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Sample records for 96-well microplate reader

  1. Development of a fluorimetric multispecies 96-well micro-plate growth test for screening metal toxicity to phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, H.G.; Ruecker, N.J.; Cantin, I.A.; Nyholm, N.; Dal-Jensen, S.

    1995-12-31

    The rapid and cost-effective screening of industrial waste is an ideal approach to regulations that offer true protection of aquatic habitats. For these tests to be ecologically important protection of large groups of organisms is also essential. This can best be done by testing batteries of species. Photosynthetic organisms compose 99.9% of habitats as well as providing food for higher trophic levels. A test was developed that can accommodate the testing of most phytoplanktonic species irrespective of morphology (unicellular, multicellular, colonial, filamentous). Forty eight to 72 h growth tests were carried out with green algae, diatoms, and cyanobacteria. The algae were incubated with different levels of toxicants in 96-well microplates which were read in a 96-well fluorometric plate reader. Phytoplankton emitting low levels of fluorescence can be incubated with DCMU, which can increase the fluorescent signal 2 to 4 times. The data from the plate reader is transferred to a computer spreadsheet and inhibition levels are automatically calculated. Eleven metal mining wastes from across Canada were tested against this method using the following phytoplanktonic species: Selenastrum, Nannochloris (green algae), Nitzschia (diatom), Microcystis, and Pseudoanabaena (cyanobacteria). These wastes were also screened against Microtox. All wastes were highly toxic to the tested phytoplankton, but only 4 were toxic to Microtox{trademark}.

  2. Detection of enteroviruses in shellfish by fluorogenic polymerase chain reaction integrated with 96-well microplate scanning.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Y Carol; Baric, Ralph S

    2002-01-01

    A one-step procedure was developed to confirm viral targets by using a fluorometric 96-well microplate scanner following polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The fluorogenic PCR, integrated with fluorometric scanning, measured the end point fluorescence of viral PCR amplicon/probe hybrids and permitted the use of nonfluorogenic PCR conditions with addition of a Cy3 fluorophore-labeled linear probe for viruses. This linear probe generated higher ratios of viral signal-to-noise than a comparative beacon probe. Detection efficiency with a Cy3/quencher linear probe was comparable with Southern analysis at the level > or = 0.27 plaque-forming units (PFU) of poliovirus/PCR. For the reaction containing < 0.27 PFU, the fluorometric measurements of the first-round PCR viral amplicon were not as sensitive as Southern analysis; however, equivalent sensitivities were achieved with fluorogenic nested PCR. Concentrates of 11 oyster samples exposed to municipal sewage were tested for enteroviruses; the fluorogenic detection correlated 100% with Southern analysis. This method using fluorometric scanning of viral amplicon is simple; it requires neither continuously monitoring equipment nor redesigning PCR primers; and it accurately detects enteroviruses in oyster sample concentrates in less time than classic spectrophotometry or Southern analysis.

  3. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  4. Establishment and validation of a method for multi-dose irradiation of cells in 96-well microplates

    SciTech Connect

    Abatzoglou, Ioannis; Zois, Christos E.; Pouliliou, Stamatia

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We established a method for multi-dose irradiation of cell cultures within a 96-well plate. ► Equations to adjust to preferable dose levels are produced and provided. ► Up to eight different dose levels can be tested in one microplate. ► This method results in fast and reliable estimation of radiation dose–response curves. -- Abstract: Microplates are useful tools in chemistry, biotechnology and molecular biology. In radiobiology research, these can be also applied to assess the effect of a certain radiation dose delivered to the whole microplate, to test radio-sensitivity, radio-sensitization or radio-protection. Whether different radiation doses can be accurately applied to a single 96-well plate to further facilitate and accelerated research by one hand and spare funds on the other, is a question dealt in the current paper. Following repeated ion-chamber, TLD and radiotherapy planning dosimetry we established a method for multi-dose irradiation of cell cultures within a 96-well plate, which allows an accurate delivery of desired doses in sequential columns of the microplate. Up to eight different dose levels can be tested in one microplate. This method results in fast and reliable estimation of radiation dose–response curves.

  5. A highly sensitive and versatile virus titration assay in the 96-well microplate format.

    PubMed

    Borisevich, V; Nistler, R; Hudman, D; Yamshchikov, G; Seregin, A; Yamshchikov, V

    2008-02-01

    This report describes a fast, reproducible, inexpensive and convenient assay system for virus titration in the 96-well format. The micromethod substantially increases assay throughput and improves the data reproducibility. A highly simplified variant of virus quantification is based on immunohistochemical detection of virus amplification foci obtained without use of agarose or semisolid overlays. It can be incorporated into several types of routine virological assays successfully replacing the laborious and time-consuming conventional methods based on plaque formation under semisolid overlays. The method does not depend on the development of CPE and can be accommodated to assay viruses with substantial differences in growth properties. The use of enhanced immunohistochemical detection enabled a five- to six-fold reduction of the total assay time. The micromethod was specifically developed to take advantage of multichannel pipettor use to simplify handling of a large number of samples. The method performs well with an inexpensive low-power binocular, thus offering a routine assay system usable outside of specialized laboratory setting, such as for testing of clinical or field samples. When used in focus reduction-neutralization tests (FRNT), the method accommodates very small volumes of immune serum, which is often a decisive factor in experiments involving small rodent models.

  6. Facile preparation of glycoprotein-imprinted 96-well microplates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), as inexpensive and stable substitutes of antibodies, have shown great promise in immunoassays. Glycoproteins are of significant diagnostic value. To facilitate the application of MIPs in clinical diagnostics, a general and facile imprinting method toward glycoproteins oriented for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the form of a 96-well microplate is essential but has not been fully explored yet. In this study, a new method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting was proposed for facile preparation of glycoprotein-imprinted microplates. A template glycoprotein was first immobilized by a boronic acid-modified microplate through boronate affinity binding, and then, a thin layer of polyaniline was formed to cover the microplate surface via in-water self-copolymerization. After the template was removed by an acidic solution, 3D cavities that can rebind the template were fabricated on the microplate surface. Using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model target, the effects of imprinting conditions as well as the properties and performance of the prepared MIPs were investigated. α-Fetoprotein (AFP)-imprinted microplate was then prepared, and thereby, a MIP-based ELISA method was established. The prepared MIPs exhibited several highly favorable features, including excellent specificity, widely applicable binding pH, superb tolerance for interference, high binding strength, fast equilibrium kinetics, and reusability. The MIP-based ELISA method was finally applied to the analysis of AFP in human serum. The result was in good agreement with that by radioimmunoassay, showing a promising prospect of the proposed method in clinical diagnostics.

  7. GT1-7 cell-based cytoxicity screening assay on 96-well microplates as a platform for the safety assessment of genetically modified Gerbera hybrida extracts.

    PubMed

    Fallarero, Adyary; Ainasoja, Miia; Sandberg, Malena; Teeri, Teemu H; Vuorela, Pia M

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, a GT1-7 cell-based cytotoxicity screening assay in 96-well microplates was set up. The assay, using propidium iodide fluorescence, was proven to be reliable, with good quality (Z' = 0.51) and low plate-to-plate and day-to-day variations. Further on, a library containing extracts from 227 genetic modification (GM) Gerbera hybrida and 42 Gerbera varieties was screened; however, no differences between them were found. Based on these findings, we propose the use of the current assay within the first-tier screening studies of large collections. Also, these results provide valuable information for GM Gerbera risk-assessment purposes and offer a model for the toxicity cell-based screening of GM crops.

  8. Cellphone-based hand-held microplate reader for point-of-care ELISA testing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Y.; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microplate format has been a gold standard first-line clinical test for diagnosis of various diseases including infectious diseases. However, this technology requires a relatively large and expensive multi-well scanning spectrophotometer to read and quantify the signal from each well, hindering its implementation in resource-limited-settings. Here, we demonstrate a cost-effective and handheld smartphone-based colorimetric microplate reader for rapid digitization and quantification of immunoserology-related ELISA tests in a conventional 96-well plate format at the point of care (POC). This device consists of a bundle of 96 optical fibers to collect the transmitted light from each well of the microplate and direct all the transmission signals from the wells onto the camera of the mobile-phone. Captured images are then transmitted to a remote server through a custom-designed app, and both quantitative and qualitative diagnostic results are returned back to the user within ~1 minute per 96-well plate by using a machine learning algorithm. We tested this mobile-phone based micro-plate reader in a clinical microbiology lab using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests on 1138 remnant patient samples (roughly 50% training and 50% testing), and achieved an overall accuracy of ~99% or higher for each ELISA test. This handheld and cost-effective platform could be immediately useful for large-scale vaccination monitoring in low-infrastructure settings, and also for other high-throughput disease screening applications at POC.

  9. Development of a microplate reader compatible microfluidic chip for ELISA.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fenghua; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Jianping; Li, Xinchun; Yang, Xiujuan; Wang, Shuping; Cheng, Zhiyi

    2012-08-01

    We report a novel microfluidic device use for sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay assay (ELISA). The related procedures including the introduction of reagents, dilution and distribution of samples, as well as immobilization of enzyme can be readily carried out on a poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) chip. Particularly, this microfluidic chip comprising of two distinct parallel units, and has an identical dimension as a conventional microtiter plate, which offers access to the directly quantitative detection by the microplate reader. Gradient-concentration reacting solutions at six different concentrations level generated by the microfluidic channel network are simultaneously transported to 24 reaction chambers to form enzymatic products. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) and KH(2)PO(4) are used as enzyme-substrate-inhibitor model, to demonstrate the utility of the developed microchip-based enzyme inhibitor assay. Various conditions such as the surface treatment of chip channels, fluids velocities, substrate concentration, and buffer pH are investigated. The present microfluidic device for ELISA holds several advantages, for instance frugal usage of samples and reagents, less of operating time, favorably integrated configuration, ease of manipulation, and could be explored to a variety of high throughput drug screening. PMID:22526682

  10. Novel versatile smart phone based Microplate readers for on-site diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Wu, Ze; Li, Xiuqing; Yao, Cuize; Yu, Shiting; Xiao, Wei; Tang, Yong

    2016-07-15

    Microplate readers are important diagnostic instruments, used intensively for various readout test kits (biochemical analysis kits and ELISA kits). However, due to their expensive and non-portability, commercial microplate readers are unavailable for home testing, community and rural hospitals, especially in developing countries. In this study, to provide a field-portable, cost-effective and versatile diagnostic tool, we reported a novel smart phone based microplate reader. The basic principle of this devise relies on a smart phone's optical sensor that measures transmitted light intensities of liquid samples. To prove the validity of these devises, developed smart phone based microplate readers were applied to readout results of various analytical targets. These targets included analanine aminotransferase (ALT; limit of detection (LOD) was 17.54 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (AKP; LOD was 15.56 U/L), creatinine (LOD was 1.35μM), bovine serum albumin (BSA; LOD was 0.0041mg/mL), prostate specific antigen (PSA; LOD was 0.76pg/mL), and ractopamine (Rac; LOD was 0.31ng/mL). The developed smart phone based microplate readers are versatile, portable, and inexpensive; they are unique because of their ability to perform under circumstances where resources and expertize are limited.

  11. Development of Singlet Oxygen Absorption Capacity (SOAC) Assay Method Using a Microplate Reader.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shingo; Iwasaki-Kino, Yuko; Aizawa, Koichi; Terao, Junji; Mukai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new assay method that can quantify the singlet oxygen absorption capacity (SOAC) of natural antioxidants and food extracts was developed. The SOAC values were measured in ethanol-chloroform-D2O (50 + 50 + 1, v/v/v) solution at 35°C using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer equipped with a six-channel cell positioner and an electron-temperature control unit. In the present study, measurement of the SOAC values was performed for eight representative carotenoids and three vegetable extracts (tomato, carrot, and red paprika) using a versatile instrument, the microplate reader. A 24-well glass microplate was used for measurements because a plastic microplate, commonly used in the laboratory, dissolves in the ethanol-chloroform-D2O solution. The SOAC values of eight carotenoids and three vegetable extracts measured using a microplate reader were in good agreement with the corresponding values measured using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer, suggesting that the microplate reader is an applicable instrument for the measurement of reliable SOAC values for general antioxidants and food extracts in solution. PMID:26822807

  12. Development of LEDs-based microplate reader for bioanalytical assay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaruri, Sami D.; Katzlinger, Michael; Schinwald, Bernhard; Kronberger, Georg; Atzler, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The optical design for an LEDs-based microplate reader that can perform fluorescence intensity (top and bottom), absorbance, luminescence and time-resolved fluorescence measurements is described. The microplate reader is the first microplate reader in the marketplace that incorporates LEDs as excitation light sources. Absorbance measurements over the 0-3.5 optical density range for caffeine solution are presented. Additionally, fluorescence intensity readings collected at 535 and 625 nm from a green and a red RediPlateTM are reported. Furthermore, fluorescence decay lifetime measurements obtained for Eu (europium) and Sm (samarium) standard solutions using 370 nm excitation are presented. The microplate reader detection limits for the fluorescence intensity top, fluorescence intensity bottom, fluorescence polarization and time-resolved fluorescence modes are 1.5 fmol 100 µL-1 fluorescein (384-well plate), 25 fmol 100 µL-1 fluorescein (384-well plate), 5 mP at 10 nM fluorescein (black 384-well plate) and 30 amol 100 µL-1 europium solution (white 384-well plate), respectively.

  13. High-throughput measurements of the optical redox ratio using a commercial microplate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Taylor M.; Shah, Amy T.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for accurate, high-throughput, functional measures to gauge the efficacy of potential drugs in living cells. As an early marker of drug response in cells, cellular metabolism provides an attractive platform for high-throughput drug testing. Optical techniques can noninvasively monitor NADH and FAD, two autofluorescent metabolic coenzymes. The autofluorescent redox ratio, defined as the autofluorescence intensity of NADH divided by that of FAD, quantifies relative rates of cellular glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. However, current microscopy methods for redox ratio quantification are time-intensive and low-throughput, limiting their practicality in drug screening. Alternatively, high-throughput commercial microplate readers quickly measure fluorescence intensities for hundreds of wells. This study found that a commercial microplate reader can differentiate the receptor status of breast cancer cell lines (p<0.05) based on redox ratio measurements without extrinsic contrast agents. Furthermore, microplate reader redox ratio measurements resolve response (p<0.05) and lack of response (p>0.05) in cell lines that are responsive and nonresponsive, respectively, to the breast cancer drug trastuzumab. These studies indicate that the microplate readers can be used to measure the redox ratio in a high-throughput manner and are sensitive enough to detect differences in cellular metabolism that are consistent with microscopy results.

  14. Cellphone-Based Hand-Held Microplate Reader for Point-of-Care Testing of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Yan-Lok; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-08-25

    Standard microplate based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are widely utilized for various nanomedicine, molecular sensing, and disease screening applications, and this multiwell plate batched analysis dramatically reduces diagnosis costs per patient compared to nonbatched or nonstandard tests. However, their use in resource-limited and field-settings is inhibited by the necessity for relatively large and expensive readout instruments. To mitigate this problem, we created a hand-held and cost-effective cellphone-based colorimetric microplate reader, which uses a 3D-printed opto-mechanical attachment to hold and illuminate a 96-well plate using a light-emitting-diode (LED) array. This LED light is transmitted through each well, and is then collected via 96 individual optical fibers. Captured images of this fiber-bundle are transmitted to our servers through a custom-designed app for processing using a machine learning algorithm, yielding diagnostic results, which are delivered to the user within ∼1 min per 96-well plate, and are visualized using the same app. We successfully tested this mobile platform in a clinical microbiology laboratory using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests using a total of 567 and 571 patient samples for training and blind testing, respectively, and achieved an accuracy of 99.6%, 98.6%, 99.4%, and 99.4% for mumps, measles, HSV-1, and HSV-2 tests, respectively. This cost-effective and hand-held platform could assist health-care professionals to perform high-throughput disease screening or tracking of vaccination campaigns at the point-of-care, even in resource-poor and field-settings. Also, its intrinsic wireless connectivity can serve epidemiological studies, generating spatiotemporal maps of disease prevalence and immunity. PMID:26159546

  15. A suite of microplate reader-based colorimetric methods to quantify ammonium, nitrate, orthophosphate and silicate concentrations for aquatic nutrient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ringuet, Stephanie; Sassano, Lara; Johnson, Zackary I

    2011-02-01

    A sensitive, accurate and rapid analysis of major nutrients in aquatic systems is essential for monitoring and maintaining healthy aquatic environments. In particular, monitoring ammonium (NH(4)(+)) concentrations is necessary for maintenance of many fish stocks, while accurate monitoring and regulation of ammonium, orthophosphate (PO(4)(3-)), silicate (Si(OH)(4)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) concentrations are required for regulating algae production. Monitoring of wastewater streams is also required for many aquaculture, municipal and industrial wastewater facilities to comply with local, state or federal water quality effluent regulations. Traditional methods for quantifying these nutrient concentrations often require laborious techniques or expensive specialized equipment making these analyses difficult. Here we present four alternative microcolorimetric assays that are based on a standard 96-well microplate format and microplate reader that simplify the quantification of each of these nutrients. Each method uses small sample volumes (200 µL), has a detection limit ≤ 1 µM in freshwater and ≤ 2 µM in saltwater, precision of at least 8% and compares favorably with standard analytical procedures. Routine use of these techniques in the laboratory and at an aquaculture facility to monitor nutrient concentrations associated with microalgae growth demonstrates that they are rapid, accurate and highly reproducible among different users. These techniques offer an alternative to standard nutrient analyses and because they are based on the standard 96-well format, they significantly decrease the cost and time of processing while maintaining high precision and sensitivity.

  16. Validation and characterization of optical redox ratio measurements with a microplate reader in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Taylor M.; Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for accurate, high-throughput measures to gauge the efficacy of potential drugs in living cells. Metabolism is an early marker of drug response in cells, and NADH and FAD are autofluorescent cellular metabolic coenzymes that can be non-invasively monitored using optical techniques. Relative rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in a cell are quantified by the redox ratio, defined as the autofluorescence intensity of NADH divided by that of FAD. Microplate readers are high-throughput instruments that can rapidly measure NADH and FAD autofluorescence intensities for hundreds of wells, and are capable of identifying receptor status and resolving drug response in breast cancer cell lines. This study tests the accuracy and repeatability of plate reader experiments measuring the redox ratio in breast cancer cell lines. NADH and FAD fluorescence levels remained constant over the course of multiple measurements (p<0.1), ruling out the incidence of photobleaching. The contribution of media to background fluorescence signal was also investigated. Media fluorescence levels for both coenzymes were significantly lower (p<0.0001) than those from wells containing cells, and replacing the media with saline resulted in the same redox ratio trends among cell lines as initial measurements with media. Following treatment with carbonyl cyanide p-fluorodeoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, the redox ratio decreased (p<0.05), validating NADH and FAD as the primary fluorescence sources. These findings verify that autofluorescence measurements taken by microplate readers accurately and reliably characterize NADH and FAD fluorescence, validating their promise in the areas of metabolic monitoring and drug development.

  17. Upgrading a microplate reader for photobiology and all-optical experiments.

    PubMed

    Richter, Florian; Scheib, Ulrike S; Mehlhorn, Jennifer; Schubert, Roman; Wietek, Jonas; Gernetzki, Oliver; Hegemann, Peter; Mathes, Tilo; Möglich, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Automation can vastly reduce the cost of experimental labor and thus facilitate high experimental throughput, but little off-the-shelf hardware for the automation of illumination experiments is commercially available. Here, we use inexpensive open-source electronics to add programmable illumination capabilities to a multimode microplate reader. We deploy this setup to characterize light-triggered phenomena in three different sensory photoreceptors. First, we study the photoactivation of Arabidopsis thaliana phytochrome B by light of different wavelengths. Second, we investigate the dark-state recovery kinetics of the Synechocystis sp. blue-light sensor Slr1694 at multiple temperatures and imidazole concentrations; while the kinetics of the W91F mutant of Slr1694 are strongly accelerated by imidazole, the wild-type protein is hardly affected. Third, we determine the light response of the Beggiatoa sp. photoactivatable adenylate cyclase bPAC in Chinese hamster ovary cells. bPAC is activated by blue light in dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal intensity of 0.58 mW cm(-2); intracellular cAMP spikes generated upon bPAC activation decay with a half time of about 5 minutes after light switch-off. Taken together, we present a setup which is easily assembled and which thus offers a facile approach to conducting illumination experiments at high throughput, reproducibility and fidelity. PMID:25373866

  18. Upgrading a microplate reader for photobiology and all-optical experiments.

    PubMed

    Richter, Florian; Scheib, Ulrike S; Mehlhorn, Jennifer; Schubert, Roman; Wietek, Jonas; Gernetzki, Oliver; Hegemann, Peter; Mathes, Tilo; Möglich, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Automation can vastly reduce the cost of experimental labor and thus facilitate high experimental throughput, but little off-the-shelf hardware for the automation of illumination experiments is commercially available. Here, we use inexpensive open-source electronics to add programmable illumination capabilities to a multimode microplate reader. We deploy this setup to characterize light-triggered phenomena in three different sensory photoreceptors. First, we study the photoactivation of Arabidopsis thaliana phytochrome B by light of different wavelengths. Second, we investigate the dark-state recovery kinetics of the Synechocystis sp. blue-light sensor Slr1694 at multiple temperatures and imidazole concentrations; while the kinetics of the W91F mutant of Slr1694 are strongly accelerated by imidazole, the wild-type protein is hardly affected. Third, we determine the light response of the Beggiatoa sp. photoactivatable adenylate cyclase bPAC in Chinese hamster ovary cells. bPAC is activated by blue light in dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal intensity of 0.58 mW cm(-2); intracellular cAMP spikes generated upon bPAC activation decay with a half time of about 5 minutes after light switch-off. Taken together, we present a setup which is easily assembled and which thus offers a facile approach to conducting illumination experiments at high throughput, reproducibility and fidelity.

  19. [Automatic reading of ABO and Rh groups on microplates using FMC medium and an IBG Systems reader].

    PubMed

    Mauri, J; Maymo, R M; Pérez, M A; Yusta, V; Mas, J; Puig, L

    1991-06-01

    We present in this paper our experience in the routine use of an automatic reader for microtiter plates (IBG Systems). A total of 2044 samples from blood donors have been tested for ABO (haematic and seric) and Rh (D antigen) blood group typing. The red blood cell samples have been tested against monoclonal anti-A, anti-B, anti-AB and anti-Rh 1 (D) sera (using two different anti-D reagents). As a negative control, 3% albumin solution was employed. In order to determine the seric groups, the plasma samples were tested against A1, A2, B and 0 cells. In all cases the red cells were suspended in Ficoll 400R-Methyl cellulose (FMC), and 0.01 Bromelin was added to red blood cell samples to be typed. The obstacles in the automatic readings were mainly solved by visual reading of the microplates. In the 2,044 samples analysed with the automatic reader, 19 discrepancies (0.94%) were found in ABO typing. In all cases the error was in the seric blood group. Three false positive reactions were found with 0 red cells. Two false negative with B red cells, interpreted by the automatic reader as doubtful results. Three positive readings were detected, in one case the positivity was due to alloantibodies (C + D specificities), the other two cases were autoagglutinations. False negative reactions were found, in 11 cases, 8 of them due to lipaemia and the remaining three were haemolysed plasma samples. It should be stressed that out of 19 cases of discrepancy, only 5 (0.24%) were due to the automatic reader while the remaining were due, to sample troubles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Toward Microbioreactor Arrays: A Slow-Responding Oxygen Sensor for Monitoring of Microbial Cultures in Standard 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Glauche, Florian; John, Gernot T; Arain, Sarina; Knepper, Andreas; Neubauer, Antje; Goelling, Detlef; Lang, Christine; Violet, Norman; King, Rudibert; Neubauer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a slow-responding chemo-optical sensor for dissolved oxygen (DO) integrated into a 96-well plate was developed. The slow response time ensures that the measured oxygen value does not change much during plate transport to the microplate reader. The sensor therefore permits at-line DO measurement of microbial cultures. Moreover, it eliminates the necessity of individual optical measurement systems for each culture plate, as many plates can be measured successively. Combined with the 96-well format, this increases the experimental throughput enormously. The novel sensor plate (Slow OxoPlate) consists of fluorophores suspended in a polymer matrix that were placed into u-bottom 96-well plates. Response time was measured using sodium sulfite, and a t90 value of 9.7 min was recorded. For application, DO values were then measured in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures grown under fed-batch-like conditions. Depending on the DO sensor's response time, different information on the oxygenation state of the culture plate was obtained: a fast sensor variant detects disturbance through sampling, whereas the slow sensor indicates oxygen limitation during incubation. A combination of the commercially available OxoPlate and the Slow OxoPlate enables operators of screening facilities to validate their cultivation procedures with regard to oxygen availability. PMID:25720599

  1. Toward Microbioreactor Arrays: A Slow-Responding Oxygen Sensor for Monitoring of Microbial Cultures in Standard 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Glauche, Florian; John, Gernot T; Arain, Sarina; Knepper, Andreas; Neubauer, Antje; Goelling, Detlef; Lang, Christine; Violet, Norman; King, Rudibert; Neubauer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a slow-responding chemo-optical sensor for dissolved oxygen (DO) integrated into a 96-well plate was developed. The slow response time ensures that the measured oxygen value does not change much during plate transport to the microplate reader. The sensor therefore permits at-line DO measurement of microbial cultures. Moreover, it eliminates the necessity of individual optical measurement systems for each culture plate, as many plates can be measured successively. Combined with the 96-well format, this increases the experimental throughput enormously. The novel sensor plate (Slow OxoPlate) consists of fluorophores suspended in a polymer matrix that were placed into u-bottom 96-well plates. Response time was measured using sodium sulfite, and a t90 value of 9.7 min was recorded. For application, DO values were then measured in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures grown under fed-batch-like conditions. Depending on the DO sensor's response time, different information on the oxygenation state of the culture plate was obtained: a fast sensor variant detects disturbance through sampling, whereas the slow sensor indicates oxygen limitation during incubation. A combination of the commercially available OxoPlate and the Slow OxoPlate enables operators of screening facilities to validate their cultivation procedures with regard to oxygen availability.

  2. Electrothermal micromixing in 96 well plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Loire, Sophie; Mezic, Igor

    2011-11-01

    Diagnostic and pharmacology processes could be greatly accelerated by appropriate mixing. Here electrothermal flows are explored to provide mixing of conductive physiological solutions (=1.6 S/m) in a 96 well plate. Three interdigitated electrodes provide an electric field (< 15Vpp, 1MHz) beneath each well. Polarization and conduction phenomenon of the fluid in a well will be first modeled numerically and compared to an electrical circuit model. Due to high conductivity and permittivity of the fluid, the impedance of the array of filled wells collapse dramatically (96 wells: R = 1Ohm, C=250nF). The power supply challenges accordingly raised by arrays of electrothermal micromixers will be then analyzed. The efficiency of different methods of mixing in those wells will be also compared: the addition of low frequency signal leading to AC electro-osmotic perturbations, a blinking vortices method. The experimental results will be compared to simulations.

  3. Parabolic growth patterns in 96-well plate cell growth experiments.

    PubMed

    Faessel, H M; Levasseur, L M; Slocum, H K; Greco, W R

    1999-05-01

    In preparing for the routine use of the ubiquitous in vitro cell growth inhibition assay for the study of anticancer agents, we characterized the statistical properties of the assay and found some surprising results. Parabolic well-to-well cell growth patterns were discovered, which could profoundly affect the results of routine growth inhibition studies of anticancer and other agents. Four human ovarian cell lines, A2780/WT, A2780/DX5, A2780/DX5B, and A121, and one human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cell line, HCT-8, were seeded into plastic 96-well plates with a 12-channel pipette, without drugs, and grown from 1-5 d. The wells were washed with a plate washer, cells stained with sulforhodamine B (SRB), and dye absorbance measured with a plate reader. Variance models were fit to the data from replicates to determine the nature of the heteroscedastic error structure. Exponential growth models were fit to data to estimate doubling times for each cell line. Polynomial models were fit to data from 10-plate stacks of 96-well plates to explore nonuniformity of cell growth in wells in different regions of the stacks. Each separate step in the assay was examined for precision, patterns, and underlying causes of variation. Differential evaporation of water from wells is likely a major, but not exclusive, contributor to the systematic well-to-well cell growth patterns. Because the fundamental underlying causes of the parabolic growth patterns were not conclusively found, a randomization step for the growth assay was developed.

  4. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds.

  5. Microplate well coverage mixing using superhydrophobic contact.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Thach; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Lye, Jonathan Kok Keung; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2012-11-01

    Two important challenges in microplate instrumentation are to achieve full well sample coverage and complete mixing. An effective approach of using superhydrophobic rods to accomplish these challenges is reported here. Experiments conducted showed that analytes above 50μl could be made to completely cover the bottom of 96-well standard and transparency microplates. Complete mixing was accomplished by moving the rod parallel to the well bottom while contacting the liquid. The approach is simple and controlled, and it minimizes the problems of spillage and cross-contamination. It works with analytes with varied volumes and of different viscosities present in each well of the microplate. PMID:22864233

  6. Dynamics of Microplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, E.; Katz, R.

    2005-12-01

    Rotating, growing microplates are observed in a wax analog model of sea-floor spreading. We show that wax microplates are kinematically similar to sea-floor tectonic microplates in terms of spreading rate, growth rate and their characteristic spiral pseudofault geometry. We propose a theory for the formation of microplates.

  7. 96-well microtiter plates for biofouling simulation in biomedical settings.

    PubMed

    Gomes, L C; Moreira, J M R; Teodósio, J S; Araújo, J D P; Miranda, J M; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2014-01-01

    Microtiter plates with 96 wells are routinely used in biofilm research mainly because they enable high-throughput assays. These platforms are used in a variety of conditions ranging from static to dynamic operation using different shaking frequencies and orbital diameters. The main goals of this work were to assess the influence of nutrient concentration and flow conditions on biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in microtiter plates and to define the operational conditions to be used in order to simulate relevant biomedical scenarios. Assays were performed in static mode and in incubators with distinct orbital diameters using different concentrations of glucose, peptone and yeast extract. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the flow inside the wells for shaking frequencies ranging from 50 to 200 rpm and orbital diameters from 25 to 100 mm. Higher glucose concentrations enhanced adhesion of E. coli in the first 24 h, but variation in peptone and yeast extract concentration had no significant impact on biofilm formation. Numerical simulations indicate that 96-well microtiter plates can be used to simulate a variety of biomedical scenarios if the operating conditions are carefully set.

  8. Laboratory evaluation of a SpectraMax microplate reader and test strips for field measurement of creatinine in spot urine samples in the event of a radiological accident.

    PubMed

    Daka, Joseph N; Moodie, Gerry; Li, Chunsheng; Wilkins, Ruth; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-08-01

    The fear that terrorists might use radiological or nuclear (RN) devices to attack others is a new but growing phenomenon, arising mainly from the events of 11 September 2001. Research on rapid analytical methods that can allow analyses of large numbers of people who may become internally contaminated with radionuclides due to a RN accident is still limited. To contribute to this bioassay capacity for emergency response, the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada has identified and evaluated two new portable SpectraMax plate readers (model 250 and Plus 384) and one brand of dry reagent strips for rapid measurement of creatinine in spot urine samples. Concentrations of creatinine in spot urine samples provide a means of adjusting or normalizing urine collections to 24 h, upon which accurate internal dose assessments due to the radionuclides can be made. Preliminary test results of the devices showed the two SpectraMax plate readers and the TECO dry creatinine reagent strips were portable, rapid and reliable for urinary creatinine measurements in spot samples, suggesting they can be used in rapid dose screening of people.

  9. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  10. Rapid acid digestion and simple microplate method for milk iodine determination.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Ordookhani, Arash; Daneshpour, Maryam Sadat; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2007-01-01

    Iodine deficiency leads to deficiency of thyroid hormones, which causes mental retardation in infant. Laboratory confirmation is important in its diagnosis. The major problems associated with the existing methods for iodine determination in milk samples are: 1) nonsafe alkaline solution; 2) harsh thermal condition; and 3) extra time required to complete various steps. In this study, a simple and rapid colorimetric method was investigated, which used acid digestion in combination with a rapid microplate reading format method to determine the total iodine content in milk. Sample digestion was done on 50 microL milk in metavanadate/perchloric, at 230 degrees C for 10 min. After digestion, iodine determination was based on the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction. The reaction results were read in 96-well microplates by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reader. The determination range of the assay was between 2 and 40 microg/dL. The within-run coefficient of variation percent in three levels (3, 12, and 36 microg/dL) ranged from 6.7 to 9.3 and between-run coefficients of variation ranged from 8.6 to 12.3%. The results obtained (n=70) by the optimized method have good correlation with the results of alkaline incineration as a reference method (n=70; r2=0.907; y=0.952x+1.77). Recovery tests for accuracy assessment in six levels from 6.2 to 34.2 microg/dL) were between 91.3 and 113%. This method has enabled us to achieve 0.12 microg/dL sensitivity. The results of this study show that a quick acid digestion combined with mild thermal and low sample volume with a quick reading of assay results were the main advantages of the acid digestion and microplate reading format. PMID:17847102

  11. The Galapagos Microplate Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Schouten, H.; Cann, J. R.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Mitchell, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    We report a new bathymetry survey of the Galapagos microplate (GMP), which separates the Pacific, Nazca, and Cocos plates at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Prior to the formation of the microplate, 1.5-1.0 Ma, there was a succession of transient minor rifts forming triple junctions north and south of the propagating Cocos-Nazca rift (see Schouten et al. abstract). As proposed by Lonsdale (1988) the formation of a large near-axis seamount coincided with the initiation of the GMP and stabilized rifting on its southern boundary, now called Dietz Deep Rift. Lonsdale also proposed that the GMP was rotating clockwise at 6 degrees/my. Schouten et al. (1993) and Klein et al. (2005) applied an edge-driven microplate model to the GMP to understand its kinematics and predicted rotation rates of 30-40 degrees/my and 22 degrees/my, respectively. These interpretations and predictions were based on sparse bathymetry data. In early 2009 (AT 15-41), we mapped the Galapagos microplate in its entirety to understand more fully the conditions that led to the stabilization of the southern triple junction at Dietz Deep Rift and to constrain the rotation rate of the microplate. Our new data show the two highly contrasted sections of Dietz Deep Rift. The northeastern section contains Dietz Deep, a 2 km deep basin, within a fault-dominated rift valley about 20 km wide; subsidiary rifts occur to the south. Sidescan data indicate that extension in this broadly rifted area has been largely amagmatic. The southwestern section of Dietz Deep Rift is dominated by a variety of volcanic constructions in which faulting plays a minor part. The volcanism has resulted in two large seamounts and a number of volcanic ridges running parallel to the fault dominated rift valley. The largest volcanic ridge is steep-sided and straight, and extends to intersect the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 1 10’N to form the triple junction. Other minor volcanic ridges occur in the SW section of the microplate fanning

  12. Calcofluor fluorescence assay for wort beta-glucan in a microplate format

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widely-used fluorescent (Calcofluor) flow injection analysis method for determining the concentrations of beta-glucans in Congress worts from barley malts is adapted to microplate format. Adaptation of the Calcofluor assay to use widely available fluorescent microplate readers makes the assay m...

  13. Tectonic microplates: laying it down on wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. R.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2008-12-01

    We present a wax analogue model of sea-floor spreading that produces rotating, growing microplates. Wax microplates are kinematically similar to sea-floor tectonic microplates in terms of spreading rate and growth rate. Furthermore, their spiral pseudofault geometry is quantitatively consistent with Schouten's oceanic microplate model. These results suggest that Schouten's edge-driven microplate model captures the kinematics of tectonic microplate evolution on Earth. We propose a theory for the formation of microplates.

  14. Transparency-based microplates for fluorescence quantification.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Diep, Vu; Ng, Tuck Wah; Liew, Oi Wah

    2012-03-01

    Microplates for use in resource-limited laboratories should ideally not require processes that involve substantial large-scale production in order to be viable. We describe and demonstrate here an approach of using a silicone sheet with holes, conveniently cut out precisely using an inexpensive cutting plotter to correspond with regions where liquid is to be dispensed, and attaching it to a transparency to create very thin well arrays. With this, the contact angle hysteresis behavior of liquid could be harnessed to produce taller drop shapes so that the fiber probe used could read in the emitted light more effectively. Experimentation conducted revealed fluorescence measurements that were significantly more sensitive than standard microplates, notwithstanding that smaller volumes of liquid were needed. This was achieved using both the fiber optic and imaging evaluation modes. The two methods investigated, one with a lid placed and one without, showed the latter to produce marginally more sensitive readings as opposed to improved immunity from the environment with the former. These favorable measurement characteristics were found to be achievable with an estimated production cost of AU $0.40 and fabrication times of 3.5 min (96 wells) and 6.5 min (384 wells) per plate. PMID:22266206

  15. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid and sensitive detection of organophosphate insecticides using a 96 well plate format is reported. Several features of this assay make it attractive for development as a laboratory-based or field screening assay. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was stabilized in a gelati...

  16. An improved 96-well turbidity assay for T4 lysozyme activity.

    PubMed

    Toro, Tasha B; Nguyen, Thao P; Watt, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    T4 lysozyme (T4L) is an important model system for investigating the relationship between protein structure and function. Despite being extensively studied, a reliable, quantitative activity assay for T4L has not been developed. Here, we present an improved T4L turbidity assay as well as an affinity-based T4L expression and purification protocol. This assay is designed for 96-well format and utilizes conditions amenable for both T4L and other lysozymes. This protocol enables easy, efficient, and quantitative characterization of T4L variants and allows comparison between different lysozymes. Our method: •Is applicable for all lysozymes, with enhanced sensitivity for T4 lysozyme compared to other 96-well plate turbidity assays;•Utilizes standardized conditions for comparing T4 lysozyme variants and other lysozymes; and•Incorporates a simplified expression and purification protocol for T4 lysozyme.

  17. FIPRONIL EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE COPEPOD (AMPHIASCUS TENUIREMIS) DEVELOPMENT, FERTILITY, AND REPRODUCTION: A RAPID LIFE-CYCLE ASSAY IN 96-WELL MICROPLATE FORMAT. (R827397)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  19. 96-well format-based microfluidic platform for parallel interconnection of multiple multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Fluri, David A; Kelm, Jens M; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform, compatible with conventional 96-well formats, that enables facile and parallelized culturing and testing of spherical microtissues in a standard incubator. The platform can accommodate multiple microtissues (up to 66) of different cell types, formed externally by using the hanging-drop method, and enables microtissue interconnection through microfluidic channels for continuous media perfusion or dosage of substances. The platform contains 11 separate channels, and each channel has six tissue compartments. Primary rat liver tissues were cultured over 8 days, and multiple tumor tissues (HCT116) were exposed to various concentrations of 5-fluorouracil for platform characterization.

  20. Stretch Injury of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neurons in a 96 Well Format

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Sydney A.; Phillips, Jack K.; Costa, J. Tighe; Cho, Frances S.; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Finan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with limited therapeutic options. Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is an important component of TBI pathology. It is difficult to reproduce TAI in animal models of closed head injury, but in vitro stretch injury models reproduce clinical TAI pathology. Existing in vitro models employ primary rodent neurons or human cancer cell line cells in low throughput formats. This in vitro neuronal stretch injury model employs human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons (hiPSCNs) in a 96 well format. Silicone membranes were attached to 96 well plate tops to create stretchable, culture substrates. A custom-built device was designed and validated to apply repeatable, biofidelic strains and strain rates to these plates. A high content approach was used to measure injury in a hypothesis-free manner. These measurements are shown to provide a sensitive, dose-dependent, multi-modal description of the response to mechanical insult. hiPSCNs transition from healthy to injured phenotype at approximately 35% Lagrangian strain. Continued development of this model may create novel opportunities for drug discovery and exploration of the role of human genotype in TAI pathology. PMID:27671211

  1. Biofilm Localization in the Vertical Wall of Shaking 96-Well Plates

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Luciana C.; Moreira, Joana M. R.; Simões, Manuel; Melo, Luís F.; Mergulhão, Filipe J.

    2014-01-01

    Microtiter plates with 96 wells are being increasingly used for biofilm studies due to their high throughput, low cost, easy handling, and easy application of several analytical methods to evaluate different biofilm parameters. These methods provide bulk information about the biofilm formed in each well but lack in detail, namely, regarding the spatial location of the biofilms. This location can be obtained by microscopy observation using optical and electron microscopes, but these techniques have lower throughput and higher cost and are subjected to equipment availability. This work describes a differential crystal violet (CV) staining method that enabled the determination of the spatial location of Escherichia coli biofilms formed in the vertical wall of shaking 96-well plates. It was shown that the biofilms were unevenly distributed on the wall with denser cell accumulation near the air-liquid interface. The results were corroborated by scanning electron microscopy and a correlation was found between biofilm accumulation and the wall shear strain rates determined by computational fluid dynamics. The developed method is quicker and less expensive and has a higher throughput than the existing methods available for spatial location of biofilms in microtiter plates. PMID:24834360

  2. Quantification of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus with an immunological focus assay in 24- or 96-well plates.

    PubMed

    Battegay, M; Cooper, S; Althage, A; Bänziger, J; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M

    1991-06-01

    Titers of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) were determined on adherent fibroblast cell lines in 24- or 96-well plates. After absorption of virus by cells and 48 h incubation under a methylcellulose overlay, cell monolayers were fixed with 4% formaldehyde in phosphate-buffered saline, permeabilized by incubation in 0.5% Triton X-100 in balanced salt solution and then stained with a monoclonal rat anti-LCMV and a peroxidase-labeled second stage antibody. The sensitivity of the assay is within a factor of 2-4 of conventional plaquing methods. The method also detects poorly or non-plaquing LCMV isolates, and therefore drastically reduces the need for titration of LCMV in mice. The method is quicker (2-3 days), as compared to conventional methods (4-6 days) and less expensive in terms of work and materials.

  3. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3-4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15-50 mL) or small bottles. PMID:26818699

  4. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3–4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15–50 mL) or small bottles. PMID:26818699

  5. A solid-phase Bcr-Abl kinase assay in 96-well hydrogel plates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Mand, Michael R; Veach, Darren R; Parker, Laurie L; Clarkson, Bayard; Kron, Stephen J

    2008-04-01

    Regulated phosphorylation by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), such as c-Abl, is critical to cellular homeostasis. In turn, once deregulated as in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) fusion protein Bcr-Abl, PTKs can promote cancer onset and progression. The dramatic success of the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib as therapy for CML has inspired interest in other PTKs as targets for cancer drug discovery. Here we report a novel PTK activity and inhibition screening method using hydrogel-immobilized peptide substrates. Using acrylate crosslinkers, we tether peptides via terminal cysteines to thiol-presenting hydrogels in 96-well plates. These surfaces display low background and high reproducibility, allowing semiquantitative detection of peptide phosphorylation by recombinant c-Abl or by Bcr-Abl activity in cell extracts using traditional anti-phosphotyrosine immunodetection and chemifluorescence. The capabilities of this assay are demonstrated by performing model screens for inhibition with several commercially available PTK inhibitors and a collection of pyridopyrimidine Src/Abl dual inhibitors. This assay provides a practical method to measure the activity of a single kinase present in a whole cell lysate with high sensitivity and specificity as a valuable means for efficient small molecule screening.

  6. Development of a quantitative 96-well method to image glycogen storage in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilling, James; Garside, Helen; Ainscow, Edward

    2010-08-01

    Within the liver, hormonal control of glycogen metabolism allows for rapid release and uptake of glucose from the circulation, providing a reserve of glucose that can be utilised by other organs. Traditionally, cellular glycogen storage has been detected using Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining of histopathology samples or a biochemical assay. Colorimetric measurement of glycogen content using PAS staining is hard to quantify whilst biochemical techniques give limited information about events such as cytotoxicity or allow analysis of hepatic heterogeneity. Here, we describe the development of an imaging based method to quantify glycogen storage in 96-well cultures of primary rat hepatocytes using the inherent fluorescence properties of the Schiff reagent. PAS-stained hepatocytes were imaged using an automated fluorescent microscope, with the amount of glycogen present in each cell being quantified. Using this technique, we found an increase in glycogen storage in response to insulin (EC50 = 0.31 nM) that was in agreement with that determined using biochemical quantification (EC50 = 0.32 nM). Furthermore, a dose dependent increase in glycogen storage was also seen in response to glycogen synthase kinase inhibitors and glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors. This technique allows rapid assessment of cellular glycogen storage in response to hormones and small molecule inhibitors.

  7. Automated expression and solubility screening of His-tagged proteins in 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Canaan, Stéphane; Offant, Julien; Cambillau, Christian; Bignon, Christophe

    2005-11-01

    A growing need for sensitive and high-throughput methods for screening the expression and solubility of recombinant proteins exists in structural genomics. Originally, the emergency solution was to use immediately available techniques such as manual lysis of expression cells followed by analysis of protein expression by gel electrophoresis. However, these handmade methods quickly proved to be unfit for the high-throughput demand of postgenomics, and it is now generally accepted that the long-term solution to this problem will be based on automation, on industrial standard-formatted experiments, and on downsizing samples and consumables. In agreement with this consensus, we have set up a fully automated method based on a dot-blot technology and using 96-well format consumables for assessing by immunodetection the amount of total and soluble recombinant histidine (His)-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. The method starts with the harvest of expression cells and ends with the display of solubility/expression results in milligrams of recombinant protein per liter of culture using a three-color code to assist analysis. The program autonomously processes 160 independent cultures at a time.

  8. Fluorinert, an oxygen carrier, improves cell culture performance in deep square 96-well plates by facilitating oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron; Condon, Russell G G; Keil, Gregory; Jhaveri, Nikita; Liu, Zhong; Tsao, Yung-Shyeng

    2012-01-01

    In bioprocess development, the 96-well plate format has been widely used for high-throughput screening of production cell line or culture conditions. However, suspension cell cultures in conventional 96-well plates often fail to reach high cell density under normal agitation presumably due to constraints in oxygen transfer. Although more vigorous agitation can improve gas transfer in 96-well plate format, it often requires specialized instruments. In this report, we employed Fluorinert, a biologically inert perfluorocarbon, to improve oxygen transfer in 96-well plate and to enable the growth of a Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody. When different amounts of Fluorinert were added to the cell culture medium, a dose-dependent improvement in cell growth was observed in both conventional and deep square 96-well plates. When sufficient Fluorinert was present in the culture, the cell growth rate, the peak cell density, and recombinant protein production levels achieved in deep square 96-wells were comparable to cultures in ventilated shake flasks. Although Fluorinert is known to dissolve gases such as oxygen and CO(2), it does not dissolve nor extract medium components, such as glucose, lactate, or amino acids. We conclude that mixing Fluorinert with culture media is a suitable model for miniaturization of cell line development and process optimization. Proper cell growth and cellular productivity can be obtained with a standard shaker without the need for any additional aeration or vigorous agitation. PMID:21954223

  9. Macroscale versus microscale methods for physiological analysis of biofilms formed in 96-well microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Gomes, L C; Moreira, J M R; Miranda, J M; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2013-12-01

    Microtiter plates with 96 wells have become one of the preferred platforms for biofilm studies mainly because they enable high-throughput assays. In this work, macroscale and microscale methods were used to study the impact of hydrodynamic conditions on the physiology and location of Escherichia coli JM109(DE3) biofilms formed in microtiter plates. Biofilms were formed in shaking and static conditions, and two macroscale parameters were assayed: the total amount of biofilm was measured by the crystal violet assay and the metabolic activity was determined by the resazurin assay. From the macroscale point of view, there were no statistically significant differences between the biofilms formed in static and shaking conditions. However, at a microscale level, the differences between both conditions were revealed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was observed that biofilm morphology and spatial distribution along the wall were different in these conditions. Simulation of the hydrodynamic conditions inside the wells at a microscale was performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These simulations showed that the shear strain rate was unevenly distributed on the walls during shaking conditions and that regions of higher shear strain rate were obtained closer to the air/liquid interface. Additionally, it was shown that wall regions subjected to higher shear strain rates were associated with the formation of biofilms containing cells of smaller size. Conversely, regions with lower shear strain rate were prone to have a more uniform spatial distribution of adhered cells of larger size. The results presented on this work highlight the wealth of information that may be gathered by complementing macroscale approaches with a microscale analysis of the experiments. PMID:24140575

  10. Human tear analysis with miniaturized multiplex cytokine assay on “wall-less” 96-well plate

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Joanne; Tong, Louis; Kim, Namyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tears are a particularly limited body fluid and commonly used in the diagnosis of patients who have ocular diseases. A popular method for analysis of ocular inflammation in tears uses Luminex® bead multiplex technology to generate valuable multiple cytokine profile outputs with 25–50 µl tear sample volume. We propose a method for measuring tear cytokines with 5 μl tear sample volume and 80% reduced Luminex reagents compared to previous protocols. Methods Using human tears pooled from 1,000 participants, the DA-Bead-based method running at 5–20 µl volume, using manual pipetting, in conjunction with a magnetic Luminex cytokine (four-plex) panel assay in a 96-well format was performed and validated for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Results Upon use of the DA-Bead method at the 5 μl volume with cytokine standards, the concentrations of each of the four cytokines were found to be linear over a range of 3.5–4 log pg/ml with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ≤5%, inter-assay %CV ≤10%, and accuracy within the 70–130% range. Upon use of a 5 µl healthy pooled tear sample, cytokine concentrations were detected with a precision intra-assay %CV ˂ 20% for IL-6, IFN-γ, or TNF-α or 30.37% with IL-1β. The inter-assay %CV with tears was ≤20.84% for all cytokines. Tear volumes run at 5 μl on DA-Bead produced a similar cytokine expression profile at a 1-month interval and were highly correlated with the larger 10 μl–based tear sample volume cytokine profile with R2 = 0.98. Conclusions DA-Bead assay is highly sensitive and reproducible and has a performance profile that is potentially suitable for use in standard clinical scenarios. Considering the use of as little as 5 µl of assay beads and 5 µl sample, this is also likely to reduce the assay cost significantly and ease diagnosis of patients with ocular diseases. PMID:26539027

  11. Adjustable bioadhesive control of PEGylated hyperbranch brushes on polystyrene microplate interface for the improved sensitivity of human blood typing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Wen; Chang, Yung; Lee, Rong-Ho; Li, Wen-Tyng; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Hsiue, Ging-Ho

    2014-08-01

    A PEGylated 96-well polystyrene (PS) microplate was first introduced for applications in high-throughput screening for selective blood typing to minimize the risks in blood transfusions. Herein, we present a hemocompatible PS 96-well microplate with adjustable PEGylated hyperbranch brush coverage prepared by ozone pretreated activation and thermally induced surface PEGylation. The grafting properties, hydration capacity, and blood compatibility of the PEGylated hyperbrush immobilized PS surfaces in human blood were illustrated by the combined chemical and physical properties of the surface, and the dependence of the specific absorption of human plasma fibrinogen onto the PEGylated surfaces on the grafting density was analyzed by monoclonal antibodies. The surface coverage of PEGylated brushes plays a major role in the bioadhesive properties of modified PS microplates, which in turn control the level of agglutination sensitivity in blood typing. The bioadhesive resistance toward proteins, platelets, and erythrocytes in human whole blood showed a correlation to the controlled hydration properties of the PEGylated hyperbrush-modified surfaces. Therefore, we suggested that the surface coverage of PEGylated hyperbrushes on PS surfaces can increase the sensitivity of cross-matching blood agglutination by up to 16-fold compared to that of the conventional 96-well virgin PS due to the regulated biorecognition of hematocrit and antibodies of the PEGylated hyperbrush-modified surfaces. PMID:25022949

  12. MStern Blotting-High Throughput Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membrane-Based Proteomic Sample Preparation for 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sebastian T; Ahmed, Saima; Muntel, Jan; Cuevas Polo, Nerea; Bachur, Richard; Kentsis, Alex; Steen, Judith; Steen, Hanno

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 96-well plate compatible membrane-based proteomic sample processing method, which enables the complete processing of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) within a single workday. This method uses a large-pore hydrophobic PVDF membrane that efficiently adsorbs proteins, resulting in fast liquid transfer through the membrane and significantly reduced sample processing times. Low liquid transfer speeds have prevented the useful 96-well plate implementation of FASP as a widely used membrane-based proteomic sample processing method. We validated our approach on whole-cell lysate and urine and cerebrospinal fluid as clinically relevant body fluids. Without compromising peptide and protein identification, our method uses a vacuum manifold and circumvents the need for digest desalting, making our processing method compatible with standard liquid handling robots. In summary, our new method maintains the strengths of FASP and simultaneously overcomes one of the major limitations of FASP without compromising protein identification and quantification. PMID:26223766

  13. A semistatic microplate-based phytotoxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Radetski, C.M.; Ferard, J.F. . Centre des Sciences de l'Environnement); Blaise, C. )

    1995-02-01

    A novel phytotoxicity test is described herein that employs a microplate equipped with membrane-bottomed wells. This MultiScreen[trademark] (Millipore Corp., Bedford, MA) microplate allows performance of a semistatic algal test, in which test medium is renewed periodically. With such a design, the algal test becomes comparable to other short-term tests used to evaluate chronic toxicity of chemicals and effluents. The EC50s obtained for Cu[sup 2+], Cd[sup 2+], Cr[sup 6+], atrazine, and one leachate sample (municipal sludge incinerator residue) with static and semistatic algal microplate tests were compared in this study. The semistatic microplate test revealed greater sensitivity than did the static microplate test.

  14. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  15. Seismicity of the Adriatic microplate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Console, R.; Di, Giovambattista R.; Favali, P.; Presgrave, B.W.; Smriglio, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Adriatic microplate was previously considered to be a unique block, tectonically active only along its margins. The seismic sequences that took place in the basin from 1986 to 1990 give new information about the geodynamics of this area. Three subsets of well recorded events were relocated by the joint hypocentre determination technique. On the whole, this seismic activity was concentrated in a belt crossing the southern Adriatic sea around latitude 42??, in connection with regional E-W fault systems. Some features of this seismicity, similar to those observed in other well known active margins of the Adriatic plate, support a model of a southern Adriatic lithospheric block, detached from the Northern one. Other geophysical information provides evidence of a transitional zone at the same latitude. ?? 1993.

  16. A 96-well screen filter plate for high-throughput biological sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sean X; Cousineau, Martin; Juzwin, Stephen J; Ritchie, David M

    2006-01-01

    A novel 96-well screen filter plate (patent pending) has been invented to eliminate a time-consuming and labor-intensive step in preparation of in vivo study samples--to remove blood or plasma clots. These clots plug the pipet tips during a manual or automated sample-transfer step causing inaccurate pipetting or total pipetting failure. Traditionally, these blood and plasma clots are removed by picking them out manually one by one from each sample tube before any sample transfer can be made. This has significantly slowed the sample preparation process and has become a bottleneck for automated high-throughput sample preparation using robotic liquid handlers. Our novel screen filter plate was developed to solve this problem. The 96-well screen filter plate consists of 96 stainless steel wire-mesh screen tubes connected to the 96 openings of a top plate so that the screen filter plate can be readily inserted into a 96-well sample storage plate. Upon insertion, the blood and plasma clots are excluded from entering the screen tube while clear sample solutions flow freely into it. In this way, sample transfer can be easily completed by either manual or automated pipetting methods. In this report, three structurally diverse compounds were selected to evaluate and validate the use of the screen filter plate. The plasma samples of these compounds were transferred and processed in the presence and absence of the screen filter plate and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS methods. Our results showed a good agreement between the samples prepared with and without the screen filter plate, demonstrating the utility and efficiency of this novel device for preparation of blood and plasma samples. The device is simple, easy to use, and reusable. It can be employed for sample preparation of other biological fluids that contain floating particulates or aggregates. PMID:16383347

  17. Ice-Cap: a method for growing Arabidopsis and tomato plants in 96-well plates for high-throughput genotyping.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Clark, Katie A; Gibbs, Nicole M; Bush, Susan M; Krysan, Patrick J

    2011-11-09

    It is becoming common for plant scientists to develop projects that require the genotyping of large numbers of plants. The first step in any genotyping project is to collect a tissue sample from each individual plant. The traditional approach to this task is to sample plants one-at-a-time. If one wishes to genotype hundreds or thousands of individuals, however, using this strategy results in a significant bottleneck in the genotyping pipeline. The Ice-Cap method that we describe here provides a high-throughput solution to this challenge by allowing one scientist to collect tissue from several thousand seedlings in a single day (1,2). This level of throughput is made possible by the fact that tissue is harvested from plants 96-at-a-time, rather than one-at-a-time. The Ice-Cap method provides an integrated platform for performing seedling growth, tissue harvest, and DNA extraction. The basis for Ice-Cap is the growth of seedlings in a stacked pair of 96-well plates. The wells of the upper plate contain plugs of agar growth media on which individual seedlings germinate. The roots grow down through the agar media, exit the upper plate through a hole, and pass into a lower plate containing water. To harvest tissue for DNA extraction, the water in the lower plate containing root tissue is rapidly frozen while the seedlings in the upper plate remain at room temperature. The upper plate is then peeled away from the lower plate, yielding one plate with 96 root tissue samples frozen in ice and one plate with 96 viable seedlings. The technique is named "Ice-Cap" because it uses ice to capture the root tissue. The 96-well plate containing the seedlings can then wrapped in foil and transferred to low temperature. This process suspends further growth of the seedlings, but does not affect their viability. Once genotype analysis has been completed, seedlings with the desired genotype can be transferred from the 96-well plate to soil for further propagation. We have demonstrated

  18. A Novel 96well-formatted Micro-gap Plate Enabling Drug Response Profiling on Primary Tumour Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Yuan; Hsiung, Lo-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ho; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wo, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Drug-based treatments are the most widely used interventions for cancer management. Personalized drug response profiling remains inherently challenging with low cell count harvested from tumour sample. We present a 96well-formatted microfluidic plate with built-in micro-gap that preserves up to 99.2% of cells during multiple assay/wash operation and only 9,000 cells needed for a single reagent test (i.e. 1,000 cells per test spot x 3 selected concentration x triplication), enabling drug screening and compatibility with conventional automated workstations. Results with MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines showed that no statistical significance was found in dose-response between the device and conventional 96-well plate control. Primary tumour samples from breast cancer patients tested in the device also showed good IC50 prediction. With drug screening of primary cancer cells must consider a wide range of scenarios, e.g. suspended/attached cell types and rare/abundant cell availability, the device enables high throughput screening even for suspended cells with low cell count since the signature microfluidic cell-trapping feature ensures cell preservation in a multiple solution exchange protocol.

  19. Protocol: high throughput silica-based purification of RNA from Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96-well format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing popularity of systems-based approaches to plant research has resulted in a demand for high throughput (HTP) methods to be developed. RNA extraction from multiple samples in an experiment is a significant bottleneck in performing systems-level genomic studies. Therefore we have established a high throughput method of RNA extraction from Arabidopsis thaliana to facilitate gene expression studies in this widely used plant model. We present optimised manual and automated protocols for the extraction of total RNA from 9-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96 well plate format using silica membrane-based methodology. Consistent and reproducible yields of high quality RNA are isolated averaging 8.9 μg total RNA per sample (~20 mg plant tissue). The purified RNA is suitable for subsequent qPCR analysis of the expression of over 500 genes in triplicate from each sample. Using the automated procedure, 192 samples (2 × 96 well plates) can easily be fully processed (samples homogenised, RNA purified and quantified) in less than half a day. Additionally we demonstrate that plant samples can be stored in RNAlater at -20°C (but not 4°C) for 10 months prior to extraction with no significant effect on RNA yield or quality. Additionally, disrupted samples can be stored in the lysis buffer at -20°C for at least 6 months prior to completion of the extraction procedure providing a flexible sampling and storage scheme to facilitate complex time series experiments. PMID:22136293

  20. 96-Well Plate Colorimetric Assay for K(sub i) Determination of (plusmn)-2-Benzylsuccinic Acid, an Inhibitor of Carboxypeptidase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentland, Mark P.; Raza, Shaan; Yingtong Gao

    2004-01-01

    An appropriate assay to determine the inhibition potency of carboxypeptidase A (CPA) in 96-well format to illustrate how high throughput screening is used in modern drug discovery to identify bioactive molecules is developed. Efforts in developing a colorimetric 96-well plate assay for determination of the K(sub i) for inhibition of CPA by…

  1. Direct monitoring of molecular recognition processes using fluorescence enhancement at colloid-coated microplates.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, C; Hawa, G; Götzinger, M; Wirth, M; Pittner, F; Gabor, F

    2001-01-01

    Direct monitoring of recognition processes at the molecular level is a valuable tool for studying reaction kinetics to assess affinity constants (e.g. drugs to receptors) and for designing rapid single step immunoassays. Methods currently used to gain information about binding processes predominantly depend on surface plasmon resonance. These systems use excitation with coherent light in attenuated total reflection geometry to obtain discrimination between surface-bound and free molecules in solution. Therefore labeling of the compounds is not necessary, but due to the complexity of the measuring setup the method is rather costly. In this contribution we present a simple method for performing kinetic single step biorecognition assays with fluorophore labeled compounds using the fluorescence enhancement properties of surface bound silver colloids. Silver colloids are bound to standard microplates via silanization of the plastic surface. Fluorophores close to this colloid coated surface show a significant gain in fluorescence compared to fluorophores farther away in the bulk solution. Therefore discrimination between surface bound and free fluorophores is possible and the binding of, for example, fluorophore labeled antibodies to antigens immobilized on the colloid surface results in increasing fluorescence intensity. Utilization of standard microplates makes this method fully compatible with conventional microplate processing and reading devices. Neither excitation with coherent laser light nor ATR geometry is required, the measurement is performed in a standard fluorescence microplate reader in front face geometry with a xenon flash lamp as excitation source. Methods for the preparation of colloid-coated microplates and fluorescence-enhanced biorecognition assays are presented. Additionally the dependence of the system performance on the structure and properties of the metal colloid coated surface is described. A two-component biorecognition model system shows a

  2. Scalable 96-well Plate Based iPSC Culture and Production Using a Robotic Liquid Handling System.

    PubMed

    Conway, Michael K; Gerger, Michael J; Balay, Erin E; O'Connell, Rachel; Hanson, Seth; Daily, Neil J; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Continued advancement in pluripotent stem cell culture is closing the gap between bench and bedside for using these cells in regenerative medicine, drug discovery and safety testing. In order to produce stem cell derived biopharmaceutics and cells for tissue engineering and transplantation, a cost-effective cell-manufacturing technology is essential. Maintenance of pluripotency and stable performance of cells in downstream applications (e.g., cell differentiation) over time is paramount to large scale cell production. Yet that can be difficult to achieve especially if cells are cultured manually where the operator can introduce significant variability as well as be prohibitively expensive to scale-up. To enable high-throughput, large-scale stem cell production and remove operator influence novel stem cell culture protocols using a bench-top multi-channel liquid handling robot were developed that require minimal technician involvement or experience. With these protocols human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were cultured in feeder-free conditions directly from a frozen stock and maintained in 96-well plates. Depending on cell line and desired scale-up rate, the operator can easily determine when to passage based on a series of images showing the optimal colony densities for splitting. Then the necessary reagents are prepared to perform a colony split to new plates without a centrifugation step. After 20 passages (~3 months), two iPSC lines maintained stable karyotypes, expressed stem cell markers, and differentiated into cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. The system can perform subsequent high-throughput screening of new differentiation protocols or genetic manipulation designed for 96-well plates. This technology will reduce the labor and technical burden to produce large numbers of identical stem cells for a myriad of applications. PMID:26068617

  3. Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Mertiri, Taulant; Holland, Thomas; Basu, Amar S

    2012-10-21

    It is well known that biological systems respond to chemical signals as well as physical stimuli. The workhorses of high throughput screening, microplates and pipetting robots, are well suited for screening chemical stimuli; however, there are fewer options for screening physical stimuli, particularly those which involve temporal patterns. This paper presents an optical microplate for photonic high-throughput screening. The system provides addressable intensity and temporal control of LED light emission in each well, and operates on standard black-wall clear-bottom 96-well microplates, which prevent light spillover. Light intensity can be controlled to 7-bit resolution (128 levels), with a maximum intensity of 120 mE cm(-2). The temporal resolution, useful for studying dynamics of light-driven bioprocesses, can be as low as 10 μs. The microplate is used for high-throughput studies of light-dependent growth rates and photosynthetic efficiency in the model organism Dunaliella tertiolecta, a lipid-producing algae of interest in 2(nd) generation biofuels. By conducting 96 experiments in parallel, photoirradiance studies, which would require 2 years using conventional tools, can be completed in <2 weeks. In a 12 day culture, algal growth rates increase with total photon flux, as expected. Interestingly, the lipid production efficiency, defined as lipid production per unit photon flux per capita, increases nearly 5 fold at low light intensity (constant light) and at low duty cycle (pulsed light). High throughput protocols enabled by this system are conducive to systematic studies and discovery in the fields of photobiology and photochemistry.

  4. Facile preparation of a photoactivatable surface on a 96-well plate: a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masao; Scheideler, Olivia; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Shota; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is an essential cellular activity in various physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. Therefore, in vitro cell migration assays are important not only for fundamental biological studies but also for evaluating potential drugs that control cell migration activity in medical applications. In this regard, robust control over cell migrating microenvironments is critical for reliable and quantitative analysis as cell migration is highly dependent upon the microenvironments. Here, we developed a facile method for making a commercial glass-bottom 96-well plate photoactivatable for cell adhesion, aiming to develop a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform. Cationic poly-d-lysine was adsorbed to the anionic glass surface via electrostatic interactions and, subsequently, functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) bearing a photocleavable reactive group. The initial PEGylated surface is non-cell-adhesive. However, upon near-ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, the photorelease of PEG switches the surface from non-biofouling to cell-adhesive. With this platform, we assayed cell migration in the following procedure: (1) create cell-attaching regions of precise geometries by controlled photoirradiation, (2) seed cells to allow them to attach selectively to the irradiated regions, (3) expose UV light to the remaining PEGylated regions to extend the cell-adhesive area, (4) analyse cell migration using microscopy. Surface modification of the glass surface was characterized by ζ-potential and contact angle measurements. The PEGylated surface showed cell-resistivity and became cell-adhesive upon releasing PEG by near-UV irradiation. The method was applied for parallelly evaluating the effect of model drugs on the migration of epithelial MDCK cells in the multiplexed platform. The dose-response relationship for cytochalasin D treatment on cell migration behavior was successfully evaluated with high

  5. CometChip: a high-throughput 96-well platform for measuring DNA damage in microarrayed human cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Wood, David K; Weingeist, David M; Fessler, Jessica; Navasummrit, Panida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Engelward, Bevin P

    2014-10-18

    DNA damaging agents can promote aging, disease and cancer and they are ubiquitous in the environment and produced within human cells as normal cellular metabolites. Ironically, at high doses DNA damaging agents are also used to treat cancer. The ability to quantify DNA damage responses is thus critical in the public health, pharmaceutical and clinical domains. Here, we describe a novel platform that exploits microfabrication techniques to pattern cells in a fixed microarray. The 'CometChip' is based upon the well-established single cell gel electrophoresis assay (a.k.a. the comet assay), which estimates the level of DNA damage by evaluating the extent of DNA migration through a matrix in an electrical field. The type of damage measured by this assay includes abasic sites, crosslinks, and strand breaks. Instead of being randomly dispersed in agarose in the traditional assay, cells are captured into an agarose microwell array by gravity. The platform also expands from the size of a standard microscope slide to a 96-well format, enabling parallel processing. Here we describe the protocols of using the chip to evaluate DNA damage caused by known genotoxic agents and the cellular repair response followed after exposure. Through the integration of biological and engineering principles, this method potentiates robust and sensitive measurements of DNA damage in human cells and provides the necessary throughput for genotoxicity testing, drug development, epidemiological studies and clinical assays.

  6. Philippine microplate tectonics and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J.J. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    Hydrocarbon traps in the Philippine Islands developed during a long, complex history of microplate tectonics. Carbonate and clastic stratigraphic traps formed during Mesozoic and early Cenozoic rifting and drifting. Hydrocarbons, generated in deep rift basins, migrated to the traps during drifting. Later Cenozoic compressional tectonic activity and concomitant faulting enhanced some traps and destroyed others. Seismic data offshore from Palawan Island reveal the early trap histories. Later trap histories can be interpreted from seismic, outcrop, and remote-sensing data. Understanding the microplate tectonic history of the Philippines is the key to interpreting trap histories.

  7. A simple 96 well microfluidic chip combined with visual and densitometry detection for resource-poor point of care testing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghui; Sun, Steven; Kostov, Yordan

    2010-01-01

    There is a well-recognized need for low cost biodetection technologies for resource-poor settings with minimal medical infrastructure. Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology has the ability to perform biological assays in such settings. The aim of this work is to develop a low cost, high-throughput detection system for the analysis of 96 samples simultaneously outside the laboratory setting. To achieve this aim, several biosensing elements were combined: a syringe operated ELISA lab-on-a-chip (ELISA-LOC) which integrates fluid delivery system into a miniature 96-well plate; a simplified non-enzymatic reporter and detection approach using a gold nanoparticle-antibody conjugate as a secondary antibody and silver enhancement of the visual signal; and Carbon nanotubes (CNT) to increase primary antibody immobilization and improve assay sensitivity. Combined, these elements obviate the need for an ELISA washer, electrical power for operation and a sophisticated detector. We demonstrate the use of the device for detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B, a major foodborne toxin using three modes of detection, visual detection, CCD camera and document scanner. With visual detection or using a document scanner to measure the signal, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.5ng/ml. In addition to visual detection, for precise quantitation of signal using densitometry and a CCD camera, the LOD was 0.1ng/ml for the CCD analysis and 0.5 ng/ml for the document scanner. The observed sensitivity is in the same range as laboratory-based ELISA testing. The point of care device can analyze 96 samples simultaneously, permitting high throughput diagnostics in the field and in resource poor areas without ready access to laboratory facilities or electricity. PMID:21503269

  8. A high-throughput, homogeneous microplate assay for agents that kill mammalian tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Michael; Wang, Chunwei; Rebentisch, Matt; Endo, Mark; Stump, Mark; Kamb, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    Screens for cytostasis/cytoxicity have considerable value for the discovery of therapeutic agents and the investigation of the biology of apoptosis. For instance, genetic screens for proteins, protein fragments, peptides, RNAs, or chemicals that kill tissue culture cells may aid in identifying new cancer therapeutic targets. A microplate assay for cell death is needed to achieve throughputs sufficient to sift through thousands of agents from expression or chemical libraries. The authors describe a homogeneous assay for cell death in tissue culture cells compatible with 96- or 384-well plates. In combination with a previously described system for retroviral packaging and transduction, nearly 6000 expression library clones could be screened per week in a 96-well plate format. The screening system may also prove useful for chemical screens.

  9. Counter-rotating microplates at the Galapagos triple junction.

    PubMed

    Klein, Emily M; Smith, Deborah K; Williams, Clare M; Schouten, Hans

    2005-02-24

    An 'incipient' spreading centre east of (and orthogonal to) the East Pacific Rise at 2 degrees 40' N has been identified as forming a portion of the northern boundary of the Galapagos microplate. This spreading centre was described as a slowly diverging, westward propagating rift, tapering towards the East Pacific Rise. Here we present evidence that the 'incipient rift' has also rifted towards the east and opens anticlockwise about a pivot at its eastern end. The 'incipient rift' then bounds a second microplate, north of the clockwise-rotating Galapagos microplate. The Galapagos triple junction region, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, thus consists of two counter-rotating microplates partly separated by the Hess Deep rift. Our kinematic solution for microplate motion relative to the major plates indicates that the two counter-rotating microplates may be treated as rigid blocks driven by drag on the microplates' edges3.

  10. Highly Multiplexed RNA Aptamer Selection using a Microplate-based Microcolumn Device

    PubMed Central

    Reinholt, Sarah J.; Ozer, Abdullah; Lis, John T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed RNA aptamer selection to 19 different targets simultaneously using a microcolumn-based device, MEDUSA (Microplate-based Enrichment Device Used for the Selection of Aptamers), as well as a modified selection process, that significantly reduce the time and reagents needed for selections. We exploited MEDUSA’s reconfigurable design between parallel and serially-connected microcolumns to enable the use of just 2 aliquots of starting library, and its 96-well microplate compatibility to enable the continued use of high-throughput techniques in downstream processes. Our modified selection protocol allowed us to perform the equivalent of a 10-cycle selection in the time it takes for 4 traditional selection cycles. Several aptamers were discovered with nanomolar dissociation constants. Furthermore, aptamers were identified that not only bound with high affinity, but also acted as inhibitors to significantly reduce the activity of their target protein, mouse decapping exoribonuclease (DXO). The aptamers resisted DXO’s exoribonuclease activity, and in studies monitoring DXO’s degradation of a 30-nucleotide substrate, less than 1 μM of aptamer demonstrated significant inhibition of DXO activity. This aptamer selection method using MEDUSA helps to overcome some of the major challenges with traditional aptamer selections, and provides a platform for high-throughput selections that lends itself to process automation. PMID:27432610

  11. CUZCO READER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SOLA, DONALD F.

    WRITTEN TO ACCOMPANY THE SPOKEN CUZCO QUECHUA MATERIALS, THIS READER CONSISTS OF SHORT SELECTIONS ACTUALLY RECORDED IN THE FIELD AND REPRESENTING SEVERAL SUBDIALECTS SPOKEN IN RURAL SECTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CUZCO, PERU. INCLUDED ARE DIALOGS, STORIES, SONGS, CULTURAL SELECTIONS, AND INTERVIEWS. THE FORMAT GIVES THE CUZCO QUECHUA DIALECT AND…

  12. COCHABAMBA READER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LASTRA, YOLANDA

    INTENDED AS FOLLOWUP MATERIAL AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THE TWO-VOLUME SPOKEN COCHABAMBA COURSE, THIS READER CONSISTS OF A SINGLE LONG STORY, "JUANITO," WRITTEN BY OSCAR TERAN. IT HAS BEEN USED AS A RADIO SCRIPT FOR A SERIES OF BROADCASTS FROM A COCHABAMBA STATION WHICH SERVES THE SURROUNDING INDIGENOUS POPULATION. THE MATERIAL IS PRESENTED ON…

  13. Easter microplate evolution: Pb isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Barry B.; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    1989-06-01

    We report on 53 Pb isotope analyses of basalts from 48 dredge stations occupied along the spreading boundaries of the Easter microplate and adjacent East Pacific Rise (EPR). Also included in the study are seven analyses of basalts from Easter and Sala y Gomez islands. A major anomaly is observed on the East Rift, around 27°S, where this ridge is shallowest and closest to Easter and Sala y Gomez islands. Basalts from the West Rift are less radiogenic. The means for the two rift populations are distinct, but their ranges overlap significantly. On the average, there is a systematic westward decrease in radiogenic Pb content with distance from Sala y Gomez. The Pb isotope anomaly is confined to the boundaries of the Microplate and the total range exceeds that of the entire EPR, both in the most and the least end of radiogenic Pb content. Radiogenic Pb content covaries with (La/Sm)N ratios with the exception of a nepheline-normative picritic basalt glass outlier. The trends are curvilinear. There is no correlation between the Pb isotope ratios and the bulk composition of the lavas. In Pb versus Pb isotope diagrams, basalts from the East and West rifts form two tight linear trends of statistically indistinguishable slope. Basalts from Easter and Sala y Gomez islands lie on the upper end of these trends. A binary mixing process between a radiogenic source similar to that present beneath Sala y Gomez and the large ion lithophile element (LILE)-depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source is strongly suggested. There is no trace of the Dupal anomaly beneath the microplate nor beneath Easter or Sala y Gomez Islands. If the Dupal anomaly is indeed continuous and of semi global extent, it must lie deeper in the mantle than the depths at which basaltic melts take source beneath the microplate and these two islands. There is also no correlation between the apparent dispersion of Pb isotope ratios and the rate at which the various ridge segments of the microplate spread. Tests

  14. Surface-scribed transparency-based microplates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin Ye; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Somers, Anthony; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2013-01-15

    Transparency sheets, which are normally associated with use on overhead projectors, offer lowered costs and high amenability for optical diagnostics in microplate instrumentation. An alternative microplate design in which circles are scribed on the surface of the transparency to create the boundaries to hold the drop in place is investigated here. The 3D profile of the scribed regions obtained optically showed strong likelihood of affecting three-phase contact line interactions. During dispensation, the contact angle (≈95°) was larger than the drop advancing state (≈80°) due to a period of nonadhesion, where the contact angle later reduced to the drop advancing state followed by increase in the liquid area coverage on the substrate. It was established that 50 μL was needed to fill the well fully, and the maximum volume retainable before breaching was 190 μL. While the tilt angle needed for displacement reduced significantly from 50 to 95 μL, this was markedly better than nonscribed surfaces, where tilt angles always had to be kept to within 30°. It was found that there was greater ability to fill the well with smaller volumes with dispensation at the center. This was attributed to the growing contact line not meeting the scribed edge in parallel if liquid was dispensed closer to it, wherein pinning reduction in some directions permitted liquid travel along the scribed edge to undergo contact angle hysteresis. Fluorescence measurements conducted showed no performance compromise when using scribed transparency microplates over standard microplates. PMID:23215012

  15. Measurement of factor v activity in human plasma using a microplate coagulation assay.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A

    2012-09-09

    In response to injury, blood coagulation is activated and results in generation of the clotting protease, thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin which forms an insoluble clot that stops hemorrhage. Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical cofactor for the protease FXa and accelerator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation as part of prothrombinase (1, 2). Manual FV assays have been described (3, 4), but they are time consuming and subjective. Automated FV assays have been reported (5-7), but the analyzer and reagents are expensive and generally provide only the clot time, not the rate and extent of fibrin formation. The microplate platform is preferred for measuring enzyme-catalyzed events because of convenience, time, cost, small volume, continuous monitoring, and high-throughput (8, 9). Microplate assays have been reported for clot lysis (10), platelet aggregation (11), and coagulation Factors (12), but not for FV activity in human plasma. The goal of the method was to develop a microplate assay that measures FV activity during fibrin formation in human plasma. This novel microplate method outlines a simple, inexpensive, and rapid assay of FV activity in human plasma. The assay utilizes a kinetic microplate reader to monitor the absorbance change at 405 nm during fibrin formation in human plasma (Figure 1) (13). The assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation. It requires only μl quantities of plasma, is complete in 6 min, has high-throughput, is sensitive to 24-80 pM FV, and measures the amount of unintentionally activated (1-stage activity) and thrombin-activated FV (2-stage activity) to obtain a complete assessment of its total functional activity (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired coagulopathy that most often develops from pre-existing infections (14). DIC is associated with a poor prognosis and increases mortality

  16. Nurturing Emergent Readers through Readers Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Kelli Jo Kerry

    2006-01-01

    Readers theater is a familiar literacy strategy for children who can read independently; however, it can also be used with younger children who have not yet developed independent reading skills. The purpose of this article is to adapt the concept of readers theater for use with emergent readers. It focuses first on defining readers theater and…

  17. A new approach to the application of solid phase extraction disks with LC-MS/MS for the analysis of drugs on a 96-well plate format.

    PubMed

    Cudjoe, Erasmus; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-11-01

    A new 96-well disk solid phase extraction sample preparation technique which does not involve vacuum pumps integrated with liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) was developed for high throughput determination of benzodiazepines (nordiazepam, diazepam, lorazepam and oxazepam). In addition, the method completely allows the re-use of the SPE disk membranes for subsequent analyses after re-conditioning. The method utilizes a robotic autosampler for parallel extractions in a 96-well plate format. Results have been presented for independent extractions from three matrices; phosphate buffer solution, urine, and plasma. Factors affecting data reproducibility, extraction kinetics, sample throughput, and reliability of the system were investigated and optimized. A total time required per sample was 0.94 min using 96-well format. Method reproducibility was < or =9% relative standard deviation for all three matrices. Limits of detection and quantitation recorded were respectively in the range 0.02-0.15 and 0.2-2.0 ng/mL with linearity ranging from 0.2 to 500 ng/mL for all matrices.

  18. Present-day microplates motion in the central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, N.

    2007-12-01

    Motion of microplates in diffuse plate boundaries often accommodates convergence between major plates. In this work we present a kinematic model for the central mediterranean sector of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary, derived from GPS and earthquake slip vectors, which describe the crustal motion as resulting from the interactions of two rigid microplates: Adria and Apulia-Ionia. The styles of deformation predicted by the kinematic model along the boundaries of the proposed microplates are consistent with geological observations and present significant implications for the characterization of seismically active regions in the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary. Microplates rotation rates are succesfully reproduced by a simple slat model in which the edges of the microplates are constrained to move with the adjacent plate or microplate, suggesting a significant coupling between crustal blocks and the primary role of edge-transmitted forces as driving factor for crustal motion. These results are compared with surface wave tomographic models and other seismological observables which suggest that the rigid microplates correspond to regions of high shear wave velocities in the upper mantle and high integrated lithospheric strength. The present-day plate boundary configuration derives from the inherited Mesozoic African margin, from the rapid Neogene evolution of the Tyrrhenian subduction zone and the final fragmentation of the Adriatic promontory.

  19. India-Eurasia collision triggers formation of an oceanic microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara; Müller, Dietmar; Sandwell, David

    2016-04-01

    Detailed mapping of seafloor tectonic fabric in the Indian Ocean, using high-resolution satellite-derived vertical gravity gradient data, reveals an extinct Pacific-style oceanic microplate - the Mammerickx Microplate - west of the Ninetyeast Ridge. It is one of the first Pacific-style microplates to be mapped outside the Pacific basin, suggesting that geophysical conditions during formation probably resembled those that have dominated at eastern Pacific ridges. The microplate formed at the Indian-Antarctic ridge and is bordered by an extinct ridge in the north and pseudofault in the south, whose conjugate is located north of the Kerguelen Plateau. Independent microplate rotation is indicated by asymmetric pseudofaults and rotated abyssal hill fabric, also identified in multibeam data. Magnetic anomaly picks and age estimates calculated from published spreading rates suggest formation during chron 21o (~47.3 Ma). Plate reorganizations can trigger ridge propagation and microplate development, and we propose that formation of the Mammerickx Microplate is linked with the initial 'soft' stage of the India-Eurasia collision. The collision altered the stress regime at the Indian-Antarctic ridge, leading to a change in segmentation and ridge propagation from an establishing transform fault. Fast Indian-Antarctic spreading that preceded microplate formation, and Kerguelen Plume activity may have facilitated ridge propagation via the production of thin and weak lithosphere. However, both factors had been present for tens of millions of years and are therefore unlikely to have triggered the event. Prior to the collision, this combination of fast spreading and plume activity was responsible for the production of a wide region of undulate seafloor to the north of the extinct ridge and 'W' shaped lineations that record back and forth ridge propagation. Microplate formation provides a means of dating the onset of the India-Eurasia collision, and is completely independent of and

  20. Photonic crystal biosensor microplates with integrated fluid networks for high throughput applications in drug discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Charles J.; Chan, Leo L.; Pineda, Maria F.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2007-09-01

    Assays used in pharmaceutical research require a system that can not only detect biochemical interactions with high sensitivity, but that can also perform many measurements in parallel while consuming low volumes of reagents. While nearly all label-free biosensor transducers to date have been interfaced with a flow channel, the liquid handling system is typically aligned and bonded to the transducer for supplying analytes to only a few sensors in parallel. In this presentation, we describe a fabrication approach for photonic crystal biosensors that utilizes nanoreplica molding to produce a network of sensors that are automatically self-aligned with a microfluidic network in a single process step. The sensor/fluid network is inexpensively produced on large surface areas upon flexible plastic substrates, allowing the device to be incorporated into standard format 96-well microplates. A simple flow scheme using hydrostatic pressure applied through a single control point enables immobilization of capture ligands upon a large number of sensors with 220 nL of reagent, and subsequent exposure of the sensors to test samples. A high resolution imaging detection instrument is capable of monitoring the binding within parallel channels at rates compatible with determining kinetic binding constants between the immobilized ligands and the analytes. The first implementation of this system is capable of monitoring the kinetic interactions of 11 flow channels at once, and a total of 88 channels within an integrated biosensor microplate in rapid succession. The system was initially tested to characterize the interaction between sets of proteins with known binding behavior.

  1. Tectonic microplates in a wax model of sea-floor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Richard F.; Ragnarsson, Rolf; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    Rotating, growing microplates are observed in a wax analogue model of sea-floor spreading. Wax microplates are kinematically similar to sea-floor tectonic microplates in terms of spreading rate and growth rate. Furthermore, their spiral pseudofault geometry is quantitatively consistent with Schouten's oceanic microplate model. These results suggest that Schouten's edge-driven microplate model captures the kinematics of tectonic microplate evolution on Earth. Based on the wax observations, a theory for the nucleation of overlapping spreading centres, the precursors of tectonic microplates, is developed.

  2. Single laboratory method performance evaluation for the analysis of total food folate by trienzyme extraction and microplate assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Eitenmiller, R R

    2007-06-01

    Single laboratory method performance parameters, including the calibration curve, accuracy, recovery, precision, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantification (LOQ), were evaluated for the analysis of total food folate by the trienzyme extraction and microplate assay with Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1546 (meat homogenate), SRM 2383 (baby food composite), SRM 1846 (infant formula), Certified Reference Material (CRM) 121 (wholemeal flour), and CRM 485 (mixed vegetables), representing a broad selection of food matrices, were used to evaluate the performance of the method. A generated 4-parameter logistic equation of the calibration curve was y= (0.0705 - 1.0396)/(1 + (x/0.0165) (1.3072)) + 1.0396 (P < 0.0001). The test of parallelism demonstrated that matrix components in the food extracts did not affect the accuracy. Measured values of the SRMs and CRMs were within their certified or reference values. Recoveries for all reference materials met the requirements of the AOAC guidelines for single laboratory validation. Precision measured as repeatability, including simultaneous and consecutive replicates for each SRM and CRM, met the Horwitz criterion. LOD and LOQ values were 0.3 and 0.6 mug/100 g, respectively. The results showed that trienzyme digestion using alpha-amylase, Pronase(R), and conjugase from chicken pancreas coupled with a 96-well microplate assay provided a highly accurate, reproducible, and sensitive method for the determination of folate in a variety of foods.

  3. A microplate version of the SOS/umu-test for rapid detection of genotoxins and genotoxic potentials of environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Reifferscheid, G; Heil, J; Oda, Y; Zahn, R K

    1991-12-01

    The umu-microtest is a miniaturized automated short-term test version proposed for screening of umuC-dependent mutagenic potentials of chemicals relevant to environmental pollution, river water and industrial waste water. The test is based on the SOS/umu-test and has been modified in order to allow extensive testing of environmental samples. Genetically engineered Salmonella typhimurium (TA1535/pSK1002) are incubated on a microplate rotor in a sloping position for 2 h with the test samples, followed by addition of fresh culture medium to reach a 10-fold dilution of the incubation medium. 2 h later, the activity of the beta-galactosidase, which reflects umuC induction, is determined colorimetrically. The incubation of the bacteria in the presence of the test compounds as well as the assessment of beta-galactosidase activity takes place in 96-well microplates, thus enabling simultaneous screening of large numbers of samples. Data of the genotoxic potentials are available within 8 h. Computer-controlled automation is possible by using a laboratory workstation.

  4. Cell Treatment and Lysis in 96-Well Filter-Bottom Plates for Screening Bcr-Abl Activity and Inhibition in Whole-Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    MAND, MICHAEL R.; WU, DING; VEACH, DARREN R.; KRON, STEPHEN J.

    2015-01-01

    Although conventional high-throughput screens performed in vitro with purified protein kinases are powerful tools to discover new kinase inhibitors, they are far from ideal for determining efficacy in vivo. As a complementary approach, cell-based, target-driven secondary screens may help predict in vivo compound potency and specificity as well as evaluate bioavailability and toxicity. Here the authors report a simple protocol for treating K562 Bcr-Abl-expressing cells with small-molecule kinase inhibitors in 96-well filter-bottom plates followed by in-plate cell lysis. The lysates were assayed via a solid-phase kinase assay, allowing determination of apparent IC50 for known Bcr-Abl inhibitors as well as facilitating the screening of a small kinase inhibitor library. This approach may have further applications in generating lysates for analyzing kinase activity and inhibition in other nonadherent suspension cell lines. PMID:20237206

  5. Toward Biomarker Development in Large Clinical Cohorts: An Integrated High-Throughput 96-Well-Plate-Based Sample Preparation Workflow for Versatile Downstream Proteomic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zeyu; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Jing; Huang, Haijun; Wang, Jie; Wu, Daxian; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    We describe a cheap, robust, fast, high-throughput, and flexible proteomic sample processing method based on a regular 96-well plate by acetone precipitation under low centrifuge speed (96PACS), which enables predigestion processing of 96 samples within 2 h. Tested on a complex Huh-7 total lysate, 96PACS produced comparable proteome coverage and even showed better reproducibility than FASP. Quantitative performance of 96PACS was further tested using data-independent acquisition and parallel reaction monitoring quantitation in a set of 6 benchmark samples consisting of 6 serial dilutions of BSA spiked in complex E. coli proteome background. The protocol was also successfully modified for automation and was validated in a comparative label-free proteomic study to develop serum markers for early detection of liver fibrosis and necroinflammation in patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus. PMID:27471874

  6. Higher resolution microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis: application to a multiallelic minisatellite.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, S D; Chen, X; Day, I N

    2000-01-01

    The 5' polymorphic region of the insulin (INS, MIM# 176730) gene contains a variable tandem repetition of 14-15 bp (a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) locus). After PCR amplification, we achieved precise sizing of class I alleles (range 641 to 843 bp) on 96-well open-face polyacrylamide microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) gels, obtaining resolution of the 2% mobility difference which represents one tandem repeat. PCR products were run double-stranded, but no additional bands were generated except in the case of differences of three, two, and one repeat between alleles; none compromised allele identification, and in the latter case the heteroduplex was a useful confirmation signal. No end labelling of primers was required, as the sensitive Vistra Green intercalating dye for double strands was used for visualization of bands from diluted samples. Duracryl, a high mechanical-strength polyacrylamide derivative, proved to have good resolution properties for electrophoresis. A co-run ladder ensured precise binning without inter-lane variability. Simultaneous electrophoresis of gels in a thermostatically controlled tank allowed up to 1,000 samples to be run in 90 min. Gels were analyzed using a FluorImager 595 fluorescent scanning system, and alleles identified using a combination of Phoretix software for band migration measurement and Microsoft Excel to compute allele sizes. Unlike other systems for minisatellite allele sizing, throughput was not limited (in time or cost) by electrophoresis.

  7. Detection of sodium channel activators by a rapid fluorimetric microplate assay.

    PubMed

    Louzao, M C; Vieytes, M R; Yasumoto, T; Botana, L M

    2004-04-01

    Marine toxins such as brevetoxins and ciguatoxins are produced by dinoflagellates and can accumulate in seafood. These toxins affect humans through seafood consumption. Intoxication is mainly characterized by gastrointestinal and neurological disorders and, in most severe cases, by cardiovascular problems. To prevent the consumption of food contaminated with these toxins, shellfish have been tested by mouse bioassay. However, this method is expensive, time-consuming, and ethically questionable. The objective of this study was to use a recently developed fluorimetric microplate assay to rapidly detect brevetoxins and ciguatoxins. The method is based on the pharmacological effect of brevetoxins and ciguatoxins known to activate sodium channels and involves (i). the incubation of excitable cells in 96 well microtiter plates with the fluorescent dye bis-oxonol, whose distribution across the membrane is potential-dependent, and (ii). dose-dependent cell depolarization by the toxins. Our findings demonstrate that measuring changes in membrane potential induced by brevetoxins and ciguatoxins allowed their quantitation. Active toxins could be reliably detected at concentrations in the nanomolar range. The simplicity, sensitivity, and possibility of being automated provide the basis for development of a practical alternative to conventional testing for brevetoxins and ciguatoxins.

  8. Optical microplates for photonic high throughput screening of algal photosynthesis and biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Mertiri, Taulant; Chen, Meng; Holland, Thomas; Basu, Amar S

    2011-01-01

    Biological systems respond not only to chemical stimuli (drugs, proteins) but also to physical stimuli (light, heat, stress). Though there are many high throughput tools for screening chemical stimuli, no such tool exists for screening of physical stimuli. This paper presents a novel instrument for photonic high throughput screening of photosynthesis, a light-driven bioprocess. The optical microplate has a footprint identical to a standard 96 well plate, and it provides temporal and intensity control of light in each individual well. Intensity control provides 128 dimming levels (7-bit resolution), with maximum intensity 120 mE/cm(2). Temporal modulation, used for studying dynamics and regulation of photosynthesis, can be as low as 10 μs. We used photonic screening for high throughput studies of algal growth rates and photosynthetic efficiency, using the model organism Dunaliella tertiolecta, a lipid producing algae of interest in biofuel production. Due to the ability to conduct 96 studies in parallel, experiments that would require 2 years using conventional tools can be completed in 1 week. This instrument opens up novel high throughput protocols for photobiology and the growing field of phenomics.

  9. Microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis for cohort studies of microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-he; O'Dell, Sandra D; Day, Ian N M

    2002-05-01

    After PCR amplification, we have achieved precise sizing of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite alleles on 96-well open-faced polyacrylamide microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) gels: two tetranucleotide repeats, HUMTHOI (five alleles 248-263 bp) and DYS390 (eight alleles 200-228 bp), and DYS392, a trinucleotide repeat (eight alleles 210-231 bp). A gel matrix of Duracryl, a high mechanical strength polyacrylamide derivative, and appropriate ionic conditions provide the 1.3%-1.5% band resolution required. No end-labeling of primers is needed, as the sensitive Vistra Green intercalating dye is used for the visualization of bands. Co-run markers bracketing the PCR fragments ensure accurate sizing without inter-lane variability. Electrophoresis of multiple gels in a thermostatically controlled tank allows up to 1000 samples to be run in 90 min. Gel images were analyzed using a Fluorlmager 595 fluorescent scanning system, and alleles were identified using Phoretix software for band migration measurement and Microsoft Excel to compute fragment sizes. Estimated sizes were interpolated precisely to achieve accurate binning. Microsatellite-MADGE represents a utilitarian methodfor high-throughput genotyping in cohort studies, using standard laboratory equipment.

  10. Miniaturized plate readers for low-cost, high-throughput phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Paul A; Dougherty, Bonnie V; Moutinho, Thomas J; Papin, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    We present a miniaturized plate reader for measuring optical density in 96-well plates. Our standalone reader fits in most incubators, environmental chambers, or biological containment suites, allowing users to leverage their existing laboratory infrastructure. The device contains no moving parts, allowing an entire 96-well plate to be read several times per second. We demonstrate how the fast sampling rate allows our reader to detect small changes in optical density, even when the device is placed in a shaking incubator. A wireless communication module allows remote monitoring of multiple devices in real time. These features allow easy assembly of multiple readers to create a scalable, accurate solution for high-throughput phenotypic screening. PMID:25366331

  11. CYP isoform induction screening in 96-well plates: use of 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin as a substrate for studies with rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Price, R J; Surry, D; Renwick, A B; Meneses-Lorente, G; Lake, B G; Evans, D C

    2000-08-01

    1. In this study, 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC) was evaluated as a substrate to assess the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform enzyme activities in rat hepatocytes using a 96-well plate format. 2. BFC was metabolized by both untreated and sodium phenobarbitone (NaPB)-treated rat hepatocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner to the highly fluorescent product 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (HFC). 3. HFC was extensively conjugated with D-glucuronic acid and/or sulphate in both untreated and NaPB-treated rat hepatocytes, thus necessitating the inclusion of an enzymatic deconjugation step in the assay procedure. 4. The time-course of induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin metabolism by the CYP1A inducer beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), 7-benzyloxyresorufin metabolism by the CYP2B inducer NaPB and BFC metabolism b both BNF and NaPB was studied in rat hepatocytes treated for 24-96 h. The optimal time for induction of metabolism of all three substrates was 72 h, with no medium changes being necessary during this period. 5. The effect of treatment with 0.5-20 microM BNF, 50-2000 microM NaPB, 2-20 microM dexamethasone (DEX), 20-100 microM methylclofenapate (MCP), and 50 and 200 microM isoniazid (ISN) for 72 h on BFC metabolism in cultured rat hepatocytes was studied. BFC metabolism was induced by treatment with BNF, NaPB and MCP, but not with either DEX or ISN. 6. The metabolism of BFC in liver microsomes from the control rat and rat treated with CYP isoform inducers was also studied. BFC metabolism was induced by treatment with NaPB, BNF and DEX. 7. The metabolism of BFC was also studied using microsomes from baculovirus-infected insect cells containing rat cDNA-expressed CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP2C and CYP3A isoforms. Whereas BFC was metabolized to some extent by all the rat cDNA-expressed CYP isoforms examined, at a substrate concentration of 2.5 microM the greatest rates of BFC metabolism were observed with the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP2B1 preparations. 8

  12. What Can Readers Read after Graded Readers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Nation (2014) concluded that most of the vocabulary one needs to read challenging texts in English can be acquired incidentally through voluminous reading. This study examines possible texts that second language (L2) readers can use to move from controlled-vocabulary materials such as graded readers, which go up through approximately the…

  13. Identification of photosynthesis inhibitors of pelagic marine algae using 96-well plate microfractionation for enhanced throughput in effect-directed analysis.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Vethaak, A Dick; Leonards, Pim E G; Sjollema, Sascha B; Kool, Jeroen; de Voogt, Pim; Lamoree, Marja H

    2014-07-15

    Because of large-scale production and use of an increasing diversity of chemicals in modern society, estuarine and coastal waters may be contaminated with numerous substances. Some of these compounds have the potential to affect microalgae at the base of the pelagic food chain. Therefore, we identified the main chemical stressors that negatively affect the effective photosystem II efficiency (ϕPSII) in marine microalgae of the Dutch estuarine and coastal waters. An enhanced effect-directed analysis (EDA) was carried out by combining reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography fractionation of extracts from passive samplers, followed by effect assessment using the pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry assay and chemical analysis of biologically active fractions using high-resolution mass spectrometry. This study focuses on a novel microfractionation technique using 96-well plates to enhance throughput in EDA, structure elucidation, and the analytical and effect confirmation of the compounds that are identified. Although there are numerous unknown compounds present in estuarine and coastal waters, our EDA study shows that atrazine, diuron, irgarol, isoproturon, terbutryn, and terbutylazine are the main contributors to the observed effect on the ϕPSII of marine microalgae. PMID:24926900

  14. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  15. Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MAMEF) with silver colloids in 96-well plates: Application to ultra fast and sensitive immunoassays, High Throughput Screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Holley, Patrick; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-05-30

    Fluorescence detection is the basis of most assays used in drug discovery and High Throughput Screening (HTS) today. In all of these assays, assay rapidity and sensitivity is a primary concern, the sensitivity determined by both the quantum yield of the fluorophores and efficiency of the detection system, while rapidity is determined by the physical and biophysical parameters of temperature, concentration, assay bioaffinity, etc. In this paper we describe a platform technology that promises to fundamentally address these two physical constraints of sensitivity and rapidity. By combining the use of Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF), a near-field effect that can significantly enhance fluorescence signatures, with low power microwave heating, we can significantly increase the sensitivity of surface assays as well as >95% kinetically complete the assay within a few seconds. In addition, the metallic nanostructures used to facilitate MEF appear to be preferentially heated as compared to the surface assay fluid, advantageously localizing the MEF and heating around the nanostructures. To demonstrate proof of principle, a 96-well plate has been functionalized with silver nanostructures, and a model protein avidin-biotin assay studied. In our findings, a greater than 5-fold fluorescence enhancement coupled with a approximately 90-fold increase in assay kinetics was observed, but with no assay washing steps needed due to the silver-enhanced evanescent field mode of excitation. These findings promise to strongly facilitate high throughput fluorescence-based processes, such as in biology, drug discovery and general compound screening.

  16. Soluble penicillin-binding protein 2a: beta-lactam binding and inhibition by non-beta-lactams using a 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Toney, J H; Hammond, G G; Leiting, B; Pryor, K D; Wu, J K; Cuca, G C; Pompliano, D L

    1998-01-01

    High level methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the acquisition of the mecA gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a). PBP2a is a member of a family of peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzymes involved in assembly of the cell wall in bacteria and is poorly inactivated by beta-lactam antibiotics. We describe a 96-well-filter binding assay using recombinant, soluble PBP2a which allows for kinetic measurement of penicillin binding. The deacylation rate constant for the PBP2a-penicillin G covalent complex was found to be 5.7 +/- 1.0 x 10(-5) s-1 at 30 degrees C (half-life of approximately 200 min). For the PBP2a acylation reaction, the value of K(m) (penicillin G) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 mM and kcat = 1 x 10(-3) s-1, which yields a second-order rate constant (kcat/K(m)) for inactivation of 2.0 M-1 s-1. Using this assay, several non-beta-lactam inhibitors including Cibacron blue have been found which exhibit IC50 values between 10 and 30 microM. The binding affinities of several carbapenems and beta-lactams correlated well between the filter binding assay described in this report and an electrophoretic assay for PBP2a using membranes prepared form methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:9448849

  17. Absorbance and fluorometric sensing with capillary wells microplates

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Han Yen; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Neild, Adrian; Wah Ng, Tuck; Liew, Oi Wah

    2010-12-15

    Detection and readout from small volume assays in microplates are a challenge. The capillary wells microplate approach [Ng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 174105 (2008)] offers strong advantages in small liquid volume management. An adapted design is described and shown here to be able to detect, in a nonimaging manner, fluorescence and absorbance assays minus the error often associated with meniscus forming at the air-liquid interface. The presence of bubbles in liquid samples residing in microplate wells can cause inaccuracies. Pipetting errors, if not adequately managed, can result in misleading data and wrong interpretations of assay results; particularly in the context of high throughput screening. We show that the adapted design is also able to detect for bubbles and pipetting errors during actual assay runs to ensure accuracy in screening.

  18. Absorbance and fluorometric sensing with capillary wells microplates.

    PubMed

    Tan, Han Yen; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Neild, Adrian; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2010-12-01

    Detection and readout from small volume assays in microplates are a challenge. The capillary wells microplate approach [Ng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 174105 (2008)] offers strong advantages in small liquid volume management. An adapted design is described and shown here to be able to detect, in a nonimaging manner, fluorescence and absorbance assays minus the error often associated with meniscus forming at the air-liquid interface. The presence of bubbles in liquid samples residing in microplate wells can cause inaccuracies. Pipetting errors, if not adequately managed, can result in misleading data and wrong interpretations of assay results; particularly in the context of high throughput screening. We show that the adapted design is also able to detect for bubbles and pipetting errors during actual assay runs to ensure accuracy in screening. PMID:21198036

  19. The origin of the Iberian microplate high topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, L.; Pulgar, J. A.; Alonso, J. L.; Fernandez Viejo, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Iberian microplate is about 1100 km width, 3500 km long, and experienced contraction during the Cenozoic convergence of the Eurasian and African plates. In this process two main mountain ranges were created in the boundaries of the microplate: the Cantabrian-Pyrenean range in the north and the Betic-Rif orogenic system in the south, with a maximun height of 3479 m over sea level. However, in the interior of the microplate there is also several ranges and plateaus, with maximun heights of 2592 m. The origin of these interior high topography is controversial and has been explained by means of several procesess as: a) transference of displacement from the south border of the microplate, b) lithospheric folding, or c) more complex deep mantle related processes. In this work we investigate the relation between the northern border range of the microplate and some Iberian interior reliefs as: a) the Spanish Central System range, located in the central part of the microplate, with peaks over 2500 m, and b) the North-Iberian meseta, situated between these two ranges, and with average heights of 750 m. In order to solve this relation we have built a crustal-scale cross-section, through the northern half of the Iberian microplate, by using field geological mapping, subsoil information and deep geophysical data. The section acroos the central part of the Cantabrian range shows the well-known Iberian microplate continental subduction beneath the Eurasian plate, with a prominent crustal root that reaches up to 45 km depth. In this section an important difference between the upper and lower crust shortening values has been found. Thus, the upper crust has been shortened 97 km while the lower crust 122 km. The section across de Central System range shows a slightly thickened crust. In this range also exist a difference in the shortening values between upper and lower crust, but in the contrary sense than the Cantabrian range. Thus, the Central System range has been shortened

  20. Quantitation of serrapeptase in formulations by UV method in the microplate format.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, K V; Devi, S Gayathri; Mathew, Sam T

    2008-10-01

    Serrapeptase is an anti-inflammatory, proteolytic enzyme isolated from the microorganism, Serratia sp. HY-6. Very few methods are available for the quantification of serrapeptase. The activity of the enzyme is determined by an ELISA assay, colorimetric method using casein as substrate or by HPLC method. These methods are lengthy, time consuming and require a number of reagents and solvents. Therefore an attempt was made to develop a simple alternative method for regular estimation of drug in formulations. Serrapeptase enzyme was estimated in formulations by using microplate readers which uses the principle of vertical photometry. Further this method was validated and the robustness of this method was checked by estimating the drug in various formulations including liposomes and marketed tablet formulations. A linear relationship between drug concentration and absorbance was observed between 1-4 microg/ml at 230 nm (R(2)=0.9911). The percentage recovery values of the drug in serrapeptase liposomes were found to lie within the standard limit (97-98%) which confirms the method is accurate and free from any positive or negative interference of the excipient. The low value of standard deviation obtained confirms the precision of the method. (+/-0.020 - +/-0.044). The drug content values in marketed tablets values obtained matched the label claim. The proposed microplate UV-method for determination of serrapeptase in formulations is novel, simple, inexpensive, fast, specific and robust. Thus this method could be a better alternative for regular estimation of drug in the various marketed formulations of serrapeptase.

  1. A Sensitive Microplate Assay for Lipase Activity Measurement Using Olive Oil Emulsion Substrate: Modification of the Copper Soap Colorimetric Method.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ahmad; Karmali, Amin; Abdelmoez, Wael

    2016-01-01

    The present work involves a sensitive high-throughput microtiter plate based colorimetric assay for estimating lipase activity using cupric acetate pyridine reagent (CAPR). In the first approach, three factors two levels factorial design methodology was used to evaluate the interactive effect of different parameters on the sensitivity of the assay method. The optimization study revealed that the optimum CAPR concentration was 7.5% w/v, the optimum solvent was heptane and the optimum CAPR pH was 6. In the second approach, the optimized colorimetric microplate assay was used to measure lipase activity based on enzymatic hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion substrate at 37°C and 150 rpm. The emulsion substrates were formulated by using olive oil, triton X-100 (10% v/v in pH 8) and sodium phosphate buffer of pH 8 in ratio of 1:1:1 in the case of Candida sp. lipase. While in the case of immobilized lipozyme RMIM, The emulsion substrates were formulated by using olive oil, triton X-100 (1% v/v in pH 8) and sodium phosphate buffer of pH 8 in ratio of 2:1:1. Absorbance was measured at 655 nm. The stability of this assay (in terms of colored heptane phase absorbance readings) retained more than 92.5% after 24 h at 4°C compared to the absorbance readings measured at zero time. In comparison with other lipase assay methods, beside the developed sensitivity, the reproducibility and the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the proposed method, it permits analyzing of 96 samples at one time in a 96-well microplate. Furthermore, it consumes small quantities of chemicals and unit operations. PMID:27581492

  2. High-throughput total cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity of biological samples determined using flow injection analysis and microplate-based methods.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Joana P N; Magalhães, Luís M; Reis, Salette; Lima, José L F C; Segundo, Marcela A

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) methods were developed for assessment of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in urine and serum, based on reduction of Cu(II)-neocuproine complex to highly colored Cu(I)-neocuproine complex, measured spectrophotometrically at 450 nm. The reaction time was significantly reduced from 30 to 4 min by application of a calibration compound (uric acid) with kinetic behavior similar to that shown by urine samples. The method was implemented in a microformat (96 well plates) and also in an automatic fashion (flow injection analysis, FIA). A determination throughput value of 288 h(-1) (microplate method) or of 15 h(-1) (automatic FIA) was attained. Application of both methods to human serum (SRM 909b, level I) and urines (n = 9) provided TAC values in agreement with those of the end-point batch method.

  3. Automated panning and screening procedure on microplates for antibody generation from phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Laura; Takkinen, Kristiina; Söderlund, Hans; Pulli, Timo

    2009-03-01

    Antibody phage display technology is well established and widely used for selecting specific antibodies against desired targets. Using conventional manual methods, it is laborious to perform multiple selections with different antigens simultaneously. Furthermore, manual screening of the positive clones requires much effort. The authors describe optimized and automated procedures of these processes using a magnetic bead processor for the selection and a robotic station for the screening step. Both steps are performed in a 96-well microplate format. In addition, adopting the antibody phage display technology to automated platform polyethylene glycol precipitation of the enriched phage pool was unnecessary. For screening, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol suitable for a robotic station was developed. This system was set up using human gamma-globulin as a model antigen to select antibodies from a VTT naive human single-chain antibody (scFv) library. In total, 161 gamma-globulin-selected clones were screened, and according to fingerprinting analysis, 9 of the 13 analyzed clones were different. The system was further tested using testosterone bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta-estradiol-BSA as antigens with the same library. In total, 1536 clones were screened from 4 rounds of selection with both antigens, and 29 different testosterone-BSA and 23 beta-estradiol-BSA binding clones were found and verified by sequencing. This automated antibody phage display procedure increases the throughput of generating wide panels of target-binding antibody candidates and allows the selection and screening of antibodies against several different targets in parallel with high efficiency.

  4. Teachers as Readers: Building Communities of Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremin, Teresa; Mottram, Marilyn; Collins, Fiona; Powell, Sacha; Safford, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Given the narrow scope of primary teachers' knowledge and use of children's literature identified in Phase I of "Teachers as Readers" (2006-2007), the core goal of the Phase II project was to improve teachers' knowledge and experience of such literature in order to help them increase children's motivation and enthusiasm for reading, especially…

  5. Development of a cloud point extraction and spectrophotometry-based microplate method for the determination of nitrite in human urine and blood.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Lu, Yunhui; Fan, Chongyang; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yaling

    2015-02-01

    A novel and simple method for the sensitive determination of trace amounts of nitrite in human urine and blood has been developed by combination of cloud point extraction (CPE) and microplate assay. The method is based on the Griess reaction and the reaction product is extracted into nonionic surfactant Triton-X114 using CPE technique. In this study, decolorization treatment of urine and blood was applied to overcome the interference of matrix and enhance the sensitivity of nitrite detection. Multi-sample can be simultaneously detected thanks to a 96-well microplate technique. The effects of different operating parameters such as type of decolorizing agent, concentration of surfactant (Triton X-114), addition of (NH4)2SO4, extraction temperature and time, interfering elements were studied and optimum conditions were obtained. Under the optimum conditions, a linear calibration graph was obtained in the range of 10-400 ng mL(-1) of nitrite with limit of detection (LOD) of 2.5 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for determination of 100 ng mL(-1) of nitrite was 2.80%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of nitrite in the urine and blood samples with recoveries of 92.6-101.2%.

  6. Development of a cloud point extraction and spectrophotometry-based microplate method for the determination of nitrite in human urine and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiao; Lu, Yunhui; Fan, Chongyang; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yaling

    2015-02-01

    A novel and simple method for the sensitive determination of trace amounts of nitrite in human urine and blood has been developed by combination of cloud point extraction (CPE) and microplate assay. The method is based on the Griess reaction and the reaction product is extracted into nonionic surfactant Triton-X114 using CPE technique. In this study, decolorization treatment of urine and blood was applied to overcome the interference of matrix and enhance the sensitivity of nitrite detection. Multi-sample can be simultaneously detected thanks to a 96-well microplate technique. The effects of different operating parameters such as type of decolorizing agent, concentration of surfactant (Triton X-114), addition of (NH4)2SO4, extraction temperature and time, interfering elements were studied and optimum conditions were obtained. Under the optimum conditions, a linear calibration graph was obtained in the range of 10-400 ng mL-1 of nitrite with limit of detection (LOD) of 2.5 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for determination of 100 ng mL-1 of nitrite was 2.80%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of nitrite in the urine and blood samples with recoveries of 92.6-101.2%.

  7. McGuffey's Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norstad, Eric

    McGuffey's "Eclectic Readers" were a pervasive educational influence for almost 100 years in America and over 122 million copies were published before their use began to decline in the 1920s. Originally the work of William Holmes McGuffey, born in 1800 and raised on the Ohio frontier, the first McGuffey's readers appeared in 1837: a primer, four…

  8. Heroic and Passionate Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents books to be used in a thematic unit focusing on readers as heroes and heroines in which characters become readers despite being poor, homeless, deaf, visually impaired, dyslexic, or having parents who are illiterate or who read and write in another language. Describes student activities: research, art, writing, family reading, letter…

  9. Romancing the YA Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Mosley, Shelley; Bouricius, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the romance genre and provides guidelines for librarians with high school aged readers. Highlights include where to find information about the romance genre; the appeal of romance fiction; levels of sex and sensuality; reference tools; subgenres; and authors and titles that may be popular with young adult romance readers. (LRW)

  10. Motivating Reluctant Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciani, Alfred J., Ed.

    Representing views on many facets of reluctant readers, the chapters in this book provide suggestions for working with students who function at a frustration level and those who have an aversion to reading. Specific topics discussed in the book's nine chapters are: (1) building language experiences for reluctant readers, (2) home remedies, (3)…

  11. The Readers' Advisor's Companion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, Kenneth D., Ed.; Burgin, Robert, Ed.

    From scholarly discourse to the latest issues in readers' advisory services, this guide provides up-to-date information on the many challenges of the practice, as well as on interdisciplinary directions, continuing education, and the gap in graduate professional education for readers' advisory. The book's 16 chapters are organized into three main…

  12. Synthesis of gold nano- and microplates in hexagonal liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyan; Chen, Xiao; Zhan, Jie; Chai, Yongcun; Yang, Chunjie; Xu, Limei; Zhuang, Wenchang; Jing, Bo

    2005-03-01

    Single-crystalline gold nano- and microplates with triangular or hexagonal shapes are synthesized by reduction of HAuCl(4) in lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) mainly made of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers and water after adding a small amount of capping agents, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB). During the growth of such plates, capping agents play the crucial role. It is found that there is an optimal value of CTAB or TBAB concentration for producing microplates. The selective adsorption of CTAB or TBAB on certain crystallographic facets may be the key point of the supposed mechanism. Although LLC does not really act as a template, it provides an ordered structure confining CTAB as well as the nascent metal nuclei, which enhances the oriented attachment of nuclei and thus the consequent growth of single-crystal plates.

  13. Surface tension drawing of liquid from microplate capillary wells.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Willem; Ng, Tuck Wah; Lye, Jonathan Kok Keung; Liew, Oi Wah; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Pressure differentials are routinely used to actuate flow in capillaries. We advance here an alternative means of flow generation that capitalizes on the extension of a liquid bridge achieved by the drawing of a rod through the action of surface tension. This meets the exigencies of creating controllable flow using simpler and more compact means. We found the ability to generate controllable flow to be strongly affected by the liquid bridge sustaining features, and that the use of rod diameters larger than the capillary was more conducive. The extensional flow resulting from the rupture of the liquid bridge was also found to have a strong circulation component which facilitated mixing. The approach here is highly amenable for use in capillary well microplates which have significant advantages over standard microplates. The features of this approach offer usage possibilities in biochemical applications in the field, such as in the leukocyte cell adhesion and hemagglutination tests of blood samples. PMID:21986403

  14. Cryoalgotox: Use of cryopreserved alga in a semistatic microplate test

    SciTech Connect

    Benhra, A.; Radetski, C.M.; Ferard, J.F.

    1997-03-01

    Use of cryopreserved alga Selenastrum capricornutum has been evaluated as a simple and cost-efficient procedure in a new semistatic algal ecotoxicity test. Experiments have been conducted to compare performance criteria of this method, named Cryoalgotox, versus the classic microplate test using fresh algae. Cryoalgotox 72-h 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) determined with Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 6+}, and atrazine were more sensitive, repeatable (low coefficients of variation), and reproducible (low time effect) than the results obtained with the classical microplate tests. The effect of storage time at {minus}80 C on the sensitivity of the algae was assessed using cadmium as a toxic reference; it was shown that algae stored at {minus}80 C over a 3-month period gave comparable toxicity results to those found with fresh algae.

  15. Microplate based biosensing with a computer screen aided technique.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Daniel; Andersson, Tony P M; Svensson, Samuel P S; Lundström, Ingemar

    2003-10-30

    Melanophores, dark pigment cells from the frog Xenopus laevis, have the ability to change light absorbance upon stimulation by different biological agents. Hormone exposure (e.g. melatonin or alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone) has been used here as a reversible stimulus to test a new compact microplate reading platform. As an application, the detection of the asthma drug formoterol in blood plasma samples is demonstrated. The present system utilizes a computer screen as a (programmable) large area light source, and a standard web camera as recording media enabling even kinetic microplate reading with a versatile and broadly available platform, which suffices to evaluate numerous bioassays. Especially in the context of point of care testing or self testing applications these possibilities become advantageous compared with highly dedicated comparatively expensive commercial systems.

  16. Microplate based biosensing with a computer screen aided technique.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Daniel; Andersson, Tony P M; Svensson, Samuel P S; Lundström, Ingemar

    2003-10-30

    Melanophores, dark pigment cells from the frog Xenopus laevis, have the ability to change light absorbance upon stimulation by different biological agents. Hormone exposure (e.g. melatonin or alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone) has been used here as a reversible stimulus to test a new compact microplate reading platform. As an application, the detection of the asthma drug formoterol in blood plasma samples is demonstrated. The present system utilizes a computer screen as a (programmable) large area light source, and a standard web camera as recording media enabling even kinetic microplate reading with a versatile and broadly available platform, which suffices to evaluate numerous bioassays. Especially in the context of point of care testing or self testing applications these possibilities become advantageous compared with highly dedicated comparatively expensive commercial systems. PMID:14558996

  17. A Colorimetric Microplate Assay for DNA-Binding Activity of His-Tagged MutS Protein.

    PubMed

    Banasik, Michał; Sachadyn, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    A simple microplate method was designed for rapid testing DNA-binding activity of proteins. The principle of the assay involves binding of tested DNA by his-tagged protein immobilized on a nickel-coated ELISA plate, following colorimetric detection of biotinylated DNA with avidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The method was used to compare DNA mismatch binding activities of MutS proteins from three bacterial species. The assay required relatively low amounts of tested protein (approximately 0.5-10 pmol) and DNA (0.1-10 pmol) and a relatively short time of analysis (up to 60 min). The method is very simple to apply and convenient to test different buffer conditions of DNA-protein binding. Sensitive colorimetric detection enables naked eye observations and quantitation with an ELISA reader. The performance of the assay, which we believe is a distinguishing trait of the method, is based on two strong and specific molecular interactions: binding of a his-tagged protein to a nickel-coated microplate and binding of biotinylated DNA to avidin. In the reported experiments, the solution was used to optimize the conditions for DNA mismatch binding by MutS protein; however, the approach could be implemented to test nucleic acids interactions with any protein of interest. PMID:27241123

  18. GPS estimates of microplate motions, northern Caribbean: evidence for a Hispaniola microplate and implications for earthquake hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, B.; DeMets, C.; Calais, E.

    2012-09-01

    We use elastic block modelling of 126 GPS site velocities from Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and other islands in the northern Caribbean to test for the existence of a Hispaniola microplate and estimate angular velocities for the Gônave, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands and two smaller microplates relative to each other and the Caribbean and North America plates. A model in which the Gônave microplate spans the whole plate boundary between the Cayman spreading centre and Mona Passage west of Puerto Rico is rejected at a high confidence level. The data instead require an independently moving Hispaniola microplate between the Mona Passage and a likely diffuse boundary within or offshore from western Hispaniola. Our updated angular velocities predict 6.8 ± 1.0 mm yr-1 of left-lateral slip along the seismically hazardous Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone of southwest Hispaniola, 9.8 ± 2.0 mm yr-1 of slip along the Septentrional fault of northern Hispaniola and ˜14-15 mm yr-1 of left-lateral slip along the Oriente fault south of Cuba. They also predict 5.7 ± 1 mm yr-1 of fault-normal motion in the vicinity of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone, faster than previously estimated and possibly accommodated by folds and faults in the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone borderlands. Our new and a previous estimate of Gônave-Caribbean plate motion suggest that enough elastic strain accumulates to generate one to two Mw˜ 7 earthquakes per century along the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden and nearby faults of southwest Hispaniola. That the 2010 M= 7.0 Haiti earthquake ended a 240-yr-long period of seismic quiescence in this region raises concerns that it could mark the onset of a new earthquake sequence that will relieve elastic strain that has accumulated since the late 18th century.

  19. Microplates with integrated oxygen sensors for kinetic cell respiration measurement and cytotoxicity testing in primary and secondary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Rahul Ravi; Koch-Kirsch, Yvonne; Maas, Ruth; John, Gernot T; Krause, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a cytotoxicity and cell respiration assay that is nondestructive and kinetic. It makes use of 96-well microplates integrated with oxygen sensors. The oxygen signal monitored on-line gives an indication of the cell viability. We show its application for suspension cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary and HL60 cells) as well as adherent (Caco2 cells) and primary (rat hepatocytes) cells using well-known cytotoxic compounds (sodium azide, diclofenac, clozapine, sodium dodecyl sulfate, 2-thiouracil, tamoxifen, and tranylcypromine). The 50% lethality concentration (LC50) obtained from the assay is compared with the standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide end-point assay. The cells can be grown directly in the plates, and the assay requires no further reagents or processing. The cells can be harvested for further analysis, if required. The on-line dynamic measurement allows the calculation of LC50 as a function of exposure time. LC50 was shown to decrease with time in HL60 cells. The dynamics of this process was considerably different for the three compounds sodium dodecyl sulfate, tamoxifen, and diclofenac, indicating a large potential of application of this method for cell death studies. The assay system can be applied to almost any cell-based systems with little adaptation. The assay is robust, flexible, and applicable for medium- to high-throughput systems requiring only minimal handling and no additional agent.

  20. A sensitive and quick microplate method to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration of plant extracts for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eloff, J N

    1998-12-01

    Agar diffusion techniques are used widely to assay plant extracts for antimicrobial activity, but there are problems associated with this technique. A micro-dilution technique was developed using 96-well microplates and tetrazolium salts to indicate bacterial growth. p-Iodonitrotetrazolium violet [0.2 mg/ml] gave better results than tetrazolium red or thiazolyl blue. The method is quick, worked well with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli and with non-aqueous extracts from many different plants. The method gave reproducible results; required only 10-25 microliters of extract to determine minimal inhibitory concentrations, distinguished between microcidal and microstatic effects, and provided a permanent record of the results. Using S. aureus, and a Combretum molle extract, the technique was 32 times more sensitive than agar diffusion techniques and was not sensitive to culture age of the test organism up to 24 hours. The S. aureus culture could be stored up to 10 days in a cold room with little effect on the assay results. This method was useful in screening plants for antimicrobial activity and for the bioassay-guided isolation of antimicrobial compounds from plants. MIC values determined for sulfisoxazole, norfloxacin, gentamicin, and nitrofuratoin were similar to values indicated in the literature but values obtained with trimethroprim and ampicillin were higher with some bacteria. PMID:9933989

  1. PANJABI READER, LEVEL 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VATUK, VED P.

    THIS SECOND-LEVEL READER IN THE PANJABI LANGUAGE CAN BE USED IN A SECOND- OR THIRD-YEAR COURSE AS A SUPPLEMENT TO CONVERSATIONAL MATERIALS, OR BY ITSELF IN A COURSE ON THE WRITTEN LANGUAGE. THE GRAMMAR APPENDIX INCLUDED IS IDENTICAL TO THAT FOUND IN THE FIRST-LEVEL PANJABI READER (ED 010 485). THE MAIN PORTION OF THE BOOK CONSISTS OF 23 UNITS,…

  2. A Cenozoic tectonic model for Southeast Asia - microplates and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, K.A.

    1995-04-01

    A computer-assisted Cenozoic tectonic model was built for Southeast Asia and used to construct 23 base maps, 2 to 6 million years apart. This close temporal spacing was necessary to constrain all the local geometric shifts in a consistent and geologically feasible fashion. More than a hundred individual blocks were required to adequately treat Cenozoic microplate processes at a basic level. The reconstructions show tectonic evolution to be characterized by long periods of gradual evolution, interrupted by brief, widespread episodes of reorganization in fundamental plate geometries and kinematics. These episodes are triggered by major collisions, or by accumulation of smaller changes. The model takes into account difficulties inherent in the region. The Pacific and Indo-Australian plates and their predecessors have driven westward and northward since the late Paleozoic, towards each other and the relatively stationary backstop of Asia. Southeast Asia is therefore the result of a long-lived, complex process of convergent tectonics, making it difficult to reconstruct tectonic evolution as much of the continental margin and sea floor spreading record was erased. In addition, the region has been dominated by small-scale microplate processes with short time scales and internal deformation, taking place in rapidly evolving and more ductile buffer zones between the major rigid plate systems. These plate interaction zones have taken up much of the relative motion between the major plates. Relatively ephemeral crustal blocks appear and die within the buffer zones, or accrete to and disperse from the margins of the major plate systems. However, such microplate evolution is the dominant factor in Cenozoic basin evolution. This detailed testonic model aids in comprehension and prediction of basin development, regional hydrocarbon habitat, and petroleum systems.

  3. Evaporative preconcentration of fluorescent protein samples in capillary based microplates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fenfen; Ng, Tuck Wah; Lye, Jonathan Kok Keung; Liew, Oi Wah

    2011-09-01

    The preconcentration of analytes is important in biochemical analysis as it offers the ability to detect for trace species, and increase signal-to-noise ratios when using optical sensing on fluorophores. A strong advantage of the evaporation technique lies in its ability to operate without the need of any energy source; albeit major challenges exist on how to increase the surface area exposure to air for heightened evaporation, ensure no further increases once specified analyte concentrations have been achieved, and not needing any intervening membranes. We demonstrate here that the droplet creation and retraction approach in capillary based microplates offers such abilities whilst at the same time facilitating mixing. PMID:21559858

  4. a Model of the Kinematics of the Danakil Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloaguen, R.; Eagles, G.

    2001-12-01

    We present a regional approach to the tectonics of the Afar depression, in which we attempt to relate reconnaissance-scale data to overall movement of a Danakil microplate. Topographic, satellite, airphoto, magnetic and gravity data from the flanks and interior of the Afar depression, NE Africa, are used to assess differing models of the dispersal of the Danakil microplate from its western to its eastern margin. The data are compared to small circles about published instantaneous poles to find evidence of strike-slip and transverse features. A good fit to such features is made using a statistically-significant modern pole to the NNE of the Afar depression. A possible reconstruction about this pole, which reunites branches of an inherited shear zone, is presented. This reconstruction is not consistent with a `crank-arm' or `saloon-doors' mode of opening for the Afar depression. Instead we suggest that only recently has the Danakil microplate come into existence, after the westwards propagation of the Gulf of Aden rift into the Afar depression. Prior to this time movement of Danakil occurred very slowly about the same pole, but as part of the Somalian plate; as shown by the continuity of ancient flowline features onto the Nubian margin of the Main Ethiopian Rift. At 7 Ma, possibly due to the onset of oceanic-type accretion in Afar where the lithosphere was hot and thin already from the presence of a hotspot, Danakil accelerated eastwards about this pole. In response the Gulf of Aden rift propagated westwards to form a new plate boundary between Danakil and Somalia. The newly-formed Danakil microplate is thus an intermediate stage in the transfer of all or part of the Danakil horst to the Arabian plate from the Somalian plate. Further south, at the Main Ethiopian Rift, continental lithosphere did not rupture but the presence of focussed accretion at Afar in a hitherto-diffuse plate boundary precipitated the southward migration of the Somalia-Nubia pole to its present

  5. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  6. Detection of dengue viral RNA by microplate hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, B H; Zamora, M P; Liu, S

    1995-08-01

    Dengue virus infection is a major public health problem throughout tropical countries. In endemic areas, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are common complications resulting in death. However, serological confirmation of dengue-related illness is often complicated and time-consuming. Detection of dengue viruses in clinical or field samples usually depends on virus isolation in susceptible cell lines or in mosquitoes, followed by viral protein identification using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. The increasing incidence of dengue virus infections has prompted increased efforts to develop rapid and reliable diagnostic techniques. A simple microplate hybridization method was developed for identification of viral RNA. Microplate hybridization is simpler than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and has several advantages over the conventional dot-blot hybridization method: (1) radioisotopes are not necessary; (2) synthetic oligonucleotide for the probe is not needed; (3) the time required for washing of the solid phase is greatly reduced; and (4) baking is eliminated. The results show that this procedure is sensitive, rapid and easy to perform.

  7. Structural patterns and tectonic history of the Bauer microplate, Eastern Tropical Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, B.W.; Lonsdale, P.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Bauer microplate was an independent slab of oceanic lithosphere that from 17 Ma to 6 Ma grew from 1.4 ?? 105 km2 to 1.2 ?? 106 km2 between the rapidly diverging Pacific and Nazca plates. Growth was by accretion at the lengthening and overlapping axes of the (Bauer-Nazca) Galapagos Rise (GR) and the (Pacific-Bauer) East Pacific Rise (EPR). EPR and GR axial propagation to create and rapidly grow the counter-clockwise spinning microplate occurred in two phases: (1) 17-15Ma, when the EPR axis propagated north and the GR axis propagated south around a narrow (100- to 200-km-wide) core of older lithosphere; and (2) 8-6 Ma, when rapid northward propagation of the EPR axis resumed, overlapping ???400 km of the fast-spreading Pacific-Nazca rise-crest and appending a large (200- to 400-km-wide) area of the west flank of that rise as a 'northern annex' to the microplate. Between 15 and 8 Ma the microplate grew principally by crustal accretion at the crest of its rises. The microplate was captured by the Nazca plate and the Galapagos Rise axis became extinct soon after 6 Ma, when the south end of the Pacific-Bauer EPR axis became aligned with the southern Pacific-Nazca EPR axis and its north end was linked by the Quebrada Transform to the northern Pacific-Nazca EPR axis. Incomplete multibeam bathymetry of the microplate margins, and of both flanks of the Pacific-Bauer and Bauer-Nazca Rises, together with archival magnetic and satellite altimetry data, clarifies the growth and (counter-clockwise) rotation of the microplate, and tests tectonic models derived from studies of the still active, much smaller, Easter and Juan Fernandez microplates. Our interpretations differ from model predictions in that Euler poles were not located on the microplate boundary, propagation in the 15-8 Ma phase of growth was not toward these poles, and microplate rotation rates were small (5??/m.y.) for much of its history, when long, bounding transform faults reduced coupling to Nazca plate

  8. Tectonics and evolution of the Juan Fernandez microplate at the Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic triple junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson-Fontana, S.; Larson, R. L.; Engein, J. F.; Lundgren, P.; Stein, S.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic and bathymetric profiles derived from the R/V Endeavor survey and focal mechanism studies for earthquakes on two of the Juan Fernandez microplate boundaries are analyzed. It is observed that the Nazca-Juan Fernandez pole is in the northern end of the microplate since the magnetic lineation along the East Ridge of the microplate fans to the south. The calculation of the relative motion of the Juan Fernandez-Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic four-plate system using the algorithm of Minster et al. (1974) is described. The development of tectonic and evolutionary models of the region is examined. The tectonic model reveals that the northern boundary of the Juan Fernandez microplate is a zone of compression and that the West Ridge and southwestern boundary are spreading obliquely; the evolutionary model relates the formation of the Juan Fernandez microplate to differential spreading rates at the triple junction.

  9. Strategies for Teen Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutant, Carolyn; Perchemlides, Natalia

    2005-01-01

    Genre-specific reading or comprehension strategies can help older, striving students comprehend expository and narrative texts. Students being taught to be strategic and methodical in their approach can create a generation of readers, who will be able to apply their critical thinking skills to any piece of text they encounter.

  10. Growing Young Gifted Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Patricia F.

    2009-01-01

    There is great pressure on parents to teach children to read as early as possible. In reality, precocious (early advanced) readers seem to almost master the skill on their own, without the assistance of highly touted, commercially available programs. The 18-month-old toddler who names the letters on alphabet blocks; or the 26-month-old who can…

  11. Understanding Readers' Differing Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucer, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the characteristics of reader understandings that vary from those stated in the text. Eighty-seven fourth graders orally read complex academic literary and scientific texts, followed by probed retellings. Retold ideas not directly supported by, or reflective of, the texts were identified. These differing understandings…

  12. Parents and Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Virginia H., Ed.

    This series of 12 articles for parents on how to help pre-schoolers and beginning readers at home was written for the National Reading Center by specialists in reading and early childhood education. The titles and authors are: "Getting Ready to Read" (E. Robert La Crosse), "Creating a Good Reading Climate at Home" (Mary Frances K. Johnson),…

  13. Overloading the Competent Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frank

    Two sources of information are involved in reading; the visual information picked up by the eyes from the printed page and the nonvisual information, or prior knowledge, that the reader possesses. An overreliance on visual information leads to an overloading of the cognitive process involved in reading and loss in comprehension. Overreliance on…

  14. PANJABI READER. LEVEL 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VATUK, VED P.

    A FIRST-LEVEL READER IS PRESENTED, PRIMARILY FOR THOSE STUDENTS WHO HAVE A SPEAKING KNOWLEDGE OF PANJABI AND SOME KNOWLEDGE OF PANJABI GRAMMAR. THIS VOLUME CAN BE USED IN A GENERAL PANJABI LANGUAGE COURSE AS A SUPPLEMENT TO CONVERSATIONAL MATERIALS, OR BY ITSELF IN A COURSE ON THE WRITTEN LANGUAGE. A GLOSSARY AND A BRIEF GRAMMATICAL APPENDIX HAVE…

  15. NaturalReader: A New Generation Text Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    NaturalReader (http://www.naturalreaders.com/) is a new generation text reader, which means that it reads any machine readable text using synthesized speech without having to copy and paste the selected text into the NaturalReader application window. It installs a toolbar directly into all of the Microsoft Office[TM] programs and uses a mini-board…

  16. Microplate Technique for Determining Accumulation of Metals by Algae

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, James M.; Jennett, J. Charles; Smith, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A microplate technique was developed to determine the conditions under which pure cultures of algae removed heavy metals from aqueous solutions. Variables investigated included algal species and strain, culture age (11 and 44 days), metal (mercury, lead, cadmium, and zinc), pH, effects of different buffer solutions, and time of exposure. Plastic, U-bottomed microtiter plates were used in conjunction with heavy metal radionuclides to determine concentration factors for metal-alga combinations. The technique developed was rapid, statistically reliable, and economical of materials and cells. Results (expressed as concentration factors) were in reasonably good agreement with literature values. All species of algae studied removed mercury from solution. Green algae proved better at accumulating cadmium than did blue-green algae. No alga studied removed zinc, perhaps because cells were maintained in the dark during the labeling period. Chlamydomonas sp. proved superior in ability to remove lead from solution. PMID:16345764

  17. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Verena; Kiesslich, Tobias; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs) for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011). In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4) for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i) was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii) added simultaneously with the cells or (iii) one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly) store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings. PMID:23509741

  18. The western transverse ranges microplate as a native terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Reed, W.E. )

    1994-04-01

    Palocurrent measurements from the entire Cretaceous section of the western Transverse Ranges microplate (WTRM) yield a northerly flow direction. Point count data indicate a mixed provenance for both conglomerates and associated sandstones. The dominant provenance was mixed magmatic arc/recycled orogen and disected/transitional arc terranes. Petrographic, quantitative SEM and microprobe analysis also indicate the presence of diagnostic Franciscan mineralogy in these sediments, including glaucophane, riebeckite, lawsonite, and serpentine, suggesting derivation from a subduction complex. Olistoclasts of chert, jadeitic graywacke, serpentine and blueschist are found intermixed within the arc-derived sediments. Olistoclasts range in size from sub-millimeter to centimeter scale and olistoliths range up to 150 m. Well preserved internal bedding in some of the olistoliths suggest emplacement by landsliding indicating very short transport distance. This Franciscan material represents the oldest melange-derived material reported from this part of California and documents uplift and erosion of the subduction complex earlier than previously suggested. These data are consistent with deposition in a Cretaceous fore-arc basin located west or south of the San Diego area. The allochthonous WTRM of southern California can be reconstructed to an originally north-south oriented fore-arc basin. After deposition of the Sespe Formation (22 Ma [+-]) the microplate was slivered by strike-slip faults and rotated clockwise approximately 90[degrees], after which, the block again accreted against the continental margin. Our reconstruction suggest that depositional and structural trends for Eocene and Cretaceous sediments is likely to be different from that in the Miocene Monterey pay zones in the Santa Barbara channel region. If our reconstruction is correct, exploration strategy for Eocene and Cretaceous petroleum in the southern California Bight should take this tectonic model into account.

  19. Oceanic microplate formation records the onset of India-Eurasia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Sandwell, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of seafloor tectonic fabric in the Indian Ocean, using high-resolution satellite-derived vertical gravity gradient data, reveals an extinct Pacific-style oceanic microplate ('Mammerickx Microplate') west of the Ninetyeast Ridge. It is one of the first Pacific-style microplates to be mapped outside the Pacific basin, suggesting that geophysical conditions during formation probably resembled those that have dominated at eastern Pacific ridges. The microplate formed at the Indian-Antarctic ridge and is bordered by an extinct ridge in the north and pseudofault in the south, whose conjugate is located north of the Kerguelen Plateau. Independent microplate rotation is indicated by asymmetric pseudofaults and rotated abyssal hill fabric, also seen in multibeam data. Magnetic anomaly picks and age estimates calculated from published spreading rates suggest formation during chron 21o (∼47.3 Ma). Plate reorganizations can trigger ridge propagation and microplate development, and we propose that Mammerickx Microplate formation is linked with the India-Eurasia collision (initial 'soft' collision). The collision altered the stress regime at the Indian-Antarctic ridge, leading to a change in segmentation and ridge propagation from an establishing transform. Fast Indian-Antarctic spreading that preceded microplate formation, and Kerguelen Plume activity, may have facilitated ridge propagation via the production of thin and weak lithosphere; however both factors had been present for tens of millions of years and are therefore unlikely to have triggered the event. Prior to the collision, the combination of fast spreading and plume activity was responsible for the production of a wide region of undulate seafloor to the north of the extinct ridge and 'W' shaped lineations that record back and forth ridge propagation. Microplate formation provides a precise means of dating the onset of the India-Eurasia collision, and is completely independent of and complementary to timing

  20. Biochemical characterization and immobilization of Erwinia carotovoral-asparaginase in a microplate for high-throughput biosensing of l-asparagine.

    PubMed

    Labrou, Nikolaos E; Muharram, Magdy Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    l-Asparaginases (l-ASNase, E.C. 3.5.1.1) catalyze the conversion of l-asparagine to l-aspartic acid and ammonia. In the present work, a new form of l-ASNase from a strain of Erwinia carotovora (EcaL-ASNase) was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein and characterized. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a single-step procedure comprising ion-exchange chromatography. The properties of the recombinant enzyme were investigated employing kinetic analysis and molecular modelling and the kinetic parameters (Km, kcat) were determined for a number of substrates. The enzyme was used to assemble a microplate-based biosensor that was used for the development of a simple assay for the determination of l-asparagine in biological samples. In this sensor, the enzyme was immobilized by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde and deposited into the well of a microplate in 96-well format. The sensing scheme was based on the colorimetric measurement of ammonia formation using the Nessler's reagent. This format is ideal for micro-volume applications and allows the use of the proposed biosensor in high-throughput applications for monitoring l-asparagine levels in serum and foods samples. Calibration curve was obtained for l-asparagine, with useful concentration range 10-200μΜ. The biosensor had a detection limit of 10μM for l-asparagine. The method's reproducibility was in the order of ±3-6% and l-asparagine mean recoveries were 101.5%.

  1. Biochemical characterization and immobilization of Erwinia carotovoral-asparaginase in a microplate for high-throughput biosensing of l-asparagine.

    PubMed

    Labrou, Nikolaos E; Muharram, Magdy Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    l-Asparaginases (l-ASNase, E.C. 3.5.1.1) catalyze the conversion of l-asparagine to l-aspartic acid and ammonia. In the present work, a new form of l-ASNase from a strain of Erwinia carotovora (EcaL-ASNase) was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein and characterized. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a single-step procedure comprising ion-exchange chromatography. The properties of the recombinant enzyme were investigated employing kinetic analysis and molecular modelling and the kinetic parameters (Km, kcat) were determined for a number of substrates. The enzyme was used to assemble a microplate-based biosensor that was used for the development of a simple assay for the determination of l-asparagine in biological samples. In this sensor, the enzyme was immobilized by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde and deposited into the well of a microplate in 96-well format. The sensing scheme was based on the colorimetric measurement of ammonia formation using the Nessler's reagent. This format is ideal for micro-volume applications and allows the use of the proposed biosensor in high-throughput applications for monitoring l-asparagine levels in serum and foods samples. Calibration curve was obtained for l-asparagine, with useful concentration range 10-200μΜ. The biosensor had a detection limit of 10μM for l-asparagine. The method's reproducibility was in the order of ±3-6% and l-asparagine mean recoveries were 101.5%. PMID:27542748

  2. A Fluorescent Microplate Assay Quantifies Bacterial Efflux and Demonstrates Two Distinct Compound Binding Sites in AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R.; Erwin, Alice L.

    2015-01-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux. PMID:25645845

  3. My Journey as a Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cevellos, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    In this case history, the author describes how her journey as a reader evolved from a poor reader who did not like to read in elementary school into an avid trilingual reader in graduate school. Once she discovered the joy of reading, each language in which she read had its own purpose and emotional connection. She credits self-selected reading…

  4. β-Cyclodextrin enhanced on-line organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of ambroxol in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Bi, Youwei; Wang, Li; Sun, Fanlu; Chen, Zhao; Xu, Guili; Fan, Guorong

    2012-07-01

    A field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method is described for the quantification of ambroxol hydrochloride in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format. The separation was carried out at 25 °C in a 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 6.25 mM borate-25 mM phosphate (pH 3.0) and 1mM β-cyclodextrin. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Clean-up and preconcentration of plasma biosamples were developed by 96-well format liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). In this study, FASS in combination with β-cyclodextrin enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 fold in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision, extraction recovery and robustness. The calibration graph was linear for ambroxol hydrochloride from 2 to 500 ng/ml. The lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day precisions of lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 9.61 and 11.80%, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to the evaluation of clinical pharmacokinetic study of ambroxol hydrochloride tablet after oral administration to 12 healthy volunteers.

  5. β-Cyclodextrin enhanced on-line organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of ambroxol in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Bi, Youwei; Wang, Li; Sun, Fanlu; Chen, Zhao; Xu, Guili; Fan, Guorong

    2012-07-01

    A field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method is described for the quantification of ambroxol hydrochloride in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format. The separation was carried out at 25 °C in a 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 6.25 mM borate-25 mM phosphate (pH 3.0) and 1mM β-cyclodextrin. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Clean-up and preconcentration of plasma biosamples were developed by 96-well format liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). In this study, FASS in combination with β-cyclodextrin enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 fold in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision, extraction recovery and robustness. The calibration graph was linear for ambroxol hydrochloride from 2 to 500 ng/ml. The lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day precisions of lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 9.61 and 11.80%, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to the evaluation of clinical pharmacokinetic study of ambroxol hydrochloride tablet after oral administration to 12 healthy volunteers. PMID:22464560

  6. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric bioanalysis using normal-phase columns with aqueous/organic mobile phases - a novel approach of eliminating evaporation and reconstitution steps in 96-well SPE.

    PubMed

    Naidong, Weng; Shou, Wilson Z; Addison, Thomas; Maleki, Saber; Jiang, Xiangyu

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical methods using automated 96-well solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. SPE methods typically require manual steps of drying of the eluates and reconstituting of the analytes with a suitable injection solvent possessing elution strength weaker than the mobile phase. In this study, we demonstrated a novel approach of eliminating these two steps in 96-well SPE by using normal-phase LC/MS/MS methods with low aqueous/high organic mobile phases, which consisted of 70-95% organic solvent, 5-30% water, and small amount of volatile acid or buffer. While the commonly used SPE elution solvents (i.e. acetonitrile and methanol) have stronger elution strength than a mobile phase on reversed-phase chromatography, they are weaker elution solvents than a mobile phase for normal-phase LC/MS/MS and therefore can be injected directly. Analytical methods for a range of polar pharmaceutical compounds, namely, omeprazole, metoprolol, fexofenadine, pseudoephedrine as well as rifampin and its metabolite 25-desacetyl-rifampin, in biological fluids, were developed and optimized based on the foregoing principles. As a result of the time saving, a batch of 96 samples could be processed in one hour. These bioanalytical LC/MS/MS methods were validated according to "Guidance for Industry - Bioanalytical Method Validation" recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States.

  7. Use of a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader in high-throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebe, Duncan R.; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha; Hahn, Holly; Warrior, Usha; Traphagen, Linda; Burns, David J.

    1999-04-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) efforts at Abbott Laboratories have been greatly facilitated by the use of a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader. The FLIPR consists of an incubated cabinet with integrated 96-channel pipettor and fluorometer. An argon laser is used to excite fluorophores in a 96-well microtiter plate and the emitted fluorometer. An argon laser is used to excite fluorophores in a 96-well microtiter plate and the emitted fluorescence is imaged by a cooled CCD camera. The image data is downloaded from the camera and processed to average the signal form each well of the microtiter pate for each time point. The data is presented in real time on the computer screen, facilitating interpretation and trouble-shooting. In addition to fluorescence, the camera can also detect luminescence form firefly luciferase.

  8. A 96-well single-pot protein precipitation, liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the determination of muraglitazar, a novel diabetes drug, in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y-J; Liu, Jane; Pursley, Janice; Unger, Steve

    2006-02-01

    A 96-well single-pot protein precipitation, liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of muraglitazar, a PPAR alpha/gamma dual agonist, in human plasma. The internal standard, a chemical analogue, was dissolved in acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid. The solvent system was also served as a protein precipitation reagent. Human plasma samples (0.1 mL) and the internal standard solution (0.3 mL) were added to a 96-well plate. The plate was vortexed for 1 min and centrifuged for 5 min. Then the supernatant layers were directly injected into the LC/MS/MS system. The chromatographic separation was achieved isocratically on a Phenomenox C18(2) Luna column (2 mm x 50 mm, 5 microm). The mobile phase contained 20/80 (v/v) of water and acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid. Detection was by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry on a Sciex API 3000. The standard curve, which ranged from 1 to 1000 ng/mL, was fitted to a 1/x weighted quadratic regression model. This single-pot approach effectively eliminated three time consuming sample preparation steps: sample transfer, dry-down, and reconstitution before the injection, while it preserved all the benefits of the traditional protein precipitation. By properly adjusting the autosampler needle offset level, only the supernatant was injected, without disturbing the precipitated proteins in the bottom. As a result, the quality of chromatography and column life were not compromised. After more than 600 injections, there was only slightly increase of column back-pressure. The validation results demonstrated that this method was rugged and provide satisfactory precision and accuracy. The method has been successfully applied to analyze human plasma samples in support of a first-in-man study. This method has also been validated in monkey and mouse plasma for the determination of muraglitazar. PMID:16388995

  9. The larval parasitoid Microplitis croceipes oviposits in conspecific adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasu, Keiji; Hoang Le, K.

    2007-03-01

    Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a larval parasitoid of Helicoverpa/Heliothis spp. In the course of mass rearing of M. croceipes, we found that females oviposited in the conspecific adults in rearing cages. When 20 pairs of inexperienced females and males or of experienced females and males were reared in a cage, the males lived for 14-15 days and the females for 18-20 days on average. At their death, 37-42% of the males and 50-57% of the females contained conspecific eggs or first instar larvae in their abdominal cavity. When two of inexperienced females met on a host-infested leaf of soybean, they attempted to sting each other. Of the attacked females, 30% contained a conspecific egg laid in their abdomen. In abdominal cavity of the adults parasitized by a conspecific female, the majority of the parasitoid eggs laid disappeared within 1 day after oviposition. Only 10-30% of the parasitoid eggs laid in conspecific adults hatched 3-4 days after oviposition, but those larvae never molted to second instar. When the adults were stung by one or two conspecific females, their subsequent longevity was significantly shorter than that for the control adults. Oviposition in conspecific adults may be prevalent in other parasitic wasps that quickly oviposit without intensive host examination, and have cuticle and size of abdomen to be stung by conspeicifcs.

  10. Microplates based on liquid bridges between glass rods.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Lye, Jonathan Kok Keung; Backhous, Scott; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2013-05-01

    Microplating that (i) does not necessitate complex or precise machinery to dispense small liquid volumes, (ii) enables fluorescent optical diagnosis, and (iii) permits simple analyte mixing mechanically is desirable. We advance here a novel approach that employs the formation of a liquid bridge held in place by capillary forces between glass rod tubes located parallel to each other. Experimental investigations made on liquid filling characteristics show conformance to theoretical notions. Analytical development showed the presence of regions of minimal uncertainty in the cross-sectional area of the liquid body arising from variations in the contact angle which permit consistent fluorescence measurements. Cyclical translation of the rods relative to each other, which cause rupture and reattachment of the liquid bridge, was found to engender good mixing. Strong linear trends were found in fluorescence signals relative to EGFP fluorophore concentration using standard and optical fiber (which offer targeted) excitation illumination. The open nature of liquid handling in the approach reported here and the positive results obtained portend the ability for development as integrated lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:23484766

  11. Microplate spectroscopic methods for determination of the organophosphate soman.

    PubMed

    Prokofieva, Daria Stanislavovna; Voitenko, Natalia Gennadievna; Gustyleva, Lyudmila Konstantinovna; Babakov, Vladimir Nikolaevich; Savelieva, Elena Igorevna; Jenkins, Richard Owen; Goncharov, Nikolay Vasilievich

    2010-06-01

    Two microplate spectroscopic methods for determination of organophosphates, based on inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity, have been elaborated and evaluated for determination of the chemical weapon agent soman. The principal difference between the methods is that one measures reaction substrate concentration (elaborated from Hestrin), while the other measures reaction product (elaborated from Ellman). The linear ranges of the two methods were found to be similar. Although the limit of quantification was lower for the Ellman method (110 pM), the sensitivity coefficient was in favor of the Hestrin method (1.55-fold higher). The effects of the main soman hydrolysis products were consistent for the two methods: both methylphosphonic acid and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid did not inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity. The main components of decontaminating solutions showed differential effects: while monoethanolamine had no influence upon results obtained by either method, hydrogen peroxide interfered with the Ellman method at far lower concentrations than with the Hestrin method. In practical applications involving samples containing hydrogen peroxide, the method based on Hestrin should be regarded as much more specific for OP determination than the Ellman method. PMID:20411202

  12. Thermoluminescence dosimeter reader

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, S.; Miura, N.

    1984-10-30

    A thermoluminescence dosimeter reader having a heater for heating a thermoluminescence element, a light measuring circuit for measuring circuit for measuring the intensity of the thermoluminescence emanated from the element when it is heated and a display device for displaying the reading of the dosage of radiation to which the element is exposed according to the intensity of the thermoluminescence is provided with a dosage information inputting means which outputs an electric signal having a value representing a predetermined reference dosage of radiation, a calculating means for calculating a calibration constant which is the ratio between the value of the electric signal and the output value of the light measuring circuit which is the measured value of the dosage of radiation of a reference thermoluminescence element which is exposed to the predetermined reference dosage of radiation, and a memory means for memorizing the calibration constant.

  13. Top One Hundred Kids' Books: Readers Talking to Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Elaine; Kist, Marijo; Sugden, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a committee of children's librarians created a booklist that allowed young readers to talk to other readers through published book annotations. Discusses development, promotion, and judging of a contest that encouraged children to submit new ideas and resulted in a list of entries from children at 55 schools. Includes sample winning…

  14. Microfilm Reader and Reader-Printer Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Alonzo J.

    Both microfilm readers and reader-printers (RRP) for cartridge, roll, microfiche, and aperture card use are evaluated in this report. A method of selection is described which uses a seven-step procedure. The first step for a user is to fill out his requirements on a form which is provided in the report. The second step is to review the…

  15. pyGadgetReader: GADGET snapshot reader for python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert

    2014-11-01

    pyGadgetReader is a universal GADGET snapshot reader for python that supports type-1, type-2, HDF5, and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015) binary formats. It additionally supports reading binary outputs from FoF_Special, P-StarGroupFinder, Rockstar (ascl:1210.008), and Rockstar-Galaxies.

  16. A rapid and high-throughput microplate spectrophotometric method for field measurement of nitrate in seawater and freshwater

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiapeng; Hong, Yiguo; Guan, Fengjie; Wang, Yan; Tan, Yehui; Yue, Weizhong; Wu, Meilin; Bin, Liying; Wang, Jiaping; Wen, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    The well-known zinc-cadmium reduction method is frequently used for determination of nitrate. However, this method is seldom to be applied on field research of nitrate due to the long time consuming and large sample volume demand. Here, we reported a modified zinc-cadmium reduction method (MZCRM) for measurement of nitrate at natural-abundance level in both seawater and freshwater. The main improvements of MZCRM include using small volume disposable tubes for reaction, a vortex apparatus for shaking to increase reduction rate, and a microplate reader for high-throughput spectrophotometric measurements. Considering salt effect, two salinity sections (5~10 psu and 20~35 psu) were set up for more accurate determination of nitrate in low and high salinity condition respectively. Under optimized experimental conditions, the reduction rates were stabilized on 72% and 63% on the salinity of 5 and 20 psu respectively. The lowest detection limit for nitrate was 0.5 μM and was linear up to 100 μM (RSDs was 4.8%). Environmental samples assay demonstrated that MZCRM was well consistent with conventional zinc-cadmium reduction method. In total, this modified method improved accuracy and efficiency of operations greatly, and would be realized a rapid and high-throughput determination of nitrate in field analysis of nitrate with low cost. PMID:26832984

  17. A rapid and high-throughput microplate spectrophotometric method for field measurement of nitrate in seawater and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiapeng; Hong, Yiguo; Guan, Fengjie; Wang, Yan; Tan, Yehui; Yue, Weizhong; Wu, Meilin; Bin, Liying; Wang, Jiaping; Wen, Jiali

    2016-02-01

    The well-known zinc-cadmium reduction method is frequently used for determination of nitrate. However, this method is seldom to be applied on field research of nitrate due to the long time consuming and large sample volume demand. Here, we reported a modified zinc-cadmium reduction method (MZCRM) for measurement of nitrate at natural-abundance level in both seawater and freshwater. The main improvements of MZCRM include using small volume disposable tubes for reaction, a vortex apparatus for shaking to increase reduction rate, and a microplate reader for high-throughput spectrophotometric measurements. Considering salt effect, two salinity sections (5~10 psu and 20~35 psu) were set up for more accurate determination of nitrate in low and high salinity condition respectively. Under optimized experimental conditions, the reduction rates were stabilized on 72% and 63% on the salinity of 5 and 20 psu respectively. The lowest detection limit for nitrate was 0.5 μM and was linear up to 100 μM (RSDs was 4.8%). Environmental samples assay demonstrated that MZCRM was well consistent with conventional zinc-cadmium reduction method. In total, this modified method improved accuracy and efficiency of operations greatly, and would be realized a rapid and high-throughput determination of nitrate in field analysis of nitrate with low cost.

  18. A rapid and high-throughput microplate spectrophotometric method for field measurement of nitrate in seawater and freshwater.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiapeng; Hong, Yiguo; Guan, Fengjie; Wang, Yan; Tan, Yehui; Yue, Weizhong; Wu, Meilin; Bin, Liying; Wang, Jiaping; Wen, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    The well-known zinc-cadmium reduction method is frequently used for determination of nitrate. However, this method is seldom to be applied on field research of nitrate due to the long time consuming and large sample volume demand. Here, we reported a modified zinc-cadmium reduction method (MZCRM) for measurement of nitrate at natural-abundance level in both seawater and freshwater. The main improvements of MZCRM include using small volume disposable tubes for reaction, a vortex apparatus for shaking to increase reduction rate, and a microplate reader for high-throughput spectrophotometric measurements. Considering salt effect, two salinity sections (5~10 psu and 20~35 psu) were set up for more accurate determination of nitrate in low and high salinity condition respectively. Under optimized experimental conditions, the reduction rates were stabilized on 72% and 63% on the salinity of 5 and 20 psu respectively. The lowest detection limit for nitrate was 0.5 μM and was linear up to 100 μM (RSDs was 4.8%). Environmental samples assay demonstrated that MZCRM was well consistent with conventional zinc-cadmium reduction method. In total, this modified method improved accuracy and efficiency of operations greatly, and would be realized a rapid and high-throughput determination of nitrate in field analysis of nitrate with low cost.

  19. "Striving Readers" Tough to Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Many students at the Edward Coles Model for Excellence World Language Academy or the Rachel Carson Elementary School in Chicago--schools that takes part in the Striving Readers program--say they came to enjoy reading for the first time or became better readers through the program, now in its fourth year. The federal program supports the…

  20. Report Card on Basal Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kenneth S.; And Others

    This report examines the nature of the modern basal reader, its economics, and use. First, the report provides a history showing how the confluence of business principles, positivistic science, and behavioral psychology led to the transformation of reading textbooks into basal readers. Next, the report examines objectives and subjective factors…

  1. The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Li, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader" is an essential collection of readings for students of Applied Linguistics. Divided into five sections: Language Teaching and Learning, Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Identity and Power and Language Use in Professional Contexts, the "Reader" takes a broad interpretation of the subject…

  2. Readers, Instruction, and the NRP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, G. Pat; Martens, Prisca; Arya, Poonam; Altwerger, Bess

    2004-01-01

    Are programs that emphasize systematic phonics instruction truly superior to other types of programs for young readers, as the National Reading Panel claims? The authors conducted a study of three different programs to see what kinds of readers are actually emerging from them. Two were commercial programs that used explicit and systematic phonics…

  3. Interpersonal Needs of Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Judith

    A study sought to determine the effects of reading deficiency on the interpersonal relationship needs of regular and remedial readers as composite groups and on elementary and secondary school remedial and regular readers as age groups. Elementary and secondary school students were randomly selected and tested on the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests…

  4. Native American Adult Reader I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root, Ed.

    Aspects of Native American history and culture as well as issues and concerns of American Indians are presented in the twelve short articles in this reader for adults. Intended for use in an adult basic education/GED program, the reader features simply written stories (for grades 0-3), illustrations, vocabulary lists and student study questions.…

  5. Shifting Perspectives on Struggling Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primeaux, Joan

    2000-01-01

    Draws on social constructivist theory to present principles of reading instruction for struggling readers. Focuses on three social constructivist-based components that have been used successfully with struggling readers to enhance their reading instruction: a responsive literacy environment, explicit comprehension-strategy instruction, and time…

  6. Magmatic evolution of the Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region (South East Pacific)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hekinian, R.; Stoffers, P.; Akermand, D.; Binard, N.; Francheteau, Jean; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schonberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region located between 25?? S-116?? W and 25?? S-122?? W consists of a chain of seamounts forming isolated volcanoes and elongated (100-200 km in length) en echelon volcanic ridges oriented obliquely NE (N 065??), to the present day general spreading direction (N 100??) of the Pacific-Nazca plates. The extension of this seamount chain into the southwestern edge of the Easter microplate near 26??30??? S-115?? W was surveyed and sampled. The southern boundary including the Orongo fracture zone and other shallow ridges ( 0.25) MORBs which are similar in composition to other more recent basalts from the Southwest and East Rifts spreading axes of the Easter microplate. Incompatible element ratios normalized to chondrite values [(Ce/Yb)N = 1-2.5}, {(La/Sm)N = 0.4-1.2} and {(Zr/Y)N = 0.7-2.5} of the basalts are also similar to present day volcanism found in the Easter microplate. The volcanics from the Easter microplate-Crough region are unrelated to other known South Pacific intraplate magmatism (i.e. Society, Pitcairn, and Salas y Gomez Islands). Instead their range in incompatible element ratios is comparable to the submarine basalts from the recently investigated Ahu and Umu volcanic field (Easter hotspot) (Scientific Party SO80, 1993) and centered at about 80 km west of Easter Island. The oblique ridges and their associated seamounts are likely to represent ancient leaky transform faults created during the initial stage of the Easter microplate formation (??? 5 Ma). It appears that volcanic activity on seamounts overlying the oblique volcanic ridges has continued during their westward drift from the microplate as shown by the presence of relatively fresh lava observed on one of these structures, namely the first Oblique Volcanic Ridge near 25?? S-118?? W at about 160 km west of the Easter microplate West Rift. Based on a reconstruction of the Easter microplate, it is suggested that the Crough seamount (< 800 m depth) was formed

  7. Work function engineering of SnO single crystal microplates with thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Won Hui; Jeong, Wooseok; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jonghyurk; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-08-01

    We synthesized black SnO single-crystal microplates via a sonochemical process and engineered the work function of the SnO microplates using thermal treatments. The as-synthesized SnO microplates have a wide (001) plane, as is clearly evident from TEM images and diffraction patterns. Surface potential measurements on the SnO microplates show that the work function changes as the annealing temperature increases. The TEM and XAS results after thermal treatments imply that the micro-sized SnO(001) single-crystals are stable up to about 400 °C in air, after which the surface starts to become locally oxidized. Consequently, the long-range ordering and lattice parameter of the SnO(001) single crystals started to change to make polycrystalline SnO2 at about 600 °C. These results demonstrate the ability to tune the work function of the microplates and suggest an intriguing way to engineer the electrical properties of nanostructures.

  8. Work function engineering of SnO single crystal microplates with thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Doh, Won Hui; Jeong, Wooseok; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jonghyurk; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-08-19

    We synthesized black SnO single-crystal microplates via a sonochemical process and engineered the work function of the SnO microplates using thermal treatments. The as-synthesized SnO microplates have a wide (001) plane, as is clearly evident from TEM images and diffraction patterns. Surface potential measurements on the SnO microplates show that the work function changes as the annealing temperature increases. The TEM and XAS results after thermal treatments imply that the micro-sized SnO(001) single-crystals are stable up to about 400 °C in air, after which the surface starts to become locally oxidized. Consequently, the long-range ordering and lattice parameter of the SnO(001) single crystals started to change to make polycrystalline SnO2 at about 600 °C. These results demonstrate the ability to tune the work function of the microplates and suggest an intriguing way to engineer the electrical properties of nanostructures. PMID:27389518

  9. Work function engineering of SnO single crystal microplates with thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Doh, Won Hui; Jeong, Wooseok; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jonghyurk; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-08-19

    We synthesized black SnO single-crystal microplates via a sonochemical process and engineered the work function of the SnO microplates using thermal treatments. The as-synthesized SnO microplates have a wide (001) plane, as is clearly evident from TEM images and diffraction patterns. Surface potential measurements on the SnO microplates show that the work function changes as the annealing temperature increases. The TEM and XAS results after thermal treatments imply that the micro-sized SnO(001) single-crystals are stable up to about 400 °C in air, after which the surface starts to become locally oxidized. Consequently, the long-range ordering and lattice parameter of the SnO(001) single crystals started to change to make polycrystalline SnO2 at about 600 °C. These results demonstrate the ability to tune the work function of the microplates and suggest an intriguing way to engineer the electrical properties of nanostructures.

  10. Automation of in-tip solid-phase microextraction in 96-well format for the determination of a model drug compound in human plasma by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, W; Mullett, W M; Miller-Stein, C M; Pawliszyn, J

    2009-02-01

    Studies using in-tip solid phase microextraction (in-tip SPME) in a 96-well plate format are conducted to investigate the feasibility of SPME automation. The sample preparation process, including extraction and desorption, was fully automated and coupled with currently commercially available automated liquid handling systems. Several process parameters including extraction time and speed, and desorption time were investigated. An LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated to determine the levels of a drug compound (MK-0533) in human plasma that demonstrates the suitability of this new approach. The developed method has a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 5 ng/mL when 0.25 mL of human plasma is processed and is validated in the concentration range of 5-2, 000 ng/mL. The successful application of the assay in clinical sample analysis indicates that in-tip SPME can be easily automated and has great potential to be used for high throughput quantitative determination of drugs in pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Rigid and non-rigid micro-plates: Philippines and Myanmar-Andaman case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Generally, tectonic plates are considered as rigid. Oblique plate convergence favors the development of micro-plates along the converging boundaries. The north-south-trending Philippines archipelago (here named Philippine Mobile Belt, PMB), a few hundreds kilometers wide, is one of such complex tectonic zones. We show here that it is composed of rigid rotating crustal blocks (here called platelets). In Myanmar, the northernmost tip of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction system is another complex zone made of various crustal blocks in-between convergent plates. Yet, contrary to PMB, it sustains internal deformation with platelet buckling, altogether indicative of a non-rigid behavior. Therefore, the two case studies, Philippine Mobile Belt and Myanmar-Andaman micro-plate (MAS), illustrate the complexity of micro-plate tectonics and kinematics at convergent plate boundaries.

  12. High-throughput method for a kinetics analysis of the high-pressure inactivation of microorganisms using microplates.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toshimi; Hayashi, Manabu; Nomura, Kazuki; Hayashi, Mayumi; Kido, Miyuki; Ohmori, Tsuneo; Fukuda, Masao; Iguchi, Akinori; Ueno, Shigeaki; Shigematsu, Toru; Hirayama, Masao; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-01

    Using microplates as pressure and cultivation vessels, a high-throughput method was developed for analyzing the high-pressure inactivation kinetics of microorganisms. The loss of viability from a high-pressure treatment, measured based on the growth delay during microplate cultivation, showed reproducibility with the conventional agar plate method and was applicable for the kinetics analysis.

  13. Crustal Accretion and Mantle Geodynamics at Microplates: Constraints from Gravity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, K.; Georgen, J. E.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Oceanic crustal accretion occurs in a variety of locations, including mid-ocean ridges and back-arc spreading centers, and in unique settings within these systems, such as plate boundary triple junctions, intra-transform spreading centers, and microplates. This study focuses on crustal accretion and mantle geodynamics at microplates. The Easter and Juan Fernandez microplates are located in the South Pacific along the Pacific, Nazca and Antarctic plate boundaries. Both microplates formed 3-5 Ma and they are currently rotating clockwise at 15 deg/Ma and 9 deg/Ma respectively (e.g., Searle et al. J. Geol. Soc. Lond. 1993). The study area also encompasses the Easter/Sala y Gomez mantle plume and the Foundation seamount chain, both of which are located close to spreading centers. We calculate mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) from satellite gravity measurements and shipboard soundings in order to gain a better understanding of the thermal structure of these two oceanic microplates and to quantify the effect that melting anomalies may have on their boundaries. We assume a crustal thickness of 6.0 km, a 1.7 g/cm^3 density difference at the water/crust interface, and a 0.6 g/cm^3 density difference at the crust/mantle interface. The west rift of the Easter microplate has an MBA low ranging from approximately -50 to -100 mGal, while the east rift has slightly higher MBA values ranging from roughly 10 to -50 mGal. The west rift of the Juan Fernandez microplate has a maximum MBA low of about -100 mGal with a sharp increase to -20 mGal at -35 deg S. The east rift of the Juan Fernandez microplate is characterized by more variable MBA, ranging from 0 to -140 mGal. The MBA low associated with the Easter/Sala y Gomez mantle plume has a maximum amplitude about 150 mGal. Likewise, the Foundation seamounts show a gravity low of -140 to -150 mGal. These spatial variations in gravity, as well as published isotopic data and exploratory numerical models, are used to constrain upper mantle

  14. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynamic mass redistribution signals in the same cells. This suggests that TIRF in microplate can be used for profiling and screening drugs.

  15. Events & Opinion: A Report to Our Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph H.

    1995-01-01

    Reprints an article originally published in 1957. Surveys readers of the journal. Notes that readers felt that 89% of the articles were either very good or excellent. Lists readers' views of pressing educational issues. (RS)

  16. Dari Newspaper Reader. Vol. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latify, A. Hafiz

    This reader was designed for use in the Foreign Service Institute's basic course in Dari (Kabuli or Afghan Persian). It consists of sample newspaper articles in Dari, each followed by an English-Dari vocabulary list. (PMP)

  17. Validation and application of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the determination of GDC-0834 and its metabolite in human plasma using semi-automated 96-well protein precipitation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young G; Jones, Steve A; Murakami, Stan C; Liu, Lichuan; Wong, Harvey; Buonarati, Michael H; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2012-11-01

    A liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of GDC-0834 and its amide hydrolysis metabolite (M1) in human plasma to support clinical development. The method consisted of semi-automated 96-well protein precipitation extraction for sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis in positive ion mode using TurboIonSpray® for analysis. D6-GDC-0834 and D6-M1 metabolite were used as internal standards. A linear regression (weighted 1/concentration(2) ) was used to fit calibration curves over the concentration range of 1 - 500 ng/mL for both GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite. The accuracy (percentage bias) at the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was 5.20 and 0.100% for GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite, respectively. The precision (CV) for samples at the LLOQ was 3.13-8.84 and 5.20-8.93% for GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite, respectively. For quality control samples at 3, 200 and 400 ng/mL, the between-run CV was ≤ 7.38% for GDC-0834 and ≤ 8.20% for M1 metabolite. Between run percentage bias ranged from -2.76 to 6.98% for GDC-0834 and from -6.73 to 2.21% for M1 metabolite. GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite were stable in human plasma for 31 days at -20 and -70°C. This method was successfully applied to support a GDC-0834 human pharmacokinetic-based study.

  18. A rapid method for the determination of perfluoroalkyl substances including structural isomers of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid in human serum using 96-well plates and column-switching ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salihovic, Samira; Kärrman, Anna; Lindström, Gunilla; Lind, P Monica; Lind, Lars; van Bavel, Bert

    2013-08-30

    To facilitate high-throughput analysis suitable for large epidemiological studies we developed an automated column-switching ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for determination of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs; C5, C6, C7, C8, C9, C10, C11, C12, and C13), perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs; C4, C6, C8, and C10), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), and five groups of structural perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) isomers in human serum or plasma. The analytical procedure involves rapid protein precipitation using 96-well plates followed by an automated sample clean-up using an on-line trap column removing many potentially interfering sample components while through the mobile phase gradient the target analytes are eluted onto the analytical column for further separation and subsequent mass detection. The method was linear (R(2)<0.995) at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 60ngmL(-1) with method detection limits ranging between 0.01 and 0.17ngmL(-1) depending on the analyte. The developed method was precise, with repeatability (n=7) and reproducibility (n=103) coefficients of variation between 2% and 20% for most compounds including PFOS (2% and 8%) and its structural isomers (2-6% and 4-8%). The method was in conformity with a standard reference material. The column-switching HPLC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied for the determination of perfluoroalkyl substances including structural PFOS isomers in human plasma from an epidemiological study.

  19. Customizable PCR-microplate array for differential identification of multiple pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Woubit, Abdela; Yehualaeshet, Teshome; Roberts, Sherrelle; Graham, Martha; Kim, Moonil; Samuel, Temesgen

    2014-01-01

    Customizable PCR-microplate arrays were developed for the rapid identification of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, Salmonella Typhi, Shigella dysenteriae, Yersinia pestis, Vibrio cholerae Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Saintpaul, Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Previously, we identified highly specific primers targeting each of the pathogens above. Here, we report the development of customizable PCR-microplate arrays for simultaneous identification of the pathogens using the primers. A mixed aliquot of genomic DNA from 38 different strains was used to validate three PCR-microplate array formats. Identical PCR conditions were used to run all the samples on the three formats. Results show specific amplifications on all the three custom plates. In a preliminary test to evaluate the sensitivity of these assays in laboratory-inoculated samples, detection limits as low as 9 cfu/g/ml S. Typhimurium were obtained from beef hot dog, and 78 cfu/ml from milk. Such microplate arrays could serve as valuable tools for initial identification or secondary confirmation of these pathogens. PMID:24215700

  20. Microplate based optical biosensor for L-Dopa using tyrosinase from Amorphophallus campanulatus.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amardeep Singh; Kumar, Jitendra; Melo, Jose Savio

    2014-11-01

    Developing a biosensor which is capable of simultaneously monitoring l-Dopa levels in multiple samples besides requiring small reaction volume is of great value. The present study describes the detection of l-Dopa using tyrosinase enzyme extracted from Amorphophallus campanulatus and immobilized on the surface of the microplate wells. Among the different approaches used for immobilizing tyrosinase onto the microplate wells, glutaraldehyde treatment was found to be most effective. Besides enzyme activity, ESEM-EDS (environmental scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive system) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were also carried out to confirm the immobilization of tyrosinase enzyme onto the microplate well surface. This immobilized biocomponent was then integrated with an optical transducer for l-Dopa detection and it showed good reproducibility. The sensing property of the system was studied by measuring the initial rate of dopachrome formation at 475 nm. The calibration plot gave a linear range of detection from 10-1000 μM and the detection limit was calculated to be 3 μM. The immobilized biocomponent was stable for 41 days and was reused up to nine times. Spiked samples (blood plasma) were also analyzed using this biocomponent. This microplate based biosensor thus provides a convenient system for detection of multiple samples in a single run. PMID:25300217

  1. High-Resolution Vertical Observation of Intracellular Structure Using Magnetically Responsive Microplates.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Onoe, Hiroaki; Tottori, Soichiro; Aonuma, Hiroka; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kamiya, Koki; Ishihara, Hirotaka; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A vertical confocal observation system capable of high-resolution observation of intracellular structure is demonstrated. The system consists of magnet-active microplates to rotate, incline, and translate single adherent cells in the applied magnetic field. Appended to conventional confocal microscopes, this system enables high-resolution cross-sectional imaging with single-molecule sensitivity in single scanning. PMID:27185344

  2. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-01

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  3. New GPS Constrains on Crustal Deformation within the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, M. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over twenty years of Global Positioning System (GPS) observations along the northeastern region of the Caribbean plate boundary zone have been used to evaluate crustal deformation in the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands (PRVI) microplate, which generally translates westward relative to the Caribbean plate. New data from continuous GPS stations (cGPS) and re-occupied campaign GPS stations (eGPS) obtained between 2014 and 2015 allowed us to update the velocity field of the PRVI GPS Network and redefine the existing plate kinematics model of the PRVI microplate from previous measurements (Jansma et al., 2000; Jansma & Mattioli, 2005). Geodetic datasets for this epoch were processed with GIPSY/OASIS II (v.6.2) using an absolute point positioning strategy with final, precise orbits and clocks from JPL (IGS08). Results of sites velocity in the PRVI block are presented with respect to North America and Caribbean reference frames in ITRF08. The horizontal velocity components were used to calculate baseline lengths changes between selected GPS stations that span on-land faults and microplate boundaries, thus allowing quantification of internal deformation within the PRVI block. This enables us to locate zones of active deformation and faulting in order to understand how the relative motion between geological structures is accommodated. Our updated velocity field constrains intraplate deformation to 1-3 mm/yr across the PRVI microplate and active extension of 1-2 mm/yr in the Anegada passage eastern boundary. In addition, counterclockwise rotation has been observed and may be related to the deformation in southwestern Puerto Rico continuing offshore to the Muertos Trough along PRVI's southern boundary. Despite the PRVI microplate slow motion and small deformation, increasing velocities from east to west coincides with the most active microseismic zone and ongoing deformation in southwestern Puerto Rico suggesting independent motion along this segment of the PRVI block.

  4. Readers' Theatre as a History Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Sandra D.; Riney-Kehrberg, Pamela; Westbury, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Describes the production of a readers' theater version of the first women's rights convention held at Seneca Falls, New York (includes script). Discusses the benefits of readers' theater for studying women's history and encouraging female student class participation; strategies for using readers' theater; and students creating their own readers'…

  5. Cognitive Profiles of Korean Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Jeung-Ryeul; Ji, Yu-Kyong

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the performance of 30 poor readers in the third grade with those of 30 average readers of the same age and 30 younger readers matched with the same reading level on phonological, visuo-perceptual, orthographic, and naming speed tasks. Individual data revealed heterogeneous profiles for the poor readers: six (20%) exhibited…

  6. The Westcoast Reader. A Newspaper for New Adult Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acosta, Joan, Ed.

    This document consists of informative material on and a copy of a newspaper for adults who are learning to read. The newspaper is designed to help new readers develop reading skills, while providing interesting and relevant information with an adult focus. Local, national, and international news stories as well as information about health, safety,…

  7. Comprehension of Written Syntactic Structures by Good Readers and Slow Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Barbara L.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of ninth-grade slow readers with ninth-grade good readers and with sixth grade readers on a test of syntactic comprehension. The significant difference between the ninth-grade good readers' and the ninth-grade slow readers' performance on A Test of Sentence Meaning (ATSM), developed by…

  8. Comparative Education. ASHE Reader Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempner, Ken, Ed.; Mollis, Marcela, Ed.; Tierney, William G., Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore why particular national higher education systems operate as they do and the effects these systems have on one another, on national and global development, and on the production of knowledge. The works included in this reader address the assessment of inputs and outputs of institutions and the meaning these…

  9. Writing Reviews for Readers' Advisory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Reviews are an important resource for readers' advisory and collection development. They are also a helpful promotional tool, introducing patrons to what is new on the shelf. This resource includes: (1) Tips for writing strong, relevant reviews; (2) Different ways reviews can be used to promote your library; and (3) A chapter by Joyce Saricks…

  10. Serving Boys through Readers' Advisory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Based on more than twenty years' experience working to get boys interested in reading, the author now offers his first readers' advisory volume. With an emphasis on nonfiction and the boy-friendly categories of genre fiction, the work offers a wealth of material including: (1) Suggestions for how to booktalk one-on-one as well as in large groups;…

  11. Fairy Tales for Two Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criscoe, Betty L., Ed.; Lanasa, Philip J., III, Ed.

    The 15 adapted fairy tales presented in this book were prepared for use in practicing oral reading by a parent and a child, a teacher and a child, or two children, one of whom reads slightly better than the other. The stories in the book are arranged in dialogue format for two readers. The high interest/low readability stories in the book are…

  12. Readers' Knowledge of Popular Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Peter; Bortolussi, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    This research examined readers' knowledge of popular genres. Participants wrote short essays on fantasy, science fiction, or romance. The similarities among the essays were measured using latent semantic analysis (LSA) and were then analyzed using multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. The clusters and scales were interpreted by searching…

  13. Narratives of the Struggling Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlach, Saba; Burcie, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Struggling readers need to be taught at their instruction level. But often, separating them from their classmates reinforces their feelings of inadequacy. This article will explain the importance of developing a sense of agency in struggling learners and outline some strategies teachers can incorporate to help make this happen within the classroom.

  14. Books for Adult New Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Roberta Luther, Comp.

    This document is an annotated bibliography of recommended print materials for English-speaking adults reading at the seventh grade level or below. (Sixty percent of the titles are at fifth grade level or below). The titles were selected for their broad appeal to the average adult new reader. In the selection, special consideration was given to…

  15. Error Patterns of Bilingual Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Phillip C.; Elijah, David V.

    1979-01-01

    In a study of developmental reading behaviors, errors of 75 Spanish-English bilingual students (grades 2-9) on the McLeod GAP Comprehension Test were categorized in an attempt to ascertain a pattern of language difficulties. Contrary to previous research, bilingual readers minimally used native language cues in reading second language materials.…

  16. Reader Response in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Charles, Ed.; And Others

    Focusing on reader response in the classroom, the works collected in this book represent the results of a five-week summer institute in which 25 middle school, high school, and college teachers studied the principles and applications of literature instruction. The following essays are included: an introduction by G. Garber; "An Overview of the…

  17. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  18. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  19. Fabrication of surface plasmon resonators by nanoskiving single-crystalline gold microplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Benjamin J.; Lipomi, Darren J.; Bao, Jiming; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the sectioning of chemically synthesized, single-crystalline microplates of gold with an ultramicrotome to produce single-crystalline nanowires. This method produces collinearly aligned nanostructures with small, regular changes in dimension with each consecutive cross-section. The diamond knife cuts cleanly through microplates 100 nm thick without bending the resulting nanowire, and cuts through the sharp edges of a crystal to generate nanoscale tips. This paper demonstrates that the smooth surface of the single-crystalline gold nanowires allows them to guide plasmons with lower loss than rough, polycrystalline nanowires, and that the sharp tips on the singlecrystalline nanowires serve as optical antenna that selectively couple light into the nanowire at the resonance frequency of the sharp tip.

  20. A fast optical method for the determination of liquid levels in microplates.

    PubMed

    Thurow, Kerstin; Stoll, Norbert; Ritterbusch, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Parallel liquid handling systems are widely used in different applications of life sciences. In order to avoid false positive or negative results which lead to higher costs due to the replication of the experiments it is necessary to monitor the process and success of liquid delivery. An easy method for the determination of the liquid levels in microplates has been developed and evaluated. The optical method bases on the measurement of the liquid level using CCD cameras followed by special algorithms for the evaluation and visualization of the measured data. The proposed method was tested in changing environmental lighting for two different liquids. These tests confirm our approach towards optical liquid level determination for smallest volumes in microplates and also show the challenges regarding environmental lighting and different physical properties of fluids.

  1. A Fast Optical Method for the Determination of Liquid Levels in Microplates

    PubMed Central

    Thurow, Kerstin; Stoll, Norbert; Ritterbusch, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Parallel liquid handling systems are widely used in different applications of life sciences. In order to avoid false positive or negative results which lead to higher costs due to the replication of the experiments it is necessary to monitor the process and success of liquid delivery. An easy method for the determination of the liquid levels in microplates has been developed and evaluated. The optical method bases on the measurement of the liquid level using CCD cameras followed by special algorithms for the evaluation and visualization of the measured data. The proposed method was tested in changing environmental lighting for two different liquids. These tests confirm our approach towards optical liquid level determination for smallest volumes in microplates and also show the challenges regarding environmental lighting and different physical properties of fluids. PMID:21747734

  2. Analysis of Aerobic Respiration in Intact Skeletal Muscle Tissue by Microplate-Based Respirometry.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Jonathan; Guttridge, Denis C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is a key component of skeletal muscle health, and its dysfunction has been associated with a wide variety of diseases. Microplate-based respirometry measures aerobic respiration of live cells through extracellular changes in oxygen concentration. Here, we describe a methodology to measure aerobic respiration of intact murine skeletal muscle tissue. The tissues are not cultured, permeabilized, or enzymatically dissociated to single fibers, so there is minimal experimental manipulation affecting the samples prior to acquiring measurements. PMID:27492183

  3. Osteoplastic laminotomy using titanium microplates for reconstruction of the laminar roof: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Wiedemayer, H; Schoch, B; Stolke, D

    1998-01-01

    A technique to reconstruct the posterior elements of the spinal canal in osteoplastic laminotomy is described. The use of titanium microplates allows a stable fixation of the laminar arch with optimal realignment of the lamina cut ends. The titanium implants are fully compatible with magnetic resonance imaging. The author's experience with thirty patients is reported. The method proved to be simple and effective with distinct advantages over conventional techniques. PMID:9795940

  4. Wafer-scale growth of large arrays of perovskite microplate crystals for functional electronics and optoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gongming; Li, Dehui; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Li, Yongjia; Chen, Chih-Yen; Yin, Anxiang; Zhao, Zipeng; Lin, Zhaoyang; Wu, Hao; He, Qiyuan; Ding, Mengning; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted intensive interest for its diverse optoelectronic applications. However, most studies to date have been limited to bulk thin films that are difficult to implement for integrated device arrays because of their incompatibility with typical lithography processes. We report the first patterned growth of regular arrays of perovskite microplate crystals for functional electronics and optoelectronics. We show that large arrays of lead iodide microplates can be grown from an aqueous solution through a seeded growth process and can be further intercalated with methylammonium iodide to produce perovskite crystals. Structural and optical characterizations demonstrate that the resulting materials display excellent crystalline quality and optical properties. We further show that perovskite crystals can be selectively grown on prepatterned electrode arrays to create independently addressable photodetector arrays and functional field effect transistors. The ability to grow perovskite microplates and to precisely place them at specific locations offers a new material platform for the fundamental investigation of the electronic and optical properties of perovskite materials and opens a pathway for integrated electronic and optoelectronic systems. PMID:26601297

  5. High-throughput microplate enzymatic assays for fast sugar and acid quantification in apple and tomato.

    PubMed

    Vermeir, S; Nicolaï, B M; Jans, K; Maes, G; Lammertyn, J

    2007-05-01

    In this article, we report on the use of miniaturized and automated enzymatic assays as an alternative technology for fast sugar and acid quantification in apples and tomatoes. Enzymatic assays for d-glucose, d-fructose, sucrose, D-sorbitol/xylitol, L-malic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and L-glutamic acid were miniaturized from the standard 3 mL assays in cuvettes into assays of 200 microL or lower in 96 or 384 well microplates. The miniaturization and the automation were achieved with a four channel automatic liquid handling system in order to reduce the dispensing errors and to obtain an increased sample throughput. Performance factors (limit of detection, linearity of calibration curve, and repeatability) of the assays with standard solutions were proven to be satisfactory. The automated and miniaturized assays were validated with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses for the quantification of sugars and acids in tomato and apple extracts. The high correlation between the two techniques for the different components indicates that the high-throughput microplate enzymatic assays can serve as a fast, reliable, and inexpensive alternative for HPLC as the standard analysis technique in the taste characterization of fruit and vegetables. In addition to the analysis of extracts, the high-throughput microplate enzymatic assays were used for the direct analysis of centrifuged and filtered tomato juice with an additional advantage that the sample preparation time and analysis costs are reduced significantly.

  6. Size-dependent electromechanical coupling behaviors of circular micro-plate due to flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Anqing; Zhou, Shenjie; Qi, Lu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the flexoelectric theory is re-expressed by a set of orthogonal components of strain gradient tensor. The general formulations of flexoelectric theory in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are derived and, then, are specified for the case of cylindrical coordinates. A flexoelectric circular micro-plate model is established based on the current formulations in cylindrical coordinates to evaluate its size-dependent static and dynamic responses. The governing equations, boundary conditions and initial conditions are obtained according to the Hamilton's principle. A static bending problem of simply supported axisymmetric circular micro-plate is solved in two cases, of which one is subjected to a distributed load and the other is subjected to a voltage across the plate thickness. And the free vibration problem of a simply supported circular micro-plate is also analyzed. The bending numerical results show that both the deflection and the electric potential exhibit obvious size dependency in the two cases. Both the induced electric potential in direct flexoelectric effect and the induced deflection in inverse flexoelectric effect decrease as the decrease in flexoelectric coefficient and even disappear when the flexoelectric coefficient equals zero. Moreover, the numerical results of free vibration demonstrate the dimensionless natural frequency shows obvious size effect, while the influence of flexoelectric coefficient on dimensionless natural frequency is negligible.

  7. Carbon-coated lithium titanium phosphate nanoporous microplates with superior electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifeng; Liu, Li; Zhou, Qian; Tan, Jinli; Yan, Zichao; Xia, Dongdong; Shu, Hongbo; Yang, Xiukang; Wang, Xianyou

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we report a facile method to synthesize carbon-coated LiTi2(PO4)3 nanoporous microplates (LTP/C MPs) using ethylenediamine as the chelating agent and carbon source. The as-prepared LTP/C MPs with thickness of 0.4 μm consist of interconnected nanosized particles embedded in nano-thickness carbon layer and well-dispersed nanopores. The carbon layer significantly improves the electrochemical performance of LiTi2(PO4)3 microplates. LTP/C MPs deliver a reversible capacity of 121 mAh g-1 at 0.2C (1C = 138 mAh g-1) and show a remarkable capacity retention of 94.2% over 100 cycles when matched with Li metal counter electrode. It also presents excellent electrochemical properties as anode material for aqueous rechargeable lithium batteries (ARLBs). LTP/C MPs//LiMn2O4 ARLB shows a high discharge capacity of 76 mAh g-1 at 20 mA g-1 and superior rate capability. The results suggest a practical stratagem to develop a novel composite in which the carbon is coated with LiTi2(PO4)3 nanoporous microplates, which can become one of the promising electrode materials for both non-aqueous and aqueous lithium ion batteries.

  8. Into Focus: Understanding and Creating Middle School Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Kylene, Ed.; Samuels, Barbara G., Ed.

    Addressing the needs of English language learners, remedial readers, avid readers, gifted readers, dormant readers, reluctant readers, and readers in content areas, this book's goal is to help middle school teachers connect their students to reading. The book offers multiple lists of trade books that different types of middle school readers enjoy;…

  9. The Setting of the Okhotsk-Sea Micro-Plate Northern Boundary and its Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedov, B. M.

    2004-12-01

    The Sea of Okhotsk is surrounded by seismic zones. That is why we believe that its water area corresponds spatially to hard platform. The Okhotsk-sea micro-plate in triangular form is located at the joint of the Pacific, North-Amerikan, and Eurasian plates. It is bounded from the west by sub-meridional zone of deep sesmogenic faults spreading through the Sakhalin island. From the east, micro-plate is bounded by subduction zones, extending along the Kuril Islans and the eastern coast of Kamchatka. The northern boundary of the Okhotsk-sea plate is considered differently by different authors. The analysis of data of the marine seismic exploration by the method of common deep point, deep seismic sounding, gravitation field and the anomalous magnetic field, and also the seismological observation by the equipment make possible to conclude that the northern boundary of the Okhotsk-sea micro-plate has the sublatitudinal extending and spatially coincides with wide zone of deep faults confided to the coast. On land and offshore, this zone is marked by the line of riftogenic basins filled with Cenozoic continental sediments. On the continent, their thickness is not more than 1500-2000m, although on the offshore it reaches 8-10 km. The basins are mostly spread in meridian direction. The epicenters of the crust earthquakes are spatially related with these basins. This fact testifies of the right-lateral faults. Cenozoic sediments in basins of land are broken by numerous fault-shifts with the summary amplitude of horizontal displacements up to 1.5 km and by the vertical ones up to the first hundreds of meters. The northern boundary of the Okhotsk-sea micro-plate is marked by the change of the Earth's crust type: the continental type on the north, and transitional type on the offshore. Geological and geophisical data make possible to suppose that the northern boundary of micro-plate in primagadanskaya part coincides with the Benioff paleozone that closed its active existence in

  10. Block rotation and continental extension in Afar: A comparison to oceanic microplate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Gary D.; Stein, Seth; Engeln, Joseph F.

    1991-06-01

    The reorganization of oceanic spreading centers separating major plates often appears to occur by a process in which discrete microplates form and evolve by rift propagation. To see whether such microplate behavior has implications for continental rifting, we investigate the application of a microplate model to the Afar region at the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia triple junction. Studies of marine magnetic anomalies, volcanic ages, bathymetry, and seismicity suggest that the westward propagating Gulf of Aden spreading center has propagated into eastern Afar within the past 2 m.y., causing rifting and extension within the continent. We derive constraints on the extension history from the geometry and timing of rift formation and from paleomagnetic data indicating that Pliocene to Pleistocene age rocks have undergone a clockwise rotation of ˜11°. We suggest that the history of rifting, the rotation, and several other features of the regional geology can be described by combining features of an oceanic microplate model and the concept of rift localization previously proposed for Afar. In this scenario, motion occurring on several rifts within an extensional zone preceding the propagating spreading center is gradually transferred to a single rift. While motion is transferred, the overlap region between the growing and dying rifts acts as one or more microplates or blocks that rotate relative to the surrounding major plates. The rifting history and rotations in eastern Afar are thus related to the rift propagation and localization that occurs as the plate boundary evolves. Provided the constraints we use are appropriate, our model better describes the regional kinematics than alternative block models including one based on "bookshelf" faulting. If the tectonics of Afar are typical for continental breakup, they have interesting implications for the geometry of passive margins. In particular, asymmetric rifted margins can be produced if the final location of the rift axis is not

  11. E-Readers: Powering up for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Twyla; Johnson, Kary A.; Rossi-Williams, Dara

    2012-01-01

    E-readers like the Amazon Kindle and the Barnes and Noble Nook are beginning to make their way into school libraries and classrooms. It's about time. E-readers have tremendous potential to entice reluctant readers to read more. A study that the authors recently conducted among low-reading-ability middle school students demonstrated that potential.…

  12. Graded Readers: Validating Reading Levels across Publishers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigo, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Graded readers can be an optimal resource to help language students improve and personalize their learning experience. An extensive reading library with graded readers and well-defined levels of reading difficulty increases language students' chances of having a successful reading experience and become independent readers. However, when it comes…

  13. Tutoring Struggling Adolescent Readers: A Program Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Janis M.; Keehn, Susan; Kenney, Michelle S.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined a reading tutoring program for struggling adolescent readers. The major objectives of the tutoring program were to help struggling adolescent readers develop an understanding of the strategic nature of reading and to encourage these reluctant readers to take control of their reading. The results of the study hold implications…

  14. Benefit of the Doubt. Reader Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The editors of Mathematics Teacher appreciate the interest of readers and value the views of those who write in with comments. The editors ask that name and affiliation including email address be provided at the end of their letters. This September 2016 Reader Reflections, provides reader comments on the following articles: (1) "Innocent…

  15. Enhancing Readers' Analysis-by-Synthesis Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Margaret E.

    A variety of techniques for improving readers' analysis-by-synthesis abilities (rapid, efficient reading typical of highly skilled readers) are presented in this paper. The techniques discussed in the first part emphasize improving reading comprehension and include the following: (1) modifications of the cloze procedure (encouraging readers to use…

  16. Precision Reading: New Hope for Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeze, Rick

    2006-01-01

    A rationale for a novel approach to remedial reading for struggling readers, including students labeled with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, attention deficit and behavior disorders, below average language development, and those described as reluctant or resistant readers is presented. It is suggested that struggling readers find…

  17. Cerebral Dominance in Disabled Readers, Good Readers, and Gifted Children: Search for a Valid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershner, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Disabled readers, good readers, and gifted children were compared on their recognition of words presented tachistoscopically under stimultaneous, bilateral viewing conditions. Poor readers showed inferior right-field performance compared with gifted and good readers, but when IQ was covaried, they showed higher left-field scores and lower visual…

  18. Extending the E-Z Reader Model of Eye Movement Control to Chinese Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Keith; Li, Xingshan; Pollatsek, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Chinese readers' eye movements were simulated in the context of the E-Z Reader model, which was developed to account for the eye movements of readers of English. Despite obvious differences between English and Chinese, the model did a fairly good job of simulating the eye movements of Chinese readers. The successful simulation suggests that the…

  19. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  20. The August 2002 earthquake sequence in north Afar: Insights into the neotectonics of the Danakil microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayele, Atalay; Stuart, Graham; Bastow, Ian; Keir, Derek

    2007-06-01

    In August 2002, there was high seismic activity in Afar concentrated at the plateau margin of the northern Ethiopian rift east of Mekele, near the western part of the Danakil microplate. The spatial and temporal distributions of this seismic activity over four weeks indicate the NNW propagation of the Gulf of Aden rift across the Afar Depression towards the western Ethiopian plateau. Fault plane solutions for six larger earthquakes from the August 2002 sequence are estimated from moment tensor inversion of local broadband waveform data. The results show only normal faulting on NNW trending and NE dipping faults, which agree with tectonics of the area and distribution of aftershocks. No strike-slip component is observed in any of our fault plane solutions or those of other workers including Harvard CMT solutions in the region. Such motion would be indicative of oblique-slip deformation between the Nubian plate and the Danakil microplate consistent with counter-clockwise rotation of the microplate. Hypocentral depths of well-constrained events are 5-7 km, which is the approximate elastic plate thickness in the Main Ethiopian rift, possibly indicating the depth to the brittle-ductile transition zone in this part of the Afar Depression. The shallowness of the depth estimates agree with the macroseismic reports available from a wide area in northern Ethiopia. Potential future shallow crustal deformation may cause significant loss of human life and damage to property in the densely populated highland region around Mekele unless measures are taken in improving building standards. The b-value for this sequence is estimated to be 0.66 using a least squares fit, while it is 0.67 ± 0.16 from a maximum-likelihood approach. This estimated b-value is low or the frequency of occurrence of relatively larger magnitude events is high indicating that it is a highly stressed region as evidenced by the recent increase of the seismicity in the area.

  1. Sensitive microplate assay for the detection of proteolytic enzymes using radiolabeled gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, B.D.; Kwan-Lim, G.E.; Maizels, R.M.

    1988-07-01

    A sensitive, microplate assay is described for the detection of a wide range of proteolytic enzymes, using radio-iodine-labeled gelatin as substrate. The technique uses the Bolton-Hunter reagent to label the substrate, which is then coated onto the wells of polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates. By measuring the radioactivity released the assay is able to detect elastase, trypsin, and collagenase in concentrations of 1 ng/ml or less, while the microtiter format permits multiple sample handling and minimizes sample volumes required for analysis.

  2. Self-assembly of gold nanorods into vertically aligned, rectangular microplates with a supercrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Junyan; Li, Zhe; Ye, Xiaozhou; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2013-12-01

    Vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates with a well-defined rectangular shape were fabricated in a large area through self-assembly of gold nanorods by a novel bulk solution evaporation method. This evaporative self-assembly strategy involving continuous movement of the contact line can prevent the coffee-ring effect, thus allowing uniform deposition of discrete GNR superstructures over a large area and favoring the formation of GNR supercrystals with geometrically symmetric shapes. A mechanism based on the continuing nucleation and growth of smectic GNR superstructures accompanying the movement of the contact line was put forward for the formation of the unique GNR supercrystal arrays. Based on this mechanism, a micropatterned substrate was designed to control the nucleation location and growth direction, leading to the spontaneous self-assembly of nearly parallel arrays of vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates of GNRs. The obtained rectangular-plate-shaped GNR supercrystals exhibited interesting anisotropic optical reflection properties, which were revealed by polarized light microscopy.Vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates with a well-defined rectangular shape were fabricated in a large area through self-assembly of gold nanorods by a novel bulk solution evaporation method. This evaporative self-assembly strategy involving continuous movement of the contact line can prevent the coffee-ring effect, thus allowing uniform deposition of discrete GNR superstructures over a large area and favoring the formation of GNR supercrystals with geometrically symmetric shapes. A mechanism based on the continuing nucleation and growth of smectic GNR superstructures accompanying the movement of the contact line was put forward for the formation of the unique GNR supercrystal arrays. Based on this mechanism, a micropatterned substrate was designed to control the nucleation location and growth direction, leading to the spontaneous self-assembly of

  3. A Sign Language Screen Reader for Deaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghoul, Oussama; Jemni, Mohamed

    Screen reader technology has appeared first to allow blind and people with reading difficulties to use computer and to access to the digital information. Until now, this technology is exploited mainly to help blind community. During our work with deaf people, we noticed that a screen reader can facilitate the manipulation of computers and the reading of textual information. In this paper, we propose a novel screen reader dedicated to deaf. The output of the reader is a visual translation of the text to sign language. The screen reader is composed by two essential modules: the first one is designed to capture the activities of users (mouse and keyboard events). For this purpose, we adopted Microsoft MSAA application programming interfaces. The second module, which is in classical screen readers a text to speech engine (TTS), is replaced by a novel text to sign (TTSign) engine. This module converts text into sign language animation based on avatar technology.

  4. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    PubMed

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited. PMID:6913282

  5. Revision of the genera Microplitis and Snellenius (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica, with a key to all species previously described from Mesoamerica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genera Microplitis and Snellenius (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from Area de Conservacion Guanacaste (ACG), Costa Rica, are revised. A total of 28 new species are described: 23 of Snellenius (the first record for Mesoamerica) and five of Microplitis. A key is provided to all new spec...

  6. An analytical model for squeeze-film damping of perforated torsional microplates resonators.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Fang, Yuming

    2015-03-25

    Squeeze-film damping plays a significant role in the performance of micro-resonators because it determines their quality factors. Perforations in microstructures are often used to control the squeeze-film damping in micro-resonators. To model the perforation effects on the squeeze-film damping, many analytical models have been proposed, however, most of the previous models have been concerned with the squeeze-film damping due to the normal motion between the perforated vibrating plate and a fixed substrate, while there is a lack of works that model the squeeze-film damping of perforated torsion microplates, which are also widely used in MEMS devices. This paper presents an analytical model for the squeeze-film damping of perforated torsion microplates. The derivation in this paper is based on a modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects. The pressure distribution under the vibrating plate is obtained using the double sine series. Closed-form expressions for the stiffness and the damping coefficients of the squeeze-film are derived. The accuracy of the model is verified by comparing its results with the finite element method (FEM) results and the experimental results available in the literature. The regime of validity and limitations of the present model are assessed.

  7. A paper/polymer hybrid microfluidic microplate for rapid quantitative detection of multiple disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Sharma T; Dou, Maowei; Sun, Jianjun; Li, XiuJun

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is one of the most widely used laboratory disease diagnosis methods. However, performing ELISA in low-resource settings is limited by long incubation time, large volumes of precious reagents, and well-equipped laboratories. Herein, we developed a simple, miniaturized paper/PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) hybrid microfluidic microplate for low-cost, high throughput, and point-of-care (POC) infectious disease diagnosis. The novel use of porous paper in flow-through microwells facilitates rapid antibody/antigen immobilization and efficient washing, avoiding complicated surface modifications. The top reagent delivery channels can simply transfer reagents to multiple microwells thus avoiding repeated manual pipetting and costly robots. Results of colorimetric ELISA can be observed within an hour by the naked eye. Quantitative analysis was achieved by calculating the brightness of images scanned by an office scanner. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) were quantitatively analyzed with good reliability in human serum samples. Without using any specialized equipment, the limits of detection of 1.6 ng/mL for IgG and 1.3 ng/mL for HBsAg were achieved, which were comparable to commercial ELISA kits using specialized equipment. We envisage that this simple POC hybrid microplate can have broad applications in various bioassays, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:27456979

  8. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirm that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature- and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials. PMID:27098114

  9. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung -Chieh; Chen, Chih -Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-04-21

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirmmore » that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Lastly, our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature-and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials.« less

  10. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirm that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature- and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials.

  11. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirm that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature- and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials. PMID:27098114

  12. A paper/polymer hybrid microfluidic microplate for rapid quantitative detection of multiple disease biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Sharma T.; Dou, Maowei; Sun, Jianjun; Li, XiuJun

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is one of the most widely used laboratory disease diagnosis methods. However, performing ELISA in low-resource settings is limited by long incubation time, large volumes of precious reagents, and well-equipped laboratories. Herein, we developed a simple, miniaturized paper/PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) hybrid microfluidic microplate for low-cost, high throughput, and point-of-care (POC) infectious disease diagnosis. The novel use of porous paper in flow-through microwells facilitates rapid antibody/antigen immobilization and efficient washing, avoiding complicated surface modifications. The top reagent delivery channels can simply transfer reagents to multiple microwells thus avoiding repeated manual pipetting and costly robots. Results of colorimetric ELISA can be observed within an hour by the naked eye. Quantitative analysis was achieved by calculating the brightness of images scanned by an office scanner. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) were quantitatively analyzed with good reliability in human serum samples. Without using any specialized equipment, the limits of detection of 1.6 ng/mL for IgG and 1.3 ng/mL for HBsAg were achieved, which were comparable to commercial ELISA kits using specialized equipment. We envisage that this simple POC hybrid microplate can have broad applications in various bioassays, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:27456979

  13. Rapid and reproducible infectivity end-point titration of virulent phage in a microplate system.

    PubMed

    Fridholm, Helena; Everitt, Einar

    2005-09-01

    The standard method for measuring the number of infectious phages in solution has traditionally been the plaque forming assay. An alternative method is described where the number of lytic, infectious phages is determined in an endpoint titration assay adapted for a microplate system. In this model system, susceptible Escherichia coli B6 at a density of 4 x 10(7) cells/ml, were mixed with an equal volume (100 microl) of PhiX174 diluted serially in a microtest plate. After 3h of incubation on a microplate shaker the endpoint was determined spectrophotometrically and calculated according to the method of Reed and Muench. A well was considered positive for infection if the OD630-value was < or = 10% compared to the OD630-value of the negative control of uninfected cells. ID50-titers were 2.5x higher than the PFU-titers (CV 15%) and the intra assay reproducibility revealed a CV of 9%. The method has several advantages as compared with the conventional PFU-titration. It is less time and material consuming with the possibility to assess several samples at the same time.

  14. Biocompatibility of microplates for culturing epithelial renal cells evaluated by a microcalorimetric technique.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; DePierre, J W; Nässberger, L

    2000-09-01

    In the present study we have developed a microcalorimetric procedure which allows convenient investigation of biocompatibility in a microsystem. We examined the biocompatibility of a porcine renal epithelial tubule cell line LLC-PK1 and a human primary renal epithelial tubule cell (RPTEC) with microplates composed of three different materials, i.e. Thermanox, transparent film and titanium. All three materials showed equal biocompatibility with LLC-PK1 cells, judging from the attainment of steady-state power curves and the same rate of heat production per cell (2.5 microW / microg DNA). The human renal cells were poorly biocompatible with the Thermanox and transparent film. However, on titanium the RPTEC cell did adhere, as demonstrated by a steady-state power curve. The human cells also showed a higher metabolic activity (3.0 microW / microg DNA), than did LLC-PK1 cells cultured on the same type of microplates. In research on biocompatibility there is a need for alternatives to experimental animal investigations. The present technique allows studies of cellular interactions with different biomaterials in a rapid and standardized manner and may therefore prove to be a useful screening procedure. PMID:15348389

  15. A paper/polymer hybrid microfluidic microplate for rapid quantitative detection of multiple disease biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjay, Sharma T.; Dou, Maowei; Sun, Jianjun; Li, Xiujun

    2016-07-01

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is one of the most widely used laboratory disease diagnosis methods. However, performing ELISA in low-resource settings is limited by long incubation time, large volumes of precious reagents, and well-equipped laboratories. Herein, we developed a simple, miniaturized paper/PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) hybrid microfluidic microplate for low-cost, high throughput, and point-of-care (POC) infectious disease diagnosis. The novel use of porous paper in flow-through microwells facilitates rapid antibody/antigen immobilization and efficient washing, avoiding complicated surface modifications. The top reagent delivery channels can simply transfer reagents to multiple microwells thus avoiding repeated manual pipetting and costly robots. Results of colorimetric ELISA can be observed within an hour by the naked eye. Quantitative analysis was achieved by calculating the brightness of images scanned by an office scanner. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) were quantitatively analyzed with good reliability in human serum samples. Without using any specialized equipment, the limits of detection of 1.6 ng/mL for IgG and 1.3 ng/mL for HBsAg were achieved, which were comparable to commercial ELISA kits using specialized equipment. We envisage that this simple POC hybrid microplate can have broad applications in various bioassays, especially in resource-limited settings.

  16. [Metabolic properties of the microbial community in the biofilters using biolog microplates].

    PubMed

    Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying; Jiang, Jian; Qian, Yi

    2005-07-01

    It is very important to know the structure and metabolic function of the microbial community in a bioreactor in order to improve its performance. In this study, two biofilters, packed with wood chips and granular activated carbons respectively, were operated for 160 days to treat toluene gas. The metabolic profiles of the microbial communities in the biofilters were monitored using Biolog microplates periodically during the experiments. The metabolic activities of the microorganisms in both biofilters were observed to decrease during long-term operation. According to the results of principle components analysis, the metabolic profiles of the microbial communities did not change much in the former period of the operation, but they changed in the inlet layers on day 103 and changed throughout the filter beds on day 160. The variation of the metabolic profiles in both biofilters showed little difference, which suggested that the packing media had little effect on them during long-term operation. Among the 95 carbon sources in Biolog microplate, carboxylic acids and amino acids were much easier to be utilized by the microorganisms in the biofilters than the other carbon

  17. An Analytical Model for Squeeze-Film Damping of Perforated Torsional Microplates Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Fang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Squeeze-film damping plays a significant role in the performance of micro-resonators because it determines their quality factors. Perforations in microstructures are often used to control the squeeze-film damping in micro-resonators. To model the perforation effects on the squeeze-film damping, many analytical models have been proposed, however, most of the previous models have been concerned with the squeeze-film damping due to the normal motion between the perforated vibrating plate and a fixed substrate, while there is a lack of works that model the squeeze-film damping of perforated torsion microplates, which are also widely used in MEMS devices. This paper presents an analytical model for the squeeze-film damping of perforated torsion microplates. The derivation in this paper is based on a modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects. The pressure distribution under the vibrating plate is obtained using the double sine series. Closed-form expressions for the stiffness and the damping coefficients of the squeeze-film are derived. The accuracy of the model is verified by comparing its results with the finite element method (FEM) results and the experimental results available in the literature. The regime of validity and limitations of the present model are assessed. PMID:25815453

  18. Metabolic activities of five botryticides against Botrytis cinerea examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Li, Licui; Hsiang, Tom; Wang, Maosheng; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an important fungal disease worldwide. Boscalid, carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and propiconazole are representative botryticides for grey mold management. This research investigated the sensitivities of B. cinerea from tobacco to these chemicals using the Biolog FF Microplate. All five chemicals showed inhibitory activity, with average EC50 values of 0.94, 0.05, 0.50, 0.61 and 0.31 μg ml−1, respectively. B. cinerea metabolized 96.8% of tested carbon sources, including 29 effectively and 33 moderately, but the metabolic fingerprints differed under pressures imposed by these botryticides. For boscalid, B. cinerea was unable to metabolize many substrates related to tricarboxylic acid cycle. For carbendazim, carbon sources related to glycolysis were not metabolized. For iprodione, use of most carbon substrates was weakly inhibited, and the metabolic profile was similar to that of the control. For propiconazole, no carbon substrates were metabolized and the physiological and biochemical functions of the pathogen were totally inhibited. These findings provide useful information on metabolic activities of these botryticides, and may lead to future applications of the Biolog FF Microplate for examining metabolic effects of other fungicides on other fungi, as well as providing a metabolic fingerprint of B. cinerea that could be useful for identification. PMID:27491536

  19. Inline chemical process analysis in micro-plants based on thermoelectric flow and impedimetric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, T.; Kutzner, C.; Kropp, M.; Brokmann, G.; Lang, W.; Steinke, A.; Kienle, A.; Hauptmann, P.

    2010-10-01

    In micro-plants, as used in chemical micro-process engineering, an integrated inline analytics is regarded as an important factor for the development and optimization of chemical processes. Up to now, there is a lack of sensitive, robust and low-priced micro-sensors for monitoring mixing and chemical conversion in micro-fluidic channels. In this paper a novel sensor system combining an impedimetric sensor and a novel pressure stable thermoelectric flow sensor for monitoring chemical reactions in micro-plants is presented. The CMOS-technology-based impedimetric sensor mainly consists of two capacitively coupled interdigital electrodes on a silicon chip. The thermoelectric flow sensor consists of a heater in between two thermopiles on a perforated membrane. The pulsed and constant current feeds of the heater were analyzed. Both sensors enable the analysis of chemical conversion by means of changes in the thermal and electrical properties of the liquid. The homogeneously catalyzed synthesis of n-butyl acetate as a chemical model system was studied. Experimental results revealed that in an overpressure regime, relative changes of less than 1% in terms of thermal and electrical properties can be detected. Furthermore, the transition from one to two liquid phases accompanied by the change in slug flow conditions could be reproducibly detected.

  20. Metabolic activities of five botryticides against Botrytis cinerea examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Li, Licui; Hsiang, Tom; Wang, Maosheng; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an important fungal disease worldwide. Boscalid, carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and propiconazole are representative botryticides for grey mold management. This research investigated the sensitivities of B. cinerea from tobacco to these chemicals using the Biolog FF Microplate. All five chemicals showed inhibitory activity, with average EC50 values of 0.94, 0.05, 0.50, 0.61 and 0.31 μg ml(-1), respectively. B. cinerea metabolized 96.8% of tested carbon sources, including 29 effectively and 33 moderately, but the metabolic fingerprints differed under pressures imposed by these botryticides. For boscalid, B. cinerea was unable to metabolize many substrates related to tricarboxylic acid cycle. For carbendazim, carbon sources related to glycolysis were not metabolized. For iprodione, use of most carbon substrates was weakly inhibited, and the metabolic profile was similar to that of the control. For propiconazole, no carbon substrates were metabolized and the physiological and biochemical functions of the pathogen were totally inhibited. These findings provide useful information on metabolic activities of these botryticides, and may lead to future applications of the Biolog FF Microplate for examining metabolic effects of other fungicides on other fungi, as well as providing a metabolic fingerprint of B. cinerea that could be useful for identification. PMID:27491536

  1. AgI microplate monocrystals with polar {0001} facets: spontaneous photocarrier separation and enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qin; Zheng, Xiaoli; Yang, Shihe

    2014-02-24

    Elucidating the facet-dependent photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts is important in improving the overall efficiency of photocatalysis. Furthermore, combining facet control with selective deposition of oxidation and/or reduction cocatalysts on specific faces of semiconductor photocatalysts is potentially an effective strategy to synergistically optimize the functionality of photocatalysts. In the present study, high-purity wurtzite-type β-AgI platelet microcrystals with polar {0001} facets were prepared by a facile polyvinylpyrrolidone-assisted precipitation reaction. The polar-faceted AgI microplates were used as archetypes to demonstrate preferential diametric migration (i.e., effective separation) of photogenerated electrons and holes along the c axis. Such vectorial electron-hole separation stems from the asymmetric surface structures, which give rise to distinct photoexcited reaction behaviors on the ±(0001) polar facets of wurtzite-type semiconductors. Furthermore, on selective deposition of Ag and MnOx (1.5microplates in degrading organic pollutants was dramatically enhanced thanks to the broad light-absorption range, strong dye-adsorption ability, and effective spatial separation of photocarriers. PMID:24449437

  2. Metabolic activities of five botryticides against Botrytis cinerea examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Li, Licui; Hsiang, Tom; Wang, Maosheng; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-08-05

    Tobacco grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an important fungal disease worldwide. Boscalid, carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and propiconazole are representative botryticides for grey mold management. This research investigated the sensitivities of B. cinerea from tobacco to these chemicals using the Biolog FF Microplate. All five chemicals showed inhibitory activity, with average EC50 values of 0.94, 0.05, 0.50, 0.61 and 0.31 μg ml(-1), respectively. B. cinerea metabolized 96.8% of tested carbon sources, including 29 effectively and 33 moderately, but the metabolic fingerprints differed under pressures imposed by these botryticides. For boscalid, B. cinerea was unable to metabolize many substrates related to tricarboxylic acid cycle. For carbendazim, carbon sources related to glycolysis were not metabolized. For iprodione, use of most carbon substrates was weakly inhibited, and the metabolic profile was similar to that of the control. For propiconazole, no carbon substrates were metabolized and the physiological and biochemical functions of the pathogen were totally inhibited. These findings provide useful information on metabolic activities of these botryticides, and may lead to future applications of the Biolog FF Microplate for examining metabolic effects of other fungicides on other fungi, as well as providing a metabolic fingerprint of B. cinerea that could be useful for identification.

  3. Self-assembly of gold nanorods into vertically aligned, rectangular microplates with a supercrystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junyan; Li, Zhe; Ye, Xiaozhou; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2014-01-21

    Vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates with a well-defined rectangular shape were fabricated in a large area through self-assembly of gold nanorods by a novel bulk solution evaporation method. This evaporative self-assembly strategy involving continuous movement of the contact line can prevent the coffee-ring effect, thus allowing uniform deposition of discrete GNR superstructures over a large area and favoring the formation of GNR supercrystals with geometrically symmetric shapes. A mechanism based on the continuing nucleation and growth of smectic GNR superstructures accompanying the movement of the contact line was put forward for the formation of the unique GNR supercrystal arrays. Based on this mechanism, a micropatterned substrate was designed to control the nucleation location and growth direction, leading to the spontaneous self-assembly of nearly parallel arrays of vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates of GNRs. The obtained rectangular-plate-shaped GNR supercrystals exhibited interesting anisotropic optical reflection properties, which were revealed by polarized light microscopy. PMID:24292548

  4. An analytical model for squeeze-film damping of perforated torsional microplates resonators.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Fang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Squeeze-film damping plays a significant role in the performance of micro-resonators because it determines their quality factors. Perforations in microstructures are often used to control the squeeze-film damping in micro-resonators. To model the perforation effects on the squeeze-film damping, many analytical models have been proposed, however, most of the previous models have been concerned with the squeeze-film damping due to the normal motion between the perforated vibrating plate and a fixed substrate, while there is a lack of works that model the squeeze-film damping of perforated torsion microplates, which are also widely used in MEMS devices. This paper presents an analytical model for the squeeze-film damping of perforated torsion microplates. The derivation in this paper is based on a modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects. The pressure distribution under the vibrating plate is obtained using the double sine series. Closed-form expressions for the stiffness and the damping coefficients of the squeeze-film are derived. The accuracy of the model is verified by comparing its results with the finite element method (FEM) results and the experimental results available in the literature. The regime of validity and limitations of the present model are assessed. PMID:25815453

  5. High School Readers: A Profile of above Average Readers and Readers with Learning Disabilities Reading Expository Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigent, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined above average high school readers and high school readers with learning disabilities in order to better understand the impact of twelve years of formal education on reading skills and strategy use while reading expository text. This study examined reading strategies related to knowledge construction, monitoring, and evaluating…

  6. Three Readers, Three Languages, Three Texts: The Strategic Reading of Multilingual and Multiliterate Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsheikh, Negmeldin O.

    2011-01-01

    This case study investigates the metacognitive reading strategies of three advanced proficient trilingual readers whose native language is Hausa. The study examines the reading strategies employed by the three readers in English, French and Hausa. The aim of the study was to compare the reading strategy profiles of trilingual readers through…

  7. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  8. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short…

  9. Planning Behaviour in Good and Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    A group of 50 good readers and a group of 50 poor readers of Grade 5 matched for age and intelligence and selected on the basis of their proficiency in reading comprehension were tested for their competence in word reading and the process of planning at three different levels, namely, perceptual, memory and conceptual in order to study the…

  10. Reaching Advanced Readers in the Middle Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preddy, Leslie B.

    2009-01-01

    People pay a great deal of attention to the needs of reluctant readers, however, they should not forget that middle school students, reading above grade level, also have unique needs that require help and resources to engage them as readers. A group of students, teachers, and library media specialists in Indiana began in 2005 to address the…

  11. Two Gifted Rapid Readers--Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schale, Florence C.

    The "page-at-a-glance" reading phenomenon in two gifted readers using only monocular vision was investigated. The specific questions to be answered in this preliminary study were (1) What is the average duration of fixations made by gifted readers while reading a somewhat familiar article? and (2) What degree of comprehension on materials of…

  12. Reader Response in the Teaching of Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Marian

    As an interesting development in recent literary criticism, reader response can enhance a composition class in many ways. Reader response, by incorporating both intellect and feeling into an aesthetic reaction to literature, restores the subjective aspect that some forms of criticism deny. Three main elements compose the repeated cycle of a…

  13. Using Readers' Theater with Multicultural Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisenburger, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The author needed a way to engage her students in the reading process and found one extremely successful strategy: using Readers' Theater. Readers' Theater "dramatizes" literature through a classroom performance and provides visual and oral stimulus to students who are not used to using imagination to appreciate literary texts. It involves a…

  14. Attracting New Readers with Hip Hop Lit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloni, Christine

    2007-01-01

    With the explosion of technology, librarians are not the only ones who sometimes feel that reading has taken a backseat as a recreational activity. Readers are not reading like they used to. However, while overall readership is down in almost every demographic group, African-Americans, a faction traditionally considered reluctant readers, are…

  15. Using Nooks to Hook Reluctant Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierking, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a two-year qualitative study of electronic reading device use with high school sophomores, most of whom self-identified as reluctant or struggling readers. Electronic readers were used primarily in one weekly fifty-minute class period, during silent sustained reading, wherein students chose freely their texts.…

  16. High Ability Readers and the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scott L.; Parke, Cynthia J.; Bramble, Joan G.

    2004-01-01

    To close the achievement gap, the "No Child Left Behind" law calls for all students to make appropriate yearly progress. This presumably means that progress is being made by capable readers at the same time progress is being made by struggling readers. However, there appear to be unintended effects of "No Child Left Behind" that may impede the…

  17. Helping Your Child Become a Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Helping Your Child Become a Reader" includes information about why and how to use language skills (talking and listening, reading, and writing) to help young children grow into readers. Everyday activities and a list of resources for parents to encourage children's love of reading and strengthen language skills are also provided. This brochure…

  18. Verbal Reports: How Readers Process Unfamiliar Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marr, Mary Beth

    With the use of verbal report strategies, a study was conducted to examine (1) the types of comprehension strategies readers use to process familiar and less familiar texts and (2) the differential use of think aloud strategies by average and below average readers. Subjects were 15 tenth grade male students in upstate New York. Two weeks prior to…

  19. Developing Readers: Lessons from Agatha Christie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    Reminds readers that looking at individual authors rather than dealing in generalizations is a very meaningful approach to increasing an understanding of how reading works by making sense of the text. Discusses how Agatha Christie's writing follows very predictable patterns and may provide useful experiences for novice readers. (MG)

  20. Designing Online Courses for Screen Reader Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Lorna R.; Frey, Barbara A.; McMorland, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    A review of multiple online courses at one institution was conducted by a skilled screen reader user for the purpose of assessing the extent to which the courses were navigable and understandable to online students using assistive technologies. This paper identifies features of online courses that may present problems for screen reader users and…

  1. Readers Theatre: An Introduction to Classroom Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    One of the primary principles of Readers Theater is to "dramatize" literature in classroom performance and to provide a visual and oral stimulus to students who are unaccustomed to using imagination to appreciate literary texts. Readers Theater may be used to enhance the critical study of language; to explore author meaning or point of view; to…

  2. Apprenticing Adolescent Readers to Academic Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenleaf, Cynthia L.; Schoenbach, Ruth; Cziko, Christine; Mueller, Faye L.

    2001-01-01

    In Reading Apprenticeships, teachers serve as "master readers" of texts, engaging in collaborative inquiry with students. Reading is demystified through metacognitive conversations that draw on readers' self-knowledge. Academically underperforming students gained an average of 2 years' reading growth in 1 academic year using the approach.…

  3. Notebook Connections: Strategies for the Reader's Notebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Aimee

    2009-01-01

    In "Notebook Know-How", Aimee Buckner demonstrated the power of notebooks to spark and capture students' ideas in the writing workshop. In "Notebook Connections", she turns her focus to the reading workshop, showing how to transform those "couch-potato" readers into deep thinkers. Buckner's fourth-grade students use reader's notebooks as a place…

  4. The Portrayal of Reader-Writer Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della-Piana, Gabriel M.

    Reader-writer conferencing was examined as an alternative or complement to the direct assessment of writing. Criteria guiding development of a framework for analysis of reader-writer conferencing were summarized as: (1) achievability; (2) transfer to other domains of writing; (3) importance of the outcomes; (4) inter-scorer agreement; and (5)…

  5. Minimization of Between-well Sample Variance of Antifungal Activity Measurements Using a High-Throughput Screening Microplate Bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of microplate bioassays, or broth microdilution assays, to measure the activity of biological and synthetic compounds against fungal pathogens has increased in recent years; this technique has been identified as the most promising in vitro bioassay for quantifying antifungal activity. Quant...

  6. Microplate-based active/inactive 1 screen for biomass degrading enzyme library purification and gene discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here a whole-cell and permeabilized E. coli cell 1' active/inactive microplate screen for ß-D-xylosidase, xylanase, endocellulase, and ferulic acid esterase enzyme activities which are critical for the enzymatic deconstruction of biomass for fuels and chemicals. Transformants from genomic...

  7. From a collage of microplates to stable continental crust - an example from Precambrian Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korja, Annakaisa

    2013-04-01

    Svecofennian orogen (2.0-1.7 Ga) comprises the oldest undispersed orogenic belt on Baltica and Eurasian plate. Svecofennian orogenic belt evolved from a series of short-lived terrane accretions around Baltica's Archean nucleus during the formation of the Precambrian Nuna supercontinent. Geological and geophysical datasets indicate W-SW growth of Baltica with NE-ward dipping subduction zones. The data suggest a long-lived retreating subduction system in the southwestern parts whereas in the northern and central parts the northeasterly transport of continental fragments or microplates towards the continental nucleus is also documented. The geotectonic environment resembles that of the early stages of the Alpine-Himalayan or Indonesian orogenic system, in which dispersed continental fragments, arcs and microplates have been attached to the Eurasian plate margin. Thus the Svecofennian orogeny can be viewed as proxy for the initial stages of an internal orogenic system. Svecofennian orogeny is a Paleoproterozoic analogue of an evolved orogenic system where terrane accretion is followed by lateral spreading or collapse induced by change in the plate architecture. The exposed parts are composed of granitoid intrusions as well as highly deformed supracrustal units. Supracrustal rocks have been metamorphosed in LP-HT conditions in either paleo-lower-upper crust or paleo-upper-middle crust. Large scale seismic reflection profiles (BABEL and FIRE) across Baltica image the crust as a collage of terranes suggesting that the bedrock has been formed and thickened in sequential accretions. The profiles also image three fold layering of the thickened crust (>55 km) to transect old terrane boundaries, suggesting that the over-thickened bedrock structures have been rearranged in post-collisional spreading and/or collapse processes. The middle crust displays typical large scale flow structures: herringbone and anticlinal ramps, rooted onto large scale listric surfaces also suggestive

  8. Modal interactions in primary and subharmonic resonant dynamics of imperfect microplates with geometric nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Ghayesh, Mergen H.

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyses the modal interactions in the nonlinear, size-dependent dynamics of geometrically imperfect microplates. Based on the modified couple stress theory, the equations of motion for the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are obtained employing the von Kármán plate theory as well as Kirchhoff's hypotheses by means of the Lagrange equations. The equations of motions are solved using the pseudo-arclength continuation technique and direct time-integration method. The system parameters are tuned to the values associated with modal interactions, and then nonlinear resonant responses and energy transfer are analysed. Nonlinear motion characteristics are shown in the form of frequency-response and force-response curves, time histories, phase-plane portraits, and fast Fourier transforms.

  9. Rapid microplate, green method for high-throughput evaluation of vinegar acidity using thermal infrared enthalpimetry.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Bruna; Oliveira, Alessandra Stangherlin; Ferreira, Daniele de Freitas; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin; Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Wagner, Roger; Barin, Juliano Smanioto

    2017-01-15

    Infrared thermal imaging was combined with disposable microplates to perform enthalpimetric analysis using an infrared camera to monitor temperature without contact. The proposed thermal infrared enthalpimetry (TIE) method was used to determine the total, fixed and volatile acidities of vinegars. Sample preparation and analysis were performed in the same vessel, avoiding excessive sample handling and reducing energy expenditure by more than ten times. The results agreed with those of the conventional method for different kinds of vinegars, with values of 1.7%, and 2.3% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. A linear calibration curve was obtained from 0.040 to 1.30molL(-1). The proposed method provided rapid results (within 10s) for four samples simultaneously, a sample throughput of up to 480 samples per hour. In addition, the method complies with at least eight of twelve recommendations for green analytical chemistry, making TIE a promising tool for routine vinegar analysis.

  10. Rapid microplate, green method for high-throughput evaluation of vinegar acidity using thermal infrared enthalpimetry.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Bruna; Oliveira, Alessandra Stangherlin; Ferreira, Daniele de Freitas; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin; Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Wagner, Roger; Barin, Juliano Smanioto

    2017-01-15

    Infrared thermal imaging was combined with disposable microplates to perform enthalpimetric analysis using an infrared camera to monitor temperature without contact. The proposed thermal infrared enthalpimetry (TIE) method was used to determine the total, fixed and volatile acidities of vinegars. Sample preparation and analysis were performed in the same vessel, avoiding excessive sample handling and reducing energy expenditure by more than ten times. The results agreed with those of the conventional method for different kinds of vinegars, with values of 1.7%, and 2.3% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. A linear calibration curve was obtained from 0.040 to 1.30molL(-1). The proposed method provided rapid results (within 10s) for four samples simultaneously, a sample throughput of up to 480 samples per hour. In addition, the method complies with at least eight of twelve recommendations for green analytical chemistry, making TIE a promising tool for routine vinegar analysis. PMID:27542445

  11. Analysis and interpretation of microplate-based oxygen consumption and pH data.

    PubMed

    Divakaruni, Ajit S; Paradyse, Alexander; Ferrick, David A; Murphy, Anne N; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Breakthrough technologies to measure cellular oxygen consumption and proton efflux are reigniting the study of cellular energetics by increasing the scope and pace with which discoveries are made. As we learn the variation in metabolism between cell types is large, it is helpful to continually provide additional perspectives and update our roadmap for data interpretation. In that spirit, this chapter provides the following for those conducting microplate-based oxygen consumption experiments: (i) a description of the standard parameters for measuring respiration in intact cells, (ii) a framework for data analysis and normalization, and (iii) examples of measuring respiration in permeabilized cells to follow up results observed with intact cells. Additionally, rate-based measurements of extracellular pH are increasingly used as a qualitative indicator of glycolytic flux. As a resource to help interpret these measurements, this chapter also provides a detailed accounting of proton production during glucose oxidation in the context of plate-based assays. PMID:25416364

  12. The Adriatic region: An independent microplate within the Africa-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Murray, Mark H.; Serpelloni, Enrico; Bürgmann, Roland

    2004-05-01

    We use GPS measurements and block modeling to investigate the present-day deformation of the Adriatic region, whose kinematics within the Nubia-Eurasia plate boundary zone is not well constrained and remains controversial. Block modeling allows us to compute rigid-plate angular velocities while accounting for elastic strain accumulation along block-bounding faults. Results suggest that the Adriatic is a microplate (Adria) and that the southern boundary with the Nubia plate and the Aegean domain may be located along the Apulia Escarpment and the Kefallinia fault. Geodetic data alone cannot discriminate between a single block (AP) or a two blocks (GDAP) description of Adria, but the GDAP model predicts boundary slip rates that are in better agreement with observations from previous studies.

  13. Microplate assay analysis of the distribution of organophosphate and carbamate resistance in Guatemalan Anopheles albimanus

    PubMed Central

    Brogdon, W. G.; Beach, R. F.; Stewart, J. M.; Castanaza, L.

    1988-01-01

    Simple microplate assay methods for determining the frequency of insecticide resistance in single mosquitos were used to study the distribution and localization of organophosphate and carbamate resistance in field populations of Anopheles albimanus Weidemann in Guatemala, where such resistance, caused by heavy use of agricultural pesticides, has long been assumed to be widespread. Areas of complete susceptibility to organophosphates and carbamates were observed, as well as areas where the resistant phenotypes represented up to 98% of the population. Overall, the resistance levels were lower and more localized than expected. Two mechanisms of resistance were identified by the microassay methods. These were the elevated esterase (nonspecific esterase) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase mechanisms which were selected independently, the former (documented for the first time in Central American anophelines) being predominant. These methods represent a promising new technology for the detection and assessment of resistance and will facilitate improved control strategy decisions. PMID:3262440

  14. Application of Imaging-Based Assays in Microplate Formats for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Adam I; Martin, Scott E; Hasson, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    The use of multiparametric microscopy-based screens with automated analysis has enabled the large-scale study of biological phenomena that are currently not measurable by any other method. Collectively referred to as high-content screening (HCS), or high-content analysis (HCA), these methods rely on an expanding array of imaging hardware and software automation. Coupled with an ever-growing amount of diverse chemical matter and functional genomic tools, HCS has helped open the door to a new frontier of understanding cell biology through phenotype-driven screening. With the ability to interrogate biology on a cell-by-cell basis in highly parallel microplate-based platforms, the utility of HCS continues to grow as advancements are made in acquisition speed, model system complexity, data management, and analysis systems. This chapter uses an example of screening for genetic factors regulating mitochondrial quality control to exemplify the practical considerations in developing and executing high-content campaigns. PMID:27317002

  15. Analysis and interpretation of microplate-based oxygen consumption and pH data.

    PubMed

    Divakaruni, Ajit S; Paradyse, Alexander; Ferrick, David A; Murphy, Anne N; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Breakthrough technologies to measure cellular oxygen consumption and proton efflux are reigniting the study of cellular energetics by increasing the scope and pace with which discoveries are made. As we learn the variation in metabolism between cell types is large, it is helpful to continually provide additional perspectives and update our roadmap for data interpretation. In that spirit, this chapter provides the following for those conducting microplate-based oxygen consumption experiments: (i) a description of the standard parameters for measuring respiration in intact cells, (ii) a framework for data analysis and normalization, and (iii) examples of measuring respiration in permeabilized cells to follow up results observed with intact cells. Additionally, rate-based measurements of extracellular pH are increasingly used as a qualitative indicator of glycolytic flux. As a resource to help interpret these measurements, this chapter also provides a detailed accounting of proton production during glucose oxidation in the context of plate-based assays.

  16. Typing dinucleotide repeat loci using microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Santiago; Chen, Xiao-He; Day, Ian N M

    2004-04-01

    Polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci ('microsatellite markers') are found in varying abundance throughout the genomes of most organisms. They have been extensively used for genetic studies, but conventional techniques used for their genotyping require sophisticated equipment. Microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) has previously been extended to economical high-throughput genotyping of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite amplicons. However, the capability of this technique to resolve the alleles of dinucleotide repeat loci has not been explored previously. Here we show that a modified microsatellite-MADGE approach can provide sufficient resolution for dinucleotide repeat typing. This enables economical and convenient set up for analysis of single markers in many samples in parallel, suitable, for example, for population association studies.

  17. Application of Imaging-Based Assays in Microplate Formats for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Adam I; Martin, Scott E; Hasson, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    The use of multiparametric microscopy-based screens with automated analysis has enabled the large-scale study of biological phenomena that are currently not measurable by any other method. Collectively referred to as high-content screening (HCS), or high-content analysis (HCA), these methods rely on an expanding array of imaging hardware and software automation. Coupled with an ever-growing amount of diverse chemical matter and functional genomic tools, HCS has helped open the door to a new frontier of understanding cell biology through phenotype-driven screening. With the ability to interrogate biology on a cell-by-cell basis in highly parallel microplate-based platforms, the utility of HCS continues to grow as advancements are made in acquisition speed, model system complexity, data management, and analysis systems. This chapter uses an example of screening for genetic factors regulating mitochondrial quality control to exemplify the practical considerations in developing and executing high-content campaigns.

  18. [Evaluation of DNA-DNA hybridization method for identification of mycobacteria using a colorimetric microplate kit].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, T; Takahashi, H; Nakamura, R M

    1993-01-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization was applied for identification of mycobacteria and developed as a kit "microplate hybridization kit" (refers to MPHD) by Kobayashi Pharmaceutical Co. We received test samples of the microplates from the company and examined them for their and reliability using 180 mycobacterial strains of 21 species kept in our laboratory. The results of identification by MPHD were 100% identical to those of biochemical identification in the type or reference strains of mycobacteria, showing good reliability of MPHD method. Among clinical isolates, there were six M. tuberculosis strains which did not show typical characteristics for M. tuberculosis, i.e., niacin test negative or nitrate reduction weak positive, but all of these were identified as M. tuberculosis complex by MPHD method. Some strains from clinical isolates showed difference in identification between MPHD and biochemical methods: M. avium complex, identified biochemically were divided into M. avium and M. intracellulare by MPHD, M. fortuitum complex by biochemical identification were distinguished as M. fortuitum and M. chelonae by MPHD. Further, M. chelonae were separated into M. chelonae subsp. chelonae and M. chelonae subsp. abscessus by MPHD. M. peregrinum has been considered as a synonym of M. fortuitum, but we could distinguish M. peregrinum from M. fortuitum clearly by MPHD method. Thus, it is suggested that M. peregrinum and M. fortuitum are different species. Keys for getting reliable results using the MPHD kit are: (1) appropriate amount of bacteria for use, (2) purification of DNA, (3) enough deproteinization, and (4) appropriate timing to read colorimetry measurement of the plate. PMID:8437424

  19. Deformation driven by subduction and microplate collision: Geodynamics of Cook Inlet basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruhn, R.L.; Haeussler, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Late Neogene and younger deformation in Cook Inlet basin is caused by dextral transpression in the plate margin of south-central Alaska. Collision and subduction of the Yakutat microplate at the northeastern end of the Aleutian subduction zone is driving the accretionary complex of the Chugach and Kenai Mountains toward the Alaska Range on the opposite side of the basin. This deformation creates belts of fault-cored anticlines that are prolific traps of hydrocarbons and are also potential sources for damaging earthquakes. The faults dip steeply, extend into the Mesozoic basement beneath the Tertiary basin fill, and form conjugate flower structures at some localities. Comparing the geometry of the natural faults and folds with analog models created in a sandbox deformation apparatus suggests that some of the faults accommodate significant dextral as well as reverse-slip motion. We develop a tectonic model in which dextral shearing and horizontal shortening of the basin is driven by microplate collision with an additional component of thrust-type strain caused by plate subduction. This model predicts temporally fluctuating stress fields that are coupled to the recurrence intervals of large-magnitude subduction zone earthquakes. The maximum principal compressive stress is oriented east-southeast to east-northeast with nearly vertical least compressive stress when the basin's lithosphere is mostly decoupled from the underlying subduction megathrust. This stress tensor is compatible with principal stresses inferred from focal mechanisms of earthquakes that occur within the crust beneath Cook Inlet basin. Locking of the megathrust between great magnitude earthquakes may cause the maximum principal compressive stress to rotate toward the northwest. Moderate dipping faults that strike north to northeast may be optimally oriented for rupture in the ambient stress field, but steeply dipping faults within the cores of some anticlines are unfavorably oriented with respect to

  20. The Encapsidated Genome of Microplitis demolitor Bracovirus Integrates into the Host Pseudoplusia includens ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Markus H.; Zhang, Shu; Bitra, Kavita; Burke, Gaelen R.; Strand, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Polydnaviruses (PDVs) are symbionts of parasitoid wasps that function as gene delivery vehicles in the insects (hosts) that the wasps parasitize. PDVs persist in wasps as integrated proviruses but are packaged as circularized and segmented double-stranded DNAs into the virions that wasps inject into hosts. In contrast, little is known about how PDV genomic DNAs persist in host cells. Microplitis demolitor carries Microplitis demolitor bracovirus (MdBV) and parasitizes the host Pseudoplusia includens. MdBV infects primarily host hemocytes and also infects a hemocyte-derived cell line from P. includens called CiE1 cells. Here we report that all 15 genomic segments of the MdBV encapsidated genome exhibited long-term persistence in CiE1 cells. Most MdBV genes expressed in hemocytes were persistently expressed in CiE1 cells, including members of the glc gene family whose products transformed CiE1 cells into a suspension culture. PCR-based integration assays combined with cloning and sequencing of host-virus junctions confirmed that genomic segments J and C persisted in CiE1 cells by integration. These genomic DNAs also rapidly integrated into parasitized P. includens. Sequence analysis of wasp-viral junction clones showed that the integration of proviral segments in M. demolitor was associated with a wasp excision/integration motif (WIM) known from other bracoviruses. However, integration into host cells occurred in association with a previously unknown domain that we named the host integration motif (HIM). The presence of HIMs in most MdBV genomic DNAs suggests that the integration of each genomic segment into host cells occurs through a shared mechanism. PMID:21880747

  1. Reader Profiles for Adults with Low Literacy Skills: A Quest to Find Resilient Readers.

    PubMed

    Binder, Katherine S; Lee, Cheryl; College, Mount Holyoke

    2012-01-01

    Resilient readers are those who, despite their poor phonological decoding skills, have good comprehension abilities (Jackson & Doellinger, 2002). Thus far, these readers have been identified in college settings. The purpose of this study was to a) determine if this reader profile was present in a sample taken from an Adult Basic Education (ABE) population, and b) identify compensatory mechanisms these readers might use to better their reading comprehension. We administered a battery of tasks consisting of non-word reading, comprehension, fluency, and orthographic processing to a diverse sample of adults in ABE classes. Not only did we identify a group of resilient readers in this sample, we identified three other sub-groups: unskilled readers who had poor decoding and comprehension abilities, skilled readers who possessed good decoding and comprehension abilities, and a group of individuals who had good decoding skills but poor comprehension abilities. We found that the resilient readers and good decoders/poor comprehenders had better orthographic and fluency skills compared to the unskilled readers. However, these last two groups produced different error patterns on the orthographic and fluency tasks. We discuss the implications that these very different reader profiles have for ABE programs.

  2. Surface oxide effect on optical sensing and photoelectric conversion of α-In2Se3 hexagonal microplates.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Lin, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ying-Cen; Chen, Shin-Hong; Huang, Ying-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    The surface formation oxide assists of visible to ultraviolet photoelectric conversion in α-In2Se3 hexagonal microplates has been explored. Hexagonal α-In2Se3 microplates with the sizes of 10s to 100s of micrometers were synthesized and prepared by the chemical vapor transport method using ICl3 as a transport agent. Many vacancies and surface imperfection states have been found in the bulk and on the surface of the microplate because of the intrinsic defect nature of α-In2Se3. To discover physical and chemical properties and finding technological uses of α-In2Se3, several experiments including transmission electron miscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface photovoltage (SPV), photoluminescence (PL), surface photoresponse (SPR), photoconductivity (PC), and thermoreflectance (TR) measurements have been carried out. Experimental results of TEM, XPS, SPV, PL, and SPR measurements show that a surface oxidation layer α-In2Se3-3xO3x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) has formed on the crystal face of α-In2Se3 in environmental air with the inner layer content close to In2Se3 but the outermost layer content approaching In2O3. The near band edge transitions of α-In2Se3 microplates have been probed experimentally by TR and PC measurements. The direct band gap of α-In2Se3 has been determined to be 1.453 eV. The SPV result shows a maximum quantum efficiency of the surface oxide α-In2Se3-3xO3x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) that presents a peak photoresponse near 2.18 eV. The analyses of SPV, SPR, PL, TR, and PC measurements revealed that the surface oxide layer facilitates the conversion of the ultraviolet to the visible range while the native defects (Se and In vacancies) sustain photoconductivity in the near-infrared region. On the basis of the experimental results a wide-energy-range photodetector that combines PC- and SPR-mode operations for α-In2Se3 microplate has been made. The testing results show a well-behaved function of photoelectric conversion in the near-infrared to

  3. Fluorescence lifetime plate reader: resolution and precision meet high-throughput.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl J; Peterson, Kurt C; Muretta, Joseph M; Higgins, Sutton E; Gillispie, Gregory D; Thomas, David D

    2014-11-01

    We describe a nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer that acquires fluorescence decay waveforms from each well of a 384-well microplate in 3 min with signal-to-noise exceeding 400 using direct waveform recording. The instrument combines high-energy pulsed laser sources (5-10 kHz repetition rate) with a photomultiplier and high-speed digitizer (1 GHz) to record a fluorescence decay waveform after each pulse. Waveforms acquired from rhodamine or 5-((2-aminoethyl)amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid dyes in a 384-well plate gave lifetime measurements 5- to 25-fold more precise than the simultaneous intensity measurements. Lifetimes as short as 0.04 ns were acquired by interleaving with an effective sample rate of 5 GHz. Lifetime measurements resolved mixtures of single-exponential dyes with better than 1% accuracy. The fluorescence lifetime plate reader enables multiple-well fluorescence lifetime measurements with an acquisition time of 0.5 s per well, suitable for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime screening applications.

  4. Epstein-barr virus VCA IgM and EBNA IgG antibodies titered by immunofluorescence in microplates. A semi-automated method based on microtiter system.

    PubMed

    Lamy, M E; Favart, A M; Leclercq, M F; Segas, M; Mendez, M; Lhoir, C; Cornu, C; Burtonboy, G

    1982-01-01

    We describe methods of immunofluorescence in microplates for titration of EBV VCA-IgM and EBNA-IgG antibodies and compare the sensitivity of the methods with glass slides and with microplates, showing the reproducibility of the methods. Results of VCA-IgM and -IgG, EA and EBNA titers obtained in four groups of patients are given, comprising cases of infectious mononucleosis, renal graft recipients, lymphoproliferative diseases and controls.

  5. Development of Magnetization Measurement Devices Using Micro-dc-SQUIDs and a Sr_2RuO_4 Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nago, Y.; Shinozaki, T.; Tsuchiya, S.; Ishiguro, R.; Kashiwaya, H.; Kashiwaya, S.; Nomura, S.; Kono, K.; Takayanagi, H.; Maeno, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We developed high-sensitivity magnetization measurement devices composed of micro-dc-SQUIDs and a superconducting Sr_2RuO_4 microplate, aiming to investigate novel magnetic properties related to a spin-triplet chiral p-wave superconductor with a mesoscopic size. Micron-sized dc-SQUID was fabricated by thin Al electrodes, and the SQUID structure was improved to prevent magnetic fluxes from intruding into SQUID electrodes. A Sr_2RuO_4 superconducting microplate was fabricated into the size as small as the SQUID loop using a focused ion beam and directly mounted on the SQUID with precise positioning for high-sensitivity magnetization measurements. In the preliminary magnetization measurements of this device, we observed vortices trapped into the plate and thus the lower critical field. The improved magnetization measurement device developed to exclude undesirable flux intrusion successfully enabled high-sensitivity detection of quantized vortex.

  6. Microplitis demolitor Bracovirus Proviral Loci and Clustered Replication Genes Exhibit Distinct DNA Amplification Patterns during Replication

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, Tyler J.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Strand, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polydnaviruses are large, double-stranded DNA viruses that are beneficial symbionts of parasitoid wasps. Polydnaviruses in the genus Bracovirus (BVs) persist in wasps as proviruses, and their genomes consist of two functional components referred to as proviral segments and nudivirus-like genes. Prior studies established that the DNA domains where proviral segments reside are amplified during replication and that segments within amplified loci are circularized before packaging into nucleocapsids. One DNA domain where nudivirus-like genes are located is also amplified but never packaged into virions. We recently sequenced the genome of the braconid Microplitis demolitor, which carries M. demolitor bracovirus (MdBV). Here, we took advantage of this resource to characterize the DNAs that are amplified during MdBV replication using a combination of Illumina and Pacific Biosciences sequencing approaches. The results showed that specific nucleotide sites identify the boundaries of amplification for proviral loci. Surprisingly, however, amplification of loci 3, 4, 6, and 8 produced head-to-tail concatemeric intermediates; loci 1, 2, and 5 produced head-to-head/tail-to-tail concatemers; and locus 7 yielded no identified concatemers. Sequence differences at amplification junctions correlated with the types of amplification intermediates the loci produced, while concatemer processing gave rise to the circularized DNAs that are packaged into nucleocapsids. The MdBV nudivirus-like gene cluster was also amplified, albeit more weakly than most proviral loci and with nondiscrete boundaries. Overall, the MdBV genome exhibited three patterns of DNA amplification during replication. Our data also suggest that PacBio sequencing could be useful in studying the replication intermediates produced by other DNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Polydnaviruses are of fundamental interest because they provide a novel example of viruses evolving into beneficial symbionts. All polydnaviruses are

  7. Assessing the Rigidity of the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands Microplate: Results from GPS Geodesy in the British Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, D. S.; Baldwin, A.; Turner, H.; Mattioli, G.; Jansma, P.

    2005-12-01

    Recent studies provide evidence of three microplates defined by the Puerto Rico trench to the north and the Muertos trough to the south in the boundary zone between the North America and Caribbean plates in the northeastern Caribbean. From west to east, these are the Gonave, Hispaniola, and Puerto Rico-northern Virgin Islands (PRVI) microplates. The eastern and western boundaries of the Gonave and Hispaniola microplates and the western boundary of the PRVI microplate have been defined in previous studies. However, the easternmost terminus of PRVI is undetermined, but suspected to lie either within or at the eastern terminus of the British Virgin Islands (BVI). Previously reported geodetic data indicates east-west extension across Puerto Rico and between eastern Puerto Rico and Virgin Gorda in the BVI. Our 2005 campaign focused on defining the easternmost terminus of PRVI and testing the extensional hypothesis by collecting surface motion data using Global Positioning System (GPS) geodesy. We collected data at sites on Tortola and Anegada in the BVI and concluded that the GPS-derived velocities of Tortola and Anegada with respect to the Caribbean are 5.71 + 5.5 mm/yr to the NNW (one sigma) and 3.12 + 2.7 mm/yr to the WNW (one sigma), respectively. These velocities are similar to those of eastern Puerto Rico. No motion relative to the Caribbean for Tortola and Anegada also is a possibility within error. If the GPS-derived velocities of Tortola and Anegada are 3-5 mm/yr, little to no east-west extension occurs between the BVI and eastern Puerto Rico, implying that PRVI is rigid at the mm/yr level and that the eastern terminus of PRVI coincides with the eastern end of the BVI near Virgin Gorda.

  8. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  9. "True Wizardry": Readers Theatre in the Classroom. PEN 79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marion E.

    This article describes Readers Theater (a form of group storytelling in which two or more readers present a piece of literature by reading aloud from hand-held scripts) and advocates its use in the classroom. The paper's seven sections are as follows: (1) What is Readers Theater; (2) Readers Theater and Its Conventions (discussing scripts,…

  10. A SURVEY OF MICROFICHE READERS AND READER-PRINTERS CURRENTLY MANUFACTURED IN THE UNITED STATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TATE, VERNON D.; WOLF, DAVID R.

    A DISCUSSION OF MICROFICHE, INCLUDING DEFINITION OF THE TERM, CONSIDERATION OF ITS CHARACTERISTICS AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN IT AND OTHER MICROFORMS, PUBLICATION IN THE FORM, AND STANDARDIZATION OF ITS SIZE AND FORMAT IS FOLLOWED BY AN EXPLANATION OF THE SURVEY OF MICROFICHE READERS AND READER-PRINTERS. THE SURVEY ITSELF GIVES THE FOLLOWING…

  11. Breaking off Engagement: Readers' Disengagement as a Function of Reader and Text Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goedecke, Patricia J.; Dong, Daqi; Shi, Genghu; Feng, Shi; Risko, Evan; Olney, Andrew M.; D'Mello, Sidney K.; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2015-01-01

    Engagement during reading can be measured by the amount of time readers invest in the reading process. It is hypothesized that disengagement is marked by a decrease in time investment as compared with the demands made on the reader by the text. In this study, self-paced reading times for screens of text were predicted by a text complexity score…

  12. "It's All Coming Together": An Encounter between Implied Reader and Actual Reader in the Australian Rainforest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sandra J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I discuss how taking a particular literary theory--the implied reader--serves to offer a focus for the teacher's initial reading of a text and provides a formative assessment tool. Iser's Implied Reader theory is discussed, after which a picture book, "Where the Forest Meets the Sea" by Jeannie Baker, is analysed from this…

  13. Biomineralized anisotropic gold microplate-macrophage interactions reveal frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon: a novel paclitaxel drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Batuwangala, Madu; Mundra, Ruchir; Mehta, Krunal; Patke, Sanket; Falletta, Ermelinda; Patil, Rajendra; Gade, W N

    2014-08-27

    This study reports a facile biomineralization route for gold microplates (GMPs) synthesis using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a reductant and stabilizing agent. Adding BSA to HAuCl4 solution yields spontaneous versatile anisotropic and partially hollow GMPs upon aging. We hypothesize that the instantaneous protein denaturation at low pH enabled access to serine and threonine hydroxyl, and sulfhydryl groups of BSA, which act as a reductant and stabilizer, respectively. This reaction could be hastened by increasing the temperature well beyond 65 °C. Transmission electron microscopy/X-ray diffraction studies revealed highly crystalline and anisotropic structures (triangle, pentagon, and rectangle). Atomic force microscopy/scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated unique morphology of microplates with a partially void core and BSA mineralized edge structure. RAW 264.7 mice peritoneal macrophage-microplate interaction studies using live cell confocal imaging reveal that cells are capable of selectively internalizing smaller GMPs. Large GMPs are preferentially picked with sharp vertices but cannot be internalized and exhibit frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon. We explored particle phagocytosis as an actin mediated process that recruits phagosome-like acidic organelles, shown by a lysosensor probe technique. The biocompatible GMPs exhibited ∼70% paclitaxel (PCL) loading and sustained release of PCL, showing antitumor activity with the MCF-7 cell line, and could be a novel drug carrier for breast cancer therapy.

  14. Development, optimization and validation of a rapid colorimetric microplate bioassay for neomycin sulfate in pharmaceutical drug products.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Saviano, Alessandro Morais; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus Andreoli; Lourenço, Felipe Rebello

    2014-08-01

    Microbiological assays have been used to evaluate antimicrobial activity since the discovery of the first antibiotics. Despite their limitations, microbiological assays are widely employed to determine antibiotic potency of pharmaceutical dosage forms, since they provide a measure of biological activity. The aim of this work is to develop, optimize and validate a rapid colorimetric microplate bioassay for the potency of neomycin in pharmaceutical drug products. Factorial and response surface methodologies were used in the development and optimization of the choice of microorganism, culture medium composition, amount of inoculum, triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) concentration and neomycin concentration. The optimized bioassay method was validated by the assessment of linearity (range 3.0 to 5.0μg/mL, r=0.998 and 0.994 for standard and sample curves, respectively), precision (relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.8% and 4.0 for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively), accuracy (mean recovery=100.2%) and robustness. Statistical analysis showed equivalency between agar diffusion microbiological assay and rapid colorimetric microplate bioassay. In addition, microplate bioassay had advantages concerning the sensitivity of response, time of incubation, and amount of culture medium and solutions required.

  15. Analysis of Genetic Variation across the Encapsidated Genome of Microplitis demolitor Bracovirus in Parasitoid Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Gaelen R.

    2016-01-01

    Insect parasitoids must complete part of their life cycle within or on another insect, ultimately resulting in the death of the host insect. One group of parasitoid wasps, the ‘microgastroid complex’ (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), engage in an association with beneficial symbiotic viruses that are essential for successful parasitism of hosts. These viruses, known as Bracoviruses, persist in an integrated form in the wasp genome, and activate to replicate in wasp ovaries during development to ultimately be delivered into host insects during parasitism. The lethal nature of host-parasitoid interactions, combined with the involvement of viruses in mediating these interactions, has led to the hypothesis that Bracoviruses are engaged in an arms race with hosts, resulting in recurrent adaptation in viral (and host) genes. Deep sequencing was employed to characterize sequence variation across the encapsidated Bracovirus genome within laboratory and field populations of the parasitoid wasp species Microplitis demolitor. Contrary to expectations, there was a paucity of evidence for positive directional selection among virulence genes, which generally exhibited signatures of purifying selection. These data suggest that the dynamics of host-parasite interactions may not result in recurrent rounds of adaptation, and that adaptation may be more variable in time than previously expected. PMID:27390861

  16. DNA based classification of food associated Enterobacteriaceae previously identified by Biolog GN Microplates.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Crister; Ahrné, Siv; Pettersson, Bertil; Molin, Göran

    2004-03-01

    Enterobacteriaceae are frequently isolated from food products and it is essential to have methods for correct identification for both food hygiene and epidemiology reasons. Phenotypic methods are not always sufficient and have to be supplemented by DNA based methods. In the present study, 70 strains of Enterobacteriaceae derived from milk, fish and meat that had previously been identified by Biolog GN Microplates were genomically classified together with 15 representative type strains of species of Enterobacteriaceae. The field strains were dominated by Hafnia alvei, Serratia liquefaciens and Rahnella aquatilis. All strains were subjected to temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis using amplicons encompassing the V3, V4 and V9 variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Selected strains were analysed by ribotyping and partial 16S rDNA sequencing. The type strains were differentiated into 10 different TTGE groups. Two of the groups contained two type strains. Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella planticola were not distinguished due to their identical sequences and Yersinia ruckeri and Citrobacter freundii showed the same migration pattern. The 70 food strains could be differentiated into 14 TTGE groups where 33 strains (47.1%) could be assigned to TTGE groups including type or reference strains. Rahnella strains were dispersed into three TTGE groups of which one group corresponded to Rahnella genomospecies 1 and one to genomospecies 3. The grouping of Rahnella strains was supported by ribotyping and phylogenetic analysis. TTGE can be a useful additional tool for identification on the species level of food related Enterobacteriaceae.

  17. Viscous and acoustic losses in length-extensional microplate resonators in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Díez, Víctor; Hernando-García, Jorge; Manzaneque, Tomás; Kucera, Martin; Schmid, Ulrich; Sánchez-Rojas, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Damping mechanisms in the length-extensional mode of rectangular, mid-point supported microplate resonators immersed in liquid are studied. Piezoelectrically excited structures with different lengths and thicknesses were designed, fabricated, and characterized both optically and electrically in isopropanol. The experimental quality factors were compared to the results of Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations and the two main mechanisms of losses, i.e., acoustic and viscous losses, were identified. Analytical models for those two mechanisms are presented and the effects of the geometry on the in-liquid performance of the resonators are discussed. By applying these models, we found that for a given thickness, a maximum quality factor is reached at a critical length, resulting from the balance between acoustic and viscous losses. To further increase quality factors, a quarter wavelength fluid cavity was implemented, thereby reducing acoustic losses; an increase over 40% in the quality factor was predicted by a 2D FEM model including the cavity, and a quality factor as high as 145 was measured for a 3 mm long and 93 μm thick resonator in this configuration.

  18. Identification and Expression Analysis of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes in Microplitis mediator by Antennal Transcriptome Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Gu, Shao-Hua; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-seeking, ovipositional behavior and mating of insects are controlled mainly by odor perception through sensory organs such as antennae. Antennal chemoreception is extremely important for insect survival. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in mediating the odor detection in insects, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), to ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In the present study, we identified the chemosensory receptor gene repertoire of the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator, a generalist endoparasitoid that infests more than 40 types of Lepidopterous larvae and is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region. By transcriptome sequencing of male and female antennae we identified 60 candidate odorant receptors, six candidate ionotropic receptors and two gustatory receptors in M. mediator. The full-length sequences of these putative chemosensory receptor genes were obtained by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RACE-PCR) method. We also conducted reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for investigating the expression profiles of these chemosensory receptor genes in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues. The tissue- and sex-biased expression patterns may provide insights into the roles of the chemosensory receptor in M. mediator. Our findings support possible future study of the chemosensory behavior of M. mediator at the molecular level. PMID:26078716

  19. Modeling the liquid filling in capillary well microplates for analyte preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Xuewei; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2012-06-15

    An attractive advantage of the capillary well microplate approach is the ability to conduct evaporative analyte preconcentration. We advance the use of hydrophobic materials for the wells which apart from reducing material loss through wetting also affords self entry into the well when the droplet size reduces below a critical value. Using Surface Evolver simulation without gravity, we find the critical diameters D(c) fitting very well with theoretical results. When simulating the critical diameters D(c)(G) with gravity included, the gravitational effect could only be ignored when the liquid volumes were small (difference of 5.7% with 5 μL of liquid), but not when the liquid volumes were large (differences of more than 22% with 50 μL of liquid). From this, we developed a modifying equation from a series of simulation results made to describe the gravitational effect. This modifying equation fitted the simulation results well in our simulation range (100°≤θ≤135° and 1 μL≤V≤200 μL). In simulating the condition of multiple wells underneath each droplet, we found that having more holes did not alter the critical diameters significantly. Consequently, the modifying relation should also generally express the critical diameter for multiple wells under a droplet.

  20. Development of a fluorometric microplate antiadhesion assay using uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kimble, Lindsey L; Mathison, Bridget D; Kaspar, Kerrie L; Khoo, Christina; Chew, Boon P

    2014-05-23

    A fluorometric microplate assay has been developed to determine Escherichia (E.) coli adhesion to uroepithelial cells (UEC). P-fimbriated E. coli were labeled with BacLight Green and preincubated 30 min with human urine or standard. Fluorescent-E. coli were added to UEC in mircoplates at a 400:1 ratio, incubated 1 h, and washed, and the fluorescence intensity was measured. Specific labeling and adherence were confirmed by flow cytometry. A myricetin (1) standard curve (0-30 μg/mL) was developed; the lower limit of detection was 0.1 μg/mL, and half-maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.88 μg/mL (intra- and interassay coefficients of variance were <10% and <15%, respectively). Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) extracts, quercetin (2), and procyanidins B1 (3), B2 (4), and C1 (5) showed similar inhibition. Antiadhesion activity of urine samples from subjects (n = 12) consuming placebo or V. macrocarpon beverage determined using this assay was positively correlated (R(2) = 0.78; p < 0.01) with a radiolabeled-E. coli assay.

  1. Cloning and expression profile of ionotropic receptors in the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Zheng, Yao; Shan, Shuang; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ionotropic receptors (IRs) mainly detect the acids and amines having great importance in many insect species, representing an ancient olfactory receptor family in insects. In the present work, we performed RNAseq of Microplitis mediator antennae and identified seventeen IRs. Full-length MmedIRs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the Hymenoptera IRs revealed that ten MmedIR genes encoded "antennal IRs" and seven encoded "divergent IRs". Among the IR25a orthologous groups, two genes, MmedIR25a.1 and MmedIR25a.2, were found in M. mediator. Gene structure analysis of MmedIR25a revealed a tandem duplication of IR25a in M. mediator. The tissue distribution and development specific expression of the MmedIR genes suggested that these genes showed a broad expression profile. Quantitative gene expression analysis showed that most of the genes are highly enriched in adult antennae, indicating the candidate chemosensory function of this family in parasitic wasps. Using immunocytochemistry, we confirmed that one co-receptor, MmedIR8a, was expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons. Our data will supply fundamental information for functional analysis of the IRs in parasitoid wasp chemoreception. PMID:27208597

  2. Analysis of Genetic Variation across the Encapsidated Genome of Microplitis demolitor Bracovirus in Parasitoid Wasps.

    PubMed

    Burke, Gaelen R

    2016-01-01

    Insect parasitoids must complete part of their life cycle within or on another insect, ultimately resulting in the death of the host insect. One group of parasitoid wasps, the 'microgastroid complex' (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), engage in an association with beneficial symbiotic viruses that are essential for successful parasitism of hosts. These viruses, known as Bracoviruses, persist in an integrated form in the wasp genome, and activate to replicate in wasp ovaries during development to ultimately be delivered into host insects during parasitism. The lethal nature of host-parasitoid interactions, combined with the involvement of viruses in mediating these interactions, has led to the hypothesis that Bracoviruses are engaged in an arms race with hosts, resulting in recurrent adaptation in viral (and host) genes. Deep sequencing was employed to characterize sequence variation across the encapsidated Bracovirus genome within laboratory and field populations of the parasitoid wasp species Microplitis demolitor. Contrary to expectations, there was a paucity of evidence for positive directional selection among virulence genes, which generally exhibited signatures of purifying selection. These data suggest that the dynamics of host-parasite interactions may not result in recurrent rounds of adaptation, and that adaptation may be more variable in time than previously expected. PMID:27390861

  3. Geosmin induces genomic instability in the mammalian cell microplate-based comet assay.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline Flor; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Geosmin (GEO) (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol) is a metabolite that renders earthy and musty taste and odor to water. Data of GEO genotoxicity on mammalian cells are scarce in the literature. Thus, the present study assessed the genotoxicity of GEO on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the microplate-based comet assay. The percent of tail DNA (tail intensity (TI)), tail moment (TM), and tail length (TL) were used as parameters for DNA damage assessment. The results demonstrated that concentrations of GEO of 30 and 60 μg/mL were genotoxic to CHO cells after 4- and 24-h exposure periods, in all parameters evaluated, such as TI, TM, and TL. Additionally, GEO 15 μg/mL was genotoxic in the three parameters only in the 24-h exposure time. The same was observed for GEO 7.5 μg/mL, which induced significant DNA damage observed as TI in the 24-h treatment. The results present evidence that exposure to GEO may be associated with genomic instability in mammalian cells.

  4. Odorant binding characteristics of three recombinant odorant binding proteins in Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Keming; Wang, Shanning; Zhang, Kang; Ren, Liyan; Ali, Abid; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingjiang; Guo, Yuyuan

    2014-06-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are believed to be important for transporting semiochemicals through the aqueous sensillar lymph to the olfactory receptor cells within the insect antennal sensilla. In this study, three new putative OBP genes, MmedOBP8-10, were identified from a Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) antennal cDNA library. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that all three of the OBP genes were expressed mainly in the antennae of adult wasps. The three OBPs were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni ion affinity chromatography. Fluorescence competitive binding assays were performed using N-phenyl-naphthylamine as a fluorescent probe and 45 small organic compounds as competitors. These assays demonstrated that the three M. mediator OBPs can bind a broad range of odorant molecules with different binding affinities. They can bind the following ligands: nonane, farnesol, nerolidol, nonanal, β-ionone, acetic ether, and farnesene. In a Y-tube assay with these ligands as odor stimuli and paraffin oil as a control, all ligands, except nerolidol and acetic ether, were able to elicit behavioral responses in adult M. mediator. The wasps were significantly attracted to β-ionone, nonanal, and farnesene and repelled by nonane and farnesol. The results of this work provide insight into the chemosensory functions of the OBPs in M. mediator.

  5. High-throughput determination of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) by a microplate-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Pang, Hei-Leung; Kwok, Nga-Yan; Chan, Pak-Ho; Yeung, Chi-Hung; Lo, Waihung; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2007-06-01

    The use of the conventional 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) method in BOD determination is greatly hampered by its time-consuming sampling procedure and its technical difficulty in the handling of a large pool of wastewater samples. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop a fast and high-throughput biosensor for BOD measurements. This paper describes the construction of a microplate-based biosensor consisting of an organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) oxygen sensing film for high-throughput determination of BOD in wastewater. The ORMOSIL oxygen sensing film was prepared by reacting tetramethoxysilane with dimethyldimethoxysilane in the presence of the oxygen-sensitive dye tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium-(II) chloride. The silica composite formed a homogeneous, crack-free oxygen sensing film on polystyrene microtiter plates with high stability, and the embedded ruthenium dye interacted with the dissolved oxygen in wastewater according to the Stern-Volmer relation. The bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was loaded into the ORMOSIL/ PVA composite (deposited on the top of the oxygen sensing film) and used to metabolize the organic compounds in wastewater. This BOD biosensor was found to be able to determine the BOD values of wastewater samples within 20 min by monitoring the dissolved oxygen concentrations. Moreover, the BOD values determined by the BOD biosensor were in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional BOD5 method.

  6. Microplate biochemical determination of Russian VX: influence of admixtures and avoidance of false negative results.

    PubMed

    Prokofieva, Daria S; Jenkins, Richard O; Goncharov, Nikolay V

    2012-05-15

    Two microplate spectroscopic methods for determination of organophosphates, based on inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, were further improved and evaluated for determination of the chemical weapon agent Russian VX (RVX) in aqueous solutions. The linear range of the Hestrin method (74.8-1120 pM) was 3.1-fold wider than that of the Ellman method (37.4-374 pM). Limits of detection and quantification of RVX for both methods were below the maximal allowable concentration of RVX in water-soluble washouts. One of the early products of RVX hydrolysis, N,N-diethylaminoethanethiol, like reduced glutathione, caused false negative results in the Ellman method at concentrations exceeding 10 μM; individual blanks were necessary to eliminate the effect. The Hestrin method showed greater specificity (~3 orders of magnitude) for analysis of samples containing mercaptans. A major product of RVX degradation, 2,2'-dithiobis(N,N-diethylethanamine), caused significant inhibition of AChE at concentrations of ≥0.1 mM (P<0.01) and had a false positive effect at higher concentrations (≥2 mM). For environmental monitoring of RVX, the method based on Hestrin is preferred over that based on Ellman, principally because the former method was less sensitive to interference from major admixtures and did not give rise to potentially dangerous false negative results. PMID:22381367

  7. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  8. What Eye Movements Reveal about Deaf Readers

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Levels of illiteracy in the deaf populations around the world have been extremely high for decades and much higher than the illiteracy levels found in the general population. Research has mostly focused on deaf readers’ difficulties rather than on their strengths, which can then inform reading education. Deaf readers are a unique population. They process language and the world surrounding them mostly via the visual channel and this greatly affects how they read or might learn to read. The study of eye movements in reading provides highly sophisticated information about how words and sentences are processed and our research with deaf readers reveals the importance of their uniqueness. PMID:26594098

  9. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  10. Stimulating Cognitive Processes in Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Mary Ann; Wallace, Nancy

    Drawing from research on reading, this paper suggests various methods of stimulating cognition in beginning readers. Defining cognition as the process by which a person gains knowledge, or understands or comprehends, discussion in the paper centers on the following topics: (1) perceptive and cognitive skills; (2) prior experience; (3) knowledge of…

  11. Project Physics Reader 4, Light and Electromagnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    As a supplement to Project Physics Unit 4, a collection of articles is presented in this reader for student browsing. The 21 articles are included under the following headings: Letter from Thomas Jefferson; On the Method of Theoretical Physics; Systems, Feedback, Cybernetics; Velocity of Light; Popular Applications of Polarized Light; Eye and…

  12. Reflections on Teaching Struggling Middle School Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Gay

    1999-01-01

    Shares four working generalizations on what it takes for middle school students with persistent reading difficulties to become successful readers: (1) access to materials that span the gamut of interests and difficulty levels; (2) opportunities to share reading experiences with teachers and classmates; (3) real purposes for reading; and (4)…

  13. 38 CFR 21.150 - Reader service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.150 Reader service. (a) Limitations on vision. A veteran considered... vision is 20/200 in both eyes; (2) Whose central vision is greater than 20/200 but whose field of vision... greater than 20 degrees; or (3) With impaired vision, whose condition or prognosis indicates that...

  14. Digital Reading Pedagogy for Novice Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Annah; Dooley, Karen

    This paper reports on a study of pedagogic practices surrounding novice readers of digital texts in four early childhood classrooms in Queensland, Australia. An empirical study of digital reading pedagogy was conducted in two middle class outer suburban schools in the Queensland capital, Brisbane--two classes in each school provided study sites:…

  15. 38 CFR 21.150 - Reader service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.150 Reader service. (a) Limitations on vision. A veteran considered... vision is 20/200 in both eyes; (2) Whose central vision is greater than 20/200 but whose field of vision... greater than 20 degrees; or (3) With impaired vision, whose condition or prognosis indicates that...

  16. 38 CFR 21.150 - Reader service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.150 Reader service. (a) Limitations on vision. A veteran considered... vision is 20/200 in both eyes; (2) Whose central vision is greater than 20/200 but whose field of vision... greater than 20 degrees; or (3) With impaired vision, whose condition or prognosis indicates that...

  17. Getting Ready to Read with Readers Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchers, Suzanne I; Pfeffinger, Charla R.

    2007-01-01

    Readers theatre is a presentation by two or more participants who read from scripts and interpret a literary work in such a way that the audience imaginatively senses characterization, setting, and action. This book offers 50, two-page reproducible scripts to entice the preschool and kindergarten group into beginning to read. These patterned…

  18. The Expectant Reader in Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Lois Josephs; McCormick, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    Offers a method of using reader response theory that emphasizes the expectations about a text and how those expectations are fulfilled or deflated. Specifically, students read traditional fables, fairy tales, and parables, and compare them to contemporary works such as Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and Marquez's "The Very Old Man With Enormous Wings."…

  19. Teaching Social Studies Using Basal Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Jesus; Logan, John W.

    1983-01-01

    A lesson, "Harriet Tubman: A Most Successful Conductor," illustrates how to employ a basal reader in social studies instruction in the elementary grades. This approach offers students a relevant curriculum, greater opportunities for concept development, practice in skills areas, and activities that offer greater opportunity to master social…

  20. Oral Interpretation of Literature: Readers' Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The pedagogical principle of experiential learning embodied in the oral interpretation of literature through Readers' Theater provides an avenue to accomplish a seemingly daunting task. Students' participation in reading, interpreting, discussing, writing, assessing, and performing their own creative responses to a literary work promotes a…

  1. Teaching Content Material through Reader's Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forney, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    When it comes to content area material, much of what students read and learn is predicated on information they have read before and are supposed to remember. Teachers often use silent reading and round robin reading as preferred reading methods to help students learn content area material. The objective of this study was to test reader's theater…

  2. 38 CFR 21.150 - Reader service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.150 Reader service. (a) Limitations on vision. A veteran considered... vision is 20/200 in both eyes; (2) Whose central vision is greater than 20/200 but whose field of vision... greater than 20 degrees; or (3) With impaired vision, whose condition or prognosis indicates that...

  3. Tape Lessons to Accompany Intermediate Nepali Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Manindra K.

    These tape lessons follow the sequence of the intermediate Nepali Reader. There are 12 lessons each containing various types of exercises designed to increase listening, speaking, and reading skills. Each lesson contains the following types of exercises: (1) listening comprehension; (2) question answering; (3) repetition; and (4) multiple choice…

  4. eReaders in School Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the possibility of using eReaders in the schools of the Houston Independent School District (HISD), specifically the Barnes and Noble Nook Pilot Project. HSID initially approved only an eReading device that was not wireless since it is very strict on the devices granted access to the wireless network. The biggest roadblock…

  5. Project Physics Reader 6, The Nucleus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    As a supplement to Project Physics Unit 6, a collection of articles is presented in this reader for student browsing. Five excerpts are concerned with the nuclear energy revolution, the 20th birthday and possible consequences of the atomic age, a scientist's view of science, and relations between mathematics and physics. Six book passages are…

  6. Guiding Young Readers to Multicultural Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton-Johnson, KaaVonia; Dickinson, Gail

    2005-01-01

    Stocking the shelves of library media centers with multicultural literature is not enough, it is important that children are helped to choose the ones that would interest them as reading about various cultures is of great benefit to young readers. The importance of accurately representing to children a multicultural society is emphasized and…

  7. Trade Related Reading Packets for Disabled Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Beverly; Woodruff, Nancy S.

    Six trade-related reading packets for disabled readers are provided for these trades: assemblers, baking, building maintenance, data entry, interior landscaping, and warehousing. Each packet stresses from 9 to 14 skills. Those skills common to most packets include context clues, fact or opinion, details, following directions, main idea,…

  8. The Emergent Reader's Working Kit of Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on a careful study of series fiction read in the 1950s to explore how stereotypes feature in the development of a young reader's competence in learning to process stories in print. Five categories of stereotype are teased out: "embodied stereotypes," understood through physical experience; "working stereotypes," discerned…

  9. International Reports on Literacy Research: Emergent Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.; Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This is a compilation of reports from international research correspondents on the topic of emergent reading. The report includes 14 separate reports on Nigeria, China, Hong Kong, Israel, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, Estonia, Italy, Canada, Mexico, United States, Argentina, and Chile. Overall, reports on the topic of emergent readers have…

  10. How and Why Stories for Readers Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfman, Judy

    2004-01-01

    How did the bee get his bumble? How do birds get their feathers? Why is the bluebird blue? Curious first through fifth graders want to know how and why things happen! Judy Wolfman has created 40 Readers Theatre scripts based on imaginative and creative porquoi stories that stem from multicultural folktales as well as Native American Indian legends…

  11. Vocabulary Instruction for Second Language Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Deanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, research has consistently affirmed the importance of explicit vocabulary instruction for adult learners of English as a second language (ESL). Given the significant vocabulary demands faced by adult second language readers, ESL teachers must carefully target their instruction for maximum impact and to foster meaningful…

  12. Wholistic Assessment of Proficient Second Language Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Paul Michael

    A study investigated the reading behaviors of proficient second language (L2) readers through their oral retellings. Subjects, 12 advanced English-as-a-Second-Language students who were native speakers of Spanish (10 from Spain, 2 from Central America), read two passages from a college-level expository text and gave two oral retellings which were…

  13. Classic Readers Theatre for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchers, Suzanne I.; Kroll, Jennifer L.

    This book presents 16 original scripts that have been adapted from classic works of literature for use for readers theatre with young adults and ESL (English as a Second Language) students. Adaptations of the following works are included: "Little Women" (Louisa May Alcott); episodes from "Don Quixote" (Miguel de Cervantes; "The Necklace" (Guy de…

  14. Japanese-American Internment. A Historical Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This Historical Reader on "Japanese American Internment" in World War II introduces students to key events and issues during the period through the voices of people with firsthand experienced. Source documents and illustrations are arranged in chronological order and/or thematic units that establish context. Each selection is followed by critical…

  15. Readerly and Writerly "Letters from the Park."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conde, Susana

    1993-01-01

    Discusses in depth the film "Cartas del parque" ("Letters from the Park"), the first of six films in the "Amores Dificiles" series. Notes that the film is pervaded by the traditional overdetermination of gender roles. Suggests that an intrusive and authoritative narrator makes of this both a "readerly" and a "writerly" film. (RS)

  16. Project Physics Reader 1, Concepts of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    As a supplement to Project Physics Unit 1, 21 articles are presented in this reader. Concepts of motion are discussed under headings: motion, motion in words, representation of movement, introducing vectors, Galileo's discussion of projectile motion, Newton's laws of dynamics, the dynamics of a golf club, report on Tait's lecture on force, and bad…

  17. The Copenhagen Studies in Reader Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollerup, Cay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article describes a series of Scandinavian studies in reader response from 1968 to 1990. Studies chronologically discussed in the article are: (1) "Rhythm in Poetry"; (2) "The Esthetic Experience"; (3) "Meaning in Literary Texts"; (4) "Tension"; (5) the "Ram" study; (6) the "Fairytale" project (discontinued); (7) a continuation of the "Ram"…

  18. Understanding Deaf Readers: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelstone, Aaron Weir

    2013-01-01

    The development of reading skills, beyond a functional level, is difficult for most deaf readers. Standardized testing demonstrates a median 4th grade reading level that remains consistent even after national norming of the Stanford Achievement test on the population of deaf school children. Deaf education continues to generate various educational…

  19. Revisiting the Reader's Rudder: A Comprehension Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Presents the structured comprehension method, a strategy that facilitates literal, inferential, and critical reading comprehension for passive readers who can decode but not comprehend. Uses the method to illustrate how other areas of students' instruction (e.g., vocabulary enhancement through morphemic analysis, use of a phonogram approach to…

  20. The Author as Reader and Writer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This article presents contemporary commentary on the previously published articles "Writing for the Reader: A Problem-Solution Approach" and "Motivating Learners at South Korean Universities." Having been out of the field of English as a foreign language for several years, the author was surprised and pleased when he was asked to write some…

  1. Character and Moral Education: A Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVitis, Joseph L., Ed.; Yu, Tianlong, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Against a formidable national discourse that emphasizes academic standardization, accountability, and high-stakes testing in educational policy, "Character and Moral Education: A Reader" seeks to re-introduce and revive the moral mission of education in public conversation and practices in America's schools. With contributions from a prominent…

  2. Readers Response Approach to English Poetry Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Antonia Hsiu-Chen; Sher, Teresa Hsiang-Jen

    This paper describes an elective course at Taiwan's Wen Tzao Ursuline College of Modern Languages, "Concise English Poetry Appreciation and Recitation." The course is based on the reader response approach and targets third year students, leading them into the world of poetry through various stages (traditional nursery rhymes and simple, humorous,…

  3. Effective Instruction for Struggling Readers, K-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Barbara M., Ed.; Ysseldyke, James, E., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    With contributions from recognized leaders in the field of reading interventions, this book examines what has been learned from research to help struggling readers in grades K-6. Focusing on strategies that have been proven effective, the authors help educators meet the demands placed on them to ensure that all students are making good progress…

  4. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  5. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  6. Fluorometric microplate assay to measure glutathione S-transferase activity in insects and mites using monochlorobimane.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Stumpf, Natascha

    2002-04-15

    Elevated levels of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides and acaricides in resistant pest insects and mites, respectively. Such compounds are either detoxicated directly via phase I metabolism or detoxicated by phase II metabolism of metabolites as formed by microsomal monooxygenases. Here we used monochlorobimane (MCB) as an artificial substrate and glutathione to determine total GST activity in equivalents of single pest insects and spider mites in a sensitive 96-well plate-based assay system by measuring the enzymatic conversion of MCB to its fluorescent bimane-glutathione adduct. The differentiation by their GST activity between several strains of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), with different degrees of resistance to numerous acaricides was more sensitive with MCB compared to the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Compared to an acaricide-susceptible reference strain, one field population of T. urticae showed a more than 10-fold higher GST activity measured with MCB, in contrast to a less than 2-fold higher activity when CDNB was used. Furthermore, we showed that GST activity can be sensitively assessed with MCB in homogenates of pest insects such as Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). PMID:11950219

  7. Transdermal film-loaded finasteride microplates to enhance drug skin permeation: Two-step optimization study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tarek A; El-Say, Khalid M

    2016-06-10

    The goal was to develop an optimized transdermal finasteride (FNS) film loaded with drug microplates (MIC), utilizing two-step optimization, to decrease the dosing schedule and inconsistency in gastrointestinal absorption. First; 3-level factorial design was implemented to prepare optimized FNS-MIC of minimum particle size. Second; Box-Behnken design matrix was used to develop optimized transdermal FNS-MIC film. Interaction among MIC components was studied using physicochemical characterization tools. Film components namely; hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (X1), dimethyl sulfoxide (X2) and propylene glycol (X3) were optimized for their effects on the film thickness (Y1) and elongation percent (Y2), and for FNS steady state flux (Y3), permeability coefficient (Y4), and diffusion coefficient (Y5) following ex-vivo permeation through the rat skin. Morphological study of the optimized MIC and transdermal film was also investigated. Results revealed that stabilizer concentration and anti-solvent percent were significantly affecting MIC formulation. Optimized FNS-MIC of particle size 0.93μm was successfully prepared in which there was no interaction observed among their components. An enhancement in the aqueous solubility of FNS-MIC by more than 23% was achieved. All the studied variables, most of their interaction and quadratic effects were significantly affecting the studied variables (Y1-Y5). Morphological observation illustrated non-spherical, short rods, flakes like small plates that were homogeneously distributed in the optimized transdermal film. Ex-vivo study showed enhanced FNS permeation from film loaded MIC when compared to that contains pure drug. So, MIC is a successful technique to enhance aqueous solubility and skin permeation of poor water soluble drug especially when loaded into transdermal films.

  8. A novel microplate-based screening strategy to assess the cellulolytic potential of Trichoderma strains.

    PubMed

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Galletti, Stefania; Burzi, Pier Luigi; Cerato, Claudio

    2010-10-15

    Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel requires a hydrolysis step to obtain fermentable sugars, generally accomplished by fungal enzymes. An assorted library of cellulolytic microbial strains should facilitate the development of optimal enzyme cocktails specific for locally available feedstocks. Only a limited number of strains can be simultaneously assayed in screening based on large volume cultivation methods, as in shake flasks. This study describes a miniaturization strategy aimed at allowing parallel assessment of large numbers of fungal strains. Trichoderma strains were cultivated stationary on microcrystalline cellulose using flat bottom 24-well plates containing an agarized medium. Supernatants obtained by a rapid centrifugation step of the whole culture plates were evaluated for extracellular total cellulase activity, measured as filter paper activity, using a microplate-based assay. The results obtained were consistent with those observed in shake-flask experiments and more than 300 Trichoderma strains were accordingly characterized for cellulase production. Five strains, displaying on shake-flasks at least 80% of the activity shown by the hyper-cellulolytic mutant Trichoderma Rut-C30, were correctly recognized by the screening on 24-well plates, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. Cellulase activity distribution for the entire Trichoderma collection is also reported. One strain (T. harzianum Ba8/86) displayed the closest profile to the reference strain Rut-C30 in time course experiments. The method is scalable and addresses a major bottleneck in screening programs, allowing small-scale parallel cultivation and rapid supernatant extraction. It can also be easily integrated with high-throughput enzyme assays and could be suitable for automation.

  9. Microplitis demolitor bracovirus genome segments vary in abundance and are individually packaged in virions

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Markus H.; Inman, Ross B.; Strand, Michael R. . E-mail: mrstrand@bugs.ent.uga.edu

    2007-03-01

    Polydnaviruses (PDVs) are distinguished by their unique association with parasitoid wasps and their segmented, double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes that are non-equimolar in abundance. Relatively little is actually known, however, about genome packaging or segment abundance of these viruses. Here, we conducted electron microscopy (EM) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies to characterize packaging and segment abundance of Microplitis demolitor bracovirus (MdBV). Like other PDVs, MdBV replicates in the ovaries of females where virions accumulate to form a suspension called calyx fluid. Wasps then inject a quantity of calyx fluid when ovipositing into hosts. The MdBV genome consists of 15 segments that range from 3.6 (segment A) to 34.3 kb (segment O). EM analysis indicated that MdBV virions contain a single nucleocapsid that encapsidates one circular DNA of variable size. We developed a semi-quantitative real-time PCR assay using SYBR Green I. This assay indicated that five (J, O, H, N and B) segments of the MdBV genome accounted for more than 60% of the viral DNAs in calyx fluid. Estimates of relative segment abundance using our real-time PCR assay were also very similar to DNA size distributions determined from micrographs. Analysis of parasitized Pseudoplusia includens larvae indicated that copy number of MdBV segments C, B and J varied between hosts but their relative abundance within a host was virtually identical to their abundance in calyx fluid. Among-tissue assays indicated that each viral segment was most abundant in hemocytes and least abundant in salivary glands. However, the relative abundance of each segment to one another was similar in all tissues. We also found no clear relationship between MdBV segment and transcript abundance in hemocytes and fat body.

  10. Hydrolytic potential of Trichoderma sp. strains evaluated by microplate-based screening followed by switchgrass saccharification.

    PubMed

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Galletti, Stefania; Burzi, Pier Luigi; Cerato, Claudio

    2012-05-10

    Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel requires a hydrolysis step to obtain fermentable sugars, generally accomplished by fungal enzymes. Large-scale screening of different microbial strains would provide optimal enzyme cocktails for any target feedstock. The aim of this study was to screen a large collection of Trichoderma sp. strains for the hydrolytic potential towards switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). Strains were cultivated in a small-scale system and assayed in micro-plates for xylanase and cellulase activities. The population distributions of these traits are reported after growth on switchgrass in comparison with cellulose. The distribution profiles suggest that the growth on switchgrass strongly promotes xylanase production. The IK4 strain displayed the highest xylanase activity after growth on switchgrass (133U/mL). Enzymes (10FPU/g substrate) from IK4 were compared with those from 2 cellulolytic Trichoderma strains and a commercial enzyme in saccharification time-course experiments on untreated and pretreated switchgrass and on an artificial substrate. Samples were analysed by DNS assay and by an oxygraphic method for sugar equivalent or glucose concentration. On the untreated substrate, IK4 enzymes even outperformed a 5-fold load of commercial enzyme, suggesting that xylanase or accessory enzymes are a limiting factor on this type of recalcitrant substrate. On the other substrates, IK4 preparations showed intermediate behaviour if compared with the commercial enzyme at 10FPU/g substrate and at 5-fold load. IK4 also nearly halved the time to release 50% of the hydrolysable sugar equivalents (T(50%)), with respect to the other preparations at the same enzymatic load. DNS assay and oxygraphic method gave highly correlated results for the 3 saccharified substrates. The study suggests that accessory enzymes like xylanase play a key role in improving the performance of cellulase preparations on herbaceous lignocellulosic feedstocks like switchgrass.

  11. Free vibration and biaxial buckling analysis of magneto-electro-elastic microplate resting on visco-Pasternak substrate via modified strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalpoor, A.; Ahmadi-Savadkoohi, A.; Hosseini-Hashemi, Sh

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical analysis of free vibration and biaxial buckling of magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) microplate resting on Kelvin-Voigt visco-Pasternak foundation and subjected to initial external electric and magnetic potentials, using modified strain gradient theory (MSGT). Kirchhoff plate model and Hamilton’s principle are employed to extract the governing equations of motion. Governing equations were analytically solved to obtain clear closed-form expression for complex natural frequencies and buckling loads using Navier’s approach. Numerical results are presented to reveal variations of natural frequency and buckling load ratio of MEE microplate against different amounts of the length scale parameter, initial external electric and magnetic potentials, aspect ratio, damping and transverse and shear stiffness parameters of the visco-Pasternak foundation, length to thickness ratio, microplate thickness and higher modes. Numerical results of this study illustrate that by increasing thickness-to-material length scale parameter ratio, both natural frequency and buckling load ratio predicted by MSGT and modified couple stress theory are reduced because the non-dimensional length scale parameter tends to decrease the stiffness of structures and make them more flexible. In addition, results show that initial external electric and initial external magnetic potentials have no considerable influence on the buckling load ratio and frequency of MEE microplate as the microplate thickness increases.

  12. GPS-Constrained Microplate Kinematics and Plio-Pleistocene Tectonic Evolution of the North Anatolian Fault and North Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W.

    2004-12-01

    Emerging evidence from Global Position System (GPS) survey measurements in the Aegean and elsewhere suggests that present-day active continental deformation occurs largely due to the relative motions of a small number of rigid blocks or microplates. However, it is not universally agreed whether the continental microplate description of the GPS data is superior to other proposed models, nor is it clear whether present-day movement patterns can be usefully extrapolated into the geologic past. Here I examine the known deformation history of the North Aegean over the past ~10 Ma and compare it with predictions based on the present-day microplate model. Agreement provides independent support for the GPS-based model and demonstrates its value in bettering our understanding of Aegean tectonics. If we knew nothing about late Cenozoic North Aegean tectonics and provisionally assumed the correctness of the Aegean microplate model of Nyst & Thatcher [2004 JGR], we would predict several features of the tectonic evolution that accord with geologic evidence. First, the North Aegean Sea would be created by extension due to SSW motion of the South Aegean and concomitant CW rotation of central Greece during the past 10 Ma. The same kinematic process would cause extension to be succeeded by strike-slip motion as the `ridge-transform-ridge' triple junction migrates WSW 24 km/Ma and the North Anatolian fault propagates into the region. The Plio-Pleistocene history of the North Aegean shows these same general features. Drilling and seismic imaging document the existence of young (< 10 Ma) and thick (up to 6 km) sedimentary sequences attributed to crustal extension by a factor of 3-4. Seismic profiling and bathymetric mapping show a mesh of roughly orthogonal faults with dip-slip offsets. Structural studies of sub-aerial exposures of these faults suggest an earlier episode of extension was followed by predominantly strike-slip motions. The plate kinematic reconstruction of late Cenozoic

  13. Blind Braille readers mislocate tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sterr, Annette; Green, Lisa; Elbert, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    In a previous experiment, we observed that blind Braille readers produce errors when asked to identify on which finger of one hand a light tactile stimulus had occurred. With the present study, we aimed to specify the characteristics of this perceptual error in blind and sighted participants. The experiment confirmed that blind Braille readers mislocalised tactile stimuli more often than sighted controls, and that the localisation errors occurred significantly more often at the right reading hand than at the non-reading hand. Most importantly, we discovered that the reading fingers showed the smallest error frequency, but the highest rate of stimulus attribution. The dissociation of perceiving and locating tactile stimuli in the blind suggests altered tactile information processing. Neuroplasticity, changes in tactile attention mechanisms as well as the idea that blind persons may employ different strategies for tactile exploration and object localisation are discussed as possible explanations for the results obtained.

  14. Microplate-based active/inactive 1° screen for biomass degrading enzyme library purification and gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Wagschal, Kurt; Lee, Charles C

    2012-04-01

    We present here a whole-cell and permeabilized E. coli cell 1° active/inactive microplate screen for β-d-xylosidase, xylanase, endoglucanase, and ferulic acid esterase enzyme activities, which are critical for the enzymatic deconstruction of biomass for fuels and chemicals. Transformants from genomic or mutagenesis-derived libraries are screened using fluorophore-tagged substrate/enzyme activity pairs that are assayed directly in the protein expression host growth media using a minimum of specialized equipment and supplies. PMID:22285853

  15. Readers Use Black Newspapers for Health/Cancer Information

    PubMed Central

    Len-Ríos, María E.; Cohen, Elisia; Caburnay, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of readers of black newspapers shows that whether readers depend on black newspapers for cancer and health information depends on their black newspaper use, black self-identity and general media dependency. PMID:21833156

  16. A Problem Solving Framework for Managing Poor Readers in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    Points out that poor readers may exhibit behavioral, cognitive, and emotional problems. Offers a problem-solving framework for intervention in poor readers' nonacademic problems, and describes several possible types of intervention. (ARH)

  17. Shared Poetry: A Whole Language Experience Adapted for Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicklund, LaDonna K.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how a shared poetry exercise, combining whole language experiences with process writing techniques, motivates remedial readers. Notes that this technique helps remedial readers achieve success in writing, build sight and meaning vocabularies, and improve reading fluency. (MM)

  18. CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS--I. NEWSPAPER ARABIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCARUS, ERNEST N.; YACOUB, ADIL I.

    THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF FIVE READERS, THIS VOLUME IS ON AN ADVANCED-ELEMENTARY/LOWER-INTERMEDIATE LEVEL AND ASSUMES A KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC ARABIC AS COVERED IN FERGUSON AND ANI'S "LESSONS IN CONTEMPORARY ARABIC, 1-8," CENTER FOR APPLIED LINGUISTICS, WASHINGTON, D.C., 1960. THE 20 LESSONS (1-15 ARE NEWS REPORTS AND 16-20 ARE PROSE SELECTIONS) ARE…

  19. Child readers' eye movements in reading Thai.

    PubMed

    Kasisopa, Benjawan; Reilly, Ronan G; Luksaneeyanawin, Sudaporn; Burnham, Denis

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been found that adult native readers of Thai, an alphabetic scriptio continua language, engage similar oculomotor patterns as readers of languages written with spaces between words; despite the lack of inter-word spaces, first and last characters of a word appear to guide optimal placement of Thai readers' eye movements, just to the left of word-centre. The issue addressed by the research described here is whether eye movements of Thai children also show these oculomotor patterns. Here the effect of first and last character frequency and word frequency on the eye movements of 18 Thai children when silently reading normal unspaced and spaced text was investigated. Linear mixed-effects model analyses of viewing time measures (first fixation duration, single fixation duration, and gaze duration) and of landing site location revealed that Thai children's eye movement patterns were similar to their adult counterparts. Both first character frequency and word frequency played important roles in Thai children's landing sites; children tended to land their eyes further into words, close to the word centre, if the word began with higher frequency first characters, and this effect was facilitated in higher frequency words. Spacing also facilitated more effective use of first character frequency and it also assisted in decreasing children's viewing time. The use of last-character frequency appeared to be a later development, affecting mainly single fixation duration and gaze duration. In general, Thai children use the same oculomotor control mechanisms in reading spaced and unspaced texts as Thai adults, who in turn have similar oculomotor control as readers of spaced texts. Thus, it appears that eye movements in reading converge on the optimal landing site using whatever cues are available to guide such placement. PMID:27137836

  20. E-Readers and Visual Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Simone; Drai-Zerbib, Véronique; Pedrotti, Marco; Tissier, Geoffrey; Baccino, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The mass digitization of books is changing the way information is created, disseminated and displayed. Electronic book readers (e-readers) generally refer to two main display technologies: the electronic ink (E-ink) and the liquid crystal display (LCD). Both technologies have advantages and disadvantages, but the question whether one or the other triggers less visual fatigue is still open. The aim of the present research was to study the effects of the display technology on visual fatigue. To this end, participants performed a longitudinal study in which two last generation e-readers (LCD, E-ink) and paper book were tested in three different prolonged reading sessions separated by - on average - ten days. Results from both objective (Blinks per second) and subjective (Visual Fatigue Scale) measures suggested that reading on the LCD (Kindle Fire HD) triggers higher visual fatigue with respect to both the E-ink (Kindle Paperwhite) and the paper book. The absence of differences between E-ink and paper suggests that, concerning visual fatigue, the E-ink is indeed very similar to the paper. PMID:24386252

  1. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  2. "Science in Society, Omnibus Pack, Readers M-P."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    Four additional readers have been written for use in the Science in Society general studies project. Three of the readers discuss the applications and importance of engineering in the world. They include: Engineering 1 (Reader M), which discusses such topics as the role of engineering in society, structural design and engineering, the engineering…

  3. BEGINNING CHINESE READER, PART I. YALE LINGUISTIC SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DE FRANCIS, JOHN; AND OTHERS

    THIS READER, ALONG WITH "BEGINNING CHINESE READER, PART II," IS CLOSELY INTEGRATED WITH THE SETON HALL UNIVERSITY TEXTS FOR SPOKEN AND WRITTEN CHINESE, "BEGINNING CHINESE" AND "CHARACTER TEXT FOR BEGINNING CHINESE." OF THE 400 CHARACTERS IN THESE TWO READERS, ALL BUT 33 HAVE BEEN PRESENTED TO THE STUDENT IN "BEGINNING CHINESE" AND "CHARACTER…

  4. Tester automatically checks paper tape punch and reader after maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, L.; Mc Murchy, D. D.

    1967-01-01

    Device automatically bench tests paper tape punches and readers in a simulated operating environment following routine maintenance. The reader and punch operate back-to-back and the paper tape output feeds the reader. The tape leader is prepunched with an arbitrary pattern that is continuously reproduced during the check.

  5. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  6. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  9. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  10. Examining Cultural Relevancy in the "Doctor Bird Readers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headlam, Alis L.

    The "Doctor Bird Readers" represent a first attempt by the Jamaican government to produce readers for children in grades four-six by using Jamaican authors and artists. This study examined whether cultural relevancy was achieved in the development of stories for the "Doctor Bird Readers." A quantitative questionnaire combined with interview data…

  11. Reader Use and Understanding of Newspaper Informational Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasternack, Steve; Utt, Sandra H.

    While the use of informational graphics in newspapers is increasing, little is known regarding how well readers can understand them and how readers use them. A study investigated whether readers of newspapers read graphics before or after they read the headline/text, and whether people decide to read a graphic device for appearance-related or…

  12. Are You a Reader? 5th Graders Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The author tells the story of a 5th-grade teacher who challenges her class to take on self-identities as readers. Students defined seven characteristics of what it means to be a good reader and considered whether those characteristics applied to them: Good readers read for fun, talk about books, usually finish the book they're reading, can relate…

  13. What's New in Children's Literature? Engaging Readers through Series Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Barbara A.; Young, Terrell A.

    2007-01-01

    Although experts may debate the literary value of series books and bemoan readers' reluctance to move away from familiar characters and settings, the fact remains that they often draw reluctant readers to the printed word. There is no evidence that reading series books ruins the literary health or moral fiber of readers (Tunnell & Jacobs, 2008).…

  14. Reader Engagement in English and Persian Applied Linguistics Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansarin, Ali Akbar; Tarlani-Aliabdi, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the way academic writers establish the presence of their readers over the past few years. Establishing the presence of readers or what Kroll (1984, p.181) calls imagining "a second voice" is accomplished when a writer refers "explicitly" to their readers using explicit linguistic resources…

  15. Gifted Male Readers: Current Understandings and Suggestions for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagnani, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Research literature concerning gifted male readers relies primarily on more extensive bodies of work regarding gifted males and male readers. Studied as a whole, the two halves portray a worrisome state of affairs for gifted male readers, who lag behind their female counterparts in the same patterns found across the ability spectrum. This literacy…

  16. Pockmarks and Pustules on the Face of Multicultural Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Susan Ho

    Using multicultural readers for writing courses runs two risks--"pockmarks and pustules." Pockmarks refer to problems with the multicultural readers or books themselves, while pustules refers to characteristics associated with readers or the ones who read the books. Pockmark No. 1 is that readings may create negative opinions or stereotypes in the…

  17. 21 CFR 886.5810 - Ophthalmic prism reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic prism reader. 886.5810 Section 886.5810...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5810 Ophthalmic prism reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic prism reader is a device intended for use by a patient who is in a supine...

  18. 21 CFR 886.5810 - Ophthalmic prism reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic prism reader. 886.5810 Section 886.5810...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5810 Ophthalmic prism reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic prism reader is a device intended for use by a patient who is in a supine...

  19. 21 CFR 886.5810 - Ophthalmic prism reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic prism reader. 886.5810 Section 886.5810...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5810 Ophthalmic prism reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic prism reader is a device intended for use by a patient who is in a supine...

  20. 21 CFR 886.5810 - Ophthalmic prism reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic prism reader. 886.5810 Section 886.5810...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5810 Ophthalmic prism reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic prism reader is a device intended for use by a patient who is in a supine...

  1. 21 CFR 886.5810 - Ophthalmic prism reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic prism reader. 886.5810 Section 886.5810...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5810 Ophthalmic prism reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic prism reader is a device intended for use by a patient who is in a supine...

  2. Graded Readers: How the Publishers Make the Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claridge, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Publishing graded readers is big business, but there is evidence that the texts themselves are not being read in sufficient quantity to improve language proficiency. This article reports on a study of graded readers, focusing on interviews with some major publishers of graded readers, to investigate their production rationales. The findings…

  3. Reading and Spelling Error Analysis of Native Arabic Dyslexic Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-rabia, Salim; Taha, Haitham

    2004-01-01

    This study was an investigation of reading and spelling errors of dyslexic Arabic readers ("n"=20) compared with two groups of normal readers: a young readers group, matched with the dyslexics by reading level ("n"=20) and an age-matched group ("n"=20). They were tested on reading and spelling of texts, isolated words and pseudowords. Two…

  4. Space-time model for migration of weak earthquakes along the northern boundary of the Amurian microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimenko, S. V.; Bykov, V. G.; Merkulova, T. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the statistical distributions of shallow earthquakes with 2 ≤ M ≤ 4, located in 13 rectangular areas (clusters) bounded by 120°E and 144°E along the northern boundary of the Amurian microplate. As a result of our study, the displacement of seismicity maxima has been determined and three recurrent spatial cycles have been observed. The clusters with similar distribution of earthquakes are suggested to alternate being equally spaced at 7.26° (360-420 km). A comparison of investigation results on the structure of seismicity in various segments of the Amurian microplate reveals the identity between the alternation pattern observed for meridional zones of large earthquakes and a distinguished spatial period. The displacement vector for seismicity in the annual cycles is determined, and the correspondence between its E-W direction and the displacement of the fronts of large earthquakes is established. The elaborated model of seismic and deformation processes is considered, in which subsequent activation of clusters of weak earthquakes (2 ≤ M ≤ 4), tending to extend from the Japanese-Sakhalin island arc to the eastern closure of the Baikal rift zone, is initiated by the displacement of the strain wave front.

  5. High-sensitive and high-efficient biochemical analysis method using a bionic electronic eye in combination with a smartphone-based colorimetric reader system.

    PubMed

    Kaiqi Su; Quchao Zou; Ning Hu; Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Bionic electronic eye (Bionic e-Eye), a developed smartphone-based colorimetric reader system, consists of smartphone or pad (iPhone 4s or iPad 3) as detection instrument and portable accessory as illumination provider, integrating with a wide-angle lens, a piece of lowest-power electro luminescent and a custom-made dark hood. A 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) was positioned on the electro luminescent and Bionic e-Eye captures the detection images by the back camera of smartphone. Being similar to human visual system, the hue, saturation and value (HSV, also called hex cone model) color model was employed in image processing algorithm of Bionic e-Eye. Optimized system dimension was determined by the system steadiness experiment of different photograph distances. Moreover, the commercially available BCA protein assay and CCK8 cell number assay were carried out to evaluate this Bionic e-Eye. Analytical performance of Bionic e-Eye had the better precision, higher sensitivity than microtiter plate reader (MTPR) and previous smartphone-based colorimetric reader for both two assays. Also, Bionic e-Eye using optical image detection had simultaneous and synchronous working mode, while MPTR using machine moving detection had asynchronous working mode in high throughput detection. Therefore, Bionic e-Eye will be an ideal point-of-care (POC) colorimetric detection device in the field of clinical application, industrial quality control, environment monitoring, and food assessment.

  6. High-sensitive and high-efficient biochemical analysis method using a bionic electronic eye in combination with a smartphone-based colorimetric reader system.

    PubMed

    Kaiqi Su; Quchao Zou; Ning Hu; Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Bionic electronic eye (Bionic e-Eye), a developed smartphone-based colorimetric reader system, consists of smartphone or pad (iPhone 4s or iPad 3) as detection instrument and portable accessory as illumination provider, integrating with a wide-angle lens, a piece of lowest-power electro luminescent and a custom-made dark hood. A 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) was positioned on the electro luminescent and Bionic e-Eye captures the detection images by the back camera of smartphone. Being similar to human visual system, the hue, saturation and value (HSV, also called hex cone model) color model was employed in image processing algorithm of Bionic e-Eye. Optimized system dimension was determined by the system steadiness experiment of different photograph distances. Moreover, the commercially available BCA protein assay and CCK8 cell number assay were carried out to evaluate this Bionic e-Eye. Analytical performance of Bionic e-Eye had the better precision, higher sensitivity than microtiter plate reader (MTPR) and previous smartphone-based colorimetric reader for both two assays. Also, Bionic e-Eye using optical image detection had simultaneous and synchronous working mode, while MPTR using machine moving detection had asynchronous working mode in high throughput detection. Therefore, Bionic e-Eye will be an ideal point-of-care (POC) colorimetric detection device in the field of clinical application, industrial quality control, environment monitoring, and food assessment. PMID:26738081

  7. PC-based car license plate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chung-Mu; Shu, Shyh-Yeong; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yie-Wern; Wen, Kuang-Pu

    1992-11-01

    A car license plate reader (CLPR) using fuzzy inference and neural network algorithm has been developed in Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) and installed in highway toll stations to identify stolen cars. It takes an average of 0.7 seconds to recognize a car license plate by using a PC with 80486-50 CPU. The recognition rate of the system is about 97%. The techniques of CLPR include vehicle sensing, image grab control, optic pre- processing, lighting, and optic character recognition (OCR). The CLPR can be used in vehicle flow statistics, the checking of stolen vehicles, automatic charging systems in parking lots or garage management, and so on.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Astrophysics (Advanced Physics Readers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Bob

    2000-07-01

    Here is a handy and attractive reader to support students on post-16 courses. It covers the astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology that are demanded at A-level and offers anyone interested in these fields an interesting and engaging reference book. The author and the production team deserve credit for producing such an attractive book. The content, in ten chapters, covers what one would expect at this level but it is how it is presented that struck me as the book's most powerful asset. Each chapter ends with a summary of key ideas. Line drawings are clear and convey enough information to make them more than illustrations - they are as valuable as the text in conveying information. Full colour is used throughout to enhance illustrations and tables and to lift key sections of the text. A number of colour photographs complement the material and serve to maintain interest and remind readers that astrophysics is about real observable phenomena. Included towards the end is a set of tables offering information on physical and astronomical data, mathematical techniques and constellation names and abbreviations. This last table puzzled me as to its value. There is a helpful bibliography which includes society contacts and a website related to the text. Perhaps my one regret is that there is no section where students are encouraged to actually do some real astronomy. Astrophysics is in danger of becoming an armchair and calculator interest. There are practical projects that students could undertake either for school assessment or for personal interest. Simple astrophotography to capture star trails, observe star colours and estimate apparent magnitudes is an example, as is a simple double-star search. There are dozens more. However, the author's style is friendly and collaborative. He befriends the reader as they journey together through the ideas. There are progress questions at the end of each chapter. Their style tends to be rather closed and they emphasize factual recall

  9. AGU Publications: Improvements for Authors and Readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Brooks

    2013-12-01

    AGU has introduced several new features aimed at simplifying and improving the submission of papers to AGU journals. Enhanced PDF and HTML formats and new journal home pages developed with our publishing partner, Wiley, will also provide improvements for readers. In previous issues of Eos, we provided broader overviews of AGU publications, including the transition to Wiley and open access (Eos, 94(30), 264-266, doi:10.1002/2013EO300009; Eos, 94(39), 345, doi:10.1002/2013EO390006).

  10. Inducing comprehension in the bilateral poor reader.

    PubMed

    Rattan, G; Dean, R S; Lowrie, R E

    1987-09-01

    The comprehension effects of changes in the spatial configuration of prose were examined with reading disabled children who differed in laterality preference. Specifically, 24 learning disabled boys were presented with prose materials in a standard, phrased, and backward (right to left) fashion. Measures of comprehension showed that text in the phrased and backward conditions differentially facilitated comprehension for the more bilateral subjects but had little effect on more right lateralized subjects. The results were discussed in terms of the instructional implications of alterations in the visual-spatial arrangement of prose materials for bilateral readers.

  11. Proficient Readers' Reading Behavior in Taiwan: The Study of Young Chinese Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Li-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reading behavior of young proficient Chinese readers at preschool age. Especially, the roles of phonetic skill and Chinese Character recognition in reading comprehension were explored. 10 kindergartens were recruited to participate in the study. Subjects were 72-98 kindergarten children. Instruments…

  12. Metacognition and Reading: Comparing Three Forms of Metacognition in Normally Developing Readers and Readers with Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Furnes, Bjarte; Norman, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Metacognition refers to 'cognition about cognition' and includes metacognitive knowledge, strategies and experiences (Efklides, 2008; Flavell, 1979). Research on reading has shown that better readers demonstrate more metacognitive knowledge than poor readers (Baker & Beall, 2009), and that reading ability improves through strategy instruction (Gersten, Fuchs, Williams, & Baker, 2001). The current study is the first to specifically compare the three forms of metacognition in dyslexic (N = 22) versus normally developing readers (N = 22). Participants read two factual texts, with learning outcome measured by a memory task. Metacognitive knowledge and skills were assessed by self-report. Metacognitive experiences were measured by predictions of performance and judgments of learning. Individuals with dyslexia showed insight into their reading problems, but less general knowledge of how to approach text reading. They more often reported lack of available reading strategies, but groups did not differ in the use of deep and surface strategies. Learning outcome and mean ratings of predictions of performance and judgments of learning were lower in dyslexic readers, but not the accuracy with which metacognitive experiences predicted learning. Overall, the results indicate that dyslexic reading and spelling problems are not generally associated with lower levels of metacognitive knowledge, metacognitive strategies or sensitivity to metacognitive experiences in reading situations.

  13. Struggling Reader to Struggling Reader: High School Students' Responses to a Cross-Age Tutoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Patricia O.; Elliott, Lori N.

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the perceptions and responses of struggling ninth-grade readers who are teaching reading to struggling second- and third-grade students in a cross-age tutoring program. The program was designed to overcome the entrenched, negative affective barriers that older students often bring to the required reading class by…

  14. The Reader-Text-Writer Interaction: L2 Japanese Learners' Response toward Graded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabata-Sandom, Mitsue

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on two projects which investigated graded readers (GRs) as meaningful input for learners of Japanese as a foreign language (JFL). Project One examined the intentions of six writers of Japanese GRs. A focus group interview demonstrated that the writers had a genuine communicative intent in the writing process. Project Two…

  15. Error Detection Mechanism for Words and Sentences: A Comparison between Readers with Dyslexia and Skilled Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Breznitz, Zvia

    2011-01-01

    The activity level of the error monitoring system for processing isolated versus contextual words in Hebrew was studied in adults with dyslexia and skilled readers while committing reading errors. Behavioural measures and event-related potentials were measured during a lexical decision task using words in a list and sentences. Error-related…

  16. Reader Development Bibliography. Books Recommended for Adult New Readers. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Vickie L.

    This edition is an annotated list of 390 literacy materials for adult new readers. All the materials are written on an eighth-grade level or below. These paperback instructional titles, many in workbook format, are for use with adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students. The introduction includes guidelines for…

  17. Low-cost and highly efficient DNA biosensor for heavy metal ion using specific DNAzyme-modified microplate and portable glucometer-based detection mode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Ying; Teng, Liumei; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2015-06-15

    A simple and low-cost DNA sensing platform based on Pb(2+)-specific DNAzyme-modified microplate was successfully developed for highly sensitive monitoring of lead ion (Pb(2+), one kind of toxic heavy metal ion) in the environmental samples coupling with a portable personal glucometer (PGM)-based detection mode. The detection cell was first prepared simply by means of immobilizing the DNAzyme on the streptavidin-modified microplate. Gold nanoparticle labeled with single-stranded DNA and invertase (Enz-AuNP-DNA) was utilized as the signal-transduction tag to produce PGM substrate (glucose). Upon addition of lead ion into the microplate, the substrate strand of the immobilized DNAzyme was catalytically cleaved by target Pb(2+), and the newly generated single-strand DNA in the microplate could hybridize again with the single-stranded DNA on the Enz-AuNP-DNA. Accompanying with the Enz-AuNP-DNA, the carried invertase could convert sucrose into glucose. The as-produced glucose could be monitored by using a widely accessible PGM for in situ amplified digital readout. Based on Enz-AuNP-DNA amplification strategy, as low as 1.0 pM Pb(2+) could be detected under the optimal conditions. Moreover, the methodology also showed good reproducibility and high selectivity toward target Pb(2+) against other metal ions because of highly specific Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme, and was applicable for monitoring Pb(2+) in the naturally contaminated sewage and spiked drinking water samples.

  18. Low-cost and highly efficient DNA biosensor for heavy metal ion using specific DNAzyme-modified microplate and portable glucometer-based detection mode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Ying; Teng, Liumei; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2015-06-15

    A simple and low-cost DNA sensing platform based on Pb(2+)-specific DNAzyme-modified microplate was successfully developed for highly sensitive monitoring of lead ion (Pb(2+), one kind of toxic heavy metal ion) in the environmental samples coupling with a portable personal glucometer (PGM)-based detection mode. The detection cell was first prepared simply by means of immobilizing the DNAzyme on the streptavidin-modified microplate. Gold nanoparticle labeled with single-stranded DNA and invertase (Enz-AuNP-DNA) was utilized as the signal-transduction tag to produce PGM substrate (glucose). Upon addition of lead ion into the microplate, the substrate strand of the immobilized DNAzyme was catalytically cleaved by target Pb(2+), and the newly generated single-strand DNA in the microplate could hybridize again with the single-stranded DNA on the Enz-AuNP-DNA. Accompanying with the Enz-AuNP-DNA, the carried invertase could convert sucrose into glucose. The as-produced glucose could be monitored by using a widely accessible PGM for in situ amplified digital readout. Based on Enz-AuNP-DNA amplification strategy, as low as 1.0 pM Pb(2+) could be detected under the optimal conditions. Moreover, the methodology also showed good reproducibility and high selectivity toward target Pb(2+) against other metal ions because of highly specific Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme, and was applicable for monitoring Pb(2+) in the naturally contaminated sewage and spiked drinking water samples. PMID:25576929

  19. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave Microplate: Plantain Garden Strike-Slip Fault Zone of Eastern Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Demets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Benford, B.

    2008-12-01

    At the longitude of Jamaica, Caribbean (Carib)-North America (Noam) plate motion of 19 ± 2 mm/a is carried by two parallel, left-lateral strike-slip faults, the Oriente fault zone, immediately south of Cuba, and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ), which lies 100-150 km further south. It has been postulated that the lithosphere between these faults constitutes an independent Gonave microplate that has formed in response to the ongoing collision between the leading edge of Carib in Hispaniola and the Bahama carbonate platform. GPS measurements in Jamaica and Hispanola is supportive of the microplate hypothesis and indicates that roughly half of Carib-Noam plate motion (8-14 mm/a) is carried by the EPGFZ of southern Hispaniola and eastern Jamaica. This study applies geomorphic and paleoseismic methods as a direct test of the activity and amount of microplate motion carried on the Plantain Garden fault segment of eastern Hispaniola and how this motion is distributed across a large restraining bend that has formed the island of Jamaica since the late Miocene. The EPFZ curves gently to the northeast and forming a steep mountain front to the Blue Mountains restraining bend with elevations up to 2200 m. Geomorphic fault-related features along the mountain front fault zone include left-laterally deflected rivers and streams, but no small scale features indicative of Holocene activity. River and stream deflections range from 0.1 to 0.5 km. We identified and trenched the most active trace of the mountain front fault at the Morant River where the fault is characterized by a 1.5-m-wide sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and fault Cretaceous basement rocks This section is overlain by a 6-m-thick fluvial terrace. Trenching in the unfaulted terrace immediately overlying the fault trace revealed radiocarbon and OSL ages ranging from 20 to 21 ka that are consistent with a prominent unfaulted alluvial fan along the projection of this fault 1.5 km to

  20. Metabolic effects of azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl against Fusarium kyushuense examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Chen, Qingyuan; Wang, Maosheng; Hsiang, Tom; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-06-01

    Azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl are strobilurin fungicides, and are effective in controlling many plant diseases, including Fusarium wilt. The mode of action of this kind of chemical is inhibition of respiration. This research investigated the sensitivities of Fusarium kyushuense to azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl, and to the alternative oxidase inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM). The Biolog FF MicroPlate is designed to examine substrate utilization and metabolic profiling of micro-organisms, and was used here to study the activity of azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and SHAM against F. kyushuense. Results presented that azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl strongly inhibited conidial germination and mycelial growth of F. kyushuense, with EC50 values of 1.60 and 1.79μgml(-1), and 6.25 and 11.43μgml(-1), respectively; while not for SHAM. In the absence of fungicide, F. kyushuense was able to metabolize 91.6% of the tested carbon substrates, including 69 effectively and 18 moderately. SHAM did not inhibit carbon substrate utilization. Under the selective pressure of azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl during mycelial growth (up to 100μgml(-1)) and conidial germination (up to 10μgml(-1)), F. kyushuense was unable to metabolize many substrates in the Biolog FF MicroPlate; while especially for carbon substrates in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, with notable exceptions such as β-hydroxybutyric acid, y-hydroxybutyric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, α-d-glucose-1-phosphate, d-saccharic acid and succinic acid in the mycelial growth stage, and β-hydroxybutyric acid, y-hydroxybutyric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, tween-80, arbutin, dextrin, glycerol and glycogen in the conidial germination stage. This is a new finding for some effect of azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl on carbon substrate utilization related to glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle and other carbons, and may lead to future applications of Biolog FF MicroPlate for metabolic effects of other

  1. Metabolic effects of azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl against Fusarium kyushuense examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Chen, Qingyuan; Wang, Maosheng; Hsiang, Tom; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-06-01

    Azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl are strobilurin fungicides, and are effective in controlling many plant diseases, including Fusarium wilt. The mode of action of this kind of chemical is inhibition of respiration. This research investigated the sensitivities of Fusarium kyushuense to azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl, and to the alternative oxidase inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM). The Biolog FF MicroPlate is designed to examine substrate utilization and metabolic profiling of micro-organisms, and was used here to study the activity of azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and SHAM against F. kyushuense. Results presented that azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl strongly inhibited conidial germination and mycelial growth of F. kyushuense, with EC50 values of 1.60 and 1.79μgml(-1), and 6.25 and 11.43μgml(-1), respectively; while not for SHAM. In the absence of fungicide, F. kyushuense was able to metabolize 91.6% of the tested carbon substrates, including 69 effectively and 18 moderately. SHAM did not inhibit carbon substrate utilization. Under the selective pressure of azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl during mycelial growth (up to 100μgml(-1)) and conidial germination (up to 10μgml(-1)), F. kyushuense was unable to metabolize many substrates in the Biolog FF MicroPlate; while especially for carbon substrates in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, with notable exceptions such as β-hydroxybutyric acid, y-hydroxybutyric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, α-d-glucose-1-phosphate, d-saccharic acid and succinic acid in the mycelial growth stage, and β-hydroxybutyric acid, y-hydroxybutyric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, tween-80, arbutin, dextrin, glycerol and glycogen in the conidial germination stage. This is a new finding for some effect of azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl on carbon substrate utilization related to glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle and other carbons, and may lead to future applications of Biolog FF MicroPlate for metabolic effects of other

  2. Chinese deaf readers have early access to parafoveal semantics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Pan, Jinger; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Shu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we manipulated different types of information available in the parafovea during the reading of Chinese sentences and examined how deaf readers make use of the parafoveal information. Results clearly indicate that although the reading-level matched hearing readers make greater use of orthographic information in the parafovea, parafoveal semantic information is obtained earlier among the deaf readers. In addition, a phonological preview benefit effect was found for the better deaf readers (relative to less-skilled deaf readers), although we also provide an alternative explanation for this effect. Providing evidence that Chinese deaf readers have higher efficiency when processing parafoveal semantics, the study indicates flexibility across individuals in the mechanisms underlying word recognition adapting to the inputs available in the linguistic environment.

  3. Chinese Deaf Readers Have Early Access to Parafoveal Semantics

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Pan, Jinger; Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Shu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we manipulated different types of information available in the parafovea during the reading of Chinese sentences and examined how deaf readers make use of the parafoveal information. Results clearly indicate that, although the reading-level matched hearing readers make greater use of orthographic information in the parafovea, parafoveal semantic information is obtained earlier among the deaf readers. In addition, a phonological PB effect was found for the better deaf readers (relative to less-skilled deaf readers) though we also provide an alternative explanation for this effect. Providing evidence that Chinese deaf readers have higher efficiency when processing parafoveal semantics, the study indicates flexibility across individuals in the mechanisms underlying word recognition adapting to the inputs available in the linguistic environment. PMID:24999711

  4. U-Pb isotopic evidence for accretion of a continental microplate in the Zalm region of the Saudi Arabian Shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Agar, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    U-Pb zircon age determinations show that this "Andean" continental margin developed before about 720 Ma, and emplacement of calc-alkaline plutonic rocks continued until about 690 Ma. During the period 690-640 Ma, the continental Afif microplate collided with the Asir terrane as part of the Nabitah orogeny. At approximately 640 Ma ago, the Najd strike-slip orogen commenced with a dextral phase that controlled the emplacement of granitic plutons as well as the development of a series of large pull-apart grabens. Some of these grabens were floored by new oceanic crust and were filled with volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Bani Ghayy group. Subsequently, the Najd fault system changed to sinistral strike slip motion at about 620 Ma ago.

  5. Neutral red cytotoxicity assays for assessing in vivo carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in mussels--Comparing microscope and microplate methods.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Bankier, C; Al-Shaeri, M A M; Hartl, M G J

    2015-12-30

    The purpose of the present study was to compare two neutral red retention methods, the more established but very labour-intensive microscope method (NRR) against the more recently developed microplate method (NRU). The intention was to explore whether the sample volume throughput could be increased and potential operator bias avoided. Mussels Mytilus sp. were exposed in vivo to 50, 250 and 500 μg L(-1) single (SWCNTs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Using the NRR method, SWCNTs and MWCNTs caused concentration dependent decreases in neutral red retention time. However, a concentration dependent decrease in optical density was not observed using the NRU method. We conclude that the NRU method is not sensitive enough to assess carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in vivo in environmentally relevant media, and recommend using the NRR method. PMID:26549297

  6. Neutral red cytotoxicity assays for assessing in vivo carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in mussels--Comparing microscope and microplate methods.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Bankier, C; Al-Shaeri, M A M; Hartl, M G J

    2015-12-30

    The purpose of the present study was to compare two neutral red retention methods, the more established but very labour-intensive microscope method (NRR) against the more recently developed microplate method (NRU). The intention was to explore whether the sample volume throughput could be increased and potential operator bias avoided. Mussels Mytilus sp. were exposed in vivo to 50, 250 and 500 μg L(-1) single (SWCNTs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Using the NRR method, SWCNTs and MWCNTs caused concentration dependent decreases in neutral red retention time. However, a concentration dependent decrease in optical density was not observed using the NRU method. We conclude that the NRU method is not sensitive enough to assess carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in vivo in environmentally relevant media, and recommend using the NRR method.

  7. A universally calibrated microplate ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay for foods and applications to Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Bolanos de la Torre, Amparo Angelica S; Henderson, Terence; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Owusu-Apenten, Richard K

    2015-05-01

    The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was recently adapted to a microplate format. However, microplate-based FRAP (mFRAP) assays are affected by sample volume and composition. This work describes a calibration process for mFRAP assays which yields data free of volume effects. From the results, the molar absorptivity (ε) for the mFRAP assay was 141,698 M(-1) cm(-1) for gallic acid, 49,328 M(-1) cm(-1) for ascorbic acid, and 21,606 M(-1) cm(-1) for ammonium ferrous sulphate. The significance of ε (M(-1) cm(-1)) is discussed in relation to mFRAP assay sensitivity, minimum detectable concentration, and the dimensionless FRAP-value. Gallic acid showed 6.6 mol of Fe(2+) equivalents compared to 2.3 mol of Fe(+2) equivalents for ascorbic acid. Application of the mFRAP assay to Manuka honey samples (rated 5+, 10+, 15+, and 18+ Unique Manuka Factor; UMF) showed that FRAP values (0.54-0.76 mmol Fe(2+) per 100g honey) were strongly correlated with UMF ratings (R(2)=0.977) and total phenols content (R(2) = 0.982)whilst the UMF rating was correlated with the total phenols (R(2) = 0.999). In conclusion, mFRAP assay results were successfully standardised to yield data corresponding to 1-cm spectrophotometer which is useful for quality assurance purposes. The antioxidant capacity of Manuka honey was found to be directly related to the UMF rating.

  8. Neural syntax: cell assemblies, synapsembles and readers

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György

    2010-01-01

    Summary A widely discussed hypothesis in neuroscience is that transiently active ensembles of neurons, known as ‘cell assemblies’, underlie numerous operations of the brain, from encoding memories to reasoning. However, the mechanisms responsible for the formation and disbanding of cell assemblies and temporal evolution of cell assembly sequences are not well understood. I introduce and review three interconnected topics, which could facilitate progress in defining cell assemblies, identifying their neuronal organization and revealing causal relationships between assembly organization and behavior. First, I hypothesize that cell assemblies are best understood in light of their output product, as detected by ‘reader-actuator’ mechanisms. Second, I suggest that the hierarchical organization of cell assemblies may be regarded as a neural syntax. Third, constituents of the neural syntax are linked together by dynamically changing constellations of synaptic weights (‘synapsembles’). Existing support for this tripartite framework is reviewed and strategies for experimental testing of its predictions are discussed. PMID:21040841

  9. The PHD Finger: A Versatile Epigenome Reader

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Roberto; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2011-01-01

    PHD (plant homeodomain) zinc fingers are structurally conserved modules found in proteins that modify chromatin as well as mediate molecular interactions in gene transcription. The original discovery of their role in gene transcription is attributed to the recognition of lysine-methylated histone H3. Recent studies show that PHD fingers have a sophisticated histone sequence reading capacity that is modulated by the interplay between different histone modifications. These studies underscore the functional versatility of PHD fingers as epigenome readers that control gene expression through molecular recruitment of multi-protein complexes of chromatin regulators and transcription factors. Moreover, they reinforce the concept that evolutionary changes in amino acids surrounding ligand binding sites on a conserved structural fold impart great functional diversity upon this family of proteins. PMID:21514168

  10. Improved reader for magnetically-encoded ID cards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid demodulator in electronic card reader for magnetically encoded identification cards, accommodates variations in insertion speeds, yet is simpler and less expensive than equivalent all-digital circuits.

  11. Development and testing of a multiwell plates absorbance reader for clinical analysis using inexpensive webcam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Jimmy; Gutierrez, Hector; Vitta, Yosmery; Martinez, Mauro; Fernandez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Biochemical analysis and clinical tests like glucose, hemoglobin, cholesterol, iron, etc. are crucial for early illness diagnosis like diabetes, anemia and coronary deceases. These tests usually are done in state of the art instruments in well equipped laboratories in health centers. In some cases, these instruments are not portable, so they are not recommended for clinical field studies in remote areas. The present work shows a portable low-cost prototype of multi-well plates reader designed for clinical analysis. A Light Emission Diodes (LEDs) array is used as excitation source and an inexpensive webcam as detector. The light source illuminates the 96 well plates and the webcam take the image with 640x480 pixels. The data is acquired and processed by using a portable computer. 96 samples can be read including blanks and calibration standards simultaneously. Light absorption data are processed using a MatLab software designed in our laboratory to obtain calibration curves, standards lectures and samples concentration. The system was evaluated using different analytes series solutions: Neutral Red, Cooper (II) Ammonia Complex and Methyl Orange. The results shows that it is possible to measure few micro liters of solutions with adequate exactitude and precision of less than 3%. As possible analytical clinical application, iron determination was performed using Fe(III) Thiocyanate complex. This method is usually applied in serum samples analysis. The sensibility achieved with the proposed instrumentation configurations allows the analysis of iron in serum samples in the references values normal range (0.75 - 1.5 mg/L) in human.

  12. Alps, Carpathians and Dinarides-Hellenides: about plates, micro-plates and delaminated crustal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Before the onset of Europe-Africa continental collision in the Dinarides-Hellenides (around 60Ma) and in the Alps and Western Carpathians (around 35 Ma), and at a large scale, the dynamics of orogenic processes in the Mediterranean Alpine chains were governed by Europe-Africa plate convergence leading to the disappearance of large parts of intervening oceanic lithosphere, i.e. the northern branch of Neotethys along the Sava-Izmir-Ankara suture and Alpine Tethys along the Valais-Magura suture (Schmid et al. 2008). In spite of this, two major problems concerning the pre-collisional stage are still poorly understood: (1) by now we only start to understand geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the along-strike changes in the polarity of subduction between Alps-Carpathians and Dinarides-Hellenides, and (2) it is not clear yet during exactly which episodes and to what extent intervening rifted continental fragments such as, for example, Iberia-Briançonnais, Tisza, Dacia, Adria-Taurides moved independently as micro-plates, and during which episodes they remained firmly attached to Europa or Africa from which they broke away. As Europe-Africa plate convergence slowed down well below 1 cm/yr at around 30 Ma ago these pre-collisional processes driven by plate convergence on a global scale gave way to more local processes of combined roll-back and crustal delamination in the Pannonian basin of the Carpathian embayment and in the Aegean (as well as in the Western Mediterranean, not discussed in this contribution). In the case of the Carpathian embayment E-directed roll back totally unrelated to Europe-Africa N-S-directed convergence, started at around 20 Ma ago, due to the presence relict oceanic lithosphere in the future Pannonian basin that remained un-subducted during collision. Due to total delamination of the crust from the eastward rolling back European mantle lithosphere the anticlockwise rotating ALCAPA crustal block, consisting of Eastern Alps and Western Carpathian

  13. What do mind readers know and what do we know about mind readers?

    PubMed

    Woolley, Jacqueline D

    2014-11-01

    In this commentary, I raise various questions about Kim and Harris's fascinating findings. I ask what kind of knowledge children expect telepathic individuals to have, who children might consider to be good mind readers, why children value telepathy, and how puzzled children are by telepathy. I suggest potential ways to address some of these questions and end by reiterating the importance of probing individual differences in scepticism and credulity.

  14. Investigating the Relationship between Connectives and Readers' Reading Comprehension Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gençer, Yusuf; ÇetiInkaya, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between connectives in Turkish texts and readers' reading comprehension. Research was conducted with a total of 50 teachers. In the study group, readers' reading comprehension was determined through 10 descriptive texts by using open-ended questions. The results of the analysis revealed…

  15. Toward a Reevaluation of Reader Response and School Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    Reconsiders the nature of literature as a school subject. Discusses the notion that school literature is different from reading literature outside school. Discusses three anomalies: the text and the textbook; educators' idolatry of "naive readers" whose heads are to be stuffed; and the roles of the reader and writer in school programs. (RS)

  16. A Comparative Review of Stratification Texts and Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peoples, Clayton D.

    2012-01-01

    Social stratification is a core substantive area within sociology. There are a number of textbooks and readers available on the market that deal with this central topic. In this article, I conduct a comparative review of (a) four stratification textbooks and (b) four stratification readers. (Contains 2 tables.)

  17. Are You Ready for E-Readers in Your Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses some things to consider when thinking about adding e-readers to one's collection. These include: (1) What is the purpose?; (2) Which device?; (3) How will one keep track of his or her e-readers and their contents?; (4) What are some potential pitfalls?; (5) Is there a positive impact on student learning?; and (6) Are…

  18. Lexical Patterns in the Eyes of Intermediate EFL Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Kyoko

    2005-01-01

    Hoey (1991) claims that lexical patterns, which are a network of repetitious and synonymous words of a text, can be identified even by elementary foreign language readers. The present study investigates whether intermediate Japanese EFL readers can actually find elements of lexical patterns of a text Hoey uses in his book to demonstrate the…

  19. Accelerated Reader[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Reader"[TM] is a guided reading intervention used to supplement regular reading instruction in K-12 classrooms. Its aim is to improve students' reading skills through reading practice and quizzes on the books students read. The "Accelerated Reader"[TM] program calls for students to select and read a book and then take a computerized…

  20. Skilled or Skillful: What's the Difference for Readers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Carol; Dickinson, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the difference between "drilling for skills" and "becoming skillful readers" and shows how teachers can help students become skillful readers, writers, discussants, and thinkers through literature discussions. Discusses establishing a context for literature study, and initiating and maintaining literature study groups. (SR)

  1. Slow and Fast Adult Readers in Text Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Marie-France; Tardieu, Hubert

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a study of fast and slow adult readers' textual organization subprocesses. Reveals that title and text type variables were manipulated in the study. Concludes that fast and slow readers processed textual organization similarly and showed identical comprehension performances. Calls for research into the characteristics of good…

  2. Benefits of Computer-Presented Speed Training for Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irausquin, Rosemarie S.; Drent, Jeanine; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of computer-presented automatization exercises in a group of 14 poor readers were assessed in comparison to a matched control group of 14 poor readers that received computer-presented exercises aimed at the use of context for word identification and comprehension. Training took place three sessions a week for 15 minutes per session and…

  3. Strategies for Classifying Readers: Effects on Prose Processing Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Rosalind; And Others

    The limitations and advantages of any given measure of performance used to classify students as good or poor readers have not been investigated thoroughly. A study was conducted to determine what happens on several dependent measures of comprehension when the same students are separated into good and poor readers based on different criteria.…

  4. In Days Gone By: A Reader. Ukrainian Language Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This reader contains a selection of short texts and is intended for intermediate- to advanced-level students of Ukrainian. The reader is one of four in the Ukrainian Language Development series; the other three are "Conflict,""Deeds and Doers," and "Decisions." The book includes a variety of poems by Ukrainian national poet Taras Shevchenko, and…

  5. Schema Utilization by Skilled and Less Skilled Sixth Grade Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Ellen Bouchard; And Others

    Twenty-four sixth grade students participated in a study that adapted earlier reading research to determine whether students would demonstrate sensitivity to the presence or absence of a relevant schema in a passage and whether skilled readers would show more use of the schema than would less skilled readers. Six skilled and six less skilled…

  6. The Responding Reader: Nine New Approaches to Teaching Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ken, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Articles in this journal issue explore the relationship between the reader and the literature text, and discuss ways that instruction can enhance reader response to that literature. Following an introduction summarizing the nine articles, the titles and their authors are as follows: (1) "It Is the Poem That I Remake: Using Kenneth Burke's Pentad…

  7. Motivating Struggling Adolescent Readers: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    In a high-school reading class, the author used Reader's Theater as an instructional and motivational strategy for underachieving students. This action research focused on the extent to which implementing Reader's Theater motivated students to read and improve their reading skills. Consistent increases in scores for all students occurred over the…

  8. "Science in Society, Omnibus Pack, Readers A-L."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    Twelve readers have been written for use in a course developed by the Science in Society Project. Each reader (corresponding to a specific unit in the course) contains a number of short articles contributed by prominent figures in industry, the professions, the academic world, and in politics. Detailed suggestions on how to take advantage of the…

  9. Stance, Navigation, and Reader Response in Expository Hypertext

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEneaney, John E.; Li, Ledong; Allen, Kris; Guzniczak, Lizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on two studies investigating reader stance, navigation, and response in expository hypertext. Subjects in the studies included 69 and 147 adult readers prompted to adopt either an efferent or aesthetic stance when reading a 36-node expository hypertext. Reading was followed by recall and essay writing tasks. Results of the…

  10. Library Services to Distance Learners in the Commonwealth: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Elizabeth F., Ed.; Jagannathan, Neela, Ed.

    The provision of good library services is a crucial factor in determining the quality of distance education. This collection of articles acquaints readers with distance librarianship as it is practiced in developed and developing countries throughout the British Commonwealth. The reader includes: "Introduction" (Michael Wooliscroft); "Distance…

  11. Sexism Springs Eternal--in the Reader's Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimbardo, Philip G.; Meadow, Wendy

    This document reports on an empirical investigation of anti-women humor appearing in the Reader's Digest over three decades, revealing the operation of an unconscious sexist ideology. A systematic analysis was made of 1,069 jokes appearing in two featured columns of the Reader's Digest for the two-year periods 1947-48, 1957-58, and 1967-68.…

  12. Accelerated Reader/Reading Renaissance. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Accelerated Reader/Reading Renaissance program (now called Accelerated Reader Best Classroom Practices) is a guided reading intervention in which teachers direct student reading of text. It involves two components. Reading Renaissance, the first component, is a set of recommended principles on guided reading (or teachers' direction of…

  13. Prevalence and Nature of Late-Emerging Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catts, Hugh W.; Compton, Donald; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Bridges, Mindy Sittner

    2012-01-01

    Some children demonstrate adequate or better reading achievement in early school grades but fall significantly behind their peers in later grades. These children are often referred to as late-emerging poor readers. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and heterogeneity of these poor readers. We also examined the early language and…

  14. Perceptions about "Good Readers": Analyzing Curricular, Linguistic, and Socioeconomic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions about "what good readers do" are representative of their definition of reading and what they believe they should be striving toward as a reader. These beliefs about reading influence their motivation and ways they engage with texts. In this study, interviews were conducted with students in three first-grade…

  15. Learning to Choose: The Hidden Art of the Enthusiastic Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Often the difference between a successful and unsuccessful reader is that the former is simply better at finding enjoyable books to read. The capacity to select appealing reading is not developed in classrooms where the decision about what book to read is made by someone other than the reader: the teacher, the curriculum planner, the person who…

  16. Readers as Writers Composing from Sources. Technical Report No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Nancy Nelson; King, James R.

    A study of discourse synthesis (readers/writers composing new texts by selecting, organizing, and connecting content from source texts) examined the performance of accomplished and less accomplished readers in the 6th, 8th, and 10th grades on a report-writing task. Over a 3-day period 60 English/language arts students wrote informational reports…

  17. Can Bold Typeface Improve Readers' Comprehension and Metacomprehension of Negation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Sara J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research on negation has demonstrated that while readers are aware that this text construction is difficult, they seem to be able to do little to improve their comprehension. The present research evaluated whether a change in typeface could improve comprehension and metacomprehension of negation. Results indicated that while readers were…

  18. Proud Readers Own What's Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jessica Fink

    2014-01-01

    Proud Readers Own What's Learned (PROWL) was developed out of the need to find an engaging, creative process for readers to express what they have read and, frankly, to let teachers see that the students actually read the books. In other more prescriptive reading programs students can go through the motions and actually pass tests without…

  19. Temporal and Causal Reasoning in Deaf and Hearing Novice Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Susan; Oakhill, Jane; Arfé, Barbara; Boureux, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Temporal and causal information in text are crucial in helping the reader form a coherent representation of a narrative. Deaf novice readers are generally poor at processing linguistic markers of causal/temporal information (i.e., connectives), but what is unclear is whether this is indicative of a more general deficit in reasoning about…

  20. Homophone Effects in Deaf Readers: Evidence from Lexical Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Deanna C.; Joanisse, Marc F.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the nature of deaf readers' phonological processing during online word recognition, and how this compares to similar effects in hearing individuals. Unlike many previous studies on phonological activation, we examined whether deaf readers activated phonological representations for words as opposed to pseudohomophones.…

  1. Chinese Deaf Readers Have Early Access to Parafoveal Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Ming; Pan, Jinger; Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Shu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we manipulated different types of information available in the parafovea during the reading of Chinese sentences and examined how deaf readers make use of the parafoveal information. Results clearly indicate that although the reading-level matched hearing readers make greater use of orthographic information in the parafovea,…

  2. Reader Theories, Cognitive Theories and Educational Media Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Ann

    This paper is the introduction to an inquiry into the relationship of post-structural reader theories to cognitive theories in the study of educational media. Basic concepts in reader and cognitive theories are defined, including the notions of "meaning" and "learners." Similarities and differences in the theories are described. It is suggested…

  3. Breaking the Silence: Toward Improving LGBTQ Representation in Composition Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, John

    2014-01-01

    Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender-Queer (LGBTQ) representation in composition readers remains limited and is frequently nonexistent. In addition, the LGBTQ-related materials that do find their way into composition readers are often problematic. In this essay I explain why WPAs and composition teachers should be concerned about LGBTQ representation…

  4. Signal Panel Alerts Users to Reader-Printer Condition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Henry J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an innovative monitoring device developed to modify microtext reader-printers at California State University, Long Beach. Problems associated with the 3M Model 500's operating features, the signal light panel solution, benefits to staff who service and patrons who use the reader-printers, and cost savings resulting from the modification…

  5. Addressing Learning Disabilities with UDL and Technology: Strategic Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Tracey E.; Cohen, Nicole; Vue, Ge; Ganley, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    CAST created "Strategic Reader," a technology-based system blending Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) in a digital learning environment to improve reading comprehension instruction. This experimental study evaluates the effectiveness of Strategic Reader using two treatment conditions for measuring…

  6. How the Relationship between Text and Headings Influences Readers' Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchey, Kristin; Schuster, Jonathan; Allen, Jaryn

    2008-01-01

    Two questions regarding signals' influence on memory were examined. First, the relationship between headings and text was manipulated to determine whether headings serve as visual cues, directing readers to recall all subsequent information, or content-specific cues, directing readers to recall only to certain information. Second, distance between…

  7. Author's Intentions and Readers' Interpretations. Technical Report No. 276.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Robert J.; And Others

    Three studies investigated the nature of the author-reader relationship during discourse comprehension and production, as well as the influence of selected factors on the author-reader relationship. The first study produced data indicating that the relationship is susceptible to subtle variations in the identity of the author. In those situations…

  8. Identifying What Works for Struggling Readers. Educator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.; Lake, Cynthia; Davis, Susan; Madden, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    This guide summarizes "Effective Programs for Struggling Readers: A Best Evidence Synthesis," a research review conducted by Johns Hopkins University's Center for Research and Reform in Education. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the achievement outcomes of alternative approaches for struggling readers in grade K-5: (1) one-to-one…

  9. Tadpole Tales and Other Totally Terrific Treats for Readers Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Anthony D.

    Readers theater is a storytelling device that stimulates the imagination and promotes all of the language arts. Readers theater is an oral interpretation of a piece of literature read in a dramatic style. It involves and motivates students, energizes the language arts program, and stimulates learning. Geared for children in grades 1-4, this book…

  10. Teaching Materials for German. G3: Readers. Teaching Materials Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centre for Information on Language Teaching, London (England).

    This publication, part of a bibliography of language teaching materials, lists 91 readers. It contains a contents list, annotated entries, an index of authors, editors, compilers and adapters, and a title index. In addition to basic bibliographical details, the following are provided for each entry: an annotation describing the reader, a statement…

  11. Infographics for Educational Purposes: Their Structure, Properties and Reader Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Infographics are one of the new educational environments used to provide information to their readers in a visual way. Infographics are designed to provide information to their readers using various visuals such as texts, pictures, drawings, diagrams, graphs, etc. The use of infographics becomes increasingly widespread both in advertising…

  12. Young Readers' Strategic Approaches to Reading Unfamiliar Words in Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beech, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Children reported the strategies they used when identifying unfamiliar words while reading. Study 1 compared 39 poor readers (M age = 10 years, 7 months) with 2 groups of average readers, one of the same reading age (N = 39; M age = 8 years, 5 months) and the other (N = 31) matched on chronological age. Study 2 included 241 children aged 7 to 11…

  13. An Unforgiving Enemy: AIDS. Student Reader and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education Services, Johnstown, PA.

    These adult basic education instructional materials on the prevention of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) include a student reader and a teacher's guide. The student reader contains six chapters. Chapter 1 introduces two characters--Ricco and Francis--and focuses on the definition of AIDS, the three stages of the disease, the cause, and…

  14. Towards More Secure Biometric Readers for Effective Digital Forensic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Zouheir; Al-Hemairy, Mohamed; Baggili, Ibrahim; Amin, Saad

    This paper investigates the effect of common network attacks on the performance, and security of several biometric readers. Experiments are conducted using Denial of Service attacks (DoSs) and the ARP cache poisoning attack. The experiments show that the tested biometric readers are vulnerable to DoS attacks, and their recognition performance is significantly affected after launching the attacks. However, the experiments show that the tested biometric readers are secure from the ARP cache poisoning attack. This work demonstrates that biometric readers are easy targets for malicious network users, lack basic security mechanisms, and are vulnerable to common attacks. The confidentiality, and integrity of the log files in the biometric readers, could be compromised with such attacks. It then becomes important to study these attacks in order to find flags that could aid in a network forensic investigation of a biometric device.

  15. ANNOUNCEMENT: To the readers of Kvantovaya Elektronika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-06-01

    The Radio i Svyaz' Press is preparing to publish several books on a number of topics in quantum electronics. These books are described below. They are included in the Federal Target Programme for the publication of books in Russia in 1994. In accordance with the Programme, the books are supported financially by the State to pay for the cost of paper and printing. Since at present the question of finance is very problematic and the actual cost of each of these books can be between 12 and 20 thousand roubles per copy, if the number of copies printed is 800-1500 the retail price of each copy would be between 15 and 25 thousand roubles. Consequently, if for any reason we do not receive financial support from the Federal Programme or if we do not receive guaranteed orders from readers, bearing in mind the real retail price, the Press will be unable to publish these books. Guaranteed orders are accepted from organisations and from individuals. The price includes postage on a cash-on-delivery basis if there is a guaranteed print order of 800-1500 copies of each book.

  16. Handheld E-Book Readers and Scholarship Report and Reader Survey: ACLS Humanities E-Book. White Paper No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gielen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a conversion experiment and subsequent reader survey conducted by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Humanities E-Book (HEB) in late 2009 and early 2010 to assess the viability of using scholarly monographs with handheld e-readers. As sample content, HEB selected six titles from its own online collection, three…

  17. Thermal and rheological properties of the NW sector of the Adria microplate between Alps and Apennines (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigano', Alfio; Della Vedova, Bruno; Ranalli, Giorgio; Martin, Silvana; Scafidi, Davide

    2010-05-01

    The present structural setting of the NW sector of the Adria microplate, overridden by the advancing fronts of the Alpine and Apennine chains from nearly opposite directions, is the result of polyphase tectonic deformation beginning in the Late Cretaceous. The deformation was accomodated at different times by S-verging (Alpine front) and N-verging (Appennine front) thrust systems, in which fault patterns are strongly affected by inherited Mesozoic extensional N-S oriented faults. We study the thermal and rheological properties of the central part of the present Po Plain (approximately 44.5-45.7 ° N lat, 9.4-11.2 ° E long), which records the convergence of the Alpine and Apennine orogenic fronts. The present thermal regime of the crust is constrained by geological and geophysical results from oil exploration. A set of 38 deep boreholes (Eni Exploration & Production) provides lithology and temperature data (bottom hole, drill stem, and production test temperatures) down to 6-7 km of depth. Bottom hole data were processed to estimate undisturbed formation temperatures. The thermal conductivity was estimated from lithology and logging data. The thermal resistance method was applied to verify the appropriateness of purely conductive and steady-state heat transfer conditions. Temperature-depth plots show two clearly distinguishable average geotherms, corresponding to the Western (W) and Eastern (E) areas of the NW Adria microplate sector. The two zones show significantly different crustal structures. The internal consistency of data in each zone and the difference between the two groups of data, which is larger than measurement uncertainties, confirm the validity of spatial zonation as a first-order working hypothesis. Temperature measurements in the upper ~7 km of the crust are used to constrain 1D thermal models at the crustal scale. Although the Adria microplate in this area is expected to exhibit lateral heterogeneities due to its complex 3D structure, we derive

  18. Inter- and Intra-Assay Reproducibility of Microplate Alamar Blue Assay Results for Isoniazid, Rifampicin, Ethambutol, Streptomycin, Ciprofloxacin, and Capreomycin Drug Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Brian; Coronel, Jorge; Siedner, Mark; Grandjean, Louis; Caviedes, Luz; Navarro, Pilar; Gilman, Robert H.; Moore, David A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The intersample and intrasample variability of the results obtained with the microplate Alamar blue assay for the indirect drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was investigated. Between 1.2 and 8.5% of paired MICs differed by more than one twofold dilution, resulting in discordant susceptible-resistant designations at frequencies between 0.6% (rifampin) and 18.9% (ethambutol). PMID:18701659

  19. Electrocortical Measures during a Lexical Decision Task: A Comparison between Elementary School-Aged Normal and Dyslexic Readers and Adult Normal and Dyslexic Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Shaul, Shelley; Breznitz, Zvia

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the differences in performance between 30 dyslexic readers in 4th grade, 30 dyslexic readers attending university, and age-matched normal readers for both groups on a lexical decision task to evaluate the underlying factors of dyslexia that persist into adulthood. In both age groups, the dyslexic readers were significantly…

  20. RFID reader design for identification of industrial metallic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczurkowski, M.; Jankowski, H.; Worek, C.; Maksymowicz, L. J.

    2006-10-01

    An electronic circuit design of the RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) reader was the aim of our research. This device is designed for identification of transponders, which are present on the surface of metal elements or inside machine elements made of metal. In order to achieve that, we optimized the antenna reader circuit, that works in near field (magnetic coupling), by means of field flux lines analysis (using finite elements method) and experimental data collecting. Finally, one obtaines a specific shaped magnetic field around the reader.

  1. Usability and Accessibility of eBay by Screen Reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, Maria Claudia; Buzzi, Marina; Leporini, Barbara; Akhter, Fahim

    The evolution of Information and Communication Technology and the rapid growth of the Internet have fuelled a great diffusion of eCommerce websites. Usually these sites have complex layouts crowded with active elements, and thus are difficult to navigate via screen reader. Interactive environments should be properly designed and delivered to everyone, including the blind, who usually use screen readers to interact with their computers. In this paper we investigate the interaction of blind users with eBay, a popular eCommerce website, and discuss how using the W3C Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) suite could improve the user experience when navigating via screen reader.

  2. A combination turbidity and supernatant microplate assay to rank-order the supersaturation limits of early drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John S; Nophsker, Michelle J; Haskell, Roy J

    2014-10-01

    A unique opportunity exists at the drug discovery stage to overcome inherently poor solubility by selecting drug candidates with superior supersaturation propensity. Existing supersaturation assays compare either precipitation-resistant or precipitation-inhibiting excipients, or higher-energy polymorphic forms, but not multiple compounds or multiple concentrations. Furthermore, these assays lack sufficient throughput and compound conservation necessary for implementation in the discovery environment. A microplate-based combination turbidity and supernatant concentration assay was therefore developed to determine the extent to which different compounds remain in solution as a function of applied concentration in biorelevant media over a specific period of time. Dimethyl sulfoxide stock solutions at multiple concentrations of four poorly soluble, weak base compounds (Dipyridamole, Ketoconazole, Albendazole, and Cinnarizine) were diluted with pH 6.5 buffer as well as FaSSIF. All samples were monitored for precipitation by turbidity at 600 nm over 1 h and the final supernatant concentrations were measured. The maximum supersaturation ratio was calculated from the supersaturation limit and the equilibrium solubility in each media. Compounds were rank-ordered by supersaturation ratio: Ketoconazole > Dipyridamole > Cinnarizine ∼ Albendazole. These in vitro results correlated well with oral AUC ratios from published in vivo pH effect studies, thereby confirming the validity of this approach.

  3. Sensitive fluorescent microplate bioassay using recombinant Escherichia coli with multiple promoter-reporter units in tandem for detection of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tani, Chiaki; Inoue, Koichi; Tani, Yuri; Harun-ur-Rashid, Md; Azuma, Norihiro; Ueda, Shunsaku; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Maeda, Isamu

    2009-11-01

    Genetically modified bacterial biosensors can detect specific environmental compounds. Here, we attempted to establish a fluorescent microplate method to detect arsenic using recombinant Escherichia coli cells transformed with plasmids harboring three tandem copies of the ars promoter/operator-the gene for green fluorescent protein (gfp). In the biosensors, one copy of arsR, whose transcription is autoregulated by the ars promoter/operator and ArsR in the genome of E. coli, was placed in trans in another plasmid under the control of isopropyl-1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside-inducible promoter. First, this manipulation enabled regulation of the arsR expression at an adequate level. Second, the copy number of reporter unit also affected signal and noise. When the plasmid harboring three copies of the reporter unit was used, the signal-to-noise ratio doubled and the detection limit decreased from 20 to 7.5 microg L(-1) As(III), compared to the use of the plasmid harboring one copy of the ars promoter/operator-arsR-gfp. Thus, segregation of arsR from the ars promoter/operator-gfp using two plasmids is effective in regulating the signal-to-noise ratio and the detection limit with the different functions.

  4. Late Pleistocene and Holocene uplift history of Cyprus: implications for active tectonics along the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, R.W.; Tsiolakis, E.; Stone, B.D.; Lord, A.; McGeehin, J.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Chirico, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate during the Neogene is complex, controversial and fundamental in understanding active plate-margin tectonics and natural hazards in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our investigation provides new insights into the Late Pleistocene uplift history of Cyprus and the Troodos Ophiolite. We provide isotopic (14C) and radiogenic (luminescence) dates of outcropping marine sediments in eastern Cyprus that identify periods of deposition during marine isotope stages (MIS) 3, 4, 5 and 6. Past sea-levels indicated by these deposits are c. 95±25 m higher in elevation than estimates of worldwide eustatic sea-level. An uplift rate of c. 1.8 mm/year and possibly as much as c. 4.1 mm/year in the past c. 26–40 ka is indicated. Holocene marine deposits also occur at elevations higher than those expected for past SL and suggest uplift rates of c. 1.2–2.1 mm/year. MIS-3 marine deposits that crop out in southern and western Cyprus indicate uniform island-wide uplift. We propose a model of tectonic wedging at a plate-bounding restraining bend as a mechanism for Late Pleistocene to Holocene uplift of Cyprus; uplift is accommodated by deformation and seismicity along the margins of the Troodos Ophiolite and re-activation of its low-angle, basal shear zone.

  5. Reduced turn-around time for Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing with a proportional agar microplate assay.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V A T; Nguyen, H Q; Vu, T T; Nguyen, N A T; Duong, C M; Tran, T H T; Nguyen, H V; Dang, D A; Bañuls, A-L

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is a major issue worldwide; however, accessibility to drug susceptibility testing (DST) is still limited in developing countries, owing to high costs and complexity. We developed a proportion method on 12-well microplates for DST. The assay reduced the time to results to <12 days and <10 days when bacterial growth was checked with the naked eye or a microscope, respectively. Comparison with the Canetti-Grosset method showed that the results of the two assays almost overlapped (kappa index 0.98 (95% CI 0.91-1.00) for isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin; and kappa index 0.92 (95% CI 0.85-0.99) for ethambutol). The sequencing of genes involved in drug resistance showed similar level of phenotype-genotype agreement between techniques. Finally, measurement of the MICs of rifampicin and ethambutol suggests that the currently used critical ethambutol concentration should be revised, and that the current molecular drug susceptibility tests for rifampicin need to be re-evaluated, as in vitro rifampicin-sensitive isolates could harbour drug resistance-associated mutation(s). PMID:26348263

  6. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of olfactory receptor genes in the parasitic wasp, Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Gu, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ze-Wen; Wang, Shan-Ning; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (OR) are believed to fulfil an indispensable role in insects host-seeking, mating and ovipositing. We obtained 4785 high-quality expressed sequencing tags (EST) from the antennal cDNA library of the parasitic wasp Microplitis mediator, a natural enemy of crop pests. After assembling, 786 contigs and 2130 singletons were generated. Using BLAST searches, a number of olfactory-related genes were identified, including ESTs encoding for 25 ORs. 14 full-length OR genes were cloned and their expression profiles in the wasp olfactory organs were quantified by real-time qRT-PCR. The results indicated a diverse distribution between the tissues and genders, yet the majority of OR genes are highly expressed in antennae. Three OR genes (Or2, Or12 and Or13) are highly expressed in female antennae, eight OR genes (ORco, Or3, Or4, Or5, Or7, Or8, Or9 and Or11) are highly expressed in male antennae. This is the first report on tissue-specific expression of wasp OR genes. Our study provides a foundational knowledge to explore and understand the molecular basis of odorant reception in this parasitic wasp and for the study of trophic interactions of natural enemy. PMID:24291166

  7. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Flexible Polymer Composite Based on Hexagonal NiCo2O4 Microplates and PVDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui; Wang, Xian; Song, Kai; Yang, Jing; Gong, Rongzhou

    2016-08-01

    Hexagonal NiCo2O4 microplates were synthesized via a facile one-pot hydrothermal method and followed by a subsequent annealing process. The complex permittivity and permeability of a NiCo2O4 and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) composite were investigated over 2-18 GHz. The experiment indicated that the good microwave absorption performance of NiCo2O4@PVDF depends on dielectric loss and quarter-wavelength cancellation. Our results show that the absorption frequency bandwidth of reflection loss (RL) less than -20 dB for the NiCo2O4@PVDF composite can be measured over the frequency range of 3-15.5 GHz with an absorbing thickness that varies in the range of 1.25-5 mm. Furthermore, an optimal RL of -44.8 dB was observed at 10.7 GHz with a thickness of 1.75 mm. The loss mechanism is also discussed.

  8. Did the Kyrenia Range of northern Cyprus rotate with the Troodos-Hatay microplate during the tectonic evolution of the eastern Mediterranean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Antony; Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Anderson, Mark W.; Hodgson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Previous palaeomagnetic studies have allowed the recognition of a distinctive area of Neotethyan oceanic rocks, including the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus and the Hatay ophiolite to the east in southern Turkey, that underwent 90° of anticlockwise rotation between Late Cretaceous (Campanian) and Early Eocene time. The southern and western boundaries of this rotated Troodos-Hatay microplate have been inferred to lie within, or adjacent to, zones of deformed oceanic and continental margin rocks that are now exposed in southern and western Cyprus; however, the northern boundary of the microplate remains undefined. Relevant to this problem, palaeomagnetic data are presented here from basaltic lavas exposed along the Kyrenia Range, mostly from Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) sites and one Eocene site. A positive inclination-only fold test demonstrates that remanences are pre-deformational in age, and positive conglomerate tests show that magnetic remanences were acquired before Late Eocene-Early Oligocene time, together suggesting that primary magnetizations are preserved. Data from the eastern Kyrenia Range and the Karpas Peninsula (the easternmost extension of the Kyrenia Range) document significant relative tectonic rotation between these localities, with no rotation in the eastern range versus 30° of anticlockwise rotation of the Karpas Peninsula. Unfortunately, palaeomagnetic sites from the western Kyrenia Range did not yield tectonically interpretable magnetization directions, probably due to complex poly-phase thrusting and folding, and the central range also yielded no interpretable data. However, the available palaeomagnetic data are sufficient to demonstrate that the Kyrenia terrane underwent a separate rotation history to the Troodos-Hatay microplate and also implies that the northern boundary of the Troodos-Hatay microplate was located between the Troodos ophiolite and the Kyrenia Range. The former microplate margin has since been overridden and concealed by

  9. Late Miocene to Recent formation of the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt and foreland basin as a consequence of Woodlark microplate rotation, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Bryan; Mann, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt and Aure-Moresby foreland basin are located in the eastern Gulf of Papua (GOP), Papua New Guinea (PNG), and formed during late Miocene-Recent as the result of large-scale, counterclockwise rotation of the 355,000 km2 Woodlark microplate. To document the structure, stratigraphy, and age of convergent deformation along the poorly studied, western edge of the rotating Woodlark microplate, we integrate results of 2,538 km of previously unpublished 2-D seismic reflection data with onshore geologic and GPS studies from previous workers. The late Miocene Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt is a 400 km long, northwest-trending fold-belt exposed onshore in Papua New Guinea that plunges to the southeast, where continuous folds and northeast-dipping thrusts can be imaged in the subsurface for more than 250 km. The arcuate trend of the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt along the southwestern coast and offshore areas of the Papuan peninsula parallels the shape of the adjacent, offshore Aure-Moresby foreland basin and the strike of the transpressional segment of the left-lateral Owen-Stanley fault zone (OSFZ) passing along the center of the Papuan peninsula. As the OSFZ becomes more transtensional east of 148°E, folds of the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt along southern coast of the peninsula become less prominent, and the adjacent Aure-Moresby foreland basin transitions into an undeformed Cenozoic passive margin setting. These observations of convergent an left-lateral deformation along the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt are consistent with: (1) counterclockwise rotation of the Woodlark microplate known from regional GPS studies; (2) coeval opening of the Woodlark basin along its southern edge in the late Miocene; and (3) rapid subduction at the New Britain trench along its northern edge. The kinematics of the rotating Woodlark microplate are driven by slab pull forces acting on the actively subducting northern edge of the microplate.

  10. Reversal and Rotation Errors by Normal and Retarded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, F. William

    1973-01-01

    Reports an investigation of the incidence of and relationships among word and letter reversals in writing and Bender-Gestalt rotation errors in matched samples of normal and retarded readers. No significant diffenences were found in the two groups. (TO)

  11. History Textbooks for Poor Readers--At What Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allen

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes seven junior high school American history textbooks for slow readers. Results indicate weaknesses in historical explanations, causal-effect relationships, background, and synthesizing historical information, specifically when depicting the Civil War and the Great Depression. (Author/KC)

  12. "Pro Patria": Young Readers and the "Great War."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geoff

    1985-01-01

    Provides a thematic presentation of poems written for young readers during the First World War. Draws heavily upon the poems and articles that appeared in "The Boy's Own Paper," a British popular magazine of the period. (HOD)

  13. Editorial Comment: Practice and Inquiry: "EJ" Readers and "EJ" Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Points out that the "English Journal" considers all readers prospective contributors. Lists and discusses the criteria that "English Journal" uses to judge manuscripts that purport to describe effective classroom practices. (ARH)

  14. How Readers and Advertisers Benefit from Local Newspaper Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Shu-Ling Chen; Everett, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    Explores relations among three competitive schemes with respect to newspapers' price structures, including advertising rates and prices to consumers. Finds that readers get some benefit from greater competition, but that advertisers do not. (MM)

  15. The Reading-Writing Connection for Struggling Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aihara, Kathleen; Au, Kathryn; Carroll, Jacquelin; Nakanishi, Patricia; Scheu, Judith; Wong-Kam, Jo Ann

    1999-01-01

    Describes and discusses six recent books for teachers that illuminate, from different perspectives, aspects of the reading-writing connection for struggling readers, and how to teach reading and writing effectively. (SR)

  16. Flexible electronics enters the e-reader market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2010-02-01

    A company that was spun off from the physics department at the University of Cambridge in the UK 10 years ago released its first product last month. Plastic Logic, founded by Henning Sirringhaus and Richard Friend, launched an electronic reader that can display books, magazines and newspapers on a flexible, lightweight plastic display. The reader commercializes pioneering work first started over 20 years ago at the lab by the two physicists, who are based in the department's optoelectronics group.

  17. Evaluation of eye movement variables of Chinese and American readers. Information abstraction by Chinese and American readers.

    PubMed

    Peng, D L; Orchard, L N; Stern, J A

    1983-01-01

    Eye movements were recorded while competent readers of English and Chinese read in their respective languages. There were no important differences in oculometric patterns of fixation pause durations for Chinese and American readers, suggesting that cognitive aspects of reading are more important than perceptual ones in determining eye movement patterns and fixation pauses of competent readers. An analysis of undershoot saccades associated with return of the eyes from the end of one line to the beginning of the next line suggests that these occur more frequently during reading than during the performance of similar eye movements that are more perceptually determined, however, the amount of undershoot does not discriminate between readers of alphabetic and logographic texts.

  18. When High-Capacity Readers Slow Down and Low-Capacity Readers Speed Up: Working Memory and Locality Effects.

    PubMed

    Nicenboim, Bruno; Logačev, Pavel; Gattei, Carolina; Vasishth, Shravan

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of argument-head distance in SVO and SOV languages (Spanish and German), while taking into account readers' working memory capacity and controlling for expectation (Levy, 2008) and other factors. We predicted only locality effects, that is, a slowdown produced by increased dependency distance (Gibson, 2000; Lewis and Vasishth, 2005). Furthermore, we expected stronger locality effects for readers with low working memory capacity. Contrary to our predictions, low-capacity readers showed faster reading with increased distance, while high-capacity readers showed locality effects. We suggest that while the locality effects are compatible with memory-based explanations, the speedup of low-capacity readers can be explained by an increased probability of retrieval failure. We present a computational model based on ACT-R built under the previous assumptions, which is able to give a qualitative account for the present data and can be tested in future research. Our results suggest that in some cases, interpreting longer RTs as indexing increased processing difficulty and shorter RTs as facilitation may be too simplistic: The same increase in processing difficulty may lead to slowdowns in high-capacity readers and speedups in low-capacity ones. Ignoring individual level capacity differences when investigating locality effects may lead to misleading conclusions. PMID:27014113

  19. When High-Capacity Readers Slow Down and Low-Capacity Readers Speed Up: Working Memory and Locality Effects

    PubMed Central

    Nicenboim, Bruno; Logačev, Pavel; Gattei, Carolina; Vasishth, Shravan

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of argument-head distance in SVO and SOV languages (Spanish and German), while taking into account readers' working memory capacity and controlling for expectation (Levy, 2008) and other factors. We predicted only locality effects, that is, a slowdown produced by increased dependency distance (Gibson, 2000; Lewis and Vasishth, 2005). Furthermore, we expected stronger locality effects for readers with low working memory capacity. Contrary to our predictions, low-capacity readers showed faster reading with increased distance, while high-capacity readers showed locality effects. We suggest that while the locality effects are compatible with memory-based explanations, the speedup of low-capacity readers can be explained by an increased probability of retrieval failure. We present a computational model based on ACT-R built under the previous assumptions, which is able to give a qualitative account for the present data and can be tested in future research. Our results suggest that in some cases, interpreting longer RTs as indexing increased processing difficulty and shorter RTs as facilitation may be too simplistic: The same increase in processing difficulty may lead to slowdowns in high-capacity readers and speedups in low-capacity ones. Ignoring individual level capacity differences when investigating locality effects may lead to misleading conclusions. PMID:27014113

  20. When High-Capacity Readers Slow Down and Low-Capacity Readers Speed Up: Working Memory and Locality Effects.

    PubMed

    Nicenboim, Bruno; Logačev, Pavel; Gattei, Carolina; Vasishth, Shravan

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of argument-head distance in SVO and SOV languages (Spanish and German), while taking into account readers' working memory capacity and controlling for expectation (Levy, 2008) and other factors. We predicted only locality effects, that is, a slowdown produced by increased dependency distance (Gibson, 2000; Lewis and Vasishth, 2005). Furthermore, we expected stronger locality effects for readers with low working memory capacity. Contrary to our predictions, low-capacity readers showed faster reading with increased distance, while high-capacity readers showed locality effects. We suggest that while the locality effects are compatible with memory-based explanations, the speedup of low-capacity readers can be explained by an increased probability of retrieval failure. We present a computational model based on ACT-R built under the previous assumptions, which is able to give a qualitative account for the present data and can be tested in future research. Our results suggest that in some cases, interpreting longer RTs as indexing increased processing difficulty and shorter RTs as facilitation may be too simplistic: The same increase in processing difficulty may lead to slowdowns in high-capacity readers and speedups in low-capacity ones. Ignoring individual level capacity differences when investigating locality effects may lead to misleading conclusions.

  1. Micro-plate tectonics and kinematics in Northeast Asia inferred from a dense set of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Park, Pil-Ho; Zhu, Wenyao

    2007-05-01

    The plate tectonics of Northeast Asia are very complex with diffuse and sparse seismicity in the broad plate deformation zones embedded by a number of micro-plates, particularly the controversial Amurian plate. Now the increasingly dense GPS networks in this area provide an important tool to investigate plate tectonic kinematics and to identify the approximate plate tectonic geometries. In this paper, we have processed GPS data (1998-2005) collected by an extensive GPS network (China and South Korea) with more than 85 continuous sites and about 1000 campaign GPS stations. The kinematics of Northeast Asia is studied by modeling GPS-derived velocities with rigid block rotations and elastic deformation. We find that the deformation in Northeast Asia can be well described by a number of rotating blocks, which are independent of the Eurasian plate motion with statistical significance above the 99% confidence level. The tectonic boundary between the North China and Amuria plates is the Yin Shan-Yan Shan Mountain belts with about 2.4 mm/yr extension. Along the boundary between North China and South China, the Qinling-Dabie fault is moving left laterally at about 3.1 mm/yr. The Amuria and South Korea blocks are extending at about 1.8 mm/yr. The Baikal Rift between the Amurian and Eurasian plates is spreading at about 3.0 mm/yr. The 9-17 mm/yr relative motion between the Amuria and Okhotsk blocks is accommodated at the East Sea-Japan trench zone. Localized deformation near the Qinling-Dabie fault and Yin Shan-Yan Shan Mountain belts may be elastic strain accumulation due to interseismic locking of faults.

  2. Validation of the Immunalysis microplate ELISA for the detection of buprenorphine and its metabolite norbuprenorphine in urine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eleanor I; Torrance, Hazel J; Oliver, John S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Immunalysis Buprenorphine Microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of buprenorphine in urine samples. Sixty-nine urine samples were obtained from volunteers on the Subutex treatment program and from routine samples submitted to the laboratory for buprenorphine testing. For ELISA analysis, samples were diluted 1:10 with K(2)HPO(4) (0.1M, pH 7.0). The limit of detection was calculated as 0.5 ng/mL buprenorphine. The intra-assay and interday precision was 3.8% (n = 10) and 8.6% (n = 50) respectively at 1 ng/mL buprenorphine. At a low concentration of norbuprenorphine (1 ng/mL), the immunoassay demonstrated a cross-reactivity of 78%. A higher cross-reactivity of 116% was observed at a higher concentration of norbuprenorphine (10 ng/mL). Dihydrocodeine, codeine, tramadol, morphine, propoxyphene, methadone, and EDDP were tested at concentrations of 10 ng/mL and 10,000 ng/mL and demonstrated no cross-reactivity with the assay. For liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), deuterated internal standard mixture, 1M acetate buffer (pH 5.0), and b-glucuronidase were added to the standards and samples, which were then incubated for 3 h at 60 degrees C. After incubation, 3 mL K(2)HPO(4) (0.1M, pH 6.0) was added and the pH altered to pH 6.0 using 1M KOH. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine were subsequently extracted by solid-phase. Twenty-one samples were confirmed positive and 48 samples were confirmed negative by LC-MS-MS. Using a cut-off value of 0.5 ng/mL buprenorphine, the immunoassay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. PMID:16620543

  3. A Transcriptome Analysis Suggests Apoptosis-Related Signaling Pathways in Hemocytes of Spodoptera litura After Parasitization by Microplitis bicoloratus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Dongshuai; Yang, Minjun; Yang, Yang; Hu, Jiansheng; Luo, Kaijun

    2014-01-01

    Microplitis bicoloratus parasitism induction of apoptotic DNA fragmentation of host Spodoptera litura hemocytes has been reported. However, how M. bicoloratus parasitism regulates the host signaling pathways to induce DNA fragmentation during apoptosis remains unclear. To address this question, we performed a new RNAseq-based comparative analysis of the hemocytes transcriptomes of non-parasitized and parasitized S. litura. We were able to assemble a total of more than 11.63 Gbp sequence, to yield 20,571 unigenes. At least six main protein families encoded by M. bicoloratus bracovirus are expressed in the parasitized host hemocytes: Ankyrin-repeat, Ben domain, C-type lectin, Egf-like and Mucin-like, protein tyrosine phosphatase. The analysis indicated that during DNA fragmentation and cell death, 299 genes were up-regulated and 2,441 genes were down-regulated. Data on five signaling pathways related with cell death, the gap junctions, Ca2+, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, ATM/p53 revealed that CypD, which is involved in forming a Permeability Transition Pore Complex (PTPC) to alter mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), was dramatically up-regulated. The qRT-PCR also provided that the key genes for cell survival were down-regulated under M. bicoloratus parasitism, including those encoding Inx1, Inx2 and Inx3 of the gap junction signaling pathway, p110 subunit of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and the p50 and p65 subunit of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings suggest that M. bicoloratus parasitism may regulate host mitochondria to trigger internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. This study will facilitate the identification of immunosuppression-related genes and also improves our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying polydnavirus-parasitoid-host interaction. PMID:25350281

  4. A transcriptome analysis suggests apoptosis-related signaling pathways in hemocytes of Spodoptera litura after parasitization by Microplitis bicoloratus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Pang, Zunyu; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Xinyi; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Dongshuai; Yang, Minjun; Yang, Yang; Hu, Jiansheng; Luo, Kaijun

    2014-01-01

    Microplitis bicoloratus parasitism induction of apoptotic DNA fragmentation of host Spodoptera litura hemocytes has been reported. However, how M. bicoloratus parasitism regulates the host signaling pathways to induce DNA fragmentation during apoptosis remains unclear. To address this question, we performed a new RNAseq-based comparative analysis of the hemocytes transcriptomes of non-parasitized and parasitized S. litura. We were able to assemble a total of more than 11.63 Gbp sequence, to yield 20,571 unigenes. At least six main protein families encoded by M. bicoloratus bracovirus are expressed in the parasitized host hemocytes: Ankyrin-repeat, Ben domain, C-type lectin, Egf-like and Mucin-like, protein tyrosine phosphatase. The analysis indicated that during DNA fragmentation and cell death, 299 genes were up-regulated and 2,441 genes were down-regulated. Data on five signaling pathways related with cell death, the gap junctions, Ca2+, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, ATM/p53 revealed that CypD, which is involved in forming a Permeability Transition Pore Complex (PTPC) to alter mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), was dramatically up-regulated. The qRT-PCR also provided that the key genes for cell survival were down-regulated under M. bicoloratus parasitism, including those encoding Inx1, Inx2 and Inx3 of the gap junction signaling pathway, p110 subunit of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and the p50 and p65 subunit of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings suggest that M. bicoloratus parasitism may regulate host mitochondria to trigger internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. This study will facilitate the identification of immunosuppression-related genes and also improves our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying polydnavirus-parasitoid-host interaction. PMID:25350281

  5. A Novel Automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test Reader Platform.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Haydar; Kayhan, Osman Semih

    2016-01-01

    A novel automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) reader platform is designed to analyze and diagnose target disease by using existing consumer cameras of a laptop-computer or a tablet. The RDT reader is useable with numerous lateral immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical tests. The system has two different components, which are 3D-printed, low-cost, tiny, and compact stand and a decision program named RDT-AutoReader 2.0. The program takes the image of RDT, crops the region of interest (ROI), and extracts the features from the control end test lines to classify the results as invalid, positive, or negative. All related patient's personal information, image of ROI, and the e-report are digitally saved and transferred to the related clinician. Condition of the patient and the progress of the disease can be monitored by using the saved data. The reader platform has been tested by taking image from used cassette RDTs of rotavirus (RtV)/adenovirus (AdV) and lateral flow strip RDTs of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) before discarding them. The created RDT reader can also supply real-time statistics of various illnesses by using databases and Internet. This can help to inhibit propagation of contagious diseases and to increase readiness against epidemic diseases worldwide. PMID:27190549

  6. Reading between the lines: Societal norms in Sierra Leonean readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brams, Patricia

    1980-12-01

    A content analysis of primary school readers of Sierra Leone revealed that the particular modern and traditional normative aspirations expressed in the National Development Plan for 1974/75-1978/79 were also generally reflected in the children's readers. Compared to the 1964 readers, the first indigenous readers developed circa 1977 contained markedly greater emphasis on traditional norms, though modernity norms continued to dominate, and substantially less emphasis on Efficacy (a central aspect of modernity) and on Non-parochial Affiliation. This closely corresponded with the intent of the National Plan to continue on a modernizing course employing the traditional norms of Manual Labor and Social Cohesion in a grassroots effort to develop the agricultural sector, with nationalism in a less important role. Apart from lesser emphasis on Efficacy and underemphasis on the Value of Education which were discordant with national goals, the 1977 readers seem to provide children and teachers with a fairly accurate image of the national ethos. This may help to account for the generally positive relationship that has been found between schooling and economic development.

  7. A Novel Automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test Reader Platform

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Haydar; Kayhan, Osman Semih

    2016-01-01

    A novel automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) reader platform is designed to analyze and diagnose target disease by using existing consumer cameras of a laptop-computer or a tablet. The RDT reader is useable with numerous lateral immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical tests. The system has two different components, which are 3D-printed, low-cost, tiny, and compact stand and a decision program named RDT-AutoReader 2.0. The program takes the image of RDT, crops the region of interest (ROI), and extracts the features from the control end test lines to classify the results as invalid, positive, or negative. All related patient's personal information, image of ROI, and the e-report are digitally saved and transferred to the related clinician. Condition of the patient and the progress of the disease can be monitored by using the saved data. The reader platform has been tested by taking image from used cassette RDTs of rotavirus (RtV)/adenovirus (AdV) and lateral flow strip RDTs of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) before discarding them. The created RDT reader can also supply real-time statistics of various illnesses by using databases and Internet. This can help to inhibit propagation of contagious diseases and to increase readiness against epidemic diseases worldwide. PMID:27190549

  8. Engaging Literacy: A Case Study in the Use of e-Reader Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lettenmaier, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine to what extent e-readers affected struggling readers as a part of reading instruction at the middle school level to improve students' literacy skills of comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary, and to show how e-readers affected engagement and self-efficacy of struggling readers to read and use…

  9. Alternate reading strategies and variable asymmetry of the planum temporale in adult resilient readers

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Suzanne E.; Leonard, Christiana M.; Chiarello, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Resilient readers are characterized by impaired phonological processing despite skilled text comprehension. We investigated orthographic and semantic processing in resilient readers to examine mechanisms of compensation for poor phonological decoding. Performance on phonological (phoneme deletion, pseudoword reading), orthographic (orthographic choice, orthographic analogy), and semantic (semantic priming, homograph resolution) tasks was compared between resilient, poor and proficient readers. Asymmetry of the planum temporale was investigated in order to determine whether atypical readers showed unusual morphology in this language-relevant region. Resilient readers showed deficits on phonological tasks similar to those shown by poor readers. We obtained no evidence that resilient readers compensate via superior orthographic processing, as they showed neither exceptional orthographic skill nor increased reliance on orthography to guide pronunciation. Resilient readers benefited more than poor or proficient readers from semantic relationships between words and experienced greater difficulty when such relationships were not present. We suggest, therefore, that resilient readers compensate for poor phonological decoding via greater reliance on word meaning relationships. The reading groups did not differ in mean asymmetry of the planum temporale. However, resilient readers showed greater variability in planar asymmetry than proficient readers. Poor readers also showed a trend towards greater variability in planar asymmetry, with more poor readers than proficient readers showing extreme asymmetry. Such increased variability suggests that university students with less reading skill display less well regulated brain anatomy than proficient readers. PMID:20223512

  10. Using Twitter to Teach Reader-Oriented Biblical Interpretation: "Tweading" the Gospel of Mark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Robert, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Twitter offers an engaging way to introduce students to reader-oriented interpretation of the Bible. The exercise described here introduces students to the idea that the reader has a role in the production of a text's meaning, which thus varies from reader to reader. Twitter enables us to capture the real-time thoughts of a variety of…

  11. Understanding Reading through the Eyes of Third-Grade Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggs, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Within the vast research base on struggling readers, very few studies address the nature of struggling readers from their own perspectives; that is, how struggling readers experience reading instruction. The purpose of this qualitative case study research was to gain a deeper understanding of how three third-grade struggling readers viewed…

  12. The Dinaric Faults System: Large-scale Structure And Rates Of Slip Of The Transpressive Northeastern Boundary Of The Adria Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Located at the northeastern corner of the Adria microplate, the Alps-Dinarides junction represents a key region for understanding how the microplate interacts with stable Europe. While the active tectonics of the alpine part of this area is relatively well-constrained, little is known about the present-day deformation imposed by the Adria rotation across the Dinarides. Through morpho-tectonic analysis based on satellite and aerial images, accurate topographical maps and digital elevation models (including LiDAR) combined with field investigations, we have mapped in details the active faults of the Northern Dinarides and the eastern part of the Southern Alps. Based on this mapping and on geological data, we have identified forty cumulative tectonic displacements ranging from few meters to several kilometres allowing to decipher how deformations have affected this area over the Pliocene to the present-day situation. The Late Pleistocene period was mainly investigated using 36Cl-exposure dating of displaced geomorphic markers combined with the existing chronologies of the glacial-interglacial landscape evolution in the area (e.g Monegato et al., 2007 ; Fontana et al., 2008). The presented results yield 3.1±0.9 mm/yr of active right-lateral faulting along the Northern Dinarides. The Adria rotation models (e.g Calais et al., 2002 ; D'Agostino et al., 2008; Weber et al., 2010) and the present knowledge of the lithospheric structure of the area (Brückl et al., 2010 ; Sumanovac et al., 2009) along with our results corroborates that the Northern Dinarides probably represents the main eastern boundary of the Adria microplate.

  13. Comparative cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of 13 drinking water disinfection by-products using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Tan, Li; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The implications of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking water are of public health concern because of their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and other toxic effects on humans. In this study, we selected 13 main DBPs found in drinking water to quantitatively analyse their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. With the developed SOS/umu test, eight DBPs: 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-fura3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[5H]-furanone (MX), dibromoacetonitrile (DBN), iodoacetic acid (IA), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCN), bromoacetic acid (BA), trichloroacetonitrile (TCN), dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were significantly genotoxic to S. typhimurium. Three DBPs: chloroacetic acid (CA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCN) were weakly genotoxic, whereas the remaining DBPs: chloroacetonitrile (CN) and chloral hydrate (CH) were negative. The rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was as follows: MX > DBN > IA > BCN > BA > TCN > DBA > DCA > CA, TCA, DCN > CN, CH. MX was approximately 370 000 times more genotoxic than DCA. In the microplate-based cytotoxicity assay, cytotoxic potencies of the 13 DBPs were compared and ranked in decreasing order as follows: MX > IA > DBN > BCN > BA > TCN > DCN > CA > DCA > DBA > CN > TCA > CH. MX was approximately 19 200 times more cytotoxic than CH. A statistically significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the 13 DBPs in S. typhimurium. Results suggest that microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and the developed SOS/umu assay are feasible tools for analysing the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DBPs, particularly for comparing their toxic intensities quantitatively.

  14. Development, Optimization, and Validation of a Microplate Bioassay for Relative Potency Determination of Linezolid Using a Design Space Concept, and its Measurement Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Saviano, Alessandro Morais; Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Ostronoff, Celina Silva; Lourenço, Felipe Rebello

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, optimize, and validate a microplate bioassay for relative potency determination of linezolid in pharmaceutical samples using quality-by-design and design space approaches. In addition, a procedure is described for estimating relative potency uncertainty based on microbiological response variability. The influence of culture media composition was studied using a factorial design and a central composite design was adopted to study the influence of inoculum proportion and triphenyltetrazolium chloride in microbial growth. The microplate bioassay was optimized regarding the responses of low, medium, and high doses of linezolid, negative and positive controls, and the slope, intercept, and correlation coefficient of dose-response curves. According to optimization results, design space ranges were established using: (a) low (1.0 μg/mL), medium (2.0 μg/mL), and high (4.0 μg/mL) doses of pharmaceutical samples and linezolid chemical reference substance; (b) Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 653 in an inoculum proportion of 10%; (c) antibiotic No. 3 culture medium pH 7.0±0.1; (d) 6 h incubation at 37.0±0.1ºC; and (e) addition of 50 μL of 0.5% (w/v) triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution. The microplate bioassay was linear (r2=0.992), specific, precise (repeatability RSD=2.3% and intermediate precision RSD=4.3%), accurate (mean recovery=101.4%), and robust. The overall measurement uncertainty was reasonable considering the increased variability inherent in microbiological response. Final uncertainty was comparable with those obtained with other microbiological assays, as well as chemical methods. PMID:26525245

  15. Comparative cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of 13 drinking water disinfection by-products using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Tan, Li; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The implications of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking water are of public health concern because of their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and other toxic effects on humans. In this study, we selected 13 main DBPs found in drinking water to quantitatively analyse their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. With the developed SOS/umu test, eight DBPs: 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-fura3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[5H]-furanone (MX), dibromoacetonitrile (DBN), iodoacetic acid (IA), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCN), bromoacetic acid (BA), trichloroacetonitrile (TCN), dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were significantly genotoxic to S. typhimurium. Three DBPs: chloroacetic acid (CA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCN) were weakly genotoxic, whereas the remaining DBPs: chloroacetonitrile (CN) and chloral hydrate (CH) were negative. The rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was as follows: MX > DBN > IA > BCN > BA > TCN > DBA > DCA > CA, TCA, DCN > CN, CH. MX was approximately 370 000 times more genotoxic than DCA. In the microplate-based cytotoxicity assay, cytotoxic potencies of the 13 DBPs were compared and ranked in decreasing order as follows: MX > IA > DBN > BCN > BA > TCN > DCN > CA > DCA > DBA > CN > TCA > CH. MX was approximately 19 200 times more cytotoxic than CH. A statistically significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the 13 DBPs in S. typhimurium. Results suggest that microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and the developed SOS/umu assay are feasible tools for analysing the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DBPs, particularly for comparing their toxic intensities quantitatively. PMID:26188195

  16. Development, Optimization, and Validation of a Microplate Bioassay for Relative Potency Determination of Linezolid Using a Design Space Concept, and its Measurement Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Saviano, Alessandro Morais; Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Ostronoff, Celina Silva; Lourenço, Felipe Rebello

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, optimize, and validate a microplate bioassay for relative potency determination of linezolid in pharmaceutical samples using quality-by-design and design space approaches. In addition, a procedure is described for estimating relative potency uncertainty based on microbiological response variability. The influence of culture media composition was studied using a factorial design and a central composite design was adopted to study the influence of inoculum proportion and triphenyltetrazolium chloride in microbial growth. The microplate bioassay was optimized regarding the responses of low, medium, and high doses of linezolid, negative and positive controls, and the slope, intercept, and correlation coefficient of dose-response curves. According to optimization results, design space ranges were established using: (a) low (1.0 μg/mL), medium (2.0 μg/mL), and high (4.0 μg/mL) doses of pharmaceutical samples and linezolid chemical reference substance; (b) Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 653 in an inoculum proportion of 10%; (c) antibiotic No. 3 culture medium pH 7.0±0.1; (d) 6 h incubation at 37.0±0.1ºC; and (e) addition of 50 μL of 0.5% (w/v) triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution. The microplate bioassay was linear (r2=0.992), specific, precise (repeatability RSD=2.3% and intermediate precision RSD=4.3%), accurate (mean recovery=101.4%), and robust. The overall measurement uncertainty was reasonable considering the increased variability inherent in microbiological response. Final uncertainty was comparable with those obtained with other microbiological assays, as well as chemical methods.

  17. Possible microplate generation at RRR triple junctions due to the non-circular finite motion of plates relative to each other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, V. S.

    2012-12-01

    First generation ideas of the kinematic stability of triple junctions lead to the common belief that the geometry of ridge-ridge-ridge (RRR) triple junctions remains constant over time under conditions of symmetric spreading. Given constant relative motion between each plate pair -- that is, the pole of plate relative motion is fixed to both plates in each pair during finite motion, as assumed in many accounts of plate kinematics -- there would be no boundary mismatch at the triple junction and no apparent kinematic reason why a microplate might develop there. But if, in a given RRR triple junction, the finite motion of one plate as observed from the other plate is not circular (as is generally the case, given the three-plate problem of plate kinematics), the geometry of the ridges and the triple junction will vary with time (Cronin, 1992, Tectonophys 207, 287-301). To explore the possible consequences of non-circular finite motion between plates at an RRR triple junction, a simple model was coded based on the cycloid finite-motion model (e.g., Cronin, 1987, Geology 15, 1006-1009) using NNR-MORVEL56 velocities for individual plates (Argus et al., 2011, G3 12, doi: 10.1029/2011GC003751). Initial assumptions include a spherical Earth, symmetric spreading, and constant angular velocities during the modeled finite time interval. The assumed-constant angular velocity vectors constitute a reference frame for observing finite plate motion. Typical results are [1] that the triple junction migrates relative to a coordinate system fixed to the angular-velocity vectors, [2] ridge axes rotates relative to each other, and [3] a boundary mismatch develops at the synthetic triple junction that might result in microplate nucleation. In a model simulating the Galapagos triple junction between the Cocos, Nazca and Pacific plates whose initial state did not include the Galapagos microplate, the mismatch gap was as much as ~3.4 km during 3 Myr of model displacement (see figure). The

  18. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen titer by immunofluorescence in microplates. A new semi-automated method based on microtiter system.

    PubMed

    Favart, A M; Lamy, M E; Allemeersch, D; Burtonboy, G; Vanoverschelde, J

    1978-11-17

    For the titration of antibodies directed against Epstein-Barr Virus early antigen (EBV-EA) we describe a method in microplates with the Microtiter System (Cooke Engineering Co., Alexandria, Va). Using this technique, which allows rapid epidemiological investigations, we have titered anti-EBV-EA antibodies in different groups of patients and controls, and particularly in group which had recent contact with infectious mononucleosis. In this group the percentage of individuals having antibodies directed against the EBV-EA antigen was significantly higher than in the group of controls.

  19. Do Poor Readers Feel Angry, Sad, and Unpopular?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Paul L.; Farkas, George; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether being poorly skilled in reading contributes to children’s self-reported feelings of anger, distractibility, anxiety, sadness, loneliness, and social isolation. Data were analyzed from a longitudinal sub-sample of children (N=2,751) participating in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study—Kindergarten Cohort. Multi-level logistic regression analyses indicated that poor readers in 3rd grade were more likely to consider themselves as angry, distractible, sad, lonely, and unpopular in 5th grade than those who had not been poor readers in 3rd grade. About 20% of 3rd grade poor readers reported feeling angry and unpopular in 5th grade. Being poorly skilled in mathematics increased children’s risk of feeling sad or lonely, but not of feeling angry, distractible, or unpopular. The results provide additional empirical evidence that reading failure contributes to generalized socio-emotional maladjustment in young children. PMID:26180489

  20. A synthesis of fluency interventions for secondary struggling readers

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Sharon; Edmonds, Meaghan; Reutebuch, Colleen Klein

    2012-01-01

    Previous research studies examining the effects of fluency interventions on the fluency and comprehension outcomes for secondary struggling readers are synthesized. An extensive search of the professional literature between 1980 and 2005 yielded a total of 19 intervention studies that provided fluency interventions to secondary struggling readers and measured comprehension and/or fluency outcomes. Findings revealed fluency outcomes were consistently improved following interventions that included listening passage previewing such as listening to an audiotape or adult model of good reading before attempting to read a passage. In addition, there is preliminary evidence that there may be no differential effects between repeated reading interventions and the same amount of non-repetitive reading with older struggling readers for increasing reading speed, word recognition, and comprehension. PMID:22485066