tolerance in suspension-cultured cells and the acquisition of this tolerance required downregulation of H2O2 and the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) into cells across the plasma membrane for regulation of PEPC activity and C4-pepc expression. PMID:25231250

  16. Deployment, Commissioning and Operation of Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Primdahl, K A; Watson, J J; O'Brien, M D; Funkhouser, W G; Biltoft, P J; Shelton, R T; Tapley, W C; DeHope, W J

    2003-12-01

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPCs) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cells allow the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass main amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, also configured in a 4 x 1 array, forms an optical switch that is key to achieving the required multi-pass operation. The operation of the PEPC is a follows: Before the arrival of the laser pulse, optically transparent, low-density helium plasmas are initiated to serve as electrodes for the KDP crystals mounted in the Pockels cell. During beam propagation through the main laser cavity a longitudinal electric field is impressed on the electro-optic crystals. The polarization of the propagating beams is rotated by 90{sup o} on each of two passes, thereby allowing the beam to be trapped in the main laser amplifier cavity for a total of four passes before being switched out into the cavity spatial filter. The physics aspects of the PEPC are well documented. Consequently, this paper will emphasize the PEPC subsystem in the context of its role and relevance within the broader NIF laser system, provide a view of the complexity of the subsystem and give an overview of PEPC's interactions with other elements of NIF, including interfaces to the Beamline Infrastructure, the NIF Timing Subsystem, and the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS); along with dependence on the Optics Production, Transport and Handling (T&H), and Assembly, Integration and Refurbishment (AIR) and Operations organizations. Further, we will discuss implementation details related to the functional blocks and individual components that comprise PEPC, with particular emphasis on the unique constraints placed on the elements and the attendant

  17. Deployment, commissioning, and operation of plasma electrode Pockels cells in the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Ollis, Craig W.; Hinz, Andrew F.; Robb, Calvin L.; Primdahl, Keith A.; Watson, Jayson J.; O'Brien, Michael D.; Funkhouser, William G.; Biltoft, Peter J.; Shelton, Randy T.; Tapley, William C.; DeHope, William J.

    2004-05-01

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPCs) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cells allow the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass main amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4x1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, also configured in a 4x1 array, forms an optical switch that is key to achieving the required multi-pass operation. The operation of the PEPC is a follows: Before the arrival of the laser pulse, optically transparent, low-density helium plasmas are initiated to serve as electrodes for the KDP crystals mounted in the Pockels cell. During beam propagation through the main laser cavity a longitudinal electric field is impressed on the electro-optic crystals. The polarization of the propagating beams is rotated by 90° on each of two passes, thereby allowing the beam to be trapped in the main laser amplifier cavity for a total of four passes before being switched out into the cavity spatial filter. The physics aspects of the PEPC are well documented. Consequently, this paper will emphasize the PEPC subsystem in the context of its role and relevance within the broader NIF laser system, provide a view of the complexity of the subsystem and give an overview of PEPC's interactions with other elements of NIF, including interfaces to the Beamline Infrastructure, the NIF Timing Subsystem, and the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS); along with dependence on the Optics Production, Transport and Handling (T&H), and Assembly, Integration and Refurbishment (AIR) and Operations organizations. Further, we will discuss implementation details related to the functional blocks and individual components that comprise PEPC, with particular emphasis on the unique constraints placed on the elements and the attendant

  18. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  19. On the Mechanism of Reinitiation of Endogenous Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Rhythm by Temperature Changes.

    PubMed

    Grams, TEE.; Borland, A. M.; Roberts, A.; Griffiths, H.; Beck, F.; Luttge, U.

    1997-04-01

    Under continuous light the endogenous Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) rhythm of Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier de la Bathie disappears at high (>29.0[deg]C) or low (<8.0[deg]C) temperatures. We investigated the reinitiation of rhythmicity when temperature was reduced from above the upper and increased from below the lower threshold level via measurements of (a) short-term changes in carbon-isotope discrimination to illustrate shifts between C3 and C4 carboxylation in vivo, and (b) the malate sensitivity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in vitro. When the net CO2-exchange rhythm disappears at both temperatures, the instantaneous discrimination indicates low PEPC activity. Leaf malate concentration and osmolarity attain high and low values at low and high temperatures, respectively. After small temperature increases or reductions from the low and high temperatures, respectively, the rhythm is reinitiated, with phases shifted by 180[deg] relative to each other. This can be related to the contrasting low and high leaf malate concentrations due to direct inhibition of PEPC and possibly also of the phosphorylation of PEPC by malate. The experimental results were satisfactorily simulated by a mathematical CAM-cycle model, with temperature acting only on the passive efflux of malate from the vacuole. We stress the important role of the tonoplast in malate compartmentation and of malate itself for the reinitiation and generation of endogenous CAM rhythmicity. PMID:12223675

  20. Evolution of the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter of the C4 species Flaveria trinervia: the role of the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Sascha; Zogel, Corinna; Koczor, Maria; Schlue, Ute; Streubel, Monika; Westhoff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background The key enzymes of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C4 plants have evolved independently several times from C3 isoforms that were present in the C3 ancestral species. The C4 isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), the primary CO2-fixing enzyme of the C4 cycle, is specifically expressed at high levels in mesophyll cells of the leaves of C4 species. We are interested in understanding the molecular changes that are responsible for the evolution of this C4-characteristic PEPC expression pattern, and we are using the genus Flaveria (Asteraceae) as a model system. It is known that cis-regulatory sequences for mesophyll-specific expression of the ppcA1 gene of F. trinervia (C4) are located within a distal promoter region (DR). Results In this study we focus on the proximal region (PR) of the ppcA1 promoter of F. trinervia and present an analysis of its function in establishing a C4-specific expression pattern. We demonstrate that the PR harbours cis-regulatory determinants which account for high levels of PEPC expression in the leaf. Our results further suggest that an intron in the 5' untranslated leader region of the PR is not essential for the control of ppcA1 gene expression. Conclusion The allocation of cis-regulatory elements for enhanced expression levels to the proximal region of the ppcA1 promoter provides further insight into the regulation of PEPC expression in C4 leaves. PMID:18208593

  1. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  2. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2′,3′,4′,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2′,3′,4′-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  3. Discrimination Processes and Shifts in Carboxylation during the Phases of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A.; Borland, A. M.; Griffiths, H.

    1997-01-01

    The magnitude and extent of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) activity in two Clusia species was manipulated to investigate the regulation of the distinct CAM phases. First, in response to leaf-air vapor pressure deficit at night, changes in leaf conductance altered on-line carbon-isotope discrimination throughout the theoretical range for dark CO2 uptake during CAM. These ranged from the limit set by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) (-6[per mille (thousand) sign], [delta]13C equivalent of -2[per mille (thousand) sign]) to that imposed by diffusion limitation (+4[per mille (thousand) sign], [delta]13C equivalent of -12[per mille (thousand) sign]), but the lowest carbon-isotope discrimination occurred when P[square root]pa was only 0.7. Second, when the availability of external or internal sources of CO2 was reduced for both field- and greenhouse-grown plants, CO2 uptake by day via PEPc during phase II largely compensated. Third, by reducing the dark period, plants accumulated low levels of acidity, and CO2 uptake occurred throughout the subsequent light period. Discrimination switched from being dominated by PEPc (phase II) to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (phase III), with both enzymes active during phase IV. Under natural conditions, photochemical stability is maintained by extended PEPc activity in phase II, which enhances acid accumulation and delays decarboxylation until temperature and light stress are maximal at midday. PMID:12223674

  4. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2‧,3‧,4‧,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2‧,3‧,4‧-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  5. 78 FR 47410 - General Management Plan, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Gateway National Recreation Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    .../gate ) and the NPS Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) Web site ( http://www.parkplanning... future management of Gateway, the environment that would be affected by the alternative management... people into the park to increase awareness and enjoyment of Gateway's historic resources and the...

  6. 77 FR 36573 - DRAFT General Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Fort Matanzas National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... within a sometimes harsh, but beautiful and rich natural environment. There would be minimal development... interpretation of the natural environment. Driving on the Atlantic Ocean beach of Anastasia Island would continue... through the NPS Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) Web site:...

  7. Spectral and holographic characterization of new photochromic compounds based on substituted spiropyrans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciapurin, Igor V.; Robu, Stephan V.; Vlad, Lyudmila A.; Lessard, Roger A.; Tork, Amir; Lafond, Christophe; Bolte, Michel

    2001-06-01

    We report a new photochromic composite polymer consisting of poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC) polymeric matrix with a nitro-brome-substituted spiropyran (BNSP) photochromic dye. The PEPC + BNSP films can be considered as negative photochromic recording media. They are colored in the initial state and bleached upon irradiation within the visible spectra. When we placed the bleached samples to the darkness, they slowly revert to the colored form. This process has strong temperature dependence, so one can either 'freeze'' or accelerate changing of the current coloration state in the PEPC + BNSP. The experimental measurements are evaluated in conjunction with its potential applications for optical holographic recording in the visible spectral range. The real-time holographic recording procedure in PEPC + BNSP films was studied. The diffraction efficiency values reached the maximum of 23 percent at spatial frequency of 1600 line pairs per mm, during direct hologram recording with the 532 nm Coherent VERDI laser irradiation. Light exposures were ranged from 70 to 280 mJ/cm2. The investigated compounds have good perspectives for use in holography, two-photon optical data storage, electro-optics, and optical-limiting applications due to coupling of some unique properties such as high optical non-linearity, well charge transport, short response times, no-limiting resolution ability, etc.

  8. Enhancement in leaf photosynthesis and upregulation of rubisco in the C4 sorghum plant at elevated growth carbon dioxide and temperature occur at early stages of leaf ontogeny.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain sorghum was grown at 350 and 700 (high) ppm CO2, and at daytime maximum/nighttime minimum temperatures of 30/20 and 36/26C. Gas exchange rates, activities of Rubisco and PEP carboxylase (PEPC), leaf area, and biomass of various plant components were determined at different stages of leaf and p...

  9. The Importance of the Strictly Conserved, C-terminal Glycine Residue in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Overall Catalysis: Mutagenesis and Truncation of GLY-961 in the Sorghum C4 Leaf Isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,W.; Ahmed, S.; Moriyama, H.; Chollet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a 'multifaceted', allosteric enzyme involved in C4 acid metabolism in green plants/microalgae and prokaryotes. Before the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of maize C4 leaf and Escherichia coli PEPC, our truncation analysis of the sorghum C4 homologue revealed important roles for the enzyme's C-terminal {alpha}-helix and its appended QNTG{sup 961} tetrapeptide in polypeptide stability and overall catalysis, respectively. Collectively, these functional and structural observations implicate the importance of the PEPC C-terminal tetrapeptide for both catalysis and negative allosteric regulation. We have now more finely dissected this element of PEPC structure-function by modification of the absolutely conserved C-terminal glycine of the sorghum C4 isoform by site-specific mutagenesis (G961(A/V/D)) and truncation ({Delta}C1/C4). Although the C4 polypeptide failed to accumulate in a PEPC{sup -} strain (XH11) of E. coli transformed with the Asp mutant, the other variants were produced at wild-type levels. Although neither of these four mutants displayed an apparent destabilization of the purified PEPC homotetramer, all were compromised catalytically in vivo and in vitro. Functional complementation of XH11 cells under selective growth conditions was restricted progressively by the Ala, {Delta}C1 and Val, and {Delta}C4 modifications. Likewise, steady-state kinetic analysis of the purified mutant enzymes revealed corresponding negative trends in k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K0.5 (phosphoenolpyruvate) but not in K{sub 0.5} or the Hill coefficient. Homology modeling of these sorghum C-terminal variants against the structure of the closely related maize C4 isoform predicted perturbations in active-site molecular cavities and/or ion-pairing with essential, invariant Arg-638. These collective observations reveal that even a modest, neutral alteration of the PEPC C-terminal hydrogen atom side chain is detrimental to enzyme

  10. Phaeodactylum tricornutum photosynthesis and Thalassiosira pseudonana bio-silica formation genes nucleotide fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Marchese, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P.; Flamholz, A.; Huerta, M.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2008-08-01

    Diatom bioactivity has been reported to be responsible for about 20% of carbon fixation globally and together with other photosynthetic organisms, the bioactivity can be monitored via satellite ocean imaging. The bioinformatics embedded in the nucleotide fluctuations of photosynthesis and bio-silicate genes in diatoms were studied. The recently reported phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase PEPC1 and PEPC2 C4-like photosynthesis genes in Phaeodactylum tricornutum were found to have similar fractal dimensions of about 2.01. In comparison, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PEPC1 and PEPC2 genes have fractal dimensions of about 2.05. The PEPC CpG dinucleotide content is 8% in P. tricornutum and 10% in C. reinhardtii. Further comparison of the cell wall protein gene showed that the VSP1 gene sequence in C. reinhardtii has a fractal dimension of 2.03 and the bio-silica formation silaffin gene in Thalassiosira pseudonana has a fractal dimension of 2.01. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase PPC1 and PPC2 in T. pseudonana were found to have fractal dimensions and CpG dinucleotide content similar to that of P. tricornutum. The fractal dimension of the dnaB replication helicase gene is about 1.98 for both diatoms as well as for the alga Heterosigma akashiwo. In comparison, the E. coli dnaB gene has a fractal dimension of about 2.03. Given that high fractal dimension and CpG dinucleotide content sequences have been associated with the presence of selective pressures, the relatively low fractal dimension gene sequences of the two unique properties of Earth-bound diatoms (photosynthesis and bio-silica cell wall) suggests the potential for the development of high fractal dimension sequences for adaptation in harsh environments.

  11. Partitioning of Nitrogen among Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Pyruvate Orthophosphate Dikinase as Related to Biomass Productivity in Maize Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, T; Mizuno, M; Hayashi, M

    1984-07-01

    Maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51) seedlings were grown under full sunlight or 50% sunlight in a temperature-controlled glasshouse at the temperatures of near optimum (30/25 degrees C) and suboptimum (17/13 degrees C) with seven levels of nitrate-N (0.4 to 12 millimolars). The contents of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPD), and ribulose-1,5-P(2) carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) were immunochemically determined for each treatment with rabbit antibodies raised against the respective maize leaf proteins (anti-PEPC and anti-PPD) or spinach leaf protein (anti-RuBisCO). The content of each enzymic protein increased with increasing N and raised under reduced temperature. The positive effect of light intensity on their contents was evident only at near optimal temperature. The relative increase in PEPC and PPD content with increasing N was significantly greater than that of RuBisCO irrespective of growth conditions. These enzymic proteins comprised about 8, 6, and 35% of total soluble protein, respectively, at near optimal growth condition. In contrast to significant increase in the proportion of soluble protein allocated to PEPC and PPD seen under certain conditions, the proportion allocated to RuBisCO decreased reciprocally with an increased biomass yield by N supply.These results indicated that the levels of PEPC and PPD parallel to maize biomass more tightly than that of RuBisCO at least under near optimal growth condition. PMID:16663684

  12. Activities of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and 14C-Bicarbonate Fixation during in Vitro Culture of Pinus radiata Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prakash P.; Bender, Ludwig; Thorpe, Trevor A.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), as indicators of autotrophic and nonautotrophic CO2 fixation, were measured in excised cotyledons of Pinus radiata D. Don cultured for 21 days under shoot-forming (SF) and nonshoot-forming (NSF) conditions. The activity of RuBPC was found to increase in both SF and NSF cultures during the initial 5 days of culture. However, it leveled off from day 5 to day 10 and subsequently began to decrease until the end of the culture period under the SF conditions. In contrast, in the NSF cultures, RuBPC activity increased until day 15, when it was twofold higher than the maximum activity found in the SF cultures. An increase in PEPC activity of about 2.5 times the level of activity in freshly excised cotyledons was observed during the initial 5 days of culture under the SF conditions. PEPC activity began to decline after day 5 until it reached the level of activity seen in NSF cotyledons by day 15. In contrast, the activity of PEPC did not show any significant increase during the initial 10 days of culture under the NSF conditions. The Km (phosphoenolpyruvate) of PEPC from SF cotyledons was about 35% higher than that of NSF cotyledons. Cotyledons from two culture periods (days 5 and 15) were incubated for 15 seconds with NaH14CO3. The label in the malate and asparatate fractions as a percentage of total 14C incorporation was 3 times higher in the SF cotyledons than in the NSF cotyledons. A higher incorporation of 14C into products of photosynthesis under the NSF conditions was also observed. PMID:16666206

  13. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  14. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during C4 photosynthetic isotope exchange and stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Asaph B; Baroli, Irene; Badger, Murray R; Ivakov, Alexander; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) plays a key role during C(4) photosynthesis and is involved in anaplerotic metabolism, pH regulation, and stomatal opening. Heterozygous (Pp) and homozygous (pp) forms of a PEPC-deficient mutant of the C(4) dicot Amaranthus edulis were used to study the effect of reduced PEPC activity on CO(2) assimilation rates, stomatal conductance, and (13)CO(2) (Delta(13)C) and C(18)OO (Delta(18)O) isotope discrimination during leaf gas exchange. PEPC activity was reduced to 42% and 3% and the rates of CO(2) assimilation in air dropped to 78% and 10% of the wild-type values in the Pp and pp mutants, respectively. Stomatal conductance in air (531 mubar CO(2)) was similar in the wild-type and Pp mutant but the pp mutant had only 41% of the wild-type steady-state conductance under white light and the stomata opened more slowly in response to increased light or reduced CO(2) partial pressure, suggesting that the C(4) PEPC isoform plays an essential role in stomatal opening. There was little difference in Delta(13)C between the Pp mutant (3.0 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand) and wild type (3.3 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand), indicating that leakiness (), the ratio of CO(2) leak rate out of the bundle sheath to the rate of CO(2) supply by the C(4) cycle, a measure of the coordination of C(4) photosynthesis, was not affected by a 60% reduction in PEPC activity. In the pp mutant Delta(13)C was 16 per thousand +/- 3.2 per thousand, indicative of direct CO(2) fixation by Rubisco in the bundle sheath at ambient CO(2) partial pressure. Delta(18)O measurements indicated that the extent of isotopic equilibrium between leaf water and the CO(2) at the site of oxygen exchange () was low (0.6) in the wild-type and Pp mutant but increased to 0.9 in the pp mutant. We conclude that in vitro carbonic anhydrase activity overestimated as compared to values determined from Delta(18)O in wild-type plants. PMID:17827274

  15. Immunolocalization of carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in developing seeds of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Aivalakis, Georgios; Dimou, Maria; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Plati, Fotini; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Drossopoulos, J B

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) during Medicago sativa seed development, the distribution of both proteins was examined using an immunohistological approach. Both enzymes are co-localized in most ovular and embryonic tissues. In early stages of seed development, both proteins were abundant in embryo and integuments, while at subsequent stages both proteins are accumulated in endosperm, nucellus and integuments. At late stages of seed development when both endosperm and nucellus are degraded, significant accumulation of both proteins was observed in the embryo proper. Chlorophyll was found to accumulate in embryos after the heart stage and reached a maximum at mature stage. It is suggested that CA and PEPC play a role in respiratory carbon dioxide refixation while generating malate to support amino acid and/or fatty acids biosynthesis. PMID:15051041

  16. The intrinsic pKa values for phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine in phosphatidylcholine host bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, F C; Ojcius, D M; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    Potentiometric titrations and surface potential measurements have been used to determine the intrinsic pKa values of both the carboxyl and amino groups of phosphatidylserine (PS) in mixed vesicles of PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC), and also of the amino group of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in mixed PE-PC vesicles. The pKa of the carboxyl group of PS in liposomes with different PS/PC lipid ratios measured by the two different methods is 3.6 +/- 0.1, and the pKa of its amino group is 9.8 +/- 0.1. The pKa of the amino group of PE in PE-PC vesicles, determined solely by surface potential measurements, is 9.6 +/- 0.1. These pKa values are independent of the aqueous phase ionic strength and of the effect of the liposome's surface potential due to the presence of these partially charged lipids. PMID:3955180

  17. Effects of granulation on organic acid metabolism and its relation to mineral elements in Citrus grandis juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-You; Wang, Ping; Qi, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Chen-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Liao, Xin-Yan; Wang, Liu-Qing; Zhu, Dong-Huang; Chen, Li-Song

    2014-02-15

    We investigated the effects of granulation on organic acid metabolism and its relation to mineral elements in 'Guanximiyou' pummelo (Citrus grandis) juice sacs. Granulated juice sacs had decreased concentrations of citrate and isocitrate, thus lowering juice sac acidity. By contrast, malate concentration was higher in granulated juice sacs than in normal ones. The reduction in citrate concentration might be caused by increased degradation, as indicated by enhanced aconitase activity, whilst the increase in malate concentration might be caused by increased biosynthesis, as indicated by enhanced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that the activities of most acid-metabolizing enzymes were regulated at the transcriptional level, whilst post-translational modifications might influence the PEPC activity. Granulation led to increased accumulation of mineral elements (especially phosphorus, magnesium, sulphur, zinc and copper) in juice sacs, which might be involved in the incidence of granulation in pummelo fruits. PMID:24128573

  18. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process as a probable mechanism for the diurnal regulatory changes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Le Marechal, P; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O; Kluge, M; Kruger, I

    1986-04-14

    Day and night forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) (PEPC) were extracted from leaves of the CAM plants Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. tubiflora and K. blossfeldiana previously fed with [32P] labelled phosphate solution. A one-step immunochemical purification followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed that, in all species, the night form of the enzyme was phosphorylated and not the day form. Limited acid hydrolysis of the night form and two-dimensional separation identified predominantly labelled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. In vitro addition of exogenous acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) to desalted night form-containing extracts resulted within 30 min in a shift in PEPC enzymic properties similar to the in vivo changes from night to day form. It is suggested that phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the enzyme could be the primary in vivo process which might explain the observed rhythmicity of enzymic properties. PMID:3707571

  19. Charge carrier generation in photosensitive amorphous molecular semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Y.; Kharkyanen, V.; Zabolotny, M.; Zabolotnaya, T.

    2006-05-01

    Thermalization process in photosensitive amorphous molecular semiconductors are theoretically considered from standpoint of their parameters, namely: thermalization time, thermalization length. The heat electron formed in consequence of absorption of the light quantum by semiconductor molecules loses his surplus energy in the time of inelastic interaction with neighbouring atoms. The results of theoretical predictions are confirmed by the experimental ones obtained for a number of molecular semiconductors (anthracene, pentacene, PVC, PEPC).

  20. Ectopic Expression of GsPPCK3 and SCMRP in Medicago sativa Enhances Plant Alkaline Stress Tolerance and Methionine Content

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Chaoyue; DuanMu, Huizi; Yu, Yang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    So far, it has been suggested that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs) and PEPC kinases (PPCKs) fulfill several important non-photosynthetic functions. However, the biological functions of soybean PPCKs, especially in alkali stress response, are not yet well known. In previous studies, we constructed a Glycine soja transcriptional profile, and identified three PPCK genes (GsPPCK1, GsPPCK2 and GsPPCK3) as potential alkali stress responsive genes. In this study, we confirmed the induced expression of GsPPCK3 under alkali stress and investigated its tissue expression specificity by using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Then we ectopically expressed GsPPCK3 in Medicago sativa and found that GsPPCK3 overexpression improved plant alkali tolerance, as evidenced by lower levels of relative ion leakage and MDA content and higher levels of chlorophyll content and root activity. In this respect, we further co-transformed the GsPPCK3 and SCMRP genes into alfalfa, and demonstrated the increased alkali tolerance of GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines. Further investigation revealed that GsPPCK3-SCMRP co-overexpression promoted the PEPC activity, net photosynthetic rate and citric acid content of transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. Moreover, we also observed the up-regulated expression of PEPC, CS (citrate synthase), H+-ATPase and NADP-ME genes in GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. As expected, we demonstrated that GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines displayed higher methionine content than wild type alfalfa. Taken together, results presented in this study supported the positive role of GsPPCK3 in plant response to alkali stress, and provided an effective way to simultaneously improve plant alkaline tolerance and methionine content, at least in legume crops. PMID:24586886

  1. Pyruvate kinase deletion as an effective phenotype to enhance lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032: Redirecting the carbon flow to a precursor metabolite.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Masaki; Aikoh, Tohru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Hagiwara, Takuya; Imai, Keita; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Various attempts have been made to enhance lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Pyruvate kinase (PYK) defect is one of the strategies used to enhance the supply of oxaloacetic acid (OAA), a precursor metabolite for lysine biosynthesis. However, inconsistent effects of this mutation have been reported: positive effects of PYK defect in mutants having phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) desensitized to feedback inhibition by aspartic acid, while negative effects in simple PYK gene (pyk) knockout mutants. To address these discrepancies, the effects of pyk deletion on lysine yield were investigated with or without the D299N mutation in ppc rendering PEPC desensitization. C. glutamicum ATCC13032 mutant strain P with a feedback inhibition-desensitized aspartokinase was used as the parent strain, producing 9.36 g/L lysine from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture. Under these conditions, while the simple mutant D2 with pyk deletion or R2 with the PEPC-desensitization mutation showed marginally increased lysine yield (∼1.1-fold, not significant), the mutant DR2 strain having both mutations showed synergistically increased lysine productivity (1.38-fold, 12.9 g/L). Therefore, the pyk deletion is effective under a PEPC-desensitized background, which ensures enhanced supply of OAA, thus clarifying the discrepancies. A citrate synthase defective mutation (S252C in gltA) further increased the lysine yield in strain DR2 (1.68-fold, 15.7 g/L). Thus, these three mutations coordinately enhanced the lysine yield. Both the malate:quinone oxidoreductase activity and respiration rate were significantly reduced in strains D2 and DR2. Overall, these results provide valuable knowledge for engineering the anaplerotic reaction to increase lysine yield in C. glutamicum. PMID:26983943

  2. Infrageneric Phylogeny and Temporal Divergence of Sorghum (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) Based on Low-Copy Nuclear and Plastid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Huan; Wen, Jun; Peterson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The infrageneric phylogeny and temporal divergence of Sorghum were explored in the present study. Sequence data of two low-copy nuclear (LCN) genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 4 (Pepc4) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), from 79 accessions of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides together with those from outgroups were used for maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses. Bayesian dating based on three plastid DNA markers (ndhA intron, rpl32-trnL, and rps16 intron) was used to estimate the ages of major diversification events in Sorghum. The monophyly of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides (with the latter nested within Sorghum) was strongly supported by the Pepc4 data using BI analysis, and the monophyly of Sorghum was strongly supported by GBSSI data using both ML and BI analyses. Sorghum was divided into three clades in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms: the subg. Sorghum lineage; the subg. Parasorghum and Stiposorghum lineage; and the subg. Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum lineage. Two LCN homoeologous loci of Cleistachne sorghoides were first discovered in the same accession. Sorghum arundinaceum, S. bicolor, S. x drummondii, S. propinquum, and S. virgatum were closely related to S. x almum in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms, suggesting that they may be potential genome donors to S. almum. Multiple LCN and plastid allelic variants have been identified in S. halepense of subg. Sorghum. The crown ages of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides and subg. Sorghum are estimated to be 12.7 million years ago (Mya) and 8.6 Mya, respectively. Molecular results support the recognition of three distinct subgenera in Sorghum: subg. Chaetosorghum with two sections, each with a single species, subg. Parasorghum with 17 species, and subg. Sorghum with nine species and we also provide a new nomenclatural combination, Sorghum sorghoides. PMID:25122516

  3. Metabolite Regulation of Partially Purified Soybean Nodule Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Turpin, David H.; Plaxton, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was purified 40-fold from soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules to a specific activity of 5.2 units per milligram per protein and an estimated purity of 28%. Native and subunit molecular masses were determined to be 440 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is a homotetramer. The response of enzyme activity to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentration and to various effectors was influenced by assay pH and glycerol addition to the assay. At pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, the Km (PEP) was about twofold greater than at pH 7 in the presence of glycerol or at pH 8. At pH 7 or pH 8 the Km (MgPEP) was found to be significantly lower than the respective Km (PEP) values. Glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate activated PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but had no effect under the other assay conditions. Malate, aspartate, glutamate, citrate, and 2-oxoglutarate were potent inhibitors of PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but their effectiveness was decreased by raising the pH to 8 and/or by adding glycerol. In contrast, 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate were less effective inhibitors at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol than under the other assay conditions. Inorganic phosphate (up to 20 millimolar) was an activator at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol but an inhibitor under the other assay conditions. The possible significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is discussed in relation to the proposed functions of this enzyme in legume nodule metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667849

  4. Comparing a 2D fluid model of the DC planar magnetron cathode to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1996-05-01

    Planar magnetron cathodes have arching magnetic field lines which concentrate plasma density near the electrode surface. This enhances the ion bombardment of the surface and the yield of sputtered atoms. Magnetron cathodes are used in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) devices of the Laser Program because they provide for significantly higher conduction than do glow discharges. An essential feature of magnetron cathodes is that the vector product of the perpendicular electric field, E[sub y], with the parallel component of the magnetic field, B[sub x], forms a closed track with a circulating current along the cathode surface. An analytical, 2D, two component, quasi-neutral, continuum model yields formulas for the plasma density, the total and component current densities, the electric field, and the positive electrical potential, between the cathode surface and a distant, uniform plasma. For a specific gas, the free parameters are electron temperature, gas number density, and total current. The model is applied to the interpretation of experimental data from the PEPC device, as well as a small vacuum facility for testing magnetron cathodes. Finally, the model has been applied to generate cross sectional views of a PEPC magnetron cathode track.

  5. Competing carboxylases: circadian and metabolic regulation of Rubisco in C3 and CAM Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed

    Davies, B N; Griffiths, H

    2012-07-01

    The temporal co-ordination of ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activities by Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. in C(3) and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) modes was investigated under conventional light-dark (LD) and continuous light (LL) conditions. When C(3) , net CO(2) assimilation rate increased during each subjective night under LL with maximum carboxylation unrelated to Rubisco activation state. The CAM circadian rhythm of CO(2) uptake was more pronounced, with CO(2) assimilation rate maximal towards the end of each subjective night. In vivo and in vitro techniques were integrated to map carboxylase enzyme regulation to the framework provided by CAM LL gas exchange activity. Rubisco was activated in vitro throughout each subjective dark period and consistently deactivated at each subjective dawn, similar to that observed at true dawn in constitutive CAM species. Instantaneous carbon isotope discrimination showed in vivo carboxylase co-dominance during the CAM subjective night, initially by Rubisco and latterly C(4) (PEPc), despite both enzymes seemingly activated in vitro. The circadian rhythm in titratable acidity accumulation was progressively damped over successive subjective nights, but maintenance of PEPc carboxylation capacity ensures that CAM plants do not become progressively more 'C(3) -like' with time under LL. PMID:22239463

  6. Redundancy of stomatal control for the circadian photosynthetic rhythm in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier.

    PubMed

    Wyka, T P; Duarte, H M; Lüttge, U E

    2005-03-01

    In continuous light, the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier has a circadian rhythm of gas exchange with peaks occurring during the subjective night. The rhythm of gas exchange is coupled to a weak, reverse phased rhythm of quantum yield of photosystem II (Phi (PSII)). To test if the rhythm of Phi (PSII) persists in the absence of stomatal control, leaves were coated with a thin layer of translucent silicone grease which prevented CO2 and H2O exchange. In spite of this treatment, the rhythm of Phi (PSII) occurred with close to normal phase timing and with a much larger amplitude than in uncoated leaves. The mechanism underlying the Phi (PSII) rhythm in coated leaves can be explained by a circadian activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). At peaks of PEPC activity, the small amount of CO2 contained in the coated leaf could have become depleted, preventing the carboxylase activity of Rubisco and causing decreases in electron transport rates (observed as deep troughs of Phi (PSII) at 23-h in LL and at ca. 24-h intervals afterwards). Peaks of Phi (PSII) would be caused by a downregulation of PEPC leading to improved supply of CO2 to Rubisco. Substrate limitation of photochemistry at 23 h (trough of Phi (PSII)) was also suggested by the weak response of ETR in coated leaves to stepwise light enhancement. These results show that photosynthetic rhythmicity in K. daigremontiana is independent of stomatal regulation and may originate in the mesophyll. PMID:15822013

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from cherimoya fruit: properties, kinetics and effects of high CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, T; Escribano, M I; Merodio, C

    2001-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) regulatory properties were studied in non-photosynthetic (mesocarp) and photosynthetic (peel) tissues from cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit stored in air, in order to gain a better understanding of in vivo enzyme regulation. Analyses were also performed with fruit treated with 20% CO(2)-20% O(2) to define the role of PEPC as part of an adaptive mechanism to high external carbon dioxide levels. The results revealed that the special kinetic characteristics of the enzyme from mesocarp--high V(max) and low sensibility to L-malate inhibition - are related to the active acid metabolism of these fruits and point to a high rate of reassimilation of respired CO(2) into keto-acids. With respect to fruit stored in air, PEPC in crude extracts from CO(2)-treated cherimoyas gave a similar V(max) (1.12+/-0.03 microkat x mg(-1) protein), a lower apparent K(m) (68+/-9 microM for PEP) and a higher I(50) of L-malate (5.95+/-0.3 mM). These kinetic values showed the increase in the affinity of this enzyme toward one of its substrate, PEP, by elevated external CO(2) concentrations. The lower K(m) value and lower sensitivity to L-malate are consistent with higher in vivo carboxylation reaction efficiency in CO(2)-treated cherimoyas, while pointing to an additional enzyme regulation system via CO(2). PMID:11730863

  8. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  9. Photoperiodism and Crassulacean acid metabolism : II. Relations between leaf aging and photoperiod in Crassulacean acid metabolism induction.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Guerrier, D; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Measurements of net CO2 exchange, malate accumulation, properties and capacity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) in leaves of different ages of two short-day dependent Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom thumb and K. velutina Welw.) show that, in both species: a) young leaves from plants grown under long days display a CO2 exchange pattern typical of C3 plants; b) leaf aging promotes CAM under long-day conditions; c) short-day treatment induces CAM in young leaves to a higher degree than aging under long days; d) at least in K. blossfeldiana, the PEPC form developed with leaf aging under long days and the enzyme form synthetized de novo in young leaves grown under short days were shown to have similar properties. Short days also promote CAM in older leaves though at a lesser extent than in young leaves: The result is that this photoperiodic treatment increases the general level of CAM performance by the whole plant. The physiological meaning of the control of PEPC capacity by photoperiodism could be to afford a precisely timed seasonal increase in CAM potentiality, enabling the plant to immediately optimize its response to the onset of drought periods. PMID:24276160

  10. Carboxylase Levels and Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Claisse, L. M.; Stoppani, A. O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphopyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) were compared in wild-type bakers' yeast (I), a cytoplasmic-respiratory mutant (II), a biotin-deficient wild-type yeast (III), and a biotin-deficient respiratory mutant (IV). PC activities were greatly reduced in III and IV, whereas PEPC was reduced in II and IV. Malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) could not be detected in any of the yeasts. With yeast I growing on glucose as the sole carbon source, PEPC decreased to negligible levels during the logarithmic phase of growth (glucose repression effect), whereas PC increased. Both enzymes reverted to their original levels during the stationary phase, when glucose in the medium was exhausted. In agreement with the leading role of PC for CO2 assimilation, the rates of 14CO2 fixation in yeasts I and II were approximately equal and were much higher than that in yeast IV. With I and II, most of the 14C was distributed similarly in oxalacetate derivatives; with yeast IV, most of 14C appeared in a compound apparently unrelated to CO2 fixation via C4-dicarboxylic acids. PMID:5732499

  11. Transgenic maize lines with cell-type specific expression of fluorescent proteins in plastids.

    PubMed

    Sattarzadeh, Amir; Fuller, Jonathan; Moguel, Salvador; Wostrikoff, Katia; Sato, Shirley; Covshoff, Sarah; Clemente, Tom; Hanson, Maureen; Stern, David B

    2010-02-01

    Plastid number and morphology vary dramatically between cell types and at different developmental stages. Furthermore, in C4 plants such as maize, chloroplast ultrastructure and biochemical functions are specialized in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which differentiate acropetally from the proplastid form in the leaf base. To develop visible markers for maize plastids, we have created a series of stable transgenics expressing fluorescent proteins fused to either the maize ubiquitin promoter, the mesophyll-specific phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepC) promoter, or the bundle sheath-specific Rubisco small subunit 1 (RbcS) promoter. Multiple independent events were examined and revealed that maize codon-optimized versions of YFP and GFP were particularly well expressed, and that expression was stably inherited. Plants carrying PepC promoter constructs exhibit YFP expression in mesophyll plastids and the RbcS promoter mediated expression in bundle sheath plastids. The PepC and RbcS promoter fusions also proved useful for identifying plastids in organs such as epidermis, silks, roots and trichomes. These tools will inform future plastid-related studies of wild-type and mutant maize plants and provide material from which different plastid types may be isolated. PMID:20051034

  12. Research on 2x1 plasma electrode electro-optical switch with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiong Jun; Zheng, Kui Xing; Feng, B.; Wu, D. S.; Lu, J. P.; Tian, X. L.; Jin, F.; Sui, Zhan; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2005-01-01

    In conceptual design of the prototype for SG-III facility, a full aperture electro-optical switch was placed between the cavity mirror and the main amplifier to isolate the reflected beams. The beam on the cavity mirror is 240mm×240mm square. Pockells cells of conversional design with coaxial ring electrodes can not scale to such large square aperture. In the 1980s, a plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) concept was invented at LLNL. It uses transparent plasma electrode formed through gas discharge as the electrodes to apply the voltage across switching crystal to rotate the polarization of a transmitted laser beam. And it can be scaled to large aperture with thin crystal. So the switch which would be used in SG-III is based on this technology. The technical integration line as a prototype of SG-III laser is actually a 4×2 beam bundle. And the full aperture optical switch is mechanically designed four apertures as a removable unit, and electrically two 2×1 PEPC putting together. So we built a 2×1 PEPC to develop the technology first. The 2×1 PEPC is a sandwich structure made of an insulating mid plane between a pair of plasma chambers. The frame of both plasma chambers are machining in duralumin. Each chamber is installed with a planar magnetic cathode and four segments spherical anodes made from stainless steel. The cathode and anode are insulated from the housing with a special shell made from plastic, and plasma is insulated from the housing by an 80-μm-thick anodic coating on the duralumin. The two plasma chambers are separated by a mid plane of glass frame with two square holes. The two holes are filled by two electro-optical crystals with a 240-mm square aperture. With the optimized operating pressure and the electrical parameters, a very good homogeneity and low resistivity plasma electrode is obtained. Finally we tested its switching performance to simulate the case that it will be used in the SG-III prototype facility. It works with a quarter wave

  13. Discrimination in the dark. Resolving the interplay between metabolic and physical constraints to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the crassulacean acid metabolism cycle.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-02-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online delta13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of delta13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (p(i)/p(a)) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, g(i), was 0.044 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1). A higher estimate of g(i) (0.085 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1)) was needed to account for the modeled and measured delta18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of g(i) from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of -5.5 per thousand between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase delta13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing delta13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry. PMID:17142488

  14. Bundle sheath diffusive resistance to CO(2) and effectiveness of C(4) photosynthesis and refixation of photorespired CO(2) in a C(4) cycle mutant and wild-type Amaranthus edulis.

    PubMed

    Kiirats, Olavi; Lea, Peter J; Franceschi, Vincent R; Edwards, Gerald E

    2002-10-01

    A mutant of the NAD-malic enzyme-type C(4) plant, Amaranthus edulis, which lacks phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in the mesophyll cells was studied. Analysis of CO(2) response curves of photosynthesis of the mutant, which has normal Kranz anatomy but lacks a functional C(4) cycle, provided a direct means of determining the liquid phase-diffusive resistance of atmospheric CO(2) to sites of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation inside bundle sheath (BS) chloroplasts (r(bs)) within intact plants. Comparisons were made with excised shoots of wild-type plants fed 3,3-dichloro-2-(dihydroxyphosphinoyl-methyl)-propenoate, an inhibitor of PEPC. Values of r(bs) in A. edulis were 70 to 180 m(2) s(-1) mol(-1), increasing as the leaf matured. This is about 70-fold higher than the liquid phase resistance for diffusion of CO(2) to Rubisco in mesophyll cells of C(3) plants. The values of r(bs) in A. edulis are sufficient for C(4) photosynthesis to elevate CO(2) in BS cells and to minimize photorespiration. The calculated CO(2) concentration in BS cells, which is dependent on input of r(bs), was about 2,000 microbar under maximum rates of CO(2) fixation, which is about six times the ambient level of CO(2). High re-assimilation of photorespired CO(2) was demonstrated in both mutant and wild-type plants at limiting CO(2) concentrations, which can be explained by high r(bs). Increasing O(2) from near zero up to ambient levels under low CO(2), resulted in an increase in the gross rate of O(2) evolution measured by chlorophyll fluorescence analysis in the PEPC mutant; this increase was simulated from a Rubisco kinetic model, which indicates effective refixation of photorespired CO(2) in BS cells. PMID:12376660

  15. Photosynthetic pathway diversity in a seasonal pool community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    1. Photosynthetic pathway diversity was evaluated for the dominant species in a seasonally aquatic community in the south-western USA using 14C pulse-chase techniques. 2. Under submerged conditions, only about half of the species were clearly C3, three of the 15 dominants were CAM, one species was C4 and three were potentially assimilating carbon with both C3 and C4 fixation. 3. During the brief terrestrial stage in the life history of these amphibious plants, both the CAM and the C3 + C4 species switched to C3, whereas the C4 species did not switch. 4. Numerous variations were apparent; for example, the C4 species, while exhibiting a biochemical pathway indistinguishable from terrestrial C4 plants, lacked Kranz anatomy in the aquatic foliage. Also, despite well-developed CAM in several species, others exhibited low-level diel changes in acidity, apparently not indicative of CAM. 5. Species with C4 or CAM CO2 concentrating mechanisms lacked the capacity for bicarbonate uptake, an alternative CO2 concentrating mechanism found in certain C3 species in this community. 6. Rubisco/PEPC in aquatic foliage was higher in C3 species than in C4, CAM or putative C3 + C4 species. In the terrestrial phase, as expected, the switch from CAM or C3 + C4 to strictly C3 assimilation was associated with a substantial increase in Rubisco/PEPC. Quite unexpected, however, was the substantial increase in this ratio in terrestrial C3 foliage. It is hypothesized that submerged C3 plants utilize PEPC for recycling of respiratory CO2 and/or C4 phototrophism under field conditions of limited CO2 and O2 saturation, and this is lost in the terrestrial foliage.

  16. Vacuum Brazing of Beryllium Copper Components for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tyhurst, C.C.; Cunningham, M.A.

    2002-06-04

    A process for vacuum brazing beryllium copper anode assemblies was required for the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell System, or PEPC, a component for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial problems with the joint design and wettability of the beryllium copper drove some minor design changes. Brazing was facilitated by plating the joint surface of the beryllium copper rod with silver 0.0006 inch thick. Individual air sampling during processing and swipe tests of the furnace interior after brazing revealed no traceable levels of beryllium.

  17. A proteomic approach to the analysis of the components of the phycobilisomes from two cyanobacteria with complementary chromatic adaptation: Fremyella diplosiphon UTEX B590 and Tolypothrix PCC 7601.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gómez, Bertha; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Cabellos-Avelar, Tecilli; Leyva-Castillo, Lourdes Elizabeth; Gutiérrez-Cirlos, Emma Berta; Gómez-Lojero, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Tolypothrix PCC 7601 and Fremyella diplosiphon UTEX B590 can produce two alternative phycobilisome (PBS) rods. PE-PBSs with one phycocyanin (PC) disk and multiple phycoerythrin (PE) disks are found in cells grown under green light (GL). PC-PBSs with only PC disks are obtained from cells grown under red light (RL). In this manuscript, we show the localization of the linker proteins and ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) in the PC-PBS and of PE-PBS rods using visible spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. PE-PBSs with different [PE]/[PC] ratios and PC-PBSs with different [PC]/[AP] (AP, allophycocyanin) ratios were isolated. CpeC was the primary rod linker protein found in the PBSs with a [PE]/[PC] ratio of 1.1, which indicates that this is the rod linker at the interphase PC-PE. CpeC and CpeD were identified in the PBSs with a [PE]/[PC] ratio of 1.6, which indicates that CpcD is the linker between the first and the second PE hexamers. Finally, CpeC, CpeD, and CpeE were found in the PBSs with a [PE]/[PC] ratio of 2.9, indicating the position of CpeE between the second and third PE moieties. CpcI2 was identified in the two PC-PBSs obtained from cells grown under RL, which indicates that CpcI2 is the linker between the first and second PC hexamers. CpcH2 was identified only in the PC-PBSs from Tolypothrix with a high [PC]/[AP] ratio of 1.92, which indicates that CpcH2 is the linker between the second and third PC hexamers. The PC-PBSs contained the rod cap protein L(R)(10) (CpcD), but this protein was absent in the PE-PBSs. PE-PBSs (lacking L(R)(10)) incorporated exogenous rFNR in a stoichiometry of up to five FNRs per PBS. A maximum of two FNRs per PBS were found in PC-PBSs (with L(R)(10)). These observations support the hypothesis that FNR binds at the distal ends of the PBS rods in the vacant site of CpcD L(R)(10). Finally, the molecular mass of the core membrane linker (L(CM)) was determined to be 102 kDa from a mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:22965313

  18. NIF Periscope Wall Modal Study Comparison of Results for 2 FEA Models with 2 Modal Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Eli, M W; Gerhard, M A; Lee, C L; Sommer, S C; Woehrle, T G

    2000-10-26

    This report summarizes experimentally and numerically determined modal properties for one of the reinforced concrete end walls of the NIF Periscope Support Structure in Laser Bay 1. Two methods were used to determine these modal properties: (1) Computational finite-element analyses (modal extraction process); and (2) Experimental modal analysis based on measured test data. This report also includes experimentally determined modal properties for a prototype LM3/Polarizer line-replaceable unit (LRU) and a prototype PEPC LRU. Two important parameters, used during the design phase, are validated through testing [ref 1]. These parameters are the natural frequencies and modal damping (of the system in question) for the first several global modes of vibration. Experimental modal testing provides these modal values, along with the corresponding mode shapes. Another important parameter, the input excitation (expected during normal operation of the NIF laser system) [ref 1], can be verified by performing a series of ambient vibration measurements in the vicinity of the particular system (or subsystem) of interest. The topic of ambient input excitation will be covered in a separate report. Due to the large mass of the Periscope Pedestal, it is difficult to excite the entire series of Periscope Pedestal Walls all at once. It was decided that the experimental modal tests would be performed on just one Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1. Experimental modal properties for the Periscope End Wall have been used to validate and update the FE analyses. Results from the analyses and modal tests support the conclusion that the Periscope Pedestal will not exceed the stability budget, which is described in reference 1. The results of the modal tests for the Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1 have provided examples of modal properties that can be derived from future modal tests of the entire Periscope Assembly (excluding the LRU's). This next series of larger modal tests can be performed

  19. Synergic effect of salinity and CO2 enrichment on growth and photosynthetic responses of the invasive cordgrass Spartina densiflora

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Álvarez, Rosario; Cambrollé, Jesús; Gandullo, Jacinto; Figueroa, M. Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Spartina densiflora is a C4 halophytic species that has proved to have a high invasive potential which derives from its clonal growth and its physiological plasticity to environmental factors, such as salinity. A greenhouse experiment was designed to investigate the synergic effect of 380 and 700 ppm CO2 at 0, 171, and 510 mM NaCl on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of S. densiflora by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. PEPC activity and total ash, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were determined, as well as the C/N ratio. Elevated CO2 stimulated growth of S. densiflora at 0 and 171 mM NaCl external salinity after 90 d of treatment. This growth enhancement was associated with a greater leaf area and improved leaf water relations rather than with variations in net photosynthetic rate (A). Despite the fact that stomatal conductance decreased in response to 700 ppm CO2 after 30 d of treatment, A was not affected. This response of A to elevated CO2 concentration might be explained by an enhanced PEPC carboxylation capacity. On the whole, plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO2, which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass and the higher water content found at 700 ppm CO2. Finally, CO2 and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:20194923

  20. Different Growth and Physiological Responses to Cadmium of the Three Miscanthus Species

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haipeng; Hong, Chuntao; Chen, Xiaomin; Xu, Yanxia; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Dean; Zheng, Bingsong

    2016-01-01

    Miscanthus has been proposed as a promising crop for phytoremediation due to its high biomass yield and remarkable adaptability to different environments. However, little is known about the resistance of Miscanthus spp. to cadmium (Cd). To determine any differences in resistance of Miscanthus to Cd, we examined plant growth, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), activities of anti-oxidant and C4 photosynthetic enzymes, concentrations of Cd in leaves and roots, and observed the chloroplast structure in three Miscanthus species treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 μM Cd in solutions. Miscanthus sinensis showed more sensitivity to Cd, including sharp decreases in growth, Pn, PEPC activity and damage to chloroplast structure, and the highest H2O2 and Cd concentrations in leaves and roots after Cd treatments. Miscanthus sacchariflorus showed higher resistance to Cd and better growth, had the highest Pn and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activities and integrative chloroplast structure and the lowest hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and leaf and root Cd concentrations. The results could play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of Cd tolerance in plants and in application of phytoremediation. PMID:27070918

  1. Luminescence of carbazolyl-containing polymers doped with iridium chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryshevskii, Yu. A.

    2008-05-01

    White light emission is shown to be obtainable at room temperature through the mixing of poly-N-vinylcarbazole (PVC) host fluorescence with fac-tris(2-phenylpyridyl)Ir(III) [Ir(ppy)3] and bis[2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3'](acetylacetonate)iridium (III) [Btp2Ir(acac)] dopant phosphorescence whereas at very low temperature through the superposition of poly-N-epoxypropyl-3,6-dibromocarbazole (3,6-DBrPEPC) host and Btp2Ir(acac) dopant phosphorescence emissions. The balance between basic colors is adjusted by the variation of triplet-emitter dopant concentrations. Spin-allowed singlet-singlet energy transfer from the host to iridium chelate dopants by the Forster mechanism is the dominant process in PVC. Spin-forbidden triplet-singlet transfer by the Forster mechanism from the host to the dopant occurs at low temperatures in 3,6-DBrPEPC due to strong spin-orbit coupling induced by the heavy bromine atoms. Spin-allowed transfer from the same host’s triplet excited state to the iridium chelate occurs via electron exchange at high temperatures.

  2. Integration and expression of Sorghum C(4) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and chloroplastic NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase separately or together in C(3) potato plants(1).

    PubMed

    Beaujean, A; Issakidis-Bourguet, E; Catterou, M; Dubois, F; Sangwan, R S.; Sangwan-Norreel, B S.

    2001-05-01

    We have integrated two cDNAs expressing Sorghum photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C(4)-PEPC) and NADP-malate dehydrogenase (cpMDH), two key enzymes involved in the primary carbon fixation pathway of NADP-malic enzyme-type C(4) plants, separately or together into a C(3) plant (potato). Analysis of the transgenic plants showed a 1.5-fold increase in PEPC and cpMDH activities compared to untransformed plants. Immunolocalization confirmed an increase at the protein level of these two enzymes in the transgenic plants and indicated that the Sorghum cpMDH was specifically addressed to the chloroplasts of potato mesophyll cells. However, integration of either or both of the cDNAs into the potato genome did not appear to significantly modify either tuber starch grain content or the rate of photosynthetic O(2) production compared to control untransformed plants. The low level of transgene expression probably explains the lack of influence on carbon metabolism and photosynthetic rates. This general observation suggests that some complex mechanism may regulate the level of production of foreign C(4) metabolism enzymes in C(3) plants. PMID:11337077

  3. Production of marker-free transgenic Jatropha curcas expressing hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin Cry1Ab/1Ac for resistance to larvae of tortrix moth (Archips micaceanus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential biofuel plant Jatropha curcas L. is affected by larvae of Archips micaceanus (Walker), a moth of the family Tortricidae. The hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin protein Cry1Ab/1Ac confers resistance to lepidopteran insects in transgenic rice. Results Here, we report the production of a marker-free transgenic line of J. curcas (L10) expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and a chemically regulated, Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination system. L10 carries a single copy of marker-free T-DNA that contains the Cry1Ab/1Ac gene under the control of a maize phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene promoter (P Pepc :Cry1Ab/1Ac:T Nos ). The P Pepc :Cry1Ab/1Ac:T Nos gene was highly expressed in leaves of L10 plants. Insecticidal bioassays using leaf explants of L10 resulted in 80-100% mortality of larvae of A. micaceanus at 4 days after infestation. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the hybrid Bt δ-endotoxin protein Cry1Ab/1Ac expressed in Jatropha curcas displays strong insecticidal activity to A. micaceanus. The marker-free transgenic J. curcas line L10 can be used for breeding of insect resistance to A. micaceanus. PMID:24808924

  4. Single Targeted Exon Mutation Creates a True Congenic Mouse for Competitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The C57BL/6-CD45.1(STEM) Mouse.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Francois E; Sykes, David B; Scadden, David T

    2016-06-14

    Defining the molecular regulators of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) requires in vivo functional analyses. Competitive bone marrow transplants (BMTs) compare control and test HSPCs to demonstrate the functional role of a genetic change or chemical perturbation. Competitive BMT is enabled by antibodies that specifically recognize hematopoietic cells from congenic mouse strains due to variants of the cell surface protein CD45, designated CD45.1 and CD45.2. The current congenic competitor strain, B6.SJL-Ptprc(a) Pepc(b)/BoyJ (CD45.1), has a substantial inherent disadvantage in competition against the C57BL/6 (CD45.2) strain, confounding experimental interpretation. Despite backcrossing, the congenic interval over which the B6.SJL-Ptprc(a) Pepc(b)/BoyJ strain differs is almost 40 Mb encoding ∼300 genes. Here, we demonstrate that a single amino acid change determines the CD45.1 epitope. Further, we report on the single targeted exon mutant (STEM) mouse strain, CD45.1(STEM), which is functionally equivalent to CD45.2 cells in competitive BMT. This strain will permit the precise definition of functional roles for candidate genes using in vivo HSPC assays. PMID:27185283

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID-STATE DRIVERS FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P A; McHale, G B; James, G; Brown, G; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C

    2008-05-14

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cell allows the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, configured in a 4 x 1 array, form an optical switch that is key to achieving multi-pass operation. Solid-state Plasma Pulse Generators (PPGs) and high current high voltage solid-state Switch Pulse Generators (SPGs) have been developed for use in the PEPC. The solid-state plasma pulse generators initiate and maintain plasma within the cells; each pulser is capable of delivering 60J of energy to each plasma channel. Deployment of the solid-state PPGs has been completed in NIF. The MOSFET-switched SPG is capable of delivering a requisite fast rise time, 17kV flattop pulse to the cells nonlinear crystals. A complete software and hardware control system has been developed and is currently being tested for use on the solid-state SPGs. Also a transmission line modeling, development, and testing effort is in process, in support of NIFs Advanced Radiographic Capabilities (ARC). Work is scheduled for completion by the end of the calendar year.

  6. Different Growth and Physiological Responses to Cadmium of the Three Miscanthus Species.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haipeng; Hong, Chuntao; Chen, Xiaomin; Xu, Yanxia; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Dean; Zheng, Bingsong

    2016-01-01

    Miscanthus has been proposed as a promising crop for phytoremediation due to its high biomass yield and remarkable adaptability to different environments. However, little is known about the resistance of Miscanthus spp. to cadmium (Cd). To determine any differences in resistance of Miscanthus to Cd, we examined plant growth, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), activities of anti-oxidant and C4 photosynthetic enzymes, concentrations of Cd in leaves and roots, and observed the chloroplast structure in three Miscanthus species treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 μM Cd in solutions. Miscanthus sinensis showed more sensitivity to Cd, including sharp decreases in growth, Pn, PEPC activity and damage to chloroplast structure, and the highest H2O2 and Cd concentrations in leaves and roots after Cd treatments. Miscanthus sacchariflorus showed higher resistance to Cd and better growth, had the highest Pn and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activities and integrative chloroplast structure and the lowest hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and leaf and root Cd concentrations. The results could play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of Cd tolerance in plants and in application of phytoremediation. PMID:27070918

  7. Phosphatidylethanolamine Is a Key Regulator of Membrane Fluidity in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Noyon, Caroline; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-02-12

    Adequate membrane fluidity is required for a variety of key cellular processes and in particular for proper function of membrane proteins. In most eukaryotic cells, membrane fluidity is known to be regulated by fatty acid desaturation and cholesterol, although some cells, such as insect cells, are almost devoid of sterol synthesis. We show here that insect and mammalian cells present similar microviscosity at their respective physiological temperature. To investigate how both sterols and phospholipids control fluidity homeostasis, we quantified the lipidic composition of insect SF9 and mammalian HEK 293T cells under normal or sterol-modified condition. As expected, insect cells show minimal sterols compared with mammalian cells. A major difference is also observed in phospholipid content as the ratio of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) is inverted (4 times higher in SF9 cells). In vitro studies in liposomes confirm that both cholesterol and PE can increase rigidity of the bilayer, suggesting that both can be used by cells to maintain membrane fluidity. We then show that exogenously increasing the cholesterol amount in SF9 membranes leads to a significant decrease in PE:PC ratio whereas decreasing cholesterol in HEK 293T cells using statin treatment leads to an increase in the PE:PC ratio. In all cases, the membrane fluidity is maintained, indicating that both cell types combine regulation by sterols and phospholipids to control proper membrane fluidity. PMID:26663081

  8. Invasion percolation between two sites in two, three, and four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2009-06-01

    The mass distribution of invaded clusters in non-trapping invasion percolation between an injection site and an extraction site has been studied, in two, three, and four dimensions. This study is an extension of the recent study focused on two dimensions by Araújo et al. [A.D. Araújo, T.F. Vasconcelos, A.A. Moreira, L.S. Lucena, J.S. Andrade Jr., Phys. Rev. E 72 (2005) 041404] with respect to higher dimensions. The mass distribution exhibits a power-law behavior, P(m)∝m. It has been found that the index α for pe, pc being the percolation threshold of a regular percolation, appears to be independent of the value of pe and is also independent of the lattice dimensionality. When pe=pc, α appears to depend marginally on the lattice dimensionality, and the relation α=τ-1, τ being the exponent associated with cluster size distribution of a regular percolation via ns∝s, appears to be valid.

  9. Proline synthesis in barley under iron deficiency and salinity.

    PubMed

    Arias-Baldrich, Cirenia; Bosch, Nadja; Begines, Digna; Feria, Ana B; Monreal, José A; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates proline synthesis in six barley varieties subjected to iron deficiency, salinity or both stresses. The highest growth under Fe sufficiency corresponded to Belgrano and Shakira. A moderate augment of leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was observed in all six varieties in response to Fe deficiency, consistently in leaves and sporadically in roots. All six varieties accumulated proline under Fe deficiency, to a higher extent in leaves than in roots. The decrease of Fe supply from 100 μM NaFe(III)-EDTA to 0.5 μM NaFe(III)-EDTA reduced growth and photosynthetic pigments similarly in the six barley varieties. On the contrary, differences between varieties could be observed with respect to increased or, conversely, decreased proline content as a function of the amount of NaFe(III)-EDTA supplied. These two opposite types were represented by Belgrano (higher proline under Fe deficiency) and Shakira (higher proline under Fe sufficiency). Time-course experiments suggested that leaf PEPC activity was not directly responsible for supplying C for proline synthesis under Fe deficiency. High proline levels in the leaves of Fe-deficient Belgrano plants in salinity were associated to a better performance of this variety under these combined stresses. PMID:26125122

  10. Proton conduction in gramicidin A and in its dioxolane-linked dimer in different lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, S; Quigley, E P; Crumrine, D S

    1997-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) molecules were covalently linked with a dioxolane ring. Dioxolane-linked gA dimers formed ion channels, selective for monovalent cations, in planar lipid bilayers. The main goal of this study was to compare the functional single ion channel properties of natural gA and its covalently linked dimer in two different lipid bilayers and HCl concentrations (10-8000 mM). Two ion channels with different gating and conductance properties were identified in bilayers from the product of dimerization reaction. The most commonly observed and most stable gramicidin A dimer is the main object of this study. This gramicidin dimer remained in the open state most of the time, with brief closing flickers (tau(closed) approximately 30 micros). The frequency of closing flickers increased with transmembrane potential, making the mean open time moderately voltage dependent (tau(open) changed approximately 1.43-fold/100 mV). Such gating behavior is markedly different from what is seen in natural gA channels. In PEPC (phosphatidylethanolamine-phosphatidylcholine) bilayers, single-channel current-voltage relationships had an ohmic behavior at low voltages, and a marked sublinearity at relatively higher voltages. This behavior contrasts with what was previously described in GMO (glycerylmonooleate) bilayers. In PEPC bilayers, the linear conductance of single-channel proton currents at different proton concentrations was essentially the same for both natural and gA dimers. g(max) and K(D), obtained from fitting experimental points to a Langmuir adsorption isotherm, were approximately 1500 pS and 300 mM, respectively, for both the natural gA and its dimer. In GMO bilayers, however, proton affinities of gA and the dioxolane-dimer were significantly lower (K(D) of approximately 1 and 1.5 M, respectively), and the g(max) higher (approximately 1750 and 2150 pS, respectively) than in PEPC bilayers. Furthermore, the relationship between single-channel conductance and proton

  11. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lamps, inspection lamps, flashlights, and animal lamps which are operated by small storage batteries or dry cells. (b) Class 2. Class 2 includes lamps such as the pneumatic-electric types and large...

  12. Changes in gravity affect gene expression, protein modulation and metabolite pools of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, R.; Martzivanou, M.; Maier, R. M.; Magel, E.

    Callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) in Petri dishes / suspension cultures were exposed to altered g-forces by centrifugation (1 to 10 g), klinorotation, and μ g (sounding rocket flights). Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, transcripts of genes coding for metabolic key enzymes (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADPG-PP; ß-amylase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBPase; glyceraldehyde-P dehydrogenase, GAPDH; hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, HMG; phenylalanine-ammonium-lyase, PAL; PEP carboxylase, PEPC) were used to monitor threshold conditions for g-number (all) and time of exposure (ß-amylase) which led to altered amounts of the gene product. Exposure to approx. 5 g and higher for 1h resulted in altered transcript levels: transcripts of ß-amylase, PAL, and PEPC were increased, those of ADPG-PP decreased, while those of FBPase, GAPDH, and HMG were not affected. This probably indicates a shift from starch synthesis to starch degradation and increased rates of anaplerosis (PEPC: supply of ketoacids for amino acid synthesis). In order to get more information about g-related effects on gene expression, we used a 1h-exposure to 7 g for a microarray analysis. Transcripts of more than 200 genes were significantly increased in amount (ratio 7g / 1g control; 21.6 and larger). They fall into several categories. Transcripts coding for enzymes of major pathways form the largest group (25%), followed by gene products involved in cellular organisation and cell wall formation / rearrangement (17%), signalling, phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (12%), proteolysis and transport (10% each), hormone synthesis plus related events (8%), defense (4%), stress-response (2%), and gravisensing (2%). Many of the alterations are part of a general stress response, but some changes related to the synthesis / rearrangement of cell wall components could be more hyper-g-specific. Using macroarrays with selected genes according to our hypergravity study (metabolism / signalling

  13. Photosynthetic flexibility in maize exposed to salinity and shade

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Sonawane, Balasaheb V.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis involves a close collaboration of the C3 and C4 metabolic cycles across the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. This study investigated the coordination of C4 photosynthesis in maize plants subjected to two salinity (50 and 100mM NaCl) treatments and one shade (20% of full sunlight) treatment. Photosynthetic efficiency was probed by combining leaf gas-exchange measurements with carbon isotope discrimination and assaying the key carboxylases [ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] operating in maize leaves. Generally, salinity inhibited plant growth and photosynthesis to a lesser extent than shade. Salinity reduced photosynthesis primarily by reducing stomatal conductance and secondarily by equally reducing Rubisco and PEPC activities; the decarboxylases were inhibited more than the carboxylases. Salinity increased photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination (Δp) and reduced leaf dry-matter carbon isotope composition (13δ) due to changes in p i/p a (intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressure), while CO2 leakiness out of the bundle sheath (ϕ) was similar to that in control plants. Acclimation to shade was underpinned by a greater downregulation of PEPC relative to Rubisco activity, and a lesser inhibition of NADP-ME (primary decarboxylase) relative to PEP-CK (secondary decarboxylase). Shade reduced Δp and ɸ without significantly affecting leaf 13δ or p i/p a relative to control plants. Accordingly, shade perturbed the balance between the C3 and C4 cycles during photosynthesis in maize, and demonstrated the flexible partitioning of C4 acid decarboxylation activity between NADP-ME and PEP-CK in response to the environment. This study highlights the need to improve our understanding of the links between leaf 13δ and photosynthetic Δp, and the role

  14. A HIGH CURRENT, HIGH VOLTAGE SOLID-STATE PULSE GENERATOR FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Barbosa, F; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C; Akana, G L; Brooksby, C A

    2007-07-27

    A high current, high voltage, all solid-state pulse modulator has been developed for use in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem in the National Ignition Facility. The MOSFET-switched pulse generator, designed to be a more capable plug-in replacement for the thyratron-switched units currently deployed in NIF, offers unprecedented capabilities including burst-mode operation, pulse width agility and a steady-state pulse repetition frequency exceeding 1 Hz. Capable of delivering requisite fast risetime, 17 kV flattop pulses into a 6 {Omega} load, the pulser employs a modular architecture characteristic of the inductive adder technology, pioneered at LLNL for use in acceleration applications, which keeps primary voltages low (and well within the capabilities of existing FET technology), reduces fabrication costs and is amenable to rapid assembly and quick field repairs.

  15. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Shoup, M. J. III; Waxer, L. J.; Cost, E. C.; Green, E. T.; Hoyt, Z. M.; Taniguchi, J.; Walker, T. W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP)laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density.

  16. Application of a novel and automated branched DNA in situ hybridization method for the rapid and sensitive localization of mRNA molecules in plant tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Andrew J.; Pence, Heather E.; Church, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH), originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. • Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. • Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes. PMID:25202621

  17. AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

  18. Effect of concentration of anionic polymethine dye in poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole polymer film composite on the spectral-luminescent properties and photoconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidenko, Nikolay A.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Kulinich, Andrii V.; Studzinsky, Sergey L.

    2012-12-01

    The absorption, fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra of polymer thin film composites based on poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC) doped with different content of anionic polymethine dye testify to the formation of contact ion-pair associates at high concentration of the latter. The photoconductivity of such composites in the visible spectrum region is observed, despite the absence in the polymer of any fragment capable of accepting a photoexcited electron from anionic dye chromophore. Analysis of the spectral data together with DFT/B3LYP quantum-chemical calculation of the HOMO and LUMO energies of the monomer N-methylcarbazole unit and the radical of the polymethine dye allowed us to suggest the possible mechanism of internal photoeffect in the investigated composites which is based on the formation of the contact ion-pair associates.

  19. Effect of concentration of anionic polymethine dye in poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole polymer film composite on the spectral-luminescent properties and photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Nikolay A; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Kulinich, Andrii V; Studzinsky, Sergey L

    2012-12-01

    The absorption, fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra of polymer thin film composites based on poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC) doped with different content of anionic polymethine dye testify to the formation of contact ion-pair associates at high concentration of the latter. The photoconductivity of such composites in the visible spectrum region is observed, despite the absence in the polymer of any fragment capable of accepting a photoexcited electron from anionic dye chromophore. Analysis of the spectral data together with DFT/B3LYP quantum-chemical calculation of the HOMO and LUMO energies of the monomer N-methylcarbazole unit and the radical of the polymethine dye allowed us to suggest the possible mechanism of internal photoeffect in the investigated composites which is based on the formation of the contact ion-pair associates. PMID:22995470

  20. Proximity-enabled protein crosslinking through genetically encoding haloalkane unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Lacey, Vanessa K; Ren, Haiyan; Xu, Jing; Burban, David J; Jennings, Patricia A; Wang, Lei

    2014-02-17

    The selective generation of covalent bonds between and within proteins would provide new avenues for studying protein function and engineering proteins with new properties. New covalent bonds were genetically introduced into proteins by enabling an unnatural amino acid (Uaa) to selectively react with a proximal natural residue. This proximity-enabled bioreactivity was expanded to a series of haloalkane Uaas. Orthogonal tRNA/synthetase pairs were evolved to incorporate these Uaas, which only form a covalent thioether bond with cysteine when positioned in close proximity. By using the Uaa and cysteine, spontaneous covalent bond formation was demonstrated between an affibody and its substrate Z protein, thereby leading to irreversible binding, and within the affibody to increase its thermostability. This strategy of proximity-enabled protein crosslinking (PEPC) may be generally expanded to target different natural amino acids, thus providing diversity and flexibility in covalent bond formation for protein research and protein engineering. PMID:24449339

  1. A carbonic anhydrase gene is induced in the nodule primordium and its cell-specific expression is controlled by the presence of Rhizobium during development.

    PubMed

    Coba de la Peña, T; Frugier, F; McKhann, H I; Bauer, P; Brown, S; Kondorosi, A; Crespi, M

    1997-03-01

    Under nitrogen starvation, Rhizobium meliloti is able to induce nitrogen-fixing nodules on alfalfa roots. Certain alfalfa cultivars spontaneously develop pseudonodules in the absence of bacteria. A transcript, Msca1, expressed in spontaneous and R. meliloti-induced nodules, that codes for a carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme catalyzing the hydration of CO2 has been identified. This is the first CA gene cloned from a non-photosynthetic tissue in plants. Msca1 was activated initially in all cells of the bacterium-induced nodule primordium and was also induced by cytokinin treatment of alfalfa roots. The presence of CA enzymatic activity in different nodule types was demonstrated. Thus, Msca1 is a new early nodulin gene with a function possibly related to the increased amyloplast deposition of the dividing cortical cells. Msca1 transcripts were subsequently found mainly in a peripheral envelope of cells in developing and mature nodules. This novel pattern of gene expression is controlled by the presence of the bacterium inside the nodule. Sucrose synthase and phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), other genes of the carbon fixation metabolism, were expressed in the same peripheral cells and even more strongly in the nitrogen-fixing region. Analysis of expression patterns of these genes indicated that early CA function may not be related to carbon fixation through PEPC. CA might be acting in pH regulation and/or CO2/HCO3-transport during nodule initiation. Thus, carbonic anhydrase may play different roles at several stages of nodule development and function. PMID:9107031

  2. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 [times] 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V[sub x] ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V[sub x], the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90[degree]. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 [times] 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  3. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 {times} 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V{sub x} ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V{sub x}, the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90{degree}. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 {times} 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  4. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A.; Abdul-Baki, Aref A.; Sobolev, Anatoli P.; Goyal, Ravinder K.; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L.; Handa, Avtar K.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotype×mulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit. PMID:18469323

  5. Conserved and Divergent Rhythms of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism-Related and Core Clock Gene Expression in the Cactus Opuntia ficus-indica1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  6. Differentiation of C4 photosynthesis along a leaf developmental gradient in two Cleome species having different forms of Kranz anatomy.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Cousins, Asaph B; Edwards, Gerald E

    2014-07-01

    In family Cleomaceae there are NAD-malic enzyme-type C4 species having different forms of leaf anatomy. Leaves of Cleome angustifolia have Glossocardioid-type anatomy with a single complex Kranz unit which surrounds all the veins, while C. gynandra has Atriplicoid anatomy with multiple Kranz units, each surrounding an individual vein. Biochemical and ultrastructural differentiation of mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells were studied along a developmental gradient, from the leaf base (youngest) to the tip (mature). Initially, there is cell-specific expression of certain photosynthetic enzymes, which subsequently increase along with structural differentiation. At the base of the leaf, following division of ground tissue to form M and BS cells which are structurally similar, there is selective localization of Rubisco and glycine decarboxylase to BS cells. Thus, a biochemical C3 default stage, with Rubisco expression in both cell types, does not occur. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is selectively expressed in M cells near the base. Surprisingly, in both species, an additional layer of spongy M cells on the abaxial side of the leaf has the same differentiation with PEPC, even though it is not in contact with BS cells. During development along the longitudinal gradient there is structural differentiation of the cells, chloroplasts, and mitochondria, resulting in complete formation of Kranz anatomy. In both species, development of the C4 system occurs similarly, irrespective of having very different types of Kranz anatomy, different ontogenetic origins of BS and M, and independent evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:24550438

  7. Leaf anatomical traits which accommodate the facultative engagement of crassulacean acid metabolism in tropical trees of the genus Clusia.

    PubMed

    Barrera Zambrano, V Andrea; Lawson, Tracy; Olmos, Enrique; Fernández-García, Nieves; Borland, Anne M

    2014-07-01

    Succulence and leaf thickness are important anatomical traits in CAM plants, resulting from the presence of large vacuoles to store organic acids accumulated overnight. A higher degree of succulence can result in a reduction in intercellular air space which constrains internal conductance to CO2. Thus, succulence presents a trade-off between the optimal anatomy for CAM and the internal structure ideal for direct C3 photosynthesis. This study examined how plasticity for the reversible engagement of CAM in the genus Clusia could be accommodated by leaf anatomical traits that could facilitate high nocturnal PEPC activity without compromising the direct day-time uptake of CO2 via Rubisco. Nine species of Clusia ranging from constitutive C3 through C3/CAM intermediates to constitutive CAM were compared in terms of leaf gas exchange, succulence, specific leaf area, and a range of leaf anatomical traits (% intercellular air space (IAS), length of mesophyll surface exposed to IAS per unit area, cell size, stomatal density/size). Relative abundances of PEPC and Rubisco proteins in different leaf tissues of a C3 and a CAM-performing species of Clusia were determined using immunogold labelling. The results indicate that the relatively well-aerated spongy mesophyll of Clusia helps to optimize direct C3-mediated CO2 fixation, whilst enlarged palisade cells accommodate the potential for C4 carboxylation and nocturnal storage of organic acids. The findings provide insight on the optimal leaf anatomy that could accommodate the bioengineering of inducible CAM into C3 crops as a means of improving water use efficiency without incurring detrimental consequences for direct C3-mediated photosynthesis. PMID:24510939

  8. Leaf nitrogen dioxide uptake coupling apoplastic chemistry, carbon/sulfur assimilation, and plant nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanbo; Sun, Guangyu

    2010-10-01

    Emission and plant uptake of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO + NO(2)) significantly influence regional climate change by regulating the oxidative chemistry of the lower atmosphere, species composition and the recycling of carbon and nutrients, etc. Plant uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) is concentration-dependent and species-specific, and covaries with environmental factors. An important factor determining NO(2) influx into leaves is the replenishment of the substomatal cavity. The apoplastic chemistry of the substomatal cavity plays crucial roles in NO(2) deposition rates and the tolerance to NO(2), involving the reactions between NO(2) and apoplastic antioxidants, NO(2)-responsive germin-like proteins, apoplastic acidification, and nitrite-dependent NO synthesis, etc. Moreover, leaf apoplast is a favorable site for the colonization by microbes, which disturbs nitrogen metabolism of host plants. For most plant species, NO(2) assimilation in a leaf primarily depends on the nitrate (NO(3) (-)) assimilation pathway. NO(2)-N assimilation is coupled with carbon and sulfur (sulfate and SO(2)) assimilation as indicated by the mutual needs for metabolic intermediates (or metabolites) and the NO(2)-caused changes of key metabolic enzymes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase, organic acids, and photorespiration. Moreover, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization improves the tolerance of host plants to NO(2) by enhancing the efficiency of nutrient absorption and translocation and influencing foliar chemistry. Further progress is proposed to gain a better understanding of the coordination between NO(2)-N, S and C assimilation, especially the investigation of metabolic checkpoints, and the effects of photorespiratory nitrogen cycle, diverse PEPc and the metabolites such as cysteine, O-acetylserine (OAS) and glutathione. PMID:20628880

  9. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants. PMID:26208645

  10. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Goyal, Ravinder K; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotypexmulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit. PMID:18469323

  11. Differentiation of C4 photosynthesis along a leaf developmental gradient in two Cleome species having different forms of Kranz anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Koteyeva, Nuria K.; Voznesenskaya, Elena V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2014-01-01

    In family Cleomaceae there are NAD-malic enzyme-type C4 species having different forms of leaf anatomy. Leaves of Cleome angustifolia have Glossocardioid-type anatomy with a single complex Kranz unit which surrounds all the veins, while C. gynandra has Atriplicoid anatomy with multiple Kranz units, each surrounding an individual vein. Biochemical and ultrastructural differentiation of mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells were studied along a developmental gradient, from the leaf base (youngest) to the tip (mature). Initially, there is cell-specific expression of certain photosynthetic enzymes, which subsequently increase along with structural differentiation. At the base of the leaf, following division of ground tissue to form M and BS cells which are structurally similar, there is selective localization of Rubisco and glycine decarboxylase to BS cells. Thus, a biochemical C3 default stage, with Rubisco expression in both cell types, does not occur. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is selectively expressed in M cells near the base. Surprisingly, in both species, an additional layer of spongy M cells on the abaxial side of the leaf has the same differentiation with PEPC, even though it is not in contact with BS cells. During development along the longitudinal gradient there is structural differentiation of the cells, chloroplasts, and mitochondria, resulting in complete formation of Kranz anatomy. In both species, development of the C4 system occurs similarly, irrespective of having very different types of Kranz anatomy, different ontogenetic origins of BS and M, and independent evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:24550438

  12. Plasticity of crassulacean acid metabolism at subtropical latitudes: a pineapple case study.

    PubMed

    Rainha, Nuno; Medeiros, Violante P; Câmara, Mariana; Faustino, Hélder; Leite, João P; Barreto, Maria do Carmo; Cruz, Cristina; Pacheco, Carlos A; Ponte, Duarte; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Plants with the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) express high-metabolic plasticity, to adjust to environmental stresses. This article hypothesizes that irradiance and nocturnal temperatures are the major limitations for CAM at higher latitudes such as the Azores (37°45'N). Circadian CAM expression in Ananas comosus L. Merr. (pineapple) was assessed by the diurnal pattern of leaf carbon fixation into l-malate at the solstices and equinoxes, and confirmed by determining maximal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in plant material. Metabolic adjustments to environmental conditions were confirmed by gas exchange measurements, and integrated with environmental data to determine CAM's limiting factors: light and temperature. CAM plasticity was observed at the equinoxes, under similar photoperiods, but different environmental conditions. In spring, CAM expression was similar between vegetative and flowering plants, while in autumn, flowering (before anthesis) and fructifying (with fully developed fruit before ripening) plants accumulated more l-malate. Below 100 µmol m(-2) s(-1) , CAM phase I was extended, reducing CAM phase III during the day. Carbon fixation inhibition may occur by two major pathways: nocturnal temperature (<15°C) inhibiting PEPC activity and l-malate accumulation; and low irradiance influencing the interplay between CAM phase I and III, affecting carboxylation and decarboxylation. Both have important consequences for plant development in autumn and winter. Observations were confirmed by flowering time prediction using environmental data, emphasizing that CAM expression had a strong seasonal regulation due to a complex network response to light and temperature, allowing pineapple to survive in environments not suitable for high productivity. PMID:26362993

  13. Metabolic responses to iron deficiency in roots of Carrizo citrange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck. x Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Iglesias, Domingo J; Talón, Manuel; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Legaz, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The effects of iron (Fe) deficiency on the low-molecular-weight organic acid (LMWOA) metabolism have been investigated in Carrizo citrange (CC) [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] roots. Major LMWOAs found in roots, xylem sap and root exudates were citrate and malate and their concentrations increased with Fe deficiency. The activities of several enzymes involved in the LMWOA metabolism were also assessed in roots. In the cytosolic fraction, the activities of malate dehydrogenase (cMDH) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) enzymes were 132 and 100% higher in Fe-deficient conditions, whereas the activity of pyruvate kinase was 31% lower and the activity of malic enzyme (ME) did not change. In the mitochondrial fraction, the activities of fumarase, MDH and citrate synthase enzymes were 158, 117 and 53% higher, respectively, in Fe-deficient extracts when compared with Fe-sufficient controls, whereas no significant differences between treatments were found for aconitase (ACO) activity. The expression of their corresponding genes in roots of Fe-deficient plants was higher than that measured in Fe-sufficient controls, except for ACO and ME. Also, dicarboxylate-tricarboxylate carrier (DTC) expression was significantly increased in Fe-deficient roots. In conclusion, Fe deficiency in CC seedlings causes a reprogramming of the carbon metabolism that involves an increase of anaplerotic fixation of carbon via PEPC and MDH activities in the cytosol and a shift of the Krebs cycle in the mitochondria towards a non-cyclic mode, as previously described in herbaceous species. In this scheme, DTC could play an important role shuttling both malate and reducing equivalents between the cytosol and the mitochondria. As a result of this metabolic switch malate and citrate concentrations in roots, xylem sap and root exudates increase. PMID:23462311

  14. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage. PMID:26782412

  15. Low Temperature Induced Changes in Citrate Metabolism in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) Fruit during Maturation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Qian, Jing; Zhao, Chenning; Wang, Dengliang; Liu, Chunrong; Wang, Zhidong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2016-01-01

    Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruit, and its concentration in fruit cells is regulated mainly by the balance between synthesis and degradation. Ponkan (Citrus reticulate Blanco cv. Ponkan) is one of the major citrus cultivars grew in China, and the fruit are picked before fully mature to avoid bad weather. Greenhouse production is widely used to prolong the maturation period and improve the quality of Ponkan fruit by maintaining adequate temperature and providing protection from adverse weather. In this research, Ponkan fruit cultivated in either a greenhouse or open field were used to investigate differences in the expression of genes related to citrate metabolism during maturation in the two environments. The citrate contents were higher in open field fruit, and were mainly correlated with expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4, which were significantly increased. In addition, the impacts of low temperature (LT) and water stress (WS) on citrate metabolism in Ponkan were investigated during fruit maturation. The citrate contents in LT fruit were significantly increased, by between 1.4-1.9 fold, compared to the control; it showed no significant difference in fruit with water stress treatment compared to the control fruit. Furthermore, the expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4 were significantly increased in response to LT treatment, but showed no significant difference in WS compared to the control fruit. Thus, it can be concluded that low temperature may be the main factor influencing citrate metabolism during maturation in Ponkan fruit. PMID:27249065

  16. Low Temperature Induced Changes in Citrate Metabolism in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) Fruit during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Qian, Jing; Zhao, Chenning; Wang, Dengliang; Liu, Chunrong; Wang, Zhidong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2016-01-01

    Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruit, and its concentration in fruit cells is regulated mainly by the balance between synthesis and degradation. Ponkan (Citrus reticulate Blanco cv. Ponkan) is one of the major citrus cultivars grew in China, and the fruit are picked before fully mature to avoid bad weather. Greenhouse production is widely used to prolong the maturation period and improve the quality of Ponkan fruit by maintaining adequate temperature and providing protection from adverse weather. In this research, Ponkan fruit cultivated in either a greenhouse or open field were used to investigate differences in the expression of genes related to citrate metabolism during maturation in the two environments. The citrate contents were higher in open field fruit, and were mainly correlated with expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4, which were significantly increased. In addition, the impacts of low temperature (LT) and water stress (WS) on citrate metabolism in Ponkan were investigated during fruit maturation. The citrate contents in LT fruit were significantly increased, by between 1.4–1.9 fold, compared to the control; it showed no significant difference in fruit with water stress treatment compared to the control fruit. Furthermore, the expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4 were significantly increased in response to LT treatment, but showed no significant difference in WS compared to the control fruit. Thus, it can be concluded that low temperature may be the main factor influencing citrate metabolism during maturation in Ponkan fruit. PMID:27249065

  17. 49 CFR 173.5 - Agricultural operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.5 Agricultural operations. (a) For other than a Class 2 material, the... requirements of this subchapter. A Class 2 material transported over local roads between fields of the same..., transportation of the hazardous material is subject to the following conditions: (1) It is transported by...

  18. 49 CFR 173.5 - Agricultural operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.5 Agricultural operations. (a) For other than a Class 2 material, the... requirements of this subchapter. A Class 2 material transported over local roads between fields of the same..., transportation of the hazardous material is subject to the following conditions: (1) It is transported by...

  19. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  20. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  1. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  2. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  3. Characterization of carbohydrate-binding protein p33/41: relation with annexin IV, molecular basis of the doublet forms (p33 and p41), and modulation of the carbohydrate binding activity by phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kojima, K; Yamamoto, K; Irimura, T; Osawa, T; Ogawa, H; Matsumoto, I

    1996-03-29

    A protein, p33/41, expressed in bovine kidney and many other tissues was identified as a lectin which binds to sialoglycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans in a calcium-dependent manner. Partial amino acid sequences of p33/41 are highly homologous to those of calcium/phospholipid-binding annexin protein, annexin IV (endonexin), p33/41 exhibited similar calcium/phospholipid-binding activity (Kojima, K., Ogawa, H., Seno, N., Yamamoto, K., Irimura, T., Osawa, T., and Matsumoto, I. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 20536-20539). To further characterize p33/41, we cloned the p33/41 cDNA and characterized the recombinant protein encoded by this cDNA. Oligonucleotide probes were synthesized based on partial amino acid sequences of p33/41 and used for screening. A p33/41 cDNA clone was isolated encoding a protein of 319 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 35,769 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence was identical to that of bovine annexin IV except for one amino acid substitution. The recombinant protein gave two 33-kDa (p33) and 41-kDa (p41) bands on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-reducing conditions, and only one 33-kDa band under reducing conditions, as did the native protein. Mass spectrometric analysis combined with site-directed mutagenesis of each of the four cysteine residues of the recombinant protein revealed that p41 is a dimer of p33 cross-linked at Cys-198 via a disulfide bond. The recombinant protein bound to columns of heparin and fetuin glycopeptides in a calcium dependent manner and to phospholipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylserine (PS)/phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PC or phosphatidylinositol (PI)/PC. Furthermore, concurrent binding assays showed that the binding of the recombinant protein to phospholipid vesicles was not affected by heparin, whereas that to heparin was influenced by the phospholipid composition of the vesicles; the highest binding was observed with vesicles composed of PE/PC. These results

  4. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24723409

  5. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    emission was also observed from an additional wire or foil. Simulations with the 3D tree code PEPC [1] and the 2-1/2 D PIC code OSIRIS [2] will be presented. [1] P. Gibbon, PEPC: Pretty Efficient Parallel Coulomb Solver, ZAM Technical Report FZJ-ZAM-IB-2003-05(2003), available online at http://www.fz-juelich.de /zam/ docs /autoren2003 /gibbon.html [2] R. Hemker, Ph.D. Thesis, UCLA, 2000.

  6. Effects of boron deficiency on major metabolites, key enzymes and gas exchange in leaves and roots of Citrus sinensis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Bin; Yang, Lin-Tong; Li, Yan; Xu, Jing; Liao, Tian-Tai; Chen, Yan-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2014-06-01

    Boron (B) deficiency is a widespread problem in many crops, including Citrus. The effects of B-deficiency on gas exchange, carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, total soluble proteins and phenolics, and the activities of key enzymes involved in organic acid and amino acid metabolism in 'Xuegan' [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] leaves and roots were investigated. Boron-deficient leaves displayed excessive accumulation of nonstructural carbohydrates and much lower CO2 assimilation, demonstrating feedback inhibition of photosynthesis. Dark respiration, concentrations of most organic acids [i.e., malate, citrate, oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate] and activities of enzymes [i.e., phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NAD-malate dehydrogenase, NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME), NADP-ME, pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase (PEPP), citrate synthase (CS), aconitase (ACO), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-IDH) and hexokinase] involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the anapleurotic reaction were higher in B-deficient leaves than in controls. Also, total free amino acid (TFAA) concentration and related enzyme [i.e., NADH-dependent glutamate 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (NADH-GOGAT) and glutamate OAA transaminase (GOT)] activities were enhanced in B-deficient leaves. By contrast, respiration, concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates and three organic acids (malate, citrate and pyruvate), and activities of most enzymes [i.e., PEPC, NADP-ME, PK, PEPP, CS, ACO, NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase, NADP-IDH and hexokinase] involved in glycolysis, the TCA cycle and the anapleurotic reaction, as well as concentration of TFAA and activities of related enzymes (i.e., nitrate reductase, NADH-GOGAT, glutamate pyruvate transaminase and glutamine synthetase) were lower in B-deficient roots than in controls. Interestingly, leaf and root concentration of total phenolics increased, whereas that of total soluble protein decreased

  7. Photosynthesis of C3, C3–C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E.; Tissue, David T.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3–C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l–1) and glacial (180 μl l–1) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3–C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3–C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3–C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3–C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3–C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24723409

  8. (Analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti surface):

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, E.R.

    1988-03-03

    We have identified a number of genes in Rhizobium meliloti that affect outer membrane lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These include three genes defined by mutants with different patterns of resistance to a panel of bacteriophages, of which Class 2 and 3 are closely linked to each other but not to Class 1 or 4;another gene, closely linked to Class 2 and 3, defined only by its ability to suppress Class 1 defects;and three genes, unlinked to each other, defined by mutants with increased sensitivity to deoxycholate. Of the mutants that define these genes, only those in Class 2 have a clear effect on alfalfa symbiosis, having a Fix phenotype.

  9. A Lotus japonicus beta-type carbonic anhydrase gene expression pattern suggests distinct physiological roles during nodule development.

    PubMed

    Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Dimou, Maria; Cotzur, Daniela; Aivalakis, Georgios; Efrose, Rodica C; Kenoutis, Christos; Udvardi, Michael; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2003-08-25

    A full-length cDNA clone, designated Ljca1, coding for a beta-type carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC: 4.2.1.1) was isolated from a Lotus japonicus nodule cDNA library. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Ljca1 codes for a nodule-specific CA, transcripts of which accumulate at maximum levels in young nodules at 14 days post-infection (d.p.i.). In situ hybridization and immunolocalization revealed that Ljca1 transcripts and LjCA1 polypeptides were present at high levels in all cell types of young nodules. In contrast, in mature nodules both transcripts and polypeptides were confined in a few cell layers of the nodules inner cortex. However, the central infected tissue of both young and mature nodules exhibited high CA activity, indicating the presence of additional CA isoforms of plant and/or microbial origin. This was supported by the finding that a putative Mesorhizobium loti CA gene was transiently expressed during nodule development. In addition, the temporal and spatial accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC: 4.1.1.31) was determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunolocalization. The results suggest that LjCA1 might fulfill different physiological needs during L. japonicus nodule development. PMID:12932831

  10. Differential modulation of the lipid metabolism as a model for cellular resistance to fumonisin B1-induced cytotoxic effects in vitro.

    PubMed

    Riedel, S; Abel, S; Burger, H-M; van der Westhuizen, L; Swanevelder, S; Gelderblom, W C A

    2016-06-01

    Differential sensitivity of primary hepatocytes and Chang cells to the cancer promoter fumonisin B1 (FB1)-induced cytotoxic effects were investigated in relation to changes in membrane lipid distribution. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, Chang cells were resistant to FB1-induced cytotoxic effects. This was associated with a high cholesterol (Chol) and sphingomyelin (SM) and low phosphatidylcholine (PC) content, resulting in a significant (P<0.05) decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PC ratio, increased Chol/total phosphoglyceride (TPG) ratios and low total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) content in PC and PE, suggesting a more rigid membrane structure. High levels of C18:1 and reduced polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels are likely to provide selective resistance to FB1-induced oxidative stress. FB1-associated lipid changes included decreases in SM and Chol, increases in sphinganine (Sa) and PE with the increases in key saturated, monounsaturated, and PUFAs in PE as key role players in the differential responses to FB1-induced cell growth responses in cells. PMID:27269712

  11. A Novel Reference Plasmid for the Qualitative Detection of Genetically Modified Rice in Food and Feed

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice. PMID:26495318

  12. New estimates on the magnitude of fractionation during photorespiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibt, U.; Lanigan, G.; Betson, N.; Griffiths, H.

    2008-12-01

    We report new estimates of the carbon isotope fractionation during photorespiration for three Senecio species. We determined the contributions of different processes to net 13C discrimination during photosynthesis by comparing observed discrimination to predictions derived from gas exchange measurements. The rate of photorespiration was manipulated by altering the O2 partial pressure in the air surrounding the leaves. The fractionation factors for photorespiration (f) and net carboxylation by Rubisco and PEPc (b), and mesophyll conductance (gi) were treated as unknowns and determined simultaneously for all measurements. We propose this as alternative approach to analyse measurements under field conditions when mesophyll conductance and fractionation factors are not known, or cannot be determined in separate experiments. Good agreement between predicted and observed discrimination was achieved with f of 11.6 permil, b of 26 permil, and gi between 0.22 and 0.27 mol m-2 s-1. Our result for f is close to recent theoretical estimates. Photorespiratory fractionation decreases net 13C discrimination by about 1.2 permil on average under field conditions, which should be taken into account when partitioning net CO2 exchange of ecosystems into gross fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration.

  13. The tolerance of grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.) to defoliation during vegetative growth is compromised during flowering.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Erandi; Délano-Frier, John Paul; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The biochemical processes underlying variations of tolerance are often accompanied by source-sink transitions affecting carbon (C) metabolism. We investigated the tolerance of Amaranthus cruentus L. to total mechanical defoliation through development and in different growing seasons. Defoliated A. cruentus recovered ∼80% of their above-ground biomass and ∼100% of grain yield compared to intact plants if defoliation occurred early during ontogeny, but could not compensate when defoliation occurred during flowering. Tolerance index was higher in the summer season (-0.3) than in the winter season (-0.7). Overall, defoliation tolerance was closely related to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in leaves and the subsequent accumulation of starch (∼500 μmol/gDW) and sucrose (∼140 μmol/gDW) in stems and roots. Thus, A. cruentus accumulated sufficient C in roots and stem to allow branching and shoot re-growth after defoliation, but it only possessed sufficient C reserves to maintain <19% seed yield in the absence of new vegetative tissue. Seed size was larger during the warm season but it was not affected by foliar damage. Seed chemical composition was altered by defoliation at flowering. We conclude that A. cruentus defoliation tolerance depends on both, the re-allocation of starch from stem and roots, and the activation of dormant meristems before flowering to generate new photosynthetic capacity to sustain seed filling. PMID:25863889

  14. Activities of principal photosynthetic enzymes in green macroalga Ulva linza: functional implication of C₄ pathway in CO₂ assimilation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfang; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Zheng, Zhou; Mou, Shanli; Dong, Meitao; Xu, Dong; Miao, Jinlai

    2013-06-01

    The green-tide-forming macroalga Ulva linza was profiled by transcriptome sequencing to ascertain whether the alga carries both C3 and C4 photosynthesis genes. The key enzymes involved in C4 metabolism including pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) were found. When measured under normal and different stress conditions, expression of rbcL was higher under normal conditions and lower under the adverse conditions, whereas that of PPDK was higher under some adverse conditions, namely desiccation, high salinity, and low salinity. Both ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) and PPDK were found to play a role in carbon fixation, with significantly higher PPDK activity across the stress conditions. These results suggest that elevated PPDK activity alters carbon metabolism in U. linza leading to partial operation of the C4 carbon metabolism, a pathway that, under stress conditions, probably contributes to the hardy character of U. linza and thus to its wide distribution. PMID:23737004

  15. Day/night regulation of aquaporins during the CAM cycle in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Amezcua-Romero, Julio C; Pantoja, Omar

    2012-03-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum exhibits induction of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) after a threshold stage of development, by exposure to long days with high light intensities or by water and salt stress. During the CAM cycle, fluctuations in carbon partitioning within the cell lead to transient drops in osmotic potential, which are likely stabilized/balanced by passive movement of water via aquaporins (AQPs). Protoplast swelling assays were used to detect changes in water permeability during the day/night cycle of CAM. To assess the role of AQPs during the same period, we followed transcript accumulation and protein abundance of four plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and one tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP). CAM plants showed a persistent rhythm of specific AQP protein abundance changes throughout the day/night cycle, including changes in amount of McPIP2;1, McTIP1;2, McPIP1;4 and McPIP1;5, while the abundance of McPIP1;2 was unchanged. These protein changes did not appear to be coordinated with transcript levels for any of the AQPs analysed; however, they did occur in parrallel to alterations in water permeability, as well as variations in cell osmolarity, pinitol, glucose, fructose and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) levels measured throughout the day/night CAM cycle. Results suggest a role for AQPs in maintaining water balance during CAM and highlight the complexity of protein expression during the CAM cycle. PMID:21895697

  16. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  17. Genetic relationships among Enterococcus faecalis isolates from different sources as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Song, Y Q; Xu, H Y; Menghe, B L G; Zhang, H P; Sun, Z H

    2015-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the natural gut flora of humans and other mammals; some isolates are also used in food production. So, it is important to evaluate the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among E. faecalis isolates from different sources. Multilocus sequence typing protocol was used to compare 39 E. faecalis isolates from Chinese traditional food products (including dairy products, acidic gruel) and 4 published E. faecalis isolates from other sources including human-derived isolates employing 5 housekeeping genes (groEL, clpX, recA, rpoB, and pepC). A total of 23 unique sequence types were identified, which were grouped into 5 clonal complexes and 10 singletons. The value of standardized index of association of the alleles (IA(S)=0.1465) and network structure indicated a high frequency of intraspecies recombination across these isolates. Enterococcus faecalis lineages also exhibited clearly source-clustered distributions. The isolates from dairy source were clustered together. However, the relationship between isolates from acidic gruel and one isolate from a human source was close. The MLST scheme presented in this study provides a sharable and continuously growing sequence database enabling global comparison of strains from different sources, and will further advance our understanding of the microbial ecology of this important species. PMID:26074239

  18. Association of the molecular regulation of ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the reproductive stage in maize.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Zhang, Zhe; Tan, Xianjie; Jiang, Yufeng; Gao, Jiong; Lin, Li; Wang, Zhenhua; Ren, Jun; Wang, Xiaolei; Qin, Lanqiu; Cheng, Weidong; Qi, Ji; Kuai, Benke

    2016-01-01

    Maize exhibits a wide range of heterotic traits, but the molecular basis of heterosis at the reproductive stage has seldom been exploited. Leaf senescence is a degenerative process which affects crop yield and quality. In this study, we observed significantly delayed ear leaf senescence in the reciprocal hybrids of B73/Mo17 and Zheng58/Chang7-2 after silking, and all the hybrids displayed larger leaf areas and higher stems with higher yields. Our time-course transcriptome analysis identified 2,826 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two parental lines (PP-DEGs) and 2,328 DEGs between parental lines and the hybrid (PH-DEGs) after silking. Notably, several senescence promoting genes (ZmNYE1, ZmORE1, ZmWRKY53 and ZmPIFs) exhibited underdominant expression patterns in the hybrid, whereas putative photosynthesis and carbon-fixation (ZmPEPC)-associated, starch biosynthetic (ZmAPS1, ZmAPL), gibberellin biosynthetic genes (ZmGA20OX, ZmGA3OX) expressed overdominantly. We also identified 86 transcription factors from PH-DEGs, some of which were known to regulate senescence, stress and metabolic processes. Collectively, we demonstrate a molecular association of the regulations of both ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the late developmental stage. This finding not only extends our understanding to the molecular basis of maize heterosis but also provides basic information for molecular breeding. PMID:27435114

  19. Association of the molecular regulation of ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the reproductive stage in maize

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yi; Zhang, Zhe; Tan, Xianjie; Jiang, Yufeng; Gao, Jiong; Lin, Li; Wang, Zhenhua; Ren, Jun; Wang, Xiaolei; Qin, Lanqiu; Cheng, Weidong; Qi, Ji; Kuai, Benke

    2016-01-01

    Maize exhibits a wide range of heterotic traits, but the molecular basis of heterosis at the reproductive stage has seldom been exploited. Leaf senescence is a degenerative process which affects crop yield and quality. In this study, we observed significantly delayed ear leaf senescence in the reciprocal hybrids of B73/Mo17 and Zheng58/Chang7-2 after silking, and all the hybrids displayed larger leaf areas and higher stems with higher yields. Our time-course transcriptome analysis identified 2,826 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two parental lines (PP-DEGs) and 2,328 DEGs between parental lines and the hybrid (PH-DEGs) after silking. Notably, several senescence promoting genes (ZmNYE1, ZmORE1, ZmWRKY53 and ZmPIFs) exhibited underdominant expression patterns in the hybrid, whereas putative photosynthesis and carbon-fixation (ZmPEPC)-associated, starch biosynthetic (ZmAPS1, ZmAPL), gibberellin biosynthetic genes (ZmGA20OX, ZmGA3OX) expressed overdominantly. We also identified 86 transcription factors from PH-DEGs, some of which were known to regulate senescence, stress and metabolic processes. Collectively, we demonstrate a molecular association of the regulations of both ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the late developmental stage. This finding not only extends our understanding to the molecular basis of maize heterosis but also provides basic information for molecular breeding. PMID:27435114

  20. Phospholipid Profile of the Stomach and Duodenum of Normal Rabbits Fed with Supplements of Unripe Pawpaw (Carica papaya) and Unripe Plantain (Musa sapientum) Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriyamremu, G. E.; Asagba, S. O.; Osagie, V. E.; Ojeaburu, S. I.; Lolodi, O.

    This study reports the effect of unripe pawpaw and/or unripe plantain extracts on the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum of normal rabbits. Supplementation of chow with unripe pawpaw or plantain extract significantly reduced (p< 0.05) the weight gained by rabbits compared with the control. The total phospholipids content in the stomach and duodenum were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. In the stomach and duodenum, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SGM) were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. Pawpaw occasioned a decrease in the PE/PC ratio in both tissues as against an increase observed in the SGM/PC ratio. The results presented suggests that unripe pawpaw meal and unripe plantain extract alter the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum in ways which may affect membrane fluidity of these tissues and would have profound effect on the gastro-duodenal mucosa and thus have implication(s) for gastric and duodenal ulcers in rabbits.

  1. Glycine metabolism and anti-oxidative defence mechanisms in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Alhasawi, Azhar; Castonguay, Zachary; Appanna, Nishma D; Auger, Christopher; Appanna, Vasu D

    2015-02-01

    The role of metabolism in anti-oxidative defence is only now beginning to emerge. Here, we show that the nutritionally-versatile microbe, Pseudomonas fluorescens, reconfigures its metabolism in an effort to generate NADPH, ATP and glyoxylate in order to fend off oxidative stress. Glyoxylate was produced predominantly via the enhanced activities of glycine dehydrogenase-NADP(+) (GDH), glycine transaminase (GTA) and isocitrate lyase (ICL) in a medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). This ketoacid was utilized to produce ATP by substrate-level phosphorylation and to neutralize reactive oxygen species with the concomitant formation of formate. The latter was also a source of NADPH, a process mediated by formate dehydrogenase-NADP(+) (FDH). The increased activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) worked in tandem to synthesize ATP in the H₂O₂-challenged cells that had markedly diminished capacity for oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic networks provide an effective means of combating ROS and reveal therapeutic targets against microbes resistant to oxidative stress. PMID:25644949

  2. The Metabolic Reprogramming Evoked by Nitrosative Stress Triggers the Anaerobic Utilization of Citrate in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Christopher; Lemire, Joseph; Cecchini, Dominic; Bignucolo, Adam; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrosative stress is an ongoing challenge that most organisms have to contend with. When nitric oxide (NO) that may be generated either exogenously or endogenously encounters reactive oxygen species (ROS), it produces a set of toxic moieties referred to as reactive nitrogen species (RNS). As these RNS can severely damage essential biomolecules, numerous organisms have evolved elaborate detoxification strategies to nullify RNS. However, the contribution of cellular metabolism in fending off nitrosative stress is poorly understood. Using a variety of functional proteomic and metabolomic analyses, we have identified how the soil microbe Pseudomonas fluorescens reprogrammed its metabolic networks to survive in an environment enriched by sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a generator of nitrosative stress. To combat the RNS-induced ineffective aconitase (ACN) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the microbe invoked the participation of citrate lyase (CL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) to convert citrate, the sole source of carbon into pyruvate and ATP. These enzymes were not evident in the control conditions. This metabolic shift was coupled to the concomitant increase in the activities of such classical RNS detoxifiers as nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NIR) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). Hence, metabolism may hold the clues to the survival of organisms subjected to nitrosative stress and may provide therapeutic cues against RNS-resistant microbes. PMID:22145048

  3. Effects of growth light and nitrogen nutrition on the organization of the photosynthetic apparatus in leaves of a C4 plant, Amaranthus cruentus.

    PubMed

    Tazoe, Youshi; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2006-04-01

    Properties of C4 photosynthesis were examined in Amaranthus cruentus L. (NAD-malic enzyme (ME) subtype, dicot) grown under different light and nitrogen (N) conditions, from the viewpoint of N investment into their photosynthetic components. In low-light (LL) leaves, chlorophyll content per leaf area was greater and chlorophyll alb ratio was lower than in high-light (HL) leaves. These indicate that LL leaves invest more N into their light-harvesting systems. However, this N investment did not contribute to the increase in the quantum yield of photosynthesis on the incident photon flux density (PFD) basis (Qi) in LL leaves. N allocation to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylasel oxygenase (Rubisco) was significantly higher in HL-high N (HN) leaves than in other leaves. On the other hand, N allocation to C4 enzymes [phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate Pi dikinase (PPDK)] was unaffected by the growth conditions. Maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) per Rubisco content were similar irrespective of the growth light treatments. Carbon isotope ratios (delta13 C) in the leaf dry matter were more negative in LL leaves than in HL leaves (LL = -19.3% per hundred, HL = -16.0% per hundred) and independent of leaf N. Vein density was highest in HL-HN leaves, and leaf thickness was unaffected by the growth light treatments. From these results, we conclude that A. cruentus leaves would not acclimate efficiently to low growth light. PMID:17080618

  4. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges. PMID:26257361

  5. Comparing photosynthetic characteristics of Isoetes sinensis Palmer under submerged and terrestrial conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is widespread in terrestrial and aquatic species, plastic in response to environmental changes. Isoetes L. is one of the earliest basal vascular plants and CAM is popular in this genus. Isoetes sinensis Palmer is an amphibious species, alternating frequently between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Given this, we investigated and compared photosynthetic characteristics over a diurnal cycle under submerged condition (SC) and terrestrial condition (TC). The results suggest that I. sinensis possesses a stronger CAM capacity under SC. Compared with under TC, titratable acidity levels and organic acid concentrations were more enriched under SC, whereas soluble sugar or starch and protein levels were lower under SC. Transcript analyses for nine photosynthetic genes revealed that CAM-associated genes possessed high transcripts under SC, but C3-related transcripts were highly expressed under TC. In addition, the enzyme activity measurements demonstrated that PEPC activity over a diurnal cycle was slightly higher under SC, whereas Rubisco activity during the daytime was greater under TC. This comprehensive study probably facilitates general understandings about the CAM photosynthetic characteristics of Isoetes in response to the environmental changes. PMID:26634994

  6. Drought adaptation in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism involves the flexible use of different storage carbohydrate pools

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Anne M; De Proft, Maurice P

    2009-01-01

    Nocturnal CO2 uptake in CAM plants is sustained by the degradation of storage carbohydrate which provides the acceptor (PEP) for the nocturnal carboxylase (PEPC). The investment of resources into a transient storage carbohydrate pool unavoidably places restriction on other metabolic activities including dark respiration, growth and acclimation to abiotic stress. In our recent report the flexible use of different storage carbohydrate pools is shown to be involved in the acclimation process to drought and recovery from dehydration. While starch breakdown stoichiometrically accounts for nocturnal CO2 uptake under well-watered conditions, the sucrose pool is maintained in preference to starch during progressing drought and sucrose becomes the major source of carbon fuelling the dark reactions after 45 days of water deprivation. Re-watering plants results in a recovery to the original situation, with starch constituting the main carbohydrate reserve for nocturnal provision of PEP. However, substantial amounts of starch are also retained in the leaves of re-watered plants by restricting export/respiration and thus provides a potential buffer capacity against a return to water deprivation. This significant conservation of starch suggests the ability to perceive, remember and anticipate the formerly encountered drought stress in some way, with the adaptation of the equilibrium of carbohydrate balance as a central factor underpinning the physiological homeostasis of CAM plants. PMID:19721752

  7. Impact of nitrogen supply on carbon/nitrogen allocation: a case study on amino acids and catechins in green tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] plants.

    PubMed

    Ruan, J; Haerdter, R; Gerendás, J

    2010-09-01

    The concentrations of free amino acids (AA) and polyphenols (PP) are important determinants of green tea quality. Levels of AA and PP are governed interactively by nitrogen (N) supply and carbon (C) status, so the impact of C/N allocation on green tea quality was investigated in saplings cultivated hydroponically with 0.3, 0.75, 1.5 or 4.5 mmol l(-1) N. Activities of glutamine synthetase (GS), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) were determined, as were concentrations of AA, PP and soluble sugars. Concentrations of AA increased with increasing N supply, and the AA profile was shifted towards AA characterised by low C/N ratios (arginine, glutamine) and away from theanine, the unique non-protein AA that is abundant in Camellia sinensis. High N supply significantly reduced the concentrations of PP in young shoots, and was accompanied by lower levels of carbohydrates (soluble sugars). Analysis of the C and N status and selected enzyme activities, combined with path coefficient analysis of variables associated with C and N metabolism, demonstrated increasing deviation of C flux to AA under abundant N supply. Accumulation of AA and PP depended strongly on N status, and the balance shifted toward increasing synthesis of AA associated with enhanced growth, while investment of C in secondary metabolites did not change proportionally under the condition of ample N supply. PMID:20701695

  8. Grazing-induced Synechococcus microcolony formation: experimental insights from two freshwater phylotypes.

    PubMed

    Callieri, Cristiana; Amalfitano, Stefano; Corno, Gianluca; Bertoni, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Freshwater cyanobacteria of the genus Synechococcus are ubiquitous and organized either as single cells of diverse morphology or as microcolonies of different size. We studied the formation of microcolonies induced by the mixotrophic nanoflagellate Poterioochromonas sp. grazing on two Synechococcus strains belonging to phylotypes with different content of phycobiliproteins (PE: phycoerythrin-rich cells, L.Albano Group A; PC: phycocyanin-rich cells, MW101C3 Group I). The quantitative variations in cell abundance, morphological and physiological conditions were assessed on short-term incubations in semi-continuous cultures, single culture (PE, PC) and co-culture (PE+PC), with and without predators, by flow cytometry, and PhytoPAM. Under grazing pressure, we observed that (i) the abundance of PE single cells decreased over time with a concomitant formation of PE microcolonies; (ii) in PC single cultures, no significant variation in single cells was found and microcolonies did not form; (iii) both PE and PC formed monoclonal microcolonies in co-culture; (iv) PC cells increased the photosynthetic efficiency of the PSII (higher Fv/Fm) in co-culture. In the aftermath of microcolony formation as a predation-induced adaptation, our findings indicated a different response of Synechococcus phylotypes potentially co-existing in natural environment and the importance of their interaction. PMID:27411979

  9. Metabolic networks to generate pyruvate, PEP and ATP from glycerol in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Alhasawi, Azhar; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2016-04-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of the biodiesel industry. In this study we report on the metabolic networks involved in its transformation into pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP. When the nutritionally-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens was exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a mineral medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source, the microbe reconfigured its metabolism to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) primarily via substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). This alternative ATP-producing stratagem resulted in the synthesis of copious amounts of PEP and pyruvate. The production of these metabolites was mediated via the enhanced activities of such enzymes as pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). The high energy PEP was subsequently converted into ATP with the aid of pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPS) and pyruvate kinase (PK) with the concomitant formation of pyruvate. The participation of the phospho-transfer enzymes like adenylate kinase (AK) and acetate kinase (ACK) ensured the efficiency of this O2-independent energy-generating machinery. The increased activity of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) in the stressed bacteria provided the necessary precursors to fuel this process. This H2O2-induced anaerobic life-style fortuitously evokes metabolic networks to an effective pathway that can be harnessed into the synthesis of ATP, PEP and pyruvate. The bioconversion of glycerol to pyruvate will offer interesting economic benefit. PMID:26920481

  10. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P.; White, Philip J.; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m–2 s–1 or 600 µmol m–2 s–1 light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. PMID:24723402

  11. Ozone exposure and flux-based response functions for photosynthetic traits in wheat, maize and poplar.

    PubMed

    Bagard, Matthieu; Jolivet, Yves; Hasenfratz-Sauder, Marie-Paule; Gérard, Joëlle; Dizengremel, Pierre; Le Thiec, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Ozone exposure- and dose-response relationships based on photosynthetic leaf traits (CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll content, Rubisco and PEPc activities) were established for wheat, maize and poplar plants grown in identical controlled conditions, providing a comparison between crop and tree species, as well as between C3 and C4 plants. Intra-specific variability was addressed by comparing two wheat cultivars with contrasting ozone tolerance. Depending on plant models and ozone levels, first-order, second-order and segmented linear regression models were used to derive ozone response functions. Overall, flux-based functions appeared superior to exposure-based functions in describing the data, but the improvement remained modest. The best fit was obtained using the POD0.5 for maize and POD3 for poplar. The POD6 appeared relevant for wheat, although intervarietal differences were found. Our results suggest that taking into account the dynamics of leaf antioxidant capacity could improve current methods for ozone risk assessment for plants. PMID:26253315

  12. Effect of bile salts stress on protein synthesis of Lactobacillus casei Zhang revealed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wu, R; Sun, Z; Wu, J; Meng, H; Zhang, H

    2010-08-01

    Lactobacillus casei Zhang, isolated from koumiss in Inner Mongolia of China, is known from previous findings to be tolerant to bile salts. Bile salts secreted by mammals act as a natural antibacterial barrier and may serve as a component of innate immunity, as they have limited antagonistic effect against resident microflora. In this work, we compared the growth and protein expression patterns of L. casei Zhang with and without bile salts. Twenty-six proteins were found to be differentially expressed using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Peptide mass fingerprinting was used to identify these proteins. Further verification by using real-time, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and bioinformatics analysis showed that the implicated pathways are involved with a complex physiological response under bile salts stress, particularly including cell protection (DnaK and GroEL), modifications in cell membranes (NagA, GalU, and PyrD), and key components of central metabolism (PFK, PGM, CysK, LuxS, PepC, and EF-Tu). These results provide insight on the protein expression pattern of L. casei under bile salts stress and offer a new perspective for the molecular mechanisms involved in stress tolerance and adaptation of bacteria. PMID:20655455

  13. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. PMID:24723402

  14. Novel protein in human epidermal keratinocytes: regulation of expression during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; van Muijen, G.N.; van Pelt-Heerschap, H.; van de Putte, P.

    1988-05-01

    Recently, two groups of cDNA clones have been isolated from human epidermal keratinocytes; the clones correspond to genes whose expression is stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV light or treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. The proteins predicted by the nucleotide sequence of both groups of cDNAs are small (8 to 10 kilodaltons), are exceptionally rich in proline, glutamine, and cysteine, and contain repeating elements with a common sequence, PK PEPC. These proteins were designated sprI and sprII (small, proline rich). Here we describe the characterization of the sprIa protein, which is encoded by one of the group 1 cDNAs. The expression of this protein during keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and the distribution of the sprIa protein in some human tissues was studied by using a specific rabbit antiserum directed against a synthetic polypeptide corresponding to the 30 amino acids of the C-terminal region of the sprIa gene product. The results indicate that the expression of the sprIa protein is stimulated during keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Cold-night responses in grapevine inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Mélodie; Ait Barka, Essaid; Clément, Christophe; Gilard, Françoise; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Baillieul, Fabienne; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cédric

    2015-10-01

    Cold nights impact grapevine flower development and fruit set. Regulation at the female meiosis stepmay be of considerable importance for further understanding on how flower reacts to cold stress. In this study, the impact of chilling temperature (0 °C overnight) on carbon metabolism was investigated in the inflorescencesof two cultivars, Pinot noir (Pinot) and Gewurztraminer (Gewurtz.). Fluctuations in photosynthetic activity and carbohydrate metabolism were monitored by analyzing gas exchanges, simultaneous photosystem I and II activities, andcarbohydrate content. Further, the expression of PEPc, PC, FNR, ISO, OXO, AGPase, amylases and invertase genes, activities of various enzymes, as well as metabolomic analysis were attained. Results showed that the chilling night has different impacts depending on cultivars. Thus, in Gewurtz., net photosynthesis (Pn) was transiently increased whereas, in Pinot, the Pn increase was persistent and concomitant with an inhibition of respiration. However, during the days following the cold night, photosynthetic activity was decreased, and the cyclic electron flow was inhibited in Gewurtz., suggesting lower efficient energy dissipation. Likewise, metabolomic analysis revealed that several metabolites contents (namely alanine, GABA, lysine and succinate)were distinctly modulated in the two cultivars. Taking together, these results reflect a photosynthetic metabolism alteration or internal CO2 conductance in Gewurtz. explaining partly why Pinot is less susceptible to cold stress. PMID:26398796

  16. Phospho-transfer networks and ATP homeostasis in response to an ineffective electron transport chain in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Appanna, V P; Alhasawi, A A; Auger, C; Thomas, S C; Appanna, V D

    2016-09-15

    Although oxidative stress is known to impede the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, the nutritionally-versatile microbe, Pseudomonas fluorescens has been shown to proliferate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrosative stress. In this study we demonstrate the phospho-transfer system that enables this organism to generate ATP was similar irrespective of the carbon source utilized. Despite the diminished activities of enzymes involved in the TCA cycle and in the electron transport chain (ETC), the ATP levels did not appear to be significantly affected in the stressed cells. Phospho-transfer networks mediated by acetate kinase (ACK), adenylate kinase (AK), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are involved in maintaining ATP homeostasis in the oxidatively-challenged cells. This phospho-relay machinery orchestrated by substrate-level phosphorylation is aided by the up-regulation in the activities of such enzymes like phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPS). The enhanced production of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate further fuel the synthesis of ATP. Taken together, this metabolic reconfiguration enables the organism to fulfill its ATP need in an O2-independent manner by utilizing an intricate phospho-wire module aimed at maximizing the energy potential of PEP with the participation of AMP. PMID:27431058

  17. Seasonal dynamics in the stable carbon isotope composition δ¹³C from non-leafy branch, trunk and coarse root CO₂ efflux of adult deciduous (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen (Picea abies) trees.

    PubMed

    Kuptz, Daniel; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2011-03-01

    Respiration is a substantial driver of carbon (C) flux in forest ecosystems and stable C isotopes provide an excellent tool for its investigation. We studied seasonal dynamics in δ¹³C of CO₂ efflux (δ¹³C(E)) from non-leafy branches, upper and lower trunks and coarse roots of adult trees, comparing deciduous Fagus sylvatica (European beech) with evergreen Picea abies (Norway spruce). In both species, we observed strong and similar seasonal dynamics in the δ¹³C(E) of above-ground plant components, whereas δ¹³C(E) of coarse roots was rather stable. During summer, δ¹³C(E) of trunks was about -28.2‰ (Beech) and -26.8‰ (Spruce). During winter dormancy, δ¹³C(E) increased by 5.6-9.1‰. The observed dynamics are likely related to a switch from growth to starch accumulation during fall and remobilization of starch, low TCA cycle activity and accumulation of malate by PEPc during winter. The seasonal δ¹³C(E) pattern of branches of Beech and upper trunks of Spruce was less variable, probably because these organs were additionally supplied by winter photosynthesis. In view of our results and pervious studies, we conclude that the pronounced increases in δ¹³C(E) of trunks during the winter results from interrupted access to recent photosynthates. PMID:21054435

  18. Abscisic acid and nitric oxide signaling in two different portions of detached leaves of Guzmania monostachia with CAM up-regulated by drought.

    PubMed

    Mioto, Paulo Tamaso; Mercier, Helenice

    2013-07-15

    Guzmania monostachia is an epiphyte tank bromeliad capable of up-regulating crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in response to several environmental stimuli, including drought and light stress. In other plant species, abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO) seem to be involved in CAM induction. Because the leaves of tank bromeliads perform different functions along their length, this study attempted to investigate whether ABA and NO are involved in regulation of CAM expression in this species by quantifying these compounds in apical and basal portions of the leaf, and whether there would be differences in this event for each leaf portion. Detached leaves exposed to a 30% polyethylene glycol solution showed a significant upregulation of CAM on the seventh day of treatment only in the apical portion, as indicated by nocturnal acid accumulation and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity. On the three days prior to CAM induction, ABA, NO and H₂O₂ were quantified. The amounts of ABA were higher in PEG-exposed leaves, along their entire length. NO, however, was higher only in the apical portion, precisely where CAM was up-regulated. H₂O₂ was higher only in the basal portion of PEG-exposed leaves. Our results suggest that ABA might be a systemic signal to drought, occurring in the entire leaf. NO and H₂O₂, however, may be signals restricted only to the apical or basal portions, respectively. PMID:23523467

  19. Responses of growth, antioxidants and gene expression in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) to various levels of salinity.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Abigail J; Xu, Jichen; Xu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is a major environmental factor limiting the productivity and quality of crop plants. While most cereal crops are salt-sensitive, several halophytic grasses are able to maintain their growth under saline conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms for salinity responses in halophytic grasses would contribute to the breeding of salt-tolerant cereal and turf species belonging to the Poaceae family. Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is a dominant native halophytic grass in the Hackensack Meadowlands, the coastal salt marshes located in northeastern New Jersey. The goals of this study were to examine the growth pattern of S. alterniflora in a salinity gradient and identify an optimal range of salinity for its maximal growth. The regulation of its antioxidant system and gene expression under supraoptimal salinity conditions was also investigated. Our results showed that a salinity of 4 parts per thousand (ppt) (68 mM) was most favorable for the growth of S. alterniflora, followed by a non-salt environment. S. alterniflora responded to salts in the environment by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities and the expression of stress-induced proteins such as ALDH, HVA22 and PEPC. The plant may tolerate salinity up to the concentration of sea water, but any salinity above 12 ppt retarded its growth and altered the expression of genes encoding critical proteins. PMID:26760954

  20. Advancing oleaginous microorganisms to produce lipid via metabolic engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-10-01

    With the depletion of global petroleum and its increasing price, biodiesel has been becoming one of the most promising biofuels for global fuels market. Researchers exploit oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production due to their short life cycle, less labor required, less affection by venue, and easier to scale up. Many oleaginous microorganisms can accumulate lipids, especially triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are the main materials for biodiesel production. This review is covering the related researches on different oleaginous microorganisms, such as yeast, mold, bacteria and microalgae, which might become the potential oil feedstocks for biodiesel production in the future, showing that biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms has a great prospect in the development of biomass energy. Microbial oils biosynthesis process includes fatty acid synthesis approach and TAG synthesis approach. In addition, the strategies to increase lipids accumulation via metabolic engineering technology, involving the enhancement of fatty acid synthesis approach, the enhancement of TAG synthesis approach, the regulation of related TAG biosynthesis bypass approaches, the blocking of competing pathways and the multi-gene approach, are discussed in detail. It is suggested that DGAT and ME are the most promising targets for gene transformation, and reducing PEPC activity is observed to be beneficial for lipid production. PMID:23685199

  1. 46 CFR 147.40 - Materials requiring Commandant (CG-522) approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... subpart. (4) Forbidden materials listed in 49 CFR 172.101. (b) Request for approval must be submitted to... hazardous materials may be on board a vessel as ships' stores: (1) Poison gases of Class 2, Division 2.3...

  2. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  3. 75 FR 35516 - Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... 192.121... Anchor Point Energy, LLC, (APE) pipeline Energy, LLC. seeks relief from certain Federal... considered as possible for conversion to Class 2 during the life of the project. APE is requesting that...

  4. 77 FR 19412 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477), or at http://www.dot.gov/privacy.html . Dated: Issued in Washington, DC, on March... western Oklahoma to sound Class 2 safety standards. The Clinton-to-Sayre segment is critical to...

  5. 33 CFR 183.540 - Hoses: Standards and markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1 hose has a permeation rating of 100 grams or less fuel loss per square meter of interior surface in 24 hours. SAE Class 2 hose has a permeation rating of 300 grams or less fuel loss per square...

  6. 33 CFR 183.540 - Hoses: Standards and markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1 hose has a permeation rating of 100 grams or less fuel loss per square meter of interior surface in 24 hours. SAE Class 2 hose has a permeation rating of 300 grams or less fuel loss per square...

  7. 46 CFR 147.40 - Materials requiring Commandant (CG-OES) approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subpart. (4) Forbidden materials listed in 49 CFR 172.101. (b) Request for approval must be submitted to... hazardous materials may be on board a vessel as ships' stores: (1) Poison gases of Class 2, Division 2.3...

  8. 76 FR 17720 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American Family Variable Account II (the ``Annuity Account'') (together, the ``Applicants''). Summary of Application... Variable Insurance Fund (``Vanguard Fund'') for Service Class 2 Shares of the Fidelity Variable...

  9. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  10. Computational evaluation of protein – small molecule binding

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Determining protein – small molecule binding affinity is a key component of present-day rational drug discovery. To circumvent the time, labor, and materials costs associated with experimental protein – small molecule binding assays, a variety of structure-based computational methods have been developed for determining protein – small molecule binding affinities. These methods can be placed in one of two classes: accurate but slow (Class 1), and fast but approximate (Class 2). Class 1 methods, which explicitly take into account protein flexibility and include an atomic-level description of solvation, are capable of quantitatively reproducing experimental protein – small molecule absolute binding free energies. However, Class 1 computational requirements make screening thousands to millions of small molecules against a protein, as required for rational drug design, infeasible for the foreseeable future. Class 2 methods, on the other hand, are sufficiently fast to perform such inhibitor screening, yet they suffer from limited descriptions of protein flexibility and solvation, which in turn limit their ability to select and rank-order small molecules by computed binding affinities. This review presents an overview of Class 1 and Class 2 methods, avenues of research in Class 2 methods aimed at bringing them closer to Class 1 accuracy, and intermediate approaches that incorporate features of both Class 1 and Class 2 methods. PMID:19162472

  11. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Plasseraud, Kristen Meldi; Tsai, Tony; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Middlebrook, Brooke; Maetzold, Derek; Wilkinson, Jeff; Stone, John; Johnson, Clare; Oelschlager, Kristen; Aaberg, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p = 0.003) with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher's exact test p = 2.1 × 10−13 and p = 0.04, resp.). The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920). PMID:27446211

  12. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Plasseraud, Kristen Meldi; Cook, Robert W; Tsai, Tony; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Middlebrook, Brooke; Maetzold, Derek; Wilkinson, Jeff; Stone, John; Johnson, Clare; Oelschlager, Kristen; Aaberg, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p = 0.003) with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher's exact test p = 2.1 × 10(-13) and p = 0.04, resp.). The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920). PMID:27446211

  13. Leaf succulence determines the interplay between carboxylase systems and light use during Crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchöe species.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Robe, Wendy E; Girnus, Jan; Maxwell, Kate

    2008-01-01

    The photosynthetic physiology of Crassulacean acid metabolism was investigated in two Kalanchoë species with differing leaf succulence. The magnitude of CAM was higher for the more succulent leaves of K. daigremontiana, compared to the less succulent leaves of K. pinnata. High succulence was related to low mesophyll conductance: K. pinnata was able to maximize diurnal carbon gain by the C(3) pathway, whereas increased succulence is associated with a higher commitment to the CAM cycle in K. daigremontiana. The Rubisco specificity factor, tau, determining selectivity for CO(2) over O(2), was similar for both species (approximately 88), and lower than that of Spinacea (approximately 95), but in contrast to C(4) plants, the Rubisco K(mCO(2)) (determined independently) was also lower in Kalanchoë spp. than in spinach. Differences in light use were related to the nature of the sink strength in each Phase of CAM, with PEPC activity resulting in low electron transport rates. Decarboxylation was marked by high, non-saturated rates of electron transport, with Rubisco activity and activation state increasing in both species during the course of the light period. The degree of succulence, and extent of CAM activity, was associated with a progressive inhibition of PSII photochemistry and potential Rubisco activity during the night in both species. Rubisco could be 'woken up' more rapidly in K. pinnata, whereas 45 min light acclimation was required for full recovery of electron transport and Rubisco activity in K. daigremontiana. Leaf morphology therefore seems to alter the expression of and dependence on CAM, but also the extent of co-regulation of carboxylase networks and light use capacity. PMID:18408219

  14. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization revealed a globally conserved and coordinated metabolic response of E. coli to paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Ximing; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Zheng, Haoran; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-01-27

    The ability of a microorganism to adapt to changes in the environment, such as in nutrient or oxygen availability, is essential for its competitive fitness and survival. The cellular objective and the strategy of the metabolic response to an extreme environment are therefore of tremendous interest and, thus, have been increasingly explored. However, the cellular objective of the complex regulatory structure of the metabolic changes has not yet been fully elucidated and more details regarding the quantitative behaviour of the metabolic flux redistribution are required to understand the systems-wide biological significance of this response. In this study, the intracellular metabolic flux ratios involved in the central carbon metabolism were determined by fractional (13)C-labeling and metabolic flux ratio analysis (MetaFoR) of the wild-type E. coli strain JM101 at an oxidative environment in a chemostat. We observed a significant increase in the flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (MEZ) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). We applied an ε-constraint based multi-objective optimization to investigate the trade-off relationships between the biomass yield and the generation of reductive power using the in silico iJR904 genome-scale model of E. coli K-12. The theoretical metabolic redistribution supports that the trans-hydrogenase pathway should not play a direct role in the defence mounted by E. coli against oxidative stress. The agreement between the measured ratio and the theoretical redistribution established the significance of NADPH synthesis as the goal of the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in response to oxidative stress. Our work presents a framework that combines metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization to investigate the metabolic trade-offs that occur under varied environmental conditions. Our results led to the proposal that the metabolic response of E

  15. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function. PMID:24600021

  16. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression. PMID:27446191

  17. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression. PMID:27446191

  18. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV–V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  19. Validating Internal Control Genes for the Accurate Normalization of qPCR Expression Analysis of the Novel Model Plant Setaria viridis

    PubMed Central

    Lambret-Frotté, Julia; de Almeida, Leandro C. S.; de Moura, Stéfanie M.; Souza, Flavio L. F.; Linhares, Francisco S.; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio

    2015-01-01

    Employing reference genes to normalize the data generated with quantitative PCR (qPCR) can increase the accuracy and reliability of this method. Previous results have shown that no single housekeeping gene can be universally applied to all experiments. Thus, the identification of a suitable reference gene represents a critical step of any qPCR analysis. Setaria viridis has recently been proposed as a model system for the study of Panicoid grasses, a crop family of major agronomic importance. Therefore, this paper aims to identify suitable S. viridis reference genes that can enhance the analysis of gene expression in this novel model plant. The first aim of this study was the identification of a suitable RNA extraction method that could retrieve a high quality and yield of RNA. After this, two distinct algorithms were used to assess the gene expression of fifteen different candidate genes in eighteen different samples, which were divided into two major datasets, the developmental and the leaf gradient. The best-ranked pair of reference genes from the developmental dataset included genes that encoded a phosphoglucomutase and a folylpolyglutamate synthase; genes that encoded a cullin and the same phosphoglucomutase as above were the most stable genes in the leaf gradient dataset. Additionally, the expression pattern of two target genes, a SvAP3/PI MADS-box transcription factor and the carbon-fixation enzyme PEPC, were assessed to illustrate the reliability of the chosen reference genes. This study has shown that novel reference genes may perform better than traditional housekeeping genes, a phenomenon which has been previously reported. These results illustrate the importance of carefully validating reference gene candidates for each experimental set before employing them as universal standards. Additionally, the robustness of the expression of the target genes may increase the utility of S. viridis as a model for Panicoid grasses. PMID:26247784

  20. The effect of drought on photosynthetic plasticity in Marrubium vulgare plants growing at low and high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Ghader; Ajory, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Photosynthesis is a biological process most affected by water deficit. Plants have various photosynthetic mechanisms that are matched to specific climatic zones. We studied the photosynthetic plasticity of C3 plants at water deficit using ecotypes of Marrubium vulgare L. from high (2,200 m) and low (1,100 m) elevation sites in the Mishou-Dagh Mountains of Iran. Under experimental drought, high-altitude plants showed more tolerance to water stress based on most of the parameters studied as compared to the low-altitude plants. Increased tolerance in high-altitude plants was achieved by lower levels of daytime stomatal conductance (g s) and reduced damaging effect on maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) (F v /F m ) coupled with higher levels of carotenoids and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). High-altitude plants exhibited higher water use efficiency (WUE) than that in low-altitude plants depending on the presence of thick leaves and the reduced daytime stomatal conductance. Additionally, we have studied the oscillation in H(+) content and diel gas exchange patterns to determine the occurrence of C3 or weak CAM (Crassulacean acid metabolism) in M. vulgare through 15 days drought stress. Under water-stressed conditions, low-altitude plants exhibited stomatal conductance and acid fluctuations characteristic of C3 photosynthesis, though high-altitude plants exhibited more pronounced increases in nocturnal acidity and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity, suggesting photosynthetic flexibility. These results indicated that the regulation of carotenoids, NPQ, stomatal conductance and diel patterns of CO2 exchange presented the larger differences among studied plants at different altitudes and seem to be the protecting mechanisms controlling the photosynthetic performance of M. vulgare plants under drought conditions. PMID:26314352

  1. Differential expression of genes involved in alternative glycolytic pathways, phosphorus scavenging and recycling in response to aluminum and phosphorus interactions in Citrus roots.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Qi, Yi-Ping; Chen, Li-Song

    2012-05-01

    The objective was to determine the possible links between the expression levels of genes involved in alternative glycolytic pathways, phosphorus (P) scavenging and recycling and Citrus tolerance to aluminum (Al) and/or P-deficiency. 'Xuegan' (Citrus sinensis) and 'Sour pummelo' (Citrus grandis) seedlings were irrigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl(3)·6H(2)O × 0, 50 and 200 μM KH(2)PO(4). C. sinensis displayed more tolerant to Al and P-deficiency than C. grandis. Under Al stress, C. sinensis accumulated more Al in roots and less Al in shoots than C. grandis. P concentration was higher in C. sinensis shoots and roots than in C. grandis ones. C. sinensis roots secreted more malate and citrate than C. grandis ones when exposed to Al. Al-induced-secretion of malate and citrate by excised roots from Al-treated seedlings decreased with increasing P supply. Al-induced-secretion of malate and citrate from roots and Al precipitation by P in roots might be responsible for Al-tolerance of C. sinensis. qRT-PCR analysis showed that Al-activated malate transporter (ALMT1), ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFK), pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK), tonoplast adenosine-triphosphatase subunit A (V-ATPase A), tonoplast pyrophosphatase (V-PPiase), pyruvate kinase (PK), acid phosphatase (APase), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (ME) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) genes might contribute to the tolerance of Citrus to Al and/or P-deficiency, but any single gene could not explain the differences between the two species. Citrus tolerance to Al and/or P-deficiency might be caused by the coordinated regulation of gene expression involved in alternative glycolytic pathways, P scavenging and recycling. PMID:22307782

  2. Parent experiences of inpatient pediatric care in relation to health care delivery and sociodemographic characteristics: results of a Norwegian national survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The national survey of parent experiences with inpatient pediatric care contribute to the Norwegian system of health care quality indicators. This article reports on the statistical association between parent experiences of inpatient pediatric care and aspects of health care delivery, child health status and health outcome as assessed by the parents, and the parents’ sociodemographic characteristics. Methods 6,160 parents of children who were inpatients at one of Norway’s 20 pediatric departments in 2005 were contacted to take part in a survey that included the Parent Experience of Pediatric Care questionnaire. It includes 25 items that form six scales measuring parent experiences: doctor services, hospital facilities, information discharge, information about examinations and tests, nursing services and organization. The six scales were analyzed using OLS-regression. Results 3,308 (53.8%) responded. Mean scores ranged from 62.81 (organization) to 72.80 (hospital facilities) on a 0–100 scale where 100 is the best possible experience. Disappointment with staff, unexpected waiting, information regarding new medication, whether the staff were successful in easing the child’s pain, incorrect treatment and number of previous admissions had a statistically significant association with at least five of the PEPC scale scores. Disappointment with staff had the strongest association. Most sociodemographic characteristics had weak or no associations with parent experiences. Conclusions The complete relief of the child’s pain, reducing unexpected waiting and disappointment with staff, and providing good information about new medication are aspects of health care that should be considered in initiatives designed to improve parent experiences. In the Norwegian context parent experiences vary little by parents’ sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:24325153

  3. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV-V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  4. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function. PMID:26985020

  5. Spatial patterns of photosynthesis in thin- and thick-leaved epiphytic orchids: unravelling C3–CAM plasticity in an organ-compartmented way

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Matiz, Alejandra; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Hamachi, Leonardo; Félix, Lucas Macedo; Pereira, Paula Natália; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Demarco, Diego; Freschi, Luciano; Mercier, Helenice; Kerbauy, Gilberto Barbante

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims A positive correlation between tissue thickness and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression has been frequently suggested. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether water availability modulates photosynthetic plasticity in different organs of two epiphytic orchids with distinct leaf thickness. Methods Tissue morphology and photosynthetic mode (C3 and/or CAM) were examined in leaves, pseudobulbs and roots of a thick-leaved (Cattleya walkeriana) and a thin-leaved (Oncidium ‘Aloha’) epiphytic orchid. Morphological features were studied comparing the drought-induced physiological responses observed in each organ after 30 d of either drought or well-watered treatments. Key Results Cattleya walkeriana, which is considered a constitutive CAM orchid, displayed a clear drought-induced up-regulation of CAM in its thick leaves but not in its non-leaf organs (pseudobulbs and roots). The set of morphological traits of Cattleya leaves suggested the drought-inducible CAM up-regulation as a possible mechanism of increasing water-use efficiency and carbon economy. Conversely, although belonging to an orchid genus classically considered as performing C3 photosynthesis, Oncidium ‘Aloha’ under drought seemed to express facultative CAM in its roots and pseudobulbs but not in its leaves, indicating that such photosynthetic responses might compensate for the lack of capacity to perform CAM in its thin leaves. Morphological features of Oncidium leaves also indicated lower efficiency in preventing water and CO2 losses, while aerenchyma ducts connecting pseudobulbs and leaves suggested a compartmentalized mechanism of nighttime carboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) (pseudobulbs) and daytime carboxylation via Rubisco (leaves) in drought-exposed Oncidium plants. Conclusions Water availability modulated CAM expression in an organ-compartmented manner in both orchids studied. As distinct regions of the same orchid could perform

  6. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations under various geologic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Collett, T.

    2003-04-29

    In this paper we classify hydrate deposits in three classes according to their geologic and reservoir conditions, and discuss the corresponding production strategies. Simple depressurization appears promising in Class 1 hydrates, but its appeal decreases in Class 2 and Class 3 hydrates. The most promising production strategy in Class 2 hydrates involves combinations of depressurization and thermal stimulation, and is clearly enhanced by multi-well production-injection systems. The effectiveness of simple depressurization in Class 3 hydrates is limited, and thermal stimulation (alone or in combination with depressurization) through single well systems seems to be the strategy of choice in such deposits.

  7. Effect of welding conditions on transformation and properties of heat-affected zones in LWR (light-water reactor) vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Mohammed, S. . Welding Research and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The continuous cooling transformation behavior (CCT) and isothermal transformation (IT) behavior were determined for SA-508 and SA-533 materials for conditions pertaining to standard heat treatment and for the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The resulting diagrams help to select welding conditions that produce the most favorable microconstituent for the development of optimum postweld heat treatment (PWHT) toughness levels. In the case of SA-508 and SA-533, martensite responds more favorably to PWHT than does bainite. Bainite is to be avoided for the optimum toughness characteristics of the HAZ. The reheat cracking tendency for both steels was evaluated by metallographic studies of simulated HAZ structures subjected to PWHT cycles and simultaneous restraint. Both SA-533, Grade B, Class 1, and SA-508, Class 2, cracked intergranularly. The stress rupture parameter (the product of the stress for a rupture life of 10 min and the corresponding reduction of area) calculated for both steels showed that SA-508, Class 2, was more susceptible to reheat cracking than SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Cold cracking tests (Battelle Test and University of Tennessee modified hydrogen susceptibility test) indicated that a higher preheat temperature is required for SA-508, Class 2, to avoid cracking than is required for SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Further, the Hydrogen Susceptibility Test showed that SA-508, Class 2, is more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than is SA-533, Grade B, Class 1.

  8. 78 FR 39311 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan Amendment and an Associated Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... of approximately 45 acres at the top of Glass Buttes from a VRM class 2 to a VRM class 4. The BLM... atop Glass Buttes in the BLM Prineville District. This notice announces the beginning of the scoping... may submit comments on issues and planning criteria related to the Glass Buttes Communication Site...

  9. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  10. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  11. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  12. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  13. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  14. Emotional Psychological and Related Problems among Truant Youths: An Exploratory Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Ungaro, Rocio Aracelis; Gulledge, Laura M.; Karas, Lora M.; Winters, Ken C.; Belenko, Steven; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Intervention Project. Results identified two classes of youths: Class 1(n=9) - youths with low levels of delinquency, mental health and substance abuse issues; and Class 2(n=37) - youths with high levels of these problems. Comparison of these two classes on their urine analysis test results and parent/guardian reports of traumatic events found…

  15. Join the Conversation: Are Students' Behaviors in College Classes Conditioned by Their Experiences in High School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy; Jensen, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Students in an introductory college biology course who believed that attending class had been important for their academic success in high school were 1) most likely to attend their college biology class, 2) most likely to earn high grades in their college biology class, 3) most likely to report that their high school classes had been challenging,…

  16. 24 CFR 3280.715 - Circulating air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Circulating air systems. 3280.715... Systems § 3280.715 Circulating air systems. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73989, Dec. 9, 2013... steel, tin-plated steel, or aluminum, or shall be listed Class 0, Class 1, or Class 2 air ducts. Class...

  17. GROUND-WATER QUALITY CLASSIFICATION FOR THE VALLEY-FILL AQUIFER IN SPANISH VALLEY, GRAND AND SAN JUAN COUNTIES, UTAH --A BASIS FOR PRESERVING HIGH QUALITY GROUND-WATER RESOURCES, UTAH GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed study will consist of an evaluation of current ground-water quality using the Utah Water Quality Board's ground-water-quality classification system based mostly on total-dissolved-solids concentrations as follows: class 1A (Pristine), less than 500 mg/L; class 2 (dr...

  18. Black Americans: A Psychological Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baughman, E. Earl

    Contents of this book include: (1) The Concept of Race-Black, Negro, Afro-American, Colored?; Social versus Biological Definitions of Race; and Confounding Race and Social Class; (2) Intelligence-Black-White Differences in IQ: age and sex differences, the genetic explanation, the environmental explanation, family correlates of IQ, and a personal…

  19. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  20. 50 CFR 622.16 - Gulf red snapper individual fishing quota (IFQ) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirement for a Gulf IFQ dealer endorsement. Details regarding eligibility, applicable landings history... license history. No more than one initial eligibility will be granted based upon a given Class 1 or Class... with each shareholder's current Class 1 or Class 2 license during the applicable landings history....

  1. 50 CFR 622.16 - Gulf red snapper individual fishing quota (IFQ) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirement for a Gulf IFQ dealer endorsement. Details regarding eligibility, applicable landings history... license history. No more than one initial eligibility will be granted based upon a given Class 1 or Class... with each shareholder's current Class 1 or Class 2 license during the applicable landings history....

  2. A Free-Recall Demonstration versus a Lecture-Only Control: Learning Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, William R.

    2012-01-01

    On their first class day, introductory psychology students took a 14-question multiple-choice pretest on several principles of memory including primacy, recency, storage, retrieval, counterbalancing, and the free-recall method. I randomly preassigned students to come at one of two different times to the second class, 2 days later, when they either…

  3. The Way We Do the Things We Do: A Survey of Middle-School Choral Educators' Sight-Singing Attitudes and Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the rationale for sight-singing instructional choices of chorus teachers at the middle school level and sought to determine teachers' commitment to teaching music literacy. Three research questions formed the basis of the study: (1) what is the prevalence of sight-singing instruction in choral music classes, (2) what is…

  4. Problems of Soviet Law and Socialist Legality in Legalistic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samoshchenko, I. S.

    1978-01-01

    Notes that Soviet youth must be educated about Soviet law and their obligations as citizens to work, respect labor discipline, and defend the motherland. Lists functions of Soviet law as (1) shaping, mediating for, and protecting the middle class, (2) reinforcing socialist principles and the emancipation of women, and (3) guaranteeing…

  5. Multilingual Education Programs: 1996-97. Research Report on an Educational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX. Dept. of Research and Accountability.

    To study the effectiveness of multilingual education programs in the Houston Independent School District (Texas), four groups of students were identified for the analysis of their Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) results. These groups were: (1) students enrolled in bilingual education classes; (2) students in English as a Second Language…

  6. GASEOUS AND PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM GASOLINE- AND DIESEL-POWERED HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous and particulate emission rates from seven class 2B, one class 5 and six class 6 heavy-duty gasoline- and diesel-powered trucks were determined using transient chassis dynamometer test procedures. All vehicles were tested at approximately 70% of their rated gross vehicle w...

  7. HEAVY-DUTY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS MODEL (GEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Class 2b-8 vocational truck manufacturers and Class 7/8 tractor manufacturers would be subject to vehicle-based fuel economy and emission standards that would use a truck simulation model to evaluate the impact of the truck tires and/or tractor cab design on vehicle compliance wi...

  8. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  9. 17 CFR 49.27 - Access and fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... REPOSITORIES § 49.27 Access and fees. (a) Fair, open and equal access. (1) A registered swap data repository..., swap dealers, major swap participants and any other counterparties, on a fair, open and equal basis... asset class. (2) Consistent with the principles of open access set forth in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  10. 17 CFR 49.27 - Access and fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 49.27 Access and fees. (a) Fair, open and equal access. (1) A registered swap data repository..., swap dealers, major swap participants and any other counterparties, on a fair, open and equal basis... asset class. (2) Consistent with the principles of open access set forth in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  11. 17 CFR 49.27 - Access and fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 49.27 Access and fees. (a) Fair, open and equal access. (1) A registered swap data repository..., swap dealers, major swap participants and any other counterparties, on a fair, open and equal basis... asset class. (2) Consistent with the principles of open access set forth in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  12. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 61672-1 (2002-05) for a Class 2 instrument. (2) An acoustic calibrator... with the acoustic calibrator immediately before and after compliance tests. Any change in the...

  13. 37 CFR 2.86 - Application may include multiple classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... multiple classes. 2.86 Section 2.86 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... include multiple classes. (a) In a single application, an applicant may apply to register the same mark for goods and/or services in multiple classes. The applicant must: (1) Specifically identify the...

  14. 37 CFR 2.86 - Application may include multiple classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... multiple classes. 2.86 Section 2.86 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... include multiple classes. (a) In a single application, an applicant may apply to register the same mark for goods and/or services in multiple classes. The applicant must: (1) Specifically identify the...

  15. 37 CFR 2.86 - Application may include multiple classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... multiple classes. 2.86 Section 2.86 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... include multiple classes. (a) In a single application, an applicant may apply to register the same mark for goods and/or services in multiple classes. The applicant must: (1) Specifically identify the...

  16. 37 CFR 2.86 - Application may include multiple classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... multiple classes. 2.86 Section 2.86 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... include multiple classes. (a) In a single application, an applicant may apply to register the same mark for goods and/or services in multiple classes. The applicant must: (1) Specifically identify the...

  17. 37 CFR 2.86 - Application may include multiple classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... multiple classes. 2.86 Section 2.86 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... include multiple classes. (a) In a single application, an applicant may apply to register the same mark for goods and/or services in multiple classes. The applicant must: (1) Specifically identify the...

  18. A Comparative Study of Characteristics of Evening Division Students Enrolled at Los Angeles Pierce College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Pierce Coll., Woodland Hills, CA.

    The responses of the 81% of the Fall 1968 night students completing a student-characteristics questionnaire are presented in charts and graphs, and compared with responses to similar questionnaires from previous semesters. Increases were found in the numbers of (1) full-time students taking evening classes, (2) single students, (3) students…

  19. Integrating Literature in Content Areas: Professional's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walley, Carl W.; Walley, Kate

    Based on the premise that viewing the curriculum holistically enriches the instructional practices of teachers and adds depth and meaning to children's school experiences, this guide is intended to: (1) encourage teachers who have doubts about using literature in their content area classes; (2) support those presently using literature to teach;…

  20. Growth Kinetics and Transmission Potential of Existing and Emerging Field Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Mauricio J. C.; Vaz, Paola K.; Legione, Alistair R.; Quinteros, José A.; Noormohammadi, Amir H.; Markham, Phillip F.; Browning, Glenn F.; Devlin, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated live infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) vaccines are widely used in the poultry industry to control outbreaks of disease. Natural recombination between commercial ILTV vaccines has resulted in virulent recombinant viruses that cause severe disease, and that have now emerged as the dominant field strains in important poultry producing regions in Australia. Genotype analysis using PCR—restriction fragment length polymorphism has shown one recombinant virus (class 9) has largely replaced the previously dominant class 2 field strain. To examine potential reasons for this displacement we compared the growth kinetics and transmission potential of class 2 and class 9 viruses. The class 9 ILTV grew to higher titres in cell culture and embryonated eggs, but no differences were observed in entry kinetics or egress into the allantoic fluid from the chorioallantoic membrane. In vivo studies showed that birds inoculated with class 9 ILTV had more severe tracheal pathology and greater weight loss than those inoculated with the class 2 virus. Consistent with the predominance of class 9 field strains, birds inoculated with 102 or 103 plaque forming units of class 9 ILTV consistently transmitted virus to in-contact birds, whereas this could only be seen in birds inoculated with 104 PFU of the class 2 virus. Taken together, the improved growth kinetics and transmission potential of the class 9 virus is consistent with improved fitness of the recombinant virus over the previously dominant field strain. PMID:25785629

  1. Growth kinetics and transmission potential of existing and emerging field strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Hartley, Carol A; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Vaz, Paola K; Legione, Alistair R; Quinteros, José A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Markham, Phillip F; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated live infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) vaccines are widely used in the poultry industry to control outbreaks of disease. Natural recombination between commercial ILTV vaccines has resulted in virulent recombinant viruses that cause severe disease, and that have now emerged as the dominant field strains in important poultry producing regions in Australia. Genotype analysis using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism has shown one recombinant virus (class 9) has largely replaced the previously dominant class 2 field strain. To examine potential reasons for this displacement we compared the growth kinetics and transmission potential of class 2 and class 9 viruses. The class 9 ILTV grew to higher titres in cell culture and embryonated eggs, but no differences were observed in entry kinetics or egress into the allantoic fluid from the chorioallantoic membrane. In vivo studies showed that birds inoculated with class 9 ILTV had more severe tracheal pathology and greater weight loss than those inoculated with the class 2 virus. Consistent with the predominance of class 9 field strains, birds inoculated with 10(2) or 10(3) plaque forming units of class 9 ILTV consistently transmitted virus to in-contact birds, whereas this could only be seen in birds inoculated with 10(4) PFU of the class 2 virus. Taken together, the improved growth kinetics and transmission potential of the class 9 virus is consistent with improved fitness of the recombinant virus over the previously dominant field strain. PMID:25785629

  2. Extreme Makeover: Physical Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Joan; Worrell, Vicki

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author cites valuable lessons to be learned from reality television shows that can also be utilized by physical educators. The author states some of the reality television's messages like: (1) physical educators must know how to maximize the activity time during physical education class; (2) must have a plan of action so that…

  3. 7 CFR 810.2204 - Grades and grade requirements for wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12.0 20.0 Wheat of other classes: 2 Contrasting classes 1.0 2.0 3.0 10.0 10.0 Total 3 3.0 5.0 10.0 10... of other classes. 3 Includes contrasting classes. 4 Includes any combination of animal filth,...

  4. 7 CFR 810.2204 - Grades and grade requirements for wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12.0 20.0 Wheat of other classes: 2 Contrasting classes 1.0 2.0 3.0 10.0 10.0 Total 3 3.0 5.0 10.0 10... of other classes. 3 Includes contrasting classes. 4 Includes any combination of animal filth,...

  5. Using Alternative Assessments in Business and Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Deborah; Lucas, Diane

    2013-01-01

    The present study will be divided in three parts: (1) a discussion of authentic alternative assessments vs. traditional assessments in language and business classes; (2) an explanation on how to create authentic alternative assessments using technology-based and non-technology-based materials; and (3) tools to evaluate these authentic assessments.…

  6. 40 CFR 720.45 - Information that must be included in the notice form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rules and conventions). In addition, for a Class 2 substance, the notice must identify the immediate... reactant actually charged to the reaction vessel, or (B) the minimum weight of monomer or other reactant... chemical identity of the reported substance and its proprietary reactant. In addition, the...

  7. 40 CFR 720.45 - Information that must be included in the notice form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rules and conventions). In addition, for a Class 2 substance, the notice must identify the immediate... reactant actually charged to the reaction vessel, or (B) the minimum weight of monomer or other reactant... chemical identity of the reported substance and its proprietary reactant. In addition, the...

  8. 15 CFR 996.11 - Development of standards for a hydrographic product or class.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... according to the practices of the standards body and the technical needs of the product. Participation in... that body. (d) NOAA may, at its option, proceed without the participation of an existing, recognized... group to write and publish standards for the proposed hydrographic product or class; (2) Solicit,...

  9. The Case-Tone Factor in Igbo Nouns, with Special Reference to the Igbo Associative Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echeruo, Michael J. C.

    Tone-based classification rules for Igbo nouns need modification because: (1) class 1 nouns (monosyllables with high tones) do not, as claimed, operate differently from other terminal high-tone nouns; and (2) class 6 nouns (di-syllabic with downstep tones) can be accounted for within class 2 and class 3 nouns known as HH and LH nouns). The proper…

  10. Big Business Invests in Catholic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Recognizes the unused potential of inner city kids and describes how The Institute for Leadership, Excellence and Academic Development (I-Lead) program has helped prepare these students for admittance to universities and colleges. I-Lead offers four core courses: (1) test prep class; (2) constitutional law class; (3) writing class; and (4)…

  11. The Role of Mothers' and Fathers' Parental Control and Coparenting in Toddlers' Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Kyong-Ah; Elicker, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the unique and relative contributions of mothers' and fathers' parental control and coparenting to toddlers' committed compliance with parents in both dyadic parent-child and triadic family play contexts. Sixty-eight mostly middle-class, 2-parent families with toddlers (16-37 months) were observed in a…

  12. Self-Esteem and Classroom Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Thomas L.; Thomas, M. Duane

    1975-01-01

    According to the subscale of the Coopersmith Inventory specifically related to school self-esteem, college students with low self-esteem (1) say less in class, (2) contribute a smaller portion of their thoughts to class discussion, and (3) sit farther back in the classroom than the students with high self-esteem. (RC)

  13. 48 CFR 235.006 - Contracting methods and contract type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... award a fixed-price type contract for a development program effort unless— (1) The level of program risk... allocation of program risk between the Government and the contractor; and (3) A written determination that... contract for the lead ship of a class; (2) A reduction in the amount of work under a fixed-price...

  14. Longitudinal Course and Family Correlates of Sibling Relationships from Childhood through Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; McHale, Susan M.; Osgood, D. Wayne; Crouter, Ann C.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in sibling intimacy and conflict were charted from middle childhood through adolescence, and family structure and relationship correlates of change were examined. Participants were mothers, fathers, and firstborn (M=11.82 years at Time 1) and secondborn (M=9.22 years) siblings from 200 White, working/middle class, 2-parent families.…

  15. 49 CFR 176.205 - Under deck stowage requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Under deck stowage requirements. 176.205 Section 176.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2...

  16. 49 CFR 176.205 - Under deck stowage requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Under deck stowage requirements. 176.205 Section 176.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2...

  17. Learning Resources: Off-Campus Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Fay

    This study was conducted to evaluate the need for and value of learning resources services for off-campus classes at Wilkes Community College (WCC). Procedures included: (1) a questionnaire to survey kinds of services offered by other North Carolina community colleges/technical institutes to their off-campus classes; (2) an examination of the…

  18. Using Simulation to Involve Students: Instructor's Guide and Participant's Manual. Teaching Procedures for the New Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G.; Phillips, Ina M.

    Using simulations developed by the High School Geography Project and films recording the use of the simulations, teachers learn to: (1) use simulation exercises in class; (2) provide a classroom atmosphere conducive to free interaction and expression among students; (3) analyze simulation in terms of problems considered, alternative choices,…

  19. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  20. 21 CFR 526.313 - Ceftiofur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Related tolerances. See § 556.113 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use in cattle—(1) Lactating cows—(i... Escherichia coli. (iii) Limitations. Milk taken from cows during treatment (a maximum of eight daily infusions... classes. (2) Dry cows—(i) Amount. Infuse 500 mg per affected quarter at the time of dry off....

  1. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  2. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  3. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  4. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  5. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  6. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  7. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  8. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  9. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  10. 49 CFR 173.5 - Agricultural operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.5 Agricultural operations. (a) For other than a Class 2 material, the... must be painted white, aluminum, or other light-reflecting color. (8) Transportation of the...

  11. 49 CFR 173.5 - Agricultural operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.5 Agricultural operations. (a) For other than a Class 2 material, the... must be painted white, aluminum, or other light-reflecting color. (8) Transportation of the...

  12. Fair Play Game: A Group Contingency Strategy to Increase Students' Active Behaviours in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidoni, Carla; Lee, Chang-Hung; Azevedo, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    A dependent group contingency strategy called Fair Play Game was applied to promote increase in number of steps during physical education classes for sixth-grade students. Results from a multiple baseline design across three classes showed that the mean number of steps for baseline vs. intervention were: Class 1: 43 vs. 64 steps/minute; Class 2:…

  13. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded unless... Division 2.1 (flammable gas) material that is a cryogenic liquid; or (ii) A tank car, except for a DOT-106A... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including...

  14. Current Student Assessment Practices of High School Band Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCognata, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement and assessment are becoming increasingly important to all music educators. The purpose of this study was to investigate the following questions: 1) in what specific ways are current high school band directors assessing students in their ensemble classes; 2) what are high school band directors' attitudes toward the assessment process;…

  15. 49 CFR 176.92 - Cylinders laden in vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cylinders laden in vehicles. 176.92 Section 176.92... Requirements for Transport Vehicles Loaded With Hazardous Materials and Transported on Board Ferry Vessels § 176.92 Cylinders laden in vehicles. Any cylinder of Class 2 (compressed gas) material which...

  16. 49 CFR 176.92 - Cylinders laden in vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cylinders laden in vehicles. 176.92 Section 176.92... Requirements for Transport Vehicles Loaded With Hazardous Materials and Transported on Board Ferry Vessels § 176.92 Cylinders laden in vehicles. Any cylinder of Class 2 (compressed gas) material which...

  17. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  18. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  19. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  20. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  1. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  2. 19 CFR 151.45 - Storage tanks bonded as warehouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Storage tanks bonded as warehouses. 151.45 Section... Products § 151.45 Storage tanks bonded as warehouses. (a) Application. Tanks for the storage of imported petroleum or petroleum products in bulk may be bonded as warehouses of class 2 if to be used exclusively...

  3. Creating the Sociological Imagination on the First Day of Class: The Social Construction of Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouillette, John R.; Turner, Ronny E.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an exercise for the first day of courses in introductory sociology. Includes four objectives: (1) telling students what they will be able to do by the end of the class; (2) exposing them to the social construction of reality; (3) showing the power of the sociological imagination; and (4) changing students into participants in their…

  4. 77 FR 25375 - United States Standards for Wheat

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ...-AB12 United States Standards for Wheat Correction PART 810 In proposed rule document 2012-9182... 4.0 8.0 12.0 20.0 Total \\1\\ 3.0 5.0 8.0 12.0 20.0 Wheat of other classes: \\2\\ Contrasting classes...

  5. The effects of grazing on the spatial pattern of elm (Ulmus pumila L.) in the sparse woodland steppe of Horqin Sandy Land in Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Wu, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of grazing on the formation of the spatial pattern of elm growth in a sparse woodland steppe. We used a point pattern method to analyze the elm trees within different diameter classes in both grazed and fenced plots, which were established in Horqin Sandy Land, northeastern, China. The results showed that, in the grazed plot, the distances where transformation between random and aggregated patterns occurred in class 1 (10 cm ≤ DBH ≤ 15 cm) and class 2 (15 cm ≤ DBH ≤ 20 cm) were 2.27 and 2.37 m, respectively. Meanwhile, in the fenced plot, the distances between random and aggregated patterns that occurred in class 1, class 2 and class 3 (DBH > 20 cm) were 3.13, 3.13 and 7.85 m, respectively. In the fenced plot, in distances larger than 67.72 m there were a negative association between class 1 and class 2, which was also the case between class 2 and class 3 and between class 1 and class 3 for distances greater than 104.09 and 128.54 m, respectively. Meanwhile, negative associations occurred only with distances larger than 29.38 m in the grazed plot. These findings suggest that grazing reduced the competition intensity between elm trees; and therefore, grazing management could be an effective strategy used to regulate the elm population in the degraded sandy land of Northern China.

  6. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  7. Gender Fictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lesley

    1992-01-01

    Reviews and compares "Gender and Mathematics" edited by Leone Burton and Valerie Walkerdine's book "Schoolgirl Fictions" on proposed truths related to gender issues in mathematics. Issues include (1) attention given to boys and girls in mathematics class; (2) the effects of noncompetitive classroom environments; and (3) sex differences in…

  8. Eight-Year Trends in Federal Graduation Rates and Graduation Success Rates at NCAA Division I Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collegiate Athletic Association (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Data is presented on: (1) Comparison of GSR and Federal Graduation Rate Cohorts (1999-2002 Entering Classes); (2) Average GSRs for Division I Student-Athletes in 1998-01 Cohorts Vs. 1999-2002 Cohorts; (3) Graduation Success Rate Trends for Division I Men's Sports: Four-Class Averages for 1998-01 Cohorts vs. 1999-02 Cohorts; (4) Graduation Success…

  9. 46 CFR 170.250 - Types and classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.250 Types and classes. (a) Watertight doors, except doors between cargo spaces, are classed as follows: (1) Class 1—Hinged door. (2) Class 2—Sliding door, operated by hand gear only. (3) Class 3—Sliding door, operated by power and by hand gear....

  10. 46 CFR 170.250 - Types and classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.250 Types and classes. (a) Watertight doors, except doors between cargo spaces, are classed as follows: (1) Class 1—Hinged door. (2) Class 2—Sliding door, operated by hand gear only. (3) Class 3—Sliding door, operated by power and by hand gear....

  11. 46 CFR 170.250 - Types and classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.250 Types and classes. (a) Watertight doors, except doors between cargo spaces, are classed as follows: (1) Class 1—Hinged door. (2) Class 2—Sliding door, operated by hand gear only. (3) Class 3—Sliding door, operated by power and by hand gear....

  12. 46 CFR 170.250 - Types and classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.250 Types and classes. (a) Watertight doors, except doors between cargo spaces, are classed as follows: (1) Class 1—Hinged door. (2) Class 2—Sliding door, operated by hand gear only. (3) Class 3—Sliding door, operated by power and by hand gear....

  13. Teaching Anthropogenic Climate Change through Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Helping Students Think Critically about Science and Ethics in Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Claire; O'Brien, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is a complicated issue involving scientific data and analyses as well as political, economic, and ethical issues. In order to capture this complexity, we developed an interdisciplinary student and faculty collaboration by (1) offering introductory lectures on scientific and ethical methods to two classes, (2) assigning…

  14. The Effects of a Group Contingency Strategy on Behaviorally Disordered Students in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogler, E. William; French, Ron W.

    1983-01-01

    A study investigated: (1) the effectiveness of a group contingency behavior modification strategy on behaviorally disordered students in a physical education class; (2) each student's response in relation to the group; and (3) the effects of age differences on results. The strategy increased time on task for both individuals and groups. (Author/PP)

  15. Evidence for superlattice arrangements in fluid phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K H; Ruonala, M; Virtanen, J; Somerharju, P

    1997-01-01

    Recently, evidence for cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules to adapt superlattice arrangements in fluid lipid bilayers has been presented. Whether superlattice arrangements exist in other biologically relevant lipid membranes, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PC, is still speculative. In this study, we have examined the physical properties of fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PE (POPE) binary mixtures as a function of the POPE mole fraction (X(PE)) using fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. At 30 degrees C, i.e., above the Tm of POPE and POPC, deviations, or dips, as well as local data scattering in the excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensity ratio of intramolecular excimer forming dipyrenylphosphatidylcholine probe in POPE/POPC mixtures were detected at X(PE) approximately 0.04, 0.11, 0.16, 0.26, 0.33, 0.51, 0.66, 0.75, 0.82, 0.91, and 0.94. The above critical values of X(PE) coincide (within +/-0.03) with the critical mole fractions X(HX,PE) or X(R,PE) predicted by a headgroup superlattice model, which assumes that the lipid headgroups form hexagonal or rectangular superlattice, respectively, in the bilayer. Other spectroscopic data, generalized polarization of Laurdan and infrared carbonyl and phosphate stretching frequency, were also collected. Similar agreements between some of the observed critical values of X(PE) from these data and the X(HX,PE) or X(R,PE) values were also found. However, all techniques yielded critical values of X(PE) (e.g., 0.42 and 0.58) that cannot be explained by the present headgroup superlattice model. The effective cross-sectional area of the PE headgroup is smaller than that of the acyl chains. Hence, the relief of "packing frustration" of PE in the presence of PC (larger headgroup than PE) may be one of the major mechanisms in driving the PE and PC components to superlattice-like lateral distributions in the bilayer. We propose that headgroup superlattices may

  16. Seasonal influences on carbohydrate metabolism in the CAM bromeliad Aechmea ‘Maya’: consequences for carbohydrate partitioning and growth

    PubMed Central

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M.; Ceusters, Nathalie; Verdoodt, Veerle; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Photosynthetic plasticity in response to a range of environmental factors that include [CO2], water availability, light intensity and temperature, is ubiquitous among plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). The present study examined how seasonal changes in light availability, as experienced by greenhouse CAM crops in northern latitude regions, influence diel carboxylation patterns and impact on carbon gain and seasonal accumulation of biomass. Methods In the CAM bromeliad Aechmea ‘Maya’ integrated measurements of leaf gas exchange, diel metabolite dynamics (e.g. malate, soluble sugars and starch) and biomass accumulation were made four times a year, i.e. in winter, spring, summer and autumn. Key Results During the brighter seasons (spring and summer) daytime Phases II and IV were dominated by C4 carboxylation, whilst the higher diurnal uptake in the autumn and winter was characterized by equal contributions of both Rubisco and PEPC. As a consequence, net CO2 uptake showed a significant depression at the end of the day in the darker months when supplementary illumination was turned off. Remarkable seasonal consistency was found in the amount of storage reserves available for nocturnal carboxylation, a consequence of predominantly daytime export of carbohydrate in spring and summer whilst nocturnal export was the major sink for carbohydrate in autumn and winter. Conclusions Throughout the different seasons Aechmea ‘Maya’ showed considerable plasticity in the timing and magnitude of C3 and C4 carboxylation processes over the diel cycle. Under low PPFD (i.e. winter and autumn) it appears that there was a constraint on the amount of carbohydrate exported during the day in order to maintain a consistent pool of transient carbohydrate reserves. This gave remarkable seasonal consistency in the amount of storage reserves available at night, thereby optimizing biomass gain throughout the year. The data have important practical

  17. Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout (PEPC) is a program written to leverage parallelism and to automate the checkout process of plug-ins created in Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform). Eclipse plug-ins can be aggregated in a feature project. This innovation digests a feature description (xml file) and automatically checks out all of the plug-ins listed in the feature. This resolves the issue of manually checking out each plug-in required to work on the project. To minimize the amount of time necessary to checkout the plug-ins, this program makes the plug-in checkouts parallel. After parsing the feature, a request to checkout for each plug-in in the feature has been inserted. These requests are handled by a thread pool with a configurable number of threads. By checking out the plug-ins in parallel, the checkout process is streamlined before getting started on the project. For instance, projects that took 30 minutes to checkout now take less than 5 minutes. The effect is especially clear on a Mac, which has a network monitor displaying the bandwidth use. When running the client from a developer s home, the checkout process now saturates the bandwidth in order to get all the plug-ins checked out as fast as possible. For comparison, a checkout process that ranged from 8-200 Kbps from a developer s home is now able to saturate a pipe of 1.3 Mbps, resulting in significantly faster checkouts. Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) tries to build a project as soon as it is downloaded. As part of another optimization, this innovation programmatically tells Eclipse to stop building while checkouts are happening, which dramatically reduces lock contention and enables plug-ins to continue downloading until all of them finish. Furthermore, the software re-enables automatic building, and forces Eclipse to do a clean build once it finishes checking out all of the plug-ins. This software is fully generic and does not contain any NASA-specific code. It can be applied to any

  18. Novel nuclear markers inform the systematics and the evolution of serpentine use in Streptanthus and allies (Thelypodieae, Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Ivalú Cacho, N; Millie Burrell, A; Pepper, Alan E; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2014-03-01

    Streptanthus is a genus of ca. 35 species in the tribe Thelypodieae (Brassicaceae) that has remarkable morphological and ecological diversity, a large number of species in the group being edaphic specialists endemic to unusual soils such as serpentine. While ecological research has shed some light on adaptation to serpentine in Streptanthus, there have been few insights on the origins and evolution of serpentine tolerance in this group, largely due to limited success in resolving the phylogenetic relationships among Streptanthus and allied genera of the Thelypodieae (Streptanthoid complex). We present a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis for the Streptanthoid complex, based on three newly identified and highly variable single copy nuclear regions (AT4G34700, AT1G61620, and AT1G56590, and three others that are widely used (ITS, phyA, and PEPC). We also include data for two chloroplast regions (trnL and trnH-psbA). Collectively, our new markers provide 75% of the nuclear parsimony informative characters in our data. Taxonomically, our sampling is the most inclusive of any study of the Streptanthoid Complex to date, including 46 out of the 53 species of Streptanthus and Caulanthus, as well as representatives of several closely allied genera in the Thelypodieae. Our results reveal that Streptanthus, Caulanthus, and Thelypodium are not reciprocally monophyletic as currently defined. The species of Streptanthus form two rather distantly related clades. One clade (SC-I) is comprised of species with bilateral flowers and urn-shaped calyces that occur mainly within the California Floristic Province (CFP) hotspot; the other clade (SC-II) is composed of species with extant ranges mainly outside the CFP. Our data indicate that serpentine tolerance has evolved between eight and ten times in this group, of which between four and five have resulted in endemism. While serpentine endemism has been rarely lost, large and diverse clades composed mainly of serpentine endemics

  19. Respiration and Energy Turnover During the Seedling Development of Triticum aestivum L., Zea mays L., Helianthus annuus L., and Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Bolhàr-Nordenkampf, H R; Zahrl, J

    1984-08-01

    Seedling length, CO(2) output, dry weight and energy content of the seeds and seedling organs of Triticum, Zea, Helianthus and Phaseolus were determined in order to study the efficiency of storage substance utilization and energy turnover during seedling development up to 108 h. The respiration rate is lower in the large seeds of Zea and Phaseolus (2.2 and 2.0 mgCO(2)·gDW(-1)·h(-1)) than in the small seeds of Triticum and Helianthus (3.1 and 4.2 mgCO(2)·gDW(-1)·h(-1)). CO(2) output during the synthesis of seedling organs reaches a maximum value in Triticum, Zea and Helianthus after 36 h (1.0, 1.7 and 1.3 gCO(2)·gDW(n)(-1), resp.) and in Phaseolus after 60 h (3.0 gCO(2)·gDW(n)(-1)). This high CO(2) evolution is caused by the lag phase of growth at the beginning of germination, as indicated in the RGR course. The loss of mobilized storage substances caused by CO(2) evolution amounts to 46% in Phaseolus and is less (av. 30%) in the other seeds. The energy loss in relation to the energy of the ungerminated seed is relatively high in the small and energy-rich seeds of Triticum (19%) and Helianthus (21 %) compared with the large seeds of Zea (8 %) and Phaseolus (13 %). The efficiency of energy utilization corresponding to the energy stored in the newly formed seedling organs is low in Helianthus (40%) and Phaseolus (43%) and relatively high in Triticum (55%) and Zea (6 %). The calorific equivalent of the CO(2) amount evolved differs widely (11 to 24 kJ·gCO(2)(-1)). With the exception of Zea these values are much higher than the calorific equivalent of the dry weight loss. The latter may be explained by energy losses without CO(2) evolution, as well as by CO(2) refixation by PEPC and by energy dissipation in the maintenance metabolism. PMID:23194792

  20. A critical review on the improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants using genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Cheng-Jiang; Shao, Hong-Bo; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2012-03-01

    Global warming is one of the most serious challenges facing us today. It may be linked to the increase in atmospheric CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs), leading to a rise in sea level, notable shifts in ecosystems, and in the frequency and intensity of wild fires. There is a strong interest in stabilizing the atmospheric concentration of CO2 and other GHGs by decreasing carbon emission and/or increasing carbon sequestration. Biotic sequestration is an important and effective strategy to mitigate the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations by increasing carbon sequestration and storage capacity of ecosystems using plant photosynthesis and by decreasing carbon emission using biofuel rather than fossil fuel. Improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, using transgenic engineering, potentially provides a set of available and effective tools for enhancing plant carbon sequestration. In this review, firstly different biological methods of CO2 assimilation in C3, C4 and CAM plants are introduced and three types of C4 pathways which have high photosynthetic performance and have evolved as CO2 pumps are briefly summarized. Then (i) the improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation of C3 plants by transgenic engineering using non-C4 genes, and (ii) the overexpression of individual or multiple C4 cycle photosynthetic genes (PEPC, PPDK, PCK, NADP-ME and NADP-MDH) in transgenic C3 plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, rice and Arabidopsis) are highlighted. Some transgenic C3 plants (e.g. tobacco, rice and Arabidopsis) overexpressing the FBP/SBPase, ictB and cytochrome c6 genes showed positive effects on photosynthetic efficiency and growth characteristics. However, over the last 28 years, efforts to overexpress individual, double or multiple C4 enzymes in C3 plants like tobacco, potato, rice, and Arabidopsis have produced mixed results that do not confirm or eliminate the possibility of improving photosynthesis of C3 plants by this approach. Finally, a prospect

  1. Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) for Sodium Storage Facility at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.R.

    1994-09-30

    This evaluation was performed for the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) which will be constructed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the area adjacent to the South and West Dump Heat Exchanger (DHX) pits. The purpose of the facility is to allow unloading the sodium from the FFTF plant tanks and piping. The significant conclusion of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) is that the only Safety Class 2 components are the four sodium storage tanks and their foundations. The building, because of its imminent risk to the tanks under an earthquake or high winds, will be Safety Class 3/2, which means the building has a Safety Class 3 function with the Safety Class 2 loads of seismic and wind factored into the design.

  2. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  3. Tergal glands in termite soldiers of the subfamily Syntermitinae (Isoptera: Termitidae).

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Haifig, Ives; Laranjo, Lara Teixeira

    2012-02-01

    The subfamily Syntermitinae comprises 14 genera of termites that are exclusively neotropical. The present study reports morphological data about mandibulate nasute soldiers from termite species belonging to three different genera within this subfamily. We describe tergal glands that were present under all tergites of soldiers of the following species: Cornitermes cumulans, Procornitermes araujoi, Syntermes nanus, and Syntermes wheeleri. The tergal glands were composed of class 2 and class 3 cells. Class 2 cells never reached the cuticle and were located below a flat layer of epidermal cells. Class 3 cells, composed of secretory cells and canal cells, were sporadic, whereas class 2 secretory cells were abundant. Secretory cells of class 3 were narrow and their cytoplasms were filled with several clear, oval-shaped vesicles with limiting membranes. The ultrastructure of class 2 cells showed well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, elongated mitochondria, several electron-lucent vesicles, and electron-dense granules that contain paracrystalline structures in S. nanus. Scanning electron micrographs displayed pores, campaniform sensilla and hairs in the outer cuticle of the soldier tergites. We hypothesize that soldier tergal glands may be involved in the production of defensive compounds, which occur in similar glands of certain cockroaches, or of primer pheromones, that might act in the regulation of soldier differentiation in the termite colony. To date, tergal glands have only been described in termite imagoes, and their occurrence in these soldiers of basal Syntermitinae implies a specific role in this caste that is still speculative and needs to be clarified. PMID:22088389

  4. Biochemical and genetic analyses of acetoin catabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Fründ, C; Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1989-01-01

    In genetic studies on the catabolism of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, we used Tn5::mob-induced mutants which were impaired in the utilization of acetoin as the sole carbon source for growth. The transposon-harboring EcoRI restriction fragments from 17 acetoin-negative and slow-growing mutants (class 2a) and from six pleiotropic mutants of A. eutorphus, which were acetoin-negative and did not grow chemolithoautotrophically (class 2b), were cloned from pHC79 gene banks. The insertions of Tn5 were mapped on four different chromosomal EcoRI restriction fragments (A, C, D, and E) in class 2a mutants. The native DNA fragments were cloned from a lambda L47 or from a cosmid gene bank. Evidence is provided that fragments A (21 kilobase pairs [kb]) and C (7.7 kb) are closely linked in the genome; the insertions of Tn5 covered a region of approximately 5 kb. Physiological experiments revealed that this region encodes for acetoin:dichlorophenol-indophenol oxidoreductase, a fast-migrating protein, and probably for one additional protein that is as yet unknown. In mutants which were not completely impaired in growth on acetoin but which grew much slower and after a prolonged lag phase, fragments D (7.2 kb) and E (8.1 kb) were inactivated by insertion of Tn5::mob. No structural gene could be assigned to the D or E fragments. In class 2b mutants, insertions of Tn5 were mapped on fragment B (11.3 kb). This fragment complemented pleiotropic hno mutants in trans; these mutants were impaired in the formation of a rpoN-like protein. The expression of the gene cluster on fragments A and C seemed to be rpoN dependent. PMID:2556366

  5. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  6. Dating Violence Perpetration and Victimization among US Adolescents: Prevalence, Patterns, and Associations with Health Complaints and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Tilda; Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Wang, Jing; Barbieri, Brittney; Iannotti, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This research identified conceptually cohesive latent classes of youth dating violence (DV) and examined associations between covariates and classes by gender. Methods A nationally representative sample of 2,203 tenth-grade students completed assessments of physical and verbal DV victimization and perpetration, depressive symptoms, health complaints, and substance use. A Factor Mixture Model was used to identify patterns of DV. Gender differences among classes were examined for depressive symptoms, health complaints, and substance use. Results Prevalence of DV victimization was 35% and perpetration was 31%. A three-class model fit adequately and provided conceptual cohesion: Class 1) non-involved (65%); Class 2) victims/perpetrators of verbal DV (30%); and Class 3) victims/perpetrators of verbal and physical DV (5%). Compared to Class 1 adolescents, those in Classes 2 and 3 were more likely to report depressive symptoms, psychological complaints, and alcohol use. Females in Classes 2 and 3 were also more likely to report physical complaints, cigarette use, and marijuana use. Among females involved in DV, those in Class 3 compared to Class 2 reported more depressive symptoms, physical and psychological complaints, and cigarette and marijuana use. Conclusions The three-class model distinguished involvement in verbal acts from involvement in verbal and physical acts. Adolescents involved in DV had similar probabilities of reporting perpetration and victimization suggesting violence within relationships may be mutual. Involvement in DV was associated with more health issues and concurrent problem behaviors. For females in particular, the increased involvement in DV was associated with other health indicators. PMID:23664626

  7. 33 CFR 183.540 - Hoses: Standards and markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 1 and the fire test in § 183.590; or (2) Underwriters' Laboratories... SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 2 and the fire test in § 183.590; (c) “USCG Type B1” hose means hose that meets the performance requirements of SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 1. (d) “USCG Type B2”...

  8. 33 CFR 183.540 - Hoses: Standards and markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 1 and the fire test in § 183.590; or (2) Underwriters' Laboratories... SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 2 and the fire test in § 183.590; (c) “USCG Type B1” hose means hose that meets the performance requirements of SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 1. (d) “USCG Type B2”...

  9. 33 CFR 183.540 - Hoses: Standards and markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 1 and the fire test in § 183.590; or (2) Underwriters' Laboratories... SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 2 and the fire test in § 183.590; (c) “USCG Type B1” hose means hose that meets the performance requirements of SAE Standard J1527DEC85, Class 1. (d) “USCG Type B2”...

  10. A Note on Twin Primes and the Modular Ring Z[subscript 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyendekkers, J. V.; Shannon, A. G.

    2002-01-01

    The modular ring Z[subscript 6] defines integers via ( 6r[subscript i] + ( i - 3)) where i is the class and r[subscript i] the row when tabulated in an array. Since only Classes 2[subscipt 6] and 4[subscript 6] contain odd primes, this modular ring is ideally suited to the analysis of twin primes. The calculations are facilitated by the use of the…

  11. A Privacy-Protecting Authentication Scheme for Roaming Services with Smart Cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kyungho; Han, Dong-Guk; Won, Dongho

    In this work we propose a novel smart card based privacy-protecting authentication scheme for roaming services. Our proposal achieves so-called Class 2 privacy protection, i.e., no information identifying a roaming user and also linking the user's behaviors is not revealed in a visited network. It can be used to overcome the inherent structural flaws of smart card based anonymous authentication schemes issued recently. As shown in our analysis, our scheme is computationally efficient for a mobile user.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of proximal contacts in posterior composite restorations. Part I. Methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Hong, J M

    1989-07-01

    An in vivo method of quantitative measuring intertooth distance before and after placement of a Class 2 composite resin restoration has been developed. A Kaman Sciences KD-2611 non-contact displacement measuring system with a 1 U unshield sensor, based upon the variable resistance of eddy current, was used for the intraoral measurement. Quantitative evaluation of proximal wear, therefore, can be made preoperatively, postoperatively, and at subsequent recall interval for posterior composite resin restorations. PMID:2810447

  13. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, T. Scott; Justice, James J.; Egg, Rebecca

    2001-08-07

    The Oxy operated Class 2 Project at West Welch Project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO2 injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir demonstration characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO2 flood design based on the reservoir characterization.

  14. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, Scott T.; Justice James L.; Taylor, Archie R.

    1999-10-28

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs.

  15. Independent sources of anisotropy in visual orientation representation: a visual and a cognitive oblique effect.

    PubMed

    Balikou, Panagiota; Gourtzelidis, Pavlos; Mantas, Asimakis; Moutoussis, Konstantinos; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Smyrnis, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    The representation of visual orientation is more accurate for cardinal orientations compared to oblique, and this anisotropy has been hypothesized to reflect a low-level visual process (visual, "class 1" oblique effect). The reproduction of directional and orientation information also leads to a mean error away from cardinal orientations or directions. This anisotropy has been hypothesized to reflect a high-level cognitive process of space categorization (cognitive, "class 2," oblique effect). This space categorization process would be more prominent when the visual representation of orientation degrades such as in the case of working memory with increasing cognitive load, leading to increasing magnitude of the "class 2" oblique effect, while the "class 1" oblique effect would remain unchanged. Two experiments were performed in which an array of orientation stimuli (1-4 items) was presented and then subjects had to realign a probe stimulus within the previously presented array. In the first experiment, the delay between stimulus presentation and probe varied, while in the second experiment, the stimulus presentation time varied. The variable error was larger for oblique compared to cardinal orientations in both experiments reproducing the visual "class 1" oblique effect. The mean error also reproduced the tendency away from cardinal and toward the oblique orientations in both experiments (cognitive "class 2" oblique effect). The accuracy or the reproduced orientation degraded (increasing variable error) and the cognitive "class 2" oblique effect increased with increasing memory load (number of items) in both experiments and presentation time in the second experiment. In contrast, the visual "class 1" oblique effect was not significantly modulated by any one of these experimental factors. These results confirmed the theoretical predictions for the two anisotropies in visual orientation reproduction and provided support for models proposing the categorization of

  16. 38 CFR 1.9 - Description, use, and display of VA seal and flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... thereof. (ii) A Class 1 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 4′4″ on the hoist by 5′6″ on the fly, exclusive of heading and hems, and be fringed on three edges with nylon fringe, 21/2″ wide. (iii) A Class 2 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 3′ on the hoist by 5′ on the fly, exclusive of heading and...

  17. 38 CFR 1.9 - Description, use, and display of VA seal and flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... thereof. (ii) A Class 1 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 4′4″ on the hoist by 5′6″ on the fly, exclusive of heading and hems, and be fringed on three edges with nylon fringe, 21/2″ wide. (iii) A Class 2 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 3′ on the hoist by 5′ on the fly, exclusive of heading and...

  18. 38 CFR 1.9 - Description, use, and display of VA seal and flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... thereof. (ii) A Class 1 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 4′4″ on the hoist by 5′6″ on the fly, exclusive of heading and hems, and be fringed on three edges with nylon fringe, 21/2″ wide. (iii) A Class 2 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 3′ on the hoist by 5′ on the fly, exclusive of heading and...

  19. 38 CFR 1.9 - Description, use, and display of VA seal and flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... thereof. (ii) A Class 1 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 4′4″ on the hoist by 5′6″ on the fly, exclusive of heading and hems, and be fringed on three edges with nylon fringe, 21/2″ wide. (iii) A Class 2 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 3′ on the hoist by 5′ on the fly, exclusive of heading and...

  20. 38 CFR 1.9 - Description, use, and display of VA seal and flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... thereof. (ii) A Class 1 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 4′4″ on the hoist by 5′6″ on the fly, exclusive of heading and hems, and be fringed on three edges with nylon fringe, 21/2″ wide. (iii) A Class 2 flag shall be of nylon banner, measure 3′ on the hoist by 5′ on the fly, exclusive of heading and...

  1. Evaluations of 1997 Fuel Consumption Patterns of Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Danilo

    2001-08-05

    The proposed 21st Century Truck program selected three truck classes for focused analysis. On the basis of gross vehicle weight (GVW) classification, these were Class 8 (representing heavy), Class 6 (representing medium), and Class 2b (representing light). To develop and verify these selections, an evaluation of fuel use of commercial trucks was conducted, using data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS). Truck fuel use was analyzed by registered GVW class, and by body type.

  2. Latent Class Analysis of Differential Item Functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Mi-young Lee; Cohen, Allan S.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of latent class analysis for the detection of differences in item functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III). A two-class solution for a latent class model appeared to be defined in part by ability because Class 1 was lower in ability than Class 2 on both the PPVT-III and the…

  3. Structure of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase at 2.1 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, K.; El-Ahmad, M.; Ramaswamy, S.; Hjelmqvist, L.; Jörnvall, H.; Eklund, H.

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, the most abundant aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) of cod liver, has been determined at 2.1 A resolution by the X-ray crystallographic method of molecular replacement. This enzyme represents a novel structure of the highly multiple ALDH, with at least 12 distinct classes in humans. This betaine ALDH of class 9 is different from the two recently determined ALDH structures (classes 2 and 3). Like these, the betaine ALDH structure has three domains, one coenzyme binding domain, one catalytic domain, and one oligomerization domain. Crystals grown in the presence or absence of NAD+ have very similar structures and no significant conformational change occurs upon coenzyme binding. This is probably due to the tight interactions between domains within the subunit and between subunits in the tetramer. The oligomerization domains link the catalytic domains together into two 20-stranded pleated sheet structures. The overall structure is similar to that of the tetrameric bovine class 2 and dimeric rat class 3 ALDH, but the coenzyme binding with the nicotinamide in anti conformation, resembles that of class 2 rather than of class 3. PMID:9792097

  4. Technical criteria for an Area-Of-Review variance methodology. Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    This guidance was developed by the Underground Injection Practices Research Foundation to assist Underground Injection Control Directors in implementing proposed changes to EPA`s Class 2 Injection Well Regulations that will apply the Area-Of-Review (AOR) requirement to previously exempt wells. EPA plans to propose amendments this year consistent with the recommendations in the March 23, 1992, Final Document developed by the Class 2 Injection Well Advisory Committee, that will require AORs to be performed on all Class 2 injection wells except those covered by previously conducted AORs and those located in areas that have been granted a variance. Variances may be granted if the Director determines that there is a sufficiently low risk of upward fluid movement from the injection zone that could endanger underground sources of drinking water. This guidance contains suggested technical criteria for identifying areas eligible for an AOR variance. The suggested criteria were developed in consultation with interested States and representatives from EPA, industry and the academic community. Directors will have six months from the promulgation of the new regulations to provide EPA with either a schedule for performing AOR`s within five years on all wells not covered by previously conducted AORs, or notice of their intent to establish a variance program. It is believed this document will provide valuable assistance to Directors who are considering whether to establish a variance program or have begun early preparations to develop such a program.

  5. Characterization of four prestressed concrete reactor vessel liner steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R. K.

    1980-12-01

    A program of fracture toughness testing and analysis is being performed with PCRV steels for HTGRs. This report focuses on background information for the base materials and results of characterization testing, such as tensile and impact properties, chemical composition, and microstructural examination. The steels tested were an SA-508 class 1 forging, two plates of SA-537 class 1, and one plate of SA-537 class 2. Tensile requirements in effect at the time of procurement are met by all four steels. However, the SA-537 class 2 plate would not meet the minimum requirement for yield strength. Drop-weight and Charpy impact tests verified that the RT/sub NDT/ is equal to the NDT for each steel. Charpy impact energies at the NDT range from 40 J (30 ft-lb) for one heat of SA-537 class 1 to 100 J (74 ft-lb) for the SA-537 class 2 plate; upper-shelf energies range from 170 to 310 J (125 to 228 ft-lb) for the same two steels, respectively. The onset of upper-shelf energy occurred at temperatures ranging from 0 to 50/sup 0/C.

  6. Influence of Horse and Rider on Stress during Horse-riding Lesson Program

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Yun, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to confirm the influence of a horse-riding lesson program (HRLP) on the stress level of horses and riders by respectively analyzing their salivary cortisol concentration. Twenty-four healthy horses and 23 riders participated in this study. The horses were randomly classified into two groups for the horse riding lesson program: Class 1 (for the beginner lesson) and Class 2 (for the intermediate lesson). The Class 1 group consisted of 12 horses and 12 riders, while the Class 2 group consisted of 12 horses and 11 riders. Salivettes cotton wool swabs were used for saliva collection and the saliva analyses were conducted using a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with SAS version 8. As for the results, the average salivary cortisol concentration of all horses before HRLP significantly increased compared to the baseline (p<0.001) while it decreased after the HRLP. The results of the salivary cortisol concentration of the riders were similar to the horses’ results. However, there was no difference during the HRLP between Class 1 and Class 2 in the horse or rider groups. The results suggest that the HRLP did not influence the stress level of the horses or riders. Thus, this study provides the necessary information and guidelines for future studies on stress in horses during riding and gives insight into better horse welfare and management options. PMID:27004819

  7. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Behavioral Weight Loss (BWL), or guided self-help based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBTgsh). A latent transition analysis tested the predictive validity of the latent class analysis model. Results A 4-class model yielded the best overall fit to the data. Class 1 was characterized by a lower mean body mass index (BMI) and increased physical activity. Individuals in class 2 reported the most binge eating, shape and weight concerns, compensatory behaviors, and negative affect. Class 3 patients reported similar binge eating frequencies to class 2 with lower levels of exercise or compensation. Class 4 was characterized by the highest average BMI, the most overeating episodes, fewer binge episodes, and an absence of compensatory behaviors. Classes 1 and 3 had the highest and lowest percentage of individuals with a past eating disorder diagnosis, respectively. The latent transition analysis found a higher probability of remission from binge eating among those receiving IPT in Class 2 and CBTgsh in Class 3. Conclusions The latent class analysis identified four distinct classes using baseline measures of eating disorder and depressive symptoms, body weight, and physical activity. Implications of the observed differential treatment response are discussed. PMID:20873903

  8. Influence of Horse and Rider on Stress during Horse-riding Lesson Program.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Yun, Young-Min

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to confirm the influence of a horse-riding lesson program (HRLP) on the stress level of horses and riders by respectively analyzing their salivary cortisol concentration. Twenty-four healthy horses and 23 riders participated in this study. The horses were randomly classified into two groups for the horse riding lesson program: Class 1 (for the beginner lesson) and Class 2 (for the intermediate lesson). The Class 1 group consisted of 12 horses and 12 riders, while the Class 2 group consisted of 12 horses and 11 riders. Salivettes cotton wool swabs were used for saliva collection and the saliva analyses were conducted using a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with SAS version 8. As for the results, the average salivary cortisol concentration of all horses before HRLP significantly increased compared to the baseline (p<0.001) while it decreased after the HRLP. The results of the salivary cortisol concentration of the riders were similar to the horses' results. However, there was no difference during the HRLP between Class 1 and Class 2 in the horse or rider groups. The results suggest that the HRLP did not influence the stress level of the horses or riders. Thus, this study provides the necessary information and guidelines for future studies on stress in horses during riding and gives insight into better horse welfare and management options. PMID:27004819

  9. Cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982 and the associated solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at the times of greater than 3-percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978-1982 are presented. The intensity-time profiles of the particles are used to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which are subsequently associated with three types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) are associated with shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events, the ejecta are detected at 1 AU, whereas this is not usually the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the cosmic ray depression in class 2 events. It is argued that since energetic particles (from MEV to GeV energies) seen at earth may respond to solar wind structures which are not detected at earth, consideration of particle observations over a wide range of energies is necessary for a full understanding of cosmic ray decreases.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  11. Diversity of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is defined as an immune system-mediated adverse reaction to food components. Food allergic reactions are mostly IgE mediated and also known as immediate type hypersensitivity (type I reaction). There are several characteristic clinical types of food allergy, such as Anaphylaxis, Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), and Oral allergy syndrome (OAS). In addition, food allergy is also classified into two types (class 1 and class 2) based on the pathophysiological mechanism. In the class 2 food allergy, pollen allergy causes plant food allergy; therefore this type of allergy is sometimes called Pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS). The risk of food allergy (allergenicity) may vary with the treatment of the food allergens. The formation or status of the causative food affects its allergenicity. Class 1 food allergens are generally heat-, enzyme-, and low pH-resistant glycoproteins ranging in size from 10 to 70 kD. Class 1 food allergens induce allergic sensitization via the gastrointestinal tract and are responsible for systemic reactions. Class 2 food allergens are generally heat-labile, susceptible to digestion, and highly homologous with pollen allergens. Taken together, it may be important to consider the diversity of food allergy in order to fight against food allergy. PMID:26598816

  12. Prognostic Implications of Tumor Diameter in Association With Gene Expression Profile for Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Scott D.; Chao, Daniel L.; Feuer, William; Schiffman, Joyce; Char, Devron H.; Harbour, J. William

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Uveal melanoma (UM) can be divided into prognostically significant subgroups based on a prospectively validated and widely used 15-gene expression profile (GEP) test. Class 1 UMs have a low risk and class 2 UMs have a high risk for metastasis. OBJECTIVE To determine whether any clinicopathologic factors provide independent prognostic information that may enhance the accuracy of the GEP classification. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective observational study performed at 2 ocular oncology referral centers included 339 patients in a primary cohort and 241 patients in a validation cohort. Both cohorts had a diagnosis of UM arising from the ciliary body and/or choroid. All patients underwent tumor biopsy for GEP prognostic testing. Clinicopathologic variables included patient age and sex, tumor thickness, largest basal tumor diameter (LBD), ciliary body involvement, and pathologic cell type. Patients from the primary cohort were enrolled from November 1, 1998, to March 16, 2012; from the validation cohort, from November 4, 1996, to November 7, 2013. Follow-up for the primary cohort was completed on August 18, 2013; for the validation cohort, December 10, 2013. Data were analyzed from November 12, 2013, to November 25, 2015. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES Progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary outcome was overall survival. RESULTS The primary cohort included 339 patients (175 women [51.6%]; mean [SD] age, 61.8 [13.6] years). The most significant prognostic factor was GEP classification (exp[b], 10.33; 95% CI, 4.30–24.84; P < .001). The only other variable that provided independent prognostic information was LBD (exp[b], 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02–1.26; P = .02). Among class 2 UMs, LBD showed a modest but significant association with PFS (exp[b], 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04–1.24; P = .005). The 5-year actuarial metastasis-free survival estimates (SE) were 97% (3%) for class 1 UMs with LBD of less than 12 mm, 90% (4%) for class 1 UMs with LBD of at

  13. Understanding the Magnitude Dependence of PGA and PGV: A look at differences between mainshocks and aftershocks in the NGA-West2 data and ground motion from small magnitude Anza data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltay, A.; Hanks, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    We build an earthquake-source based model to explain the magnitude dependence of PGA (peak ground acceleration) and PGV (peak ground velocity) observable in the NGA-West2 ground motion database and empirically based ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). This simple model is based on a point-source, constant stress drop (Δσ) Brune model, including the high-frequency attenuation parameter (fmax or κ), random vibration theory (RVT) and a finite-fault assumption. This simple approach explains the magnitude dependence of PGA and PGV in the NGA-West2 ground motion data, and matches the GMPEs well. Using this model as a reference condition, we explore secondary dependencies, such as the difference in ground motion between mainshocks and aftershocks, and the magnitude dependence of ground motion from small magnitude earthquakes. In the NGA-West2 database, which consists of over 20,000 records of events from 3< M < 8, mainshocks are defined as Class 1 events, and on-fault aftershocks as Class 2. By comparing the median ground motion of these events with our source-based model, we can distinguish overall differences in stress drop associated with Class 1 vs. Class 2 events. We find that when taken all together, Class 2 events have slightly lower stress drop than Class 1 events. This suggests that the Class 2 events, on-fault aftershocks, may be re-rupturing damaged fault areas yielding lower stress drops. We observe more scatter in this model-based stress drop for the Class 2 events as compared to the mainshocks, similar to what is observed in seismologically based source studies. We also consider the magnitude dependence of very small magnitude data, 0

  14. Collaborative Ocular Oncology Group Report No. 1: Prospective Validation of a Multi-Gene Prognostic Assay in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Michael D.; Worley, Lori A.; Char, Devron H.; Augsburger, James J.; Correa, Zelia M; Nudleman, Eric; Aaberg, Thomas M.; Altaweel, Michael M.; Bardenstein, David S.; Finger, Paul T.; Gallie, Brenda L.; Harocopos, George J.; Hovland, Peter G.; McGowan, Hugh D.; Milman, Tatyana; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Simpson, E. Rand; Smith, Morton E.; Wilson, David J.; Wirostko, William J.; Harbour, J. William

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the prognostic performance of a 15 gene expression profiling (GEP) assay that assigns primary posterior uveal melanomas to prognostic subgroups: class 1 (low metastatic risk) and class 2 (high metastatic risk). Design Prospective, multicenter study. Participants 459 patients with posterior uveal melanoma were enrolled from 12 independent centers. Testing Tumors were classified by GEP as class 1 or class 2. The first 260 samples were also analyzed for chromosome 3 status using a single nucleotide polymorphism assay. Net reclassification improvement analysis was performed to compare the prognostic accuracy of GEP to the 7th edition clinical Tumor-Node-Metastasis (TNM) classification and to chromosome 3 status. Main Outcome Measures Patients were managed for their primary tumor and monitored for metastasis. Results The GEP assay successfully classified 446/459 (97.2%) cases. The GEP was class 1 in 276 cases (61.9%) and class 2 in 170 cases (38.1%). Median follow-up was 17.4 months (mean, 18.0 months). Metastasis was detected in 3 (1.1%) class 1 cases and 44 (25.9%) class 2 cases (log rank test, P<10−14). Although there was an association between GEP class 2 and monosomy 3 (Fisher exact test, P<0.0001), 54/260 (20.8%) tumors were discordant for GEP and chromosome 3 status, among which GEP demonstrated superior prognostic accuracy (log rank test, P=0.0001). Using multivariate Cox modeling, GEP class had a stronger independent association with metastasis than any other prognostic factor (P<0.0001). Chromosome 3 status did not contribute additional prognostic information that was independent of GEP (P=0.2). At three years follow-up, the net reclassification improvement of GEP over TNM classification was 0.43 (P=0.001) and 0.38 (P=0.004) over chromosome 3 status. Conclusions The GEP assay had a high technical success rate and was the most accurate prognostic marker among all of the factors analyzed. GEP provided a highly significant

  15. Alcohol and Drug Use among Patients Presenting to an Inner-city Emergency Department: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blow, Frederic C.; Walton, Maureen A.; Barry, Kristen L.; Murray, Regan L.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Massey, Lynn S.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    The inner city Emergency Department (ED) provides a window of opportunity for screening for alcohol and other drug misuse and substance use disorders (SUDs), in order to facilitate linkage for individuals who are in need of services targeting such issues. The majority of prior work in this area has focused on alcohol use. This study used latent class analyses to characterize substance use/SUDs among adults presenting to the ED for medical complaints or injuries. Participants (n=14,557; 77% participation; 45% male; 54% African-American) completed a computerized survey assessing demographics, health functioning, and substance use/SUDs. Although injured patients were significantly more likely to use tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana, and were more likely to have an alcohol use disorder, presenting complaint was not related to other drug use/diagnoses. Five latent classes were identified: (1) non users/SUDs (65.9%) (2) binge drinkers (24.3%), (3) marijuana users/SUD (3.5%), (4) cocaine users/SUD (2.9%), and (5) poly-drug users (3.3%). Compared to class 1, participants in the other classes were younger, male, without health insurance, with poor mental health functioning, tobacco users, and had prior substance use treatment. African-Americans were most likely to be in classes 3 or 4 and employed participants were most likely to be in class 2. In comparison to class 1, classes 2 and 3 reported better physical health; class 2 was more likely to present for injury whereas class 5 was more likely to present for a medical complaint. ED-based screening and interventions approaches need to address the co-occurrence of alcohol, illicit drug, and psychoactive prescription drug use. PMID:21514734

  16. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-11-16

    Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

  17. Identification of a Novel Cassette Array in Integronbearing Helicobacter Pylori Strains Isolated from Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Fazeli, Maryam; Roshani, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Heidary, Mohsen; Navidinia, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori as the second most common cause of gastric cancer in the world infects approximately half of the developed countries population and 80% of the population living in developing countries. Integrons as genetic reservoirs play major roles in dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report carriage of class 1 and 2 integrons and associated gene cassettes in H. pylori isolates from Iran. This crosssectional study was conducted in Tehran among 110 patients with H. pylori infection. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) for H. pylori strains were assessed by the micro broth dilution method. Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected using PCR. In order to determine gene cassettes, amplified fragments were subjected to DNA sequencing of both amplicon strands. The prevalence of resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, tetracycline, amoxicillin, rifampin, and levofloxacin were 68.2% (n=75), 25.5% (n=28), 24.5% (n=27), 19.1% (n=21), 18.2% (n=20) and 16.4% (n=18), respectively. Frequency of multidrug resistance among H. pylori isolates was 12.7%. Class 2 integron was detected in 50 (45.5%) and class 1 integron in 10 (9.1%) H. pylori isolates. The most predominant gene cassette arrays in class 2 integron bearing H. pylori were included sateraaadA1, dfrA1sat2aadA1, blaoxa2 and, aadB whereas common gene cassette arrays in class 1 integron were aadBaadA1cmlA6, aacA4, blaoxa2, and catB3. The high frequency of class 2 integron and multidrug resistance in the present study should be considered as a warning for clinicians that continuous surveillance is necessary to prevent the further spread of resistant isolates. PMID:27509968

  18. A generic static headspace gas chromatography method for determination of residual solvents in drug substance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chang; Liu, Shaorong; Mueller, Bradford J; Yan, Zimeng

    2010-10-01

    In order to increase productivity of drug analysis in the pharmaceutical industry, an efficient and sensitive generic static headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) method was successfully developed and validated for the determination of 44 classes 2 and 3 solvents of International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guideline Q3C, as residual solvents in drug substance. In order to increase the method sensitivity and efficiency in sample equilibration, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) was selected as the sample diluent based on its high capacity of dissolving drug substance, stability and high boiling point. The HS sample equilibration temperature and equilibration time are assessed in ranges of 125-150°C and 8-15 min, respectively. The results indicate that the residual solvents in 200mg of drug substance can be equilibrated efficiently in HS sampler at 140°C for 10 min. The GC parameters, e.g. sample split ratio, carrier flow rate and oven temperature gradient are manipulated to enhance the method sensitivity and separation efficiency. The two-stage gradient GC run from 35 to 240°C, using an Agilent DB-624 capillary column (30 m long, 0.32 mm I.D., 1.8 μm film thickness), is suitable to determine 44 ICH classes 2 and 3 solvents in 30 min. The method validation results indicate that the method is accurate, precise, linear and sensitive for solvents assessed. The recoveries of most of these solvents from four drug substances are greater than 80% within the method determination ranges. However, this method is not suitable for the 10 remaining ICH classes 2 and 3 solvents, because they are too polar (e.g. formic acid and acidic acid), or have boiling points higher than 150°C, (e.g. anisol and cumene). In comparison with the previous published methods, this method has a much shorter sample equilibration time, a better separation for many solvents, a higher sensitivity and a broader concentration range. PMID:20801455

  19. Patterns of Violence Against Women: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay E.; Messing, Jill T.; Petras, Hanno; Fowler, Barbara; La Flair, Lareina; Kub, Joan; Agnew, Jacqueline; Fitzgerald, Sheila; Bolyard, Richelle; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined patterns of nine types of violence against women (VAW) and associated mental health problems. The following self-reported, lifetime violence victimization was examined among 1424 employed women: (1) childhood physical abuse, (2) childhood sexual abuse, (3) physical abuse between parents/guardians during childhood, (4) psychological intimate partner violence (IPV), (5) physical IPV, (6) sexual IPV, (7) adult physical or sexual assault by a non-intimate partner, (8) physical workplace violence, and (9) psychological workplace violence. Latent class analysis was used to identify homogenous patterns, called “classes,” of women's “yes/no” responses to experiencing these types of violence. The best model consisted of 4-classes characterized by the following probabilities: low violence (class 1: 63.1%), high psychological and physical IPV (class 2: 15.6%), high physical and psychological workplace violence (class 3: 12.4%), and moderate to high childhood abuse (class 4: 9.0%). When compared to class 1 (low violence), membership in classes 2 (IPV) and 4 (childhood abuse) was associated with screening positive for depression in the past week at baseline after controlling for the influence of demographic characteristics on class membership. Also, when compared to class 1 (low all), membership in class 2 (IPV) was associated with greater odds of screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder in the past month at the six month follow-up assessment. Findings document distinct patterns of VAW and associated proximal and distal mental health outcomes. Implications for interventions aimed to improve employed women's health are discussed. PMID:22662284

  20. Chernobyl accident: reconstruction of thyroid dose for inhabitants of the Republic of Belarus.

    PubMed

    Gavrilin, Y I; Khrouch, V T; Shinkarev, S M; Krysenko, N A; Skryabin, A M; Bouville, A; Anspaugh, L R

    1999-02-01

    The Chernobyl accident in April 1986 resulted in widespread contamination of the environment with radioactive materials, including (131)I and other radioiodines. This environmental contamination led to substantial radiation doses in the thyroids of many inhabitants of the Republic of Belarus. The reconstruction of thyroid doses received by Belarussians is based primarily on exposure rates measured against the neck of more than 200,000 people in the more contaminated territories; these measurements were carried out within a few weeks after the accident and before the decay of (131)I to negligible levels. Preliminary estimates of thyroid dose have been divided into 3 classes: Class 1 ("measured" doses), Class 2 (doses "derived by affinity"), and Class 3 ("empirically-derived" doses). Class 1 doses are estimated directly from the measured thyroidal (131)I content of the person considered, plus information on lifestyle and dietary habits. Such estimates are available for about 130,000 individuals from the contaminated areas of the Gomel and Mogilev Oblasts and from the city of Minsk. Maximum individual doses are estimated to range up to about 60 Gy. For every village with a sufficient number of residents with Class 1 doses, individual thyroid dose distributions are determined for several age groups and levels of milk consumption. These data are used to derive Class 2 thyroid dose estimates for unmeasured inhabitants of these villages. For any village where the number of residents with Class 1 thyroid doses is small or equal to zero, individual thyroid doses of Class 3 are derived from the relationship obtained between the mean adult thyroid dose and the deposition density of (131)I or 137Cs in villages with Class 2 thyroid doses presenting characteristics similar to those of the village considered. In order to improve the reliability of the Class 3 thyroid doses, an extensive program of measurement of (129)I in soils is envisaged. PMID:9929121

  1. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  2. Is the full potential of the biopharmaceutics classification system reached?

    PubMed

    Bergström, Christel A S; Andersson, Sara B E; Fagerberg, Jonas H; Ragnarsson, Gert; Lindahl, Anders

    2014-06-16

    In this paper we analyse how the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) has been used to date. A survey of the literature resulted in a compilation of 242 compounds for which BCS classes were reported. Of these, 183 compounds had been reported to belong to one specific BCS class whereas 59 compounds had been assigned to multiple BCS classes in different papers. Interestingly, a majority of the BCS class 2 compounds had fraction absorbed (FA) values >85%, indicating that they were completely absorbed after oral administration. Solubility was computationally predicted at pH 6.8 for BCS class 2 compounds to explore the impact of the pH of the small intestine, where most of the absorption occurs, on the solubility. In addition, the solubilization capacity of lipid aggregates naturally present in the intestine was studied computationally and experimentally for a subset of 12 compounds. It was found that all acidic compounds with FA>85% were completely dissolved in the pH of the small intestine. Further, lipids at the concentration used in fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) dissolved the complete dose given of the most lipophilic (logD6.5>3) compounds studied. Overall, biorelevant dissolution media (pure buffer of intestinal pH or FaSSIF) identified that for 20 of the 29 BCS class 2 compounds with FA>85% the complete dose given orally would be dissolved. These results indicate that a more relevant pH restriction for acids and/or dissolution medium with lipids present better forecast solubility-limited absorption in vivo than the presently used BCS solubility criterion. The analysis presented herein further strengthens the discussion on the requirement of more physiologically relevant dissolution media for the in vitro solubility classification performed to reach the full potential of the BCS. PMID:24075971

  3. Histological populations and atresia of ovarian follicles in postpartum cattle treated with an agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Twagiramungu, H; Guilbault, L A; Proulx, J; Ramkumar, R; Dufour, J J

    1994-01-01

    Surface and histological changes of ovarian follicles and degree of atresia were characterized 3 and 6 d after a treatment with a GnRH agonist (buserelin) in postpartum beef cows. Sixteen cyclic cows on d 7 of their estrous cycle and eight acyclic cows were used. On d 0 of the experimental period, eight cyclic cows were injected with 2 mL of physiological saline and the remaining eight cyclic cows and the acyclic cows were injected i.m. with 8 micrograms of buserelin. Ovaries were collected 3 or 6 d later (n = 4 cows per group per day). All follicles (> 1.57 mm) were observed microscopically, measured using routine histological techniques, and classified as either nonatretic or atretic, with early or late atresia, and grouped into Class 1, 1.57 to 3.67 mm, Class 2, 3.68 to 8.56 mm, or Class 3, > 8.56 mm. Buserelin induced formation of new corpora lutea in all cows but one (acyclic cow). Class 1 follicles decreased on d 3 but increased on d 6 (day x treatment, P < .004), whereas those of Class 2 increased (P < .07) on both d 3 and 6 after buserelin treatment. However, within Class 2 follicles, we detected an increase on d 3 and 6 in the number (P < .01) and proportion (P < .07) of atretic follicles, an increase in the number of follicles in late atresia on d 6 (day x treatment, P < .03), and a decrease in the number (P < .06) and proportion (P < .03) of nonatretic follicles on d 6 (day x treatment).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8138489

  4. Predicting the extension of equivalence classes from primary generalization gradients: the merger of equivalence classes and perceptual classes.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, L; Reeve, K F; Adams, B J; Brown, J L; Verhave, T

    1997-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 6 college students were given generalization tests using 25 line lengths as samples with a long line, a short line, and a "neither" option as comparisons. The neither option was to be used if a sample did not go with the other comparisons. Then, four-member equivalence classes were formed. Class 1 included three nonsense words and the short line. Class 2 included three other nonsense words and the long line. After repeating the generalization test for line length, additional tests were conducted using members of the equivalence classes (i.e., nonsense words and lines) as comparisons and intermediate-length lines as samples. All Class 2 comparisons were selected in the presence of the test lines that also evoked the selection of the long line in the generalization test that had been given before equivalence class formation. Class 1 yielded complementary findings. Thus, the preclass primary generalization gradient predicted which test lines acted as members of each equivalence class. Regardless of using comparisons that were nonsense words or lines, the post-class-formation gradients overlapped, showing the substitutability of class members. Experiment 2 assessed the discriminability of the intermediate-length test lines from the Class 1 (shortest) and Class 2 (longest) lines. The test lines that functioned as members of an equivalence class were discriminable from the line that was a member of the same class by training. Thus, these test lines also acted as members of a dimensionally defined class of "long" or "short" lines. Extension of an equivalence class, then, involved its merger with a dimensionally defined class, which converted a close-ended class to an open-ended class. These data suggest a means of predicting class membership in naturally occurring categories. PMID:9241863

  5. Land use studies with Skylab data, August 1974. [Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, D. S. (Principal Investigator); Rohde, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Capabilities of Skylab photographic data suggest significant applications for: (1) identification and mapping of all primary, most secondary, and many tertiary land use classes; (2) stratification of the landscape for more detailed sampling; and (3) rapid updating of existing land use and vegetation maps subscaled at 1:25,000 and smaller with manual interpretation techniques. Automated thematic mapping of land use categories with electronic data processing techniques is feasible with the S-192 multispectral scanner, despite the high noise levels in many channels.

  6. 340 Facility secondary containment and leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bendixsen, R.B.

    1995-01-31

    This document presents a preliminary safety evaluation for the 340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Containment system, Project W-302. Project W-302 will construct Building 340-C which has been designed to replace the current 340 Building and vault tank system for collection of liquid wastes from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory buildings in the 300 Area. This new nuclear facility is Hazard Category 3. The vault tank and related monitoring and control equipment are Safety Class 2 with the remainder of the structure, systems and components as Safety Class 3 or 4.

  7. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  8. Signalling of a step-like intensity change of noxious mechanical stimuli by dorsal horn neurones in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    1991-01-01

    1. Single-unit extracellular recordings were made from thirty-one dorsal horn neurones in the sacral spinal cord of barbiturate-anaesthetized rats. Each neurone was tested with four noxious mechanical pinches applied to its receptive field on the tail. Each pinch lasted 120 s, with a step-like change in intensity after 60 s. In two pinches the step increased the intensity, from 4 to 6 N or from 6 to 8 N, and in two the step decreased the intensity, from 8 to 6 N or from 6 to 4 N. 2. The ability of the neurones to signal these step changes in intensity was examined. Five neurones with an exclusively low-threshold afferent input (class 1) were tested, and found to fire only briefly at the start of the 120 s stimulus. Neurones with a high-threshold input (nociceptive neurones), either exclusively (class 3; n = 10) or in addition to a low-threshold input (class 2: n = 16), responded throughout the 120 s stimuli. 3. Nociceptive dorsal horn neurones have been divided into two groups of 'good' and 'poor' encoders on the basis of their response to the step changes in intensity. 4. 'Good' encoders (n = 13) were neurones signalling both a step increase and a step decrease in intensity, of which seven were class 2 and six class 3, five recorded in the superficial dorsal horn and eight in the deep dorsal horn. 5. 'Poor' encoders (n = 13) were neurones which failed to signal one or both of the step changes in intensity, of which nine were class 2 and four class 3, three recorded in the superficial dorsal horn and ten in the deep dorsal horn. 6. These results demonstrate that neurones with similar input properties and location are not necessarily a homogeneous group in terms of their processing of nociceptive stimuli. Moreover, they suggest that subgroups of both class 2 and class 3 and of superficial and deep dorsal horn neurones contribute to the different components of a nociceptive response. 7. We propose that the output and projection target of a particular dorsal horn

  9. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-25

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objectives of this calculation are (1) To perform static and Safety Class 2 dynamic stress analysis of the Slurry and Supernate Process (inner) piping connecting Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 in order to be in compliance with the Code requirements; (2) To assure the thermal expansion of the process pipe not be strained by the outer encasement pipe; and (3) To furnish process pipe support to the Civil Engineering group.

  10. Update on Adolescent Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nirav K; Wulkan, Mark L; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity remains a significant public health issue. Approximately 8% of adolescent girls and 7% of adolescent boys have severe (≥class 2) obesity. Adolescent severe obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, and persists into adulthood. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment available, resulting in major weight loss and resolution of important comorbid conditions. Clinical practice guidelines for pediatric obesity treatment recommend consideration of surgery after failure of behavioral approaches. Careful screening and postoperative management of patients by a multidisciplinary team is required. Long-term studies are needed to assess the impact of adolescent bariatric surgery. PMID:27519138

  11. Urinary excretion of the acrylonitrile metabolite 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid is correlated with a variety of biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Minet, Emmanuel; Cheung, Francis; Errington, Graham; Sterz, Katharina; Scherer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Acrylonitrile is an IARC class 2B carcinogen present in cigarette smoke. Urinary 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid (CEMA) is an acrylonitrile metabolite and a potential biomarker for acrylonitrile exposure. The objective of this work was to study the dose response of CEMA in urine of non-smokers and smokers of different ISO tar yield cigarettes. We observed that smokers excreted >100-fold higher amounts of urinary CEMA than non-smokers. The CEMA levels in smokers were significantly correlated with ISO tar yield, daily cigarette consumption, and urinary biomarkers of smoke exposure. In conclusion, urinary CEMA is a suitable biomarker for assessing smoking-related exposure to acrylonitrile. PMID:21108560

  12. Wind and seismic analysis for liquid-level gauge support

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, A.H.

    1994-12-07

    A wind and seismic analysis was performed for the liquid-level gauge installation support stand. The analysis includes the stand and footing only. All of these supports are classified as safety class 3. The analysis was based on safety class 2 requirements for conservatism. Conventional hand calculations were performed to evaluate the stresses and overturning of the structure. The results and recommendations appear in Section 2.0. The configuration and loadings are discussed in Section 3.0; the analysis and evaluation appears in Section 4.0; and the detailed analysis is documented in Appendix A.

  13. A system approach to archival storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and viewgraphs of a discussion on a system approach to archival storage presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. The use of D-2 iron particles for archival storage is discussed along with how acceleration factors relating short-term tests to archival life times can be justified. Ampex Recording Systems is transferring D-2 video technology to data storage applications, and encountering concerns about corrosion. To protect the D-2 standard, Battelle tests were done on all four tapes in the Class 2 environment. Error rates were measured before and after the test on both exposed and control groups.

  14. Patterns and predictors of violence against children in Uganda: a latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Kelly; Patalay, Praveetha; Allen, Elizabeth; Knight, Louise; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore patterns of physical, emotional and sexual violence against Ugandan children. Design Latent class and multinomial logistic regression analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting Luwero District, Uganda. Participants In all, 3706 primary 5, 6 and 7 students attending 42 primary schools. Main outcome and measure To measure violence, we used the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Child Abuse Screening Tool—Child Institutional. We used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to assess mental health and administered reading, spelling and maths tests. Results We identified three violence classes. Class 1 (N=696 18.8%) was characterised by emotional and physical violence by parents and relatives, and sexual and emotional abuse by boyfriends, girlfriends and unrelated adults outside school. Class 2 (N=975 26.3%) was characterised by physical, emotional and sexual violence by peers (male and female students). Children in Classes 1 and 2 also had a high probability of exposure to emotional and physical violence by school staff. Class 3 (N=2035 54.9%) was characterised by physical violence by school staff and a lower probability of all other forms of violence compared to Classes 1 and 2. Children in Classes 1 and 2 were more likely to have worked for money (Class 1 Relative Risk Ratio 1.97, 95% CI 1.54 to 2.51; Class 2 1.55, 1.29 to 1.86), been absent from school in the previous week (Class 1 1.31, 1.02 to 1.67; Class 2 1.34, 1.10 to 1.63) and to have more mental health difficulties (Class 1 1.09, 1.07 to 1.11; Class 2 1.11, 1.09 to 1.13) compared to children in Class 3. Female sex (3.44, 2.48 to 4.78) and number of children sharing a sleeping area predicted being in Class 1. Conclusions Childhood violence in Uganda forms distinct patterns, clustered by perpetrator and setting. Research is needed to understand experiences of victimised children, and to develop mental health interventions for those with severe violence

  15. Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect

    1989-09-01

    The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-12-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: (i) a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9 fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and (ii) a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N.

  17. Treatment strategies in the left main coronary artery disease associated with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Ahmet; Cakmak, Mahmut

    2015-10-01

    Significant left main coronary artery (LMCA) stenosis is not rare and reported 3 to 10% of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Unprotected LMCA intervention is a still clinical challenge and surgery is still going to be a traditional management method in many cardiac centers. With a presentation of drug eluting stent (DES), extensive use of IVUS and skilled operators, number of such interventions increased rapidly which lead to change in recommendation in the guidelines regarding LMCA procedures in the stable angina (Class 2a recommendation for ostial and shaft lesion and class 2b recommendation for distal bifurcation lesion). However, there was not clear consensus about the management of unprotected LMCA lesion associated with acute myocardial infarction (MI) with a LMCA culprit lesion itself or distinct culprit lesion of other major coronary arteries. Surgery could be preferred as an obligatory management strategy even in the high risk patients. With this review, we aimed to demonstrate treatment strategies of LMCA disease associated with acute coronary syndrome, particularly acute myocardial infarction (MI). In addition, we presented a short case series with LMCA lesion and ST elevated acute MI in which culprit lesion placed either in the left anterior descending artery or circumflex artery. We reviewed the current medical literature and propose simple algorithm for management. PMID:26557745

  18. Increased fitness of rice plants to abiotic stress via habitat adapted symbiosis: a strategy for mitigating impacts of climate change.

    PubMed

    Redman, Regina S; Kim, Yong Ok; Woodward, Claire J D A; Greer, Chris; Espino, Luis; Doty, Sharon L; Rodriguez, Rusty J

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients.Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions.The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20-30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization).These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands. PMID:21750695

  19. Risk factor profiles among intravenous drug using young adults: a latent class analysis (LCA) approach.

    PubMed

    James, Sigrid; McField, Edward S; Montgomery, Susanne B

    2013-03-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional study that examined health risk behaviors among urban intravenous drug-using (IDU) adolescents and young adults, this study investigated risk profiles among a high-risk sample (n=274). Risk profiles were empirically derived through latent class analysis based on indicators of engagement in health-risking behaviors, experience of abuse and violence as well as individual and family risk factors. The best fitting model was a 3-class model. Class 1 (n=95) captured participants with the lowest risk across all indicators. Compared to Class 1, Class 2 (n=128) and Class 3 (n=51) had elevated rates of engagement in health-risking behaviors as well as individual and family risk factors; however, Class 3 had the highest rate of engagement in sexual risk behavior, and backgrounds of substantial abuse and violence as well as familial psychopathology. Class 2 was the group most socioeconomically disadvantaged, with the highest percentage of participants coming from poor backgrounds, spending the longest time homeless and working the fewest months. Identifying subgroups of IDU has the potential to guide the development of more targeted and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this high-risk population. PMID:23254231

  20. Increased Fitness of Rice Plants to Abiotic Stress Via Habitat Adapted Symbiosis: A Strategy for Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Regina S.; Kim, Yong Ok; Woodward, Claire J. D. A.; Greer, Chris; Espino, Luis; Doty, Sharon L.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients. Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions. The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20–30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization). These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands. PMID:21750695

  1. Comparison of Amino Acids Physico-Chemical Properties and Usage of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins, Hydrophilins and WHy Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  2. [A comparison of the clinical efficacy of enalapril maleate analogs in patients with heart failure and ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Dunaev, V V; Berezin, A E

    1998-01-01

    The authors examined 68 patients aged from 42 to 68 years with ischemic heart disease without a history of myocardial infarction and with angina pectoris of exertion functional class 2-3 and circulatory insufficiency class 2 (according to NYHA criteria). The criteria serving as the reason for relating patients to the follow-up group were left-ventricular end-diastolic volume > 160 ml, ejection fraction < 30%, cardiothoracic index > 0.55, threshold power of endured loads within a range of 71.5 +/- 2.30 watt. After stabilization of the clinical status by means of basic therapy (nitrates, blockers of slow calcium channels, diuretics, antiaggregants), all patients were divided into two follow-up groups. The first group consisted of 36 patients who received renitec (10 mg/24 h), patients of group 2 were given enap in the same dose. The course of treatment lasted 12 weeks. The effectiveness of treatment was controlled by echocardiography according to the standard methods in M- and B-regimens. Analysis of the obtained data showed that within 12-day follow-up renitec demonstrated higher effectiveness and lesser incidence of side-effects than did enap given in the same dose. PMID:9783102

  3. Molecular characterization of multiresistant Escherichia coli producing or not extended-spectrum β-lactamases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence and type of plasmids, resistance genes and integrons carried by two collections of multiresistant E. coli producing or not extended-spectrum β-lactamases have been compared. Rep-PCR was used to determine the clonal relationship of the organisms. Plasmids were classified according to their incompatibility. Class 1 and Class 2 integrons and antibiotic resistance genes were analysed by PCR and sequencing. Results Both collections of organisms contained a large diversity of unrelated strains with some clones distributed in both groups of isolates. Large plasmids were identified in the two groups of organisms. Plasmids with replicons repK and repColE were more frequent among ESBL-producing isolates, while repFIA, repFII and repA/C replicons were more frequent in isolates lacking ESBL. Conjugative plasmids with repK and repA/C replicons coded for CTX-M-14 and CMY-2 β-lactamases, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the distribution of class 1 and class 2 integrons among multiresistant E. coli producing or not ESBL, and dfrA17-ant(3″)-Ie was the cassette arrangement most commonly found. Conclusions In the concrete temporal and geographical context of this study, multiresistant E. coli producing ESBL or other mechanisms of resistance were largely clonally diverse and present some differences in the types of harboured plasmids. Still, some clones were found in both ESBL-producing and –lacking isolates. PMID:23586437

  4. Mental disorders associated with subpopulations of women affected by violence and abuse.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay E; Martins, Silvia S; Petras, Hanno; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2013-08-01

    Violence against women is a major public health problem associated with mental disorders. Few studies have examined the heterogeneity of interpersonal violence and abuse (IVA) among women and associated mental health problems. Latent class analysis was used to identify subpopulations of women with similar lifetime histories of IVA victimization and to examine 10 associated past-year mental disorders. Participants were 19,816 adult women who participated in Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). The 3-class model was best supported by the data. Class 1 (6.7%) had a high probability of witnessing domestic violence as a child. Class 2 (21.8%) had a low probability of all events except lifetime sexual assault. Class 3 (71.5%) had a low probability for all events. Mental disorders were more common among members of Classes 1 and 2 than Class 3. For example, members in Class 1 were approximately 8 and 9 times more likely than members in Class 3 to have had posttraumatic stress disorder or a drug use disorder, respectively, during the past year. Of the 10 mental disorders, 5 were more common among members of Class 1 than of Class 2. Findings suggest the mental health consequences of IVA among women are extensive and interventions should be tailored for distinct subpopulations affected by IVA. PMID:23813596

  5. Fledgling Psychopathy in the Classroom: ADHD Subtypes Psychopathy, and Reading Comprehension in a Community Sample of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    DeLisi, Matt; Vaughn, Michael; Beaver, Kevin M.; Wexler, Jade; Barth, Amy E.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study explores characteristics that are associated with fledgling psychopathy and educational outcomes relating to reading comprehension performance in a community sample of 432 middle school students. Latent class analysis (LCA) produced a four-class solution. Class 1 was a large (71.5% of sample) ‘‘control’’ group of youths with no attention/hyperactivity deficits and the highest reading comprehension scores. Class 2 was 11.6% of the sample and was consistent with traits associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) predominantly inattentive type. Class 3 was 7.4% of the sample and was consistent with traits associated with ADHD predominantly hyperactive–impulsive type. Class 4 was 9.5% of the sample and was consistent with traits associated with ADHD combined type. Classes 2 and 4 were characterized by elevated levels of psychopathic and callous-unemotional (CU) traits and lower educational performance. This study extends the utility of fledgling psychopathy to educational outcomes, which has broad implications for adolescent development, delinquency, and youth violence. PMID:21318082

  6. Profiling physical activity, diet, screen and sleep habits in Portuguese children.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sara; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K; Chaves, Raquel N; Champagne, Catherine M; Barreira, Tiago V; Maia, José A R

    2015-06-01

    Obesity in children is partly due to unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, e.g., sedentary activity and poor dietary choices. This trend has been seen globally. To determine the extent of these behaviours in a Portuguese population of children, 686 children 9.5 to 10.5 years of age were studied. Our aims were to: (1) describe profiles of children's lifestyle behaviours; (2) identify behaviour pattern classes; and (3) estimate combined effects of individual/ socio-demographic characteristics in predicting class membership. Physical activity and sleep time were estimated by 24-h accelerometry. Nutritional habits, screen time and socio-demographics were obtained. Latent Class Analysis was used to determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Logistic regression analysis predicted class membership. About 78% of children had three or more unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, while 0.2% presented no risk. Two classes were identified: Class 1-Sedentary, poorer diet quality; and Class 2-Insufficiently active, better diet quality, 35% and 65% of the population, respectively. More mature children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 6.75; 95%CI = 4.74-10.41), and boys (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.98-4.72) were more likely to be overweight/obese. However, those belonging to Class 2 were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.43-0.84). Maternal education level and household income did not significantly predict weight status (p ≥ 0.05). PMID:26043034

  7. Latent Trajectory Classes for Alcohol-Related Blackouts from Age 15 to 19 in ALSPAC

    PubMed Central

    Schuckit, Marc A.; Smith, Tom L.; Heron, Jon; Hickman, Matthew; Macleod, John; Munafo, Marcus R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Dick, Danielle M.; Davey-Smith, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol-related blackouts (ARBs) are reported by ~50% of drinkers. While much is known about the prevalence of ARBs in young adults and their cross-sectional correlates, there are few prospective studies regarding their trajectories over time during mid-adolescence. This paper reports latent trajectory classes of alcohol-related blackouts between ages 15 and 19, along with predictors of those patterns. Methods Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA) was used to evaluate the pattern of occurrence of ARBs across four time points for 1402 drinking adolescents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Multinomial regression analyses evaluated age 15 demography, substance-related items, externalizing characteristics, and estimated peer substance use as predictors of latent class membership. Results ARBs were reported at age 15 in 30% and at age 19 in 74% of these subjects. Four latent trajectory classes were identified: Class 1 (5.1%) reported no blackouts; for Class 2 (29.5%) ARBs rapidly increased with age; for Class 3 (44.9%) blackouts slowly increased; and for Class 4 (20.5%) ARBs were consistently reported. Using Class 2 (rapid increasers) as the reference, predictors of class membership included female sex, higher drinking quantities, smoking, externalizing characteristics, and estimated peer substance involvement (pseudo R2 =.22). Conclusions ARBs were common and repetitive in these young subjects, and predictors of their trajectories over time involved multiple domains representing diverse characteristics. PMID:25516068

  8. Profiling Physical Activity, Diet, Screen and Sleep Habits in Portuguese Children

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Chaves, Raquel N.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Maia, José A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity in children is partly due to unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, e.g., sedentary activity and poor dietary choices. This trend has been seen globally. To determine the extent of these behaviours in a Portuguese population of children, 686 children 9.5 to 10.5 years of age were studied. Our aims were to: (1) describe profiles of children’s lifestyle behaviours; (2) identify behaviour pattern classes; and (3) estimate combined effects of individual/socio-demographic characteristics in predicting class membership. Physical activity and sleep time were estimated by 24-h accelerometry. Nutritional habits, screen time and socio-demographics were obtained. Latent Class Analysis was used to determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Logistic regression analysis predicted class membership. About 78% of children had three or more unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, while 0.2% presented no risk. Two classes were identified: Class 1-Sedentary, poorer diet quality; and Class 2-Insufficiently active, better diet quality, 35% and 65% of the population, respectively. More mature children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 6.75; 95%CI = 4.74–10.41), and boys (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.98–4.72) were more likely to be overweight/obese. However, those belonging to Class 2 were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.43–0.84). Maternal education level and household income did not significantly predict weight status (p ≥ 0.05). PMID:26043034

  9. The Plexin PLX-2 and the Ephrin EFN-4 Have Distinct Roles in MAB-20/Semaphorin 2A Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Fumi; Hudson, Martin L.; Suzuki, Motoshi; Peckler, Zachary; Kurokawa, Rie; Liu, Zhicen; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Nukazuka, Akira; Fujii, Takashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Shibata, Yukimasa; Shioi, Go; Fujisawa, Hajime; Mitani, Shohei; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Takagi, Shin

    2007-01-01

    Semaphorins are extracellular proteins that regulate axon guidance and morphogenesis by interacting with a variety of cell surface receptors. Most semaphorins interact with plexin-containing receptor complexes, although some interact with non-plexin receptors. Class 2 semaphorins are secreted molecules that control axon guidance and epidermal morphogenesis in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the C. elegans class 2 semaphorin MAB-20 binds the plexin PLX-2. plx-2 mutations enhance the phenotypes of hypomorphic mab-20 alleles but not those of mab-20 null alleles, indicating that plx-2 and mab-20 act in a common pathway. Both mab-20 and plx-2 mutations affect epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic and in postembryonic development. In both contexts, plx-2 null mutant phenotypes are much less severe than mab-20 null phenotypes, indicating that PLX-2 is not essential for MAB-20 signaling. Mutations in the ephrin efn-4 do not synergize with mab-20, indicating that EFN-4 may act in MAB-20 signaling. EFN-4 and PLX-2 are coexpressed in the late embryonic epidermis where they play redundant roles in MAB-20-dependent cell sorting. PMID:17507686

  10. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and Molecular Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Rissen from Different Sources.

    PubMed

    García-Fierro, Raquel; Montero, Ignacio; Bances, Margarita; González-Hevia, Maria Ángeles; Rodicio, María Rosario

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen is one of the most common serovars found in pigs and pork products in different countries, including Spain. However, information on the molecular bases of antimicrobial drug resistance and the population structure of Salmonella Rissen from different sources in Spain is limited. The present study focused on 84 isolates collected in Spain from pig and beef carcasses, foods and clinical samples associated with sporadic cases of gastroenteritis, and one outbreak. The majority of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline (73.8%), mainly conferred by tet(A). Resistances to streptomycin (aadA1-like, aadA2, and strAB), sulfonamides (sul1, sul2, and sul3), trimethoprim (dfrA1-like and dfrA12), ampicillin (blaTEM-1-like), and chloramphenicol (cmlA1-like) were also detected, with frequencies ranging from 12% to 20.2%. Most of the identified genes were carried by integrons, including three class 1 integrons of the sul1 type, a class 1 integron of the sul3 type, and the class 2 integron of Tn7. Two sul1 integrons, the sul3 integron, and the class 2 integron are first reported in Salmonella Rissen. Typing of the isolates with XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis detected a major clone, which was circulating in humans and animals during the past decade, and was responsible for the outbreak. The obtained results are relevant for food safety and public health. PMID:26295933

  11. Antibiotic resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various Greek aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Olga, Pappa; Apostolos, Vantarakis; Alexis, Galanis; George, Vantarakis; Athena, Mavridou

    2016-05-01

    A large number of antibiotic-resistantP. aeruginosaisolates are continuously discharged into natural water basins mainly through sewage. However, the environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance factors are poorly understood. In this study, the antibiotic resistance patterns of 245 isolates from various aquatic sites in Greece were analysed. Twenty-three isolates with resistance patterns cefotaxime-aztreonam-ceftazidime, cefotaxime-aztreonam-meropenem, cefotaxime-ceftazidime-meropenem, cefotaxime-ceftazidime-aztreonam-meropenem and cefotaxime-ceftazidime-cefepime-aztreonam-meropenem were screened phenotypically for the presence of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), while 77 isolates with various resistant phenotypes were screened for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrase genes. The aztreonam-resistant isolates and ESBL producers were the main resistant phenotypes in all habitats tested. In 13/77 isolates class 1 integron was detected, while all tested isolates were negative for the presence of the class 2 integrase gene. CTX-M group 9 β-lactamase was present in a small number of isolates (three isolates) highlighting the emergence of ESBL genes in aquatic environments. As a conclusion, it seems that Greek water bodies could serve as a potential reservoir of resistantP. aeruginosaisolates posing threats to human and animal health. PMID:26917780

  12. Exploratory Investigation of the Limiting Steps of Oral Absorption of Fluconazole and Ketoconazole in Children Using an In Silico Pediatric Absorption Model.

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Charoo, Naseem A; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-09-01

    Due to the higher total clearance of certain drugs in children than in adults, it is recommended that, in such cases, higher relative doses on a milligram/kilogram basis should be administered to children in order to achieve similar systemic exposure to adults. This is the case for fluconazole and ketoconazole. Even though the lower absorptive surface area and smaller volumes of intestinal fluids in children does not affect fluconazole absorption, cumulative fraction absorbed of ketoconazole seems to be dose dependent. A dose of 200 mg of ketoconazole, which belongs to the class 2a of the Developability Classification System (DCS) in adults, seems to be higher than the maximum absorbable dose in children, and ketoconazole absorption is expected to be solubility limited (i.e., DCS class 2b) in this population, indicating a DCS class migration. Therefore, extrapolating DCS and DCS drug classification from adults to pediatric groups does not seem to be straightforward and the development of specific pediatric classification systems should be a high priority. PMID:26987949

  13. Spread of the newly emerging infectious laryngotracheitis viruses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Agnew-Crumpton, Rebecca; Vaz, Paola K; Devlin, Joanne M; O'Rourke, Denise; Blacker-Smith, Hayley Patricia; Konsak-Ilievski, Barbara; Hartley, Carol A; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2016-09-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a significant viral disease of chickens in many countries around the globe. In this report the status of ILT in Australia has been used as a model to evaluate the evolution of the ILT viruses (ILTVs). Due to its geographical isolation, Australia harbored a distinct lineage of ILT viruses (ILTV) up to 2007. However examination of the ILT viruses (ILTV) involved in outbreaks between 2007 and 2009 has revealed that many of the outbreaks were caused by two new viral genotypes, class 8 and class 9. These two recombinant viruses were found to emerge as a result of recombination between previously existing live vaccine strains (SA2 and A20), and another live vaccine strain (Serva) introduced into the country in 2007. The new recombinant ILTVs were also shown to possess significantly higher virulence and replication capacity compared with a previously predominant ILTV, class 2. In the current study, examination of a large number of ILTVs isolated from outbreaks between 2009 and 2015 revealed the emergence of yet another recombinant virus (class 10) that appears to have become a predominant genotype in New South Wales. In Victoria however, the recombinant class 9 gradually became the predominant virus, replacing class 2. Therefore, there was an unusual pattern in geographical spread of the newly emerged viruses in different states of the country. These results suggest that ILTV is fast evolving towards a greater transmissibility and therefore greater capacity to spread into ILTV-free areas. PMID:27223632

  14. Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, E.H.

    2002-07-22

    The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

  15. A latent class regression analysis of men's conformity to masculine norms and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y Joel; Owen, Jesse; Shea, Munyi

    2012-01-01

    How are specific dimensions of masculinity related to psychological distress in specific groups of men? To address this question, the authors used latent class regression to assess the optimal number of latent classes that explained differential relationships between conformity to masculine norms and psychological distress in a racially diverse sample of 223 men. The authors identified a 2-class solution. Both latent classes demonstrated very different associations between conformity to masculine norms and psychological distress. In Class 1 (labeled risk avoiders; n = 133), conformity to the masculine norm of risk-taking was negatively related to psychological distress. In Class 2 (labeled detached risk-takers; n = 90), conformity to the masculine norms of playboy, self-reliance, and risk-taking was positively related to psychological distress, whereas conformity to the masculine norm of violence was negatively related to psychological distress. A post hoc analysis revealed that younger men and Asian American men (compared with Latino and White American men) had significantly greater odds of being in Class 2 versus Class 1. The implications of these findings for future research and clinical practice are examined. PMID:22229799

  16. Increased fitness of rice plants to abiotic stress via habitat adapted symbiosis: A strategy for mitigating impacts of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, R.S.; Kim, Y.-O.; Woodward, C.J.D.A.; Greer, C.; Espino, L.; Doty, S.L.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients. Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions. The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20–30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization). These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands.

  17. The effects of grazing on the spatial pattern of elm (Ulmus pumila L.) in the sparse woodland steppe of Horqin Sandy Land in northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Wu, J.; Tang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of grazing on the formation of the spatial pattern of elm growth in a sparse woodland steppe. We used a point pattern method to analyze the elm trees within different diameter at breast height (DBH) classes in both grazed and fenced plots, which were established in Horqin Sandy Land of northeastern China. The results showed that, in the grazed plot, the distances where transformation between random and clustered patterns occurred in class 1 (10 cm ≤ DBH ≤ 15 cm) and class 2 (15 cm < DBH ≤ 20 cm) were 2.27 and 2.37 m, respectively. Meanwhile, in the fenced plot, the distances between random and aggregated patterns that occurred in classes 1, 2 and 3 (DBH > 20 cm) were 3.13, 3.13 and 7.85 m, respectively. In the fenced plot, at distances larger than 67.72 m there was a negative association between classes 1 and 2, which was also the case between classes 2 and 3 and between classes 1 and 3 for distances greater than 104.09 and 128.54 m, respectively. Meanwhile, negative associations occurred only at distances larger than 29.38 m in the grazed plot. These findings suggest that grazing reduced the competition intensity between elm trees; and therefore, grazing management could be an effective strategy used to regulate the elm population in the degraded sandy land of northern China.

  18. Comparison of amino acids physico-chemical properties and usage of late embryogenesis abundant proteins, hydrophilins and WHy domain.

    PubMed

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  19. Multivariate screening in food adulteration: untargeted versus targeted modelling.

    PubMed

    López, M Isabel; Trullols, Esther; Callao, M Pilar; Ruisánchez, Itziar

    2014-03-15

    Two multivariate screening strategies (untargeted and targeted modelling) have been developed to compare their ability to detect food fraud. As a case study, possible adulteration of hazelnut paste is considered. Two different adulterants were studied, almond paste and chickpea flour. The models were developed from near-infrared (NIR) data coupled with soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) as a classification technique. Regarding the untargeted strategy, only unadulterated samples were modelled, obtaining 96.3% of correct classification. The prediction of adulterated samples gave errors between 5.5% and 2%. Regarding targeted modelling, two classes were modelled: Class 1 (unadulterated samples) and Class 2 (almond adulterated samples). Samples adulterated with chickpea were predicted to prove its ability to deal with non-modelled adulterants. The results show that samples adulterated with almond were mainly classified in their own class (90.9%) and samples with chickpea were classified in Class 2 (67.3%) or not in any class (30.9%), but no one only as unadulterated. PMID:24206702

  20. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  1. Risk Factor Profiles among Intravenous Drug Using Young Adults: A Latent Class Analysis (LCA) Approach

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid; McField, Edward S.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional study that examined health risk behaviors among urban intravenous drug-using (IDU) adolescents and young adults, this study investigated risk profiles among a high-risk sample (n=274). Risk profiles were empirically derived through latent class analysis based on indicators of engagement in health-risking behaviors, experience of abuse and violence as well as individual and family risk factors. The best fitting model was a 3-class model. Class 1 (n=95) captured participants with the lowest risk across all indicators. Compared to Class 1, Class 2 (n=128) and Class 3 (n=51) had elevated rates of engagement in health-risking behaviors as well as individual and family risk factors; however, Class 3 had the highest rate of engagement in sexual risk behavior, and backgrounds of substantial abuse and violence as well as familial psychopathology. Class 2 was the group most socioeconomically disadvantaged, with the highest percentage of participants coming from poor backgrounds, spending the longest time homeless and working the fewest months. Identifying subgroups of IDU has the potential to guide the development of more targeted and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this high-risk population. PMID:23254231

  2. RBDMS user`s guide which includes the RBDMS administrative guide, Version 4.0. Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    RBDMS (Risk Based Data Management System) is an oil and gas electronic data management system which stems from the idea developed from four previous projects conducted by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC). The first study studied oil and gas industry injection well corrosion. It included a methodology for assessing the probability of contaminating underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) via Class 2 injection well operations. A feasibility study was conducted to investigate if an electronic data management system could incorporate the methodology. A second feasibility study was conducted to test the methodology on a much small basis. The RBDMS effort then continued through a grant from DOE with a multi-task project consisting of an inventory and needs assessment of 25 oil and gas producing states pertaining to oil and gas production/regulatory activities, state geological/hydrogeological considerations, Class 2 underground injection activities, electronic data management needs and functional requirements, environmental risk assessment and management objectives, resultant benefit of a RBDMS, and various information and data required for the design and development of a RBDMS in individual states. This appendix contains the documentation for the use of the RBDMS.

  3. Comparison of oral health status between children with cerebral palsy and normal children in India: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nidhi; Singh, Bijay; Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Patil, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present research was to describe and compare the oral health of children with cerebral palsy (CP) with the normal children in India. Materials and Methods: Fifty children with CP of the age range 7-17 years and fifty normal children were selected for the study. An oral examination was carried out and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft/DMFT) index, oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) index, Angles malocclusion were charted along with other significant dental findings. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and Kruskal–Wallis one-way ANOVA test. Results: The mean dmft/DMFT of the CP group was 4.11 ± 2.62, while that of controls was 2.95 ± 2.75, which showed higher caries prevalence in the CP group. There was a significant association between the dmft/DMFT (P = 0.03), OHI-S (P = 0.001), and Angles Class 2 malocclusion and CP. Conclusions: Cerebral palsy group had higher caries, poor oral hygiene and Class 2 malocclusion when compared to controls primarily because of their compromised general health condition and also less dental awareness. Effort should be made for better organization of preventive dental care and promoting dental health of this challenged population. PMID:25810598

  4. The Use of Horizontal Wells in Gas Production from Hydrate Accumulations

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Zhang, Keni

    2008-04-15

    The amounts of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations are enormous, leading to a recent interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Earlier studies have demonstrated that large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from gas hydrate accumulations by means of depressurization-induced dissociation, using conventional technology and vertical wells. The results of this numerical study indicate that the use of horizontal wells does not confer any practical advantages to gas production from Class 1 deposits. This is because of the large disparity in permeabilities between the hydrate layer (HL) and the underlying free gas zone, leading to a hydrate dissociation that proceeds in a horizontally dominant direction and is uniform along the length of the reservoir. When horizontal wells are placed near the base of the HL in Class 2 deposits, the delay in the evolution of a significant gas production rate outweighs their advantages, which include higher rates and the prevention of flow obstruction problems that often hamper the performance of vertical wells. Conversely, placement of a horizontal well near to top of the HL can lead to dramatic increases in gas production from Class 2 and Class 3 deposits over the corresponding production from vertical wells.

  5. Role of interleukin-15 receptor alpha polymorphisms in normal weight obese syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, L; Gloria-Bottini, F; Saccucci, P; Bigioni, M; Abenavoli, L; Gasbarrini, G; De Lorenzo, A

    2009-01-01

    Previous published studies have identified a class of women, Normal Weight Obese women (NWO) with normal BMI and high fat content. An important role of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) has been documented in facilitating muscle proliferation and promoting fat depletion. Indeed the presence of three types of IL-15 receptor subunits in fat tissue suggests a direct effect on adipose tissue. We studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of IL-15R-alpha receptor gene and investigated their relationship with NWO phenotype. We considered two classes of women according to their BMI and percent fat mass (percent FAT), class 1: including 72 overweight-obese women (high BMI-high fat mass) and class 2: including 36 NWO (normal BMI, high fat mass). Three sites of Interleukin-15 receptor subunit á gene were examined, located respectively in exon4, exon5 intron-exon border and exon7. Genotyping of the identified polymorphisms was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Haplotype frequency estimation was performed by using the Mendel-University of Chicago program. Odds ratio analyses were calculated by EPISTAT program. Highly significant differences were observed for exon 7- exon5 intron-exon border and exon 4-exon 7 haplotype distribution between class 1 and class 2 women. These results strongly support the hypothesis that genetic variability of the IL-15 receptor has an important role in body fat composition. Our data underscore previous findings that suggest a potential role of IL-15 cytokine in NWO syndrome. PMID:19309557

  6. Genome-wide comparative analysis of the transposable elements in the related species Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wessler, Susan R

    2004-04-13

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the major component of plant genomes where they contribute significantly to the >1,000-fold genome size variation. To understand the dynamics of TE-mediated genome expansion, we have undertaken a comparative analysis of the TEs in two related organisms: the weed Arabidopsis thaliana (125 megabases) and Brassica oleracea ( approximately 600 megabases), a species with many crop plants. Comparison of the whole genome sequence of A. thaliana with a partial draft of B. oleracea has permitted an estimation of the patterns of TE amplification, diversification, and loss that has occurred in related species since their divergence from a common ancestor. Although we find that nearly all TE lineages are shared, the number of elements in each lineage is almost always greater in B. oleracea. Class 1 (retro) elements are the most abundant TE class in both species with LTR and non-LTR elements comprising the largest fraction of each genome. However, several families of class 2 (DNA) elements have amplified to very high copy number in B. oleracea where they have contributed significantly to genome expansion. Taken together, the results of this analysis indicate that amplification of both class 1 and class 2 TEs is responsible, in part, for B. oleracea genome expansion since divergence from a common ancestor with A. thaliana. In addition, the observation that B. oleracea and A. thaliana share virtually all TE lineages makes it unlikely that wholesale removal of TEs is responsible for the compact genome of A. thaliana. PMID:15064405

  7. Latent profile analysis of working memory performance in a sample of children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Rapson; Gomez, Rashika Miranjani; Winther, Jo; Vance, Alasdair

    2014-11-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to ascertain distinct groups of children with ADHD (N = 701) in terms of performance on working memory (WM) tasks that tapped visuospatial sketchpad, spatial central executive, and verbal central executive functions. It compared the WM performances of these classes with a clinical comparison group (N = 59). The participants' age ranged from 7 to 16 years (586 males, 71 females). The results of the LPA supported three classes. For all three WM tasks, class 1 (N = 196) had more difficulties than classes 2 (N = 394) and 3 (N = 111), and the clinical comparison group. Class 2 had more difficulties than class 3 and the clinical comparison group, and there was no difference between class 3 and the clinical comparison group. Class 1 had lower IQ and academic abilities, and relatively more individuals with depressive disorders. The implications of the findings for understanding ADHD and its treatment are discussed. PMID:24824189

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP OF EMERGING ADULTHOOD TRAJECTORIES TO DRUG USE, AND OTHER CORRELATES

    PubMed Central

    Lisha, Nadra E.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Rohrbach, Luanne; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Sun, Ping; Sussman, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Interest in “Emerging Adulthood” (EA) as a unique developmental period has increased. This study examined the heterogeneity of EA among at-risk youth (N=1,677) by identifying trajectories of development across individuals. First, an 8-item version of the Inventory of Dimensions of EA (IDEA) measure was tested for factorial invariance across three time points; the 5-item EA measure was found to be factorially invariant. Next, latent class growth modeling identified three unique developmental trajectories. Lastly, classes were compared on demographics and health-risk behaviors. Class 1 represented a large, low-risk class (highest on EA). Classes 2 and 3 were comparably sized (~5% of the sample). Class 2 appears to be a high-risk class that decreases in EA, while Class 3 appears to be a medium-risk class that increases in EA. This study confirms that not everyone experiences EA similarly and that continuation high school students do not circumvent EA (move directly to adulthood). PMID:27065763

  9. PREDICTING DRUG DISPOSITION, ABSORPTION / ELIMINATION / TRANSPORTER INTERPLAY AND THE ROLE OF FOOD ON DRUG ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Custodio, Joseph M.; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict drug disposition involves concurrent consideration of many chemical and physiological variables and the effect of food on the rate and extent of availability adds further complexity due to postprandial changes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A system that allows for the assessment of the multivariate interplay occurring following administration of an oral dose, in the presence or absence of meal, would greatly benefit the early stages of drug development. This is particularly true in an era when the majority of new molecular entities are highly permeable, poorly soluble, extensively metabolized compounds (BDDCS Class 2), which present the most complicated relationship in defining the impact of transporters due to the marked effects of transporter-enzyme interplay. This review evaluates the GI luminal environment by taking into account the absorption / transport / elimination interplay and evaluates the physiochemical property issues by taking into account the importance of solubility, permeability and metabolism. We concentrate on the BDDCS and its utility in predicting drug disposition. Furthermore, we focus on the effect of food on the extent of drug availability (F), which appears to follow closely what might be expected if a significant effect of high fat meals is inhibition of transporters. That is, high fat meals and lipidic excipients would be expected to have little effect on F for Class 1 drugs; they would increase F of Class 2 drugs, while decreasing F for Class 3 drugs. PMID:18199522

  10. Distinct kimberlite pipe classes with contrasting eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Marsh, J. S.

    2004-09-01

    Field and Scott Smith [Field, M., Scott Smith, B.H., 1999. Contrasting geology and near-surface emplacement of kimberlite pipes in southern Africa and Canada. Proc. 7th Int. Kimb. Conf. (Eds. Gurney et al.) 1, 214-237.] propose that kimberlite pipes can be grouped into three types or classes. Classical or Class 1 pipes are the only class with characteristic low temperature, diatreme-facies kimberlite in addition to hypabyssal- and crater-facies kimberlite. Class 2 and 3 pipes are characterized only by hypabyssal-and crater-facies kimberlite. In an increasing number of Class 1 pipes a new kimberlite facies, transitional-facies kimberlite, is being found. In most cases this facies forms a zone several metres wide at the interface between the hypabyssal- and diatreme-facies. The transitional-facies exhibits textural and mineralogical features, which are continuously gradational between the hypabyssal and the diatreme types. The textural gradations are from a coherent magmatic texture to one where the rock becomes increasingly magmaclastic and this is accompanied by concomitant mineralogical gradations involving the decline and eventual elimination of primary calcite at the expense of microlitic diopside. Both transitional- and diatreme-facies kimberlites are considered to have formed in situ from intruding hypabyssal kimberlite magma as a consequence of exsolution of initially CO 2-rich volatiles from the volatile-rich kimberlite magma. The transitional-facies is initiated by volatile exsolution at depths of about 3 km below the original surface. With subsequent cracking through to the surface and resultant rapid decompression, the further catastrophic exsolution of volatiles and their expansion leads to the formation of the diatreme facies. Thus diatreme-facies kimberlite and Class 1 pipes are emplaced by essentially magmatic processes rather than by phreatomagmatism. Distinctly different petrographic features characterize crater-facies kimberlite in each of the

  11. Trajectories of Television Watching from Childhood to Early Adulthood and Their Association with Body Composition and Mental Health Outcomes in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Joanne; Smith, Anne; Howie, Erin; Straker, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prior studies examining longitudinal patterns of television (TV) watching have tended to use analytical approaches which do not allow for heterogeneity in the variation of TV watching over time. In the current study, we used latent class analysis (LCA) to examine the relationships between television watching (from childhood to early adulthood) and body fat percentage (%) and mental health. Methods Data were collected from 2411 participants (50% female) from the Raine Study, a prospective birth cohort study in Australia. Participants were followed up over 15 years and answered questions about hours of TV watching per week at six time-points (5, 8, 10, 14, 17 and 20yrs). Trajectories of television watching were estimated using LCA and appropriate regression models used to test the association of television watching class with percentage body fat (measured by DXA) and mental health (DASS-21) at age 20. Physical activity was used as a covariate. Results Three distinct trajectories of TV watching were identified. Class 1 (47.4%) had consistently high (>14 hrs/wk) levels of TV watching, Class 2 (37.9%) was characterised by an increase in TV watching over adolescence and Class 3 (14.7%) had consistently lower (<14 hrs/wk) TV watching over 15 years. Sex was used as an active covariate in the latent class model and was significantly associated with class membership (p<0.001), with females comprising 45%, 47% and 59% of Class 1, 2 and 3 respectively. In females, membership in Class 2 or 3 was associated with lower body fat % at age 20, compared to Class 1 (p<0.001). For males, membership in Class 2 was associated with lower body fat % compared with males in Class 1 (p = 0.026). Membership of TV watching class and mental health were not related (p>0.05). Conclusions TV watching from childhood to young adulthood appears to be a relatively stable behavior for around two thirds of participants, but not everyone tracks consistently. This study identified a subset of

  12. Alteration products of shock metamorphosed basalt from a range of shock pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the possibility that shock metamorphosed basalt weathers at faster rates than unshocked protoliths, a petrographic study of weathering products in shocked basalts is necessary. Lonar Crater, India is a fortuitous impact ~550 ka [Jourdan et al., 2010] into Deccan flood basalt. Deccan basalt is an excellent spectral analog for Martian basalts [Bandfield et al., 2000], and hence Lonar basalt shocked to a range of pressures [Kieffer et al., 1976] are excellent samples to compare to shergottites and remote sensing data of Mars. Shocked basalt is found as clasts in a thin, ~1 m suevite breccia layer that drapes an ~8 m lithic breccia that comprises the majority of the Lonar ejecta blanket. The lithic breccia represents the “throw out” ejected over the crater rim and only consists of clasts of unshocked and Class 1 (fractured grains) shocked basalt. The suevite breccia or “fall out” consists of all classes of shocked basalt classified by Kieffer et al. [1976]. Petrography of these clasts from suevite breccia outcrops will be shown and discussed. Class 2 shocked basalt shows intense shattering and fracturing of clinopyroxene grains, and labradorite has been converted to maskelynite (Figure 1). Classes 3 and 4 can be differentiated from Class 2 as the labradorite glass shows evidence of flow and vesiculation (e.g., Class 4 in Figure 2), respectively. Petrographic images of impact melts (Class 5) exhibit schlieren and flow features similar to lechatelierite from Meteor Crater and other terrestrial impact melts. The growth of hematite (Figure 1), calcite, chlorite, and serpentine within shattered augite and augite-maskelynite boundaries will be shown with comparisons to these minerals in unshocked basalt. Also discussed will be the petrography of shocked basalt talus vs. that of the in-situ clasts, as this bias in sample collection is influenced by what shocked basalt remains after ~550 ka. Class 2 shocked basalt in plain and cross polarized light. Note

  13. Integrating self-care into nursing education.

    PubMed

    Meadows, L C

    1998-05-01

    The didactic and clinical components of the mental health curriculum content within a school of nursing in the southeastern United States were revised to integrate a self-care focus. The major learning modalities used were group process dynamics and a structured psychoeducation approach. A six-hour per quarter credit course was divided into three parts: theory, laboratory, and clinical. Students averaged 3 hours in class, 2 hours in a simulated college laboratory, and 7 hours at a clinical site per week for one quarter. Theoretical concepts were taught during class time; self-care activities and concepts were taught in the college laboratory; and clinical time was devoted to practicing self-care through patient-nurse interactions and group work. Nurse educators may use this study to guide curriculum development in fostering caring models of nursing education. PMID:9605199

  14. Annotated bibliography of the biomedical literature pertaining to chiropractic, pediatrics and manipulation in relation to the treatment of health conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gotlib, Allan C; Beingessner, Melanie

    1995-01-01

    Biomedical literature retrieval, both indexed and non-indexed, with respect to the application of manipulative therapy with therapeutic intent and pediatric health conditions (ages 0 to 17 years) yielded 66 discrete documents which met specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was one experimental study (RCT’s), 3 observational (cohort, case control) studies and 62 descriptive studies (case series, case reports, surveys, literature reviews). An independent rating panel determined consistency with a modified quality of evidence scale adopted from procedure ratings system 1 of Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada. Results indicate minimal Class 1 and Class 2 and some Class 3 evidence for a variety of pediatric conditions utilizing the application of manipulation with therapeutic intent.

  15. Roles of Amino Acids 161 to 179 in the PSE-4 Ω Loop in Substrate Specificity and in Resistance to Ceftazidime

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Christian; Sanschagrin, Francois; Palzkill, Timothy; Levesque, Roger C.

    1998-01-01

    The PSE-4 enzyme is a prototype carbenicillin-hydrolyzing enzyme exhibiting high activity against penicillins and early cephalosporins. To understand the mechanism that modulates substrate profiles and to verify the ability of PSE-4 to extend its substrate specificity toward expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, we used random replacement mutagenesis to generate six random libraries from amino acids 162 to 179 in the Ω loop. This region is known from studies with TEM-1 to be implicated in substrate specificity. It was found that the mechanism modulating ceftazidime hydrolysis in PSE-4 was different from that in TEM-1. The specificity of class 2c carbenicillin-hydrolyzing enzymes could not be assigned to the Ω loop of PSE-4. Analysis of the percentage of functional enzymes revealed that the hydrolysis of ampicillin was more affected than hydrolysis of carbenicillin by amino acid substitutions at positions 162 to 164 and 165 to 167. PMID:9756758

  16. Differential Growth Trajectories for Achievement Among Children Retained in First Grade: A Growth Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Hughes, Jan N.; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the differential effect of retention on the development of academic achievement from grade one to five on children retained in first grade over six years. Growth Mixture Model (GMM) analyses supported the existence of two distinct trajectory groups of retained children for both reading and math among 125 ethnically and linguistically diverse retained children. For each achievement domain, a low intercept/higher growth group (Class 1) and a high intercept/slower growth group (Class 2) were identified. Furthermore, Class 1 children were found to score lower on several measures of learning related skills (LRS) variables and were characterized by having poorer self-regulation and less prosocial behaviors, compared to the other group. Findings suggest that some children appear to benefit more from retention, in terms of higher reading and math growth, than others. Study findings have implications for selecting children into retention intervention and early intervention. PMID:24771882

  17. Optimization of knowledge-based systems and expert system building tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuda, Phyllis; Mckellar, Donald

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA-AMES Cooperative Agreement were to investigate, develop, and evaluate, via test cases, the system parameters and processing algorithms that constrain the overall performance of the Information Sciences Division's Artificial Intelligence Research Facility. Written reports covering various aspects of the grant were submitted to the co-investigators for the grant. Research studies concentrated on the field of artificial intelligence knowledge-based systems technology. Activities included the following areas: (1) AI training classes; (2) merging optical and digital processing; (3) science experiment remote coaching; (4) SSF data management system tests; (5) computer integrated documentation project; (6) conservation of design knowledge project; (7) project management calendar and reporting system; (8) automation and robotics technology assessment; (9) advanced computer architectures and operating systems; and (10) honors program.

  18. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; ( 2 ) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; ( 5 ) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  19. Origin of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J. (Principal Investigator); Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; (2) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; (5) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CO spectra of Virgo cluster galaxies (Grossi,+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; de Looze, I.; Goncalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Reduced IRAM 30m telescope spectra of 20 star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster, that are presented in Figure B.1 and Figure B.2 of the paper. The spectra were observed with the EMIR receiver using the FTS spectrometer. The nomenclature of the files is: ObjectName_10.dat and ObjectName_21.dat, for the 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) transition, respectively. Multiple pointings for the same target are indicated with letters (a,b,c,d,e). All spectra have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 8.1km/s for both lines, with the exception of VCC032410.dat and VCC1686c_10.dat which have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 16.2km/s. The observed sources and the list of files are given below. The files are created by GILDAS/Class. (2 data files).