Science.gov

Sample records for 910-kda class-2 pepc

  1. PEPC LRU: Ball Support Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T

    1999-05-14

    The PEPC LRU upper ball support assembly consists of a ball and a pneumatic air cylinder/conical seat latching mechanism to be attached to the optics support frame,and a ball attached to the PEPC LRU. Both components are designed to allow manual positioning in three axes. Upon insertion of the PEPC LRU into the structure, the upper pneumatic cylinder is actuated to latch the two assemblies together through the conical seat device to grab the lower ball to support the LRU weight. To be conservative, the design load for the assembly is 1500 pounds (the prototype PEPC LRU weight was measured to be near 1380 pounds).

  2. NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand Safety Note

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J W

    1998-05-21

    The NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand is to be used in the building 432. Building 432 is being used to test components and processes for NIF. The test stand is to be bolted to the floor. The test stand provides a platform from which the PEPC kinematic repeatability and vibrational characteristics of the PEPC LRU can be tested. The test stand will allow user access to the LRU to install instrumentation and to make adjustments to the kinematics. The mechanical test stand is designed to hold the 1700 lb. PEPC LRU.

  3. Mechanical Engineering Safety Note PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.

    2001-08-26

    The PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly consists of a spreader bar that will be attached to the PEPC Cell Housing or the Midplane Transportation Fixture during operation. While in use in the OAB (Optics Assembly Building), the Spreader Bar Assembly will be manipulated by the NOID (New Optics Insertion Device). The other critical components of the assembly are the three angular contact bearing swivels that attach the spreader bar to the lifting mechanism and the corner clamps which are used to capture the Cell Housing.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide regulated photosynthesis in C4-pepc transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, C G; Li, X; Liu, X L; Wei, X D; Dai, C C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the photosynthetic physiological basis in 'PC' transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.), showing high-level expression of the gene encoding C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pepc), by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The C4-PEPC gene (pepc) from maize in the transgenic rice plants was checked by PCR. Comparison of yield components and photosynthetic indices between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants indicated that increased yield in PC was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate and higher activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Both PC and WT plants were treated with 1 mmol L(-1) abscisic acid (ABA), 0.04% 1-butanol (BA), 2 mmol L(-1) neomycin (NS), or 2 mmol L(-1) diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) to investigate the relationship between photosynthesis and levels of H2O2 and phosphatidic acid. In both PC and WT, ABA induced H2O2 generation and simultaneous decrease in stomatal conductance (g(s)). PC plants treated with BA showed decreased H2O2 content and strongly increased g(s) within 2 h of treatment. Similar results were observed in response to DPI treatment in PC. However, WT did not observe the decrease of H2O2 during the treatments of BA and DPI. The reduced H2O2 content in PC caused by BA treatment differed to that induced by DPI because BA did not inhibit NADPH oxidase activities. While BA induced a larger PEPC activity in PC, and higher catalase activity as well. These results indicated that the regulation of endogenous H2O2 metabolism of PC could be helpful for enhancing photosynthetic capability.

  5. Light-regulated and cell-specific methylation of the maize PEPC promoter

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, Ben J.; Woodfield, Helen; Wanchana, Samart; Bruskiewich, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing PEPC expression in maize remain to be fully defined. Differential methylation of a region in the PEPC promoter has been shown to correlate with transcript accumulation, however, to date, investigations into the role of DNA methylation in maize PEPC expression have relied on the use of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Bisulphite sequencing was used here to provide a single-base resolution methylation map of the maize PEPC promoter. It is shown that four cytosine residues in the PEPC promoter are heavily methylated in maize root tissue. In leaves, de-methylation of these cytosines is dependent on illumination and is coincident with elevated PEPC expression. Furthermore, light-regulated de-methylation of these cytosines occurs only in mesophyll cells. No methylation was discovered in the 0.6 kb promoter required for mesophyll-specific expression indicating that cytosine methylation is not required to direct the cell-specificity of PEPC expression. This raises interesting questions regarding the function of the cell-specific cytosine de-methylation observed in the upstream region of the PEPC promoter. PMID:22143916

  6. Identification and phylogeny of putative PEPC genes in three toxin-producing Karenia (Dinophyta) species.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Darcie E; Campbell, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Dense blooms of toxin-producing Karenia brevis increase local surface ocean pH through CO2 uptake. To identify genes that may contribute to bloom-related environmental pH and pCO2 changes, transcriptomes with RNA from K. brevis Wilson cultures that had been acclimated to low CO2 (250 ppm) or recent CO2 (350 ppm) pCO2 levels were assembled. Among the annotated transcripts were PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK enzymes found in the model C4 carbon fixation pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated that the enzymatic activity of PEPC, PPDK, and/or PEPCK in some algae species, including marine diatoms, is influenced by variations in dissolved inorganic carbon. We found significantly similar PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK enzymes in the transcriptomes of K. brevis and two sister species Karenia papilionacea, and Karenia mikimotoi. One or more isoforms of PEPC were also identified in the transcriptomes of thirty additional photosynthetic phytoplankton species from nine phyla. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with neighbor joining and maximum likelihood techniques to characterize the evolutionary relationship among phytoplankton, terrestrial plant C4, and terrestrial plant C3 PEPC sequences. Based on the nucleotide trees constructed during this study, the Karenia PEPC transcripts were more closely related to the terrestrial C4 genes than the terrestrial C3 genes. Furthermore, PEPC phylogeny among phytoplankton closely resembles phylogenetic trees constructed with ribosomal RNA. This study confirmed that the toxin-producing dinoflagellates K. brevis, K. mikimotoi, and K. papilionacea express putative PEPC, PEPCK, and PPDK transcripts.

  7. Identification and phylogeny of putative PEPC genes in three toxin-producing Karenia (Dinophyta) species.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Darcie E; Campbell, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Dense blooms of toxin-producing Karenia brevis increase local surface ocean pH through CO2 uptake. To identify genes that may contribute to bloom-related environmental pH and pCO2 changes, transcriptomes with RNA from K. brevis Wilson cultures that had been acclimated to low CO2 (250 ppm) or recent CO2 (350 ppm) pCO2 levels were assembled. Among the annotated transcripts were PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK enzymes found in the model C4 carbon fixation pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated that the enzymatic activity of PEPC, PPDK, and/or PEPCK in some algae species, including marine diatoms, is influenced by variations in dissolved inorganic carbon. We found significantly similar PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK enzymes in the transcriptomes of K. brevis and two sister species Karenia papilionacea, and Karenia mikimotoi. One or more isoforms of PEPC were also identified in the transcriptomes of thirty additional photosynthetic phytoplankton species from nine phyla. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with neighbor joining and maximum likelihood techniques to characterize the evolutionary relationship among phytoplankton, terrestrial plant C4, and terrestrial plant C3 PEPC sequences. Based on the nucleotide trees constructed during this study, the Karenia PEPC transcripts were more closely related to the terrestrial C4 genes than the terrestrial C3 genes. Furthermore, PEPC phylogeny among phytoplankton closely resembles phylogenetic trees constructed with ribosomal RNA. This study confirmed that the toxin-producing dinoflagellates K. brevis, K. mikimotoi, and K. papilionacea express putative PEPC, PEPCK, and PPDK transcripts. PMID:27136041

  8. Expression and knockdown of the PEPC1 gene affect carbon flux in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerols by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaodong; Cai, Jiajia; Li, Yajun; Fei, Xiaowen

    2014-11-01

    The regulation of lipid biosynthesis is important in photosynthetic eukaryotic cells. This regulation is facilitated by the direct synthesis of fatty acids and triacylglycerol (TAG), and by other controls of the main carbon metabolic pathway. In this study, knockdown of the mRNA expression of the Chlamydomonas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoform 1 (CrPEPC1) gene by RNA interference increased TAG level by 20 % but decreased PEPC activities in the corresponding transgenic algae by 39-50 %. The decrease in CrPEPC1 expression increased the expression of TAG biosynthesis-related genes, such as acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase and phosphatidate phosphatase. Conversely, CrPEPC1 over-expression decreased TAG level by 37 % and increased PEPC activities by 157-184 %. These observations suggest that the lipid content of algal cells can be controlled by regulating the CrPEPC1 gene. PMID:24966045

  9. Investigation of Class 2b Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2002-04-03

    The popularity of trucks in the class 2 category--that is, those with a 6,000 to 10,000 pounds (lbs) gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)--has increased since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine vehicles in the upper portion of the class 2 weight range (designated as vehicle class 2b) and to assess their impact. Vehicles in class 2b (8,500-10,000 lbs GVWR) include pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and large vans (i.e., not minivans). Oak Ridge National Laboratory researched each individual truck model to determine which models were class 2b trucks and arrived at four methodologies to derive sales volumes. Two methods--one for calendar year and one for model year sales--were recommended for producing believable and reliable results. The study indicates that 521,000 class 2b trucks were sold in calendar year 1999--6.4% of sales of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Eighty-two percent of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were pickups; one third of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were diesel. There were 5.8 million class 2b trucks on the road in 2000, which amounts to 7.8% of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Twenty-four percent of the class 2b truck population is diesel. Estimates show that class 2b trucks account for 8% of annual miles traveled by trucks under 10,000 lbs and 9% of fuel use. Data on class 2b trucks are scarce. As the Tier 2 standards, which apply to passenger vehicles in the 8,500-10,000 lb GVWR category, become effective, additional data on class 2b trucks may become available--not only emissions data, but data in all areas. At the moment, distinguishing class 2b trucks from class 2 trucks in general is a substantial task requiring data on an individual model level.

  10. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Ag/PEPC/NiPc/ZnO/Ag thin film capacitive and resistive humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimov, Kh. S.; Yew Cheong, Kuan; Saleem, M.; Murtaza, Imran; Farooq, M.; Fauzi Mohd Noor, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    A thin film of blended poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC) (25 wt.%), nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc) (50 wt.%) and ZnO nano-powder (25 wt.%) in benzene (5 wt.%) was spin-coated on a glass substrate with silver electrodes to produce a surface-type Ag/PEPC/NiPc/ZnO/Ag capacitive and resistive sensor. Sensors with two different PEPC/NiPc/ZnO film thicknesses (330 and 400 nm) were fabricated and compared. The effects of humidity on capacitance and resistance of the Ag/PEPC/NiPc/ZnO/Ag sensors were investigated at two frequencies of the applied voltage: 120 Hz and 1 kHz. It was observed that at 120 Hz under humidity of up to 95% RH the capacitance of the sensors increased by 540 times and resistance decreased by 450 times with respect to humidity conditions of 50% RH. It was found that the sensor with a thinner semiconducting film (330 nm) was more sensitive than the sensor with a thicker film (400 nm). The sensitivity was improved when the sensor was used at a lower frequency as compared with a high frequency. It is assumed that the humidity response of the sensors is associated with absorption of water vapors and doping of water molecules in the semiconductor blend layer. This had been proven by simulation of the capacitance-humidity relationship.

  11. Deployment of a class 2 tensegrity boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul; Solari, Soren; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    Tensegrity structures are special truss structures composed of bars in compression and cables in tension. Most tensegrity structures under investigation, to date, have been of Class 1, where bars do not touch. In this article, however, we demonstrate the hardware implementation of a 2 stage symmetric Class 2 tensegrity structure, where bars do connect to each other at a pivot. The open loop control law for tendon lengths to accomplish the desired geometric reconfiguration are computed analytically. The velocity of the structure's height is chosen and reconfiguration is accomplished in a quasi-static manner, ignoring dynamic effects. The main goal of this research was to design, build, and test the capabilities of the Class 2 structure for deployment concepts and to further explore the possibilities of multiple stage structures using the same design and components.

  12. Optimization of class 2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns the optimal mass-to-stiffness ratio design of class-2 tensegrity towers. For different loading scenarios, the procedure seeks the topology and geometry of the structure that yields an optimal design satisfying common constraints. The domain of feasible tensegrity geometries is defined by imposing tensegrity equilibrium conditions on both unloaded and loaded structure. Remaining constraints include strength constraints for all elements of the structure and buckling constraints for bars. The symmetry of the design is imposed by restricting the domain of geometric variables and element parameters. The static response of the structure is computed by using a nonlinear large displacement model. The problem is cast in the form of a nonlinear program. The influence of material parameters on the optimal shape of the structure is investigated.

  13. Regulation of pepc gene expression in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its effects on cyclic electron flow around photosystem I and tolerances to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Peng-Peng; Shi, Ding-Ji; Mi, Hua-Ling; Zhu, Jia-Cheng; Huang, Xi-Wen; He, Pei-Min

    2015-05-01

    Since pepc gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) has been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and other cyanobacteria, the effects of pepc gene expression on photosynthesis have not been reported yet. In this study, we constructed mutants containing either upregulated (forward) or downregulated (reverse) pepc gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Results from real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Western blot and enzymatic analysis showed that PEPCase activity was significantly reduced in the reverse mutant compared with the wild type, and that of the forward mutant was obviously increased. Interestingly, the net photosynthesis in both the reverse mutant and the forward mutant were higher than that of the wild type, but dark respiration was decreased only in the reverse mutant. The absorbance changes of P700 upon saturation pulse showed the photosystem I (PSI) activity was inhibited, as reflected by Y(I), and Y(NA) was elevated, and dark reduction of P700(+) was stimulated, indicating enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI in the reverse mutant. Additionally, the reverse mutant photosynthesis was higher than that of the wild type in low temperature, low and high pH, and high salinity, and this implies increased tolerance in the reverse mutant through downregulated pepc gene.

  14. Kranz and single-cell forms of C4 plants in the subfamily Suaedoideae show kinetic C4 convergence for PEPC and Rubisco with divergent amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Evans, Marc A.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    The two carboxylation reactions performed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) are vital in the fixation of inorganic carbon for C4 plants. The abundance of PEPC is substantially elevated in C4 leaves, while the location of Rubisco is restricted to one of two chloroplast types. These differences compared with C3 leaves have been shown to result in convergent enzyme optimization in some C4 species. Investigation into the kinetic properties of PEPC and Rubisco from Kranz C4, single cell C4, and C3 species in Chenopodiaceae s. s. subfamily Suaedoideae showed that these major carboxylases in C4 Suaedoideae species lack the same mutations found in other C4 systems which have been examined; but still have similar convergent kinetic properties. Positive selection analysis on the N-terminus of PEPC identified residues 364 and 368 to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 using Bayes empirical Bayes. Compared with previous analyses on other C4 species, PEPC from C4 Suaedoideae species have different convergent amino acids that result in a higher K m for PEP and malate tolerance compared with C3 species. Kinetic analysis of Rubisco showed that C4 species have a higher catalytic efficiency of Rubisco (k catc in mol CO2 mol–1 Rubisco active sites s–1), despite lacking convergent substitutions in the rbcL gene. The importance of kinetic changes to the two-carboxylation reactions in C4 leaves related to amino acid selection is discussed. PMID:26417023

  15. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) materials. 177.840 Section 177.840... and Unloading § 177.840 Class 2 (gases) materials. (See also § 177.834 (a) to (j).) (a) Floors...

  16. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) materials. 177.840 Section 177.840... and Unloading § 177.840 Class 2 (gases) materials. (See also § 177.834 (a) to (j).) (a) Floors...

  17. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) materials. 177.840 Section 177.840... and Unloading § 177.840 Class 2 (gases) materials. (See also § 177.834 (a) to (j).) (a) Floors...

  18. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes.

  19. The impact of ozone on juvenile maize (Zea mays L.) plant photosynthesis: effects on vegetative biomass, pigmentation, and carboxylases (PEPc and Rubisco).

    PubMed

    Leitao, L; Bethenod, O; Biolley, J-P

    2007-07-01

    The impact of ozone on crops was more studied in C (3) than in C (4) species. In C (3) plants, ozone is known to induce a photosynthesis impairment that can result in significant depressions in biomass and crop yields. To investigate the impact of O (3) on C (4) plant species, maize seedlings ( ZEA MAYS L. cv. Chambord) were exposed to 5 atmospheres in open-top chambers: non-filtered air (NF, 48 nL L (-1) O (3)) and NF supplied with 20 (+ 20), 40 (+ 40), 60 (+ 60), and 80 (+ 80) nL L (-1) ozone. An unchambered plot was also available. Leaf area, vegetative biomass, and leaf dry mass per unit leaf area (LMA) were evaluated 33 days after seedling emergence in OTCs. At the same time, photosynthetic pigments as well as carboxylase (PEPc and Rubisco) activities and amounts were also examined in the 5th leaf. Ozone enhanced visible symptoms characterizing foliar senescence. Across NF, + 20, + 40, and + 60 atmospheres, both chlorophylls and carotenoids were found to be linearly decreased against increasing AOT40 ( CA. - 50 % in + 60). No supplementary decrease was observed between + 60 and + 80. Total above-ground biomass was reduced by 26 % in + 80 atmosphere; leaf dry matter being more depressed by ozone than leaf area. In some cases, LMA index was consistent to reflect low negative effects caused by a moderate increase in ozone concentration. PEPc and Rubisco were less sensitive to ozone than pigments: only the two highest external ozone doses reduced their activities by about 20 - 30 %. These changes might be connected to losses in PEPc and Rubisco proteins that were decreased by about one-third. The underlying mechanisms for these results were discussed with special reference to C (3) species. To conclude, we showed that both light and dark reactions of C (4) photosynthesis can be impaired by realistic ozone doses.

  20. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... point of origin to destination. (b) Portable tank containers containing Class 2 (gases) materials shall... Safety and Health (NIOSH) Pittsburgh Research Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for... without human intervention in the event of a leak or separation in the hose. (t) Unloading...

  1. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 174.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS.... (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2 (gases... prevent their overturning; (2) Loaded into racks securely attached to the car; (3) Packed in boxes...

  2. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... permitted only if— (1) Its sill is above the deepest load line; and (2) It is not a door described in § 170.265(d). (b) If passenger spaces are located below the bulkhead deck, Class 2 doors with sills below the deepest load line may be used if— (1) The number of watertight doors located below the...

  3. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... permitted only if— (1) Its sill is above the deepest load line; and (2) It is not a door described in § 170.265(d). (b) If passenger spaces are located below the bulkhead deck, Class 2 doors with sills below the deepest load line may be used if— (1) The number of watertight doors located below the...

  4. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... permitted only if— (1) Its sill is above the deepest load line; and (2) It is not a door described in § 170.265(d). (b) If passenger spaces are located below the bulkhead deck, Class 2 doors with sills below the deepest load line may be used if— (1) The number of watertight doors located below the...

  5. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... permitted only if— (1) Its sill is above the deepest load line; and (2) It is not a door described in § 170.265(d). (b) If passenger spaces are located below the bulkhead deck, Class 2 doors with sills below the deepest load line may be used if— (1) The number of watertight doors located below the...

  6. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... permitted only if— (1) Its sill is above the deepest load line; and (2) It is not a door described in § 170.265(d). (b) If passenger spaces are located below the bulkhead deck, Class 2 doors with sills below the deepest load line may be used if— (1) The number of watertight doors located below the...

  7. Multiplex Immunoassay for Lyme Disease Using VlsE1-IgG and pepC10-IgM Antibodies: Improving Test Performance through Bioinformatics ▿

    PubMed Central

    Porwancher, Richard B.; Hagerty, C. Greg; Fan, Jianqing; Landsberg, Lisa; Johnson, Barbara J. B.; Kopnitsky, Mark; Steere, Allen C.; Kulas, Karen; Wong, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends a 2-tier serologic approach to Lyme disease laboratory diagnosis, comprised of an initial serum enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi followed by supplementary IgG and IgM Western blotting of EIA-positive or -equivocal samples. Western blot accuracy is limited by subjective interpretation of weakly positive bands, false-positive IgM immunoblots, and low sensitivity for detection of early disease. We developed an objective alternative second-tier immunoassay using a multiplex microsphere system that measures VlsE1-IgG and pepC10-IgM antibodies simultaneously in the same sample. Our study population comprised 79 patients with early acute Lyme disease, 82 patients with early-convalescent-phase disease, 47 patients with stage II and III disease, 34 patients post-antibiotic treatment, and 794 controls. A bioinformatic technique called partial receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) regression was used to combine individual antibody levels into a single diagnostic score with a single cutoff; this technique enhances test performance when a high specificity is required (e.g., ≥95%). Compared to Western blotting, the multiplex assay was equally specific (95.6%) but 20.7% more sensitive for early-convalescent-phase disease (89.0% versus 68.3%, respectively; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] for difference, 12.1% to 30.9%) and 12.5% more sensitive overall (75.0% versus 62.5%, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 8.1% to 17.1%). As a second-tier test, a multiplex assay for VlsE1-IgG and pepC10-IgM antibodies performed as well as or better than Western blotting for Lyme disease diagnosis. Prospective validation studies appear to be warranted. PMID:21367982

  8. Multiplex immunoassay for Lyme disease using VlsE1-IgG and pepC10-IgM antibodies: improving test performance through bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Porwancher, Richard B; Hagerty, C Greg; Fan, Jianqing; Landsberg, Lisa; Johnson, Barbara J B; Kopnitsky, Mark; Steere, Allen C; Kulas, Karen; Wong, Susan J

    2011-05-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends a 2-tier serologic approach to Lyme disease laboratory diagnosis, comprised of an initial serum enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi followed by supplementary IgG and IgM Western blotting of EIA-positive or -equivocal samples. Western blot accuracy is limited by subjective interpretation of weakly positive bands, false-positive IgM immunoblots, and low sensitivity for detection of early disease. We developed an objective alternative second-tier immunoassay using a multiplex microsphere system that measures VlsE1-IgG and pepC10-IgM antibodies simultaneously in the same sample. Our study population comprised 79 patients with early acute Lyme disease, 82 patients with early-convalescent-phase disease, 47 patients with stage II and III disease, 34 patients post-antibiotic treatment, and 794 controls. A bioinformatic technique called partial receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) regression was used to combine individual antibody levels into a single diagnostic score with a single cutoff; this technique enhances test performance when a high specificity is required (e.g., ≥ 95%). Compared to Western blotting, the multiplex assay was equally specific (95.6%) but 20.7% more sensitive for early-convalescent-phase disease (89.0% versus 68.3%, respectively; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] for difference, 12.1% to 30.9%) and 12.5% more sensitive overall (75.0% versus 62.5%, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 8.1% to 17.1%). As a second-tier test, a multiplex assay for VlsE1-IgG and pepC10-IgM antibodies performed as well as or better than Western blotting for Lyme disease diagnosis. Prospective validation studies appear to be warranted.

  9. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  10. Gas production from oceanic Class 2 hydrate accumulations

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.

    2007-02-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gasmolecules are lodged within the lattices of ice crystals. The vastamounts of hydrocarbon gases that are trapped in hydrate deposits in thepermafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a promising energysource. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-BearingLayer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Inthis study we investigated three methods of gas production via verticalwell designs. A long perforated interval (covering the hydrate layer andextending into the underlying water zone) yields the highest gasproduction rates (up to 20 MMSCFD), but is not recommended for long-termproduction because of severe flow blockage caused by secondary hydrateand ice. A short perforated interval entirely within the water zoneallows long-term production, but only at rates of 4.5 7 MMSCFD. A newwell design involving localized heating appears to be the most promising,alleviating possible blockage by secondary hydrate and/or ice near thewellbore) and delivering sustainably large, long-term rates (10-15MMSCFD).The production strategy involves a cyclical process. During eachcycle, gas production continuously increases, while the correspondingwater production continuously decreases. Each cycle is concluded by acavitation event (marked by a precipitous pressure drop at the well),brought about by the inability of thesystem to satisfy the constant massproduction rate QM imposed at the well. This is caused by the increasinggas contribution to the production stream, and/or flow inhibition causedby secondary hydrate and/or ice. In the latter case, short-term thermalstimulation removes the blockage. The results show that gas productionincreases (and the corresponding water-to-gas ratio RWGC decreases) withan increasing(a) QM, (b) hydrate temperature (which defines its stabilityfor a given pressure), and (c) intrinsic permeability. Lower initialhydrate saturations lead initially to higher gas

  11. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials. PMID:26568975

  12. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials.

  13. Novel Insights about Class 2 Integrons from Experimental and Genomic Epidemiology▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Piñeiro, Silvia; Centrón, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    In order to contribute to the knowledge of the architecture and epidemiology of class 2 integrons, we performed a class 2 integron molecular survey in which we analyzed 726 isolates in two bacterial populations from environmental and nonepidemiologically related clinical samples, respectively, collected from 1982 to 2007. We recovered the intI2 gene from 130 of 726 isolates, most of which were clinical isolates, and only 1 (a psychrophilic Pseudomonas sp.) was from a water sample. Unlike the widespread distribution of class 1 integrons within Gram-negative bacilli, only Acinetobacter baumannii and Enterobacter cloacae harbored class 2 integrons at a high frequency in our collection. Class 2 integrons with six novel cassette arrays were documented. Characterization of the transposition module of Tn7, the genetic platform in which class 2 integrons have always been reported, showed tns modules with a mosaic genetic structure. A bioinformatic analysis performed with the tns genes present in sequence databases, the finding of intI2 not associated with tns genes, and the genetic examination of novel tns-like genes found in three isolates indicated the possibility of the independent evolution of the two components related to horizontal gene transfer, the class 2 integrons and the Tn7 transposons. PMID:19917745

  14. The controlled placement and delayed polymerization technique for the direct Class 2 posterior composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Alan M

    2005-11-01

    Adhesion dentistry and its application to the direct posterior composite restoration is the most controversial topic in dentistry today. The concepts behind this procedure are now the backbone of restorative dentistry. Adhesion dentistry influences basic fillings, crown buildups, post-and-core restorations, cementation, orthodontics, and endodontics. Yet, controversy remains about the correct way to place a direct Class 2 posterior composite restoration. This article will examine the scientific evidence to determine which materials and placement techniques will achieve the optimum direct Class 2 posterior composite restoration at or below the cementoenamel junction using the controlled placement and delayed polymerization technique.

  15. Depressurization-induced gas production from Class 1 and Class 2hydrate deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Kowalsky, Michael

    2006-05-12

    Class 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) underlain by a two-phase zone involving mobile gas. Such deposits are further divided to Class 1W (involving water and hydrate in the HBL) and Class 1G (involving gas and hydrate in the HBL). In Class 2 deposits, a mobile water zone underlies the hydrate zone. Methane is the main hydrate-forming gas in natural accumulations. Using TOUGH-FX/HYDRATE to study the depressurization-induced gas production from such deposits, we determine that large volumes of gas could be readily produced at high rates for long times using conventional technology. Dissociation in Class 1W deposits proceeds in distinct stages, but is continuous in Class 1G deposits. Hydrates are shown to contribute significantly to the production rate (up to 65 percent and 75 percent in Class 1W and 1G, respectively) and to the cumulative volume of produced gas (up to 45 percent and 54 percent in Class 1W and 1G, respectively). Large volumes of hydrate-originating CH4 could be produced from Class 2 hydrates, but a relatively long lead time would be needed before gas production (which continuously increases over time) attains a substantial level. The permeability of the confining boundaries plays a significant role in gas production from Class 2 deposits. In general, long-term production is needed to realize the full potential of the very promising Class 1 and Class 2 hydrate deposits.

  16. CLASS2: accurate and efficient splice variant annotation from RNA-seq reads

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Florea, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of cellular RNA is making it possible to characterize genes and alternative splicing in unprecedented detail. However, designing bioinformatics tools to accurately capture splicing variation has proven difficult. Current programs can find major isoforms of a gene but miss lower abundance variants, or are sensitive but imprecise. CLASS2 is a novel open source tool for accurate genome-guided transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq reads based on the model of splice graph. An extension of our program CLASS, CLASS2 jointly optimizes read patterns and the number of supporting reads to score and prioritize transcripts, implemented in a novel, scalable and efficient dynamic programming algorithm. When compared against reference programs, CLASS2 had the best overall accuracy and could detect up to twice as many splicing events with precision similar to the best reference program. Notably, it was the only tool to produce consistently reliable transcript models for a wide range of applications and sequencing strategies, including ribosomal RNA-depleted samples. Lightweight and multi-threaded, CLASS2 requires <3GB RAM and can analyze a 350 million read set within hours, and can be widely applied to transcriptomics studies ranging from clinical RNA sequencing, to alternative splicing analyses, and to the annotation of new genomes. PMID:26975657

  17. Nematode and Arthropod Genomes Provide New Insights into the Evolution of Class 2 B1 GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João C. R.; Félix, Rute C.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes. PMID:24651821

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Zhang, Keni

    2008-05-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.

  19. Complex structure of a bacterial class 2 histone deacetylase homologue with a trifluoromethylketone inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Tine Kragh; Hildmann, Christian; Riester, Daniel; Wegener, Dennis; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Ficner, Ralf

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of HDAH FB188 in complex with a trifluoromethylketone at 2.2 Å resolution is reported and compared to a previously determined inhibitor complex. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as attractive targets in anticancer drug development. To date, a number of HDAC inhibitors have been developed and most of them are hydroxamic acid derivatives, typified by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Not surprisingly, structural information that can greatly enhance the design of novel HDAC inhibitors is so far only available for hydroxamic acids in complex with HDAC or HDAC-like enzymes. Here, the first structure of an enzyme complex with a nonhydroxamate HDAC inhibitor is presented. The structure of the trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitor 9,9,9-trifluoro-8-oxo-N-phenylnonanamide in complex with bacterial FB188 HDAH (histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes strain FB188) has been determined. HDAH reveals high sequential and functional homology to human class 2 HDACs and a high structural homology to human class 1 HDACs. Comparison with the structure of HDAH in complex with SAHA reveals that the two inhibitors superimpose well. However, significant differences in binding to the active site of HDAH were observed. In the presented structure the O atom of the trifluoromethyl ketone moiety is within binding distance of the Zn atom of the enzyme and the F atoms participate in interactions with the enzyme, thereby involving more amino acids in enzyme–inhibitor binding.

  20. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  1. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  2. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    2000-04-30

    This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small independent producer to identify

  3. Class 1 and class 2 integrons in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli from poultry in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavicchio, Lara; Dotto, Giorgia; Giacomelli, Martina; Giovanardi, Davide; Grilli, Guido; Franciosini, Maria Pia; Trocino, Angela; Piccirillo, Alessandra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of class 1 and 2 integrons in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) from poultry in northern Italy. Strains were tested for phenotypic resistance to aminoglycosides and sulphonamides, and the association between the presence of integrons and the resistance to these antimicrobials was evaluated. A total of 299 isolates (158 from turkeys, 110 from broilers, and 31 from layer hens) were collected from 200 industrial farms. Antimicrobial susceptibility test by the disk diffusion method was performed in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. All strains were screened for the presence of class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR and sequencing. About 55% of APEC contained integrons (class 1, 49.8%; class 2, 10.4%). Different variants of the aadA (5 variants) and the dfrA (4 variants) genes, encoding for streptomycin and trimethoprim resistance respectively, were detected in integron-positive isolates. Less common gene cassettes, such as sat, estX, and orfF, were also identified. Fifteen and 4 gene cassette arrays were found among class 1 and 2 integrons, respectively. High levels of resistance were observed for triple sulphonamides (79.3%), streptomycin (67.2%), and sulfamethoxazole combined with trimethoprim (62.2%), whereas resistance against gentamycin (16.7%), kanamycin (14.7%), and apramycin 3.0%) was low. Integron positivity was significantly higher in isolates phenotypically resistant to aminoglycosides (63.6% vs. 37.8%, P<0.001) and sulfonamides (64.1% vs. 21.1%, P<0.001) than in susceptible ones. Integron-borne aminoglycoside and sulfonamide resistance in APEC represents a concern for the poultry industry in Italy, since they are among the most commonly used antimicrobials in poultry therapy.

  4. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  5. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  6. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  7. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  8. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  9. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS... Assignments and Exceptions for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.115 Class 2, Divisions..., a flammable gas (Division 2.1) means any material which is a gas at 20 °C (68 °F) or less and...

  10. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS... Assignments and Exceptions for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.115 Class 2, Divisions..., a flammable gas (Division 2.1) means any material which is a gas at 20 °C (68 °F) or less and...

  11. Structural and kinetic properties of high and low molecular mass phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms from the endosperm of developing castor oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Blonde, James D; Plaxton, William C

    2003-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is believed to play an important role in producing malate as a substrate for fatty acid synthesis by leucoplasts of the developing castor oilseed (COS) endosperm. Two kinetically distinct isoforms of COS PEPC were resolved by gel filtration chromatography and purified. PEPC1 is a typical 410-kDa homotetramer composed of 107-kDa subunits (p107). In contrast, PEPC2 exists as an unusual 681-kDa hetero-octamer composed of the same p107 found in PEPC1 and an associated 64-kDa polypeptide (p64) that is structurally and immunologically unrelated to p107. Relative to PEPC1, PEPC2 demonstrated significantly enhanced thermal stability and a much lower sensitivity to allosteric activators (Glc-6-P, Glc-1-P, Fru-6-P, glycerol-3-P) and inhibitors (Asp, Glu, malate) and pH changes within the physiological range. Nondenaturing PAGE of clarified extracts followed by in-gel PEPC activity staining indicated that the ratio of PEPC1:PEPC2 increases during COS development such that only PEPC1 is detected in mature COS. Dissimilar developmental profiles and kinetic properties support the hypotheses that (i) PEPC1 functions to replenish dicarboxylic acids consumed through transamination reactions required for storage protein synthesis, whereas (ii) PEPC2 facilitates PEP flux to malate in support of fatty acid synthesis. Interestingly, the respective physical and kinetic properties of COS PEPC1 and PEPC2 are remarkably comparable with those of the homotetrameric low M(r) Class 1 and heteromeric high M(r) Class 2 PEPC isoforms of unicellular green algae.

  12. [Effects of activator and activator + anterior high-pull headgear on the growth direction of Class 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Uner, O; Akkaya, S; Buyruk, F

    1989-04-01

    In this study which the effects of activator and activator + anterior high-pull headgear on the growth direction of skeletal class 2 cases for a period of approximately 9 months; 33 cases having a mean age of 10.59 years; ANB angles 4.5 degrees and over were studied. Activator treatment has been applied to the 11 of the 22 treatment cases, the others have had the activator + anterior high-pull headgear treatment. The control group, 11 patients, has only been observed in terms of the growth and development without having any treatment. At the end of the study; it was found that the decrease in ANB angle and the increase in SL dimension in the treatment groups; the increase in anterior lower face height in the activator group and the increase in the ratio of posterior to anterior face height were statistically significant.

  13. Development and Implementation of a Battery-Electric Light-Duty Class 2a Truck including Hybrid Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmeyer, Phillip J.

    This dissertation addresses two major related research topics: 1) the design, fabrication, modeling, and experimental testing of a battery-electric light-duty Class 2a truck; and 2) the design and evaluation of a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) for this and other vehicles. The work begins with the determination of the truck's peak power and wheel torque requirements (135kW/4900Nm). An electric traction system is then designed that consists of an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine, two-speed gearbox, three-phase motor drive, and LiFePO4 battery pack. The battery pack capacity is selected to achieve a driving range similar to the 2011 Nissan Leaf electric vehicle (73 miles). Next, the demonstrator electric traction system is built and installed in the vehicle, a Ford F150 pickup truck, and an extensive set of sensors and data acquisition equipment is installed. Detailed loss models of the battery pack, electric traction machine, and motor drive are developed and experimentally verified using the driving data. Many aspects of the truck's performance are investigated, including efficiency differences between the two-gear configuration and the optimal gear selection. The remainder focuses on the application of battery/ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (HESS) to electric vehicles. First, the electric truck is modeled with the addition of an ultracapacitor pack and a dc/dc converter. Rule-based and optimal battery/ultracapacitor power-split control algorithms are then developed, and the performance improvements achieved for both algorithms are evaluated for operation at 25°C. The HESS modeling is then extended to low temperatures, where battery resistance increases substantially. To verify the accuracy of the model-predicted results, a scaled hybrid energy storage system is built and the system is tested for several drive cycles and for two temperatures. The HESS performance is then modeled for three variants of the vehicle design, including the

  14. The bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozyme from developing castor oil seeds is subject to in vivo regulatory phosphorylation at serine-451.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Katie J; O'Leary, Brendan; Brikis, Carolyne; Rao, Srinath K; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; Plaxton, William C

    2012-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled anaplerotic enzyme situated at a pivotal branch point of plant carbohydrate-metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds (COS) a novel allosterically-densensitized 910-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex arises from a tight interaction between 107-kDa plant-type PEPC and 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting with anti-phosphoSer451 specific antibodies established that COS BTPC is in vivo phosphorylated at Ser451, a highly conserved target residue that occurs within an intrinsically disordered region. This phosphorylation was enhanced during COS development or in response to depodding. Kinetic characterization of a phosphomimetic (S451D) mutant indicated that Ser451 phosphorylation inhibits the catalytic activity of BTPC subunits within the Class-2 PEPC complex.

  15. Randomized Phase II Trial of High-Dose Melatonin and Radiation Therapy for RPA Class 2 Patients With Brain Metastases (RTOG 0119)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Lawrence . E-mail: Berklb@moffitt.usf.edu; Berkey, Brian; Rich, Tyvin; Hrushesky, William; Gallagher, Michael; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; McGarry, Ronald C.; Suh, John; Mehta, Minesh

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-dose melatonin for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 2 patients with brain metastases improved survival over historical controls, and to determine if the time of day melatonin was given affected its toxicity or efficacy. RTOG 0119 was a phase II randomized trial for this group of patients. Methods and Materials: RTOG RPA Class 2 patients with brain metastases were randomized to 20 mg of melatonin, given either in the morning (8-9 AM) or in the evening (8-9 PM). All patients received radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) in the afternoon. Melatonin was continued until neurologic deterioration or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival time. Neurologic deterioration, as reflected by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, was also measured. Results: Neither of the randomized groups had survival distributions that differed significantly from the historic controls of patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. The median survivals of the morning and evening melatonin treatments were 3.4 and 2.8 months, while the RTOG historical control survival was 4.1 months. Conclusions: High-dose melatonin did not show any beneficial effect in this group of patients.

  16. Bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes from developing castor oil seeds interact in vivo and associate with the surface of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Khuu, Nicholas; Howard, Alexander S M; Mullen, Robert T; Plaxton, William C

    2012-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from developing castor oil seeds (COS) exists as two distinct oligomeric isoforms. The typical class-1 PEPC homotetramer consists of 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits, whereas the allosterically desensitized 910-kDa class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from the association of class-1 PEPC with 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. The in vivo interaction and subcellular location of COS BTPC and PTPC were assessed by imaging fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged PEPCs in tobacco suspension-cultured cells. The BTPC-FP mainly localized to cytoplasmic punctate/globular structures, identified as mitochondria by co-immunostaining of endogenous cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of respiration with KCN resulted in proportional decreases and increases in mitochondrial versus cytosolic BTPC-FP, respectively. The FP-PTPC and NLS-FP-PTPC (containing an appended nuclear localization signal, NLS) localized to the cytosol and nucleus, respectively, but both co-localized with mitochondrial-associated BTPC when co-expressed with BTPC-FP. Transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled developing COS revealed that BTPC and PTPC are localized at the mitochondrial (outer) envelope, as well as the cytosol. Moreover, thermolysin-sensitive BTPC and PTPC polypeptides were detected on immunoblots of purified COS mitochondria. Overall, our results demonstrate that: (i) COS BTPC and PTPC interact in vivo as a class-2 PEPC complex that associates with the surface of mitochondria, (ii) BTPC's unique and divergent intrinsically disordered region mediates its interaction with PTPC, whereas (iii) the PTPC-containing class-1 PEPC is entirely cytosolic. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-associated class-2 PEPC facilitates rapid refixation of respiratory CO(2) while sustaining a large anaplerotic flux to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons withdrawn for biosynthesis. PMID:22404138

  17. Bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes from developing castor oil seeds interact in vivo and associate with the surface of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Khuu, Nicholas; Howard, Alexander S M; Mullen, Robert T; Plaxton, William C

    2012-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from developing castor oil seeds (COS) exists as two distinct oligomeric isoforms. The typical class-1 PEPC homotetramer consists of 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits, whereas the allosterically desensitized 910-kDa class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from the association of class-1 PEPC with 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. The in vivo interaction and subcellular location of COS BTPC and PTPC were assessed by imaging fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged PEPCs in tobacco suspension-cultured cells. The BTPC-FP mainly localized to cytoplasmic punctate/globular structures, identified as mitochondria by co-immunostaining of endogenous cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of respiration with KCN resulted in proportional decreases and increases in mitochondrial versus cytosolic BTPC-FP, respectively. The FP-PTPC and NLS-FP-PTPC (containing an appended nuclear localization signal, NLS) localized to the cytosol and nucleus, respectively, but both co-localized with mitochondrial-associated BTPC when co-expressed with BTPC-FP. Transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled developing COS revealed that BTPC and PTPC are localized at the mitochondrial (outer) envelope, as well as the cytosol. Moreover, thermolysin-sensitive BTPC and PTPC polypeptides were detected on immunoblots of purified COS mitochondria. Overall, our results demonstrate that: (i) COS BTPC and PTPC interact in vivo as a class-2 PEPC complex that associates with the surface of mitochondria, (ii) BTPC's unique and divergent intrinsically disordered region mediates its interaction with PTPC, whereas (iii) the PTPC-containing class-1 PEPC is entirely cytosolic. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-associated class-2 PEPC facilitates rapid refixation of respiratory CO(2) while sustaining a large anaplerotic flux to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons withdrawn for biosynthesis.

  18. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas: Near term, Class 2. [Annual report], September 18, 1994--October 1, 1995. Draft.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the progress during the first year of Budget period 1 of the near term Class 2 project entitled ``Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas``. Two examples of advanced technologies developed as part of this project are highlighted along with the use of the Internet to transfer these technologies. The two advanced technologies are a spread-sheet petrophysical analysis and reservoir evaluation (PfEFFER), and a petrophysical/seismic approach to well logs (pseudoseismic). Work continues on multi-disciplinary reservoir characterization at the demonstration site. The potential for incremental primary recovery is being evaluated using the improved reservoir characterization to target infill drilling and evaluate the potential of a horizontal well. The impact of successful incremental primary recovery from sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity Mississippian reservoirs such as are present at the Schaben demonstration site would be significant for Kansas and the US.

  19. Class 1 and class 2 integrons and plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance in coliforms isolated from ten rivers in northern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozgumus, Osman Birol; Sandalli, Cemal; Sevim, Ali; Celik-Sevim, Elif; Sivri, Nuket

    2009-02-01

    We aimed to determine the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in coliforms isolated from ten rivers in northern region of Turkey. A total of 183 isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by disk diffusion and agar dilution methods. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, trimethoprim, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol was detected in 58%, 51.9%, 24%, 28.4%, and 12.5%, respectively. Twelve (6.5%) phylogenetically distant organisms were detected to harbor self-transmissible plasmids ranging 52 to >147 kb in sizes. Resistances to ampicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim, streptomycin, and nalidixic acid were commonly transferable traits. Transferable nalidixic acid-resistant strains harbored qnrS gene, which was the first report of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in bacteria of environmental origin in Turkey. Fourteen and five coliforms harbored class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively, and some of them were located on transferable plasmids. Sequence analyses of variable regions of the class 1 and 2 integrons harbored various gene cassettes, dfrA1, dfr2d, dfrA7, dfrA16, dfrA17, aadA1, aadA5, bla(oxA-30), and sat1. A gene cassette array, dfrA16 has been demonstrated for the first time in a Citrobacter koseri isolate. Class 1 and class 2-bearing strains were clustered in different groups by BOX-PCR fingerprinting. Rivers in the northern Turkey may act as receptacle for the multi-drug resistant enterobacteria and can serve as reservoirs of the antimicrobial resistance determinants in the environment. The actual risk to public health is the transfer of resistance genes from the environmental bacteria to human pathogens.

  20. Insights into the mechanism of oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate catalysed by human class 2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: a QM/MM free energy study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Silva, José Rogério A; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2015-07-21

    The dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) enzyme catalyzes the unique redox reaction in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. In this reaction, the oxidation of dihydroorotate (DHO) to orotate (OA) and reduction of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor is catalysed by DHOD. The class 2 DHOD, to which the human enzyme belongs, was experimentally shown to follow a stepwise mechanism but the data did not allow the determination of the order of bond-breaking in a stepwise oxidation of DHO. The goal of this study is to understand the reaction mechanism at the molecular level of class 2 DHOD, which may aid in the design of inhibitors that selectively impact the activity of only certain members of the enzyme family. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of oxidation of DHO to OA in human DHOD was studied using a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) approach and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy barriers calculated reveal that the mechanism in human DHOD occurs via a stepwise reaction pathway. In the first step, a proton is abstracted from the C5 of DHO to the deprotonated Ser215 side chain. Whereas, in the second step, the transfer of the hydride or hydride equivalent from the C6 of DHO to the N5 of FMN, where free energy barrier calculated by the DFT/MM level is 10.84 kcal mol(-1). Finally, a residual decomposition analysis was carried out in order to elucidate the influence of the catalytic region residues during DHO oxidation.

  1. [Characterization of class 1 and class 2 integron gene cassettes in Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine cultures: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Çopur Çiçek, Ayşegül; Sandallı, Cemal; Budak, Emine Esra; Yağmur, Gülhan; Çizmeci, Zeynep; Ak, Sibel; Balcı, Pervin Özlem; Şay Coşkun, Safiye Umut; Ay Altıntop, Yasemin; Fırat, Mehmet; Sarı, Fatma; Çalışkan, Ahmet; Yıldız, Nazan; Sancaktar, Metin; Özgümüş, Osman Birol

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from both nosocomial and community acquired urinary tract infections. Although there are many studies from different centers concerning the antibiotic susceptibility of E.coli isolates in Turkey, the studies are quite few about class 1 and class 2 integron cassettes in clinical E.coli isolates from urinary samples. The aim of the study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility and the carriage of integron gene cassettes in E.coli strains isolated from urinary samples. A total of 626 E.coli strains isolated from urine cultures in microbiology laboratories located at 10 provinces from different regions of Turkey (Denizli, Ankara, Kayseri, Niğde, Şanlıurfa, Kahramanmaras, Tokat, Malatya, Konya and Trabzon) between June 2011-June 2012 were included in the study. The identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates were studied by conventional methods as well as Vitek® 2 Compact (bioMérieux, France) and BD Phoenix™ 100 (Becton Dickinson, USA) systems. The antibiotic susceptibilities of all the isolates were retested by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations in the main center of the study in order to achive the standardization. The presence of integrons was detected with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method by using specific primers targeting class 1 (intI1) and class 2 (intI2) integrase gene regions. After integron amplification the samples were cloned and subjected to DNA sequencing. When the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates were evaluated, the highest resistance was observed against most commonly used empirical antibiotics namely ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) with the mean rate of 58.6% (range: 43.8%-73.2%) and 41.2% (range: 35.4%-45.8%), respectively. The most effective antibiotics detected against the isolates were imipenem and amikacin with the lowest resistance rates of 0.2% (range: 0%-1.1%) and 0.6% (range: 0

  2. M2/M1 ratio of tumor associated macrophages and PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with class 1 and class 2 molecular profiles.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Martina C; Bergstrom, Chris; Wells, Jill R; Höller, Tobias; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages have been found to be negative predictors of outcome in patients with uveal melanoma. In particular, recent studies point toward a disease-progressing role of proangiogenic M2 macrophages in melanomas with monosomy 3. Although most studies implicate a protective effect of PPAR-gamma activation in tumors, PPAR-gamma has also been shown to promote the polarization of M1 macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. The purpose of this investigation was first, to characterize the phenotype of tumor infiltrating macrophages and second, to study PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with molecular gene expression profile as prognostic predictors for patients' outcome. Twenty specimens from patients with uveal melanoma were analyzed for clinical and histologic tumor characteristics. The molecular RNA profile (class 1 or class 2) was commercially determined. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the specimens were dual labeled for CD68 and CD163. CD68 + CD163- M1 macrophages and CD68 + CD163+ M2 macrophages were analyzed in ten high power fields sparing macrophage-poor areas and a mean value was calculated for each tumor. The tumors were immunostained for von Willebrand factor and the micro vascular density (MVD) was analyzed according to Foss. To assess the proliferative rate of each tumor, Ki67 expression was evaluated in ten high power fields followed by calculation of a mean value. Expression of PPAR-gamma was evaluated using a score from 0 (no staining) to 3 (tumor entirely stained). Statistical analysis and a respective correlation were made between histologic characteristics, molecular profile, type of tumor infiltrating macrophages (M1 vs. M2), MVD, proliferative rate, and PPAR-gamma expression. Our results showed a correlation between the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages and the molecular profile with a ratio of approximately 1 corresponding to molecular class 1 and a ratio of approximately 2 corresponding to molecular class 2 (p = 0.01). The ratio of M2/M1

  3. Assistance to state underground injection control programs and the oil and gas industry with class 2 injection well data management and technology transfer. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Paque, M.J.

    1995-11-23

    The Underground Injection Practices Research Foundation (UIPRF) administered a grant project funded by the US Department of Energy relating to Class 2 injection well operations in various primacy and direct implementation states throughout the country. This effort provided substantial benefits to state regulatory agencies and oil and gas producing companies. It enhanced the protection of the environment through the protection of ground water resources and improved oil and gas production operations within affected states. This project involved the following accomplishment: (1) Completed the design and installation of the only comprehensive, fully relational PC-Based Oil and Gas regulatory data management system (the Risk Based Data Management System) in the country. Additionally, training and data conversion was conduced and the RBDMS User`s Guide and the RBDMS Administrator`s Guide were completed. (2) State wide Area-Of-Review (AOR) workshop were held in California and Oklahoma and a national three-day workshop was held in Kansas City, Missouri where 24 state oil and gas agencies were represented.

  4. An introduction to the design and fabrication progress of a megawatt class 2G HTS motor for the ship propulsion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heejong; Kim, Yeong-Chun; Park, Heui-Joo; Yu, In-Keun; Park, Minwon

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the design and fabrication progress of a megawatt class 2G high temperature superconductor (HTS) motor for the ship propulsion application at Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction. The purpose of this 2G HTS propulsion motor is to launch the business area for marine applications such as surface ship, submarine, merchant ship etc. The principles and interpretation of the magnetic field for 2G HTS motor and permanent magnet type motors are similar on the basis of 3D design and production. The most important component of an HTS motor is the rotor, which is composed of HTS coil, non-ferrous metal, torque disk, damper, and hollow shaft. A HTS rotor using hastelloy-based 2G HTS coils was designed and built. Open-circuit and short-circuit characteristics of the superconducting motor were investigated and compared with the analysis results at reduced excitation to verify the design. Preliminary testing of a 2G HTS motor has been conducted at a few hundred kilowatts as per the design. Through these results, we anticipate that most of the design criteria can be satisfied. However, we have faced several issues during the testing of the motor and these issues need to be resolved in order to take the design further.

  5. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas near term Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--March 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1998-04-01

    This annual report describes progress during the second year of the project entitled {open_quotes}Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas{close_quotes}. This project funded under the Department of Energy`s Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, several tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated. These include: (1) a new approach to subsurface visualization using electric logs ({open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{open_quotes}); (2) a low-cost easy-to-use spreadsheet log analysis software (PfEFFER); and (3) an extension of the BOAST-3 computer program for full field reservoir simulation. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). These results include an outline of the reservoir description based on available and newly acquired data and reservoir simulation results. Detailed information is available on-line through the Internet. Based on the reservoir simulation, three infill wells will be drilled to validate the reservoir description and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies. The demonstration phase of the project has just begun and will be presented in the next annual report.

  6. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Mechanisms Responsible for the Superior Stability of Hybrid Class 1/Class 2 CO2 Sorbents: A New Class 4 Category.

    PubMed

    Wilfong, Walter Christopher; Kail, Brian W; Jones, Christopher W; Pacheco, Carlos; Gray, McMahan L

    2016-05-25

    Hybrid Class 1/Class 2 supported amine CO2 sorbents demonstrate superior performance under practical steam conditions, yet their amine immobilization and stabilization mechanisms are unclear. Uncovering the interactions responsible for the sorbents' robust features is critical for further improvements and can facilitate practical applications. We employ solid state (29)Si CP-MAS and 2-D FSLG (1)H-(13)C CP HETCOR NMR spectroscopies to probe the overall molecular interactions of aminosilane/silica, polyamine [poly(ethylenimine), PEI]/silica, and hybrid aminosilane/PEI/silica sorbents. A unique, sequential impregnation sorbent preparation method is executed in a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) setup to decouple amine binding mechanisms at the amine-silica interface from those within bulk amine layers. These mechanisms are correlated with each sorbents' resistance to accelerated liquid H2O and TGA steam treatments (H2O stability) and to oxidative degradation (thermal stability). High percentages of CO2 capture retained (PCR) and organic content retained (OCR) values after H2O testing of N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl)ethylenediamine (TMPED)/PEI and (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS)/PEI hybrid sorbents are associated with a synergistic stabilizing effect of the amine species observed during oxidative degradation (thermal gravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry, TGA-DSC). Solid state NMR spectroscopy reveals that the synergistic effect of the TMPED/PEI mixture is manifested by the formation of hydrogen-bonded PEI-NH2···NH2-TMPED and PEI-NH2···HO-Si/O-Si-O (TMPED, T(2)) linkages within the sorbent. DRIFTS further determines that PEI enhances the grafting of TMPED to silica and that PEI is dispersed among a stable network of polymerized TMPED in the bulk, utilizing H-bonded linkages. These findings provide the scientific basis for establishing a Class 4 category for aminosilane/polyamine/silica hybrid sorbents

  7. The peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch) homeobox gene KNOPE3, which encodes a class 2 knotted-like transcription factor, is regulated during leaf development and triggered by sugars.

    PubMed

    Testone, Giulio; Condello, Emiliano; Verde, Ignazio; Caboni, Emilia; Iannelli, Maria Adelaide; Bruno, Leonardo; Mariotti, Domenico; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice; Giannino, Donato

    2009-07-01

    Class 1 KNOTTED1-like transcription factors (KNOX) are known to regulate plant development, whereas information on class 2 KNOX has been limited. The peach KNOPE3 gene was cloned, belonged to a family of few class 2 members and was located at 66 cM in the Prunus spp. G1 linkage-group. The mRNA localization was diversified in leaf, stem, flower and drupe, but recurred in all organ sieves, suggesting a role in sap nutrient transport. During leaf development, the mRNA earliest localized to primordia sieves and subsequently to mesophyll cells of growing leaves. Consistently, its abundance augmented with leaf expansion. The transcription was monitored in leaves responding to darkening, supply and transport block of sugars. It peaked at 4 h after darkness and dropped under prolonged obscurity, showing a similar kinetic to that of sucrose content variation. Feeding leaflets via the transpiration stream caused KNOPE3 up-regulation at 3 h after fructose, glucose and sucrose absorption and at 12 h after sorbitol. In girdling experiments, leaf KNOPE3 was triggered from 6 h onwards along with sucrose and sorbitol raise. Both the phloem-associated expression and sugar-specific gene modulation suggest that KNOPE3 may play a role in sugar translocation during the development of agro-relevant organs such as drupe.

  8. Possible Domain Formation In PE/PC Bilayers Containing High Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Matthew; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol is a significant component of animal cell membranes, and its presence has the effects of not only adding rigidity to the lipid bilayer, but also leading to the formation of lipid domains. Two other lipids of interest are phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which constitutes about 45 percent of the phospholipids found in human nervous tissues, and phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is found in every cell of the human body. The maximum solubility of cholesterol is the highest mole fraction of cholesterol that the lipid bilayer can retain, at which point cholesterol begins to precipitate out to form cholesterol monohydrate crystals. We have measured the maximum solubility of cholesterol in mixtures of 16:0-18:1PE and 16:0-18:1PC using a new light scattering technique, which utilizes the anisotropic nature of light scattering by cholesterol crystals. This new method is highly accurate and reproducible. Our results show that the maximum solubility of cholesterol increases linearly as a function of the molar ratio POPC/(POPE+POPC), which suggests possible domain formation in mixtures of PE and PC containing maximum amount of cholesterol.

  9. Evaluation of materials proposed for the construction of the plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) on beamlet

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.; Robb, C.; DeYoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1992-11-01

    The proposed upgrade of the NOVA laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employs a multipass architecture that requires an optical switch to emit the laser light at the appropriate fluence. This Pockels cell-based optical switch does not use traditional ring or thin-film electrodes because of the large aperture and high fluence of the laser system. Rather, it uses a plasma electrode Pockels cell with a KD*P crystal as the electro-optical medium. A discharge plasma is formed on each side of the electro-optic crystal and high voltage is applied across the crystal through the plasma electrode to initiate optical switching. In October 1991 we began evaluating materials suggested for the large aperture plasma electrode optical switch. Previous experiments suggested that switching performance could be significantly affected by the deterioration of cell materials. The final prototype switch tested used polyethylene for the switch body, Mykroy for the mid-plane and a silicone vulcanite to encapsulate the KD*P crystal. The encapsulant easily compensated for the effect of assembling the optical switch and we measured no strain-induced birefringence in the crystal after encapsulation. Oxygen was eventually added to the plasma to react with the sputtered carbon from the cathode and produce a gaseous effluent. As an added benefit, the production of ozone absorbed most of the ultra violet radiation affecting the encapsulant. All the materials tested decomposed and produced volatiles, although we have seen no change in the damage threshold of exposed optical surfaces tested to date. The following is an evaluation of the recommended materials for major cell components using published manufacturers data, experimental results from our Material Evaluation Apparatus, and outgassing performance and sputtering data produced at the Laboratory`s Vacuum Process Lab.

  10. Tissue-specific expression and post-translational modifications of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Hill, Allyson T; Bettridge, James; Park, Joonho; Rao, Srinath K; Leach, Craig A; Plaxton, William C

    2011-11-01

    This study employs transcript profiling together with immunoblotting and co-immunopurification to assess the tissue-specific expression, protein:protein interactions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) isozymes (PTPC and BTPC, respectively) in the castor plant, Ricinus communis. Previous studies established that the Class-1 PEPC (PTPC homotetramer) of castor oil seeds (COS) is activated by phosphorylation at Ser-11 and inhibited by monoubiquitination at Lys-628 during endosperm development and germination, respectively. Elimination of photosynthate supply to developing COS by depodding caused the PTPC of the endosperm and cotyledon to be dephosphorylated, and then subsequently monoubiquitinated in vivo. PTPC monoubiquitination rather than phosphorylation is widespread throughout the castor plant and appears to be the predominant PTM of Class-1 PEPC that occurs in planta. The distinctive developmental patterns of PTPC phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination indicates that these two PTMs are mutually exclusive. By contrast, the BTPC: (i) is abundant in the inner integument, cotyledon, and endosperm of developing COS, but occurs at low levels in roots and cotyledons of germinated COS, (ii) shows a unique developmental pattern in leaves such that it is present in leaf buds and young expanding leaves, but undetectable in fully expanded leaves, and (iii) tightly interacts with co-expressed PTPC to form the novel and allosterically-desensitized Class-2 PEPC heteromeric complex. BTPC and thus Class-2 PEPC up-regulation appears to be a distinctive feature of rapidly growing and/or biosynthetically active tissues that require a large anaplerotic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons being withdrawn for anabolism.

  11. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surrounded with explosive mixtures of Pittsburgh natural gas 1 and air. A sufficient number of tests of each... for practical purposes Pittsburgh natural gas (containing a high percentage of methane) is a... adequate, may be used to obtain a firm seat for the glass but not elsewhere. Rubber, putty, and plaster...

  12. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Unless special features of the lamp prevent ignition of explosive mixtures of methane and air by the... surrounded with explosive mixtures of Pittsburgh natural gas 1 and air. A sufficient number of tests of each... explosive mixtures are not ignited, if external flame is observed, if excessive pressures are developed,...

  13. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Unless special features of the lamp prevent ignition of explosive mixtures of methane and air by the... surrounded with explosive mixtures of Pittsburgh natural gas 1 and air. A sufficient number of tests of each... explosive mixtures are not ignited, if external flame is observed, if excessive pressures are developed,...

  14. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of extra-heavy glass to withstand pick blows, and be adequately protected by shrouds or by an... permit assembly, the flanges comprising the joints between parts shall have surfaces with metal-to-metal contact, except enclosures requiring glass, in which case glass-to-metal joints are permitted. Gaskets,...

  15. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adequately protected at the battery end by a fuse in the locked battery box or housing. The cable (or cord... of extra-heavy glass to withstand pick blows, and be adequately protected by shrouds or by an... prevent unauthorized and unsafe opening of the compartments in a mine. (c) Locks or seals (battery)....

  16. Open-loop control of class-2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns open-loop control laws for reconfiguration of tensegrity towers. By postulating the control strategy as an equilibrium tracking control, very little control energy is required. Several different reconfiguration scenarios are possible for different string connectivity schemes. This includes unit radius control, twist angle control and truncation parameter control. All these control laws allow a nonuniform distribution of the control parameters among units. By defining a wave--like reference signal and injecting it in the open--loop control law, we demonstrate the concept of self--propelled tensegrity structure that are capable of locomotion.

  17. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (flammable gas) material. (2) Cylinders for hydrogen, cryogenic liquid. A Specification DOT-4L cylinder containing hydrogen, cryogenic liquid may only be transported on a motor vehicle as follows: (i) The vehicle... the hydrogen venting rates, as marked, on the cylinders transported on one motor vehicle may...

  18. Mechanical integrity test methods for Class 2 injection wells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.P.

    1991-03-01

    Mechanical integrity testing of injection wells to ensure that they do not threaten an underground source of drinking water (USDW) is a key component of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program of the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974. Approximately 55% of all active injection wells are classified as Class II wells. These wells are used by the oil and gas industry primarily to dispose of waste fluids or to enhance production of hydrocarbons. Mechanical integrity is defined as the absence of significant leaks in the casing, tubing, or packers (internal integrity); and the absence of significant fluid movement into a USDW through cement channels behind the casing (external integrity). A wide variety of mechanical integrity test (MIT) methods have been developed to meet federal and primacy state program requirements. The internal mechanical integrity of standard injection wells can be evaluated by radioactive tracer surveys, standard annular pressure tests, annulus pressure monitoring, and continuous injection pressure versus injection rate monitoring. These tests are listed in order of decreasing reliability and increasing detection limits. 28 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Aviation Structural Mechanic, First Class, 2-12. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become aviation structural mechanics (first class). The course materials consist of three pamphlets. The first pamphlet covers aircraft maintenance management, records, and reports…

  20. 49 CFR 173.116 - Class 2-Assignment of hazard zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... criteria: Hazard zone Inhalation toxicity A LC50 less than or equal to 200 ppm. B LC50 greater than 200 ppm and less than or equal to 1000 ppm. C LC50 greater than 1000 ppm and less than or equal to 3000 ppm. D LC50 greater than 3000 ppm or less than or equal to 5000 ppm. (b) The criteria specified in...

  1. 49 CFR 173.116 - Class 2-Assignment of hazard zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... criteria: Hazard zone Inhalation toxicity A LC50 less than or equal to 200 ppm. B LC50 greater than 200 ppm and less than or equal to 1000 ppm. C LC50 greater than 1000 ppm and less than or equal to 3000 ppm. D LC50 greater than 3000 ppm or less than or equal to 5000 ppm. (b) The criteria specified in...

  2. 49 CFR 173.116 - Class 2-Assignment of hazard zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... criteria: Hazard zone Inhalation toxicity A LC50 less than or equal to 200 ppm. B LC50 greater than 200 ppm and less than or equal to 1000 ppm. C LC50 greater than 1000 ppm and less than or equal to 3000 ppm. D LC50 greater than 3000 ppm or less than or equal to 5000 ppm. (b) The criteria specified in...

  3. 49 CFR 173.116 - Class 2-Assignment of hazard zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... criteria: Hazard zone Inhalation toxicity A LC50 less than or equal to 200 ppm. B LC50 greater than 200 ppm and less than or equal to 1000 ppm. C LC50 greater than 1000 ppm and less than or equal to 3000 ppm. D LC50 greater than 3000 ppm or less than or equal to 5000 ppm. (b) The criteria specified in...

  4. 49 CFR 173.116 - Class 2-Assignment of hazard zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... criteria: Hazard zone Inhalation toxicity A LC50 less than or equal to 200 ppm. B LC50 greater than 200 ppm and less than or equal to 1000 ppm. C LC50 greater than 1000 ppm and less than or equal to 3000 ppm. D LC50 greater than 3000 ppm or less than or equal to 5000 ppm. (b) The criteria specified in...

  5. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  6. Aviation Structural Mechanic, Second Class, 2-13. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become aviation structural mechanics (second class). The course materials consist of five pamphlets covering the structural maintenance and repair of aircraft. The first pamphlet…

  7. 7 CFR 30.37 - Class 2; fire-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of.... Groups applicable to types 21, 22, and 23: A—Wrappers. B—Heavy Leaf. C—Thin Leaf. X—Lugs....

  8. In Vivo Regulatory Phosphorylation of Novel Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Isoforms in Endosperm of Developing Castor Oil Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, Karina E.; Turner, William L.; Gennidakis, Sam; Plaxton, William C.

    2005-01-01

    Our previous research characterized two phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) isoforms (PEPC1 and PEPC2) from developing castor oil seeds (COS). The association of a shared 107-kD subunit (p107) with an immunologically unrelated bacterial PEPC-type 64-kD polypeptide (p64) leads to marked physical and kinetic differences between the PEPC1 p107 homotetramer and PEPC2 p107/p64 heterooctamer. Here, we describe the production of antiphosphorylation site-specific antibodies to the conserved p107 N-terminal serine-6 phosphorylation site. Immunoblotting established that the serine-6 of p107 is phosphorylated in COS PEPC1 and PEPC2. This phosphorylation was reversed in vitro following incubation of clarified COS extracts or purified PEPC1 or PEPC2 with mammalian protein phosphatase type 2A and is not involved in a potential PEPC1 and PEPC2 interconversion. Similar to other plant PEPCs examined to date, p107 phosphorylation increased PEPC1 activity at pH 7.3 by decreasing its Km(PEP) and sensitivity to l-malate inhibition, while enhancing glucose-6-P activation. By contrast, p107 phosphorylation increased PEPC2's Km(PEP) and sensitivity to malate, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid inhibition. Phosphorylation of p107 was promoted during COS development (coincident with a >5-fold increase in the I50 [malate] value for total PEPC activity in desalted extracts) but disappeared during COS desiccation. The p107 of stage VII COS became fully dephosphorylated in planta 48 h following excision of COS pods or following 72 h of dark treatment of intact plants. The in vivo phosphorylation status of p107 appears to be modulated by photosynthate recently translocated from source leaves into developing COS. PMID:16169958

  9. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  10. Jasmonic acid is a downstream component in the modulation of somatic embryogenesis by Arabidopsis Class 2 phytoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Mohamed M.; Wally, Owen S. D.; Elhiti, Mohamed; El-Shanshory, Adel; Reddy, Dhadi S.; Hill, Robert D.; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the beneficial effect of suppression of the Arabidopsis phytoglobin 2 gene, PGB2, on somatic embryogenesis occurs through the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) within the embryogenic cells originating from the cultured explant. NO activates the expression of Allene oxide synthase (AOS) and Lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2), genes encoding two key enzymes of the jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthetic pathway, elevating JA content within the embryogenic tissue. The number of embryos in the single aos1-1 mutant and pgb2-aos1-1 double mutant declined, and was not rescued by increasing levels of NO stimulating embryogenesis in wild-type tissue. NO also influenced JA responses by up-regulating PLANT DEFENSIN 1 (PDF1) and JASMONATE-ZIM-PROTEIN (JAZ1), as well as down-regulating MYC2. The NO and JA modulation of MYC2 and JAZ1 controlled embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of JAZ1 or suppression of MYC2 promoted the formation of somatic embryos, while repression of JAZ1 and up-regulation of MYC2 reduced the embryogenic performance. Sustained expression of JAZ1 induced the transcription of several indole acetic acid (IAA) biosynthetic genes, resulting in higher IAA levels in the embryogenic cells. Collectively these data fit a model integrating JA in the PGB2 regulation of Arabidopsis embryogenesis. Suppression of PGB2 increases JA through NO. Elevated levels of JA repress MYC2 and induce JAZ1, favoring the accumulation of IAA in the explants and the subsequent production of somatic embryos. PMID:26962208

  11. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- near term -- Class 2. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. General overview--progress is reported for the period from 1 April 1995 to 30 June 1995. Work in this quarter has concentrated on reservoir characterization with the initiation of technology transfer. Difficulties still remain in the drilling of the final two wells. Some preliminary work on reservoir characterization has been completed, and related technology transfer has been initiated.

  12. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... kPa (14.7 psia) of pressure (a material which has a boiling point of 20 °C (68 °F) or less at 101.3... pressure of 101.3 kPa (14.7 psia) (a material which has a boiling point of 20 °C (68 °F) or less at 101.3 k... gas having a boiling point colder than -−90 °C (−130 °F) at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psia) absolute. A...

  13. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... °F), is a liquefied gas or is a cryogenic liquid, and (2) Does not meet the definition of Division 2... pressure for transportation is partially liquid at temperatures above −50 °C (−58 °F), is considered to be... which is dissolved in a solvent. (g) Cryogenic liquid. A cryogenic liquid means a refrigerated...

  14. 49 CFR 173.115 - Class 2, Divisions 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... °F), is a liquefied gas or is a cryogenic liquid, and (2) Does not meet the definition of Division 2... pressure for transportation is partially liquid at temperatures above −50 °C (−58 °F), is considered to be... which is dissolved in a solvent. (g) Cryogenic liquid. A cryogenic liquid means a refrigerated...

  15. Expression of codon-optmized phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene from Glaciecola sp. HTCC2999 in Escherichia coli and its application for C4 chemical production.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2012-08-01

    We examined the expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene from marine bacteria in Escherichia coli using codon optimization. The codon-optimized PEPC gene was expressed in the E. coli K-12 strain W3110. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the codon-optimized PEPC gene was only expressed in E. coli, and measurement of enzyme activity indicated the highest PEPC activity in the E. coli SGJS112 strain that contained the codon-optimized PEPC gene. In fermentation assays, the E. coli SGJS112 produced the highest yield of oxaloacetate using glucose as the source and produced a 20-times increase in the yield of malate compared to the control. We concluded that the codon optimization enabled E. coli to express the PEPC gene derived from the Glaciecola sp. HTCC2999. Also, the expressed protein exhibited an enzymatic activity similar to that of E. coli PEPC and increased the yield of oxaloacetate and malate in an E. coli system.

  16. Roots, cycles and leaves. Expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase gene family in soybean.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stuart; Jenkins, Gareth I; Nimmo, Hugh G

    2004-08-01

    Phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc; EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in the control of central metabolism of higher plants. This phosphorylation is controlled largely at the level of expression of PEPc kinase (PPCK) genes. We have analyzed the expression of both PPCK genes and the PEPC genes that encode PEPc in soybean (Glycine max). Soybean contains at least four PPCK genes. We report the genomic and cDNA sequences of these genes and demonstrate the function of the gene products by in vitro expression and enzyme assays. For two of these genes, GmPPCK2 and GmPPCK3, transcript abundance is highest in nodules and is markedly influenced by supply of photosynthate from the shoots. One gene, GmPPCK4, is under robust circadian control in leaves but not in roots. Its transcript abundance peaks in the latter stages of subjective day, and its promoter contains a sequence very similar to the evening element found in Arabidopsis genes expressed at this time. We report the expression patterns of five PEPC genes, including one encoding a bacterial-type PEPc lacking the phosphorylation site of the plant-type PEPcs. The PEPc expression patterns do not match those of any of the PPCK genes, arguing against the existence of specific PEPc-PPCK expression partners. The PEPC and PPCK gene families in soybean are significantly more complex than previously understood.

  17. Nitrogen-Dependent Carbon Fixation by Picoplankton In Culture and in the Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey Smith; Marguerite W. Coomes; Thomas E. Smith

    2005-04-30

    The pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, was isolated and sequenced. PEPC is an anaplerotic enzyme, but it may also contribute to overall CO2 fixation through β-carboxylation reactions. A consensus sequence generated by aligning the pepc genes of Anabaena variabilis, Anacystis nidulans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 was used to design two sets of primers that were used to amplify segments of Synechococcus PCC 7002 pepc. In order to isolate the gene, the sequence of the PCR product was used to search for the pepc nucleotide sequence from the publicly available genome of Synechococcus PCC 7002. At the time, the genome for this organism had not been completed although sequences of a significant number of its fragments are available in public databases. Thus, the major challenge was to find the pepc gene among those fragments and to complete gaps as necessary. Even though the search did not yield the complete gene, PCR primers were designed to amplify a DNA fragment using a high fidelity thermostable DNA polymerase. An open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 2988 base pairs coding for 995 amino acids was found in the 3066 bp PCR product. The pepc gene had a GC content of 52% and the deduced protein had a calculated molecular mass of 114,049 Da. The amino acid sequence was closely related to that of PEPC from other cyanobacteria, exhibiting 59-61% identity. The sequence differed significantly from plant and E. coli PEPC with only 30% homology. However, comparing the Synechococcus PCC 7002 sequence to the recently resolved E. coli PEPC revealed that most of the essential domains and amino acids involved in PEPC activity were shared by both proteins. The recombinant Synechococcus PCC 7002 PEPC was expressed in E. coli.

  18. Glutamine Induces the N-Dependent Accumulation of mRNAs Encoding Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Carbonic Anhydrase in Detached Maize Leaf Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Sugiharto, Bambang; Suzuki, Iwane; Burnell, James N.; Sugiyama, Tatsuo

    1992-01-01

    We have used detached leaves to study the N-dependent control of expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) genes in maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51). Following supplementation with an N-source and zeatin, PEPC and CA mRNA levels increased in leaves detached from N-deficient maize plants. Addition of methionine sulfoximine (MSX), a specific inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, inhibited the nitrate-dependent increase of PEPC and CA mRNA but did not affect the glutamine-dependent increase of PEPC and CA mRNA levels. Glutamine levels in detached maize leaves treated with various N sources in the presence or absence of MSX correlated with the levels of PEPC and CA mRNA. We conclude that glutamine is the most likely effector for controlling the N-dependent expression of PEPC and CA in maize plants. PMID:16653241

  19. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas - near term -- Class 2. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile petroleum. Specific reservoirs targeted are the Schaben Field in Ness County and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County.

  20. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term -- Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--October 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report represents a summary of the progress during the first year of Budget period 1 of the project. Two examples of advanced technologies developed as part of this project are highlighted along with the use of the Internet to transfer these technologies. The two advanced technologies are a spread-sheet petrophysical analysis and reservoir evaluation (PfEFFER), and a petrophysical/seismic approach to well logs (pseudoseismic). Work continues on multi-disciplinary reservoir characterization at the demonstration site. The potential for incremental primary recovery is being evaluated using the improved reservoir characterization to target infill drilling and evaluate the potential of a horizontal well. The impact of demonstrating additional incremental primary recovery from sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity Mississippian reservoirs would be significant for Kansas and the US.

  1. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.T.

    2011-01-15

    In the second paper of this series, we evaluate two additional well designs for production from permafrost-associated (PA) hydrate deposits. Both designs are within the capabilities of conventional technology. We determine that large volumes of gas can be produced at high rates (several MMSCFD) for long times using either well design. The production approach involves initial fluid withdrawal from the water zone underneath the hydrate-bearing layer (HBL). The production process follows a cyclical pattern, with each cycle composed of two stages: a long stage (months to years) of increasing gas production and decreasing water production, and a short stage (days to weeks) that involves destruction of the secondary hydrate (mainly through warm water injection) that evolves during the first stage, and is followed by a reduction in the fluid withdrawal rate. A well configuration with completion throughout the HBL leads to high production rates, but also the creation of a secondary hydrate barrier around the well that needs to be destroyed regularly by water injection. However, a configuration that initially involves heating of the outer surface of the wellbore and later continuous injection of warm water at low rates (Case C) appears to deliver optimum performance over the period it takes for the exhaustion of the hydrate deposit. Using Case C as the standard, we determine that gas production from PA hydrate deposits increases with the fluid withdrawal rate, the initial hydrate saturation and temperature, and with the formation permeability.

  2. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas, near term, Class 2. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1997-02-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: Specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. Work in this quarter has continued to concentrate on Task 1.2 reservoir characterization and Task 1.3 technology transfer.

  3. Program for Enlightened and Productive Creativity Illustrated with a Moire Patterns Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuk, Keun Cheol; Cramond, Bonnie

    2006-01-01

    Combining both the Western perspective of creativity as productivity and the Eastern perspective of creativity as enlightenment, a Program for Enlightened and Productive Creativity (PEPC) for teaching inquiry was devised. The PEPC describes stages through which a student is guided to solve a problem using increasingly complex observation, inquiry,…

  4. Toward a better knowledge of the molecular evolution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by comparison of partial cDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, H H; Heute, V; Kluge, M

    1998-01-01

    To get deeper insight into the evolution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase we have identified PEPC fragments (about 1,100 bp) of another 12 plants species not yet investigated in this context. The selected plants include one Chlorophyta, two Bryophyta, four Pteridophyta, and five Spermatophyta species. The obtained phylogenetic trees on PEPC isoforms are the most complete ones up to now available. Independent of their manner of construction, the resulting dendrograms are very similar and fully consistent with the main topology as it is postulated for the evolution of the higher terrestrial plants. We found a distinct clustering of the PEPC sequences of the prokaryotes, the algae, and the spermatophytes. PEPC isoforms of the archegoniates are located in the phylogenetic trees between the algae and spermatophytes. Our results strengthen the view that the PEPC is a very useful molecular marker with which to visualize phylogenetic trends both on the metabolic and organismic levels.

  5. Identification and Functional Verification of Archaeal-Type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, a Missing Link in Archaeal Central Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ettema, Thijs J. G.; Makarova, Kira S.; Jellema, Gera L.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Huynen, Martijn A.; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Oost, John

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity has been measured and in some cases even purified from some Archaea, the gene responsible for this activity has not been elucidated. Using sensitive sequence comparison methods, we detected a highly conserved, uncharacterized archaeal gene family that is distantly related to the catalytic core of the canonical PEPC. To verify the predicted function of this archaeal gene family, we cloned a representative from the hyperthermophilic acidophile Sulfolobus solfataricus and functionally produced the corresponding enzyme as a fusion with the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein. The purified fusion protein indeed displayed highly thermostable PEPC activity. The structural and biochemical properties of the characterized archaeal-type PEPC (atPEPC) from S. solfataricus are in good agreement with previously reported biochemical analyses of other archaeal PEPC enzymes. The newly identified atPEPC, with its distinct properties, constitutes yet another example of the versatility of the enzymes of the central carbon metabolic pathways in the archaeal domain. PMID:15516590

  6. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase in Tobacco Leaves Is Activated by Light in a Similar but Not Identical Way as in Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chollet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported the partial purification of a Ca2+- independent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein-serine/threonine kinase (PEPC-PK) from illuminated leaves of N-sufficient tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants (Y.-H. Wang, R. Chollet [1993] FEBS Lett 328: 215-218). We now report that this C3 PEPC-kinase is reversibly light activated in vivo in a time-dependent manner. As the kinase becomes light activated, the activity and L-malate sensitivity of its target protein increases and decreases, respectively. The light activation of tobacco PEPC-PK is prevented by pretreatment of detached leaves with various photosynthesis and cytosolic protein-synthesis inhibitors. Similarly, specific inhibitors of glutamine synthetase block the light activation of tobacco leaf PEPC-kinase under both photorespiratory and nonphotorespiratory conditions. This striking effect is partially and specifically reversed by exogenous glutamine, whereas it has no apparent effect on the light activation of the maize (Zea mays L.) leaf kinase. Using an in situ "activity-gel" phosphorylation assay, we have identified two major Ca2+-independent PEPC-kinase catalytic polypeptides in illuminated tobacco leaves that have the same molecular masses (approximately 30 and 37 kD) as found in illuminated maize leaves. Collectively, these results indicate that the phosphorylation of PEPC in N-sufficient leaves of tobacco (C3) and maize (C4) is regulated through similar but not identical light-signal transduction pathways. PMID:12226305

  7. Induction of a C(4)-like mechanism of CO(2) fixation in Egeria densa, a submersed aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Casati, P; Lara, M V; Andreo, C S

    2000-08-01

    The expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) in Egeria densa leaves was studied under low temperature and light (LTL) following incubation under high temperature and light (HTL), conditions previously shown to induce high and low CO(2) compensation points, respectively. Transfer from LTL to HTL conditions induced increases in the activities and amounts of both enzymes. One NADP-ME isoform was observed in induced and uninduced samples. Two isoforms of PEPC were expressed, with the lower M(r) isoform being induced by HTL. NADP-ME showed properties similar to those of the isoform in C(3) species. The inducible PEPC isoform has a low K(m) for both substrates. PEPC kinetic and regulatory properties (V(max) and K(m) for phosphoenolpyruvate, and I(50) for L-malate) are different in samples taken in the dark from those in the light, indicating that some modification of PEPC may be occurring during the day. Finally, abscisic acid induced the expression of PEPC and NADP-ME in a manner similar to temperature induction, except that the activities of both PEPC isoforms were increased. A different signaling system may exist in this species in response to high temperature or abscisic acid, both of which induce changes in photosynthetic metabolism. PMID:10938377

  8. In Vivo and in Vitro Phosphorylation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Wheat Seeds during Germination.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, L.; Gonzalez, M. C.; Cejudo, F. J.; Vidal, J.; Echevarria, C.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was detected in the aleurone endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) seeds, and specific anti-Sorghum C4 PEPC polyclonal anti-bodies cross-reacted with 103- and 100-kD polypeptides present in dry seeds and seeds that had imbibed; in addition, a new, 108-kD polypeptide was detected 6 h after imbibition. The use of specific anti-phosphorylation-site immunoglobulin G (APS-IgG) identified the presence of a phosphorylation motif equivalent to that found in other plant PEPCs studied so far. The binding of this APS-IgG to the target protein promoted changes in the properties of seed PEPC similar to those produced by phosphorylation, as previously shown for the recombinant Sorghum leaf C4 PEPC. In desalted seed extracts, an endogenous PEPC kinase activity catalyzed a bona fide phosphorylation of the target protein, as deduced from the immunoinhibition of the in vitro phosphorylation reaction by the APS- IgG. In addition, the major, 103-kD PEPC polypeptide was also shown to be radiolabeled in situ 48 h after imbibition in [32P]orthophosphate. The ratio between optimal (pH 8) and suboptimal (pH 7.3 or 7.1) PEPC activity decreased during germination, thereby suggesting a change in catalytic rate related to an in vivo phosphorylation process. These collective data document that the components needed for the regulatory phosphorylation of PEPC are present and functional during germination of wheat seeds. PMID:12226309

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants. Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis. PMID:25588735

  10. Oxaloacetate and malate production in engineered Escherichia coli by expression of codon-optimized phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase2 gene from Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Chang, Kwang Suk; Jin, Eonseon; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2013-01-01

    A new phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene of Dunaliella salina is identified using homology analysis was conducted using PEPC gene of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant E. coli SGJS115 with increased production of malate and oxaloacetate was developed by introducing codon-optimized phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase2 (OPDSPEPC2) gene of Dunaliella salina. E. coli SGJS115 yielded a 9.9 % increase in malate production. In addition, E. coli SGJS115 exhibited two times increase in the yield of oxaloacetate over the E. coli SGJS114 having identified PEPC2 gene obtained from Dunaliella salina.

  11. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  12. Pulsed Power Aspects of the NIF Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A F; Barbosa, F; Fulkerson, E S

    2005-06-09

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) embodies technology essential to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Together with a thin-film polarizer, PEPC functions as an optical switch for the main amplifier cavity, allowing optical pulses to be trapped, and then released, and enabling NIF to take advantage of the attendant gain and cost-savings. Details of the genesis, development, and prototyping of the PEPC are well documented. After moving from its laboratory setting to the NIF facility, PEPC--via its performance during the two-year NIF Early Light (NEL) campaign and its ongoing operation during facility build-out--has proven to be a fully functional system. When complete, NIF will accommodate 192 beams, capable of delivering 1.8 MJ to a fusion target. Forty-eight Plasma Electrode Pockels--driven by nearly 300 high-power, high-voltage pulse generators--will support this complement of beams. As deployed, PEPC is a complex association of state-of-the-art optics; low-voltage and high-voltage electronics; and mechanical, gas, and vacuum subsystems--all under computer control. In this paper, we briefly describe each of these elements, but focus on the pulse power aspects of the PEPC system.

  13. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  14. Design and performance of the beamlet optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.W.; DeYoreo, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments are typically designed with large apertures (>30 cm) to keep the fluence below the damage threshold of the various optical components. Until recently, no optical switch technology could be scaled to the aperture size, aperture shape (square), and switching speed required for the next generation of ICF drivers. This step is critical: The Beamlet multipass amplifier cavity uses a full-aperture optical switch to trap the laser pulse within the cavity and to divert the pulse out of the cavity when it reaches the required energy. By rotating the polarization of the beam, a Pockels cell in the switch controls whether the beam is transmitted through, or reflected from, the polarizer. In this article the authors describe an optical switch technology that does scale to the required aperture size and shape for Beamlet and the porposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, and can employ a thin crystal. This switch consists of a thin-film polarizer and a plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC), the latter originally invented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the 1980s and under further development since 1991. After discussing the PEPC concept, they present the design and optical performance of a 32 x 32 cm{sup 2} prototype PEPC, including discussions of the crystals, the PEPC assembly, the vacuum and gas system, and the high-voltage pulsers. Then they describe the performance of the 37 x 37 cm{sup 2} PEPC construced specifically for the Beamlet laser. Finally, they discuss important technology issues that arose during PEPC development: cathode sputtering, cathode heating, nonuniformities in the switching profile, switch-pulse leakage current, and an estimate of the plasma density and temperature produced during PEPC operation.

  15. Reciprocal Control of Anaplerotic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by in Vivo Monoubiquitination and Phosphorylation in Developing Proteoid Roots of Phosphate-Deficient Harsh Hakea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al3+, Fe3+, and Ca2+ phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme’s activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  16. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum.

  17. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  18. Evolution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity and lipid content during seed maturation of two spring rapeseed cultivars (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Sebei, Khaled; Ouerghi, Zeineb; Kallel, Habib; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2006-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc: EC 4.1.1.31) activity was monitored during seed maturation of two varieties (Hybridol and Pactol) of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.), widely cultivated in Tunisia. In the Hybridol variety, PEPc activity did not exceed 5 micromol h(-1) per gram of fresh weight (FW) during the first stages of maturation. It then highly increased to reach more than 30 micromol h(-1) g(-1)/FW. On the contrary, in the Pactol variety, the evolution of PEPc activity showed a classical curve, i.e. an increase during the most active phase of lipid accumulation in maturating seeds, followed by a rapid decrease until the end of seed maturation. In both varieties, the seed oil was characterised by a high content of oleic acid (C(18:1)), linoleic (C(18:2)) and linolenic acids (C(18:3)). Saturated fatty acids were also present, although decreasing with maturation course. The analysis of the triacylglycerols (TAG) showed that trioleoylglycerol (OOO) and dioleoyllinoleoylglycerol (OOL) were the major species (ca. 35% and ca. 25% of the total respectively). The evolution pattern of fatty acids and TAG contents was similar to that of PEPc activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that PEPc may be involved in fatty acid and triacylglycerol biosynthesis during seed maturation of both rapeseed varieties.

  19. Shared origins of a key enzyme during the evolution of C4 and CAM metabolism.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Monica; Osborne, Colin P; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sage, Rowan F; Hibberd, Julian M; Kelly, Steven; Covshoff, Sarah; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hancock, Lillian; Edwards, Erika J

    2014-07-01

    CAM and C4 photosynthesis are two key plant adaptations that have evolved independently multiple times, and are especially prevalent in particular groups of plants, including the Caryophyllales. We investigate the origin of photosynthetic PEPC, a key enzyme of both the CAM and C4 pathways. We combine phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding PEPC with analyses of RNA sequence data of Portulaca, the only plants known to perform both CAM and C4 photosynthesis. Three distinct gene lineages encoding PEPC exist in eudicots (namely ppc-1E1, ppc-1E2 and ppc-2), one of which (ppc-1E1) was recurrently recruited for use in both CAM and C4 photosynthesis within the Caryophyllales. This gene is present in multiple copies in the cacti and relatives, including Portulaca. The PEPC involved in the CAM and C4 cycles of Portulaca are encoded by closely related yet distinct genes. The CAM-specific gene is similar to genes from related CAM taxa, suggesting that CAM has evolved before C4 in these species. The similar origin of PEPC and other genes involved in the CAM and C4 cycles highlights the shared early steps of evolutionary trajectories towards CAM and C4, which probably diverged irreversibly only during the optimization of CAM and C4 phenotypes. PMID:24638902

  20. Deregulation of Feedback Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Improved Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Frank, Doinita; Rappert, Sugima

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) controls the metabolic flux distribution of anaplerotic pathways. In this study, the feedback inhibition of Corynebacterium glutamicum PEPC was rationally deregulated, and its effect on metabolic flux redistribution was evaluated. Based on rational protein design, six PEPC mutants were designed, and all of them showed significantly reduced sensitivity toward aspartate and malate inhibition. Introducing one of the point mutations (N917G) into the ppc gene, encoding PEPC of the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum LC298, resulted in ∼37% improved lysine production. In vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based metabolic flux analysis showed ca. 20 and 30% increases in the PEPC activity and corresponding flux, respectively, in the mutant strain. Higher demand for NADPH in the mutant strain increased the flux toward pentose phosphate pathway, which increased the supply of NADPH for enhanced lysine production. The present study highlights the importance of allosteric regulation on the flux control of central metabolism. The strategy described here can also be implemented to improve other oxaloacetate-derived products. PMID:24334667

  1. Origin and Reticulate Evolutionary Process of Wheatgrass Elymus trachycaulus (Triticeae: Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongwei; Wu, Panpan; Wu, Dexiang; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    To study origin and evolutionary dynamics of tetraploid Elymus trachycaulus that has been cytologically defined as containing StH genomes, thirteen accessions of E. trachycaulus were analyzed using two low-copy nuclear gene Pepc (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) and Rpb2 (the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II), and one chloroplast region trnL–trnF (spacer between the tRNA Leu (UAA) gene and the tRNA-Phe (GAA) gene). Our chloroplast data indicated that Pseudoroegneria (St genome) was the maternal donor of E. trachycaulus. Rpb2 data indicated that the St genome in E. trachycaulus was originated from either P. strigosa, P. stipifolia, P. spicata or P. geniculate. The Hordeum (H genome)-like sequences of E. trachycaulus are polyphyletic in the Pepc tree, suggesting that the H genome in E. trachycaulus was contributed by multiple sources, whether due to multiple origins or introgression resulting from subsequent hybridization. Failure to recovering St copy of Pepc sequence in most accessions of E. trachycaulus might be caused by genome convergent evolution in allopolyploids. Multiple copies of H-like Pepc sequence from each accession with relative large deletions and insertions might be caused by either instability of Pepc sequence in H- genome or incomplete concerted evolution. Our results highlighted complex evolutionary history of E. trachycaulus. PMID:25946188

  2. Origin and Reticulate Evolutionary Process of Wheatgrass Elymus trachycaulus (Triticeae: Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongwei; Wu, Panpan; Wu, Dexiang; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    To study origin and evolutionary dynamics of tetraploid Elymus trachycaulus that has been cytologically defined as containing StH genomes, thirteen accessions of E. trachycaulus were analyzed using two low-copy nuclear gene Pepc (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) and Rpb2 (the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II), and one chloroplast region trnL-trnF (spacer between the tRNA Leu (UAA) gene and the tRNA-Phe (GAA) gene). Our chloroplast data indicated that Pseudoroegneria (St genome) was the maternal donor of E. trachycaulus. Rpb2 data indicated that the St genome in E. trachycaulus was originated from either P. strigosa, P. stipifolia, P. spicata or P. geniculate. The Hordeum (H genome)-like sequences of E. trachycaulus are polyphyletic in the Pepc tree, suggesting that the H genome in E. trachycaulus was contributed by multiple sources, whether due to multiple origins or introgression resulting from subsequent hybridization. Failure to recovering St copy of Pepc sequence in most accessions of E. trachycaulus might be caused by genome convergent evolution in allopolyploids. Multiple copies of H-like Pepc sequence from each accession with relative large deletions and insertions might be caused by either instability of Pepc sequence in H- genome or incomplete concerted evolution. Our results highlighted complex evolutionary history of E. trachycaulus. PMID:25946188

  3. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  4. High activity and stability of codon-optimized phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Photobacterium profundum SS9 at low temperatures and its application for in vitro production of oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Hong, Soohye; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2014-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of Photobacterium profundum SS9 can be expressed and purified using the Escherichia coli expression system. In this study, a codon-optimized PEPC gene (OPPP) was used to increase expression levels. We confirmed OPPP expression and purified it from extracts of recombinant E. coli SGJS117 harboring the OPPP gene. The purified OPPP showed a specific activity value of 80.3 U/mg protein. The OPPP was stable under low temperature (5-30 °C) and weakly basic conditions (pH 8.5-10). The enzymatic ability of OPPP was investigated for in vitro production of oxaloacetate using phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and bicarbonate. Only samples containing the OPPP, PEP, and bicarbonate resulted in oxaloacetate production. OPPP production system using E. coli could be a platform technology to produce high yields of heterogeneous gene and provide the PEPC enzyme, which has high enzyme activity.

  5. Deployment, Commissioning and Operation of Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Primdahl, K A; Watson, J J; O'Brien, M D; Funkhouser, W G; Biltoft, P J; Shelton, R T; Tapley, W C; DeHope, W J

    2003-12-01

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPCs) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cells allow the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass main amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, also configured in a 4 x 1 array, forms an optical switch that is key to achieving the required multi-pass operation. The operation of the PEPC is a follows: Before the arrival of the laser pulse, optically transparent, low-density helium plasmas are initiated to serve as electrodes for the KDP crystals mounted in the Pockels cell. During beam propagation through the main laser cavity a longitudinal electric field is impressed on the electro-optic crystals. The polarization of the propagating beams is rotated by 90{sup o} on each of two passes, thereby allowing the beam to be trapped in the main laser amplifier cavity for a total of four passes before being switched out into the cavity spatial filter. The physics aspects of the PEPC are well documented. Consequently, this paper will emphasize the PEPC subsystem in the context of its role and relevance within the broader NIF laser system, provide a view of the complexity of the subsystem and give an overview of PEPC's interactions with other elements of NIF, including interfaces to the Beamline Infrastructure, the NIF Timing Subsystem, and the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS); along with dependence on the Optics Production, Transport and Handling (T&H), and Assembly, Integration and Refurbishment (AIR) and Operations organizations. Further, we will discuss implementation details related to the functional blocks and individual components that comprise PEPC, with particular emphasis on the unique constraints placed on the elements and the attendant

  6. 76 FR 70483 - Environmental Impact Statement and General Management Plan, Paterson Great Falls National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Commission will be involved early in the planning process and will remain actively involved throughout the... will also be placed on the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) Web site ( http..., Community Planner/Team Leader, National Park Service, Park Planning and Special Studies, 200 Chestnut...

  7. 78 FR 8582 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Brooks River Visitor Access for Katmai National Park and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... online at the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) Web site . Hard copies and compact... Register on that date (77 FR 37707). The public comment period ran from June 22 through August 20, 2012... attended the public meetings. During the 60-day comment period, comments were received via hard copy...

  8. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  9. 77 FR 62257 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Herring River Restoration Project, Cape Cod National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Herring River Restoration Project, Cape... Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Herring River Restoration Project in Cape Cod National Seashore... Restoration Project will be available for public review online at the NPS's PEPC Web site (...

  10. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2′,3′,4′,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2′,3′,4′-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  11. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2‧,3‧,4‧,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2‧,3‧,4‧-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  12. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  13. The Importance of the Strictly Conserved, C-terminal Glycine Residue in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Overall Catalysis: Mutagenesis and Truncation of GLY-961 in the Sorghum C4 Leaf Isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,W.; Ahmed, S.; Moriyama, H.; Chollet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a 'multifaceted', allosteric enzyme involved in C4 acid metabolism in green plants/microalgae and prokaryotes. Before the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of maize C4 leaf and Escherichia coli PEPC, our truncation analysis of the sorghum C4 homologue revealed important roles for the enzyme's C-terminal {alpha}-helix and its appended QNTG{sup 961} tetrapeptide in polypeptide stability and overall catalysis, respectively. Collectively, these functional and structural observations implicate the importance of the PEPC C-terminal tetrapeptide for both catalysis and negative allosteric regulation. We have now more finely dissected this element of PEPC structure-function by modification of the absolutely conserved C-terminal glycine of the sorghum C4 isoform by site-specific mutagenesis (G961(A/V/D)) and truncation ({Delta}C1/C4). Although the C4 polypeptide failed to accumulate in a PEPC{sup -} strain (XH11) of E. coli transformed with the Asp mutant, the other variants were produced at wild-type levels. Although neither of these four mutants displayed an apparent destabilization of the purified PEPC homotetramer, all were compromised catalytically in vivo and in vitro. Functional complementation of XH11 cells under selective growth conditions was restricted progressively by the Ala, {Delta}C1 and Val, and {Delta}C4 modifications. Likewise, steady-state kinetic analysis of the purified mutant enzymes revealed corresponding negative trends in k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K0.5 (phosphoenolpyruvate) but not in K{sub 0.5} or the Hill coefficient. Homology modeling of these sorghum C-terminal variants against the structure of the closely related maize C4 isoform predicted perturbations in active-site molecular cavities and/or ion-pairing with essential, invariant Arg-638. These collective observations reveal that even a modest, neutral alteration of the PEPC C-terminal hydrogen atom side chain is detrimental to enzyme

  14. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  15. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta): Evidence for the predominant operation of the c3 cycle and the contribution of {beta}-carboxylases to the active anaplerotic reaction.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2009-02-01

    The coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) is a representative and unique marine phytoplankton species that fixes inorganic carbon by photosynthesis and calci-fication. We examined the initial process of photosynthetic carbon assimilation by analyses of metabolites, enzymes and genes. When the cells were incubated with a radioactive substrate (2.3 mM NaH(14)CO(3)) for 10 s under illumination, 70% of the (14)C was incorporated into the 80% methanol-soluble fraction. Eighty-five and 15% of (14)C in the soluble fraction was incorporated into phosphate esters (P-esters), including the C(3) cycle intermediates and a C(4) compound, aspartate, respectively. A pulse-chase experiment showed that (14)C in P-esters was mainly transferred into lipids, while [(14)C]aspartate, [(14)C]alanine and [(14)C]glutamate levels remained almost constant. These results indicate that the C(3) cycle functions as the initial pathway of carbon assimilation and that beta-carboxylation contributes to the production of amino acids in subsequent metabolism. Transcriptional analysis of beta-carboxylases such as pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) revealed that PYC and PEPC transcripts were greatly increased under illumination, whereas the PEPCK transcript decreased remarkably. PEPC activity was higher in light-grown cells than in dark-adapted cells. PYC activity was detected in isolated chloroplasts of light-grown cells. According to analysis of their deduced N-terminal sequence, PYC and PEPC are predicted to be located in the chloroplasts and mitochondria, respectively. These results suggest that E. huxleyi possesses unique carbon assimila-tion mechanisms in which beta-carboxylation by both PYC and PEPC plays important roles in different organelles.

  16. The intrinsic pKa values for phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine in phosphatidylcholine host bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, F C; Ojcius, D M; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    Potentiometric titrations and surface potential measurements have been used to determine the intrinsic pKa values of both the carboxyl and amino groups of phosphatidylserine (PS) in mixed vesicles of PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC), and also of the amino group of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in mixed PE-PC vesicles. The pKa of the carboxyl group of PS in liposomes with different PS/PC lipid ratios measured by the two different methods is 3.6 +/- 0.1, and the pKa of its amino group is 9.8 +/- 0.1. The pKa of the amino group of PE in PE-PC vesicles, determined solely by surface potential measurements, is 9.6 +/- 0.1. These pKa values are independent of the aqueous phase ionic strength and of the effect of the liposome's surface potential due to the presence of these partially charged lipids. PMID:3955180

  17. Effects of granulation on organic acid metabolism and its relation to mineral elements in Citrus grandis juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-You; Wang, Ping; Qi, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Chen-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Liao, Xin-Yan; Wang, Liu-Qing; Zhu, Dong-Huang; Chen, Li-Song

    2014-02-15

    We investigated the effects of granulation on organic acid metabolism and its relation to mineral elements in 'Guanximiyou' pummelo (Citrus grandis) juice sacs. Granulated juice sacs had decreased concentrations of citrate and isocitrate, thus lowering juice sac acidity. By contrast, malate concentration was higher in granulated juice sacs than in normal ones. The reduction in citrate concentration might be caused by increased degradation, as indicated by enhanced aconitase activity, whilst the increase in malate concentration might be caused by increased biosynthesis, as indicated by enhanced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that the activities of most acid-metabolizing enzymes were regulated at the transcriptional level, whilst post-translational modifications might influence the PEPC activity. Granulation led to increased accumulation of mineral elements (especially phosphorus, magnesium, sulphur, zinc and copper) in juice sacs, which might be involved in the incidence of granulation in pummelo fruits.

  18. Comparison of plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from rice: identification of two plant-specific regulatory regions of the allosteric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Masayuki; Suzuki, Rintaro; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Miyao, Mitsue

    2015-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme of primary metabolism in bacteria, algae and vascular plants, and it undergoes allosteric regulation by various metabolic effectors. Rice (Oryza sativa) has five plant-type PEPCs, four cytosolic and one chloroplastic. We investigated their kinetic properties using recombinant proteins and found that, like most plant-type PEPCs, rice cytosolic isozymes were activated by glucose 6-phosphate and by alkaline pH. In contrast, no such activation was observed for the chloroplastic isozyme, Osppc4. In addition, Osppc4 showed low affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and very low sensitivities to allosteric inhibitors aspartate and glutamate. By comparing the isozyme amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures simulated on the basis of the reported crystal structures, we identified two regions where Osppc4 has unique features that can be expected to affect its kinetic properties. One is the N-terminal extension; replacement of the extension of Osppc2a (cytosolic) with that from Osppc4 reduced the aspartate and glutamate sensitivities to about one-tenth of the wild-type values but left the PEP affinity unaffected. The other is the N-terminal loop, in which a conserved lysine at the N-terminal end is replaced with a glutamate-alanine pair in Osppc4. Replacement of the lysine of Osppc2a with glutamate-alanine lowered the PEP affinity to a quarter of the wild-type level (down to the Osppc4 level), without affecting inhibitor sensitivity. Both the N-terminal extension and the N-terminal loop are specific to plant-type PEPCs, suggesting that plant-type isozymes acquired these regions so that their activity could be regulated properly at the sites where they function. PMID:25505033

  19. Infrageneric phylogeny and temporal divergence of Sorghum (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) based on low-copy nuclear and plastid sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Huan; Wen, Jun; Peterson, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The infrageneric phylogeny and temporal divergence of Sorghum were explored in the present study. Sequence data of two low-copy nuclear (LCN) genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 4 (Pepc4) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), from 79 accessions of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides together with those from outgroups were used for maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses. Bayesian dating based on three plastid DNA markers (ndhA intron, rpl32-trnL, and rps16 intron) was used to estimate the ages of major diversification events in Sorghum. The monophyly of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides (with the latter nested within Sorghum) was strongly supported by the Pepc4 data using BI analysis, and the monophyly of Sorghum was strongly supported by GBSSI data using both ML and BI analyses. Sorghum was divided into three clades in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms: the subg. Sorghum lineage; the subg. Parasorghum and Stiposorghum lineage; and the subg. Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum lineage. Two LCN homoeologous loci of Cleistachne sorghoides were first discovered in the same accession. Sorghum arundinaceum, S. bicolor, S. x drummondii, S. propinquum, and S. virgatum were closely related to S. x almum in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms, suggesting that they may be potential genome donors to S. almum. Multiple LCN and plastid allelic variants have been identified in S. halepense of subg. Sorghum. The crown ages of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides and subg. Sorghum are estimated to be 12.7 million years ago (Mya) and 8.6 Mya, respectively. Molecular results support the recognition of three distinct subgenera in Sorghum: subg. Chaetosorghum with two sections, each with a single species, subg. Parasorghum with 17 species, and subg. Sorghum with nine species and we also provide a new nomenclatural combination, Sorghum sorghoides.

  20. Ectopic Expression of GsPPCK3 and SCMRP in Medicago sativa Enhances Plant Alkaline Stress Tolerance and Methionine Content

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Chaoyue; DuanMu, Huizi; Yu, Yang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    So far, it has been suggested that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs) and PEPC kinases (PPCKs) fulfill several important non-photosynthetic functions. However, the biological functions of soybean PPCKs, especially in alkali stress response, are not yet well known. In previous studies, we constructed a Glycine soja transcriptional profile, and identified three PPCK genes (GsPPCK1, GsPPCK2 and GsPPCK3) as potential alkali stress responsive genes. In this study, we confirmed the induced expression of GsPPCK3 under alkali stress and investigated its tissue expression specificity by using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Then we ectopically expressed GsPPCK3 in Medicago sativa and found that GsPPCK3 overexpression improved plant alkali tolerance, as evidenced by lower levels of relative ion leakage and MDA content and higher levels of chlorophyll content and root activity. In this respect, we further co-transformed the GsPPCK3 and SCMRP genes into alfalfa, and demonstrated the increased alkali tolerance of GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines. Further investigation revealed that GsPPCK3-SCMRP co-overexpression promoted the PEPC activity, net photosynthetic rate and citric acid content of transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. Moreover, we also observed the up-regulated expression of PEPC, CS (citrate synthase), H+-ATPase and NADP-ME genes in GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. As expected, we demonstrated that GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines displayed higher methionine content than wild type alfalfa. Taken together, results presented in this study supported the positive role of GsPPCK3 in plant response to alkali stress, and provided an effective way to simultaneously improve plant alkaline tolerance and methionine content, at least in legume crops. PMID:24586886

  1. Infrageneric Phylogeny and Temporal Divergence of Sorghum (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) Based on Low-Copy Nuclear and Plastid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Huan; Wen, Jun; Peterson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The infrageneric phylogeny and temporal divergence of Sorghum were explored in the present study. Sequence data of two low-copy nuclear (LCN) genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 4 (Pepc4) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), from 79 accessions of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides together with those from outgroups were used for maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses. Bayesian dating based on three plastid DNA markers (ndhA intron, rpl32-trnL, and rps16 intron) was used to estimate the ages of major diversification events in Sorghum. The monophyly of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides (with the latter nested within Sorghum) was strongly supported by the Pepc4 data using BI analysis, and the monophyly of Sorghum was strongly supported by GBSSI data using both ML and BI analyses. Sorghum was divided into three clades in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms: the subg. Sorghum lineage; the subg. Parasorghum and Stiposorghum lineage; and the subg. Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum lineage. Two LCN homoeologous loci of Cleistachne sorghoides were first discovered in the same accession. Sorghum arundinaceum, S. bicolor, S. x drummondii, S. propinquum, and S. virgatum were closely related to S. x almum in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms, suggesting that they may be potential genome donors to S. almum. Multiple LCN and plastid allelic variants have been identified in S. halepense of subg. Sorghum. The crown ages of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides and subg. Sorghum are estimated to be 12.7 million years ago (Mya) and 8.6 Mya, respectively. Molecular results support the recognition of three distinct subgenera in Sorghum: subg. Chaetosorghum with two sections, each with a single species, subg. Parasorghum with 17 species, and subg. Sorghum with nine species and we also provide a new nomenclatural combination, Sorghum sorghoides. PMID:25122516

  2. Key Amino Acid Residues of Ankyrin-Sensitive Phosphatidylethanolamine/Phosphatidylcholine-Lipid Binding Site of βI-Spectrin

    PubMed Central

    Wolny, Marcin; Grzybek, Michał; Bok, Ewa; Chorzalska, Anna; Lenoir, Marc; Czogalla, Aleksander; Adamczyk, Klaudia; Kolondra, Adam; Diakowski, Witold; Overduin, Michael; Sikorski, Aleksander F.

    2011-01-01

    It was shown previously that an ankyrin-sensitive, phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylcholine (PE/PC) binding site maps to the N-terminal part of the ankyrin-binding domain of β-spectrin (ankBDn). Here we have identified the amino acid residues within this domain which are responsible for recognizing monolayers and bilayers composed of PE/PC mixtures. In vitro binding studies revealed that a quadruple mutant with substituted hydrophobic residues W1771, L1775, M1778 and W1779 not only failed to effectively bind PE/PC, but its residual PE/PC-binding activity was insensitive to inhibition with ankyrin. Structure prediction and analysis, supported by in vitro experiments, suggests that “opening” of the coiled-coil structure underlies the mechanism of this interaction. Experiments on red blood cells and HeLa cells supported the conclusions derived from the model and in vitro lipid-protein interaction results, and showed the potential physiological role of this binding. We postulate that direct interactions between spectrin ankBDn and PE-rich domains play an important role in stabilizing the structure of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton. PMID:21738695

  3. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from cherimoya fruit: properties, kinetics and effects of high CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, T; Escribano, M I; Merodio, C

    2001-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) regulatory properties were studied in non-photosynthetic (mesocarp) and photosynthetic (peel) tissues from cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit stored in air, in order to gain a better understanding of in vivo enzyme regulation. Analyses were also performed with fruit treated with 20% CO(2)-20% O(2) to define the role of PEPC as part of an adaptive mechanism to high external carbon dioxide levels. The results revealed that the special kinetic characteristics of the enzyme from mesocarp--high V(max) and low sensibility to L-malate inhibition - are related to the active acid metabolism of these fruits and point to a high rate of reassimilation of respired CO(2) into keto-acids. With respect to fruit stored in air, PEPC in crude extracts from CO(2)-treated cherimoyas gave a similar V(max) (1.12+/-0.03 microkat x mg(-1) protein), a lower apparent K(m) (68+/-9 microM for PEP) and a higher I(50) of L-malate (5.95+/-0.3 mM). These kinetic values showed the increase in the affinity of this enzyme toward one of its substrate, PEP, by elevated external CO(2) concentrations. The lower K(m) value and lower sensitivity to L-malate are consistent with higher in vivo carboxylation reaction efficiency in CO(2)-treated cherimoyas, while pointing to an additional enzyme regulation system via CO(2). PMID:11730863

  4. Carboxylase Levels and Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Claisse, L. M.; Stoppani, A. O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphopyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) were compared in wild-type bakers' yeast (I), a cytoplasmic-respiratory mutant (II), a biotin-deficient wild-type yeast (III), and a biotin-deficient respiratory mutant (IV). PC activities were greatly reduced in III and IV, whereas PEPC was reduced in II and IV. Malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) could not be detected in any of the yeasts. With yeast I growing on glucose as the sole carbon source, PEPC decreased to negligible levels during the logarithmic phase of growth (glucose repression effect), whereas PC increased. Both enzymes reverted to their original levels during the stationary phase, when glucose in the medium was exhausted. In agreement with the leading role of PC for CO2 assimilation, the rates of 14CO2 fixation in yeasts I and II were approximately equal and were much higher than that in yeast IV. With I and II, most of the 14C was distributed similarly in oxalacetate derivatives; with yeast IV, most of 14C appeared in a compound apparently unrelated to CO2 fixation via C4-dicarboxylic acids. PMID:5732499

  5. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  6. Transgenic maize lines with cell-type specific expression of fluorescent proteins in plastids.

    PubMed

    Sattarzadeh, Amir; Fuller, Jonathan; Moguel, Salvador; Wostrikoff, Katia; Sato, Shirley; Covshoff, Sarah; Clemente, Tom; Hanson, Maureen; Stern, David B

    2010-02-01

    Plastid number and morphology vary dramatically between cell types and at different developmental stages. Furthermore, in C4 plants such as maize, chloroplast ultrastructure and biochemical functions are specialized in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which differentiate acropetally from the proplastid form in the leaf base. To develop visible markers for maize plastids, we have created a series of stable transgenics expressing fluorescent proteins fused to either the maize ubiquitin promoter, the mesophyll-specific phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepC) promoter, or the bundle sheath-specific Rubisco small subunit 1 (RbcS) promoter. Multiple independent events were examined and revealed that maize codon-optimized versions of YFP and GFP were particularly well expressed, and that expression was stably inherited. Plants carrying PepC promoter constructs exhibit YFP expression in mesophyll plastids and the RbcS promoter mediated expression in bundle sheath plastids. The PepC and RbcS promoter fusions also proved useful for identifying plastids in organs such as epidermis, silks, roots and trichomes. These tools will inform future plastid-related studies of wild-type and mutant maize plants and provide material from which different plastid types may be isolated. PMID:20051034

  7. CO2-fixing enzymes and phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocio; Valero, Adela; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2009-07-23

    CO2 stimulates the development of many of the intestinal helminths that are able to fix CO2 by means of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), such as Hysterothylacium aduncum. We determined the activity of CO2-fixing enzymes such as PEPCK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), although no significant activity was detected for pyruvate carboxylase or carboxylating-malic enzyme. The former act on phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield oxalacetate. In the helminths studied, PEP has a vital role in glucidic metabolism. Consequently, we determined the activity of other enzymes involved in the crossroad of PEP, such as pyruvate kinase (PK), lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase. All enzymes detected showed significant variations in activity during the in vitro development of the parasite from the third larval stage to mature adult. Fixing of CO2 by PEPCK decreased during development (from 228 to 115 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), while that by PEPC increased (from 19 to 46 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein). This enzyme, which is rare in animals, could play a part in detecting levels of free phosphate, releasing it from PEP when required for processes such as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. PK, which showed increasing activity during development up to immature adult (from 56 to 82 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), could act in combination with PEPC to obtain energy in the cytosol (in the form of ATP) and in the mitochondria (possible destination of the pyruvate formed), compensating for the decrease in activity of PEPCK. PMID:19750810

  8. Transgenic maize lines with cell-type specific expression of fluorescent proteins in plastids.

    PubMed

    Sattarzadeh, Amir; Fuller, Jonathan; Moguel, Salvador; Wostrikoff, Katia; Sato, Shirley; Covshoff, Sarah; Clemente, Tom; Hanson, Maureen; Stern, David B

    2010-02-01

    Plastid number and morphology vary dramatically between cell types and at different developmental stages. Furthermore, in C4 plants such as maize, chloroplast ultrastructure and biochemical functions are specialized in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which differentiate acropetally from the proplastid form in the leaf base. To develop visible markers for maize plastids, we have created a series of stable transgenics expressing fluorescent proteins fused to either the maize ubiquitin promoter, the mesophyll-specific phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepC) promoter, or the bundle sheath-specific Rubisco small subunit 1 (RbcS) promoter. Multiple independent events were examined and revealed that maize codon-optimized versions of YFP and GFP were particularly well expressed, and that expression was stably inherited. Plants carrying PepC promoter constructs exhibit YFP expression in mesophyll plastids and the RbcS promoter mediated expression in bundle sheath plastids. The PepC and RbcS promoter fusions also proved useful for identifying plastids in organs such as epidermis, silks, roots and trichomes. These tools will inform future plastid-related studies of wild-type and mutant maize plants and provide material from which different plastid types may be isolated.

  9. Discrimination in the dark. Resolving the interplay between metabolic and physical constraints to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the crassulacean acid metabolism cycle.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-02-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online delta13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of delta13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (p(i)/p(a)) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, g(i), was 0.044 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1). A higher estimate of g(i) (0.085 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1)) was needed to account for the modeled and measured delta18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of g(i) from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of -5.5 per thousand between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase delta13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing delta13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry.

  10. Photosynthetic pathway diversity in a seasonal pool community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.

    1999-01-01

    1. Photosynthetic pathway diversity was evaluated for the dominant species in a seasonally aquatic community in the south-western USA using 14C pulse-chase techniques.2. Under submerged conditions, only about half of the species were clearly C3, three of the 15 dominants were CAM, one species was C4 and three were potentially assimilating carbon with both C3 and C4 fixation.3. During the brief terrestrial stage in the life history of these amphibious plants, both the CAM and the C3 + C4 species switched to C3, whereas the C4 species did not switch.4. Numerous variations were apparent; for example, the C4 species, while exhibiting a biochemical pathway indistinguishable from terrestrial C4 plants, lacked Kranz anatomy in the aquatic foliage. Also, despite well-developed CAM in several species, others exhibited low-level diel changes in acidity, apparently not indicative of CAM.5. Species with C4 or CAM CO2 concentrating mechanisms lacked the capacity for bicarbonate uptake, an alternative CO2 concentrating mechanism found in certain C3 species in this community.6. Rubisco/PEPC in aquatic foliage was higher in C3 species than in C4, CAM or putative C3 + C4species. In the terrestrial phase, as expected, the switch from CAM or C3 + C4 to strictly C3assimilation was associated with a substantial increase in Rubisco/PEPC. Quite unexpected, however, was the substantial increase in this ratio in terrestrial C3 foliage. It is hypothesized that submerged C3 plants utilize PEPC for recycling of respiratory CO2 and/or C4 phototrophism under field conditions of limited CO2 and O2 saturation, and this is lost in the terrestrial foliage.

  11. Photosynthetic responses of a C(3) and three C(4) species of the genus Panicum (s.l.) with different metabolic subtypes to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Sabrina U; Brüggemann, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    Young plants of Panicum bisulcatum (C(3)), Zuloagaea bulbosa [NADP-malic enzyme (ME)-C(4)], P. miliaceum (NAD-ME-C(4)) and Urochloa maxima [phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK)-C(4)] were subjected to drought stress (DS) in soil for 6 days. The C(3) species showed severe wilting symptoms at higher soil water potential (-1.1 MPa) and relative leaf water content (77 %) than in the case of the C(4) species (-1.5 to -1.7 MPa; 58-64 %). DS decreased photosynthesis, both under atmospheric and under saturating CO(2). Stomatal limitation of net photosynthesis (P(N)) in the C(3), but not in the C(4) species was indicated by P(N)/C(o) curves. Chlorophyll fluorescence of photosystem II, resulting from different cell types in the four species, indicated NADPH accumulation and non-stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in all four species, even under high CO(2). In the NAD-ME-C(4) and the PCK-C(4) species, DS plants showed increased violaxanthin de-epoxidase rates. Biochemical analyses of carboxylating enzymes and in vitro enzyme activities of the C(4) enzymes identified the most likely non-stomatal limiting steps of photosynthesis. In P. bisulcatum, declining RubisCO content and activity would explain the findings. In Z. bulbosa, all photosynthesis enzymes declined significantly; photosynthesis is probably limited by the turnover rate of the PEPC reaction. In P. miliaceum, all enzyme levels remained fairly constant under DS, but photosynthesis can be limited by feedback inhibition of the Calvin cycle, resulting in asp inhibition of PEPC. In U. maxima, declines of in vivo PEPC activity and feedback inhibition of the Calvin cycle are the main candidates for non-stomatal limitation of photosynthesis under DS.

  12. Photosynthetic pathway diversity in a seasonal pool community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    1. Photosynthetic pathway diversity was evaluated for the dominant species in a seasonally aquatic community in the south-western USA using 14C pulse-chase techniques. 2. Under submerged conditions, only about half of the species were clearly C3, three of the 15 dominants were CAM, one species was C4 and three were potentially assimilating carbon with both C3 and C4 fixation. 3. During the brief terrestrial stage in the life history of these amphibious plants, both the CAM and the C3 + C4 species switched to C3, whereas the C4 species did not switch. 4. Numerous variations were apparent; for example, the C4 species, while exhibiting a biochemical pathway indistinguishable from terrestrial C4 plants, lacked Kranz anatomy in the aquatic foliage. Also, despite well-developed CAM in several species, others exhibited low-level diel changes in acidity, apparently not indicative of CAM. 5. Species with C4 or CAM CO2 concentrating mechanisms lacked the capacity for bicarbonate uptake, an alternative CO2 concentrating mechanism found in certain C3 species in this community. 6. Rubisco/PEPC in aquatic foliage was higher in C3 species than in C4, CAM or putative C3 + C4 species. In the terrestrial phase, as expected, the switch from CAM or C3 + C4 to strictly C3 assimilation was associated with a substantial increase in Rubisco/PEPC. Quite unexpected, however, was the substantial increase in this ratio in terrestrial C3 foliage. It is hypothesized that submerged C3 plants utilize PEPC for recycling of respiratory CO2 and/or C4 phototrophism under field conditions of limited CO2 and O2 saturation, and this is lost in the terrestrial foliage.

  13. NIF Periscope Wall Modal Study Comparison of Results for 2 FEA Models with 2 Modal Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Eli, M W; Gerhard, M A; Lee, C L; Sommer, S C; Woehrle, T G

    2000-10-26

    This report summarizes experimentally and numerically determined modal properties for one of the reinforced concrete end walls of the NIF Periscope Support Structure in Laser Bay 1. Two methods were used to determine these modal properties: (1) Computational finite-element analyses (modal extraction process); and (2) Experimental modal analysis based on measured test data. This report also includes experimentally determined modal properties for a prototype LM3/Polarizer line-replaceable unit (LRU) and a prototype PEPC LRU. Two important parameters, used during the design phase, are validated through testing [ref 1]. These parameters are the natural frequencies and modal damping (of the system in question) for the first several global modes of vibration. Experimental modal testing provides these modal values, along with the corresponding mode shapes. Another important parameter, the input excitation (expected during normal operation of the NIF laser system) [ref 1], can be verified by performing a series of ambient vibration measurements in the vicinity of the particular system (or subsystem) of interest. The topic of ambient input excitation will be covered in a separate report. Due to the large mass of the Periscope Pedestal, it is difficult to excite the entire series of Periscope Pedestal Walls all at once. It was decided that the experimental modal tests would be performed on just one Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1. Experimental modal properties for the Periscope End Wall have been used to validate and update the FE analyses. Results from the analyses and modal tests support the conclusion that the Periscope Pedestal will not exceed the stability budget, which is described in reference 1. The results of the modal tests for the Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1 have provided examples of modal properties that can be derived from future modal tests of the entire Periscope Assembly (excluding the LRU's). This next series of larger modal tests can be performed

  14. Different Growth and Physiological Responses to Cadmium of the Three Miscanthus Species

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haipeng; Hong, Chuntao; Chen, Xiaomin; Xu, Yanxia; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Dean; Zheng, Bingsong

    2016-01-01

    Miscanthus has been proposed as a promising crop for phytoremediation due to its high biomass yield and remarkable adaptability to different environments. However, little is known about the resistance of Miscanthus spp. to cadmium (Cd). To determine any differences in resistance of Miscanthus to Cd, we examined plant growth, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), activities of anti-oxidant and C4 photosynthetic enzymes, concentrations of Cd in leaves and roots, and observed the chloroplast structure in three Miscanthus species treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 μM Cd in solutions. Miscanthus sinensis showed more sensitivity to Cd, including sharp decreases in growth, Pn, PEPC activity and damage to chloroplast structure, and the highest H2O2 and Cd concentrations in leaves and roots after Cd treatments. Miscanthus sacchariflorus showed higher resistance to Cd and better growth, had the highest Pn and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activities and integrative chloroplast structure and the lowest hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and leaf and root Cd concentrations. The results could play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of Cd tolerance in plants and in application of phytoremediation. PMID:27070918

  15. Serodiagnosis of Lyme disease by kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant VlsE1 or peptide antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi compared with 2-tiered testing using whole-cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Rendi Murphree; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Schriefer, Martin E; Gilmore, Robert D; Philipp, Mario T; Steere, Allen C; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Johnson, Barbara J B

    2003-04-15

    In a study of US patients with Lyme disease, immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM antibody responses to recombinant Borrelia burgdorferi antigen VlsE1 (rVlsE1), IgG responses to a synthetic peptide homologous to a conserved internal sequence of VlsE (C6), and IgM responses to a synthetic peptide comprising the C-terminal 10 amino acid residues of a B. burgdorferi outer-surface protein C (pepC10) were evaluated by kinetic enzyme-linked immunoassay. At 99% specificity, the overall sensitivities for detecting IgG antibody to rVlsE1 or C6 in samples from patients with diverse manifestations of Lyme disease were equivalent to that of 2-tiered testing. When data were considered in parallel, 2 combinations (IgG responses to either rVlsE1 or C6 in parallel with IgM responses to pepC10) maintained high specificity (98%) and were significantly more sensitive than 2-tiered analysis in detecting antibodies to B. burgdorferi in patients with acute erythema migrans. In later stages of Lyme disease, the sensitivities of the in parallel tests and 2-tiered testing were high and statistically equivalent.

  16. Phosphatidylethanolamine Is a Key Regulator of Membrane Fluidity in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Noyon, Caroline; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-02-12

    Adequate membrane fluidity is required for a variety of key cellular processes and in particular for proper function of membrane proteins. In most eukaryotic cells, membrane fluidity is known to be regulated by fatty acid desaturation and cholesterol, although some cells, such as insect cells, are almost devoid of sterol synthesis. We show here that insect and mammalian cells present similar microviscosity at their respective physiological temperature. To investigate how both sterols and phospholipids control fluidity homeostasis, we quantified the lipidic composition of insect SF9 and mammalian HEK 293T cells under normal or sterol-modified condition. As expected, insect cells show minimal sterols compared with mammalian cells. A major difference is also observed in phospholipid content as the ratio of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) is inverted (4 times higher in SF9 cells). In vitro studies in liposomes confirm that both cholesterol and PE can increase rigidity of the bilayer, suggesting that both can be used by cells to maintain membrane fluidity. We then show that exogenously increasing the cholesterol amount in SF9 membranes leads to a significant decrease in PE:PC ratio whereas decreasing cholesterol in HEK 293T cells using statin treatment leads to an increase in the PE:PC ratio. In all cases, the membrane fluidity is maintained, indicating that both cell types combine regulation by sterols and phospholipids to control proper membrane fluidity.

  17. Invasion percolation between two sites in two, three, and four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2009-06-01

    The mass distribution of invaded clusters in non-trapping invasion percolation between an injection site and an extraction site has been studied, in two, three, and four dimensions. This study is an extension of the recent study focused on two dimensions by Araújo et al. [A.D. Araújo, T.F. Vasconcelos, A.A. Moreira, L.S. Lucena, J.S. Andrade Jr., Phys. Rev. E 72 (2005) 041404] with respect to higher dimensions. The mass distribution exhibits a power-law behavior, P(m)∝m. It has been found that the index α for pe, pc being the percolation threshold of a regular percolation, appears to be independent of the value of pe and is also independent of the lattice dimensionality. When pe=pc, α appears to depend marginally on the lattice dimensionality, and the relation α=τ-1, τ being the exponent associated with cluster size distribution of a regular percolation via ns∝s, appears to be valid.

  18. Production of marker-free transgenic Jatropha curcas expressing hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin Cry1Ab/1Ac for resistance to larvae of tortrix moth (Archips micaceanus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential biofuel plant Jatropha curcas L. is affected by larvae of Archips micaceanus (Walker), a moth of the family Tortricidae. The hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin protein Cry1Ab/1Ac confers resistance to lepidopteran insects in transgenic rice. Results Here, we report the production of a marker-free transgenic line of J. curcas (L10) expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and a chemically regulated, Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination system. L10 carries a single copy of marker-free T-DNA that contains the Cry1Ab/1Ac gene under the control of a maize phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene promoter (P Pepc :Cry1Ab/1Ac:T Nos ). The P Pepc :Cry1Ab/1Ac:T Nos gene was highly expressed in leaves of L10 plants. Insecticidal bioassays using leaf explants of L10 resulted in 80-100% mortality of larvae of A. micaceanus at 4 days after infestation. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the hybrid Bt δ-endotoxin protein Cry1Ab/1Ac expressed in Jatropha curcas displays strong insecticidal activity to A. micaceanus. The marker-free transgenic J. curcas line L10 can be used for breeding of insect resistance to A. micaceanus. PMID:24808924

  19. The nature of the CO2 -concentrating mechanisms in a marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Clement, Romain; Dimnet, Laura; Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms are widespread in aquatic ecosystems where they may be limited by the supply of inorganic carbon. Their carbon dioxide-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) involving transporters and carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are well known, but the contribution of a biochemical CCM involving C4 metabolism is contentious. The CCM(s) present in the marine-centric diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, were studied in cells exposed to high or low concentrations of CO2 , using a range of approaches. At low CO2 , cells possessed a CCM based on active uptake of CO2 (70% contribution) and bicarbonate, while at high CO2 , cells were restricted to CO2 . CA was highly and rapidly activated on transfer to low CO2 and played a key role because inhibition of external CA produced uptake kinetics similar to cells grown at high CO2 . The activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) and the PEP-regenerating enzyme, pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), were lower in cells grown at low than at high CO2 . The ratios of PEPC and PPDK to ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase were substantially lower than 1, even at low CO2 . Our data suggest that the kinetic properties of this species results from a biophysical CCM and not from C4 type metabolism. PMID:26529678

  20. Synergic effect of salinity and CO2 enrichment on growth and photosynthetic responses of the invasive cordgrass Spartina densiflora

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Álvarez, Rosario; Cambrollé, Jesús; Gandullo, Jacinto; Figueroa, M. Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Spartina densiflora is a C4 halophytic species that has proved to have a high invasive potential which derives from its clonal growth and its physiological plasticity to environmental factors, such as salinity. A greenhouse experiment was designed to investigate the synergic effect of 380 and 700 ppm CO2 at 0, 171, and 510 mM NaCl on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of S. densiflora by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. PEPC activity and total ash, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were determined, as well as the C/N ratio. Elevated CO2 stimulated growth of S. densiflora at 0 and 171 mM NaCl external salinity after 90 d of treatment. This growth enhancement was associated with a greater leaf area and improved leaf water relations rather than with variations in net photosynthetic rate (A). Despite the fact that stomatal conductance decreased in response to 700 ppm CO2 after 30 d of treatment, A was not affected. This response of A to elevated CO2 concentration might be explained by an enhanced PEPC carboxylation capacity. On the whole, plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO2, which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass and the higher water content found at 700 ppm CO2. Finally, CO2 and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:20194923

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID-STATE DRIVERS FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P A; McHale, G B; James, G; Brown, G; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C

    2008-05-14

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cell allows the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, configured in a 4 x 1 array, form an optical switch that is key to achieving multi-pass operation. Solid-state Plasma Pulse Generators (PPGs) and high current high voltage solid-state Switch Pulse Generators (SPGs) have been developed for use in the PEPC. The solid-state plasma pulse generators initiate and maintain plasma within the cells; each pulser is capable of delivering 60J of energy to each plasma channel. Deployment of the solid-state PPGs has been completed in NIF. The MOSFET-switched SPG is capable of delivering a requisite fast rise time, 17kV flattop pulse to the cells nonlinear crystals. A complete software and hardware control system has been developed and is currently being tested for use on the solid-state SPGs. Also a transmission line modeling, development, and testing effort is in process, in support of NIFs Advanced Radiographic Capabilities (ARC). Work is scheduled for completion by the end of the calendar year.

  2. Occurrence of a number of enzymes involved in either gluconeogenesis or other processes in the pericarp of three cultivars of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) during development.

    PubMed

    Famiani, Franco; Moscatello, Stefano; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Gardi, Tiziano; Battistelli, Alberto; Walker, Robert P

    2014-11-01

    It is uncertain whether the enzymes pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) or isocitrate lyase (ICL) are present in the pericarp of grape, in which they could function in gluconeogenesis. The occurrence of these and other enzymes was investigated in the pericarp of three cultivars of grape (Vitis vinifera L.). In particular, the abundance of the enzymes aldolase, glutamine synthase (GS), acid invertase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), PPDK and ICL were determined during the development of the pericarp of the cultivars Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Zibibbo. PPDK and ICL were not detected at any stage of development. Each of the other enzymes showed different changes in abundance during development. However, for a given enzyme its changes in abundance were similar in each cultivar. In the ripe pericarp of Cabernet Sauvignon, PEPC, cytosolic GS and aldolase were equally distributed between the vasculature and parenchyma cells of the flesh and skin. The absence or very low abundance of PPDK provides strong evidence that any gluconeogenesis from malate utilises phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). The absence or very low abundance of ICL in the pericarp precludes any gluconeogenesis from ethanol.

  3. Proton conduction in gramicidin A and in its dioxolane-linked dimer in different lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, S; Quigley, E P; Crumrine, D S

    1997-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) molecules were covalently linked with a dioxolane ring. Dioxolane-linked gA dimers formed ion channels, selective for monovalent cations, in planar lipid bilayers. The main goal of this study was to compare the functional single ion channel properties of natural gA and its covalently linked dimer in two different lipid bilayers and HCl concentrations (10-8000 mM). Two ion channels with different gating and conductance properties were identified in bilayers from the product of dimerization reaction. The most commonly observed and most stable gramicidin A dimer is the main object of this study. This gramicidin dimer remained in the open state most of the time, with brief closing flickers (tau(closed) approximately 30 micros). The frequency of closing flickers increased with transmembrane potential, making the mean open time moderately voltage dependent (tau(open) changed approximately 1.43-fold/100 mV). Such gating behavior is markedly different from what is seen in natural gA channels. In PEPC (phosphatidylethanolamine-phosphatidylcholine) bilayers, single-channel current-voltage relationships had an ohmic behavior at low voltages, and a marked sublinearity at relatively higher voltages. This behavior contrasts with what was previously described in GMO (glycerylmonooleate) bilayers. In PEPC bilayers, the linear conductance of single-channel proton currents at different proton concentrations was essentially the same for both natural and gA dimers. g(max) and K(D), obtained from fitting experimental points to a Langmuir adsorption isotherm, were approximately 1500 pS and 300 mM, respectively, for both the natural gA and its dimer. In GMO bilayers, however, proton affinities of gA and the dioxolane-dimer were significantly lower (K(D) of approximately 1 and 1.5 M, respectively), and the g(max) higher (approximately 1750 and 2150 pS, respectively) than in PEPC bilayers. Furthermore, the relationship between single-channel conductance and proton

  4. Proton conduction in gramicidin A and in its dioxolane-linked dimer in different lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Cukierman, S; Quigley, E P; Crumrine, D S

    1997-11-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) molecules were covalently linked with a dioxolane ring. Dioxolane-linked gA dimers formed ion channels, selective for monovalent cations, in planar lipid bilayers. The main goal of this study was to compare the functional single ion channel properties of natural gA and its covalently linked dimer in two different lipid bilayers and HCl concentrations (10-8000 mM). Two ion channels with different gating and conductance properties were identified in bilayers from the product of dimerization reaction. The most commonly observed and most stable gramicidin A dimer is the main object of this study. This gramicidin dimer remained in the open state most of the time, with brief closing flickers (tau(closed) approximately 30 micros). The frequency of closing flickers increased with transmembrane potential, making the mean open time moderately voltage dependent (tau(open) changed approximately 1.43-fold/100 mV). Such gating behavior is markedly different from what is seen in natural gA channels. In PEPC (phosphatidylethanolamine-phosphatidylcholine) bilayers, single-channel current-voltage relationships had an ohmic behavior at low voltages, and a marked sublinearity at relatively higher voltages. This behavior contrasts with what was previously described in GMO (glycerylmonooleate) bilayers. In PEPC bilayers, the linear conductance of single-channel proton currents at different proton concentrations was essentially the same for both natural and gA dimers. g(max) and K(D), obtained from fitting experimental points to a Langmuir adsorption isotherm, were approximately 1500 pS and 300 mM, respectively, for both the natural gA and its dimer. In GMO bilayers, however, proton affinities of gA and the dioxolane-dimer were significantly lower (K(D) of approximately 1 and 1.5 M, respectively), and the g(max) higher (approximately 1750 and 2150 pS, respectively) than in PEPC bilayers. Furthermore, the relationship between single-channel conductance and proton

  5. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lamps, inspection lamps, flashlights, and animal lamps which are operated by small storage batteries or dry cells. (b) Class 2. Class 2 includes lamps such as the pneumatic-electric types and large...

  6. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... lamps, inspection lamps, flashlights, and animal lamps which are operated by small storage batteries or dry cells. (b) Class 2. Class 2 includes lamps such as the pneumatic-electric types and large...

  7. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lamps, inspection lamps, flashlights, and animal lamps which are operated by small storage batteries or dry cells. (b) Class 2. Class 2 includes lamps such as the pneumatic-electric types and large...

  8. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lamps, inspection lamps, flashlights, and animal lamps which are operated by small storage batteries or dry cells. (b) Class 2. Class 2 includes lamps such as the pneumatic-electric types and large...

  9. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lamps, inspection lamps, flashlights, and animal lamps which are operated by small storage batteries or dry cells. (b) Class 2. Class 2 includes lamps such as the pneumatic-electric types and large...

  10. Photosynthetic flexibility in maize exposed to salinity and shade

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Sonawane, Balasaheb V.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis involves a close collaboration of the C3 and C4 metabolic cycles across the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. This study investigated the coordination of C4 photosynthesis in maize plants subjected to two salinity (50 and 100mM NaCl) treatments and one shade (20% of full sunlight) treatment. Photosynthetic efficiency was probed by combining leaf gas-exchange measurements with carbon isotope discrimination and assaying the key carboxylases [ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] operating in maize leaves. Generally, salinity inhibited plant growth and photosynthesis to a lesser extent than shade. Salinity reduced photosynthesis primarily by reducing stomatal conductance and secondarily by equally reducing Rubisco and PEPC activities; the decarboxylases were inhibited more than the carboxylases. Salinity increased photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination (Δp) and reduced leaf dry-matter carbon isotope composition (13δ) due to changes in p i/p a (intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressure), while CO2 leakiness out of the bundle sheath (ϕ) was similar to that in control plants. Acclimation to shade was underpinned by a greater downregulation of PEPC relative to Rubisco activity, and a lesser inhibition of NADP-ME (primary decarboxylase) relative to PEP-CK (secondary decarboxylase). Shade reduced Δp and ɸ without significantly affecting leaf 13δ or p i/p a relative to control plants. Accordingly, shade perturbed the balance between the C3 and C4 cycles during photosynthesis in maize, and demonstrated the flexible partitioning of C4 acid decarboxylation activity between NADP-ME and PEP-CK in response to the environment. This study highlights the need to improve our understanding of the links between leaf 13δ and photosynthetic Δp, and the role

  11. Changes in gravity affect gene expression, protein modulation and metabolite pools of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, R.; Martzivanou, M.; Maier, R. M.; Magel, E.

    Callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) in Petri dishes / suspension cultures were exposed to altered g-forces by centrifugation (1 to 10 g), klinorotation, and μ g (sounding rocket flights). Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, transcripts of genes coding for metabolic key enzymes (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADPG-PP; ß-amylase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBPase; glyceraldehyde-P dehydrogenase, GAPDH; hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, HMG; phenylalanine-ammonium-lyase, PAL; PEP carboxylase, PEPC) were used to monitor threshold conditions for g-number (all) and time of exposure (ß-amylase) which led to altered amounts of the gene product. Exposure to approx. 5 g and higher for 1h resulted in altered transcript levels: transcripts of ß-amylase, PAL, and PEPC were increased, those of ADPG-PP decreased, while those of FBPase, GAPDH, and HMG were not affected. This probably indicates a shift from starch synthesis to starch degradation and increased rates of anaplerosis (PEPC: supply of ketoacids for amino acid synthesis). In order to get more information about g-related effects on gene expression, we used a 1h-exposure to 7 g for a microarray analysis. Transcripts of more than 200 genes were significantly increased in amount (ratio 7g / 1g control; 21.6 and larger). They fall into several categories. Transcripts coding for enzymes of major pathways form the largest group (25%), followed by gene products involved in cellular organisation and cell wall formation / rearrangement (17%), signalling, phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (12%), proteolysis and transport (10% each), hormone synthesis plus related events (8%), defense (4%), stress-response (2%), and gravisensing (2%). Many of the alterations are part of a general stress response, but some changes related to the synthesis / rearrangement of cell wall components could be more hyper-g-specific. Using macroarrays with selected genes according to our hypergravity study (metabolism / signalling

  12. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, B E; Kelly, J H; Shoup Iii, M J; Waxer, L J; Cost, E C; Green, E T; Hoyt, Z M; Taniguchi, J; Walker, T W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP) laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density. PMID:17318253

  13. Development of long-lifetime, low-contamination beam dumps for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M.A.; Murray, J.E.; Boley, C.D.; Milam, D.; Sell, W.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1996-12-09

    The laser architecture of the NIF beamlines requires small-area beam dumps to safely absorb back reflections from the output and leakage through the PEPC switch. The problems presented by these beam dumps are that fluences they must absorb are very large, beyond the damage threshold of any material, and ablation of beam dump materials potentially contaminates adjacent optical components. Full scale tests have demonstrated that a stainless steel beam dump will survive fluence levels and energies as high as 820 j/CM{sup 2} and 2.5 kJ, respectively. Small scale tests with tungsten, tantalum, and stainless steel have demonstrated erosion rates less than about 0.5 {mu}m/shot, with stainless steel having the smallest rate. They also suggest that increased angles of incidence ({ge}60{degree}) will greatly reduce the material ablated directly back along the beam path.

  14. Hormonally induced modulation in the phosphate metabolites of breast cancer: analysis of in vivo 31P MRS signals with a modified prony method.

    PubMed

    Viti, V; Ragona, R; Guidoni, L; Barone, P; Furman, E; Degani, H

    1997-08-01

    A modified Prony method (MPM) was applied to analyze the main signals present in spatially resolved 31P NMR spectra of MCF7 breast tumors implanted in nude mice. First, the method was tested on synthetic data to establish its limits of reliability. Its performance with respect to peak identification and quantification of signal intensities was then exploited on data from three implanted tumors during hormonal manipulation with estrogen and the antiestrogenic drug tamoxifen. The phosphomonoester peak was resolved into phosphocholine (PC) and phosphoethanolamine (PE). Treatment with tamoxifen led to a significant reduction in the PE to PE+PC peak amplitude ratio in the tumors under consideration. MPM analysis also revealed the presence of two different inorganic phosphate pools: a larger acidic pool and a smaller alkaline pool during estrogen-induced growth and the reverse during tumor regression.

  15. AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

  16. Moving toward effective ozone flux assessment.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Elena; Ranieri, Annamaria; Lauteri, Marco

    2008-11-01

    We present a comment about "Ozone risk assessment for plants: central role of metabolism-dependent changes in reducing power" by Dizengremel, Le Thiec, Bagard, and Jolivet. As tools for summarizing plant O(3) sensitivity in simple indices, Dizengremel et al. suggest: reducing power, as antioxidant regeneration through the Halliwell/Asada cycle requires NADPH from the photosynthetic light reaction; Rubisco/PEPc ratio, as an index of the energy balance between anabolic and catabolic reactions; and water-use efficiency as a time-integrated approximation of the carbon gain to stomatal O(3) uptake ratio. The scientific background is solid, and simple enough (although expensive) to be translated into modelling and routine use. In the last decade, several approaches have been developed, mostly by using photosynthesis as a metric of defence. All these approaches should be experimentally tested in different and realistic conditions, before the results are transferred to the field and used in effective O(3) flux modelling and assessment.

  17. Application of a novel and automated branched DNA in situ hybridization method for the rapid and sensitive localization of mRNA molecules in plant tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Andrew J.; Pence, Heather E.; Church, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH), originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. • Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. • Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes. PMID:25202621

  18. Allohexaploidy, introgression, and the complex phylogenetic history of Elymus repens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Mason-Gamer, Roberta J

    2008-05-01

    The phylogenetic position of hexaploid Elymus repens within the tribe Triticeae (Poaceae) was examined using cloned sequences from the low-copy nuclear genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pepC) and beta-amylase. A previous analysis of E. repens using data from the nuclear granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) gene had yielded five phylogenetically distinct gene copies, two more than expected from hexaploidy alone. The three gene trees share three distinct E. repens clades, suggesting that E. repens contains three phylogenetically divergent genomes, contributed by Hordeum, Pseudoroegneria, and an unknown donor. The two additional GBSSI sequences, including one that was apparently derived from outside of the tribe, appear to reflect past introgression of GBSSI sequences into the E. repens genome. On all three trees, the Hordeum-like E. repens sequences are polyphyletic within Hordeum, and the trees are in conflict with regard to the placement of these sequences within Hordeum, highlighting multiple contributions from Hordeum to E. repens.

  19. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Shoup, M. J. III; Waxer, L. J.; Cost, E. C.; Green, E. T.; Hoyt, Z. M.; Taniguchi, J.; Walker, T. W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP)laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density.

  20. A HIGH CURRENT, HIGH VOLTAGE SOLID-STATE PULSE GENERATOR FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Barbosa, F; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C; Akana, G L; Brooksby, C A

    2007-07-27

    A high current, high voltage, all solid-state pulse modulator has been developed for use in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem in the National Ignition Facility. The MOSFET-switched pulse generator, designed to be a more capable plug-in replacement for the thyratron-switched units currently deployed in NIF, offers unprecedented capabilities including burst-mode operation, pulse width agility and a steady-state pulse repetition frequency exceeding 1 Hz. Capable of delivering requisite fast risetime, 17 kV flattop pulses into a 6 {Omega} load, the pulser employs a modular architecture characteristic of the inductive adder technology, pioneered at LLNL for use in acceleration applications, which keeps primary voltages low (and well within the capabilities of existing FET technology), reduces fabrication costs and is amenable to rapid assembly and quick field repairs.

  1. Selection of an Appropriate Protein Extraction Method to Study the Phosphoproteome of Maize Photosynthetic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Inês M.; Alexandre, Bruno M.; Oliveira, M. Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Often plant tissues are recalcitrant and, due to that, methods relying on protein precipitation, such as TCA/acetone precipitation and phenol extraction, are usually the methods of choice for protein extraction in plant proteomic studies. However, the addition of precipitation steps to protein extraction methods may negatively impact protein recovery, due to problems associated with protein re-solubilization. Moreover, we show that when working with non-recalcitrant plant tissues, such as young maize leaves, protein extraction methods with precipitation steps compromise the maintenance of some labile post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation. Therefore, a critical issue when studying PTMs in plant proteins is to ensure that the protein extraction method is the most appropriate, both at qualitative and quantitative levels. In this work, we compared five methods for protein extraction of the C4-photosynthesis related proteins, in the tip of fully expanded third-leaves. These included: TCA/Acetone Precipitation; Phenol Extraction; TCA/Acetone Precipitation followed by Phenol Extraction; direct extraction in Lysis Buffer (a urea-based buffer); and direct extraction in Lysis Buffer followed by Cleanup with a commercial kit. Protein extraction in Lysis Buffer performed better in comparison to the other methods. It gave one of the highest protein yields, good coverage of the extracted proteome and phosphoproteome, high reproducibility, and little protein degradation. This was also the easiest and fastest method, warranting minimal sample handling. We also show that this method is adequate for the successful extraction of key enzymes of the C4-photosynthetic metabolism, such as PEPC, PPDK, PEPCK, and NADP-ME. This was confirmed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of excised spots of 2DE analyses of the extracted protein pools. Staining for phosphorylated proteins in 2DE revealed the presence of several phosphorylated isoforms of PEPC, PPDK, and PEPCK. PMID

  2. Plasticity of crassulacean acid metabolism at subtropical latitudes: a pineapple case study.

    PubMed

    Rainha, Nuno; Medeiros, Violante P; Câmara, Mariana; Faustino, Hélder; Leite, João P; Barreto, Maria do Carmo; Cruz, Cristina; Pacheco, Carlos A; Ponte, Duarte; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Plants with the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) express high-metabolic plasticity, to adjust to environmental stresses. This article hypothesizes that irradiance and nocturnal temperatures are the major limitations for CAM at higher latitudes such as the Azores (37°45'N). Circadian CAM expression in Ananas comosus L. Merr. (pineapple) was assessed by the diurnal pattern of leaf carbon fixation into l-malate at the solstices and equinoxes, and confirmed by determining maximal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in plant material. Metabolic adjustments to environmental conditions were confirmed by gas exchange measurements, and integrated with environmental data to determine CAM's limiting factors: light and temperature. CAM plasticity was observed at the equinoxes, under similar photoperiods, but different environmental conditions. In spring, CAM expression was similar between vegetative and flowering plants, while in autumn, flowering (before anthesis) and fructifying (with fully developed fruit before ripening) plants accumulated more l-malate. Below 100 µmol m(-2) s(-1) , CAM phase I was extended, reducing CAM phase III during the day. Carbon fixation inhibition may occur by two major pathways: nocturnal temperature (<15°C) inhibiting PEPC activity and l-malate accumulation; and low irradiance influencing the interplay between CAM phase I and III, affecting carboxylation and decarboxylation. Both have important consequences for plant development in autumn and winter. Observations were confirmed by flowering time prediction using environmental data, emphasizing that CAM expression had a strong seasonal regulation due to a complex network response to light and temperature, allowing pineapple to survive in environments not suitable for high productivity. PMID:26362993

  3. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants.

  4. Leaf anatomical traits which accommodate the facultative engagement of crassulacean acid metabolism in tropical trees of the genus Clusia.

    PubMed

    Barrera Zambrano, V Andrea; Lawson, Tracy; Olmos, Enrique; Fernández-García, Nieves; Borland, Anne M

    2014-07-01

    Succulence and leaf thickness are important anatomical traits in CAM plants, resulting from the presence of large vacuoles to store organic acids accumulated overnight. A higher degree of succulence can result in a reduction in intercellular air space which constrains internal conductance to CO2. Thus, succulence presents a trade-off between the optimal anatomy for CAM and the internal structure ideal for direct C3 photosynthesis. This study examined how plasticity for the reversible engagement of CAM in the genus Clusia could be accommodated by leaf anatomical traits that could facilitate high nocturnal PEPC activity without compromising the direct day-time uptake of CO2 via Rubisco. Nine species of Clusia ranging from constitutive C3 through C3/CAM intermediates to constitutive CAM were compared in terms of leaf gas exchange, succulence, specific leaf area, and a range of leaf anatomical traits (% intercellular air space (IAS), length of mesophyll surface exposed to IAS per unit area, cell size, stomatal density/size). Relative abundances of PEPC and Rubisco proteins in different leaf tissues of a C3 and a CAM-performing species of Clusia were determined using immunogold labelling. The results indicate that the relatively well-aerated spongy mesophyll of Clusia helps to optimize direct C3-mediated CO2 fixation, whilst enlarged palisade cells accommodate the potential for C4 carboxylation and nocturnal storage of organic acids. The findings provide insight on the optimal leaf anatomy that could accommodate the bioengineering of inducible CAM into C3 crops as a means of improving water use efficiency without incurring detrimental consequences for direct C3-mediated photosynthesis.

  5. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-12-22

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage.

  6. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants. PMID:26208645

  7. Conserved and divergent rhythms of crassulacean acid metabolism-related and core clock gene expression in the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-08-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  8. Allotetraploid origin and divergence in Eleusine (Chloridoideae, Poaceae): evidence from low-copy nuclear gene phylogenies and a plastid gene chronogram

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Triplett, Jimmy K.; Wen, Jun; Peterson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Eleusine (Poaceae) is a small genus of the subfamily Chloridoideae exhibiting considerable morphological and ecological diversity in East Africa and the Americas. The interspecific phylogenetic relationships of Eleusine are investigated in order to identify its allotetraploid origin, and a chronogram is estimated to infer temporal relationships between palaeoenvironment changes and divergence of Eleusine in East Africa. Methods Two low-copy nuclear (LCN) markers, Pepc4 and EF-1α, were analysed using parsimony, likelihood and Bayesian approaches. A chronogram of Eleusine was inferred from a combined data set of six plastid DNA markers (ndhA intron, ndhF, rps16-trnK, rps16 intron, rps3, and rpl32-trnL) using the Bayesian dating method. Key Results The monophyly of Eleusine is strongly supported by sequence data from two LCN markers. In the cpDNA phylogeny, three tetraploid species (E. africana, E. coracana and E. kigeziensis) share a common ancestor with the E. indica–E. tristachya clade, which is considered a source of maternal parents for allotetraploids. Two homoeologous loci are isolated from three tetraploid species in the Pepc4 phylogeny, and the maternal parents receive further support. The A-type EF-1α sequences possess three characters, i.e. a large number of variations of intron 2; clade E-A distantly diverged from clade E-B and other diploid species; and seven deletions in intron 2, implying a possible derivation through a gene duplication event. The crown age of Eleusine and the allotetraploid lineage are 3·89 million years ago (mya) and 1·40 mya, respectively. Conclusions The molecular data support independent allotetraploid origins for E. kigeziensis and the E. africana–E. coracana clade. Both events may have involved diploids E. indica and E. tristachya as the maternal parents, but the paternal parents remain unidentified. The habitat-specific hypothesis is proposed to explain the divergence of Eleusine and its

  9. Plasticity of crassulacean acid metabolism at subtropical latitudes: a pineapple case study.

    PubMed

    Rainha, Nuno; Medeiros, Violante P; Câmara, Mariana; Faustino, Hélder; Leite, João P; Barreto, Maria do Carmo; Cruz, Cristina; Pacheco, Carlos A; Ponte, Duarte; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Plants with the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) express high-metabolic plasticity, to adjust to environmental stresses. This article hypothesizes that irradiance and nocturnal temperatures are the major limitations for CAM at higher latitudes such as the Azores (37°45'N). Circadian CAM expression in Ananas comosus L. Merr. (pineapple) was assessed by the diurnal pattern of leaf carbon fixation into l-malate at the solstices and equinoxes, and confirmed by determining maximal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in plant material. Metabolic adjustments to environmental conditions were confirmed by gas exchange measurements, and integrated with environmental data to determine CAM's limiting factors: light and temperature. CAM plasticity was observed at the equinoxes, under similar photoperiods, but different environmental conditions. In spring, CAM expression was similar between vegetative and flowering plants, while in autumn, flowering (before anthesis) and fructifying (with fully developed fruit before ripening) plants accumulated more l-malate. Below 100 µmol m(-2) s(-1) , CAM phase I was extended, reducing CAM phase III during the day. Carbon fixation inhibition may occur by two major pathways: nocturnal temperature (<15°C) inhibiting PEPC activity and l-malate accumulation; and low irradiance influencing the interplay between CAM phase I and III, affecting carboxylation and decarboxylation. Both have important consequences for plant development in autumn and winter. Observations were confirmed by flowering time prediction using environmental data, emphasizing that CAM expression had a strong seasonal regulation due to a complex network response to light and temperature, allowing pineapple to survive in environments not suitable for high productivity.

  10. Low Temperature Induced Changes in Citrate Metabolism in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) Fruit during Maturation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Qian, Jing; Zhao, Chenning; Wang, Dengliang; Liu, Chunrong; Wang, Zhidong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2016-01-01

    Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruit, and its concentration in fruit cells is regulated mainly by the balance between synthesis and degradation. Ponkan (Citrus reticulate Blanco cv. Ponkan) is one of the major citrus cultivars grew in China, and the fruit are picked before fully mature to avoid bad weather. Greenhouse production is widely used to prolong the maturation period and improve the quality of Ponkan fruit by maintaining adequate temperature and providing protection from adverse weather. In this research, Ponkan fruit cultivated in either a greenhouse or open field were used to investigate differences in the expression of genes related to citrate metabolism during maturation in the two environments. The citrate contents were higher in open field fruit, and were mainly correlated with expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4, which were significantly increased. In addition, the impacts of low temperature (LT) and water stress (WS) on citrate metabolism in Ponkan were investigated during fruit maturation. The citrate contents in LT fruit were significantly increased, by between 1.4-1.9 fold, compared to the control; it showed no significant difference in fruit with water stress treatment compared to the control fruit. Furthermore, the expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4 were significantly increased in response to LT treatment, but showed no significant difference in WS compared to the control fruit. Thus, it can be concluded that low temperature may be the main factor influencing citrate metabolism during maturation in Ponkan fruit. PMID:27249065

  11. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 {times} 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V{sub x} ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V{sub x}, the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90{degree}. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 {times} 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  12. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 [times] 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V[sub x] ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V[sub x], the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90[degree]. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 [times] 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  13. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage. PMID:26782412

  14. [Studies on the correlation between production of L-malic acid and some cytosolic enzymes in the L-malic acid producing strain Aspergillus sp. N1-14].

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Wu, Q; Cai, Z; Zhang, J

    2000-10-01

    The cytosol enzymatic study in the case of high L-malic acid(LMA) production of Aspergillus sp. N1-14' was reported. The activities of 4 kind enzymes that catalyse the CO2 fixation reactions have been detected, which are pyruvate carboxylase(PC), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxlase (PEPC), phosphoenolpyurvate carboxykinase(PCK) and malic enzyme(ME). With the exception of ME, the linear correlation was found between activities of three carboxlases and the production rate of LMA. The activity of malate dehydrogenase(MDH) was at the level of 2-3 exponential higher than that of the other analysed enzymes, while the activity of succinate dehydrogenase(SDH) was much lower, and as a discrepancy, SDH was in a positive correlation to the content of LMA in fermenting slurry(r = 0.9252). It is shown that the accumulated LMA acted as an activator of SDH. Through dynamic study, it is found that, in contrast with the slow and even increase of biomass, the content of cytosol protein(Cp) sharply fluctuated mainly due to the changes of aeration conditions. The data of the linear correlation coefficients(r) of activities of cytosol enzymes to Cp(PC r = 0.9563, PEPC r = 0.7688, PCK r = 0.7300, MDH r = 0.3920, SDH r = -0.2086) exhibited an inner law of protein synthesis. Experiment of increasing the amount of spore inoculum resulted in increase of LMA and decrease of SA. After fermenting 120 h in a 5 L stirred fermentor, with 3-fold of original spore inoculum 105.88 g/L of LMA was achieved, the overall productivity was 0.883 g/(L.h), the converting rate of glucose to LMA was 78.43%. This result supports the exist of a inner law of protein synthesis in the early period of LMA fermentation by Aspergillus sp. N1-14'.

  15. Low Temperature Induced Changes in Citrate Metabolism in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) Fruit during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Qian, Jing; Zhao, Chenning; Wang, Dengliang; Liu, Chunrong; Wang, Zhidong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2016-01-01

    Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruit, and its concentration in fruit cells is regulated mainly by the balance between synthesis and degradation. Ponkan (Citrus reticulate Blanco cv. Ponkan) is one of the major citrus cultivars grew in China, and the fruit are picked before fully mature to avoid bad weather. Greenhouse production is widely used to prolong the maturation period and improve the quality of Ponkan fruit by maintaining adequate temperature and providing protection from adverse weather. In this research, Ponkan fruit cultivated in either a greenhouse or open field were used to investigate differences in the expression of genes related to citrate metabolism during maturation in the two environments. The citrate contents were higher in open field fruit, and were mainly correlated with expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4, which were significantly increased. In addition, the impacts of low temperature (LT) and water stress (WS) on citrate metabolism in Ponkan were investigated during fruit maturation. The citrate contents in LT fruit were significantly increased, by between 1.4–1.9 fold, compared to the control; it showed no significant difference in fruit with water stress treatment compared to the control fruit. Furthermore, the expressions of CitPEPCs, CitCSs, CitAco3 and CitGAD4 were significantly increased in response to LT treatment, but showed no significant difference in WS compared to the control fruit. Thus, it can be concluded that low temperature may be the main factor influencing citrate metabolism during maturation in Ponkan fruit. PMID:27249065

  16. 14 CFR 101.29 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.29 Information requirements. (a) Class 2—High-Power Rockets. When a Class 2—High-Power Rocket requires a certificate of waiver or authorization, the person planning the...

  17. 14 CFR 101.29 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.29 Information requirements. (a) Class 2—High-Power Rockets. When a Class 2—High-Power Rocket requires a certificate of waiver or authorization, the person planning the...

  18. 14 CFR 101.29 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.29 Information requirements. (a) Class 2—High-Power Rockets. When a Class 2—High-Power Rocket requires a certificate of waiver or authorization, the person planning the...

  19. 14 CFR 101.29 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.29 Information requirements. (a) Class 2—High-Power Rockets. When a Class 2—High-Power Rocket requires a certificate of waiver or authorization, the person planning the...

  20. 14 CFR 101.29 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.29 Information requirements. (a) Class 2—High-Power Rockets. When a Class 2—High-Power Rocket requires a certificate of waiver or authorization, the person planning the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.903 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....5; or (iii) Any area in a Class 1 or Class 2 location where the potential impact radius is greater than 660 feet (200 meters), and the area within a potential impact circle contains 20 or more buildings intended for human occupancy; or (iv) Any area in a Class 1 or Class 2 location where the potential...

  2. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  3. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  4. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Vu, Joseph C V; Allen, Leon H

    2009-07-15

    Two cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum cv. CP73-1547 and CP88-1508) were grown for 3 months in paired-companion, temperature-gradient, sunlit greenhouses under daytime [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720 (double ambient) micromol mol(-1) and at temperatures of 1.5 degrees C (near ambient) and 6.0 degrees C higher than outside ambient temperature. Leaf area and biomass, stem biomass and juice and CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of fully developed leaves were measured at harvest. On a main stem basis, leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume were increased by growth at doubled [CO2] or high temperature. Such increases were even greater under combination of doubled [CO2]/high temperature. Plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination averaged 50%, 26%, 84% and 124% greater in leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume, respectively, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. In addition, plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination were 2-3-fold higher in stem soluble solids than those at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. Although midday CER of fully developed leaves was not affected by doubled [CO2] or high temperature, plants grown at doubled [CO2] were 41-43% less in leaf stomatal conductance and 69-79% greater in leaf water-use efficiency, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Activity of PEPC was down-regulated 23-32% at doubled [CO2], while high temperature did not have a significant impact on this enzyme. Activity of Rubisco was not affected by growth at doubled [CO2], but was reduced 15-28% at high temperature. The increases in stem juice production and stem juice soluble solids concentration for sugarcane grown at doubled [CO2] or high temperature, or at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination, were partially

  5. Breeding response of transcript profiling in developing seeds of Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaping; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Wu, Yuhua; Xiao, Ling; Li, Xiaodan; Lu, Changming

    2009-01-01

    Background The upgrading of rapeseed cultivars has resulted in a substantial improvement in yield and quality in China over the past 30 years. With the selective pressure against fatty acid composition and oil content, high erucic acid- and low oil-content cultivars have been replaced by low erucic acid- and high oil-content cultivars. The high erucic acid cultivar Zhongyou 821 and its descendent, low erucic acid cultivar Zhongshuang 9, are representatives of two generations of the most outstanding Chinese rapeseed cultivars (B. napus) developed the past 2 decades. This paper compares the transcriptional profiles of Zhongshuang 9 and Zhongyou 821 for 32 genes that are principally involved in lipid biosynthesis during seed development in order to elucidate how the transcriptional profiles of these genes responded to quality improvement over the past 20 years. Results Comparison of the cultivar Zhongyou 821 with its descendent, Zhongshuang 9, shows that the transcriptional levels of seven of the 32 genes were upregulated by 30% to 109%, including FAD3, ACCase, FAE1, GKTP, Caleosin, GAPDH, and PEPC. Of the 32 genes, 10 (KAS3, β-CT, BcRK6, P450, FatA, Oleosin, FAD6, FatB, α-CT and SUC1) were downregulated by at least 20% and most by 50%. The Napin gene alone accounted for over 75% of total transcription from all 32 genes assessed in both cultivars. Most of the genes showed significant correlation with fatty acid accumulation, but the correlation in ZS9 was significantly different from that in ZY821. Higher KCR2 activity is associated with higher C16:0, C18:0, and C18:2 in both cultivars, lower C22:1 and total fatty acid content in ZY821, and lower 18:1 in ZS9. Conclusion This paper illustrates the response of the transcription levels of 32 genes to breeding in developing rapeseed seeds. Both cultivars showed similar transcription profiles, with the Napin gene predominantly transcribed. Selective pressure for zero erucic acid, low glucosinolate, high oleic acid and

  6. Effects of boron deficiency on major metabolites, key enzymes and gas exchange in leaves and roots of Citrus sinensis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Bin; Yang, Lin-Tong; Li, Yan; Xu, Jing; Liao, Tian-Tai; Chen, Yan-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2014-06-01

    Boron (B) deficiency is a widespread problem in many crops, including Citrus. The effects of B-deficiency on gas exchange, carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, total soluble proteins and phenolics, and the activities of key enzymes involved in organic acid and amino acid metabolism in 'Xuegan' [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] leaves and roots were investigated. Boron-deficient leaves displayed excessive accumulation of nonstructural carbohydrates and much lower CO2 assimilation, demonstrating feedback inhibition of photosynthesis. Dark respiration, concentrations of most organic acids [i.e., malate, citrate, oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate] and activities of enzymes [i.e., phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NAD-malate dehydrogenase, NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME), NADP-ME, pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase (PEPP), citrate synthase (CS), aconitase (ACO), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-IDH) and hexokinase] involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the anapleurotic reaction were higher in B-deficient leaves than in controls. Also, total free amino acid (TFAA) concentration and related enzyme [i.e., NADH-dependent glutamate 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (NADH-GOGAT) and glutamate OAA transaminase (GOT)] activities were enhanced in B-deficient leaves. By contrast, respiration, concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates and three organic acids (malate, citrate and pyruvate), and activities of most enzymes [i.e., PEPC, NADP-ME, PK, PEPP, CS, ACO, NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase, NADP-IDH and hexokinase] involved in glycolysis, the TCA cycle and the anapleurotic reaction, as well as concentration of TFAA and activities of related enzymes (i.e., nitrate reductase, NADH-GOGAT, glutamate pyruvate transaminase and glutamine synthetase) were lower in B-deficient roots than in controls. Interestingly, leaf and root concentration of total phenolics increased, whereas that of total soluble protein decreased

  7. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments.

  8. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    emission was also observed from an additional wire or foil. Simulations with the 3D tree code PEPC [1] and the 2-1/2 D PIC code OSIRIS [2] will be presented. [1] P. Gibbon, PEPC: Pretty Efficient Parallel Coulomb Solver, ZAM Technical Report FZJ-ZAM-IB-2003-05(2003), available online at http://www.fz-juelich.de /zam/ docs /autoren2003 /gibbon.html [2] R. Hemker, Ph.D. Thesis, UCLA, 2000.

  9. (Analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti surface):

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, E.R.

    1988-03-03

    We have identified a number of genes in Rhizobium meliloti that affect outer membrane lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These include three genes defined by mutants with different patterns of resistance to a panel of bacteriophages, of which Class 2 and 3 are closely linked to each other but not to Class 1 or 4;another gene, closely linked to Class 2 and 3, defined only by its ability to suppress Class 1 defects;and three genes, unlinked to each other, defined by mutants with increased sensitivity to deoxycholate. Of the mutants that define these genes, only those in Class 2 have a clear effect on alfalfa symbiosis, having a Fix phenotype.

  10. Differential response of NADP-dehydrogenases and carbon metabolism in leaves and roots of two durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars (Karim and Azizi) with different sensitivities to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Bouthour, Donia; Kalai, Tawba; Chaffei, Haouari C; Gouia, Houda; Corpas, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) is a common Mediterranean species of considerable agronomic importance. Salinity is one of the major threats to sustainable agricultural production mainly because it limits plant productivity. After exposing the Karim and Azizi durum wheat cultivars, which are of agronomic significance in Tunisia, to 100mM NaCl salinity, growth parameters (dry weight and length), proline content and chlorophylls were evaluated in their leaves and roots. In addition, we analyzed glutathione content and key enzymatic activities, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH-generating system. The sensitivity index indicates that cv Karim was more tolerant to salinity than cv Azizi. This higher tolerance was corroborated at the biochemical level, as cv Karim showed a greater capacity to accumulate proline, especially in leaves, while the enzyme activities studied were differentially regulated in both organs, with NADP-ICDH being the only activity to be unaffected in all organs. In summary, the data indicate that higher levels of proline accumulation and the differential responses of some key enzymes involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH regeneration contribute to the salinity tolerance mechanism and lead to increased biomass accumulation in cv Karim.

  11. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation.

  12. In a variable thermal environment selection favors greater plasticity of cell membranes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Brandon S; Hammad, Loubna A; Fisher, Nicholas P; Karty, Jonathan A; Montooth, Kristi L

    2012-06-01

    Theory predicts that developmental plasticity, the capacity to change phenotypic trajectory during development, should evolve when the environment varies sufficiently among generations, owing to temporal (e.g., seasonal) variation or to migration among environments. We characterized the levels of cellular plasticity during development in populations of Drosophila melanogaster experimentally evolved for over three years in either constant or temporally variable thermal environments. We used two measures of the lipid composition of cell membranes as indices of physiological plasticity (a.k.a. acclimation): (1) change in the ratio of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) and (2) change in lipid saturation (number of double bonds) in cool (16°C) relative to warm (25°C) developmental conditions. Flies evolved under variable environments had a greater capacity to acclimate the PE/PC ratio compared to flies evolved in constant environments, supporting the prediction that environments with high among-generation variance favor greater developmental plasticity. Our results are consistent with the selective advantage of a more environmentally sensitive allele that may have associated costs in constant environments.

  13. Ozone exposure and flux-based response functions for photosynthetic traits in wheat, maize and poplar.

    PubMed

    Bagard, Matthieu; Jolivet, Yves; Hasenfratz-Sauder, Marie-Paule; Gérard, Joëlle; Dizengremel, Pierre; Le Thiec, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Ozone exposure- and dose-response relationships based on photosynthetic leaf traits (CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll content, Rubisco and PEPc activities) were established for wheat, maize and poplar plants grown in identical controlled conditions, providing a comparison between crop and tree species, as well as between C3 and C4 plants. Intra-specific variability was addressed by comparing two wheat cultivars with contrasting ozone tolerance. Depending on plant models and ozone levels, first-order, second-order and segmented linear regression models were used to derive ozone response functions. Overall, flux-based functions appeared superior to exposure-based functions in describing the data, but the improvement remained modest. The best fit was obtained using the POD0.5 for maize and POD3 for poplar. The POD6 appeared relevant for wheat, although intervarietal differences were found. Our results suggest that taking into account the dynamics of leaf antioxidant capacity could improve current methods for ozone risk assessment for plants.

  14. Phospho-transfer networks and ATP homeostasis in response to an ineffective electron transport chain in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Appanna, V P; Alhasawi, A A; Auger, C; Thomas, S C; Appanna, V D

    2016-09-15

    Although oxidative stress is known to impede the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, the nutritionally-versatile microbe, Pseudomonas fluorescens has been shown to proliferate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrosative stress. In this study we demonstrate the phospho-transfer system that enables this organism to generate ATP was similar irrespective of the carbon source utilized. Despite the diminished activities of enzymes involved in the TCA cycle and in the electron transport chain (ETC), the ATP levels did not appear to be significantly affected in the stressed cells. Phospho-transfer networks mediated by acetate kinase (ACK), adenylate kinase (AK), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are involved in maintaining ATP homeostasis in the oxidatively-challenged cells. This phospho-relay machinery orchestrated by substrate-level phosphorylation is aided by the up-regulation in the activities of such enzymes like phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPS). The enhanced production of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate further fuel the synthesis of ATP. Taken together, this metabolic reconfiguration enables the organism to fulfill its ATP need in an O2-independent manner by utilizing an intricate phospho-wire module aimed at maximizing the energy potential of PEP with the participation of AMP. PMID:27431058

  15. Accumulation of recombinant cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase in the leaves of mature transgenic sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Mark D; Geijskes, Jason; Coleman, Heather D; Shand, Kylie; Kinkema, Mark; Palupe, Anthony; Hassall, Rachael; Sainz, Manuel; Lloyd, Robyn; Miles, Stacy; Dale, James L

    2011-10-01

    A major strategic goal in making ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass a cost-competitive liquid transport fuel is to reduce the cost of production of cellulolytic enzymes that hydrolyse lignocellulosic substrates to fermentable sugars. Current production systems for these enzymes, namely microbes, are not economic. One way to substantially reduce production costs is to express cellulolytic enzymes in plants at levels that are high enough to hydrolyse lignocellulosic biomass. Sugar cane fibre (bagasse) is the most promising lignocellulosic feedstock for conversion to ethanol in the tropics and subtropics. Cellulolytic enzyme production in sugar cane will have a substantial impact on the economics of lignocellulosic ethanol production from bagasse. We therefore generated transgenic sugar cane accumulating three cellulolytic enzymes, fungal cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I), CBH II and bacterial endoglucanase (EG), in leaves using the maize PepC promoter as an alternative to maize Ubi1 for controlling transgene expression. Different subcellular targeting signals were shown to have a substantial impact on the accumulation of these enzymes; the CBHs and EG accumulated to higher levels when fused to a vacuolar-sorting determinant than to an endoplasmic reticulum-retention signal, while EG was produced in the largest amounts when fused to a chloroplast-targeting signal. These results are the first demonstration of the expression and accumulation of recombinant CBH I, CBH II and EG in sugar cane and represent a significant first step towards the optimization of cellulolytic enzyme expression in sugar cane for the economic production of lignocellulosic ethanol.

  16. A novel reference plasmid for the qualitative detection of genetically modified rice in food and feed.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice. PMID:26495318

  17. Phospholipid Profile of the Stomach and Duodenum of Normal Rabbits Fed with Supplements of Unripe Pawpaw (Carica papaya) and Unripe Plantain (Musa sapientum) Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriyamremu, G. E.; Asagba, S. O.; Osagie, V. E.; Ojeaburu, S. I.; Lolodi, O.

    This study reports the effect of unripe pawpaw and/or unripe plantain extracts on the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum of normal rabbits. Supplementation of chow with unripe pawpaw or plantain extract significantly reduced (p< 0.05) the weight gained by rabbits compared with the control. The total phospholipids content in the stomach and duodenum were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. In the stomach and duodenum, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SGM) were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. Pawpaw occasioned a decrease in the PE/PC ratio in both tissues as against an increase observed in the SGM/PC ratio. The results presented suggests that unripe pawpaw meal and unripe plantain extract alter the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum in ways which may affect membrane fluidity of these tissues and would have profound effect on the gastro-duodenal mucosa and thus have implication(s) for gastric and duodenal ulcers in rabbits.

  18. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  19. Augmentation of Neovascularizaiton in Hindlimb Ischemia by Combined Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Endothelial and Mural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Homma, Koichiro; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Park, Kwijun; Oyamada, Naofumi; Sawada, Naoya; Taura, Daisuke; Fukunaga, Yasutomo; Tamura, Naohisa; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2008-01-01

    Background We demonstrated that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells-derived vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2) positive cells could differentiate into both endothelial cells (EC) and mural cells (MC), and termed them as vascular progenitor cells (VPC). Recently, we have established a method to expand monkey and human ES cells-derived VPC with the proper differentiation stage in a large quantity. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of human VPC-derived EC and MC for vascular regeneration. Methods and Results After the expansion of human VPC-derived vascular cells, we transplanted these cells to nude mice with hindlimb ischemia. The blood flow recovery and capillary density in ischemic hindlimbs were significantly improved in human VPC-derived EC-transplanted mice, compared to human peripheral and umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (pEPC and uEPC) transplanted mice. The combined transplantation of human VPC-derived EC and MC synergistically improved blood flow of ischemic hindlimbs remarkably, compared to the single cell transplantations. Transplanted VPC-derived vascular cells were effectively incorporated into host circulating vessels as EC and MC to maintain long-term vascular integrity. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the combined transplantation of human ES cells-derived EC and MC can be used as a new promising strategy for therapeutic vascular regeneration in patients with tissue ischemia. PMID:18301744

  20. Novel protein in human epidermal keratinocytes: regulation of expression during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; van Muijen, G.N.; van Pelt-Heerschap, H.; van de Putte, P.

    1988-05-01

    Recently, two groups of cDNA clones have been isolated from human epidermal keratinocytes; the clones correspond to genes whose expression is stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV light or treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. The proteins predicted by the nucleotide sequence of both groups of cDNAs are small (8 to 10 kilodaltons), are exceptionally rich in proline, glutamine, and cysteine, and contain repeating elements with a common sequence, PK PEPC. These proteins were designated sprI and sprII (small, proline rich). Here we describe the characterization of the sprIa protein, which is encoded by one of the group 1 cDNAs. The expression of this protein during keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and the distribution of the sprIa protein in some human tissues was studied by using a specific rabbit antiserum directed against a synthetic polypeptide corresponding to the 30 amino acids of the C-terminal region of the sprIa gene product. The results indicate that the expression of the sprIa protein is stimulated during keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize grain on B. thuringiensis-susceptible Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Giles, K L; Hellmich, R L; Iverson, C T; Lewis, L C

    2000-06-01

    Percentage survivorship, developmental time, adult body length, and sex ratio of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) reared on field-produced grain from sixteen cultivars of maize, Zea mays L., including several transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner hybrids and selected non-Bt isolines, were evaluated under laboratory conditions. Compared with isolines, development was delayed and survivorship reduced for P. interpunctella reared on grain from transgenic hybrids with the CaMV/35s promoter that express Cry1Ab protein. Similarly, compared with non-Bt hybrids, a transgenic hybrid with the CaMV/35s promoter that expresses Cry9C protein delayed development, decreased survivorship, and caused reductions in adult body length of P. interpunctella. In contrast, no significant differences in P. interpunctella developmental times or survivorship were observed between transgenic hybrids with the PEPC promoter expressing Cry1Ab and their isolines. Additionally, developmental time, survivorship, and adult body length were similar between P. interpunctella reared on a transgenic hybrid with the CaMV/35s promoter expressing Cry1Ac and non-Bt hybrids. Our data demonstrate that transgenic Bt maize grain, especially grain from hybrids with the CaMV/35s promoter expressing Cry1Ab or Cry9C, can significantly affect B. thuringiensis-susceptible P. interpunctella populations up to 4 or 5 mo after harvest.

  2. Responses of growth, antioxidants and gene expression in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) to various levels of salinity.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Abigail J; Xu, Jichen; Xu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is a major environmental factor limiting the productivity and quality of crop plants. While most cereal crops are salt-sensitive, several halophytic grasses are able to maintain their growth under saline conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms for salinity responses in halophytic grasses would contribute to the breeding of salt-tolerant cereal and turf species belonging to the Poaceae family. Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is a dominant native halophytic grass in the Hackensack Meadowlands, the coastal salt marshes located in northeastern New Jersey. The goals of this study were to examine the growth pattern of S. alterniflora in a salinity gradient and identify an optimal range of salinity for its maximal growth. The regulation of its antioxidant system and gene expression under supraoptimal salinity conditions was also investigated. Our results showed that a salinity of 4 parts per thousand (ppt) (68 mM) was most favorable for the growth of S. alterniflora, followed by a non-salt environment. S. alterniflora responded to salts in the environment by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities and the expression of stress-induced proteins such as ALDH, HVA22 and PEPC. The plant may tolerate salinity up to the concentration of sea water, but any salinity above 12 ppt retarded its growth and altered the expression of genes encoding critical proteins. PMID:26760954

  3. The effect of nutrition pattern alteration on Chlorella pyrenoidosa growth, lipid biosynthesis-related gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhua; Cui, Yanbin; Zhou, Yang; Wan, Minxi; Wang, Weiliang; Xie, Jingli; Li, Yuanguang

    2014-07-01

    Heterotrophy to photoautotrophy transition leads to the accumulation of lipids in Chlorella, which has potential to produce both healthy food and biofuels. Therefore, it is of key interest to study the metabolism shift and gene expression changes that influenced by the transition. Both total and neutral lipids contents were increased rapidly within 48 h after the switch to light environment, from 24.5% and 18.0% to 35.3% and 27.4%, respectively, along with the sharp decline of starch from 42.3% to 10.4% during 24h photoinduction phase. By analyzing the correlation between lipid content and gene expression, results revealed several genes viz. me g3137, me g6562, pepc g6833, dgat g3280 and dgat g7566, which encode corresponding enzymes in the de novo lipid biosynthesis pathway, are highly related to lipid accumulation and might be exploited as target genes for genetic modification. These results represented the feasibility of lipid production through trophic converting cultivation.

  4. A novel reference plasmid for the qualitative detection of genetically modified rice in food and feed.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice.

  5. He-Ne laser treatment improves the photosynthetic efficiency of wheat exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huize; Han, Rong

    2014-10-01

    The level of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on the Earth’s surface has increased due to depletion of the ozone layer. Here, we explored the effects of continuous wave He-Ne laser irradiation (632 nm, 5 mW mm-2, 2 min d-1) on the physiological indexes of wheat seedlings exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation (10 KJ m-2 d-1) at the early growth stages. Wheat seedlings were irradiated with enhanced UV-B, He-Ne laser treatment or a combination of the two. Enhanced UV-B radiation had deleterious effects on wheat photosynthesis parameters including photosystem II (chlorophyll content, Hill reaction, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, electron transport rate (ETR), and yield), the thylakoid (optical absorption ability, cyclic photophosphorylation, Mg2+-ATPase, and Ca2+-ATPase) and some enzymes in the dark reaction (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), carbonic anhydrase (CA), malic dehydrogenase (MDH), and chlorophyllase). These parameters were improved in UV-B-exposed wheat treated with He-Ne laser irradiation; the parameters were near control levels and the enzyme activities increased, suggesting that He-Ne laser treatment partially alleviates the injury caused by enhanced UV-B irradiation. Furthermore, the use of He-Ne laser alone had a favourable effect on seedling photosynthesis compared with the control. Therefore, He-Ne laser irradiation can enhance the adaptation capacity of crops.

  6. The Metabolic Reprogramming Evoked by Nitrosative Stress Triggers the Anaerobic Utilization of Citrate in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Christopher; Lemire, Joseph; Cecchini, Dominic; Bignucolo, Adam; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrosative stress is an ongoing challenge that most organisms have to contend with. When nitric oxide (NO) that may be generated either exogenously or endogenously encounters reactive oxygen species (ROS), it produces a set of toxic moieties referred to as reactive nitrogen species (RNS). As these RNS can severely damage essential biomolecules, numerous organisms have evolved elaborate detoxification strategies to nullify RNS. However, the contribution of cellular metabolism in fending off nitrosative stress is poorly understood. Using a variety of functional proteomic and metabolomic analyses, we have identified how the soil microbe Pseudomonas fluorescens reprogrammed its metabolic networks to survive in an environment enriched by sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a generator of nitrosative stress. To combat the RNS-induced ineffective aconitase (ACN) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the microbe invoked the participation of citrate lyase (CL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) to convert citrate, the sole source of carbon into pyruvate and ATP. These enzymes were not evident in the control conditions. This metabolic shift was coupled to the concomitant increase in the activities of such classical RNS detoxifiers as nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NIR) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). Hence, metabolism may hold the clues to the survival of organisms subjected to nitrosative stress and may provide therapeutic cues against RNS-resistant microbes. PMID:22145048

  7. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges. PMID:26257361

  8. Essential newborn care training activities: 8 years of experience in Eastern European, Caucasian and Central Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Uxa, Fabio; Bacci, Alberta; Mangiaterra, Viviana; Chiaffoni, Gian Paolo

    2006-02-01

    There is still an alarming gap in neonatal healthcare and outcome between Western and Eastern European countries and the former USSR countries in particular. Most of the causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity can be prevented or managed by simple cost-effective interventions aimed at improving quality of healthcare, health system organisation and family and community participation. Training of health professionals and health policy-makers in the field of essential neonatal care and breastfeeding promotion is one of the cornerstones of the World Health Organization (WHO) initiatives Making Pregnancy Safer (MPS) and Promoting Effective Perinatal Care (PEPC) - the latter specifically tailored to the European Region - aimed at ensuring safe pregnancy and childbirth through ensuring the availability, access and use of quality skilled care. After 8 years of experience of training in essential neonatal care, positive changes in planning for and delivering neonatal care are taking place, even in challenging contexts, and this model of intervention should be further implemented in the region.

  9. Genetic relationships among Enterococcus faecalis isolates from different sources as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Song, Y Q; Xu, H Y; Menghe, B L G; Zhang, H P; Sun, Z H

    2015-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the natural gut flora of humans and other mammals; some isolates are also used in food production. So, it is important to evaluate the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among E. faecalis isolates from different sources. Multilocus sequence typing protocol was used to compare 39 E. faecalis isolates from Chinese traditional food products (including dairy products, acidic gruel) and 4 published E. faecalis isolates from other sources including human-derived isolates employing 5 housekeeping genes (groEL, clpX, recA, rpoB, and pepC). A total of 23 unique sequence types were identified, which were grouped into 5 clonal complexes and 10 singletons. The value of standardized index of association of the alleles (IA(S)=0.1465) and network structure indicated a high frequency of intraspecies recombination across these isolates. Enterococcus faecalis lineages also exhibited clearly source-clustered distributions. The isolates from dairy source were clustered together. However, the relationship between isolates from acidic gruel and one isolate from a human source was close. The MLST scheme presented in this study provides a sharable and continuously growing sequence database enabling global comparison of strains from different sources, and will further advance our understanding of the microbial ecology of this important species.

  10. Advancing oleaginous microorganisms to produce lipid via metabolic engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-10-01

    With the depletion of global petroleum and its increasing price, biodiesel has been becoming one of the most promising biofuels for global fuels market. Researchers exploit oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production due to their short life cycle, less labor required, less affection by venue, and easier to scale up. Many oleaginous microorganisms can accumulate lipids, especially triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are the main materials for biodiesel production. This review is covering the related researches on different oleaginous microorganisms, such as yeast, mold, bacteria and microalgae, which might become the potential oil feedstocks for biodiesel production in the future, showing that biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms has a great prospect in the development of biomass energy. Microbial oils biosynthesis process includes fatty acid synthesis approach and TAG synthesis approach. In addition, the strategies to increase lipids accumulation via metabolic engineering technology, involving the enhancement of fatty acid synthesis approach, the enhancement of TAG synthesis approach, the regulation of related TAG biosynthesis bypass approaches, the blocking of competing pathways and the multi-gene approach, are discussed in detail. It is suggested that DGAT and ME are the most promising targets for gene transformation, and reducing PEPC activity is observed to be beneficial for lipid production.

  11. A Novel Reference Plasmid for the Qualitative Detection of Genetically Modified Rice in Food and Feed

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice. PMID:26495318

  12. Association of the molecular regulation of ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the reproductive stage in maize.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Zhang, Zhe; Tan, Xianjie; Jiang, Yufeng; Gao, Jiong; Lin, Li; Wang, Zhenhua; Ren, Jun; Wang, Xiaolei; Qin, Lanqiu; Cheng, Weidong; Qi, Ji; Kuai, Benke

    2016-01-01

    Maize exhibits a wide range of heterotic traits, but the molecular basis of heterosis at the reproductive stage has seldom been exploited. Leaf senescence is a degenerative process which affects crop yield and quality. In this study, we observed significantly delayed ear leaf senescence in the reciprocal hybrids of B73/Mo17 and Zheng58/Chang7-2 after silking, and all the hybrids displayed larger leaf areas and higher stems with higher yields. Our time-course transcriptome analysis identified 2,826 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two parental lines (PP-DEGs) and 2,328 DEGs between parental lines and the hybrid (PH-DEGs) after silking. Notably, several senescence promoting genes (ZmNYE1, ZmORE1, ZmWRKY53 and ZmPIFs) exhibited underdominant expression patterns in the hybrid, whereas putative photosynthesis and carbon-fixation (ZmPEPC)-associated, starch biosynthetic (ZmAPS1, ZmAPL), gibberellin biosynthetic genes (ZmGA20OX, ZmGA3OX) expressed overdominantly. We also identified 86 transcription factors from PH-DEGs, some of which were known to regulate senescence, stress and metabolic processes. Collectively, we demonstrate a molecular association of the regulations of both ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the late developmental stage. This finding not only extends our understanding to the molecular basis of maize heterosis but also provides basic information for molecular breeding. PMID:27435114

  13. A special reactor design for investigations of mixing time effects in a scaled-down industrial L-lysine fed-batch fermentation process

    PubMed

    Schilling; Pfefferle; Bachmann; Leuchtenberger; Deckwer

    1999-09-01

    A specially designed model reactor based on a 42-L laboratory fermentor was equipped with six stirrers (Rushton turbines) and five cylindrical disks. In this model reactor, the mixing time, Theta(90), turned out to be 13 times longer compared with the 42-L standard laboratory fermentor fitted with two Rushton turbines and four wall-fixed longitudinal baffles. To prove the suitability of the model reactor for scaledown studies of mixing-time-dependent processes, parallel exponential fed-batch cultivations were carried out with the leucine-auxotrophic strain, Corynebacterium glutamicum DSM 5715, serving as a microbial test system. L&HYPHEN;Leucine, the process-limiting substrate, was fed onto the liquid surface of both reactors. Cultivations were conducted using the same inoculum material and equal oxygen supply. The model reactor showed reduced sugar consumption (-14%), reduced ammonium consumption (-19%), and reduced biomass formation (-7%), which resulted in a decrease in L-lysine formation (-12%). These findings were reflected in less specific enzyme activity, which was determined for citrate synthase (CS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-C), and aspartate kinase (AK). The reduced specific activity of CS correlated with lower CO(2) evolution (-36%) during cultivation. The model reactor represents a valuable tool to simulate the conditions of poor mixing and inhomogeneous substrate distribution in bioreactors of industrial scale. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10404240

  14. Advancing oleaginous microorganisms to produce lipid via metabolic engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-10-01

    With the depletion of global petroleum and its increasing price, biodiesel has been becoming one of the most promising biofuels for global fuels market. Researchers exploit oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production due to their short life cycle, less labor required, less affection by venue, and easier to scale up. Many oleaginous microorganisms can accumulate lipids, especially triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are the main materials for biodiesel production. This review is covering the related researches on different oleaginous microorganisms, such as yeast, mold, bacteria and microalgae, which might become the potential oil feedstocks for biodiesel production in the future, showing that biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms has a great prospect in the development of biomass energy. Microbial oils biosynthesis process includes fatty acid synthesis approach and TAG synthesis approach. In addition, the strategies to increase lipids accumulation via metabolic engineering technology, involving the enhancement of fatty acid synthesis approach, the enhancement of TAG synthesis approach, the regulation of related TAG biosynthesis bypass approaches, the blocking of competing pathways and the multi-gene approach, are discussed in detail. It is suggested that DGAT and ME are the most promising targets for gene transformation, and reducing PEPC activity is observed to be beneficial for lipid production. PMID:23685199

  15. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. PMID:24723402

  16. Metabolic networks to generate pyruvate, PEP and ATP from glycerol in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Alhasawi, Azhar; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2016-04-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of the biodiesel industry. In this study we report on the metabolic networks involved in its transformation into pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP. When the nutritionally-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens was exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a mineral medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source, the microbe reconfigured its metabolism to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) primarily via substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). This alternative ATP-producing stratagem resulted in the synthesis of copious amounts of PEP and pyruvate. The production of these metabolites was mediated via the enhanced activities of such enzymes as pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). The high energy PEP was subsequently converted into ATP with the aid of pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPS) and pyruvate kinase (PK) with the concomitant formation of pyruvate. The participation of the phospho-transfer enzymes like adenylate kinase (AK) and acetate kinase (ACK) ensured the efficiency of this O2-independent energy-generating machinery. The increased activity of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) in the stressed bacteria provided the necessary precursors to fuel this process. This H2O2-induced anaerobic life-style fortuitously evokes metabolic networks to an effective pathway that can be harnessed into the synthesis of ATP, PEP and pyruvate. The bioconversion of glycerol to pyruvate will offer interesting economic benefit. PMID:26920481

  17. Association of the molecular regulation of ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the reproductive stage in maize

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yi; Zhang, Zhe; Tan, Xianjie; Jiang, Yufeng; Gao, Jiong; Lin, Li; Wang, Zhenhua; Ren, Jun; Wang, Xiaolei; Qin, Lanqiu; Cheng, Weidong; Qi, Ji; Kuai, Benke

    2016-01-01

    Maize exhibits a wide range of heterotic traits, but the molecular basis of heterosis at the reproductive stage has seldom been exploited. Leaf senescence is a degenerative process which affects crop yield and quality. In this study, we observed significantly delayed ear leaf senescence in the reciprocal hybrids of B73/Mo17 and Zheng58/Chang7-2 after silking, and all the hybrids displayed larger leaf areas and higher stems with higher yields. Our time-course transcriptome analysis identified 2,826 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two parental lines (PP-DEGs) and 2,328 DEGs between parental lines and the hybrid (PH-DEGs) after silking. Notably, several senescence promoting genes (ZmNYE1, ZmORE1, ZmWRKY53 and ZmPIFs) exhibited underdominant expression patterns in the hybrid, whereas putative photosynthesis and carbon-fixation (ZmPEPC)-associated, starch biosynthetic (ZmAPS1, ZmAPL), gibberellin biosynthetic genes (ZmGA20OX, ZmGA3OX) expressed overdominantly. We also identified 86 transcription factors from PH-DEGs, some of which were known to regulate senescence, stress and metabolic processes. Collectively, we demonstrate a molecular association of the regulations of both ear leaf senescence/stress response and photosynthesis/metabolism with heterosis at the late developmental stage. This finding not only extends our understanding to the molecular basis of maize heterosis but also provides basic information for molecular breeding. PMID:27435114

  18. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges.

  19. Captopril does not interact with the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of digitoxin in healthy man.

    PubMed

    de Mey, C; Elich, D; Schroeter, V; Butzer, R; Belz, G G

    1992-01-01

    The chronic oral administration of 0.07 mg digitoxin o.d. for up to 58 days to 12 healthy volunteers caused a small drop in mean heart rate HR (95% CI: -7.9 to -1.6 beats.min-1), in mean diastolic blood pressure (95% CI: -8.3 to -0.4 mmHg), shortening of the QTc-interval (95% CI: -42 to -19 ms), shortening of the HR-corrected pre-ejection period PEPc (95% CI: -16 to -1 ms) and electromechanical systole QS2c (95% CI: -25 to -1 ms), and an increase in the impedance cardiographic Heather index (dZ/dtmax/RZ, 95% CI: 0.3 to 4.3) relative to the baseline measurements before digitalisation. The concomitant administration of 25 mg oral captopril b.d. did not significantly alter these responses relative to the concomitant double-blind administration of placebo, nor did it alter the pharmacokinetic characteristics of plasma digitoxin at steady state. Thus, no relevant change in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of chronically administered digitoxin were induced by concomitant treatment with captopril. PMID:1451730

  20. Evaluation of somatic hybrids of potato with Solanum stenotomum after a long-term in vitro conservation.

    PubMed

    Fock, Isabelle; Collonnier, Cécile; Lavergne, Danielle; Vaniet, Sébastien; Ambroise, Annick; Luisetti, Jacques; Kodja, Hippolyte; Sihachakr, Darasinh

    2007-01-01

    Somatic hybrids of potato with a cultivated relative, Solanum stenotomum also called Solanum tuberosum Stenotomum group, were evaluated for their physiological and agronomical characteristics as well as the stability of the introgressed resistance to bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, after a long-term in vitro conservation for more than 5 years. Analysis of photosynthesis showed that the PEPC/Rubisco ratio remained lower than 0.5 for all vitroplants of potato and the somatic hybrids, except for the relative species. This indicates that the carbon metabolism is heterotrophic (ratio>1) for S. stenotomum, and autotrophic for potato and the somatic hybrids (ratio<1). In both in vitro and greenhouse conditions, potato and the somatic hybrids produced few bigger tubers, while many small tubers were obtained from the relative. The hybrid tubers were morphologically intermediate. The starch content of hybrid tubers was much lower than that of potato, but similar to that of the relative species. Interestingly, the level of bacterial resistance, introgressed from S. stenotomum into potato, was shown to be very stable and remained as high as that of the relative after a long-term period of in vitro conservation.

  1. Genetic relationships among Enterococcus faecalis isolates from different sources as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Song, Y Q; Xu, H Y; Menghe, B L G; Zhang, H P; Sun, Z H

    2015-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the natural gut flora of humans and other mammals; some isolates are also used in food production. So, it is important to evaluate the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among E. faecalis isolates from different sources. Multilocus sequence typing protocol was used to compare 39 E. faecalis isolates from Chinese traditional food products (including dairy products, acidic gruel) and 4 published E. faecalis isolates from other sources including human-derived isolates employing 5 housekeeping genes (groEL, clpX, recA, rpoB, and pepC). A total of 23 unique sequence types were identified, which were grouped into 5 clonal complexes and 10 singletons. The value of standardized index of association of the alleles (IA(S)=0.1465) and network structure indicated a high frequency of intraspecies recombination across these isolates. Enterococcus faecalis lineages also exhibited clearly source-clustered distributions. The isolates from dairy source were clustered together. However, the relationship between isolates from acidic gruel and one isolate from a human source was close. The MLST scheme presented in this study provides a sharable and continuously growing sequence database enabling global comparison of strains from different sources, and will further advance our understanding of the microbial ecology of this important species. PMID:26074239

  2. Responses of growth, antioxidants and gene expression in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) to various levels of salinity.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Abigail J; Xu, Jichen; Xu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is a major environmental factor limiting the productivity and quality of crop plants. While most cereal crops are salt-sensitive, several halophytic grasses are able to maintain their growth under saline conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms for salinity responses in halophytic grasses would contribute to the breeding of salt-tolerant cereal and turf species belonging to the Poaceae family. Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is a dominant native halophytic grass in the Hackensack Meadowlands, the coastal salt marshes located in northeastern New Jersey. The goals of this study were to examine the growth pattern of S. alterniflora in a salinity gradient and identify an optimal range of salinity for its maximal growth. The regulation of its antioxidant system and gene expression under supraoptimal salinity conditions was also investigated. Our results showed that a salinity of 4 parts per thousand (ppt) (68 mM) was most favorable for the growth of S. alterniflora, followed by a non-salt environment. S. alterniflora responded to salts in the environment by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities and the expression of stress-induced proteins such as ALDH, HVA22 and PEPC. The plant may tolerate salinity up to the concentration of sea water, but any salinity above 12 ppt retarded its growth and altered the expression of genes encoding critical proteins.

  3. The tolerance of grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.) to defoliation during vegetative growth is compromised during flowering.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Erandi; Délano-Frier, John Paul; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The biochemical processes underlying variations of tolerance are often accompanied by source-sink transitions affecting carbon (C) metabolism. We investigated the tolerance of Amaranthus cruentus L. to total mechanical defoliation through development and in different growing seasons. Defoliated A. cruentus recovered ∼80% of their above-ground biomass and ∼100% of grain yield compared to intact plants if defoliation occurred early during ontogeny, but could not compensate when defoliation occurred during flowering. Tolerance index was higher in the summer season (-0.3) than in the winter season (-0.7). Overall, defoliation tolerance was closely related to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in leaves and the subsequent accumulation of starch (∼500 μmol/gDW) and sucrose (∼140 μmol/gDW) in stems and roots. Thus, A. cruentus accumulated sufficient C in roots and stem to allow branching and shoot re-growth after defoliation, but it only possessed sufficient C reserves to maintain <19% seed yield in the absence of new vegetative tissue. Seed size was larger during the warm season but it was not affected by foliar damage. Seed chemical composition was altered by defoliation at flowering. We conclude that A. cruentus defoliation tolerance depends on both, the re-allocation of starch from stem and roots, and the activation of dormant meristems before flowering to generate new photosynthetic capacity to sustain seed filling. PMID:25863889

  4. Abscisic acid and nitric oxide signaling in two different portions of detached leaves of Guzmania monostachia with CAM up-regulated by drought.

    PubMed

    Mioto, Paulo Tamaso; Mercier, Helenice

    2013-07-15

    Guzmania monostachia is an epiphyte tank bromeliad capable of up-regulating crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in response to several environmental stimuli, including drought and light stress. In other plant species, abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO) seem to be involved in CAM induction. Because the leaves of tank bromeliads perform different functions along their length, this study attempted to investigate whether ABA and NO are involved in regulation of CAM expression in this species by quantifying these compounds in apical and basal portions of the leaf, and whether there would be differences in this event for each leaf portion. Detached leaves exposed to a 30% polyethylene glycol solution showed a significant upregulation of CAM on the seventh day of treatment only in the apical portion, as indicated by nocturnal acid accumulation and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity. On the three days prior to CAM induction, ABA, NO and H₂O₂ were quantified. The amounts of ABA were higher in PEG-exposed leaves, along their entire length. NO, however, was higher only in the apical portion, precisely where CAM was up-regulated. H₂O₂ was higher only in the basal portion of PEG-exposed leaves. Our results suggest that ABA might be a systemic signal to drought, occurring in the entire leaf. NO and H₂O₂, however, may be signals restricted only to the apical or basal portions, respectively. PMID:23523467

  5. Grazing-induced Synechococcus microcolony formation: experimental insights from two freshwater phylotypes.

    PubMed

    Callieri, Cristiana; Amalfitano, Stefano; Corno, Gianluca; Bertoni, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Freshwater cyanobacteria of the genus Synechococcus are ubiquitous and organized either as single cells of diverse morphology or as microcolonies of different size. We studied the formation of microcolonies induced by the mixotrophic nanoflagellate Poterioochromonas sp. grazing on two Synechococcus strains belonging to phylotypes with different content of phycobiliproteins (PE: phycoerythrin-rich cells, L.Albano Group A; PC: phycocyanin-rich cells, MW101C3 Group I). The quantitative variations in cell abundance, morphological and physiological conditions were assessed on short-term incubations in semi-continuous cultures, single culture (PE, PC) and co-culture (PE+PC), with and without predators, by flow cytometry, and PhytoPAM. Under grazing pressure, we observed that (i) the abundance of PE single cells decreased over time with a concomitant formation of PE microcolonies; (ii) in PC single cultures, no significant variation in single cells was found and microcolonies did not form; (iii) both PE and PC formed monoclonal microcolonies in co-culture; (iv) PC cells increased the photosynthetic efficiency of the PSII (higher Fv/Fm) in co-culture. In the aftermath of microcolony formation as a predation-induced adaptation, our findings indicated a different response of Synechococcus phylotypes potentially co-existing in natural environment and the importance of their interaction. PMID:27411979

  6. Nuclear and chloroplast DNA phylogeny reveals complex evolutionary history of Elymus pendulinus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chi; Hu, Qianni; Sun, Genlou

    2014-02-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last decade has shown that allopolyploid genomes may undergo complex reticulate evolution. In this study, 13 accessions of tetraploid Elymus pendulinus were analyzed using two low-copy nuclear genes (RPB2 and PepC) and two regions of chloroplast genome (Rps16 and trnD-trnT). Previous studies suggested that Pseudoroegneria (St) and an unknown diploid (Y) were genome donors to E. pendulinus, and that Pseudoroegneria was the maternal donor. Our results revealed an extreme reticulate pattern, with at least four distinct gene lineages coexisting within this species that might be acquired through a possible combination of allotetraploidization and introgression from both within and outside the tribe Hordeeae. Chloroplast DNA data identified two potential maternal genome donors (Pseudoroegneria and an unknown species outside Hordeeae) to E. pendulinus. Nuclear gene data indicated that both Pseudoroegneria and an unknown Y diploid have contributed to the nuclear genome of E. pendulinus, in agreement with cytogenetic data. However, unexpected contributions from Hordeum and unknown aliens from within or outside Hordeeae to E. pendulinus without genome duplication were observed. Elymus pendulinus provides a remarkable instance of the previously unsuspected chimerical nature of some plant genomes and the resulting phylogenetic complexity produced by multiple historical reticulation events. PMID:24702067

  7. Comparing photosynthetic characteristics of Isoetes sinensis Palmer under submerged and terrestrial conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is widespread in terrestrial and aquatic species, plastic in response to environmental changes. Isoetes L. is one of the earliest basal vascular plants and CAM is popular in this genus. Isoetes sinensis Palmer is an amphibious species, alternating frequently between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Given this, we investigated and compared photosynthetic characteristics over a diurnal cycle under submerged condition (SC) and terrestrial condition (TC). The results suggest that I. sinensis possesses a stronger CAM capacity under SC. Compared with under TC, titratable acidity levels and organic acid concentrations were more enriched under SC, whereas soluble sugar or starch and protein levels were lower under SC. Transcript analyses for nine photosynthetic genes revealed that CAM-associated genes possessed high transcripts under SC, but C3-related transcripts were highly expressed under TC. In addition, the enzyme activity measurements demonstrated that PEPC activity over a diurnal cycle was slightly higher under SC, whereas Rubisco activity during the daytime was greater under TC. This comprehensive study probably facilitates general understandings about the CAM photosynthetic characteristics of Isoetes in response to the environmental changes. PMID:26634994

  8. Seasonal dynamics in the stable carbon isotope composition δ¹³C from non-leafy branch, trunk and coarse root CO₂ efflux of adult deciduous (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen (Picea abies) trees.

    PubMed

    Kuptz, Daniel; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2011-03-01

    Respiration is a substantial driver of carbon (C) flux in forest ecosystems and stable C isotopes provide an excellent tool for its investigation. We studied seasonal dynamics in δ¹³C of CO₂ efflux (δ¹³C(E)) from non-leafy branches, upper and lower trunks and coarse roots of adult trees, comparing deciduous Fagus sylvatica (European beech) with evergreen Picea abies (Norway spruce). In both species, we observed strong and similar seasonal dynamics in the δ¹³C(E) of above-ground plant components, whereas δ¹³C(E) of coarse roots was rather stable. During summer, δ¹³C(E) of trunks was about -28.2‰ (Beech) and -26.8‰ (Spruce). During winter dormancy, δ¹³C(E) increased by 5.6-9.1‰. The observed dynamics are likely related to a switch from growth to starch accumulation during fall and remobilization of starch, low TCA cycle activity and accumulation of malate by PEPc during winter. The seasonal δ¹³C(E) pattern of branches of Beech and upper trunks of Spruce was less variable, probably because these organs were additionally supplied by winter photosynthesis. In view of our results and pervious studies, we conclude that the pronounced increases in δ¹³C(E) of trunks during the winter results from interrupted access to recent photosynthates.

  9. Effect of bile salts stress on protein synthesis of Lactobacillus casei Zhang revealed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wu, R; Sun, Z; Wu, J; Meng, H; Zhang, H

    2010-08-01

    Lactobacillus casei Zhang, isolated from koumiss in Inner Mongolia of China, is known from previous findings to be tolerant to bile salts. Bile salts secreted by mammals act as a natural antibacterial barrier and may serve as a component of innate immunity, as they have limited antagonistic effect against resident microflora. In this work, we compared the growth and protein expression patterns of L. casei Zhang with and without bile salts. Twenty-six proteins were found to be differentially expressed using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Peptide mass fingerprinting was used to identify these proteins. Further verification by using real-time, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and bioinformatics analysis showed that the implicated pathways are involved with a complex physiological response under bile salts stress, particularly including cell protection (DnaK and GroEL), modifications in cell membranes (NagA, GalU, and PyrD), and key components of central metabolism (PFK, PGM, CysK, LuxS, PepC, and EF-Tu). These results provide insight on the protein expression pattern of L. casei under bile salts stress and offer a new perspective for the molecular mechanisms involved in stress tolerance and adaptation of bacteria. PMID:20655455

  10. Hybrid Tamarix widespread in U.S. invasion and undetected in native Asian range

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, John F.; Schaal, Barbara A.

    2002-01-01

    Biological invasions are drastically altering natural habitats and threatening biodiversity on both local and global levels. In one of the United States' worst invasions, Eurasian Tamarix plant species have spread rapidly to dominate over 600,000 riparian and wetland hectares. The largest Tamarix invasion consists of Tamarix chinensis and Tamarix ramosissima, two morphologically similar species. To clarify the identity, origins, and population structuring of this invasion, we analyzed DNA sequence data from an intron of a nuclear gene, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepC). This intron proved to be highly variable at the population level, and the 269 native and invasive specimens yielded 58 haplotypes, from which we constructed a gene genealogy. Only four of these haplotypes were common to both the U.S. and Eurasia. Surprisingly, we found that the most common plant in this U.S. invasion is a hybrid combination of two species-specific genotypes that were geographically isolated in their native Eurasian range. Less extensive hybrids exist in the invasion, involving combinations of T. ramosissima and T. chinensis with Tamarix parviflora and Tamarix gallica. The presence of potentially novel hybrids in the U.S. illustrates how importation of exotics can alter population structures of species and contribute to invasions. PMID:12177412

  11. Cold-night responses in grapevine inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Mélodie; Ait Barka, Essaid; Clément, Christophe; Gilard, Françoise; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Baillieul, Fabienne; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cédric

    2015-10-01

    Cold nights impact grapevine flower development and fruit set. Regulation at the female meiosis stepmay be of considerable importance for further understanding on how flower reacts to cold stress. In this study, the impact of chilling temperature (0 °C overnight) on carbon metabolism was investigated in the inflorescencesof two cultivars, Pinot noir (Pinot) and Gewurztraminer (Gewurtz.). Fluctuations in photosynthetic activity and carbohydrate metabolism were monitored by analyzing gas exchanges, simultaneous photosystem I and II activities, andcarbohydrate content. Further, the expression of PEPc, PC, FNR, ISO, OXO, AGPase, amylases and invertase genes, activities of various enzymes, as well as metabolomic analysis were attained. Results showed that the chilling night has different impacts depending on cultivars. Thus, in Gewurtz., net photosynthesis (Pn) was transiently increased whereas, in Pinot, the Pn increase was persistent and concomitant with an inhibition of respiration. However, during the days following the cold night, photosynthetic activity was decreased, and the cyclic electron flow was inhibited in Gewurtz., suggesting lower efficient energy dissipation. Likewise, metabolomic analysis revealed that several metabolites contents (namely alanine, GABA, lysine and succinate)were distinctly modulated in the two cultivars. Taking together, these results reflect a photosynthetic metabolism alteration or internal CO2 conductance in Gewurtz. explaining partly why Pinot is less susceptible to cold stress. PMID:26398796

  12. A special reactor design for investigations of mixing time effects in a scaled-down industrial L-lysine fed-batch fermentation process

    PubMed

    Schilling; Pfefferle; Bachmann; Leuchtenberger; Deckwer

    1999-09-01

    A specially designed model reactor based on a 42-L laboratory fermentor was equipped with six stirrers (Rushton turbines) and five cylindrical disks. In this model reactor, the mixing time, Theta(90), turned out to be 13 times longer compared with the 42-L standard laboratory fermentor fitted with two Rushton turbines and four wall-fixed longitudinal baffles. To prove the suitability of the model reactor for scaledown studies of mixing-time-dependent processes, parallel exponential fed-batch cultivations were carried out with the leucine-auxotrophic strain, Corynebacterium glutamicum DSM 5715, serving as a microbial test system. L&HYPHEN;Leucine, the process-limiting substrate, was fed onto the liquid surface of both reactors. Cultivations were conducted using the same inoculum material and equal oxygen supply. The model reactor showed reduced sugar consumption (-14%), reduced ammonium consumption (-19%), and reduced biomass formation (-7%), which resulted in a decrease in L-lysine formation (-12%). These findings were reflected in less specific enzyme activity, which was determined for citrate synthase (CS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-C), and aspartate kinase (AK). The reduced specific activity of CS correlated with lower CO(2) evolution (-36%) during cultivation. The model reactor represents a valuable tool to simulate the conditions of poor mixing and inhomogeneous substrate distribution in bioreactors of industrial scale. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart E of... - Federal Guidelines-User Charges for Operation and Maintenance of Publicly Owned Treatment Works

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Savings resulting from economies of scale should be apportioned to all users or user classes. (2) User... are set forth in subpart E (40 CFR part 35). (b) Authority. The authority for establishment of...

  15. 46 CFR 147.40 - Materials requiring Commandant (CG-OES) approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subpart. (4) Forbidden materials listed in 49 CFR 172.101. (b) Request for approval must be submitted to... hazardous materials may be on board a vessel as ships' stores: (1) Poison gases of Class 2, Division 2.3...

  16. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  17. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Plasseraud, Kristen Meldi; Tsai, Tony; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Middlebrook, Brooke; Maetzold, Derek; Wilkinson, Jeff; Stone, John; Johnson, Clare; Oelschlager, Kristen; Aaberg, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p = 0.003) with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher's exact test p = 2.1 × 10−13 and p = 0.04, resp.). The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920). PMID:27446211

  18. Spatial patterns of photosynthesis in thin- and thick-leaved epiphytic orchids: unravelling C3–CAM plasticity in an organ-compartmented way

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Matiz, Alejandra; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Hamachi, Leonardo; Félix, Lucas Macedo; Pereira, Paula Natália; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Demarco, Diego; Freschi, Luciano; Mercier, Helenice; Kerbauy, Gilberto Barbante

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims A positive correlation between tissue thickness and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression has been frequently suggested. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether water availability modulates photosynthetic plasticity in different organs of two epiphytic orchids with distinct leaf thickness. Methods Tissue morphology and photosynthetic mode (C3 and/or CAM) were examined in leaves, pseudobulbs and roots of a thick-leaved (Cattleya walkeriana) and a thin-leaved (Oncidium ‘Aloha’) epiphytic orchid. Morphological features were studied comparing the drought-induced physiological responses observed in each organ after 30 d of either drought or well-watered treatments. Key Results Cattleya walkeriana, which is considered a constitutive CAM orchid, displayed a clear drought-induced up-regulation of CAM in its thick leaves but not in its non-leaf organs (pseudobulbs and roots). The set of morphological traits of Cattleya leaves suggested the drought-inducible CAM up-regulation as a possible mechanism of increasing water-use efficiency and carbon economy. Conversely, although belonging to an orchid genus classically considered as performing C3 photosynthesis, Oncidium ‘Aloha’ under drought seemed to express facultative CAM in its roots and pseudobulbs but not in its leaves, indicating that such photosynthetic responses might compensate for the lack of capacity to perform CAM in its thin leaves. Morphological features of Oncidium leaves also indicated lower efficiency in preventing water and CO2 losses, while aerenchyma ducts connecting pseudobulbs and leaves suggested a compartmentalized mechanism of nighttime carboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) (pseudobulbs) and daytime carboxylation via Rubisco (leaves) in drought-exposed Oncidium plants. Conclusions Water availability modulated CAM expression in an organ-compartmented manner in both orchids studied. As distinct regions of the same orchid could perform

  19. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV-V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues.

  20. Bicarbonate blocks iron translocation from cotyledons inducing iron stress responses in Citrus roots.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Legaz, Francisco; Forner-Giner, M Ángeles; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Iglesias, Domingo J

    2013-07-01

    The effect of bicarbonate ion (HCO3(-)) on the mobilization of iron (Fe) reserves from cotyledons to roots during early growth of citrus seedlings and its influence on the components of the iron acquisition system were studied. Monoembryonic seeds of Citrus limon (L.) were germinated "in vitro" on two iron-deprived media, supplemented or not with 10mM HCO3(-) (-Fe+Bic and -Fe, respectively). After 21d of culture, Fe concentration in seedling organs was measured, as well as gene expression and enzymatic activities. Finally, the effect of Fe resupply on the above responses was tested in the presence and absence of HCO3(-) (+Fe+Bic or +Fe, respectively). -Fe+Bic seedlings exhibited lower Fe concentration in shoots and roots than -Fe ones but higher in cotyledons, associated to a significative inhibition of NRAMP3 expression. HCO3(-) upregulated Strategy I related genes (FRO1, FRO2, HA1 and IRT1) and FC-R and H(+)-ATPase activities in roots of Fe-starved seedlings. PEPC1 expression and PEPCase activity were also increased. When -Fe+Bic pre-treated seedlings were transferred to Fe-containing media for 15d, Fe content in shoots and roots increased, although to a lower extent in the +Fe+Bic medium. Consequently, the above-described root responses became markedly repressed, however, this effect was less pronounced in +Fe+Bic seedlings. In conclusion, it appears that HCO3(-) prevents Fe translocation from cotyledons to shoot and root, therefore reducing their Fe levels. This triggers Fe-stress responses in the root, enhancing the expression of genes related with Fe uptake and the corresponding enzymatic activities. PMID:23465471

  1. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression.

  2. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression. PMID:27446191

  3. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function. PMID:26985020

  4. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function. PMID:24600021

  5. The effect of drought on photosynthetic plasticity in Marrubium vulgare plants growing at low and high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Ghader; Ajory, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Photosynthesis is a biological process most affected by water deficit. Plants have various photosynthetic mechanisms that are matched to specific climatic zones. We studied the photosynthetic plasticity of C3 plants at water deficit using ecotypes of Marrubium vulgare L. from high (2,200 m) and low (1,100 m) elevation sites in the Mishou-Dagh Mountains of Iran. Under experimental drought, high-altitude plants showed more tolerance to water stress based on most of the parameters studied as compared to the low-altitude plants. Increased tolerance in high-altitude plants was achieved by lower levels of daytime stomatal conductance (g s) and reduced damaging effect on maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) (F v /F m ) coupled with higher levels of carotenoids and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). High-altitude plants exhibited higher water use efficiency (WUE) than that in low-altitude plants depending on the presence of thick leaves and the reduced daytime stomatal conductance. Additionally, we have studied the oscillation in H(+) content and diel gas exchange patterns to determine the occurrence of C3 or weak CAM (Crassulacean acid metabolism) in M. vulgare through 15 days drought stress. Under water-stressed conditions, low-altitude plants exhibited stomatal conductance and acid fluctuations characteristic of C3 photosynthesis, though high-altitude plants exhibited more pronounced increases in nocturnal acidity and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity, suggesting photosynthetic flexibility. These results indicated that the regulation of carotenoids, NPQ, stomatal conductance and diel patterns of CO2 exchange presented the larger differences among studied plants at different altitudes and seem to be the protecting mechanisms controlling the photosynthetic performance of M. vulgare plants under drought conditions.

  6. Effect of plant age, larval age, and fertilizer treatment on resistance of a cry1Ab-transformed aromatic rice to lepidopterous stem borers and foliage feeders.

    PubMed

    Alinia, F; Ghareyazie, B; Rubia, L; Bennett, J; Cohen, M B

    2000-04-01

    The resistance of vegetative, booting, and flowering stage plants of a variety of an aromatic rice, Oryza sativa L., transformed with a Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner cry1Ab gene under control of the maize phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) promoter was evaluated against four lepidopterous rice pests--the stem borers Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and the foliage feeders Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Naranga aenescens Moore (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Plants of the cry1Ab-transformed line (no. 827) were more resistant to young larvae of S. incertulas, C. suppressalis, and C. medinalis than control plants at the vegetative stage but not at the flowering stage. Survival of 10-d-old stem borer larvae did not differ on cry1Ab plants and control plants at either the vegetative or flowering stage, but the development of 10-d-old C. suppressalis larvae was retarded on the vegetative stage cry1Ab plants. Immunological analysis also showed an apparent decline in Cry1Ab titer in leaf blades and leaf sheaths at the reproductive stage. In experiments comparing three fertilizer treatments (NPK, PK, and none), there was a significant interaction between fertilizer treatment and variety on larval survival only in whole-plant assays at booting stage with C. suppressalis. On cry1Ab plants, larval survival did not differ significantly among the three fertilizer levels, whereas on control plants survival was highest with the NPK treatment. cry1Ab plants tested at the sixth and seventh generations after transformation were more resistant than control plants to N. aenescens and C. suppressalis, respectively, suggesting that gene silencing will not occur in line 827. The results of the experiments are discussed in terms of resistance management for B. thuringiensis toxins in rice. PMID:10826204

  7. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV–V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  8. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression. PMID:27446191

  9. Membrane curvature, lipid segregation, and structural transitions for phospholipids under dual-solvent stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.P.; Fuller, N.L. ); Gruner, S.M. ); Parsegian, V.A. )

    1990-01-09

    Amphiphiles respond both to polar and to nonpolar solvents. In this paper X-ray diffraction and osmotic stress have been used to examine the phase behavior, the structural dimensions, and the work of deforming the monolayer-lined aqueous cavities formed by mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) as a function of the concentration of two solvents, water and tetradecane (td). In the absence of td, most PE/PC mixtures show only lamellar phases in excess water; all of these become single reverse hexagonal (H{sub II}) phases with addition of excess td. The spontaneous radius of curvature R{sub 0} of lipid monolayers, as expressed in these H{sub II} phases, is allowed by the relief of hydrocarbon chain stress by td; R{sub 0} increases with the ratio DOPC/DOPE. Single H{sub II} phases stressed by limited water or td show several responses. (a) the molecular area is compressed at the polar end of the molecule and expanded at the hydrocarbon ends. (b) For circularly symmetrical water cylinders, the degrees of hydrocarbon chain splaying and polar group compression are different for molecules aligned in different directions around the water cylinder. (c) A pivotal position exists along the length of the phospholipid molecule where little area change occurs as the monolayer is bent to increasing curvatures. (d) By defining R{sub 0} at the pivotal position, the authors find that measured energies are well fit by a quadratic bending energy. (e) For lipid mixtures, enforced deviation of the H{sub II} monolayer from R{sub 0} is sufficiently powerful to cause demixing of the phospholipids in a way suggesting that the DOPE/DOPC ratio self-adjusts so that its R{sub 0} matches the amount of td or water available, i.e., that curvature energy is minimized.

  10. Genotypic variability within Tunisian grapevine varieties (Vitis vinifera L.) facing bicarbonate-induced iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ksouri, Riadh; Debez, Ahmed; Mahmoudi, Henda; Ouerghi, Zeineb; Gharsalli, Mohamed; Lachaâl, Mokhtar

    2007-05-01

    Morpho-physiological responses to bicarbonate-induced Fe deficiency were investigated in five Vitis vinifera L. Tunisian varieties (Khamri, Blanc3, Arich Dressé, Beldi, and Balta4). One-month-old woody cuttings were cultivated for 85days on a free calcareous soil irrigated with tap water containing increasing bicarbonate levels (0, 4, 8, 12, and 16mM NaHCO(3)). After this screening, a second experiment compared root biochemical responses of two contrasting genotypes (tolerant-sensitive) dealing with bicarbonate-induced iron deprivation (20microM Fe+/-10mM HCO(3)(-)) for 75days. Using morpho-physiological criteria, grapevine tolerance to HCO(3)(-)-induced Fe shortage appeared to be genotype-dependent: Balta4 and Beldi varieties showed the highest leaf-chlorosis score (especially at the extreme HCO(3)(-) levels), in contrast to Khamri variety. Growth parameters (shoot height, total leaf area, leaf number, and biomass production) as well as juvenile leaf chlorophyll content were also differently affected depending on both genotype and bicarbonate dose. At 16mM HCO(3)(-), Khamri was the less sensitive variety, contrasting with Balta4. On the other hand, chlorophyll content correlated positively with HCl-extractible Fe content of the juvenile leaves, suggesting that the grapevine response to iron deficiency may partly depend on to the plant ability to adequately supply young leaves with this element. Root biochemical responses revealed a relatively higher root acidification capacity in Khamri (tolerant) under Fe-deficiency while no significant changes occurred in Balta4 (sensitive). In addition, Fe(III)-reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) activities were strongly stimulated by Fe-deficiency in Khamri, while remaining constant in Balta4. These findings suggest that biochemical parameters may constitute reliable criteria for the selection of tolerant grapevine genotypes to iron chlorosis. PMID:17468003

  11. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function.

  12. Parent experiences of inpatient pediatric care in relation to health care delivery and sociodemographic characteristics: results of a Norwegian national survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The national survey of parent experiences with inpatient pediatric care contribute to the Norwegian system of health care quality indicators. This article reports on the statistical association between parent experiences of inpatient pediatric care and aspects of health care delivery, child health status and health outcome as assessed by the parents, and the parents’ sociodemographic characteristics. Methods 6,160 parents of children who were inpatients at one of Norway’s 20 pediatric departments in 2005 were contacted to take part in a survey that included the Parent Experience of Pediatric Care questionnaire. It includes 25 items that form six scales measuring parent experiences: doctor services, hospital facilities, information discharge, information about examinations and tests, nursing services and organization. The six scales were analyzed using OLS-regression. Results 3,308 (53.8%) responded. Mean scores ranged from 62.81 (organization) to 72.80 (hospital facilities) on a 0–100 scale where 100 is the best possible experience. Disappointment with staff, unexpected waiting, information regarding new medication, whether the staff were successful in easing the child’s pain, incorrect treatment and number of previous admissions had a statistically significant association with at least five of the PEPC scale scores. Disappointment with staff had the strongest association. Most sociodemographic characteristics had weak or no associations with parent experiences. Conclusions The complete relief of the child’s pain, reducing unexpected waiting and disappointment with staff, and providing good information about new medication are aspects of health care that should be considered in initiatives designed to improve parent experiences. In the Norwegian context parent experiences vary little by parents’ sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:24325153

  13. Deep evolutionary conservation of an intramolecular protein kinase activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingfen; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Luebbering, Nathan; Singh, Aman; Sibbet, Gary; Ferguson, Michael A J; Cleghon, Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    DYRK-family kinases employ an intramolecular mechanism to autophosphorylate a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Once phosphorylated, DYRKs lose tyrosine kinase activity and function as serine/threonine kinases. DYRKs have been characterized in organisms from yeast to human; however, all entities belong to the Unikont supergroup, only one of five eukaryotic supergroups. To assess the evolutionary age and conservation of the DYRK intramolecular kinase-activation mechanism, we surveyed 21 genomes representing four of the five eukaryotic supergroups for the presence of DYRKs. We also analyzed the activation mechanism of the sole DYRK (class 2 DYRK) present in Trypanosoma brucei (TbDYRK2), a member of the excavate supergroup and separated from Drosophila by ∼850 million years. Bioinformatics showed the DYRKs clustering into five known subfamilies, class 1, class 2, Yaks, HIPKs and Prp4s. Only class 2 DYRKs were present in all four supergroups. These diverse class 2 DYRKs also exhibited conservation of N-terminal NAPA regions located outside of the kinase domain, and were shown to have an essential role in activation loop autophosphorylation of Drosophila DmDYRK2. Class 2 TbDYRK2 required the activation loop tyrosine conserved in other DYRKs, the NAPA regions were critical for this autophosphorylation event, and the NAPA-regions of Trypanosoma and human DYRK2 complemented autophosphorylation by the kinase domain of DmDYRK2 in trans. Finally, sequential deletion analysis was used to further define the minimal region required for trans-complementation. Our analysis provides strong evidence that class 2 DYRKs were present in the primordial or root eukaryote, and suggest this subgroup may be the oldest, founding member of the DYRK family. The conservation of activation loop autophosphorylation demonstrates that kinase self-activation mechanisms are also primitive.

  14. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations under various geologic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Collett, T.

    2003-04-29

    In this paper we classify hydrate deposits in three classes according to their geologic and reservoir conditions, and discuss the corresponding production strategies. Simple depressurization appears promising in Class 1 hydrates, but its appeal decreases in Class 2 and Class 3 hydrates. The most promising production strategy in Class 2 hydrates involves combinations of depressurization and thermal stimulation, and is clearly enhanced by multi-well production-injection systems. The effectiveness of simple depressurization in Class 3 hydrates is limited, and thermal stimulation (alone or in combination with depressurization) through single well systems seems to be the strategy of choice in such deposits.

  15. 42 CFR 83.13 - How will NIOSH evaluate petitions, other than petitions by claimants covered under § 83.14?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... potential members of the class may have incurred, as specified under 42 CFR 83.14, from the following potential sources, as necessary: (1) The petition or petitions submitted on behalf of the class; (2) DOE and... sufficient accuracy radiation doses for members of the class, as provided under paragraph (c)(1) of...

  16. 77 FR 25375 - United States Standards for Wheat

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ...-AB12 United States Standards for Wheat Correction PART 810 In proposed rule document 2012-9182... 4.0 8.0 12.0 20.0 Total \\1\\ 3.0 5.0 8.0 12.0 20.0 Wheat of other classes: \\2\\ Contrasting classes...

  17. Current Student Assessment Practices of High School Band Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCognata, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement and assessment are becoming increasingly important to all music educators. The purpose of this study was to investigate the following questions: 1) in what specific ways are current high school band directors assessing students in their ensemble classes; 2) what are high school band directors' attitudes toward the assessment process;…

  18. Facts and Figures: A Compendium of Statistics on Ontario Universities. Spring 1993. Volume 1, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    The purpose of this compendium is to provide consistent and accurate statistical and graphic information on the Ontario (Canada) university system. There are four sections which provide: (1) financial data including revenues and expenses with expendable revenue by source, operating revenue by fund, and expenses by object class; (2) student data…

  19. 78 FR 39311 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan Amendment and an Associated Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... of approximately 45 acres at the top of Glass Buttes from a VRM class 2 to a VRM class 4. The BLM... atop Glass Buttes in the BLM Prineville District. This notice announces the beginning of the scoping... may submit comments on issues and planning criteria related to the Glass Buttes Communication Site...

  20. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  1. 49 CFR 192.327 - Cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... soil Consolidated rock Inches (Millimeters) Class 1 locations 30 (762) 18 (457) Class 2, 3, and 4... least 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover. (c) Where an underground structure prevents the installation.... (d) A main may be installed with less than 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover if the law of...

  2. 49 CFR 192.327 - Cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... soil Consolidated rock Inches (Millimeters) Class 1 locations 30 (762) 18 (457) Class 2, 3, and 4... least 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover. (c) Where an underground structure prevents the installation.... (d) A main may be installed with less than 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover if the law of...

  3. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  4. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  5. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  6. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  7. Making Sense of Time as Context: Theoretical Affordances of Chronotopes in the Study of Schooling and Student Success. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Lilly, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Time regulates the lives of educators. Time on task, 45-minute classes, 2-hour literacy blocks, 10-week marking periods, and 40-week school years are central to teachers' lives and to the operation of schools. In contemporary schools, benchmarks, standards, promotion, retention, graduation, and ultimately school success are all intricately…

  8. Teaching Anthropogenic Climate Change through Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Helping Students Think Critically about Science and Ethics in Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Claire; O'Brien, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is a complicated issue involving scientific data and analyses as well as political, economic, and ethical issues. In order to capture this complexity, we developed an interdisciplinary student and faculty collaboration by (1) offering introductory lectures on scientific and ethical methods to two classes, (2) assigning…

  9. Evaluation of an Experimental Intensive French Programme for Grade Eight Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Frances Crook

    This interim report on an experimental program to increase student motivation to learn French at the Cultural Centre of Intensive French (CCIF) examines objectives, evaluation procedures, and results of the experiment. Part 1 contains sections on: (1) French achievement in Ottawa, Canada, grade 8 classes, (2) Pimsleur listening comprehension test,…

  10. In-Service Training Model for TESOL/ABE Teacher-Aides. Vol. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document contains discussion of each of the 10 objectives of the inservice program to prepare teachers and aides for the TESOL/ABE (Teaching English as a Second Language/Adult Basic Education) class. The objectives are to instruct participants in 1) the component parts of an ABE/TESOL class; 2) construction and design of visual aides such as…

  11. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 61672-1 (2002-05) for a Class 2 instrument. (2) An acoustic calibrator... with the acoustic calibrator immediately before and after compliance tests. Any change in the...

  12. The Way We Do the Things We Do: A Survey of Middle-School Choral Educators' Sight-Singing Attitudes and Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the rationale for sight-singing instructional choices of chorus teachers at the middle school level and sought to determine teachers' commitment to teaching music literacy. Three research questions formed the basis of the study: (1) what is the prevalence of sight-singing instruction in choral music classes, (2) what is…

  13. Extreme Makeover: Physical Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Joan; Worrell, Vicki

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author cites valuable lessons to be learned from reality television shows that can also be utilized by physical educators. The author states some of the reality television's messages like: (1) physical educators must know how to maximize the activity time during physical education class; (2) must have a plan of action so that…

  14. A Comparative Study of Parental and Filial Role Definitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safilios Rothschild, Constantina; Georgiopoulos, John

    1970-01-01

    Data analysis for the American and Greek cultures indicate following trends: (1) parents of both sexes tend to define roles in terms of instrumental and expressive components, suggesting that Parsonian typology, if valid at all, applies more to lower and working class; (2) no significant social differences exist; and (3) family modernization along…

  15. Curriculum on Conflict: Some Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, David N.

    This developmental paper generally describes a task oriented model for teaching about conflict and conflict resolution, using student groups for problem solving, which can be developed in the classroom. The model involves: 1) identification of the issue, topic, or problem by the entire class; 2) identification of ideas, concepts, or facets of…

  16. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 61672-1 (2002-05) for a Class 2 instrument. (2) An acoustic calibrator... with the acoustic calibrator immediately before and after compliance tests. Any change in the...

  17. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 61672-1 (2002-05) for a Class 2 instrument. (2) An acoustic calibrator... with the acoustic calibrator immediately before and after compliance tests. Any change in the...

  18. 242-A Evaporator Condensate Tank (TK-C-100) tie down evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hundal, T.S.

    1995-01-23

    The existing Condensate Tank (TK-C-100) in the 242-A Evaporator building is not anchored to the floor slab. This tank is a Safety Class 3 sitting in a Safety Class 2 building. The tank needed to be evaluated to withstand the seismic loads. Anchor bolts have been designed to hold the tank during the seismic event.

  19. 49 CFR 176.92 - Cylinders laden in vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cylinders laden in vehicles. 176.92 Section 176.92... Requirements for Transport Vehicles Loaded With Hazardous Materials and Transported on Board Ferry Vessels § 176.92 Cylinders laden in vehicles. Any cylinder of Class 2 (compressed gas) material which...

  20. HEAVY-DUTY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS MODEL (GEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Class 2b-8 vocational truck manufacturers and Class 7/8 tractor manufacturers would be subject to vehicle-based fuel economy and emission standards that would use a truck simulation model to evaluate the impact of the truck tires and/or tractor cab design on vehicle compliance wi...

  1. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  3. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  4. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  5. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  6. 49 CFR 176.220 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.220 Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in any hold...

  7. Integrating Literature in Content Areas: Professional's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walley, Carl W.; Walley, Kate

    Based on the premise that viewing the curriculum holistically enriches the instructional practices of teachers and adds depth and meaning to children's school experiences, this guide is intended to: (1) encourage teachers who have doubts about using literature in their content area classes; (2) support those presently using literature to teach;…

  8. KNOX homeobox genes potentially have similar function in both diploid unicellular and multicellular meristems, but not in haploid meristems.

    PubMed

    Sano, Ryosuke; Juárez, Cristina M; Hass, Barbara; Sakakibara, Keiko; Ito, Motomi; Banks, Jo Ann; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2005-01-01

    Members of the class 1 knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) gene family are important regulators of shoot apical meristem development in angiosperms. To determine whether they function similarly in seedless plants, three KNOX genes (two class 1 genes and one class 2 gene) from the fern Ceratopteris richardii were characterized. Expression of both class 1 genes was detected in the shoot apical cell, leaf primordia, marginal part of the leaves, and vascular bundles by in situ hybridization, a pattern that closely resembles that of class 1 KNOX genes in angiosperms with compound leaves. The fern class 2 gene was expressed in all sporophyte tissues examined, which is characteristic of class 2 gene expression in angiosperms. All three CRKNOX genes were not detected in gametophyte tissues by RNA gel blot analysis. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the fern class 1 genes resembled plants that overexpress seed plant class 1 KNOX genes in leaf morphology. Ectopic expression of the class 2 gene in Arabidopsis did not result in any unusual phenotypes. Taken together with phylogenetic analysis, our results suggest that (a) the class 1 and 2 KNOX genes diverged prior to the divergence of fern and seed plant lineages, (b) the class 1 KNOX genes function similarly in seed plant and fern sporophyte meristem development despite their differences in structure, (c) KNOX gene expression is not required for the development of the fern gametophyte, and (d) the sporophyte and gametophyte meristems of ferns are not regulated by the same developmental mechanisms at the molecular level. PMID:15642091

  9. Reciprocal Associations between Young Children's Developing Moral Judgments and Theory of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.; Jambon, Marc; Conry-Murray, Clare; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    Associations between young children's developing theory of mind (ToM) and judgments of prototypical moral transgressions were examined 3 times across 1 year in 70 American middle class 2.5- to 4-year-olds. Separate path models controlling for cross-time stability in judgments, within-time associations, and children's age at Wave 1 indicated that…

  10. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  11. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  12. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  13. 43 CFR 2541.3 - Patents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patents. 2541.3 Section 2541.3 Public... § 2541.3 Patents. (a) Any applicant who satisfied all requirements for a claim of class 1 or class 2... will receive a patent conveying title to all other minerals except: (1) Any minerals which, at the...

  14. Biennial Survey of Education in the United States, 1928-1930. Bulletin, 1931, No. 20. Volume I. Chapter VII: Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, H. M.

    1931-01-01

    This chapter of the "Biennial Survey of Education in the United States, 1928-1930" focuses on the following topic areas as they relate to agriculture: (1) Federally reimbursed classes; (2) Agricultural extension work; (3) Agriculture in the colleges; (4) Special schools of agriculture; (5) Educational activities of the Federal Farm Board; (6)…

  15. Fair Play Game: A Group Contingency Strategy to Increase Students' Active Behaviours in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidoni, Carla; Lee, Chang-Hung; Azevedo, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    A dependent group contingency strategy called Fair Play Game was applied to promote increase in number of steps during physical education classes for sixth-grade students. Results from a multiple baseline design across three classes showed that the mean number of steps for baseline vs. intervention were: Class 1: 43 vs. 64 steps/minute; Class 2:…

  16. Self-Esteem in the Foreign Language Classroom: Activities That Do More Than Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lore-Lawson, Joye

    This paper provides activities and suggestions for foreign language teachers to use to enhance their students' self-esteem. Teachers should: (1) have students speak, write, and read the target language on the first day of class; (2) help students overcome test anxiety by focusing on what they did right, experimenting with different testing…

  17. 48 CFR 52.247-68 - Report of Shipment (REPSHIP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... officer— (i) For all shipments of— (A) Classified material, protected sensitive, and protected controlled material; (B) Explosives and poisons, class 1, division 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3; class 2, division 2.3 and class 6... before the arrival of the shipment; and (3) Send, to the receiving transportation officer, the bill...

  18. Modal Auxiliaries in Spanish. Studies in Linguistics and Language Learning, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Philip W.

    The author's stated purpose is to answer the questions: (1) Do auxiliary verbs exist in Spanish? If so, what are the characteristics which distinguish them as a class, and what specific verbs are included in that class? (2) Is there, in particular, a class of modal auxiliaries? If so, what are their defining characteristics, and what is the…

  19. 37 CFR 2.86 - Application may include multiple classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... multiple classes. 2.86 Section 2.86 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... include multiple classes. (a) In a single application, an applicant may apply to register the same mark for goods and/or services in multiple classes. The applicant must: (1) Specifically identify the...

  20. 17 CFR 270.18f-3 - Multiple class companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... class; (2) Shall have exclusive voting rights on any matter submitted to shareholders that relates solely to its arrangement; (3) Shall have separate voting rights on any matter submitted to shareholders... different arrangement for shareholder services or the distribution of securities or both, and shall pay...

  1. Using Alternative Assessments in Business and Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Deborah; Lucas, Diane

    2013-01-01

    The present study will be divided in three parts: (1) a discussion of authentic alternative assessments vs. traditional assessments in language and business classes; (2) an explanation on how to create authentic alternative assessments using technology-based and non-technology-based materials; and (3) tools to evaluate these authentic assessments.…

  2. The effects of grazing on the spatial pattern of elm (Ulmus pumila L.) in the sparse woodland steppe of Horqin Sandy Land in Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Wu, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of grazing on the formation of the spatial pattern of elm growth in a sparse woodland steppe. We used a point pattern method to analyze the elm trees within different diameter classes in both grazed and fenced plots, which were established in Horqin Sandy Land, northeastern, China. The results showed that, in the grazed plot, the distances where transformation between random and aggregated patterns occurred in class 1 (10 cm ≤ DBH ≤ 15 cm) and class 2 (15 cm ≤ DBH ≤ 20 cm) were 2.27 and 2.37 m, respectively. Meanwhile, in the fenced plot, the distances between random and aggregated patterns that occurred in class 1, class 2 and class 3 (DBH > 20 cm) were 3.13, 3.13 and 7.85 m, respectively. In the fenced plot, in distances larger than 67.72 m there were a negative association between class 1 and class 2, which was also the case between class 2 and class 3 and between class 1 and class 3 for distances greater than 104.09 and 128.54 m, respectively. Meanwhile, negative associations occurred only with distances larger than 29.38 m in the grazed plot. These findings suggest that grazing reduced the competition intensity between elm trees; and therefore, grazing management could be an effective strategy used to regulate the elm population in the degraded sandy land of Northern China.

  3. Effect of welding conditions on transformation and properties of heat-affected zones in LWR (light-water reactor) vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Mohammed, S. . Welding Research and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The continuous cooling transformation behavior (CCT) and isothermal transformation (IT) behavior were determined for SA-508 and SA-533 materials for conditions pertaining to standard heat treatment and for the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The resulting diagrams help to select welding conditions that produce the most favorable microconstituent for the development of optimum postweld heat treatment (PWHT) toughness levels. In the case of SA-508 and SA-533, martensite responds more favorably to PWHT than does bainite. Bainite is to be avoided for the optimum toughness characteristics of the HAZ. The reheat cracking tendency for both steels was evaluated by metallographic studies of simulated HAZ structures subjected to PWHT cycles and simultaneous restraint. Both SA-533, Grade B, Class 1, and SA-508, Class 2, cracked intergranularly. The stress rupture parameter (the product of the stress for a rupture life of 10 min and the corresponding reduction of area) calculated for both steels showed that SA-508, Class 2, was more susceptible to reheat cracking than SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Cold cracking tests (Battelle Test and University of Tennessee modified hydrogen susceptibility test) indicated that a higher preheat temperature is required for SA-508, Class 2, to avoid cracking than is required for SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Further, the Hydrogen Susceptibility Test showed that SA-508, Class 2, is more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than is SA-533, Grade B, Class 1.

  4. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  5. 49 CFR 173.32 - Requirements for the use of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....1 liquids, Packing Group I or II, Class 2 gases, or Class 3 or 4 liquids, must be equipped with a... (gallon) of shell capacity (kg/L or lbs./gal.) may not exceed the density of the liquefied compressed gas... of gas or liquid specified by the original valve manufacturer when piping mounted directly on...

  6. 49 CFR 173.32 - Requirements for the use of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....1 liquids, Packing Group I or II, Class 2 gases, or Class 3 or 4 liquids, must be equipped with a... (gallon) of shell capacity (kg/L or lbs./gal.) may not exceed the density of the liquefied compressed gas... of gas or liquid specified by the original valve manufacturer when piping mounted directly on...

  7. A Free-Recall Demonstration versus a Lecture-Only Control: Learning Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, William R.

    2012-01-01

    On their first class day, introductory psychology students took a 14-question multiple-choice pretest on several principles of memory including primacy, recency, storage, retrieval, counterbalancing, and the free-recall method. I randomly preassigned students to come at one of two different times to the second class, 2 days later, when they either…

  8. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  9. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  10. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  11. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  12. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  13. Big Business Invests in Catholic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Recognizes the unused potential of inner city kids and describes how The Institute for Leadership, Excellence and Academic Development (I-Lead) program has helped prepare these students for admittance to universities and colleges. I-Lead offers four core courses: (1) test prep class; (2) constitutional law class; (3) writing class; and (4)…

  14. The Role of Mothers' and Fathers' Parental Control and Coparenting in Toddlers' Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Kyong-Ah; Elicker, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the unique and relative contributions of mothers' and fathers' parental control and coparenting to toddlers' committed compliance with parents in both dyadic parent-child and triadic family play contexts. Sixty-eight mostly middle-class, 2-parent families with toddlers (16-37 months) were observed in a…

  15. Problems of Soviet Law and Socialist Legality in Legalistic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samoshchenko, I. S.

    1978-01-01

    Notes that Soviet youth must be educated about Soviet law and their obligations as citizens to work, respect labor discipline, and defend the motherland. Lists functions of Soviet law as (1) shaping, mediating for, and protecting the middle class, (2) reinforcing socialist principles and the emancipation of women, and (3) guaranteeing…

  16. 49 CFR 176.200 - General stowage requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...” over a hold or compartment containing coal. (f) Class 2 (compressed gas) material must be kept as cool as practicable and be stowed away from all sources of heat and ignition. Any package containing a... lashed to prevent any shifting. (d) Any package containing Division 2.3 (poison gas) materials must...

  17. 49 CFR 176.200 - General stowage requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hold or compartment containing coal. (f) Class 2 (compressed gas) material must be kept as cool as practicable and be stowed away from all sources of heat and ignition. Any package containing a Division 2.1... movement in any direction. (d) Any package containing Division 2.3 (poison gas) materials must be...

  18. Eight-Year Trends in Federal Graduation Rates and Graduation Success Rates at NCAA Division I Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collegiate Athletic Association (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Data is presented on: (1) Comparison of GSR and Federal Graduation Rate Cohorts (1999-2002 Entering Classes); (2) Average GSRs for Division I Student-Athletes in 1998-01 Cohorts Vs. 1999-2002 Cohorts; (3) Graduation Success Rate Trends for Division I Men's Sports: Four-Class Averages for 1998-01 Cohorts vs. 1999-02 Cohorts; (4) Graduation Success…

  19. Using Stimulus Equivalence-Based Instruction to Teach Graduate Students in Applied Behavior Analysis to Interpret Operant Functions of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Leif; Schnell, Lauren; Reeve, Kenneth F.; Sidener, Tina M.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulus equivalence-based instruction (EBI) was used to teach four, 4-member classes representing functions of behavior to ten graduate students. The classes represented behavior maintained by attention (Class 1), escape (Class 2), access to tangibles (Class 3), and automatic reinforcement (Class 4). Stimuli within each class consisted of a…

  20. 19 CFR 151.45 - Storage tanks bonded as warehouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Storage tanks bonded as warehouses. 151.45 Section... Products § 151.45 Storage tanks bonded as warehouses. (a) Application. Tanks for the storage of imported petroleum or petroleum products in bulk may be bonded as warehouses of class 2 if to be used exclusively...

  1. 46 CFR 251.1 - Applications for construction-differential subsidy under Title V, Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contract. 8. Construction-differential subsidy will not apply to owner furnished equipment. All material or....0 25 Main engine 3.0 26 Shafting and propellers 6.0 27 Condensers 1.0 28 Boilers 1.0 29 Fuel oil... Expressed as percentage of base cost of the equipment in each cost class. 2 Cost of spare anchor,...

  2. Emotional Psychological and Related Problems among Truant Youths: An Exploratory Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Ungaro, Rocio Aracelis; Gulledge, Laura M.; Karas, Lora M.; Winters, Ken C.; Belenko, Steven; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Intervention Project. Results identified two classes of youths: Class 1(n=9) - youths with low levels of delinquency, mental health and substance abuse issues; and Class 2(n=37) - youths with high levels of these problems. Comparison of these two classes on their urine analysis test results and parent/guardian reports of traumatic events found…

  3. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  4. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  5. 16 CFR 1610.61 - Reasonable and representative testing to assure compliance with the standard for the clothing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Commission enforces the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (“the Standard”), 16 CFR part 1610... and 3). § 1610.4. Class 1 textiles, those that exhibit normal flammability, are acceptable for use in clothing. § 1610.4(a)(1) & (2). Class 2 textiles, applicable only to raised-fiber surfaces, are...

  6. 16 CFR 1610.40 - Use of alternate apparatus, procedures, or criteria for tests for guaranty purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... guaranty purposes. (a) Section 8(a) of the Act provides that no person shall be subject to criminal... garments subject to its provisions as “Normal flammability, Class 1,” “Intermediate flammability, Class 2,” and “Rapid and Intense Burning, Class 3.” See § 1610.4. Sections 3 and 4 of the Act prohibit...

  7. 27 CFR 5.35 - Class and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of whiskies in mixtures. In the case of any of the types of whisky defined in § 5.22(b), Class 2, which contains any whisky or whiskies produced in a country other than that indicated by the type designation, there shall be stated on the brand label the percentage of such whisky and the country or...

  8. The Question as a Technique in Foreign-Language Teaching. ERIC Focus Reports on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Number 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Dolly D.

    This report focuses on the nature and structure of the question and its use as an educational technique enabling the language teacher to involve his students in the use of the target language. Discussion concentrates on: (1) the question in the basic level class, (2) the question as a testing technique, (3) the question as a vocabulary activator…

  9. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... liquids. 174.204 Section 174.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND..., including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded unless... property. (2) The following tank cars may not be delivered and unloaded on carrier tracks unless the...

  10. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... liquids. 174.204 Section 174.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND..., including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded unless... property. (2) The following tank cars may not be delivered and unloaded on carrier tracks unless the...

  11. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... liquids. 174.204 Section 174.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND..., including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded unless... property. (2) The following tank cars may not be delivered and unloaded on carrier tracks unless the...

  12. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... liquids. 174.204 Section 174.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND..., including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded unless... property. (2) The following tank cars may not be delivered and unloaded on carrier tracks unless the...

  13. DEVELOPMENTAL TRAJECTORIES OF CRITERIA OF NICOTINE DEPENDENCE IN ADOLESCENCE*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mei-Chen; Muthén, Bengt; Shaffran, Christine C.; Griesler, Pamela; Kandel, Denise B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the nature and predictors of developmental trajectories of symptoms of DSM-IV nicotine dependence in adolescence following smoking initiation. Data are from a longitudinal cohort of 324 new smokers from grades 6 to 10 in the Chicago Public Schools, interviewed 5 times at 6 month intervals. Monthly data on DSM-IV symptoms of nicotine dependence were available for 36 months. Growth mixture modeling was applied to the monthly histories to identify trajectories of DSM-IV criteria of nicotine dependence. A four-class solution best fitted the data: No DSM criterion (47.7%); Early onset/Chronic course (19.8%); Early onset/Remission (17.3%); Late onset (15.2%). Blunt use prior to cigarette use was associated with the three symptomatic trajectories. Conduct disorder and prior heavy smoking were associated with Class 2 (Chronic). Conduct disorder differentiated Class 2 from Class 4 (Late onset), while pleasant initial sensitivity to the first tobacco experience was associated with Classes 2 and 3 (Remit) and differentiated Class 2 from Class 4. Novelty seeking characterized Class 3. Parental dependence differentiated chronicity (Class 2) from remission (Class 3) among those who developed symptoms early. Being Hispanic reduced membership in Classes 3 and 4, and being male for Class 3. The data highlight the importance of parental nicotine dependence as a risk factor for early and sustained nicotine dependence by the offspring, pleasant initial sensitivity and conduct disorder for early onset of dependence, and blunt use prior to smoking for all trajectories. The factors important for onset of dependence are not necessarily the same as those for sustained course. PMID:18602225

  14. The cox protein of bacteriophage P2 inhibits the formation of the repressor protein and autoregulates the early operon.

    PubMed Central

    Saha, S; Haggård-Ljungquist, E; Nordström, K

    1987-01-01

    The cox gene is the first gene of the early operon of bacteriophage P2. The early promoter Pe and the repressor promoter Pc are located close to each other and in such a way that their transcripts have opposite polarity and show an overlap of about 30 nucleotides. The expression of the early operon and of the C gene was studied in vivo by using fusions to a promoterless cat (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) gene. The results show that the Cox protein negatively autoregulates the early operon and inhibits the formation of the repressor C. By measuring the efficiency of plating of a series of P2 virulent deletion mutants on bacteria carrying a cloned cox gene, the site of action of the Cox protein was mapped within the Pe-Pc region. The stimulatory effect of the C protein on expression of the Pc promoter was found to be due to inhibition of transcription from Pc; this was demonstrated by mutating Pe which showed that loss of transcription from Pe stimulated transcription from Pc. Hence, this is a case of regulation of gene expression by convergent transcription. By cloning the region C-Pe-Pc-cox such that the cat and kan genes are expressed from Pc and Pe, respectively, it was shown that only one of the resistances (Cm and Km) was expressed. This mimics the choice between lysogeny and lytic growth of the phage. The 'lysogenic' state was very stable whereas the 'lytic' state flipped to the 'lysogenic' at a somewhat higher frequency. The presence of a cloned cox gene drastically stimulated the formation of free phage from a P2-lysogen and dramatically reduced the frequency of lysogenization after P2 infection. We conclude that the pleiotropic effects of the cox (control of excision) gene, namely effects on lysogenization, formation of free phage and site-specific P2 recombination, can be explained by the effect of the Cox protein on the activity of the promoters Pc and Pe. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2826134

  15. A critical review on the improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants using genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Cheng-Jiang; Shao, Hong-Bo; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2012-03-01

    Global warming is one of the most serious challenges facing us today. It may be linked to the increase in atmospheric CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs), leading to a rise in sea level, notable shifts in ecosystems, and in the frequency and intensity of wild fires. There is a strong interest in stabilizing the atmospheric concentration of CO2 and other GHGs by decreasing carbon emission and/or increasing carbon sequestration. Biotic sequestration is an important and effective strategy to mitigate the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations by increasing carbon sequestration and storage capacity of ecosystems using plant photosynthesis and by decreasing carbon emission using biofuel rather than fossil fuel. Improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, using transgenic engineering, potentially provides a set of available and effective tools for enhancing plant carbon sequestration. In this review, firstly different biological methods of CO2 assimilation in C3, C4 and CAM plants are introduced and three types of C4 pathways which have high photosynthetic performance and have evolved as CO2 pumps are briefly summarized. Then (i) the improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation of C3 plants by transgenic engineering using non-C4 genes, and (ii) the overexpression of individual or multiple C4 cycle photosynthetic genes (PEPC, PPDK, PCK, NADP-ME and NADP-MDH) in transgenic C3 plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, rice and Arabidopsis) are highlighted. Some transgenic C3 plants (e.g. tobacco, rice and Arabidopsis) overexpressing the FBP/SBPase, ictB and cytochrome c6 genes showed positive effects on photosynthetic efficiency and growth characteristics. However, over the last 28 years, efforts to overexpress individual, double or multiple C4 enzymes in C3 plants like tobacco, potato, rice, and Arabidopsis have produced mixed results that do not confirm or eliminate the possibility of improving photosynthesis of C3 plants by this approach. Finally, a prospect

  16. Genes involved in protein metabolism of the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, A P; da Silva, D F; De Oliveira, M N V; Borges, A C; De Carvalho, A F; De Moraes, C A

    2011-09-01

    A basic requirement for the prediction of the potential use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the dairy industry is the identification of specific genes involved in flavour-forming pathways. The probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 was submitted to a genetic characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in protein catabolism. Eight genes belonging to this system were identified, which possess a closely phylogenetic relationship to NCFM strains representative, as it was demonstrated for oppC and oppBII, encoding oligopeptide transport system components. PepC, PepN, and PepX might be essential for growth of LAB, probiotic or not, since the correspondent genes are always present, including in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome. For pepX gene, a probable link between carbohydrate catabolism and PepX expression may exists, where it is regulated by PepR1/CcpA-like, a common feature between Lactobacillus strains and also in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. The well conserved evolutionary history of the ilvE gene is evidence that the pathways leading to branched-chain amino acid degradation, such as isoleucine and valine, are similar among L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains and L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. Thus, the involvement of succinate in flavour formation can be attributed to IlvE activity. The presence of aminopeptidase G in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome, which is absent in several strains, might improve the proteolytic activity and effectiveness. The nucleotide sequence encoding PepG revealed that it is a cysteine endopeptidase, belonging to Peptidase C1 superfamily; sequence analysis showed 99% identity with L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 pepG, whereas protein sequence analysis revealed 100% similarity with PepG from the same organism. The present study proposes a schematic model to explain how the proteolytic system of the probiotic L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 works, based on the components identified so far.

  17. Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout (PEPC) is a program written to leverage parallelism and to automate the checkout process of plug-ins created in Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform). Eclipse plug-ins can be aggregated in a feature project. This innovation digests a feature description (xml file) and automatically checks out all of the plug-ins listed in the feature. This resolves the issue of manually checking out each plug-in required to work on the project. To minimize the amount of time necessary to checkout the plug-ins, this program makes the plug-in checkouts parallel. After parsing the feature, a request to checkout for each plug-in in the feature has been inserted. These requests are handled by a thread pool with a configurable number of threads. By checking out the plug-ins in parallel, the checkout process is streamlined before getting started on the project. For instance, projects that took 30 minutes to checkout now take less than 5 minutes. The effect is especially clear on a Mac, which has a network monitor displaying the bandwidth use. When running the client from a developer s home, the checkout process now saturates the bandwidth in order to get all the plug-ins checked out as fast as possible. For comparison, a checkout process that ranged from 8-200 Kbps from a developer s home is now able to saturate a pipe of 1.3 Mbps, resulting in significantly faster checkouts. Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) tries to build a project as soon as it is downloaded. As part of another optimization, this innovation programmatically tells Eclipse to stop building while checkouts are happening, which dramatically reduces lock contention and enables plug-ins to continue downloading until all of them finish. Furthermore, the software re-enables automatic building, and forces Eclipse to do a clean build once it finishes checking out all of the plug-ins. This software is fully generic and does not contain any NASA-specific code. It can be applied to any

  18. Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms & C4 Enzymes In Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moolna, A.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R.

    2009-12-01

    overlapping roles with other metabolic processes. Ongoing work is using immuno-blotting to compare protein levels of the C4 enzymes PEPC (fixes HCO3-) and PEPCK (releases CO2) in cultures grown at different DIC levels. If they are involved in CCM physiology, their expression would be expected to decrease with its relaxation. Figure 1. Relaxation of carbon concentrating mechanism physiology in Gephyrocapsa oceanica. Shown by the shift of the response curve to higher DIC concentrations in the 4x DIC culture. Culture DIC levels were approximately 2 mM for present-day CO2 and 8 mM for 4x DIC.

  19. Novel nuclear markers inform the systematics and the evolution of serpentine use in Streptanthus and allies (Thelypodieae, Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Ivalú Cacho, N; Millie Burrell, A; Pepper, Alan E; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2014-03-01

    Streptanthus is a genus of ca. 35 species in the tribe Thelypodieae (Brassicaceae) that has remarkable morphological and ecological diversity, a large number of species in the group being edaphic specialists endemic to unusual soils such as serpentine. While ecological research has shed some light on adaptation to serpentine in Streptanthus, there have been few insights on the origins and evolution of serpentine tolerance in this group, largely due to limited success in resolving the phylogenetic relationships among Streptanthus and allied genera of the Thelypodieae (Streptanthoid complex). We present a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis for the Streptanthoid complex, based on three newly identified and highly variable single copy nuclear regions (AT4G34700, AT1G61620, and AT1G56590, and three others that are widely used (ITS, phyA, and PEPC). We also include data for two chloroplast regions (trnL and trnH-psbA). Collectively, our new markers provide 75% of the nuclear parsimony informative characters in our data. Taxonomically, our sampling is the most inclusive of any study of the Streptanthoid Complex to date, including 46 out of the 53 species of Streptanthus and Caulanthus, as well as representatives of several closely allied genera in the Thelypodieae. Our results reveal that Streptanthus, Caulanthus, and Thelypodium are not reciprocally monophyletic as currently defined. The species of Streptanthus form two rather distantly related clades. One clade (SC-I) is comprised of species with bilateral flowers and urn-shaped calyces that occur mainly within the California Floristic Province (CFP) hotspot; the other clade (SC-II) is composed of species with extant ranges mainly outside the CFP. Our data indicate that serpentine tolerance has evolved between eight and ten times in this group, of which between four and five have resulted in endemism. While serpentine endemism has been rarely lost, large and diverse clades composed mainly of serpentine endemics

  20. Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates from South America Use an Atypical Red Blood Cell Invasion Pathway Associated with Invasion Ligand Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Perez, Mary; Villasis, Elizabeth; Machado, Ricardo L. D.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Blair, Silvia; Gamboa, Dionicia; Lustigman, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Studies of Plasmodium falciparum invasion pathways in field isolates have been limited. Red blood cell (RBC) invasion is a complex process involving two invasion protein families; Erythrocyte Binding-Like (EBL) and the Reticulocyte Binding-Like (PfRh) proteins, which are polymorphic and not fully characterized in field isolates. To determine the various P. falciparum invasion pathways used by parasite isolates from South America, we studied the invasion phenotypes in three regions: Colombia, Peru and Brazil. Additionally, polymorphisms in three members of the EBL (EBA-181, EBA-175 and EBL-1) and five members of the PfRh (PfRh1, PfRh2a, PfRh2b, PfRh4, PfRh5) families were determined. We found that most P. falciparum field isolates from Colombia and Peru invade RBCs through an atypical invasion pathway phenotypically characterized as resistant to all enzyme treatments (NrTrCr). Moreover, the invasion pathways and the ligand polymorphisms differed substantially among the Colombian and Brazilian isolates while the Peruvian isolates represent an amalgam of those present in the Colombian and Brazilian field isolates. The NrTrCr invasion profile was associated with the presence of the PfRh2a pepC variant, the PfRh5 variant 1 and EBA-181 RVNKN variant. The ebl and Pfrh expression levels in a field isolate displaying the NrTrCr profile also pointed to PfRh2a, PfRh5 and EBA-181 as being possibly the major players in this invasion pathway. Notably, our studies demonstrate the uniqueness of the Peruvian P. falciparum field isolates in terms of their invasion profiles and ligand polymorphisms, and present a unique opportunity for studying the ability of P. falciparum parasites to expand their invasion repertoire after being reintroduced to human populations. The present study is directly relevant to asexual blood stage vaccine design focused on invasion pathway proteins, suggesting that regional invasion variants and global geographical variation are likely to preclude a simple

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Terek, Demet; Kayikcioglu, Meral; Kultursay, Hakan; Ergenoglu, Mete; Yalaz, Mehmet; Musayev, Oktay; Mogulkoc, Nesrin; Gunusen, Ilkben; Akisu, Mete; Kultursay, Nilgun

    2013-01-01

    This is the case report of a pregnant woman who refused pregnancy termination when diagnosed with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) functional class 2–3 at the 24th week of gestation and of her newborn. A pregnant woman with PAH functional class 2–3 was treated with inhaled prostacyclin analog (iloprost), oral sildenafil, oxygen, and low molecular weight heparin. She delivered at 32nd week by Cesarean section. The infant required oxygen up to 36th week postconceptional age and had a short steroid treatment. The mother needed close cardiovascular monitorization, intensive oxygen and pulmonary vasodilator therapy for 2 months and was discharged with oxygen and oral iloprost treatment. A multidisciplinary approach together with pulmonary vasodilator therapy may be succesful in such a high-risk pregnant woman. PMID:23900530

  2. Symptom Clusters in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome Differ by Sex, Age, and Discharge Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Anne G.; Knight, Elizabeth P.; Steffen, Alana; Burke, Larisa; Daya, Mohamud; DeVon, Holli A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify classes of individuals presenting to the ED for suspected ACS who shared similar symptoms and clinical characteristics. Background Describing symptom clusters in undiagnosed patients with suspected ACS is a novel and clinically relevant approach, reflecting real-world emergency department evaluation procedures Methods Symptoms were measured using a validated 13-item symptom checklist. Latent class analysis was used to describe symptom clusters. Results The sample of 874 was 37% female with a mean age of 59.9 years. Four symptom classes were identified: Heavy Symptom Burden (Class 1), Chest Symptoms and Shortness of Breath (Class 2), Chest Symptoms Only (Class 3), and Weary (Class 4). Patients with ACS were more likely to cluster in Classes 2 and 3. Women and younger patients were more likely to group in Class 1. Conclusions Further research is needed to determine the value of symptom clusters in the ED triage and management of suspected ACS. PMID:26118542

  3. Radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction. Technical report, 16 Aug 86-31 Mar 90

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Schuening, F.

    1991-06-01

    This work was aimed at investigating radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction in the dog model. One project was to produce monoclonal antibodies directed against canine hemopoietic precursor cells and specific for pluripotent stem cells. Antibodies obtained reacted with different myeloid and erythroid precursor cells; unfortunately, none of the antibodies were specific for pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells. Positive selections for these cells were performed using magnetic beads and an antibody against class 2-antigen. Transplantation of class 2 positive marrow cells into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs led to sustained recovery in only 1 of 5 dogs. A second project established and investigated long-term marrow cultures in the dog. Culture conditions were studied and optimized, and marrow cells were transplanted into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs to investigate stem cell survival in long-term cultures. Engraftment was observed only with short-term marrow cultures.

  4. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  5. Short term outcomes of revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, James D; Fields, Adam C; Moucha, Calin S

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have assessed postoperative complications in revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). The aim of this study was to assess which preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in rTKA. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement (NSQIP) database, we identified patients undergoing rTKA from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and complications within thirty days of surgery were analyzed. A total of 3421 patients underwent rTKA. After adjusted analysis, dialysis (P = 0.016) was associated with minor complications. Male gender (P = 0.03), older age (P = 0.029), ASA class >2 (P = 0.017), wound class >2 (P < 0.0001), emergency operation (P = 0.038), and pulmonary comorbidity (P = 0.047) were associated with major complications.

  6. Subtypes of Adolescent Sedative/Anxiolytic Misusers: A Latent Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Martin T.; Howard, Matthew O.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Background Few empirically-based taxonomies of nonmedical prescription drug misusers have been published. This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify classes of adolescent sedative/anxiolytic misusers. Methods Interviews assessing substance use, psychiatric symptoms, antisocial traits/behavior, and traumatic life experiences were conducted with 723 Missouri youth in residential care for antisocial behavior. Sedative/anxiolytic misusers (N = 247) averaged 15.8 (S.D. = 1.1) years of age; a majority were male (83.8%), White (70.0%), and resided in rural/small town areas (53.8%). Results LPA yielded a three-class solution. Class 1 (59.1%) was comprised of youth with significantly lower levels of currently distressing psychiatric symptoms, fewer lifetime traumatic experiences, less problematic substance use histories, less frequent antisocial behavior, and less impulsivity than youth in Classes 2 and 3. Class 2 (11.3%) youth had high levels of currently distressing psychiatric symptoms and more frequent antisocial behavior compared to youth in Classes 1 and 3. Class 3 (29.5%) youth evidenced levels of psychiatric and behavioral problems that were intermediate to those of Class 1 and 2 youth. Frequency of sedative/anxiolytic misuse was significantly higher in Classes 2 and 3 compared to Class 1. Members of Class 2 and Class 3 also had the highest levels of psychiatric symptoms for which sedatives/anxiolytics are commonly prescribed. Significant differences between classes were observed across a range of health, mental health, personality, and behavioral variables. Conclusions Adolescents who misused prescription sedatives/anxiolytics evidenced significant heterogeneity across measures of psychiatric and behavioral dysfunction. Youth with comparatively high levels of anxiety and depression reported significantly more intensive sedative/anxiolytic misuse than their counterparts and may be at high risk for sedative/anxiolytic abuse and dependence. PMID

  7. IMP-27, a Unique Metallo-β-Lactamase Identified in Geographically Distinct Isolates of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Nyssa; Fowler, Randal C.; Yoshizumi, A.; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Ishii, Y.; Harrison, Lucas; Geyer, Chelsie N.; Moland, Ellen Smith; Thomson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    A novel metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaIMP-27, was identified in unrelated Proteus mirabilis isolates from two geographically distinct locations in the United States. Both isolates harbor blaIMP-27 as part of the first gene cassette in a class 2 integron. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated susceptibility to aztreonam, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ceftazidime but resistance to ertapenem. However, hydrolysis assays indicated that ceftazidime was a substrate for IMP-27. PMID:27503648

  8. The Social Development of Two Year Old Children in Residential Nurseries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tizard, Jack; Tizard, Barbara

    This study focuses upon some aspects of the social behavior of 2-year-old children being reared in long-stay residential nurseries. These children are compared with working class 2-year-old children being raised in two-parent homes in which the mother is not working full-time and there are no older siblings of preschool age. All children were…

  9. Latent Class Analysis of Differential Item Functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Mi-young Lee; Cohen, Allan S.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of latent class analysis for the detection of differences in item functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III). A two-class solution for a latent class model appeared to be defined in part by ability because Class 1 was lower in ability than Class 2 on both the PPVT-III and the…

  10. A Privacy-Protecting Authentication Scheme for Roaming Services with Smart Cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kyungho; Han, Dong-Guk; Won, Dongho

    In this work we propose a novel smart card based privacy-protecting authentication scheme for roaming services. Our proposal achieves so-called Class 2 privacy protection, i.e., no information identifying a roaming user and also linking the user's behaviors is not revealed in a visited network. It can be used to overcome the inherent structural flaws of smart card based anonymous authentication schemes issued recently. As shown in our analysis, our scheme is computationally efficient for a mobile user.

  11. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 227 - Audiometric Test Rooms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Type 2 requirements of ANSI S1.4-1983 (Reaffirmed 2001) and to the Class 2 requirements of ANSI S1.11... Director of the Federal Register approves the incorporation by reference of ANSI S1.4-1983 (Reaffirmed 2001) and S.1.11-2004 in this section in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain...

  12. Computer simulation and design of gravity solid-liquid separation units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, D. C.; Wang, L. K.

    1981-05-01

    Two computer programs are presented that perform all the necessary calculations when the process being considered involves the clarification of a fluid, namely, water. The first computer program handles class 1 sedimentation which is the clarification of a fluid containin a dilute suspension of nonflocculating particls. The second computer program handles class 2 sedimentation which is the clarification of a fluid containing a dilute suspension of flocculating particles.

  13. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, Scott T.; Justice James L.; Taylor, Archie R.

    1999-10-28

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs.

  14. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, T. Scott; Justice, James J.; Egg, Rebecca

    2001-08-07

    The Oxy operated Class 2 Project at West Welch Project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO2 injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir demonstration characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO2 flood design based on the reservoir characterization.

  15. 29 CFR 1910.302 - Electric utilization systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)—Systems over 600 volts, nominal—Aboveground wiring methods § 1910.308(c)(2)—Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 remote control, signaling, and power-limited circuits—Marking § 1910.308(d)—Fire alarm systems (4... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric utilization systems. 1910.302 Section...

  16. Biochemical and genetic analyses of acetoin catabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Fründ, C; Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1989-01-01

    In genetic studies on the catabolism of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, we used Tn5::mob-induced mutants which were impaired in the utilization of acetoin as the sole carbon source for growth. The transposon-harboring EcoRI restriction fragments from 17 acetoin-negative and slow-growing mutants (class 2a) and from six pleiotropic mutants of A. eutorphus, which were acetoin-negative and did not grow chemolithoautotrophically (class 2b), were cloned from pHC79 gene banks. The insertions of Tn5 were mapped on four different chromosomal EcoRI restriction fragments (A, C, D, and E) in class 2a mutants. The native DNA fragments were cloned from a lambda L47 or from a cosmid gene bank. Evidence is provided that fragments A (21 kilobase pairs [kb]) and C (7.7 kb) are closely linked in the genome; the insertions of Tn5 covered a region of approximately 5 kb. Physiological experiments revealed that this region encodes for acetoin:dichlorophenol-indophenol oxidoreductase, a fast-migrating protein, and probably for one additional protein that is as yet unknown. In mutants which were not completely impaired in growth on acetoin but which grew much slower and after a prolonged lag phase, fragments D (7.2 kb) and E (8.1 kb) were inactivated by insertion of Tn5::mob. No structural gene could be assigned to the D or E fragments. In class 2b mutants, insertions of Tn5 were mapped on fragment B (11.3 kb). This fragment complemented pleiotropic hno mutants in trans; these mutants were impaired in the formation of a rpoN-like protein. The expression of the gene cluster on fragments A and C seemed to be rpoN dependent. PMID:2556366

  17. Cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982 and the associated solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at the times of greater than 3-percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978-1982 are presented. The intensity-time profiles of the particles are used to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which are subsequently associated with three types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) are associated with shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events, the ejecta are detected at 1 AU, whereas this is not usually the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the cosmic ray depression in class 2 events. It is argued that since energetic particles (from MEV to GeV energies) seen at earth may respond to solar wind structures which are not detected at earth, consideration of particle observations over a wide range of energies is necessary for a full understanding of cosmic ray decreases.

  18. Technical criteria for an Area-Of-Review variance methodology. Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    This guidance was developed by the Underground Injection Practices Research Foundation to assist Underground Injection Control Directors in implementing proposed changes to EPA`s Class 2 Injection Well Regulations that will apply the Area-Of-Review (AOR) requirement to previously exempt wells. EPA plans to propose amendments this year consistent with the recommendations in the March 23, 1992, Final Document developed by the Class 2 Injection Well Advisory Committee, that will require AORs to be performed on all Class 2 injection wells except those covered by previously conducted AORs and those located in areas that have been granted a variance. Variances may be granted if the Director determines that there is a sufficiently low risk of upward fluid movement from the injection zone that could endanger underground sources of drinking water. This guidance contains suggested technical criteria for identifying areas eligible for an AOR variance. The suggested criteria were developed in consultation with interested States and representatives from EPA, industry and the academic community. Directors will have six months from the promulgation of the new regulations to provide EPA with either a schedule for performing AOR`s within five years on all wells not covered by previously conducted AORs, or notice of their intent to establish a variance program. It is believed this document will provide valuable assistance to Directors who are considering whether to establish a variance program or have begun early preparations to develop such a program.

  19. Evidence for two isoforms of the endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ pump in pig smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, J A; Wuytack, F; De Jaegere, S; Nelles, L; Casteels, R

    1989-01-01

    cDNA clones coding for the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-transport ATPase have been cloned from a pig smooth-muscle cDNA library. The transcripts can be divided into two classes which differ in their 3' ends due to alternative splicing of the primary gene transcript. The class 1 cDNA encodes a protein of 997 amino acids (Mr 110,000). The class 2 protein (1042 amino acids; Mr 115,000) is completely identical to the class 1 protein except that the four C-terminal amino acids of the class 1 protein are replaced in the class 2 protein with a tail of 49 amino acids. Comparison of these sequences with other Ca2+ pump sequences reveals that the class 1 isoform corresponds to the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump of slow-twitch skeletal/cardiac muscle, whereas the class 2 protein corresponds to a Ca2+ pump recently detected in non-muscle tissues. PMID:2527496

  20. Food allergy to proteins.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Food allergy is defined as an immune system-mediated adverse reaction to food proteins. Class 1 food allergens are represented by peanut, egg white, and cow's milk; they are heat- and acid-stable glycoproteins that induce allergic sensitization via gastrointestinal tract and cause systemic reactions. Class 2 food allergens are homologous to proteins in birch tree pollen and class 2 food allergy develops as a consequence of respiratory sensitization to the cross-reactive pollen. Class 2 food allergens are very heat-labile and tend to induce reactions limited to oral allergy symptoms. In contrast, plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins are resistant to heating and tend to induce systemic reactions. Analysis of IgE-binding epitopes with SPOT membranes revealed that cow's milk-, egg- and peanut-allergic subjects without IgE antibodies against certain sequential epitopes of the major allergens were more likely to achieve tolerance than subjects whose IgE antibodies were directed against those epitopes. Subsequently, peptide microarray showed a correlation between reaction severity and the intensity of IgE binding and the number of epitopes recognized of patients' immune responses against peanut allergens. Taken together, these data suggest that the epitope recognition pattern and intensity of IgE binding are important determinants of severity and duration of food allergy.

  1. Influence of Horse and Rider on Stress during Horse-riding Lesson Program

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Yun, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to confirm the influence of a horse-riding lesson program (HRLP) on the stress level of horses and riders by respectively analyzing their salivary cortisol concentration. Twenty-four healthy horses and 23 riders participated in this study. The horses were randomly classified into two groups for the horse riding lesson program: Class 1 (for the beginner lesson) and Class 2 (for the intermediate lesson). The Class 1 group consisted of 12 horses and 12 riders, while the Class 2 group consisted of 12 horses and 11 riders. Salivettes cotton wool swabs were used for saliva collection and the saliva analyses were conducted using a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with SAS version 8. As for the results, the average salivary cortisol concentration of all horses before HRLP significantly increased compared to the baseline (p<0.001) while it decreased after the HRLP. The results of the salivary cortisol concentration of the riders were similar to the horses’ results. However, there was no difference during the HRLP between Class 1 and Class 2 in the horse or rider groups. The results suggest that the HRLP did not influence the stress level of the horses or riders. Thus, this study provides the necessary information and guidelines for future studies on stress in horses during riding and gives insight into better horse welfare and management options. PMID:27004819

  2. Diversity and effectiveness of tropical mangrove soil microflora on the degradation of polythene carry bags.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shristi; Hatha, A A M; Christi, K S

    2007-01-01

    The diversity and load of heterotrophic bacteria and fungi associated with the mangrove soil from Suva, Fiji Islands, was determined by using the plate count method. The ability of the bacterial isolates to produce various hydrolytic enzymes such as amylase, gelatinase and lipase were determined using the plate assay. The heterotrophic bacterial load was considerably higher than the fungal load. There was a predominance of the gram positive genus, Bacillus. Other genera encountered included Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Listeria and Vibrio. Their effectiveness on the degradation of commercial polythene carry bags made of high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) was studied over a period of eight weeks in the laboratory. Biodegradation was measured in terms of mean weight loss, which was nearly 5 % after a period of eight weeks. There was a significant increase in the bacterial load of the soil attached to class 2 (HDPE) polythene. After eight weeks of submergence in mangrove soil, soil attached to class 1 and class 3 polythene mostly had Bacillus (Staphylococcus predominated in class 2 polythene). While most of the isolates were capable of producing hydrolytic enzymes such as amylase and gelatinase, lipolytic activity was low. Class 2 HDPE suffered the greatest biodegradation. PMID:19086383

  3. Characterization of four prestressed concrete reactor vessel liner steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R. K.

    1980-12-01

    A program of fracture toughness testing and analysis is being performed with PCRV steels for HTGRs. This report focuses on background information for the base materials and results of characterization testing, such as tensile and impact properties, chemical composition, and microstructural examination. The steels tested were an SA-508 class 1 forging, two plates of SA-537 class 1, and one plate of SA-537 class 2. Tensile requirements in effect at the time of procurement are met by all four steels. However, the SA-537 class 2 plate would not meet the minimum requirement for yield strength. Drop-weight and Charpy impact tests verified that the RT/sub NDT/ is equal to the NDT for each steel. Charpy impact energies at the NDT range from 40 J (30 ft-lb) for one heat of SA-537 class 1 to 100 J (74 ft-lb) for the SA-537 class 2 plate; upper-shelf energies range from 170 to 310 J (125 to 228 ft-lb) for the same two steels, respectively. The onset of upper-shelf energy occurred at temperatures ranging from 0 to 50/sup 0/C.

  4. Molecular evolution of plant haemoglobin: two haemoglobin genes in Nymphaeaceae Euryale ferox.

    PubMed

    Guldner, E; Desmarais, E; Galtier, N; Godelle, B

    2004-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced two haemoglobin genes from the early-branching angiosperm Euryale ferox (Nymphaeaceae). The two genes belong to the two known classes of plant haemoglobin. Their existence in Nymphaeaceae supports the theory that class 1 haemoglobin was ancestrally present in all angiosperms, and is evidence for class 2 haemoglobin being widely distributed. These sequences allowed us to unambiguously root the angiosperm haemoglobin phylogeny, and to corroborate the hypothesis that the class 1/class 2 duplication event occurred before the divergence between monocots and eudicots. We addressed the molecular evolution of plant haemoglobin by comparing the synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates in various groups of genes. Class 2 haemoglobin genes of legumes (functionally involved in a symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria) show a higher nonsynonymous substitution rate than class 1 (nonsymbiotic) haemoglobin genes. This suggests that a change in the selective forces applying to plant haemoglobins has occurred during the evolutionary history of this gene family, potentially in relation with the evolution of symbiosis.

  5. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  6. Influence of Horse and Rider on Stress during Horse-riding Lesson Program.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Yun, Young-Min

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to confirm the influence of a horse-riding lesson program (HRLP) on the stress level of horses and riders by respectively analyzing their salivary cortisol concentration. Twenty-four healthy horses and 23 riders participated in this study. The horses were randomly classified into two groups for the horse riding lesson program: Class 1 (for the beginner lesson) and Class 2 (for the intermediate lesson). The Class 1 group consisted of 12 horses and 12 riders, while the Class 2 group consisted of 12 horses and 11 riders. Salivettes cotton wool swabs were used for saliva collection and the saliva analyses were conducted using a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with SAS version 8. As for the results, the average salivary cortisol concentration of all horses before HRLP significantly increased compared to the baseline (p<0.001) while it decreased after the HRLP. The results of the salivary cortisol concentration of the riders were similar to the horses' results. However, there was no difference during the HRLP between Class 1 and Class 2 in the horse or rider groups. The results suggest that the HRLP did not influence the stress level of the horses or riders. Thus, this study provides the necessary information and guidelines for future studies on stress in horses during riding and gives insight into better horse welfare and management options. PMID:27004819

  7. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-11-16

    Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

  8. Latent Classes of Course in Alzheimer’s Disease and Predictors: The Cache County Dementia ProgressionStudy

    PubMed Central

    Leoutsakos, J.S.; Forrester, S.N.; Corcoran, C.D.; Norton, M.C.; Rabins, Peter V.; Steinberg, Martin I.; Tschanz, J.T.; Lyketsos, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several longitudinal studies of Alzheimer Disease (AD) report heterogeneity in progression. We sought to identify groups (classes) of progression-trajectories in the population-based Cache County Dementia Progression Study (N=328), and to identify baseline predictors of membership for each group. Methods We used parallel-process growth mixture models (GMM) to identify latent classes of trajectories based on MMSE and CDR-sb scores over time. We then used bias-corrected multinomial logistic regression to model baseline predictors of latent class membership. We constructed ROC curves to demonstrate relative predictive utility of successive sets of predictors. Results We fit 4 latent classes; class 1 was the largest (72%), and had the slowest progression. Classes 2 (8%) ,3 (11%), and 4 (8%) had more rapid worsening. In univariate analyses, longer dementia duration, presence of psychosis, and worse baseline MMSE and CDR-sb were associated with membership in class 2, relative to class 1. Lower education was associated with membership in class 3. In the multivariate model, only MMSE remained a statistically significant predictor of class membership. ROC AUCs were 0.98, 0.88, and 0.67, for classes 2,3, and 4 relative to class 1. Conclusions Heterogeneity in AD course can be usefully characterized using GMM. The majority belonged to a class characterized by slower decline than is typically reported in clinical samples. Class membership could be predicted using baseline covariates. Further study may advance our prediction of AD course at the population level, and in turn shed light on the pathophysiology of progression. PMID:25363393

  9. Predicting drug disposition via application of a Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System.

    PubMed

    Benet, Leslie Z

    2010-03-01

    A Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) was proposed to serve as a basis for predicting the importance of transporters in determining drug bioavailability and disposition. BDDCS may be useful in predicting: routes of drug elimination; efflux and absorptive transporters effects on oral absorption; when transporter-enzyme interplay will yield clinically significant effects (e.g. low drug bioavailability and drug-drug interactions); and transporter effects on post-absorptive systemic drug levels following oral and i.v. dosing. For highly soluble, highly permeable Class 1 compounds, metabolism is the major route of elimination and transporter effects on drug bioavailability and hepatic disposition are negligible. In contrast for the poorly permeable Class 3 and 4 compounds, metabolism only plays a minor role in drug elimination. Uptake transporters are major determinants of drug bioavailability for these poorly permeable drugs and both uptake and efflux transporters could be important for drug elimination. Highly permeable, poorly soluble, extensively metabolized Class 2 compounds present the most complicated relationship in defining the impact of transporters due to a marked transporter-enzyme interplay. Uptake transporters are unimportant for Class 2 drug bioavailability, (ensure space after,) but can play a major role in hepatic and renal elimination. Efflux transporters have major effects on drug bioavailability, absorption, metabolism and elimination of Class 2 drugs. It is difficult to accurately characterize drugs in terms of the high permeability criteria, i.e. > or =90% absorbed. We suggest that extensive metabolism may substitute for the high permeability characteristic, and that BDDCS using elimination criteria may provide predictability in characterizing drug disposition profiles for all classes of compounds.

  10. Identification of a Novel Cassette Array in Integronbearing Helicobacter Pylori Strains Isolated from Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Fazeli, Maryam; Roshani, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Heidary, Mohsen; Navidinia, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori as the second most common cause of gastric cancer in the world infects approximately half of the developed countries population and 80% of the population living in developing countries. Integrons as genetic reservoirs play major roles in dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report carriage of class 1 and 2 integrons and associated gene cassettes in H. pylori isolates from Iran. This crosssectional study was conducted in Tehran among 110 patients with H. pylori infection. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) for H. pylori strains were assessed by the micro broth dilution method. Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected using PCR. In order to determine gene cassettes, amplified fragments were subjected to DNA sequencing of both amplicon strands. The prevalence of resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, tetracycline, amoxicillin, rifampin, and levofloxacin were 68.2% (n=75), 25.5% (n=28), 24.5% (n=27), 19.1% (n=21), 18.2% (n=20) and 16.4% (n=18), respectively. Frequency of multidrug resistance among H. pylori isolates was 12.7%. Class 2 integron was detected in 50 (45.5%) and class 1 integron in 10 (9.1%) H. pylori isolates. The most predominant gene cassette arrays in class 2 integron bearing H. pylori were included sateraaadA1, dfrA1sat2aadA1, blaoxa2 and, aadB whereas common gene cassette arrays in class 1 integron were aadBaadA1cmlA6, aacA4, blaoxa2, and catB3. The high frequency of class 2 integron and multidrug resistance in the present study should be considered as a warning for clinicians that continuous surveillance is necessary to prevent the further spread of resistant isolates. PMID:27509968

  11. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  12. Gender roles and binge drinking among Latino emerging adults: a latent class regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Ellen L; Wong, Y Joel; Middendorf, Katharine G

    2014-09-01

    Gender roles are often cited as a culturally specific predictor of drinking among Latino populations. This study used latent class regression to test the relationships between gender roles and binge drinking in a sample of Latino emerging adults. Participants were Latino emerging adults who participated in Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 2,442). A subsample of these participants (n = 660) completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory--Short. We conducted latent class regression using 3 dimensions of gender roles (femininity, social masculinity, and personal masculinity) to predict binge drinking. Results indicated a 3-class solution. In Class 1, the protective personal masculinity class, personal masculinity (e.g., being a leader, defending one's own beliefs) was associated with a reduction in the odds of binge drinking. In Class 2, the nonsignificant class, gender roles were not related to binge drinking. In Class 3, the mixed masculinity class, personal masculinity was associated with a reduction in the odds of binge drinking, whereas social masculinity (e.g., forceful, dominant) was associated with an increase in the odds of binge drinking. Post hoc analyses found that females, those born outside the United States, and those with greater English language usage were at greater odds of being in Class 1 (vs. Class 2). Males, those born outside the United States, and those with greater Spanish language usage were at greater odds of being in Class 3 (vs. Class 2). Directions for future research and implications for practice with Latino emerging adults are discussed.

  13. Patterns and predictors of violence against children in Uganda: a latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Kelly; Patalay, Praveetha; Allen, Elizabeth; Knight, Louise; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore patterns of physical, emotional and sexual violence against Ugandan children. Design Latent class and multinomial logistic regression analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting Luwero District, Uganda. Participants In all, 3706 primary 5, 6 and 7 students attending 42 primary schools. Main outcome and measure To measure violence, we used the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Child Abuse Screening Tool—Child Institutional. We used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to assess mental health and administered reading, spelling and maths tests. Results We identified three violence classes. Class 1 (N=696 18.8%) was characterised by emotional and physical violence by parents and relatives, and sexual and emotional abuse by boyfriends, girlfriends and unrelated adults outside school. Class 2 (N=975 26.3%) was characterised by physical, emotional and sexual violence by peers (male and female students). Children in Classes 1 and 2 also had a high probability of exposure to emotional and physical violence by school staff. Class 3 (N=2035 54.9%) was characterised by physical violence by school staff and a lower probability of all other forms of violence compared to Classes 1 and 2. Children in Classes 1 and 2 were more likely to have worked for money (Class 1 Relative Risk Ratio 1.97, 95% CI 1.54 to 2.51; Class 2 1.55, 1.29 to 1.86), been absent from school in the previous week (Class 1 1.31, 1.02 to 1.67; Class 2 1.34, 1.10 to 1.63) and to have more mental health difficulties (Class 1 1.09, 1.07 to 1.11; Class 2 1.11, 1.09 to 1.13) compared to children in Class 3. Female sex (3.44, 2.48 to 4.78) and number of children sharing a sleeping area predicted being in Class 1. Conclusions Childhood violence in Uganda forms distinct patterns, clustered by perpetrator and setting. Research is needed to understand experiences of victimised children, and to develop mental health interventions for those with severe violence

  14. 340 Facility secondary containment and leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bendixsen, R.B.

    1995-01-31

    This document presents a preliminary safety evaluation for the 340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Containment system, Project W-302. Project W-302 will construct Building 340-C which has been designed to replace the current 340 Building and vault tank system for collection of liquid wastes from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory buildings in the 300 Area. This new nuclear facility is Hazard Category 3. The vault tank and related monitoring and control equipment are Safety Class 2 with the remainder of the structure, systems and components as Safety Class 3 or 4.

  15. Serial extraction protocol for partial arches in implant dentistry: principles and clinical methodology.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, John S; Greenstein, Gary; Greenstein, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Serial extraction protocol (SEP) is a clinical technique that facilitates using natural tooth abutments to support a fixed interim resin prosthesis, while inserting a sufficient number of implants to retain a definitive fixed prosthesis. A Class 1 protocol allows all necessary implants to be placed during one surgical appointment, while a Class 2 protocol requires two or more rounds of implant installation to achieve sufficient support for a definitive fixed prosthesis. The SEP methodology can be used to restore full and partially edentulous dentitions. This article addresses rehabilitation of partial arches using an SEP protocol.

  16. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences – preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order – which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  17. A system approach to archival storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and viewgraphs of a discussion on a system approach to archival storage presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. The use of D-2 iron particles for archival storage is discussed along with how acceleration factors relating short-term tests to archival life times can be justified. Ampex Recording Systems is transferring D-2 video technology to data storage applications, and encountering concerns about corrosion. To protect the D-2 standard, Battelle tests were done on all four tapes in the Class 2 environment. Error rates were measured before and after the test on both exposed and control groups.

  18. Land use studies with Skylab data, August 1974. [Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, D. S. (Principal Investigator); Rohde, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Capabilities of Skylab photographic data suggest significant applications for: (1) identification and mapping of all primary, most secondary, and many tertiary land use classes; (2) stratification of the landscape for more detailed sampling; and (3) rapid updating of existing land use and vegetation maps subscaled at 1:25,000 and smaller with manual interpretation techniques. Automated thematic mapping of land use categories with electronic data processing techniques is feasible with the S-192 multispectral scanner, despite the high noise levels in many channels.

  19. Update on Adolescent Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nirav K; Wulkan, Mark L; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity remains a significant public health issue. Approximately 8% of adolescent girls and 7% of adolescent boys have severe (≥class 2) obesity. Adolescent severe obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, and persists into adulthood. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment available, resulting in major weight loss and resolution of important comorbid conditions. Clinical practice guidelines for pediatric obesity treatment recommend consideration of surgery after failure of behavioral approaches. Careful screening and postoperative management of patients by a multidisciplinary team is required. Long-term studies are needed to assess the impact of adolescent bariatric surgery. PMID:27519138

  20. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-25

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objectives of this calculation are (1) To perform static and Safety Class 2 dynamic stress analysis of the Slurry and Supernate Process (inner) piping connecting Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 in order to be in compliance with the Code requirements; (2) To assure the thermal expansion of the process pipe not be strained by the outer encasement pipe; and (3) To furnish process pipe support to the Civil Engineering group.

  1. Class 1 integrons and antibiotic resistance of clinical Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex in Poznań, Poland.

    PubMed

    Koczura, Ryszard; Przyszlakowska, Beata; Mokracka, Joanna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Sixty-three clinical isolates of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex were analyzed for the presence of integrons and antimicrobial resistance. Class 1 integrons were detected in 40 (63.5 %) isolates. None of them had class 2 or class 3 integrons. The majority of the integrons contained aacC1-orfA-orfB-aadA1 gene cassette array. The presence of integrons was associated with the increased frequency of resistance to 12 of 15 antimicrobials tested, multi-drug resistance phenotype, and the overall resistance ranges of the strains.

  2. RBDMS user`s guide which includes the RBDMS administrative guide, Version 4.0. Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    RBDMS (Risk Based Data Management System) is an oil and gas electronic data management system which stems from the idea developed from four previous projects conducted by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC). The first study studied oil and gas industry injection well corrosion. It included a methodology for assessing the probability of contaminating underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) via Class 2 injection well operations. A feasibility study was conducted to investigate if an electronic data management system could incorporate the methodology. A second feasibility study was conducted to test the methodology on a much small basis. The RBDMS effort then continued through a grant from DOE with a multi-task project consisting of an inventory and needs assessment of 25 oil and gas producing states pertaining to oil and gas production/regulatory activities, state geological/hydrogeological considerations, Class 2 underground injection activities, electronic data management needs and functional requirements, environmental risk assessment and management objectives, resultant benefit of a RBDMS, and various information and data required for the design and development of a RBDMS in individual states. This appendix contains the documentation for the use of the RBDMS.

  3. Exploratory Investigation of the Limiting Steps of Oral Absorption of Fluconazole and Ketoconazole in Children Using an In Silico Pediatric Absorption Model.

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Charoo, Naseem A; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-09-01

    Due to the higher total clearance of certain drugs in children than in adults, it is recommended that, in such cases, higher relative doses on a milligram/kilogram basis should be administered to children in order to achieve similar systemic exposure to adults. This is the case for fluconazole and ketoconazole. Even though the lower absorptive surface area and smaller volumes of intestinal fluids in children does not affect fluconazole absorption, cumulative fraction absorbed of ketoconazole seems to be dose dependent. A dose of 200 mg of ketoconazole, which belongs to the class 2a of the Developability Classification System (DCS) in adults, seems to be higher than the maximum absorbable dose in children, and ketoconazole absorption is expected to be solubility limited (i.e., DCS class 2b) in this population, indicating a DCS class migration. Therefore, extrapolating DCS and DCS drug classification from adults to pediatric groups does not seem to be straightforward and the development of specific pediatric classification systems should be a high priority.

  4. Parental Origin and Timing of De Novo Robertsonian Translocation Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Ruma; Heller, Anita; Knox-DuBois, Cami; McCaskill, Christopher; Berend, Sue Ann; Page, Scott L.; Shaffer, Lisa G.

    2002-01-01

    Robertsonian translocations (ROBs) are the most common chromosomal rearrangements in humans. ROBs are whole-arm rearrangements between the acrocentric chromosomes 13–15, 21, and 22. ROBs can be classified into two groups depending on their frequency of occurrence, common (rob(13q14q) and rob(14q21q)), and rare (all remaining possible nonhomologous combinations). Herein, we have studied 29 case subjects of common and rare de novo ROBs to determine their parental origins and timing of formation. We compared these case subjects to 35 published case subjects of common ROBs and found that most common ROBs apparently have the same breakpoints and arise mainly during oogenesis (50/54). These probably form through a common mechanism and have been termed “class 1.” Collectively, rare ROBs also occur mostly during oogenesis (7/10) but probably arise through a more “random” mechanism or a variety of mechanisms and have been termed “class 2.” Thus, we demonstrate that although both classes of ROBs occur predominantly during meiosis, the common, class 1 ROBs occur primarily during oogenesis and likely form through a mechanism distinct from that forming class 2 ROBs. PMID:12424707

  5. Risk factor profiles among intravenous drug using young adults: a latent class analysis (LCA) approach.

    PubMed

    James, Sigrid; McField, Edward S; Montgomery, Susanne B

    2013-03-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional study that examined health risk behaviors among urban intravenous drug-using (IDU) adolescents and young adults, this study investigated risk profiles among a high-risk sample (n=274). Risk profiles were empirically derived through latent class analysis based on indicators of engagement in health-risking behaviors, experience of abuse and violence as well as individual and family risk factors. The best fitting model was a 3-class model. Class 1 (n=95) captured participants with the lowest risk across all indicators. Compared to Class 1, Class 2 (n=128) and Class 3 (n=51) had elevated rates of engagement in health-risking behaviors as well as individual and family risk factors; however, Class 3 had the highest rate of engagement in sexual risk behavior, and backgrounds of substantial abuse and violence as well as familial psychopathology. Class 2 was the group most socioeconomically disadvantaged, with the highest percentage of participants coming from poor backgrounds, spending the longest time homeless and working the fewest months. Identifying subgroups of IDU has the potential to guide the development of more targeted and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this high-risk population. PMID:23254231

  6. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1985-12-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: (i) a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9 fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and (ii) a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N.

  7. Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, E.H.

    2002-07-22

    The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

  8. Reconnaissance amplitude versus offset techniques in the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Gullette, K.

    1996-08-01

    Reconnaissance AVO (amplitude vs. offset) techniques have been invaluable in allowing the analyses and mapping of AVO on large-volume data sets in the Nigerian Niger Delta. Forward modelling of rock properties derived from well data on the shelf and regional ties of common depth point gathers to well control show that a shale on hydrocarbon bearing sand typically generates increasing amplitude with offset [Class 2 and Class 3 type anomalies of the Rutherford and Williams (1989) classification]. Consequently, processing and display techniques have been developed that distinguish the increasing amplitude with offset response associated with hydrocarbon bearing sands from the flatter AVO response of background water wet sands and shales. Attributes are created from angle stacks rather than by analyses of individual common depth point gathers over an entire data set. We show examples of a new AVO attribute which we call the Enhanced Restricted Gradient that highlights Class 2 and Class 3 type AVO anomalies more clearly than some of the standard AVO attributes used in the industry. The techniques described here provide a cost-effective and practical way of evaluating AVO character on large volume 2D and 3D data sets and should also be useful in other areas worldwide where hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs generate increasing amplitude with offset.

  9. Latent Trajectory Classes for Alcohol-Related Blackouts from Age 15 to 19 in ALSPAC

    PubMed Central

    Schuckit, Marc A.; Smith, Tom L.; Heron, Jon; Hickman, Matthew; Macleod, John; Munafo, Marcus R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Dick, Danielle M.; Davey-Smith, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol-related blackouts (ARBs) are reported by ~50% of drinkers. While much is known about the prevalence of ARBs in young adults and their cross-sectional correlates, there are few prospective studies regarding their trajectories over time during mid-adolescence. This paper reports latent trajectory classes of alcohol-related blackouts between ages 15 and 19, along with predictors of those patterns. Methods Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA) was used to evaluate the pattern of occurrence of ARBs across four time points for 1402 drinking adolescents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Multinomial regression analyses evaluated age 15 demography, substance-related items, externalizing characteristics, and estimated peer substance use as predictors of latent class membership. Results ARBs were reported at age 15 in 30% and at age 19 in 74% of these subjects. Four latent trajectory classes were identified: Class 1 (5.1%) reported no blackouts; for Class 2 (29.5%) ARBs rapidly increased with age; for Class 3 (44.9%) blackouts slowly increased; and for Class 4 (20.5%) ARBs were consistently reported. Using Class 2 (rapid increasers) as the reference, predictors of class membership included female sex, higher drinking quantities, smoking, externalizing characteristics, and estimated peer substance involvement (pseudo R2 =.22). Conclusions ARBs were common and repetitive in these young subjects, and predictors of their trajectories over time involved multiple domains representing diverse characteristics. PMID:25516068

  10. Increased fitness of rice plants to abiotic stress via habitat adapted symbiosis: A strategy for mitigating impacts of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, R.S.; Kim, Y.-O.; Woodward, C.J.D.A.; Greer, C.; Espino, L.; Doty, S.L.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients. Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions. The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20–30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization). These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands.

  11. Increased Fitness of Rice Plants to Abiotic Stress Via Habitat Adapted Symbiosis: A Strategy for Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Regina S.; Kim, Yong Ok; Woodward, Claire J. D. A.; Greer, Chris; Espino, Luis; Doty, Sharon L.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients. Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions. The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20–30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization). These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands. PMID:21750695

  12. Sequence evolution of the porB gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis: evidence of positive Darwinian selection.

    PubMed

    Smith, N H; Maynard Smith, J; Spratt, B G

    1995-05-01

    Protein 1 (PI) is a major porin of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis and is encoded by a single locus, porB. Alleles of the porB locus of N. gonorrhoeae are assigned to two homology groups, PI(A) and PI(B), on the basis of immunological and structural similarity. In a like manner, alleles of the porB locus of the closely related bacterium, N. meningitidis, are allocated into class 2 and class 3 homology groups. An individual strain of N. gonorrhoeae or N. meningitidis expresses either one or other of these porin homology groups but never both, and the antigenic reactions of these highly diverse outer membrane proteins form part of the N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis serotyping schemes. A comparison of the number of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions per site between the two most divergent alleles of each of these four groups of porB alleles shows that PI(A) alleles have accumulated significantly more nonsynonymous substitutions per site than synonymous substitutions. In contrast the distribution of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions between alleles of class 2 and class 3 porins are not significantly different from random. We localize the regions of the PI(A) alleles with an excess of amino acid changes to the surface-exposed loops of these outer membrane proteins and suggest that positive Darwinian selection for diversity, driven by the human immune system, can most easily explain the allelic polymorphism and the pattern of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions.

  13. Comparison of ubiquitous antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae populations isolated from wastewaters, surface waters and drinking waters.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Vânia; Serra, Elizabete A; Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Brandão, Teresa R S; Manaia, Célia M

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed at assessing the role of ubiquitous (non-Escherichia coli) Enterobacteriaceae in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance through the urban water cycle. Enterobacteriaceae isolated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (111 isolates), urban water streams (33 isolates) and drinking water (123 isolates) were compared in terms of: (i) genera distribution, (ii) resistance to 12 antibiotics, and (iii) class 1 and class 2 integrons. The predominant bacterial genera were the same in the different types of water, although with a distinct pattern of species. The most prevalent resistance phenotypes were observed for amoxicillin, ticarcillin, cephalothin and sulphamethoxazole (24-59% in the three types of water). No resistance against ceftazidime or meropenem was observed. Resistance to cephalothin, amoxicillin and sulphamethoxazole was significantly more prevalent in drinking water, water streams and wastewater, respectively, than in the other types of water. It was possible to recognize antibiotic-resistance associations, namely for the pairs streptomycin-tetracycline (positive) and ticarcillin-cephalotin (negative). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons with similar gene cassettes were detected in the three types of water. This study demonstrated that Enterobacteriaceae are important vehicles of antibiotic resistance, namely in drinking water.

  14. [Changes in food allergen sensitization rates of Japanese allergic children during the last 15 years].

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Takashi; Miyanomae, Takeshi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masatoshi; Yoshioka, Takakazu; Okafuji, Ikuo; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi

    2004-07-01

    In order to evaluate the changes in food allergen sensitization rates of allergic children, serum samples from 85 patients about 15 years ago (past group) and those from 90 current patients (present group) were randomly selected, and the specific IgE for six food allergens (wheat, peanuts, sesame, mackerel, ovomucoid, and kiwi) were measured with the CAP-RAST system. Sensitivity rates (class 2 or higher) for wheat and peanuts were significantly higher in the present than in the past group. Although there was no statistical difference in sensitivity rates (class 2 or higher) for kiwi between the groups, sensitivity rates (class 1 or higher) of the present group were significantly higher than those of the past group, indicating that the number of cases mildly sensitized to kiwi has been increasing. This trend was especially marked among children aged 6 or younger, and there was no statistical difference in sensitivity rates among those aged 7 or older. For the management of food allergy, special attention should therefore be paid not only to an increase in the number of patients, but also to changes in the kinds of causative foods.

  15. Profiling physical activity, diet, screen and sleep habits in Portuguese children.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sara; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K; Chaves, Raquel N; Champagne, Catherine M; Barreira, Tiago V; Maia, José A R

    2015-06-02

    Obesity in children is partly due to unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, e.g., sedentary activity and poor dietary choices. This trend has been seen globally. To determine the extent of these behaviours in a Portuguese population of children, 686 children 9.5 to 10.5 years of age were studied. Our aims were to: (1) describe profiles of children's lifestyle behaviours; (2) identify behaviour pattern classes; and (3) estimate combined effects of individual/ socio-demographic characteristics in predicting class membership. Physical activity and sleep time were estimated by 24-h accelerometry. Nutritional habits, screen time and socio-demographics were obtained. Latent Class Analysis was used to determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Logistic regression analysis predicted class membership. About 78% of children had three or more unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, while 0.2% presented no risk. Two classes were identified: Class 1-Sedentary, poorer diet quality; and Class 2-Insufficiently active, better diet quality, 35% and 65% of the population, respectively. More mature children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 6.75; 95%CI = 4.74-10.41), and boys (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.98-4.72) were more likely to be overweight/obese. However, those belonging to Class 2 were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.43-0.84). Maternal education level and household income did not significantly predict weight status (p ≥ 0.05).

  16. Increased fitness of rice plants to abiotic stress via habitat adapted symbiosis: a strategy for mitigating impacts of climate change.

    PubMed

    Redman, Regina S; Kim, Yong Ok; Woodward, Claire J D A; Greer, Chris; Espino, Luis; Doty, Sharon L; Rodriguez, Rusty J

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients.Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions.The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20-30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization).These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands.

  17. Risk Factor Profiles among Intravenous Drug Using Young Adults: A Latent Class Analysis (LCA) Approach

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid; McField, Edward S.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional study that examined health risk behaviors among urban intravenous drug-using (IDU) adolescents and young adults, this study investigated risk profiles among a high-risk sample (n=274). Risk profiles were empirically derived through latent class analysis based on indicators of engagement in health-risking behaviors, experience of abuse and violence as well as individual and family risk factors. The best fitting model was a 3-class model. Class 1 (n=95) captured participants with the lowest risk across all indicators. Compared to Class 1, Class 2 (n=128) and Class 3 (n=51) had elevated rates of engagement in health-risking behaviors as well as individual and family risk factors; however, Class 3 had the highest rate of engagement in sexual risk behavior, and backgrounds of substantial abuse and violence as well as familial psychopathology. Class 2 was the group most socioeconomically disadvantaged, with the highest percentage of participants coming from poor backgrounds, spending the longest time homeless and working the fewest months. Identifying subgroups of IDU has the potential to guide the development of more targeted and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this high-risk population. PMID:23254231

  18. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of conventional splicing assays: IARC analytical and clinical classification of 31 BRCA2 genetic variants.

    PubMed

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Tosar, Alicia; Romero, Atocha; Garre, Pilar; Llort, Gemma; Thomassen, Mads; Díez, Orland; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Velasco, Eladio A; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines), we performed qPCR and/or minigene assays. The latter were performed with a new splicing vector (pSAD) developed by authors of the present manuscript (patent #P201231427 CSIC). We have identified three clinically relevant Class-5 variants (c.682-2A>G, c.7617+1G>A, and c.8954-5A>G), and 27 analytical Class-2 variants (not inducing splicing alterations). In addition, we demonstrate that rs9534262 (c.7806-14T>C) is a BRCA2 splicing quantitative trait locus.

  19. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin by white strains of Serratia marcescens isolated from patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, M J; Williams, R P

    1983-03-01

    Serratia marcescens isolated from infected adults generally does not synthesize prodigiosin. Other investigators have reported that most clinical strains form a pigment if furnished with 4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carboxyaldehyde (MBC), a precursor of prodigiosin. To determine whether the pigment was prodigiosin, we studied 65 white strains of S. marcescens isolated from patients. On the basis of response to MBC, we assigned the strains to one of three classes: class 1 (14 strains), strains remaining white; class 2 (48 strains), strains becoming gray or pink; and class 3 (3 strains), strains becoming blue. Ethanol extracts of bacteria of classes 2 and 3 did not behave like prodigiosin when acidified or alkalinized, and the pigment spectra were not similar to prodigiosin spectra. If strains of class 3 were furnished with MBC plus 2-methyl-3-amylpyrrole (MAP), the other immediate precursor of prodigiosin, the pigment synthesized was characteristic of prodigiosin. Strains of classes 1 and 2 responded identically to MBC plus MAP and MBC alone. Although the majority of S. marcescens white strains from patients formed pigments in the presence of MBC, the pigments were not prodigiosin. A few strains did synthesize prodigiosin, but only if furnished with both MBC and MAP.

  20. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  1. Comparison of amino acids physico-chemical properties and usage of late embryogenesis abundant proteins, hydrophilins and WHy domain.

    PubMed

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  2. Profiling Physical Activity, Diet, Screen and Sleep Habits in Portuguese Children

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Chaves, Raquel N.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Maia, José A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity in children is partly due to unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, e.g., sedentary activity and poor dietary choices. This trend has been seen globally. To determine the extent of these behaviours in a Portuguese population of children, 686 children 9.5 to 10.5 years of age were studied. Our aims were to: (1) describe profiles of children’s lifestyle behaviours; (2) identify behaviour pattern classes; and (3) estimate combined effects of individual/socio-demographic characteristics in predicting class membership. Physical activity and sleep time were estimated by 24-h accelerometry. Nutritional habits, screen time and socio-demographics were obtained. Latent Class Analysis was used to determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Logistic regression analysis predicted class membership. About 78% of children had three or more unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, while 0.2% presented no risk. Two classes were identified: Class 1-Sedentary, poorer diet quality; and Class 2-Insufficiently active, better diet quality, 35% and 65% of the population, respectively. More mature children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 6.75; 95%CI = 4.74–10.41), and boys (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.98–4.72) were more likely to be overweight/obese. However, those belonging to Class 2 were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.43–0.84). Maternal education level and household income did not significantly predict weight status (p ≥ 0.05). PMID:26043034

  3. Quantification of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 mRNA of marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) oocytes from periantral and antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Konrad, L; Kuhnert, S; Nayudu, P L; Einspanier, R; Hinsch, K D; Hinsch, E

    2012-05-01

    In mammals, the oocyte and preimplantation embryo are protected by the zona pellucida (ZP) consisting mainly of ZP glycoproteins, which are responsible for sperm binding, induction of the acrosome reaction and zona pellucida hardening to prevent polyspermia. The ZP proteins become increasingly important as possible predictors for in vitro cultured oocytes competence. As little is known about the stage-dependent expression of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 in marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) oocytes, mRNA expression was investigated with real-time RT-PCR. Total-RNA was isolated from three different classes of marmoset oocytes; Class 1 oocytes from periantral follicles (<600 μm, n = 10), Class 2 oocytes from small antral follicles (600-1000 μm, n = 10) and Class 3 oocytes from large antral follicles (>1000 μm, n = 9). Compared with Class 1 oocytes mRNA expression of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 in Class 2 oocytes was significantly decreased. In Class 3 oocytes, the transcription of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 genes showed also a significant decrease compared with Class 1 oocytes. In this study a differently regulated expression of the ZP genes during late folliculogenesis with an obvious downregulation of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 could be demonstrated for the first time in the marmoset monkey. PMID:21689136

  4. Role of interleukin-15 receptor alpha polymorphisms in normal weight obese syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, L; Gloria-Bottini, F; Saccucci, P; Bigioni, M; Abenavoli, L; Gasbarrini, G; De Lorenzo, A

    2009-01-01

    Previous published studies have identified a class of women, Normal Weight Obese women (NWO) with normal BMI and high fat content. An important role of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) has been documented in facilitating muscle proliferation and promoting fat depletion. Indeed the presence of three types of IL-15 receptor subunits in fat tissue suggests a direct effect on adipose tissue. We studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of IL-15R-alpha receptor gene and investigated their relationship with NWO phenotype. We considered two classes of women according to their BMI and percent fat mass (percent FAT), class 1: including 72 overweight-obese women (high BMI-high fat mass) and class 2: including 36 NWO (normal BMI, high fat mass). Three sites of Interleukin-15 receptor subunit á gene were examined, located respectively in exon4, exon5 intron-exon border and exon7. Genotyping of the identified polymorphisms was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Haplotype frequency estimation was performed by using the Mendel-University of Chicago program. Odds ratio analyses were calculated by EPISTAT program. Highly significant differences were observed for exon 7- exon5 intron-exon border and exon 4-exon 7 haplotype distribution between class 1 and class 2 women. These results strongly support the hypothesis that genetic variability of the IL-15 receptor has an important role in body fat composition. Our data underscore previous findings that suggest a potential role of IL-15 cytokine in NWO syndrome.

  5. The Plexin PLX-2 and the Ephrin EFN-4 Have Distinct Roles in MAB-20/Semaphorin 2A Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Fumi; Hudson, Martin L.; Suzuki, Motoshi; Peckler, Zachary; Kurokawa, Rie; Liu, Zhicen; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Nukazuka, Akira; Fujii, Takashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Shibata, Yukimasa; Shioi, Go; Fujisawa, Hajime; Mitani, Shohei; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Takagi, Shin

    2007-01-01

    Semaphorins are extracellular proteins that regulate axon guidance and morphogenesis by interacting with a variety of cell surface receptors. Most semaphorins interact with plexin-containing receptor complexes, although some interact with non-plexin receptors. Class 2 semaphorins are secreted molecules that control axon guidance and epidermal morphogenesis in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the C. elegans class 2 semaphorin MAB-20 binds the plexin PLX-2. plx-2 mutations enhance the phenotypes of hypomorphic mab-20 alleles but not those of mab-20 null alleles, indicating that plx-2 and mab-20 act in a common pathway. Both mab-20 and plx-2 mutations affect epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic and in postembryonic development. In both contexts, plx-2 null mutant phenotypes are much less severe than mab-20 null phenotypes, indicating that PLX-2 is not essential for MAB-20 signaling. Mutations in the ephrin efn-4 do not synergize with mab-20, indicating that EFN-4 may act in MAB-20 signaling. EFN-4 and PLX-2 are coexpressed in the late embryonic epidermis where they play redundant roles in MAB-20-dependent cell sorting. PMID:17507686

  6. Comparison of oral health status between children with cerebral palsy and normal children in India: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nidhi; Singh, Bijay; Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Patil, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present research was to describe and compare the oral health of children with cerebral palsy (CP) with the normal children in India. Materials and Methods: Fifty children with CP of the age range 7-17 years and fifty normal children were selected for the study. An oral examination was carried out and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft/DMFT) index, oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) index, Angles malocclusion were charted along with other significant dental findings. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and Kruskal–Wallis one-way ANOVA test. Results: The mean dmft/DMFT of the CP group was 4.11 ± 2.62, while that of controls was 2.95 ± 2.75, which showed higher caries prevalence in the CP group. There was a significant association between the dmft/DMFT (P = 0.03), OHI-S (P = 0.001), and Angles Class 2 malocclusion and CP. Conclusions: Cerebral palsy group had higher caries, poor oral hygiene and Class 2 malocclusion when compared to controls primarily because of their compromised general health condition and also less dental awareness. Effort should be made for better organization of preventive dental care and promoting dental health of this challenged population. PMID:25810598

  7. Common carotid artery duplex for the bubble test to detect right-to-left shunt.

    PubMed

    Censori, Bruno; Partziguian, Tania; Poloni, Marco

    2010-04-01

    We prospectively compared the bubble test with agitated saline for right-to-left shunt using transcranial Doppler (TCD) of the right middle cerebral artery and second harmonic imaging duplex of the right common carotid artery (CCA) in 100 consecutive patients. Microembolic signals (MES) were counted offline. MES were classified into 6 classes: absent (class 0), 1-10 MES (class 1), 11-20 MES (class 2), 21-30 MES (class 3), 31-50 MES (class 4) and >50 MES or "curtain effect" (class 5). For TCD, classes 2-5 combined (i.e., "large" shunts), the sensitivity of duplex with the Valsalva maneuver was 95.3%, the specificity was 100%, the positive predictive 100%, the negative predictive value 96.6% and accuracy 98.0%. Second harmonic imaging duplex of the CCA may substitute TCD for the bubble test when an adequate cranial bone window is not available. This technique may also greatly increase the number of facilities where the bubble test can be carried out. However, tests with few or no MES need to be confirmed by TCD or transesophageal echocardiography.

  8. Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect

    1989-09-01

    The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Genome-wide comparative analysis of the transposable elements in the related species Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wessler, Susan R

    2004-04-13

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the major component of plant genomes where they contribute significantly to the >1,000-fold genome size variation. To understand the dynamics of TE-mediated genome expansion, we have undertaken a comparative analysis of the TEs in two related organisms: the weed Arabidopsis thaliana (125 megabases) and Brassica oleracea ( approximately 600 megabases), a species with many crop plants. Comparison of the whole genome sequence of A. thaliana with a partial draft of B. oleracea has permitted an estimation of the patterns of TE amplification, diversification, and loss that has occurred in related species since their divergence from a common ancestor. Although we find that nearly all TE lineages are shared, the number of elements in each lineage is almost always greater in B. oleracea. Class 1 (retro) elements are the most abundant TE class in both species with LTR and non-LTR elements comprising the largest fraction of each genome. However, several families of class 2 (DNA) elements have amplified to very high copy number in B. oleracea where they have contributed significantly to genome expansion. Taken together, the results of this analysis indicate that amplification of both class 1 and class 2 TEs is responsible, in part, for B. oleracea genome expansion since divergence from a common ancestor with A. thaliana. In addition, the observation that B. oleracea and A. thaliana share virtually all TE lineages makes it unlikely that wholesale removal of TEs is responsible for the compact genome of A. thaliana. PMID:15064405

  10. The effects of grazing on the spatial pattern of elm (Ulmus pumila L.) in the sparse woodland steppe of Horqin Sandy Land in northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Wu, J.; Tang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of grazing on the formation of the spatial pattern of elm growth in a sparse woodland steppe. We used a point pattern method to analyze the elm trees within different diameter at breast height (DBH) classes in both grazed and fenced plots, which were established in Horqin Sandy Land of northeastern China. The results showed that, in the grazed plot, the distances where transformation between random and clustered patterns occurred in class 1 (10 cm ≤ DBH ≤ 15 cm) and class 2 (15 cm < DBH ≤ 20 cm) were 2.27 and 2.37 m, respectively. Meanwhile, in the fenced plot, the distances between random and aggregated patterns that occurred in classes 1, 2 and 3 (DBH > 20 cm) were 3.13, 3.13 and 7.85 m, respectively. In the fenced plot, at distances larger than 67.72 m there was a negative association between classes 1 and 2, which was also the case between classes 2 and 3 and between classes 1 and 3 for distances greater than 104.09 and 128.54 m, respectively. Meanwhile, negative associations occurred only at distances larger than 29.38 m in the grazed plot. These findings suggest that grazing reduced the competition intensity between elm trees; and therefore, grazing management could be an effective strategy used to regulate the elm population in the degraded sandy land of northern China.

  11. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π–cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG–W–NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78–85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  12. A review of the literature pertaining to the efficacy, safety, educational requirements, uses and usage of mechanical adjusting devices: Part 1 of 2.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shane H; Arnold, Nicole D; Biggs, Lesley; Colloca, Christopher J; Mierau, Dale R; Symons, Bruce P; Triano, John J

    2004-03-01

    Over the past decade, mechanical adjusting devices (MADs) were a major source of debate within the Chiropractors' Association of Saskatchewan (CAS). Since Saskatchewan was the only jurisdiction in North America to prohibit the use of MADs, the CAS established a committee in 2001 to review the literature on MADs. The committee evaluated the literature on the efficacy, safety, and uses of moving stylus instruments within chiropractic practice, and the educational requirements for chiropractic practice. Following the rating criteria for the evaluation of evidence, as outlined in the Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada (1994), the committee reviewed 55 articles - all of which pertained to the Activator. Of the 55 articles, 13 were eliminated from the final study. Of the 42 remaining articles, 6 were rated as class 1 evidence; 11 were rated as class 2 evidence and 25 were rated as class 3 evidence. In this article - the first in a series of two - the background and the methods utilized by the MAD committee's activities are described, as well as the results for the review of the literature on efficacy. Of the 21 articles related to efficacy, five were identified as Class 1 evidence; 4 were identified as Class 2 evidence; and 12 were identified as Class 3. Overall, the committee reached consensus that the MAD procedures using the Activator were as effective as manual (HVLA) procedures in producing clinical benefit and biological change. A minority report was also written, arguing that there was not enough evidence to support or refute the efficacy of MADs.

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP OF EMERGING ADULTHOOD TRAJECTORIES TO DRUG USE, AND OTHER CORRELATES

    PubMed Central

    Lisha, Nadra E.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Rohrbach, Luanne; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Sun, Ping; Sussman, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Interest in “Emerging Adulthood” (EA) as a unique developmental period has increased. This study examined the heterogeneity of EA among at-risk youth (N=1,677) by identifying trajectories of development across individuals. First, an 8-item version of the Inventory of Dimensions of EA (IDEA) measure was tested for factorial invariance across three time points; the 5-item EA measure was found to be factorially invariant. Next, latent class growth modeling identified three unique developmental trajectories. Lastly, classes were compared on demographics and health-risk behaviors. Class 1 represented a large, low-risk class (highest on EA). Classes 2 and 3 were comparably sized (~5% of the sample). Class 2 appears to be a high-risk class that decreases in EA, while Class 3 appears to be a medium-risk class that increases in EA. This study confirms that not everyone experiences EA similarly and that continuation high school students do not circumvent EA (move directly to adulthood). PMID:27065763

  14. Risk factor profiles among intravenous drug using young adults: a latent class analysis (LCA) approach.

    PubMed

    James, Sigrid; McField, Edward S; Montgomery, Susanne B

    2013-03-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional study that examined health risk behaviors among urban intravenous drug-using (IDU) adolescents and young adults, this study investigated risk profiles among a high-risk sample (n=274). Risk profiles were empirically derived through latent class analysis based on indicators of engagement in health-risking behaviors, experience of abuse and violence as well as individual and family risk factors. The best fitting model was a 3-class model. Class 1 (n=95) captured participants with the lowest risk across all indicators. Compared to Class 1, Class 2 (n=128) and Class 3 (n=51) had elevated rates of engagement in health-risking behaviors as well as individual and family risk factors; however, Class 3 had the highest rate of engagement in sexual risk behavior, and backgrounds of substantial abuse and violence as well as familial psychopathology. Class 2 was the group most socioeconomically disadvantaged, with the highest percentage of participants coming from poor backgrounds, spending the longest time homeless and working the fewest months. Identifying subgroups of IDU has the potential to guide the development of more targeted and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this high-risk population.

  15. PREDICTING DRUG DISPOSITION, ABSORPTION / ELIMINATION / TRANSPORTER INTERPLAY AND THE ROLE OF FOOD ON DRUG ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Custodio, Joseph M.; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict drug disposition involves concurrent consideration of many chemical and physiological variables and the effect of food on the rate and extent of availability adds further complexity due to postprandial changes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A system that allows for the assessment of the multivariate interplay occurring following administration of an oral dose, in the presence or absence of meal, would greatly benefit the early stages of drug development. This is particularly true in an era when the majority of new molecular entities are highly permeable, poorly soluble, extensively metabolized compounds (BDDCS Class 2), which present the most complicated relationship in defining the impact of transporters due to the marked effects of transporter-enzyme interplay. This review evaluates the GI luminal environment by taking into account the absorption / transport / elimination interplay and evaluates the physiochemical property issues by taking into account the importance of solubility, permeability and metabolism. We concentrate on the BDDCS and its utility in predicting drug disposition. Furthermore, we focus on the effect of food on the extent of drug availability (F), which appears to follow closely what might be expected if a significant effect of high fat meals is inhibition of transporters. That is, high fat meals and lipidic excipients would be expected to have little effect on F for Class 1 drugs; they would increase F of Class 2 drugs, while decreasing F for Class 3 drugs. PMID:18199522

  16. Distinct kimberlite pipe classes with contrasting eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Marsh, J. S.

    2004-09-01

    Field and Scott Smith [Field, M., Scott Smith, B.H., 1999. Contrasting geology and near-surface emplacement of kimberlite pipes in southern Africa and Canada. Proc. 7th Int. Kimb. Conf. (Eds. Gurney et al.) 1, 214-237.] propose that kimberlite pipes can be grouped into three types or classes. Classical or Class 1 pipes are the only class with characteristic low temperature, diatreme-facies kimberlite in addition to hypabyssal- and crater-facies kimberlite. Class 2 and 3 pipes are characterized only by hypabyssal-and crater-facies kimberlite. In an increasing number of Class 1 pipes a new kimberlite facies, transitional-facies kimberlite, is being found. In most cases this facies forms a zone several metres wide at the interface between the hypabyssal- and diatreme-facies. The transitional-facies exhibits textural and mineralogical features, which are continuously gradational between the hypabyssal and the diatreme types. The textural gradations are from a coherent magmatic texture to one where the rock becomes increasingly magmaclastic and this is accompanied by concomitant mineralogical gradations involving the decline and eventual elimination of primary calcite at the expense of microlitic diopside. Both transitional- and diatreme-facies kimberlites are considered to have formed in situ from intruding hypabyssal kimberlite magma as a consequence of exsolution of initially CO 2-rich volatiles from the volatile-rich kimberlite magma. The transitional-facies is initiated by volatile exsolution at depths of about 3 km below the original surface. With subsequent cracking through to the surface and resultant rapid decompression, the further catastrophic exsolution of volatiles and their expansion leads to the formation of the diatreme facies. Thus diatreme-facies kimberlite and Class 1 pipes are emplaced by essentially magmatic processes rather than by phreatomagmatism. Distinctly different petrographic features characterize crater-facies kimberlite in each of the

  17. Effect of body mass index on functional outcome in primary total knee arthroplasty - a single institution analysis of 2180 primary total knee replacements

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Shane C; Butler, Joseph S; Daly, Adam; Lui, Darren F; Kenny, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on short-term functional outcome and complications in primary total knee arthroplasty. METHODS All patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty at a single institution between 2007 and 2013 were identified from a prospective arthroplasty database. 2180 patients were included in the study. Age, gender, BMI, pre- and post-operative functional scores [Western Ontario and McMaster University Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and SF-36], complications and revision rate were recorded. Patients were grouped according to the WHO BMI classification. The functional outcome of the normal weight cohort (BMI < 25) was compared to the overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25) cohort. A separate sub-group analysis was performed comparing all five WHO BMI groups; Normal weight, overweight, class 1 obese, class 2 obese and class 3 obese. RESULTS With a mean age of 67.89 (28-92), 2180 primary total knee replacements were included. 64.36% (1403) were female. The mean BMI was 31.86 (18-52). Ninty-three percent of patients were either overweight or obese. Mean follow-up 19.33 mo (6-60 mo). There was no significant difference in pre or post-operative WOMAC score in the normal weight (BMI < 25) cohort compared to patients with a BMI ≥ 25 (P > 0.05). Sub-group analysis revealed significantly worse WOMAC scores in class 2 obese 30.80 compared to overweight 25.80 (P < 0.01) and class 1 obese 25.50 (P < 0.01). Similarly, there were significantly worse SF-36 scores in class 2 obese 58.16 compared to overweight 63.93 (P < 0.01) and class 1 obese 63.65 (P < 0.01) There were 32 (1.47%) superficial infections, 9 (0.41%) deep infections and 19 (0.87%) revisions overall with no complications or revisions in the normal weight cohort (BMI < 25). CONCLUSION Post-operative functional outcome was not influenced by BMI comparing normal weight individuals with BMI > 25. Patients should not be denied total knee arthroplasty based solely on weight alone.

  18. Copper binding by terrestrial versus marine organic ligands in the coastal plume of River Thurso, North Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, François L. L.; Batchelli, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    It is generally assumed that terrestrial humic matter contains a high density of metal complexing ligands spanning a wide range of stability constants. From equilibrium modelling it would be anticipated that carboxyl groups, which are known to be abundant in humic matter, should be capable of binding Cu quantitatively in humic-rich estuarine systems such as the river plume outflow of River Thurso, on Scotland's north coast, where concentrations along the full mixing gradient typically range for Cu: 1-25 nM and for DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon): 150-1500 μM. Using a combination of reverse and forward titrations monitored by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (ACSV), we show that terrestrial humic substances were the likely source of high-affinity (class 1), low abundance ligands (1-4 nM) found throughout the coastal plume, but that weaker (class 2), more abundant ligands (90-170 nM) appeared to be produced largely in situ, probably as a biological response to Cu inputs into the estuary. Conditional stability constants for Cu-binding were respectively log K1‧ = 14.9-15.9 and log K2‧ = 11.8-12.6. Class 2 ligands were evenly distributed between the low and high molecular weight fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM), both in March and May. Class 1 ligands were more abundant in the low molecular weight fraction in March, but not in May. The latter could be related to seasonal differences in the nature of peatland derived organic matter carried by River Thurso. Since class 1 ligands (terrestrial, humic) were saturated with Cu throughout the plume, it effectively fell upon class 2 ligands (marine, biological) to control Cu speciation in Thurso Bay, in particular keeping the free Cu concentration [Cu2+] within a relatively narrow range (10-13.6 M to 10-12.4 M). On the other hand, class 1 ligands were responsible for solubilising small amounts of Cu derived from this peatland catchment and effectively transporting Cu, in dissolved and colloidal forms, to

  19. A review of the literature pertaining to the efficacy, safety, educational requirements, uses and usage of mechanical adjusting devices

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Shane H; Arnold, Nicole D; Biggs, Lesley; Colloca, Christopher J; Mierau, Dale R; Symons, Bruce P; Triano, John J

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, mechanical adjusting devices (MADs) were a major source of debate within the Chiropractors’ Association of Saskatchewan (CAS). Since Saskatchewan was the only jurisdiction in North America to prohibit the use of MADs, the CAS established a committee in 2001 to review the literature on MADs. The committee evaluated the literature on the efficacy, safety, and uses of moving stylus instruments within chiropractic practice, and the educational requirements for chiropractic practice. Following the rating criteria for the evaluation of evidence, as outlined in the Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada (1994), the committee reviewed 55 articles – all of which pertained to the Activator. Of the 55 articles, 13 were eliminated from the final study. Of the 42 remaining articles, 6 were rated as class 1 evidence; 11 were rated as class 2 evidence and 25 were rated as class 3 evidence. In this article – the second in a series of two – we review the results of uses and usage, safety and educational requirements. Of the 30 articles designated under the category of usage, 3 were rated as Class 1 evidence; 9 studies were classified as Class 2 evidence and 18 were rated as Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that in clinical practice, there is broad application of these procedures. A minority report was written arguing that the reviewer was unable to reach a conclusion about the use of the Activator Instrument other than it is used as a clinical and research tool. Of the 16 studies that dealt either explicitly or implicitly with safety, 4 were Class 1 evidence; 3 were Class 2 evidence and 9 were Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that the evidence supports that the Activator instrument is safe and has no more relative risk than do manual HVLA procedures. A minority report was written arguing that there is no evidence either to support or refute the view that MAD is safe. Of the 5 studies

  20. Soil losses in rural watersheds with environmental land use conflicts.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, F A L; Varandas, S G P; Sanches Fernandes, L F; Valle, R F

    2014-07-01

    Soil losses were calculated in a rural watershed where environmental land use conflicts developed in the course of a progressive invasion of forest and pasture/forest lands by agriculture, especially vineyards. The hydrographic basin is located in the Douro region where the famous Port wine is produced (northern Portugal) and the soil losses were estimated by the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) in combination with a Geographic Information System (GIS). Environmental land use conflicts were set up on the basis of land use and land capability maps, coded as follows: 1-agriculture, 2-pasture, 3-pasture/forest, and 4-forest. The difference between the codes of capability and use defines a conflict class, where a negative or nil value means no conflict and a positive i value means class i conflict. The reliability of soil loss estimates was tested by a check of these values against the frequency of stone wall instabilities in vineyard terraces, with good results. Using the USLE, the average soil loss (A) was estimated in A=12.2 t·ha(-1)·yr(-1) and potential erosion risk areas were found to occupy 28.3% of the basin, defined where soil losses are larger than soil loss tolerances. Soil losses in no conflict regions (11.2 t·ha(-1)·yr(-1)) were significantly different from those in class 2 (6.8 t·ha(-1)·yr(-1)) and class 3 regions (21.3 t·ha(-1)·yr(-1)) that in total occupy 2.62 km(2) (14.3% of the basin). When simulating a scenario of no conflict across the entire basin, whereby land use in class 2 conflict regions is set up to permanent pastures and in class 3 conflict regions to pine forests, it was concluded that A=0.95 t·ha(-1)·yr(-1) (class 2) or A=9.8 t·ha(-1)·yr(-1) (class 3), which correspond to drops of 86% and 54% in soil loss relative to the actual values.

  1. A review of the literature pertaining to the efficacy, safety, educational requirements, uses and usage of mechanical adjusting devices: Part 2 of 2.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shane H; Arnold, Nicole D; Biggs, Lesley; Colloca, Christopher J; Mierau, Dale R; Symons, Bruce P; Triano, John J

    2004-06-01

    Over the past decade, mechanical adjusting devices (MADs) were a major source of debate within the Chiropractors' Association of Saskatchewan (CAS). Since Saskatchewan was the only jurisdiction in North America to prohibit the use of MADs, the CAS established a committee in 2001 to review the literature on MADs. The committee evaluated the literature on the efficacy, safety, and uses of moving stylus instruments within chiropractic practice, and the educational requirements for chiropractic practice. Following the rating criteria for the evaluation of evidence, as outlined in the Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada (1994), the committee reviewed 55 articles - all of which pertained to the Activator. Of the 55 articles, 13 were eliminated from the final study. Of the 42 remaining articles, 6 were rated as class 1 evidence; 11 were rated as class 2 evidence and 25 were rated as class 3 evidence. In this article - the second in a series of two - we review the results of uses and usage, safety and educational requirements. Of the 30 articles designated under the category of usage, 3 were rated as Class 1 evidence; 9 studies were classified as Class 2 evidence and 18 were rated as Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that in clinical practice, there is broad application of these procedures. A minority report was written arguing that the reviewer was unable to reach a conclusion about the use of the Activator Instrument other than it is used as a clinical and research tool. Of the 16 studies that dealt either explicitly or implicitly with safety, 4 were Class 1 evidence; 3 were Class 2 evidence and 9 were Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that the evidence supports that the Activator instrument is safe and has no more relative risk than do manual HVLA procedures. A minority report was written arguing that there is no evidence either to support or refute the view that MAD is safe. Of the 5 studies that dealt

  2. A genetic study of Wilson's disease in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Alison J; Durkie, Miranda; Hague, Stephen; McLay, Kirsten; Emmerson, Jennifer; Lo, Christine; Klaffke, Stefanie; Joyce, Christopher J; Dhawan, Anil; Hadzic, Nedim; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Kirk, Richard; Elizabeth Allen, K; Nicholl, David; Wong, Siew; Griffiths, William; Smithson, Sarah; Giffin, Nicola; Taha, Ali; Connolly, Sally; Gillett, Godfrey T; Tanner, Stuart; Bonham, Jim; Sharrack, Basil; Palotie, Aarno; Rattray, Magnus; Dalton, Ann; Bandmann, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have failed to identify mutations in the Wilson's disease gene ATP7B in a significant number of clinically diagnosed cases. This has led to concerns about genetic heterogeneity for this condition but also suggested the presence of unusual mutational mechanisms. We now present our findings in 181 patients from the United Kingdom with clinically and biochemically confirmed Wilson's disease. A total of 116 different ATP7B mutations were detected, 32 of which are novel. The overall mutation detection frequency was 98%. The likelihood of mutations in genes other than ATP7B causing a Wilson's disease phenotype is therefore very low. We report the first cases with Wilson's disease due to segmental uniparental isodisomy as well as three patients with three ATP7B mutations and three families with Wilson's disease in two consecutive generations. We determined the genetic prevalence of Wilson's disease in the United Kingdom by sequencing the entire coding region and adjacent splice sites of ATP7B in 1000 control subjects. The frequency of all single nucleotide variants with in silico evidence of pathogenicity (Class 1 variant) was 0.056 or 0.040 if only those single nucleotide variants that had previously been reported as mutations in patients with Wilson's disease were included in the analysis (Class 2 variant). The frequency of heterozygote, putative or definite disease-associated ATP7B mutations was therefore considerably higher than the previously reported occurrence of 1:90 (or 0.011) for heterozygote ATP7B mutation carriers in the general population (P < 2.2 × 10(-16) for Class 1 variants or P < 5 × 10(-11) for Class 2 variants only). Subsequent exclusion of four Class 2 variants without additional in silico evidence of pathogenicity led to a further reduction of the mutation frequency to 0.024. Using this most conservative approach, the calculated frequency of individuals predicted to carry two mutant pathogenic ATP7B alleles is 1:7026 and thus still

  3. The outer limits of the welfare state: discrimination, racism and their effect on human services.

    PubMed

    Wershow, H J

    The European social democracies have been more generous than the United States in social provision, including services to aged. The momentum of provision has slowed down in recent years. We suggest that prosperity which has led to use of foreign laborers in menial jobs has caused this slow down. The dynamics are similar to the historical U.S. use of "non-100% Americans" as our menial workers. Changes in social policy strategies are needed: 1) universal provision, rather than programs aimed at minorities, is needed to enlist support of stable working and middle classes; 2) tax reforms, which lower progressive income-tax structures for middle incomes, and value-added tax, may be necessary to overcome anti-tax ideologies; 3) clear priorities as to most necessary services must be established by the gerontological community. PMID:478661

  4. Interleukin-26: An IL-10-related cytokine produced by Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Raymond P.; Sheikh, Faruk; Dickensheets, Harold; Savan, Ram; Young, Howard A.; Walter, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    IL-26 is classified as a member of the IL-10 cytokine family because it has limited sequence homology to IL-10 and the IL-10-related cytokines. The human IL-26 gene, IL26, is located on chromosome 12q15 between the genes for two other important class-2 cytokines, IFNG (IFN-γ) and IL22 (IL-22). IL-26 is often co-expressed with IL-22 by activated T cells, especially Th17 cells. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex composed of the IL-20R1 and IL-10R2 chains. IL-26 receptors are primarily expressed on non-hematopoietic cell types, particularly epithelial cells. Signaling through IL-26 receptor complexes results in the activation of STAT1 and STAT3 with subsequent induction of IL-26-responsive genes. The biological functions of IL-26 have only begun to be defined. PMID:20947410

  5. The micro conical system: Lessons learned from a successful EVA/robot-compatible mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittleman, Mark; Johnston, Alistair

    1996-01-01

    The Micro Conical System (MCS) is a three-part, multi-purpose mechanical interface system used for acquiring and manipulating masses on-orbit by either extravehicular activity (EVA) or telerobotic means. The three components of the system are the micro conical fitting (MCF), the EVA micro tool (EMCT), and the Robot Micro Conical Tool (RMCT). The MCS was developed and refined over a four-year period. This period culminated with the delivery of 358 Class 1 and Class 2 micro conical fittings for the International Space Station and with its first use in space to handle a 1272 kg (2800 lbm) Spartan satellite (11000 times greater than the MCF mass) during an EVA aboard STS-63 in February, 1995. The micro conical system is the first successful EVA/robot-compatible mechanism to be demonstrated in the external environment aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle.

  6. Annotated bibliography of the biomedical literature pertaining to chiropractic, pediatrics and manipulation in relation to the treatment of health conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gotlib, Allan C; Beingessner, Melanie

    1995-01-01

    Biomedical literature retrieval, both indexed and non-indexed, with respect to the application of manipulative therapy with therapeutic intent and pediatric health conditions (ages 0 to 17 years) yielded 66 discrete documents which met specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was one experimental study (RCT’s), 3 observational (cohort, case control) studies and 62 descriptive studies (case series, case reports, surveys, literature reviews). An independent rating panel determined consistency with a modified quality of evidence scale adopted from procedure ratings system 1 of Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada. Results indicate minimal Class 1 and Class 2 and some Class 3 evidence for a variety of pediatric conditions utilizing the application of manipulation with therapeutic intent.

  7. Microwave Radar Imaging of Heterogeneous Breast Tissue Integrating A Priori Information

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Thomas N.; Sarafianou, Mantalena; Craddock, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional radar-based image reconstruction techniques fail when they are applied to heterogeneous breast tissue, since the underlying in-breast relative permittivity is unknown or assumed to be constant. This results in a systematic error during the process of image formation. A recent trend in microwave biomedical imaging is to extract the relative permittivity from the object under test to improve the image reconstruction quality and thereby to enhance the diagnostic assessment. In this paper, we present a novel radar-based methodology for microwave breast cancer detection in heterogeneous breast tissue integrating a 3D map of relative permittivity as a priori information. This leads to a novel image reconstruction formulation where the delay-and-sum focusing takes place in time rather than range domain. Results are shown for a heterogeneous dense (class-4) and a scattered fibroglandular (class-2) numerical breast phantom using Bristol's 31-element array configuration. PMID:25435861

  8. Restoration of antibody binding to blotted meningococcal outer membrane proteins using various detergents.

    PubMed

    Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Frøholm, L O

    1988-10-01

    Restoration of IgG antibody binding to heat-denatured meningococcal outer membrane proteins has been studied on immunoblots with a series of 14 detergents. Nitrocellulose strips with the blotted proteins were incubated with the detergents and sera from human volunteers vaccinated with meningococcal membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and ionic detergents, containing substituted quarternary ammonium or amino groups with a minimum of 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain, restored the antigenicity of the serotype-specific class 2 porin protein. The concentrations of the Zwittergent detergents necessary for activation decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the homologues. Only zwitterionic detergents renatured the class 1 protein. Both proteins were weakly antigenic in the presence of the nonionic detergents Triton X-100 and Tween 20. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharide restored antibody binding to the porin, but not to the class 1 protein. Similar concentrations of lipopolysaccharides from two other gram-negative bacteria had no effect.

  9. Substance use patterns and mental health diagnosis among youth in mental health treatment: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Riehman, Kara S; Stephens, Robert L; Schurig, Michelle L

    2009-12-01

    This study examines patterns of substance use among youth served in systems of care, and how these patterns relate to diagnosis and other youth characteristics using latent class analysis. Results indicated a four-class solution with the four groups differing in their probabilities of reporting the use of 10 different substances. Class 1 was defined by high probabilities of all drug use. Class 2 had high probabilities of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana use, and low for other drugs. Class 3 had moderate probabilities of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana use, and low probabilities for other drugs. Class 4 had a high probability of tobacco use and no other drug use. Youth who had a mood disorder diagnosis, were male, older, White and had previously run away from home were significantly more likely to be in Class 1 relative to other classes. These differences have implications for prevention and treatment. PMID:20235443

  10. Shock metamorphism of lunar and terrestrial basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Lonar Crater (India) basalt and lunar basalt 75035 were shock loaded under controlled laboratory conditions up to 1000 kbar, generally in a CO/CO2 (1:1) environment evacuated to 10 to the minus seventh power torr. The Kieffer et al. (1976) classification scheme of progressive shock metamorphism is found to apply to lunar basalts. The major shock features of the five classes that span the range 0 to 1000 kbar are described. Only three out of 152 basalt specimens show shock effects in their natural state as severe as Class 2 features. The scarcity of shocked basalt hand samples in contrast to the abundance of shock-produced agglutinates and homogeneous glass spheres in the lunar regolith indicates the dominant role of micrometeorite impact in the evolution of the lunar regolith. The overall glass content in asteroidal and Mercurian regoliths is considered.

  11. SAPHIRE models and software for ASP evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, M.B.; Schroeder, J.A.; Russell, K.D.

    1995-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the past year has created 75 plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models using the SAPHIRE suite of PRA codes. Along with the new models, the INEL has also developed a new module for SAPHIRE which is tailored specifically to the unique needs of conditional core damage probability (CCDP) evaluations. These models and software will be the next generation of risk tools for the evaluation of accident precursors by both NRR and AEOD. This paper presents an overview of the models and software. Key characteristics include: (1) classification of the plant models according to plant response with a unique set of event trees for each plant class, (2) plant-specific fault trees using supercomponents, (3) generation and retention of all system and sequence cutsets, (4) full flexibility in modifying logic, regenerating cutsets, and requantifying results, and (5) user interface for streamlined evaluation of ASP events.

  12. Structure and Mechanism of Receptor Sharing by the IL-10R2 Common Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Jones, Brandi C.; Logsdon, Naomi J.; Harris, Bethany D.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Radaeva, Svetlana; Halloran, Brian A.; Gao, Bin; Walter, Mark R.

    2010-07-19

    IL-10R2 is a shared cell surface receptor required for the activation of five class 2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-22, IL-26, IL-28, and IL-29) that play critical roles in host defense. To define the molecular mechanisms that regulate its promiscuous binding, we have determined the crystal structure of the IL-10R2 ectodomain at 2.14 {angstrom} resolution. IL-10R2 residues required for binding were identified by alanine scanning and used to derive computational models of IL-10/IL-10R1/IL-10R2 and IL-22/IL-22R1/IL-10R2 ternary complexes. The models reveal a conserved binding epitope that is surrounded by two clefts that accommodate the structural and chemical diversity of the cytokines. These results provide a structural framework for interpreting IL-10R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with human disease.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CO spectra of Virgo cluster galaxies (Grossi,+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; de Looze, I.; Goncalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Reduced IRAM 30m telescope spectra of 20 star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster, that are presented in Figure B.1 and Figure B.2 of the paper. The spectra were observed with the EMIR receiver using the FTS spectrometer. The nomenclature of the files is: ObjectName_10.dat and ObjectName_21.dat, for the 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) transition, respectively. Multiple pointings for the same target are indicated with letters (a,b,c,d,e). All spectra have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 8.1km/s for both lines, with the exception of VCC032410.dat and VCC1686c_10.dat which have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 16.2km/s. The observed sources and the list of files are given below. The files are created by GILDAS/Class. (2 data files).

  14. QSAR Study and Molecular Design of Open-Chain Enaminones as Anticonvulsant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Garro Martinez, Juan C.; Duchowicz, Pablo R.; Estrada, Mario R.; Zamarbide, Graciela N.; Castro, Eduardo A.

    2011-01-01

    Present work employs the QSAR formalism to predict the ED50 anticonvulsant activity of ringed-enaminones, in order to apply these relationships for the prediction of unknown open-chain compounds containing the same types of functional groups in their molecular structure. Two different modeling approaches are applied with the purpose of comparing the consistency of our results: (a) the search of molecular descriptors via multivariable linear regressions; and (b) the calculation of flexible descriptors with the CORAL (CORrelation And Logic) program. Among the results found, we propose some potent candidate open-chain enaminones having ED50 values lower than 10 mg·kg−1 for corresponding pharmacological studies. These compounds are classified as Class 1 and Class 2 according to the Anticonvulsant Selection Project. PMID:22272137

  15. Adult human mesenchymal stromal cells and the treatment of graft versus host disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Richard P; Sturm, Marian J

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease is a difficult and potentially lethal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It occurs with minor human leucocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch and is normally treated with corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive therapy. When it is refractory to steroid therapy, mortality approaches 80%. Mesenchymal stromal cells are rare cells found in bone marrow and other tissues. They can be expanded in culture and possess complex and diverse immunomodulatory activity. Moreover, human mesenchymal stromal cells carry low levels of class 1 and no class 2 HLA antigens, making them immunoprivileged and able to be used without HLA matching. Their use in steroid-refractory graft versus host disease was first described in 2004. Subsequently, they have been used in a number of Phase I and II trials in acute and chronic graft versus host disease trials with success. We discuss their mode of action, the results, their production, and potential dangers with a view to future application. PMID:24627644

  16. Capability comparison of pilot assistance systems based solely on terrain databases versus sensor DB fused data systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münsterer, Thomas; Scheuch, Jürgen; Völschow, Philipp; Strobel, Michael; Roth, Michael; Fadljevic, Dennis

    2016-05-01

    This paper compares the capabilities achievable with a pure database driven DVE system (NIAG class 4 system) with the capabilities of a database system fused with sensor information (NIAG class 2 system). Both systems will present the same 3D conformal symbology. To achieve terrain conformal representation with operational navigation systems and databases, specific compensation techniques are required. This applies especially for the pure database system. The sensor database fusion system on the other hand relies mainly on relative accuracies simplifying the required compensation techniques at the cost of additional sensors and fusion algorithms. Both system configurations were flight-tested on a test helicopter. The test results, specifics and basic limitations will be discussed and compared.

  17. Outbreak of Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Indigo-Pigmented Strains

    PubMed Central

    Vilacoba, Elisabet; Almuzara, Marisa; Gulone, Lucia; Rodriguez, Rocio; Pallone, Elida; Bakai, Romina; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii pigmented strains are not common in clinical settings. Here, we report an outbreak caused by indigo-pigmented A. baumannii strains isolated in an acute care hospital in Argentina from March to September 2012. Pan-PCR assays exposed a unique pattern belonging to the recently described regional CC113B/CC79P clonal complex that confirms the relevant relationships among the indigo-pigmented A. baumannii strains. All of them were extensively drug resistant and harbored different genetic elements associated with horizontal genetic transfer, such as the transposon Tn2006, class 2 integrons, AbaR-type islands, IS125, IS26, strA, strB, florR, and the small recombinase ISCR2 associated with the sul2 gene preceded by ISAba1. PMID:23985923

  18. Monthly fractional green vegetation cover associated with land cover classes of the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, Kevin P.; Tarpley, Dan; Mitchell, Ken; Csiszar, Ivan; Owen, editors, Timothy W.; Reed, Bradley C.

    2001-01-01

    The land cover classes developed under the coordination of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS) have been analyzed for a study area that includes the Conterminous United States and portions of Mexico and Canada. The 1-km resolution data have been analyzed to produce a gridded data set that includes within each 20-km grid cell: 1) the three most dominant land cover classes, 2) the fractional area associated with each of the three dominant classes, and 3) the fractional area covered by water. Additionally, the monthly fraction of green vegetation cover (fgreen) associated with each of the three dominant land cover classes per grid cell was derived from a 5-year climatology of 1-km resolution NOAA-AVHRR data. The variables derived in this study provide a potential improvement over the use of monthly fgreen linked to a single land cover class per model grid cell.

  19. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Chronology of surface history of Mercury. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Phases in the history of the planet Mercury include: (1) condensation and accretion; (2) heating; (3) planetary expansion during heavy bombardment; (4) tidal spin-down and lineament formation; (5) P5 plains emplacement; (6) P4 plains emplacement; (7) peak planetary volume in P3 period; (8) scarp formation; (9) Caloris Basin formation, late class 3; (10) scarp formation and P2 plains formation; (11) smooth plains formation in and around large basins; (12) late or local tectonic stress; and (13) quiescent class 1 period. Although the cooling and contraction of the lithosphere are complete, the core remains molten as an active dynamo, producing the magnetic fields detected by Mariner 10. Plains produced since core formation (P3 to P-1) should record its magnetic activity. Cratering during the Class 2 and Class 1 periods is probably not enough to distribute ballistic materials and homogenize any color differences.

  20. The outer limits of the welfare state: discrimination, racism and their effect on human services.

    PubMed

    Wershow, H J

    The European social democracies have been more generous than the United States in social provision, including services to aged. The momentum of provision has slowed down in recent years. We suggest that prosperity which has led to use of foreign laborers in menial jobs has caused this slow down. The dynamics are similar to the historical U.S. use of "non-100% Americans" as our menial workers. Changes in social policy strategies are needed: 1) universal provision, rather than programs aimed at minorities, is needed to enlist support of stable working and middle classes; 2) tax reforms, which lower progressive income-tax structures for middle incomes, and value-added tax, may be necessary to overcome anti-tax ideologies; 3) clear priorities as to most necessary services must be established by the gerontological community.

  1. [Assessement of combined impact of hazards on petrochemical and chemical workers' health].

    PubMed

    Badamshina, G G; Karimova, L K; Tkacheva, T A; Mavrina, L N; Bakirova, A É

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a study on working conditions and health status of petrochemical workers. The main hazardous factor of work environment and manufacture process has been found to be work environment air pollution caused by Class 2-3 hazards. Depending on the composition of the current complex of hazards, the manufacture workers comprise three groups determined by the impact of aromatic hydrocarbons, olefin oxides and their combinations. It has been shown that the combined impact of aromatic hydrocarbons and olefin oxides combination may produce a more pronounced hazardous impact on workers' health compared with the impact of aromatic hydrocarbons or olefin oxides taken separately. This may be due to the summing up of biological effects.

  2. The Optimization of GBT Pulsar Data for the GBNCC Pulsar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ashlee Nicole; Green Bank NRAO, GBNCC

    2016-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope collects data from the Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap (GBNCC) pulsar survey in order to find new pulsars within its sensitivity and also, to confirm previously found pulsars within its sensitivity range. The collected data is then loaded into the CyberSKA website database where astronomers are tasked with rating the data sets based on its potential to be a pulsar from 0(unclassified), 1(class 1 pulsar), 2(class 2 pulsar), 3(class 3 pulsar), 4(radio frequency interference), 5(not a pulsar), 6(know pulsar), 7(harmonic of a known pulsar). This specific research done was to use previously classified pulsars to create a python script that will automatically identify the data set as a pulsar or a non-pulsar. After finding the recurring frequencies of radio frequency interference (RFI), the frequencies were then added to a pipeline to further discern pulsars from RFI.

  3. Transferable integrons of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the gut of a wild boar in the buffer zone of a national park.

    PubMed

    Mokracka, Joanna; Koczura, Ryszard; Kaznowski, Adam

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in the gut of a wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) shot in the buffer zone of a national park. Five Gram-negative strains of Escherichia coli, Serratia odorifera, Hafnia alvei and Pseudomonas sp. were isolated. Four of these strains had class 2 integrase (intI2), and one harbored class 1 integrase (intI1). The integron-positive strains were multiresistant, i.e., resistant to at least three unrelated antibiotics. All of the integrons were transferred to E. coli J-53 (Rif(R)) in a conjugation assay. The results showed that a number of multiresistant, integron-containing bacterial strains of different genera may inhabit a single individual of a wild animal, allowing the possibility of transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:22661922

  4. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Raj. Kumar; Keith Brown; T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

    2000-04-27

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

  5. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    T. Scott Hickman

    2003-01-17

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

  6. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-01-15

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

  7. Bullying among High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  8. Production of Swedish Class I diesel using dual-stage process

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.H.; Soegaard-Andersen, P.; Nielsen-Hannerup, P.

    1994-12-31

    In 1991, the Swedish Government proposed the introduction of three classes of diesel, each with a specific energy tax. Environmental Class 1 diesel (SCI) specifies a maximum aromatic content of 5 vol% and a maximum sulfur content of 10 wppm. Class 2 diesel (SCII) limits aromatics to max. 20 vol% and sulfur to max. 50 wppm, while Class 3 (SCIII) has no limit on aromatics and a maximum of 0.05 wt% sulfur. The difference in taxation levels for the three classes is considerable: Skr250/m{sup 3} (corresponding to approx. $6/bbl) between SCII and SCIII, and a further Skr200/m{sup 3} (corresponding to approx. $5/bbl) between SCI and SCII. Topsoee has developed a two-stage process for low-aromatics diesel production at low partial pressures of hydrogen. In the following, the application of this process concept is described for production of Swedish Class 1 diesel from North Sea gas oils.

  9. DNA transposon activity is associated with increased mutation rates in genes of rice and other grasses

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Thomas; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Rounsley, Steve; Chen, Mingsheng; Zuccolo, Andrea; Panaud, Olivier; Wing, Rod A.; Roffler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    DNA (class 2) transposons are mobile genetic elements which move within their ‘host' genome through excising and re-inserting elsewhere. Although the rice genome contains tens of thousands of such elements, their actual role in evolution is still unclear. Analysing over 650 transposon polymorphisms in the rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, we find that DNA repair following transposon excisions is associated with an increased number of mutations in the sequences neighbouring the transposon. Indeed, the 3,000 bp flanking the excised transposons can contain over 10 times more mutations than the genome-wide average. Since DNA transposons preferably insert near genes, this is correlated with increases in mutation rates in coding sequences and regulatory regions. Most importantly, we find this phenomenon also in maize, wheat and barley. Thus, these findings suggest that DNA transposon activity is a major evolutionary force in grasses which provide the basis of most food consumed by humankind. PMID:27599761

  10. The prospects for life on Mars: A pre-Viking assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Lederberg, J.

    1976-01-01

    Mariner 9 provided a reinterpretation of several historical claims for Martian biology, and permitted an important further characterization of the environmental constraints on possible Martian organisms. Four classes of conceivable Martian organisms are identified, depending on the environmental temperature, T, and water activity, aw: Class 1, high T, high aw; Class 2, low T, high aw; Class 3, high T, low aw; and Class 4, low T, low aw. Organisms which extract their water requirements from hydrated minerals or from ice are considered possible on Mars, and the high ultraviolet flux and low oxygen partial pressure are considered to be negligible impediments to Martian biology. Large organisms are not only possible on Mars, they may be favored. The surface distribution of Martian organisms and future search strategies for life on Mars are discussed.

  11. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

    2001-06-16

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

  12. Defense acquisition programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The continuing instability in the overall defense budget and the recent changes in Eastern Europe are forcing DOD and the military services to reexamine the need, priority, and annual funding levels for many weapon system acquisition programs. GAO reviewed six weapon system acquisition programs that DOD was scheduled to make an acquisition milestone decision on during fiscal year 1991. Under milestone authorization, up to five years funding can be approved to cover the entire acquisition phase for either full-scale development or full-rate production. This report examines the Non-Line-of-Sight Missile, the Light Helicopter, the MK-50 Torpedo, the Sensor Fuzed Weapon, the Advanced Tactical Fighter, and the Joint Tactical Information Distribution System Class 2 Terminals.

  13. Independent seismic evaluation of the Diablo Canyon Unit 1 containment annulus structure and selected piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Reich, M.; Bezler, P.; Miller, C.; Wang, Y.K.; Subudhi, M.; Shteyngart, S.; Brown, P.

    1982-08-01

    An independent review and development of the vertical floor spectra for the Unit 1 containment annulus structure of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant was carried out using a detailed three-dimensional model. The developed floor spectra were then utilized for confirmatory evaluations of two selected piping systems. The latter were evaluated by the envelope response spectrum method, and by the independent support motion response spectrum method. ASME class 2 evaluations of the two systems were also performed. Finally, a confirmatory evaluation was carried out for the model utilized by URS/Blume for the development of the vertical floor response spectra. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of the report summarize the work scope and the results of the study. Details pertaining to the specific areas of the work are given in sections 2 to 8.

  14. Application of ecological geological and oceanographic ERTS-1 imagery to Delaware's coastal resources planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The Author has identified the following significant results. Significant results obtained by analysis of digital ERTS-1 data are: (1) Statistical outputs indicating the reliability of discriminating eight coastal vegetation and land use classes on a given group of training sets included: (a) mean and standard deviation of response in each class chosen; (b) contribution tables indicating importance of each channel in discriminating each thematic class from the background; (c) scatter diagrams showing relationships of thematic spectral signatures in spectral space; and (d) classification table showing reliability (in percent) of identification of each thematic class. (2) Thematic color maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000 showing vegetation and land use categories for Delaware's entire coastal zone. (3) Thematic computer plots at specified smaller (i.e. 1:24,000) scales for comparison with existing map data such as U.S.G.S. topographic maps.

  15. Optimization of knowledge-based systems and expert system building tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuda, Phyllis; Mckellar, Donald

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA-AMES Cooperative Agreement were to investigate, develop, and evaluate, via test cases, the system parameters and processing algorithms that constrain the overall performance of the Information Sciences Division's Artificial Intelligence Research Facility. Written reports covering various aspects of the grant were submitted to the co-investigators for the grant. Research studies concentrated on the field of artificial intelligence knowledge-based systems technology. Activities included the following areas: (1) AI training classes; (2) merging optical and digital processing; (3) science experiment remote coaching; (4) SSF data management system tests; (5) computer integrated documentation project; (6) conservation of design knowledge project; (7) project management calendar and reporting system; (8) automation and robotics technology assessment; (9) advanced computer architectures and operating systems; and (10) honors program.

  16. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water).

  17. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  18. DNA transposon activity is associated with increased mutation rates in genes of rice and other grasses.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Thomas; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F X; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Rounsley, Steve; Chen, Mingsheng; Zuccolo, Andrea; Panaud, Olivier; Wing, Rod A; Roffler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    DNA (class 2) transposons are mobile genetic elements which move within their 'host' genome through excising and re-inserting elsewhere. Although the rice genome contains tens of thousands of such elements, their actual role in evolution is still unclear. Analysing over 650 transposon polymorphisms in the rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, we find that DNA repair following transposon excisions is associated with an increased number of mutations in the sequences neighbouring the transposon. Indeed, the 3,000 bp flanking the excised transposons can contain over 10 times more mutations than the genome-wide average. Since DNA transposons preferably insert near genes, this is correlated with increases in mutation rates in coding sequences and regulatory regions. Most importantly, we find this phenomenon also in maize, wheat and barley. Thus, these findings suggest that DNA transposon activity is a major evolutionary force in grasses which provide the basis of most food consumed by humankind. PMID:27599761

  19. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

    2001-08-10

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

  20. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

    2001-12-11

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

  1. Thermal Decomposition of New and Aged LX-04 and PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T D; Tarver, C; Idar, D J; Rodin, W A

    2002-04-09

    One-Dimensional-Time-To-Explosion (ODTX) experiments were conducted to study the thermal decomposition of new and aged LX-04, PBX 9501, HMX class 1 and class 2, Estane and EstaneBDNPA-F (PBX 950 1 plasticized-binder) materials. New and aged LX-04 showed comparable decomposition kinetics. The data for aged PBX 9501 showed slightly longer explosion times at equivalent temperatures. Analysis of the error in time measurement is complicated by several experimental factors but the small time change appears to be experimentally significant. The results suggest that aged PBX 9501 is slightly more thermally stable. The thermal decomposition of these materials were modeled using a coupled thermal and heat transport code (chemical TOPAZ) using separate kinetics for HMX and binder decomposition. The current kinetic models describe the longer explosion times by the loss of plasticizer-binder constituent, which was more thermally reactive.

  2. On the classification of pathways in the auditory midbrain, thalamus, and cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.; Sherman, S. Murray

    2011-01-01

    Auditory forebrain pathways exhibit several morphological and physiological properties that underlie their specific neurobiological roles in auditory processing. Anatomically, such projections can be distinguished by their terminal size, arborization patterns, and postsynaptic dendritic locations. These structural features correlate with several postsynaptic physiological properties, such as EPSP amplitude, short-term plasticity, and postsynaptic receptor types. Altogether, these synaptic properties segregate into two main classes that are associated with either primarily information-bearing (Class 1) or modulatory (Class 2) roles, and have been used to delineate the principle routes of information flow through the auditory midbrain, thalamus, and cortex. Moreover, these synaptic properties engender as yet unexplored issues regarding the neuronal processing of auditory information, such as the convergent integration and long-term plasticity of auditory forebrain inputs. PMID:21184817

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from imported flamingos in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Maiko; Ahmed, Ashraf M; Noda, Ayako; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Fukumoto, Yukio; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Imported animals, especially those from developing countries, may constitute a potential hazard to native animals and to public health. In this study, a new flock of lesser flamingos imported from Tanzania to Hiroshima Zoological Park were screened for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes. Thirty-seven Gram-negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the flamingos. Seven isolates (18.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, the most common being against: ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and nalidixic acid. Molecular analyses identified class 1 and class 2 integrons, beta-lactamase-encoding genes, blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-2 and the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnrS and qnrB. This study highlights the role of animal importation in the dissemination of multidrug-resistant bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes from one country to another.

  4. Emotional/psychological and related problems among truant youths: An exploratory latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Ungaro, Rocio; Gulledge, Laura; Karas, Lora; Winters, Ken C.; Belenko, Steven; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Latent class analysis was conducted on the psychosocial problems experienced by truant youths. Data were obtained from baseline interviews completed on 131 youths and their parents/guardians involved in a NIDA-funded, Brief Intervention Project. Results identified two classes of youths: Class 1(n=94): youths with low levels of delinquency, mental health and substance abuse issues, Class 2(n=37): youths with high levels of these problems. Comparison of these two classes on their urine analysis test results and parent/guardian reports of traumatic events found significant (p<.05) differences between them that were consistent with their problem group classification. Our results have important implications for research and practice. PMID:23766624

  5. Solid rocket technology advancements for space tug and IUS applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    In order for the shuttle tug or interim upper stage (IUS) to capture all the missions in the current mission model for the tug and the IUS, an auxiliary or kick stage, using a solid propellant rocket motor, is required. Two solid propellant rocket motor technology concepts are described. One concept, called the 'advanced propulsion module' motor, is an 1800-kg, high-mass-fraction motor, which is single-burn and contains Class 2 propellent. The other concept, called the high energy upper stage restartable solid, is a two-burn (stop-restartable on command) motor which at present contains 1400 kg of Class 7 propellant. The details and status of the motor design and component and motor test results to date are presented, along with the schedule for future work.

  6. Differences in histoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Kian; Wheat, L Joseph; Connolly, Patricia; Cloud, Gretchen; Hajjeh, Rana; Wheat, Emerson; Alves, Katia; Lacaz Cd, Carlos da Silva; Keath, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    Demographic and clinical parameters among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and histoplasmosis in Brazil and United States were compared. The Brazilian isolates were typed by restriction-fragment length polymorphism analysis and were DNA fingerprinted by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Skin lesions occurred in 66% of Brazilian case patients, compared with 1%-7% of US case patients. Of 21 treated case patients, 4 (19%) died, a rate similar to that of the US case patients (5%-13%). By nuclear gene typing, the Brazilian isolates were equally divided between South American classes 5 and 6, and RAPD-PCR showed 18 distinct genetic fingerprints in 20 isolates. Skin lesions are more common in infection with class 5 or 6 organisms than with class 2 Histoplasma capsulatum. The role of genetic differences in the organism as a cause for the clinical differences requires investigation. PMID:12447743

  7. Expression and interstrain variability of the YPS3 gene of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Bohse, Megan L; Woods, Jon P

    2007-04-01

    The YPS3 locus of the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum encodes a secreted and surface-localized protein specific to the pathogenic yeast phase. In this study we examined this locus in 32 H. capsulatum strains and variants. Although protein production is limited to a select group of strains, the North American restriction fragment length polymorphism class 2/NAm 2 isolates, the locus was present in all the strains we examined. The YPS3 gene is well conserved in its 5' and 3' regions but displays an intragenic hypervariable region of tandem repeats that fluctuates in size between strains. This feature is similar to that seen with genes encoding several cell surface proteins in other fungi. PMID:17337639

  8. Smoking among schoolchildren in metropolitan Manila.

    PubMed

    Yason, J V; Parazo, M A; Morelos, S I; Geizerora, H; Tuzara, D J; Guzman, S V

    1984-01-01

    A total of 2000 school children aged 8-20 years from 3 sets of elementary and secondary schools in Metropolitan Manila (Philippines) were surveyed to determine the prevalence of smoking among them and to learn the factors affecting the acquisition of the habit. The students were chosen to represent each of the 3 socioeconomic classes of school children in Metropolitan Manila -- 500 each came from socioeconomic class 1 and socioeconomic class 2, and 1000 came from socioeconomic class 3. Cluster random sampling was used in the selection of study subjects. The necessary information was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. The students ranged in age from 8 years to over 20 years with a mean of 14 years for both males and females. The proportion of boys was the same as girls among the ever-smokers. Their mean age was likely comparable. The same result was noted among the nonsmokers. The mean age of ever-smokers was 15 + or - 1.75 years; the mean age of nonsmokers was 13 + or - 2.11. The age differences were significantly different, with ever-smokers being generally older than the nonsmokers. The prevalence of ever-smokers in the class 1 school was 34.4%. The proportion of boy ever-smokers was not significantly different from the girl ever-smokers. In class 2 school, the prevalence rate was 23.4%, and the proportion of boys and girls was not significantly different. Among class 3 school children, boy ever-smokers were significantly more prevalent than girl ever-smokers, and the combined prevalence of ever-smokers in this social class was 29.2%. A regular smoker among school children is defined as one who smokes at least 1 cigarette per week. The overall prevalence rate of regular smokers in the 3 schools was 6.6% for both sexes (11.6% for males and 1.7% for females). The proportion of boy ever-smokers was about the same or slightly higher than the girl ever-smokers except among the 15-year-olds where the proportion of girl ever-smokers was much higher than those

  9. Y-12 Industrial Landfill V. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This report contains the modifications in operations and design to meet the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conversation (TDEC) July 10, 1993, amendments to the regulations for Class 2 landfills. These modifications, though extensive in design and construction cost, are considered minor revisions and should not require a processing fee. Area 1 of ILF V, comprising approximately 20% of the ILF V footprint, was designed and submitted to TDEC prior to the implementation of current regulations. This initial area was constructed with a compacted clay liner and leachate collection system, and became operational in April 1994. The current regulations require landfills to have a composite liner with leachate collection system and closure cap. Modifications to upgrade Areas 2 and 3 of ILF V to meet the current TDEC requirements are included.

  10. Hyperspectral imaging for differentiation of foreign materials from pinto beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; Zemlan, Michael; Henry, Sam

    2015-09-01

    Food safety and quality in packaged products are paramount in the food processing industry. To ensure that packaged products are free of foreign materials, such as debris and pests, unwanted materials mixed with the targeted products must be detected before packaging. A portable hyperspectral imaging system in the visible-to-NIR range has been used to acquire hyperspectral data cubes from pinto beans that have been mixed with foreign matter. Bands and band ratios have been identified as effective features to develop a classification scheme for detection of foreign materials in pinto beans. A support vector machine has been implemented with a quadratic kernel to separate pinto beans and background (Class 1) from all other materials (Class 2) in each scene. After creating a binary classification map for the scene, further analysis of these binary images allows separation of false positives from true positives for proper removal action during packaging.

  11. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from imported flamingos in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Imported animals, especially those from developing countries, may constitute a potential hazard to native animals and to public health. In this study, a new flock of lesser flamingos imported from Tanzania to Hiroshima Zoological Park were screened for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes. Thirty-seven Gram-negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the flamingos. Seven isolates (18.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, the most common being against: ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and nalidixic acid. Molecular analyses identified class 1 and class 2 integrons, β-lactamase-encoding genes, blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-2 and the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnrS and qnrB. This study highlights the role of animal importation in the dissemination of multidrug-resistant bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes from one country to another. PMID:19930691

  12. Korean coastal water depth/sediment and land cover mapping (1:25,000) by computer analysis of LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. Y.; Miller, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    Computer analysis was applied to single date LANDSAT MSS imagery of a sample coastal area near Seoul, Korea equivalent to a 1:50,000 topographic map. Supervised image processing yielded a test classification map from this sample image containing 12 classes: 5 water depth/sediment classes, 2 shoreline/tidal classes, and 5 coastal land cover classes at a scale of 1:25,000 and with a training set accuracy of 76%. Unsupervised image classification was applied to a subportion of the site analyzed and produced classification maps comparable in results in a spatial sense. The results of this test indicated that it is feasible to produce such quantitative maps for detailed study of dynamic coastal processes given a LANDSAT image data base at sufficiently frequent time intervals.

  13. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    The current project is a systematic research effort to quantify relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: (a) Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems, (b) Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements, (c) Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs (d), Compositional flow visualization experiments, and (e) Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

  14. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water). PMID:26590695

  15. Credit PSR. This view depicts the southwest and southeast facades ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit PSR. This view depicts the southwest and southeast facades as seen when looking west southwest (260°). The building consists of a small lean-to control room and a two-story space containing a large casting pit. The pit, which can be seen through the open doors, was never used due to changes in JPL's mission. This steel frame structure is clad in "Transite" board (a fire resistant pressed asbestos composite material) and interior lighting consists of individual explosion proof lamps mounted around the walls. The building was rated for 10,000 pounds (4,545 Kg) of class 2 materials and four personnel. It was licensed 5 June 1989 for ammonium perchlorate (NH4C10,), ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), and sodium nitrate (NaNO3) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Casting & Curing Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. Imidazopyridazine Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Also Target Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase and Heat Shock Protein 90 To Kill the Parasite at Different Stages of Intracellular Development

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Robert W.; Whalley, David; Bowyer, Paul W.; Wallace, Claire; Rochani, Ankit; Nageshan, Rishi K.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Jones, Hayley M.; Ansell, Keith H.; Chapman, Timothy M.; Taylor, Debra L.; Osborne, Simon A.; Baker, David A.; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Imidazopyridazine compounds are potent, ATP-competitive inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) and of Plasmodium falciparum parasite growth in vitro. Here, we show that these compounds can be divided into two classes depending on the nature of the aromatic linker between the core and the R2 substituent group. Class 1 compounds have a pyrimidine linker and inhibit parasite growth at late schizogony, whereas class 2 compounds have a nonpyrimidine linker and inhibit growth in the trophozoite stage, indicating different modes of action for the two classes. The compounds also inhibited cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and their potency against this enzyme was greatly reduced by substitution of the enzyme's gatekeeper residue at the ATP binding site. The effectiveness of the class 1 compounds against a parasite line expressing the modified PKG was also substantially reduced, suggesting that these compounds kill the parasite primarily through inhibition of PKG rather than CDPK1. HSP90 was identified as a binding partner of class 2 compounds, and a representative compound bound to the ATP binding site in the N-terminal domain of HSP90. Reducing the size of the gatekeeper residue of CDPK1 enabled inhibition of the enzyme by bumped kinase inhibitors; however, a parasite line expressing the modified enzyme showed no change in sensitivity to these compounds. Taken together, these findings suggest that CDPK1 may not be a suitable target for further inhibitor development and that the primary mechanism through which the imidazopyridazines kill parasites is by inhibition of PKG or HSP90. PMID:26711771

  17. Who Should Be Targeted for the Prevention of Birth Defects? A Latent Class Analysis Based on a Large, Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study in Shaanxi Province, Western China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenfang; Li, Danyang; Yang, Xue; Liu, Danli; Zhang, Min; Yan, Hong; Zeng, Lingxia

    2016-01-01

    Background The wide range and complex combinations of factors that cause birth defects impede the development of primary prevention strategies targeted at high-risk subpopulations. Methods Latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify mutually exclusive profiles of factors associated with birth defects among women between 15 and 49 years of age using data from a large, population-based, cross-sectional study conducted in Shaanxi Province, western China, between August and October, 2013. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of associated factors and the latent profiles of indicators of birth defects and congenital heart defects were computed using a logistic regression model. Results Five discrete subpopulations of participants were identified as follows: No folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period (reference class, 21.37%); low maternal education level + unhealthy lifestyle (class 2, 39.75%); low maternal education level + unhealthy lifestyle + disease (class 3, 23.71%); unhealthy maternal lifestyle + advanced age (class 4, 4.71%); and multi-risk factor exposure (class 5, 10.45%). Compared with the reference subgroup, the other subgroups consistently had a significantly increased risk of birth defects (ORs and 95% CIs: class 2, 1.75 and 1.21–2.54; class 3, 3.13 and 2.17–4.52; class 4, 5.02 and 3.20–7.88; and class 5, 12.25 and 8.61–17.42, respectively). For congenital heart defects, the ORs and 95% CIs were all higher, and the magnitude of OR differences ranged from 1.59 to 16.15. Conclusions A comprehensive intervention strategy targeting maternal exposure to multiple risk factors is expected to show the strongest results in preventing birth defects. PMID:27183231

  18. Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, Douglas J.

    2007-03-31

    The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNC’s technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

  19. Respiratory Impairment and Systemic Inflammation in Cedar Asthmatics Removed from Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Chris; Dybuncio, Anne; Pui, Mandy M.; Chan-Yeung, Moira

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior research has shown that removing occupational asthmatics from exposure does not routinely lead to significant improvements in respiratory impairment. These studies were of limited duration and factors determining recovery remain obscure. Our objective was to evaluate residual respiratory impairment and associated sputum and blood biomarkers in subjects with Western red cedar asthma after exposure cessation. Methods Subjects previously diagnosed with cedar asthma, and removed from exposure to cedar dust for at least one year, were recruited. Subjects completed a questionnaire and spirometry. PC20 (methacholine concentration that produces 20% fall in FEV1 (forced expiratory volume at 1 second)) sputum cellularity and select Th1/Th2 (T helper cells 1 and 2) cytokine concentrations in peripheral blood were determined. The asthma impairment class was determined and multivariate analyses were performed to determine its relationship with sputum cell counts and serum cytokines. Results 40 non-smoking males (mean age 62) were examined at a mean interval of 25 years from cedar asthma diagnosis and 17 years from last cedar exposure. 40% were in impairment class 2/3. On average, the PC20 had increased by 2.0 mg/ml; the FEV1 decreased by 1.5 L, with greater decrease in those with greater impairment. Higher impairment was associated with serum interferon-gamma (mean = 1.3 pg/ml in class 2/3 versus 0.62 pg/ml in class 0/1, p = 0.04), mainly due to the FEV1 component (correlation with interferon-gamma = −0.46, p = 0.005). Conclusion Years after exposure cessation, patients with Western red cedar asthma have persistent airflow obstruction and respiratory impairment, associated with systemic inflammation. PMID:23468925

  20. Virtual leak channels modulate firing dynamics and synaptic integration in rat sympathetic neurons: implications for ganglionic transmission in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Mitchell G; Kullmann, Paul H M; Horn, John P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The excitability of rat sympathetic neurons and integration of nicotinic EPSPs were compared in primary cell culture and in the acutely isolated intact superior cervical ganglion using whole cell patch electrode recordings. When repetitive firing was classified by Hodgkin's criteria in cultured cells, 18% displayed tonic class 1 excitability, 36% displayed adapting class 2 excitability and 46% displayed phasic class 3 excitability. In the intact ganglion, 71% of cells were class 1 and 29% were class 2. This diverges from microelectrode reports that nearly 100% of superior cervical ganglion neurons show phasic class 3 firing. The hypothesis that the disparity between patch and microelectrode data arises from a shunt conductance was tested using the dynamic clamp in cell culture. Non-depolarizing shunts of 3–10 nS converted cells from classes 1 and 2 to class 3 dynamics with current–voltage relations that replicated microelectrode data. Primary and secondary EPSPs recorded from the intact superior cervical ganglion were modelled as virtual synapses in cell culture using the dynamic clamp. Stimulating sympathetic neurons with virtual synaptic activity, designed to replicate in vivo recordings of EPSPs in muscle vasoconstrictor neurons, produced a 2.4-fold amplification of presynaptic activity. This gain in postsynaptic output did not differ between neurons displaying the three classes of excitability. Mimicry of microelectrode damage by virtual leak channels reduced and eventually obliterated synaptic gain by inhibiting summation of subthreshold EPSPs. These results provide a framework for interpreting sympathetic activity recorded from intact animals and support the hypothesis that paravertebral ganglia function as activity-dependent amplifiers of spinal output from preganglionic circuitry. PMID:25398531