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Sample records for 96-well plate assay

  1. Lactobacillus casei microbiological assay of folic acid derivatives in 96-well microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Horne, D W; Patterson, D

    1988-11-01

    Microbiological assay is still widely used for estimating folic acid derivatives in serum and other biological samples. We describe here a modification of this procedure involving use of 96-well microtiter plates. This procedure, used with modern, computer-interfaced microtiter-plate readers and data-reduction software, greatly shortens the time and minimizes reagent costs for this assay. Under the conditions of our assay procedures, all folic acid derivatives tested gave equal growth response for Lactobacillus casei. Results for assays of rat liver extracts showed excellent agreement between the standard bioassay and the 96-well procedure. PMID:3141087

  2. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid and sensitive detection of organophosphate insecticides using a 96 well plate format is reported. Several features of this assay make it attractive for development as a laboratory-based or field screening assay. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was stabilized in a gelati...

  3. A rapid direct telomerase assay method using 96-well streptavidin plates.

    PubMed

    Francis, Rawle; Friedman, Simon H

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a high-throughput direct assay methodfor the assay of telomerase activity that improves on previous direct telomerase assays in two ways that allow larger numbers of samples to be conveniently processed: (i) 96-well streptavidin coated plates are used to bind and wash biotinylated primer extension products from the telomerase assay, as opposed to tubes containing streptavidin-coated magnetic beads; and (ii) storage phosphor-imagery is used instead of film autoradiography to detect telomerase products after being washed and released from the streptavidin-derivatized matrix. This method improves on previous direct assay methods using magnetic beads by allowing larger numbers of samples to be conveniently assayed. Also, the total activity of the radiolabeled nucleotides used in this procedure is significantly lower than that used in standard direct telomerase assays, lowering costs and exposure to radioactivity. We have validated the assay by repeating, in triplicate, the IC50 determination of rivanol, our previously identified telomerase inhibitor. PMID:12019789

  4. Establishment of ATP-based luciferase viability assay in 96-well plate for Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Allamanda, Puttik; Hakimi, Hassan; Zhou, Mo; Angeles, Jose Ma; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2014-11-01

    Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT), caused by Trypanosoma congolense, is widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There are significant concerns related to the current drugs available for the treatment of AAT due to their limited effectiveness across species and their adverse effects. Moreover, drug resistant trypanosomes have recently been reported in the field. High throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical compound library collections is a promising approach for identifying novel drug candidates. While HTS for Trypanozoon trypanosomes, T. brucei sspp. and T. evansi is well established, no assays have been developed for T. congolense. In the present study, the authors developed an ATP-based luciferase viability assay for T. congolense in a 96-well plate format. The calculated 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for pentamidine and diminazene were 10-100 times higher in T. congolense than in T. brucei. This result suggests that the transporters for the 2 tested compounds differ between T. congolense and T. brucei. This assay could further be applied to screen novel chemical compounds for the treatment of AAT caused by T. congolense. PMID:25056575

  5. Establishment of ATP-Based Luciferase Viability Assay in 96-Well Plate for Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    SUGANUMA, Keisuke; ALLAMANDA, Puttik; HAKIMI, Hassan; ZHOU, Mo; ANGELES, Jose Ma.; KAWAZU, Shin-ichiro; INOUE, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT), caused by Trypanosoma congolense, is widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There are significant concerns related to the current drugs available for the treatment of AAT due to their limited effectiveness across species and their adverse effects. Moreover, drug resistant trypanosomes have recently been reported in the field. High throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical compound library collections is a promising approach for identifying novel drug candidates. While HTS for Trypanozoon trypanosomes, T. brucei sspp. and T. evansi is well established, no assays have been developed for T. congolense. In the present study, the authors developed an ATP-based luciferase viability assay for T. congolense in a 96-well plate format. The calculated 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for pentamidine and diminazene were 10–100 times higher in T. congolense than in T. brucei. This result suggests that the transporters for the 2 tested compounds differ between T. congolense and T. brucei. This assay could further be applied to screen novel chemical compounds for the treatment of AAT caused by T. congolense. PMID:25056575

  6. Human tear analysis with miniaturized multiplex cytokine assay on “wall-less” 96-well plate

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Joanne; Tong, Louis; Kim, Namyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tears are a particularly limited body fluid and commonly used in the diagnosis of patients who have ocular diseases. A popular method for analysis of ocular inflammation in tears uses Luminex® bead multiplex technology to generate valuable multiple cytokine profile outputs with 25–50 µl tear sample volume. We propose a method for measuring tear cytokines with 5 μl tear sample volume and 80% reduced Luminex reagents compared to previous protocols. Methods Using human tears pooled from 1,000 participants, the DA-Bead-based method running at 5–20 µl volume, using manual pipetting, in conjunction with a magnetic Luminex cytokine (four-plex) panel assay in a 96-well format was performed and validated for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Results Upon use of the DA-Bead method at the 5 μl volume with cytokine standards, the concentrations of each of the four cytokines were found to be linear over a range of 3.5–4 log pg/ml with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ≤5%, inter-assay %CV ≤10%, and accuracy within the 70–130% range. Upon use of a 5 µl healthy pooled tear sample, cytokine concentrations were detected with a precision intra-assay %CV ˂ 20% for IL-6, IFN-γ, or TNF-α or 30.37% with IL-1β. The inter-assay %CV with tears was ≤20.84% for all cytokines. Tear volumes run at 5 μl on DA-Bead produced a similar cytokine expression profile at a 1-month interval and were highly correlated with the larger 10 μl–based tear sample volume cytokine profile with R2 = 0.98. Conclusions DA-Bead assay is highly sensitive and reproducible and has a performance profile that is potentially suitable for use in standard clinical scenarios. Considering the use of as little as 5 µl of assay beads and 5 µl sample, this is also likely to reduce the assay cost significantly and ease diagnosis of patients with ocular diseases. PMID:26539027

  7. 96-Well Plate Colorimetric Assay for K(sub i) Determination of (plusmn)-2-Benzylsuccinic Acid, an Inhibitor of Carboxypeptidase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentland, Mark P.; Raza, Shaan; Yingtong Gao

    2004-01-01

    An appropriate assay to determine the inhibition potency of carboxypeptidase A (CPA) in 96-well format to illustrate how high throughput screening is used in modern drug discovery to identify bioactive molecules is developed. Efforts in developing a colorimetric 96-well plate assay for determination of the K(sub i) for inhibition of CPA by…

  8. Facile preparation of a photoactivatable surface on a 96-well plate: a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masao; Scheideler, Olivia; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Shota; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is an essential cellular activity in various physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. Therefore, in vitro cell migration assays are important not only for fundamental biological studies but also for evaluating potential drugs that control cell migration activity in medical applications. In this regard, robust control over cell migrating microenvironments is critical for reliable and quantitative analysis as cell migration is highly dependent upon the microenvironments. Here, we developed a facile method for making a commercial glass-bottom 96-well plate photoactivatable for cell adhesion, aiming to develop a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform. Cationic poly-d-lysine was adsorbed to the anionic glass surface via electrostatic interactions and, subsequently, functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) bearing a photocleavable reactive group. The initial PEGylated surface is non-cell-adhesive. However, upon near-ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, the photorelease of PEG switches the surface from non-biofouling to cell-adhesive. With this platform, we assayed cell migration in the following procedure: (1) create cell-attaching regions of precise geometries by controlled photoirradiation, (2) seed cells to allow them to attach selectively to the irradiated regions, (3) expose UV light to the remaining PEGylated regions to extend the cell-adhesive area, (4) analyse cell migration using microscopy. Surface modification of the glass surface was characterized by ζ-potential and contact angle measurements. The PEGylated surface showed cell-resistivity and became cell-adhesive upon releasing PEG by near-UV irradiation. The method was applied for parallelly evaluating the effect of model drugs on the migration of epithelial MDCK cells in the multiplexed platform. The dose-response relationship for cytochalasin D treatment on cell migration behavior was successfully evaluated with high

  9. Electrothermal micromixing in 96 well plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Loire, Sophie; Mezic, Igor

    2011-11-01

    Diagnostic and pharmacology processes could be greatly accelerated by appropriate mixing. Here electrothermal flows are explored to provide mixing of conductive physiological solutions (=1.6 S/m) in a 96 well plate. Three interdigitated electrodes provide an electric field (< 15Vpp, 1MHz) beneath each well. Polarization and conduction phenomenon of the fluid in a well will be first modeled numerically and compared to an electrical circuit model. Due to high conductivity and permittivity of the fluid, the impedance of the array of filled wells collapse dramatically (96 wells: R = 1Ohm, C=250nF). The power supply challenges accordingly raised by arrays of electrothermal micromixers will be then analyzed. The efficiency of different methods of mixing in those wells will be also compared: the addition of low frequency signal leading to AC electro-osmotic perturbations, a blinking vortices method. The experimental results will be compared to simulations.

  10. Quantification of cells cultured on 96-well plates.

    PubMed

    Kueng, W; Silber, E; Eppenberger, U

    1989-10-01

    The method for cell number measurement in monolayer cultures by crystal violet staining published recently by Gillies et al. (R. G. Gillies, N. Didier, M. Denton (1986) Anal. Biochem. 159, 109-113) was modified and significantly improved. The procedure was adapted for use in 96-well plates since the method is inherently very sensitive. Modifications allowed fast and complete solubilization of dye adsorbed by cell nuclei during staining. Since light absorption of the unstained or destained cell layers is negligible, cell number measurements can be performed in the respective wells. Due to these features, multiple assays may be carried out rapidly using standard 96-well plate readers. In addition, it is shown that the sensitivity of the assay can be varied and easily controlled by choosing the appropriate pH during the staining procedure. This increases the flexibility of the method making it useful for determining cell density of a wide range of different cell types. PMID:2604040

  11. High throughput adjustable 96-well plate assay for androgen receptor binding: a practical approach for EDC screening using the chimpanzee AR.

    PubMed

    Hartig, P C; Cardon, M C; Blystone, C R; Gray, L E; Wilson, V S

    2008-09-26

    The issue as to whether natural and man-made chemicals interfere with endocrine function has raised concerns. This interference could be biologically significant even at very low doses if the chemicals interact deleteriously with hormone receptors at low concentrations. Therefore, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Office of Coordination and Policy (OSCP) requested that a nonhuman mammalian androgen receptor binding assay be developed for possible use in their Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Ideally, this assay would be high throughput, not use animals as a source of receptor protein, easily deployed throughout the scientific community, utilize reagents available to both the public and private sector, and have the potential for future automation. We developed a highly modified 96-well plate assay which meets these criteria. It employs a baculovirus expressed recombinant primate androgen receptor which is publically available and exploits the unique ability of some mammalian androgen receptors to remain biologically active after guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) solubilization. This GdnHCl treated receptor remains soluble and requires no additional purification prior to use. We provide a very detailed description of the assay protocol itself, and similarly detailed method for producing and solubilizing the receptor. PMID:18691642

  12. A novel colorimetric assay of β-D-glucans in basidiomycete strains by alcian blue dye in a 96-well microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    C Semedo, Magda; Karmali, Amin; Fonseca, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Basidiomycete strains synthesize several types of β-d-glucans, which play a major role in the medicinal properties of mushrooms. Therefore, the specific quantification of these β-d-glucans in mushroom strains is of great biochemical importance. Because published assay methods for these β-d-glucans present some disadvantages, a novel colorimetric assay method for β-d-glucan with alcian blue dye was developed. The complex formation was detected by following the decrease in absorbance in the range of 620 nm and by hypsochromic shift from 620 to 606 nm (∼14 nm) in UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Analysis of variance was used for optimization of the slope of the calibration curve by using the assay mixture containing 0.017% (w/v) alcian blue in 2% (v/v) acetic acid at pH 3.0. The high-throughput colorimetric assay method on microtiter plates was used for quantification of β-d-glucans in the range of 0-0.8 μg, with a slope of 44.15 × 10(-2) and a limit of detection of 0.017 μg/well. Recovery experiments were carried out by using a sample of Hericium erinaceus, which exhibited a recovery of 95.8% for β-1,3-d-glucan. The present assay method exhibited a 10-fold higher sensitivity and a 59-fold lower limit of detection compared with the published method with congo red. β-d-glucans of several mushrooms strains were isolated from fruiting bodies and mycelia, and they were quantified by this assay method. This assay method is fast, specific, simple, and it can be used to quantify β-d-glucans from other biological sources. PMID:26317582

  13. Automation of cell-based drug absorption assays in 96-well format using permeable support systems.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brad; Banks, Peter; Sherman, Hilary; Rothenberg, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Cell-based drug absorption assays, such as Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1, are an essential component of lead compound ADME/Tox testing. The permeability and transport data they provide can determine whether a compound continues in the drug discovery process. Current methods typically incorporate 24-well microplates and are performed manually. Yet the need to generate absorption data earlier in the drug discovery process, on an increasing number of compounds, is driving the use of higher density plates. A simple, more efficient process that incorporates 96-well permeable supports and proper instrumentation in an automated process provides more reproducible data compared to manual methods. Here we demonstrate the ability to perform drug permeability and transport assays using Caco-2 or MDCKII-MDR1 cells. The assay procedure was automated in a 96-well format, including cell seeding, media and buffer exchanges, compound dispense, and sample removal using simple robotic instrumentation. Cell monolayer integrity was confirmed via transepithelial electrical resistance and Lucifer yellow measurements. Proper cell function was validated by analyzing apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical movement of rhodamine 123, a known P-glycoprotein substrate. Apparent permeability and efflux data demonstrate how the automated procedure provides a less variable method than manual processing, and delivers a more accurate assessment of a compound's absorption characteristics. PMID:22357561

  14. Measuring oxidative stress resistance of Caenorhabditis elegans in 96-well microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Possik, Elite; Pause, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is the result of an imbalance between production and detoxification of reactive oxygen species, is a major contributor to chronic human disorders, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, aging, and cancer. Therefore, it is important to study oxidative stress not only in cell systems but also using whole organisms. C. elegans is an attractive model organism to study the genetics of oxidative stress signal transduction pathways, which are highly evolutionarily conserved. Here, we provide a protocol to measure oxidative stress resistance in C. elegans in liquid. Briefly, ROS-inducing reagents such as paraquat (PQ) and H2O2 are dissolved in M9 buffer, and solutions are aliquoted in the wells of a 96 well microtiter plate. Synchronized L4/young adult C. elegans animals are transferred to the wells (5-8 animals/well) and survival is measured every hour until most worms are dead. When performing an oxidative stress resistance assay using a low concentration of stressors in plates, aging might influence the behavior of animals upon oxidative stress, which could lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. However, in the assay described herein, this problem is unlikely to occur since only L4/young adult animals are being used. Moreover, this protocol is inexpensive and results are obtained in one day, which renders this technique attractive for genetic screens. Overall, this will help to understand oxidative stress signal transduction pathways, which could be translated into better characterization of oxidative stress-associated human disorders. PMID:25993260

  15. Biofilm Localization in the Vertical Wall of Shaking 96-Well Plates

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Luciana C.; Moreira, Joana M. R.; Simões, Manuel; Melo, Luís F.; Mergulhão, Filipe J.

    2014-01-01

    Microtiter plates with 96 wells are being increasingly used for biofilm studies due to their high throughput, low cost, easy handling, and easy application of several analytical methods to evaluate different biofilm parameters. These methods provide bulk information about the biofilm formed in each well but lack in detail, namely, regarding the spatial location of the biofilms. This location can be obtained by microscopy observation using optical and electron microscopes, but these techniques have lower throughput and higher cost and are subjected to equipment availability. This work describes a differential crystal violet (CV) staining method that enabled the determination of the spatial location of Escherichia coli biofilms formed in the vertical wall of shaking 96-well plates. It was shown that the biofilms were unevenly distributed on the wall with denser cell accumulation near the air-liquid interface. The results were corroborated by scanning electron microscopy and a correlation was found between biofilm accumulation and the wall shear strain rates determined by computational fluid dynamics. The developed method is quicker and less expensive and has a higher throughput than the existing methods available for spatial location of biofilms in microtiter plates. PMID:24834360

  16. Development of a novel bead-based 96-well filtration plate competitive immunoassay for the detection of Gentamycin.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tien Yu Jessica; Chan, Chia-Chung; Chan, KinGho; Wang, Yu Chieh; Lin, Jing-Tang; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2013-11-15

    We developed a sensitive, simple, inexpensive and rapid bead-based immunoassay platform, composed of liposomal nanovesicle amplification system, Gentamycin sulfate beads and 96-well filtration plates. In the beginning of the assay, Gentamycin sulfate beads, Gentamycin sulfate and Gentamycin specific antibody were incubated in a bottom-sealed 96-well filtration plate. After incubation, washing was done by running washing buffer through the unsealed filtration plate with only gravity and the antibody-Gentamycin bead complexes were retained in the plate. Fluorescent dye-loaded protein G-liposomal nanovesicles were then added to specifically bind to antibodies on the retained beads. After washing unbound nanovesicles, millions of fluorescent dye molecules were released by adding a detergent solution to lyse liposomal nanovesicles. The limit of detection (LOD) of this novel detection platform in TBS and in skim milk were 52.65 ng/mL and 14.16 ng/mL, which are both sufficient for detecting the 200 ng/mL Codex maximum residual level (MRL). The dynamic ranges were both from each of their LODs to 100 μg/mL. The 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) in TBS and skim milk were 199.66 ng/mL and 360.81 ng/mL, respectively. We also demonstrated the good specificity of this platform by comparing detection results between pure Gentamycin solution and a mixture solution of 6 different antibiotics including Gentamycin in skim milk. The entire assay with 60 samples was conducted within 2h. In sum, this novel biosensing platform not only fulfilled most benefits of magnetic bead-based assays, but also was inexpensive and convenient by replacing the magnetic separation with filtration plate separation. PMID:23728198

  17. Stability test for amorphous materials in humidity controlled 96-well plates by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Tanabe, Hideaki

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to apply near infrared spectrometry (NIR) with chemoinformetrics to predict the change of crystalline properties of indomethacin (IMC) amorphous under various levels of relative humidity storage conditions. Stability test for amorphous and meta-stable polymorphic forms was performed in humidity controlled the modified 96-well quartz plates containing various kinds of saturated salt solutions (0-100% of relative humidity (RH)) by NIR spectroscopy. Amorphous form was obtained melt product to pour into liquid nitrogen and after then ground. Samples were stored at 25°C in the 6-well plates at various levels of RH. The spectra of the powder samples were measured by the reflectance FT-NIR spectrometer. The second derivative spectra of form α showed specific absorption peaks at 4980, 6036, 7296 and 8616 cm-1 and that of form γ showed those at 5020, 5028, 7344, 7428 and 8436 cm-1. After storage at less than 50% RH, the peak intensities at 5020, 5028, 7344, 7428 and 8436 cm-1 of the amorphous solid increased with increasing of storage time. However, the peak intensity at 4980, 6036 and 7296 cm-1 increased at more than 50% RH Please check and confirm the edit. The results suggested that at lower humidity, the IMC amorphous solid transformed into form γ, but it transformed into form α at more than high humidity. It is possible that crystalline stability of the pharmaceutical preparations could be predicted by using humidity controlled 96-well plates and reflectance NIR-chemoinformetric methods. PMID:21942281

  18. A novel 96-well gel-based assay for determining antifungal activity against filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Troskie, Anscha Mari; Vlok, Nicolas Maré; Rautenbach, Marina

    2012-12-01

    In recent years the global rise in antibiotic resistance and environmental consciousness lead to a renewed fervour to find and develop novel antibiotics, including antifungals. However, the influence of the environment on antifungal activity is often disregarded and many in vitro assays may cause the activity of certain antifungals to be overestimated or underestimated. The general antifungal test assays that are economically accessible to the majority of scientists primarily rely on visual examination or on spectrophotometric analysis. The effect of certain morphogenic antifungals, which may lead to hyperbranching of filamentous fungi, unfortunately renders these methods unreliable. To minimise the difficulties experienced as a result of hyperbranching, we developed a straightforward, economical 96-well gel-based method, independent of spectrophotometric analysis, for highly repeatable determination of antifungal activity. For the calculation of inhibition parameters, this method relies on the visualisation of assay results by digitisation. The antifungal activity results from our novel micro-gel dilution assay are comparable to that of the micro-broth dilution assay used as standard reference test of The Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute. Furthermore, our economical assay is multifunctional as it permits microscopic analysis of the preserved assay results, as well as rendering highly reliable data. PMID:23089670

  19. A Novel 96well-formatted Micro-gap Plate Enabling Drug Response Profiling on Primary Tumour Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Yuan; Hsiung, Lo-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ho; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wo, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Drug-based treatments are the most widely used interventions for cancer management. Personalized drug response profiling remains inherently challenging with low cell count harvested from tumour sample. We present a 96well-formatted microfluidic plate with built-in micro-gap that preserves up to 99.2% of cells during multiple assay/wash operation and only 9,000 cells needed for a single reagent test (i.e. 1,000 cells per test spot x 3 selected concentration x triplication), enabling drug screening and compatibility with conventional automated workstations. Results with MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines showed that no statistical significance was found in dose-response between the device and conventional 96-well plate control. Primary tumour samples from breast cancer patients tested in the device also showed good IC50 prediction. With drug screening of primary cancer cells must consider a wide range of scenarios, e.g. suspended/attached cell types and rare/abundant cell availability, the device enables high throughput screening even for suspended cells with low cell count since the signature microfluidic cell-trapping feature ensures cell preservation in a multiple solution exchange protocol.

  20. Urine sample preparation in 96-well filter plates for quantitative clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Suh, Moo-Jin; Sikorski, Patricia; Kwon, Keehwan; Nelson, Karen E; Pieper, Rembert

    2014-06-01

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ~10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700-900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics. PMID:24797144

  1. Toward Microbioreactor Arrays: A Slow-Responding Oxygen Sensor for Monitoring of Microbial Cultures in Standard 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Glauche, Florian; John, Gernot T; Arain, Sarina; Knepper, Andreas; Neubauer, Antje; Goelling, Detlef; Lang, Christine; Violet, Norman; King, Rudibert; Neubauer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a slow-responding chemo-optical sensor for dissolved oxygen (DO) integrated into a 96-well plate was developed. The slow response time ensures that the measured oxygen value does not change much during plate transport to the microplate reader. The sensor therefore permits at-line DO measurement of microbial cultures. Moreover, it eliminates the necessity of individual optical measurement systems for each culture plate, as many plates can be measured successively. Combined with the 96-well format, this increases the experimental throughput enormously. The novel sensor plate (Slow OxoPlate) consists of fluorophores suspended in a polymer matrix that were placed into u-bottom 96-well plates. Response time was measured using sodium sulfite, and a t90 value of 9.7 min was recorded. For application, DO values were then measured in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures grown under fed-batch-like conditions. Depending on the DO sensor's response time, different information on the oxygenation state of the culture plate was obtained: a fast sensor variant detects disturbance through sampling, whereas the slow sensor indicates oxygen limitation during incubation. A combination of the commercially available OxoPlate and the Slow OxoPlate enables operators of screening facilities to validate their cultivation procedures with regard to oxygen availability. PMID:25720599

  2. Is biofilm removal properly assessed? Comparison of different quantification methods in a 96-well plate system.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Philipp; Rosenberg, Urs; Schneider, Jana; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-05-01

    Various methods have been reported to quantify total biofilm or different components of biofilm; however, these methods are often confusedly used, leading to discrepancies and misleading results. In this study, different methods for quantification of biofilm, including those for total biomass, total amount of bacterial cells, viable cell number, and amount of extracellular polymeric substances, were systematically compared in microtiter plates. To evaluate which method is suitable for assessment of biofilm removal and for bacterial killing, biofilm samples were treated with various cleaners possessing removing and/or killing capacities. It was found that most of the methods tested in this study in general exhibited high reproducibility and repeatability. Crystal Violet staining was a simple but reliable method for total biomass quantification. Total bacteria cell numbers could be reliably quantified by the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Acridine Orange. Viable cells could be quantified by either an ATP-based assay or a proliferation assay. Both of these viability methods showed a broad detection range and led to precise measurement. For quantification of proteins in the biofilm, staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate was most suitable. Furthermore, it was revealed that a combination of different methods is required to determine if a cleaner kills or removes biofilm. PMID:26923144

  3. Ice-Cap: a method for growing Arabidopsis and tomato plants in 96-well plates for high-throughput genotyping.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Clark, Katie A; Gibbs, Nicole M; Bush, Susan M; Krysan, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming common for plant scientists to develop projects that require the genotyping of large numbers of plants. The first step in any genotyping project is to collect a tissue sample from each individual plant. The traditional approach to this task is to sample plants one-at-a-time. If one wishes to genotype hundreds or thousands of individuals, however, using this strategy results in a significant bottleneck in the genotyping pipeline. The Ice-Cap method that we describe here provides a high-throughput solution to this challenge by allowing one scientist to collect tissue from several thousand seedlings in a single day (1,2). This level of throughput is made possible by the fact that tissue is harvested from plants 96-at-a-time, rather than one-at-a-time. The Ice-Cap method provides an integrated platform for performing seedling growth, tissue harvest, and DNA extraction. The basis for Ice-Cap is the growth of seedlings in a stacked pair of 96-well plates. The wells of the upper plate contain plugs of agar growth media on which individual seedlings germinate. The roots grow down through the agar media, exit the upper plate through a hole, and pass into a lower plate containing water. To harvest tissue for DNA extraction, the water in the lower plate containing root tissue is rapidly frozen while the seedlings in the upper plate remain at room temperature. The upper plate is then peeled away from the lower plate, yielding one plate with 96 root tissue samples frozen in ice and one plate with 96 viable seedlings. The technique is named "Ice-Cap" because it uses ice to capture the root tissue. The 96-well plate containing the seedlings can then wrapped in foil and transferred to low temperature. This process suspends further growth of the seedlings, but does not affect their viability. Once genotype analysis has been completed, seedlings with the desired genotype can be transferred from the 96-well plate to soil for further propagation. We have demonstrated

  4. MStern Blotting-High Throughput Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membrane-Based Proteomic Sample Preparation for 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sebastian T; Ahmed, Saima; Muntel, Jan; Cuevas Polo, Nerea; Bachur, Richard; Kentsis, Alex; Steen, Judith; Steen, Hanno

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 96-well plate compatible membrane-based proteomic sample processing method, which enables the complete processing of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) within a single workday. This method uses a large-pore hydrophobic PVDF membrane that efficiently adsorbs proteins, resulting in fast liquid transfer through the membrane and significantly reduced sample processing times. Low liquid transfer speeds have prevented the useful 96-well plate implementation of FASP as a widely used membrane-based proteomic sample processing method. We validated our approach on whole-cell lysate and urine and cerebrospinal fluid as clinically relevant body fluids. Without compromising peptide and protein identification, our method uses a vacuum manifold and circumvents the need for digest desalting, making our processing method compatible with standard liquid handling robots. In summary, our new method maintains the strengths of FASP and simultaneously overcomes one of the major limitations of FASP without compromising protein identification and quantification. PMID:26223766

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF SALMONELLA-POSITIVE FECAL SAMPLES USING A 96-WELL MICROCULTURE PLATE TECHNIQUE (RX METHOD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional Salmonella isolation involves multiple sample transfers to culture media performed by an experienced microbiologist. The modified semi-solid RV and XLT (RX) Plate method, a modification of the RX tube format designed by Gailey et al. (2004), consolidates pre-enrichment (buffered pepton...

  6. SIMPLE DEVICE TO DELIVER BEADS TO 96-WELL PLATES FOR RAPID RESUSPENSION OF CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic sequencing involves sequence determination of inserts from a large numbers of plasmids of a genomic library. In high throughput DNA sequencing projects, cultures are grown in a 96-deep well plate format, centrifuged, and resuspended. Resuspension of cells was aided by use of a simple devic...

  7. Development and validation of a 96-well cellular assay for the discovery of ALDH1A1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ming, Wenyu; Ma, Wenzhen; Chen, Lisa H; Volk, Catherine; Michael, Mervyn Dodson; Xu, Yanping; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Xiaojun

    2013-07-01

    Retinoic acid, the active metabolite of vitamin A, plays important roles in various physiological and pathological processes. The two-step production of retinoic acid from vitamin A (retinol) is catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potential therapeutic targets for numerous diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Currently, the lack of a suitable high-throughput cellular assay hinders efforts to identify therapeutic small molecular inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenase, such as ALDH1A1. In this report, we utilized high-content imaging technology and a commercially available cell permeable ALDH substrate to develop a 96-well cellular ALDH1A1 assay. This assay has a robust and sensitive readout and is amenable to automation. With this cellular assay, we identified potent selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors to explore the role of retinoic acid production in various preclinical disease models. PMID:23957476

  8. Development of a fluorimetric multispecies 96-well micro-plate growth test for screening metal toxicity to phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, H.G.; Ruecker, N.J.; Cantin, I.A.; Nyholm, N.; Dal-Jensen, S.

    1995-12-31

    The rapid and cost-effective screening of industrial waste is an ideal approach to regulations that offer true protection of aquatic habitats. For these tests to be ecologically important protection of large groups of organisms is also essential. This can best be done by testing batteries of species. Photosynthetic organisms compose 99.9% of habitats as well as providing food for higher trophic levels. A test was developed that can accommodate the testing of most phytoplanktonic species irrespective of morphology (unicellular, multicellular, colonial, filamentous). Forty eight to 72 h growth tests were carried out with green algae, diatoms, and cyanobacteria. The algae were incubated with different levels of toxicants in 96-well microplates which were read in a 96-well fluorometric plate reader. Phytoplankton emitting low levels of fluorescence can be incubated with DCMU, which can increase the fluorescent signal 2 to 4 times. The data from the plate reader is transferred to a computer spreadsheet and inhibition levels are automatically calculated. Eleven metal mining wastes from across Canada were tested against this method using the following phytoplanktonic species: Selenastrum, Nannochloris (green algae), Nitzschia (diatom), Microcystis, and Pseudoanabaena (cyanobacteria). These wastes were also screened against Microtox. All wastes were highly toxic to the tested phytoplankton, but only 4 were toxic to Microtox{trademark}.

  9. Single-step method for β-galactosidase assays in Escherichia coli using a 96-well microplate reader.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jorrit; Jovanovic, Goran; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2016-06-15

    Historically, the lacZ gene is one of the most universally used reporters of gene expression in molecular biology. Its activity can be quantified using an artificial substrate, o-nitrophenyl-ß-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG). However, the traditional method for measuring LacZ activity (first described by J. H. Miller in 1972) can be challenging for a large number of samples, is prone to variability, and involves hazardous compounds for lysis (e.g., chloroform, toluene). Here we describe a single-step assay using a 96-well microplate reader with a proven alternative cell permeabilization method. This modified protocol reduces handling time by 90%. PMID:27036618

  10. Single-step method for β-galactosidase assays in Escherichia coli using a 96-well microplate reader

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jorrit; Jovanovic, Goran; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the lacZ gene is one of the most universally used reporters of gene expression in molecular biology. Its activity can be quantified using an artificial substrate, o-nitrophenyl-ß-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG). However, the traditional method for measuring LacZ activity (first described by J. H. Miller in 1972) can be challenging for a large number of samples, is prone to variability, and involves hazardous compounds for lysis (e.g., chloroform, toluene). Here we describe a single-step assay using a 96-well microplate reader with a proven alternative cell permeabilization method. This modified protocol reduces handling time by 90%. PMID:27036618

  11. Scalable 96-well Plate Based iPSC Culture and Production Using a Robotic Liquid Handling System

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Michael K.; Gerger, Michael J.; Balay, Erin E.; O'Connell, Rachel; Hanson, Seth; Daily, Neil J.; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Continued advancement in pluripotent stem cell culture is closing the gap between bench and bedside for using these cells in regenerative medicine, drug discovery and safety testing. In order to produce stem cell derived biopharmaceutics and cells for tissue engineering and transplantation, a cost-effective cell-manufacturing technology is essential. Maintenance of pluripotency and stable performance of cells in downstream applications (e.g., cell differentiation) over time is paramount to large scale cell production. Yet that can be difficult to achieve especially if cells are cultured manually where the operator can introduce significant variability as well as be prohibitively expensive to scale-up. To enable high-throughput, large-scale stem cell production and remove operator influence novel stem cell culture protocols using a bench-top multi-channel liquid handling robot were developed that require minimal technician involvement or experience. With these protocols human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were cultured in feeder-free conditions directly from a frozen stock and maintained in 96-well plates. Depending on cell line and desired scale-up rate, the operator can easily determine when to passage based on a series of images showing the optimal colony densities for splitting. Then the necessary reagents are prepared to perform a colony split to new plates without a centrifugation step. After 20 passages (~3 months), two iPSC lines maintained stable karyotypes, expressed stem cell markers, and differentiated into cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. The system can perform subsequent high-throughput screening of new differentiation protocols or genetic manipulation designed for 96-well plates. This technology will reduce the labor and technical burden to produce large numbers of identical stem cells for a myriad of applications. PMID:26068617

  12. Scalable 96-well Plate Based iPSC Culture and Production Using a Robotic Liquid Handling System.

    PubMed

    Conway, Michael K; Gerger, Michael J; Balay, Erin E; O'Connell, Rachel; Hanson, Seth; Daily, Neil J; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Continued advancement in pluripotent stem cell culture is closing the gap between bench and bedside for using these cells in regenerative medicine, drug discovery and safety testing. In order to produce stem cell derived biopharmaceutics and cells for tissue engineering and transplantation, a cost-effective cell-manufacturing technology is essential. Maintenance of pluripotency and stable performance of cells in downstream applications (e.g., cell differentiation) over time is paramount to large scale cell production. Yet that can be difficult to achieve especially if cells are cultured manually where the operator can introduce significant variability as well as be prohibitively expensive to scale-up. To enable high-throughput, large-scale stem cell production and remove operator influence novel stem cell culture protocols using a bench-top multi-channel liquid handling robot were developed that require minimal technician involvement or experience. With these protocols human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were cultured in feeder-free conditions directly from a frozen stock and maintained in 96-well plates. Depending on cell line and desired scale-up rate, the operator can easily determine when to passage based on a series of images showing the optimal colony densities for splitting. Then the necessary reagents are prepared to perform a colony split to new plates without a centrifugation step. After 20 passages (~3 months), two iPSC lines maintained stable karyotypes, expressed stem cell markers, and differentiated into cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. The system can perform subsequent high-throughput screening of new differentiation protocols or genetic manipulation designed for 96-well plates. This technology will reduce the labor and technical burden to produce large numbers of identical stem cells for a myriad of applications. PMID:26068617

  13. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  14. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Chan, Melissa V; Lundberg, Martina H; Morgan, Neil V; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Jones, Matthew L; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E; Mumford, Andrew D; Warner, Timothy D; Watson, Steve P

    2014-02-20

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  15. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  16. Immobilization of saccharides and peptides on 96-well microtiter plates coated with methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride copolymer.

    PubMed

    Satoh, A; Kojima, K; Koyama, T; Ogawa, H; Matsumoto, I

    1998-06-15

    We have previously reported a method to immobilize protein ligands on microtiter plates coated with methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride copolymer (MMAC) [Isosaki, K., et al. (1992) J. Chromatogr. 597, 123-128]. In this study, we improved the MMAC method to efficiently immobilize not only small ligands such as peptides and oligosaccharides, which could not be efficiently immobilized previously, but also heparin via its reducing end. Amino and hydrazino groups were introduced to MMAC-coated microtiter plate wells by coupling to acid anhydride groups of MMAC with 1,6-hexamethylenediamine and adipic acid dihydrazide, respectively. The amino groups introduced were allowed to react with peptides by use of divalent cross-linkers. Hydrazino groups were allowed to react with formyl groups of saccharides by reductive amination. Peptides and oligosaccharides were immobilized in a dose-dependent manner by these methods. In the case of the angiotensin peptide thus immobilized, the detection limit by monoclonal antibodies was as low as 0.1-1 fmol peptide per well. Application of 20-200 nmol oligosaccharides to the well was sufficient to immobilize and subsequently detect lectins. Furthermore, heparin immobilized on the hydrazinocoated wells was successfully used for the binding assay of annexin IV. PMID:9648659

  17. Identification of photosynthesis inhibitors of pelagic marine algae using 96-well plate microfractionation for enhanced throughput in effect-directed analysis.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Vethaak, A Dick; Leonards, Pim E G; Sjollema, Sascha B; Kool, Jeroen; de Voogt, Pim; Lamoree, Marja H

    2014-07-15

    Because of large-scale production and use of an increasing diversity of chemicals in modern society, estuarine and coastal waters may be contaminated with numerous substances. Some of these compounds have the potential to affect microalgae at the base of the pelagic food chain. Therefore, we identified the main chemical stressors that negatively affect the effective photosystem II efficiency (ϕPSII) in marine microalgae of the Dutch estuarine and coastal waters. An enhanced effect-directed analysis (EDA) was carried out by combining reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography fractionation of extracts from passive samplers, followed by effect assessment using the pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry assay and chemical analysis of biologically active fractions using high-resolution mass spectrometry. This study focuses on a novel microfractionation technique using 96-well plates to enhance throughput in EDA, structure elucidation, and the analytical and effect confirmation of the compounds that are identified. Although there are numerous unknown compounds present in estuarine and coastal waters, our EDA study shows that atrazine, diuron, irgarol, isoproturon, terbutryn, and terbutylazine are the main contributors to the observed effect on the ϕPSII of marine microalgae. PMID:24926900

  18. Collection, storage, and filtration of in vivo study samples using 96-well filter plates to facilitate automated sample preparation and LC/MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Berna, M; Murphy, A T; Wilken, B; Ackermann, B

    2002-03-01

    The benefits of high-throughput bioanalysis within the pharmaceutical industry are well established. One of the most significant bottlenecks in bioanalysis is transferring in vivo-generated study samples from their collection tubes during sample preparation and extraction. In most cases, the plasma samples must be stored frozen prior to analysis, and the freeze/thaw (F/T) process introduces thrombin clots that are capable of plugging pipets and automated liquid-transfer systems. A new approach to dealing with this problem involves the use of Ansys Captiva 96-well 20-microm polypropylene filter plates to collect, store frozen, and filter plasma samples prior to bioanalysis. The samples are collected from the test subjects, and the corresponding plasma samples are placed directly into the wells of the filter plate. Two Duoseal (patent pending) covers are used to seal the top and bottom of the plate, and the plate is stored at down to -70 degrees C. Prior to sample analysis, the seals are removed and the plate is placed in a 96-well SPE manifold. As the plasma thaws, it passes (by gravity or mild vacuum) through the polypropylene filter into a 96-well collection plate. A multichannel pipet or automated liquid-transfer system is used to transfer sample aliquots without fear of plugging. A significant advantage of this approach is that, unlike other methods, issues related to incomplete pipetting are virtually eliminated. The entire process is rapid since thawing and filtering take place simultaneously, and if a second F/T cycle is required for reanalysis, it is not necessary to refilter the samples (additional clotting was not observed after three F/T cycles). This technique was tested using monkey, rat, and dog plasma and sodium heparin and EDTA anticoagulants. To assess the possibility of nonspecific binding to the polypropylene filter, a variety of drug candidates from diverse drug classes were studied. Validation data generated for two Lilly compounds from distinct

  19. Determining cereal starch amylose content using a dual wavelength iodine binding 96 well plate assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal starch amylose/amylopectin (AM/AP) ratios are critical in functional properties for food and industrial applications. Conventional determination of AM/AP of cereal starches are very time consuming and labor intensive making it very difficult to screen large sample sets. Studying these large...

  20. Development of a 96-well plate iodine binding assay for amylose content determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal starch amylose/amylopectin (AM/AP) ratios are critical in functional properties for food and industrial applications. Conventional methods for the determination of AM/AP of cereal starches are very time consuming and labor intensive making it very difficult to screen large sample sets. Stud...

  1. Folate content in fresh-cut vegetable packed products by 96-well microtiter plate microbiological assay.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Violeta; Alonso-Aperte, Elena; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-15

    Ready-to-eat foods have nowadays become a significant portion of the diet. Accordingly, nutritional composition of these food categories should be well-known, in particular its folate content. However, there is a broad lack of folate data in food composition tables and databases. A total of 21 fresh-cut vegetable and fruit packed products were analysed for total folate (TF) content using a validated method that relies on the folate-dependent growth of chloramphenicol-resistant Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus (NCIMB 10463). Mean TF content ranged from 10.0 to 140.9μg/100g for the different matrices on a fresh weight basis. Higher TF quantity, 140.9-70.1μg/100g, was found in spinach, rocket, watercress, chard and broccoli. Significant differences were observed between available data for fresh vegetables and fruits from food composition tables or databases and the analysed results for fresh-cut packed products. Supplied data support the potential of folate-rich fresh-cut ready-to-eat vegetables to increase folate intake significantly. PMID:25236228

  2. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the approaches for reducing uncertainties in the assessment of human exposure is to better characterize concentrations of hazardous compounds that may be present in our immediate environment. A significant limitation to this approach, however, is that sampling and labora...

  3. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) using a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. Detection to 31 pM with a total incubation time of 3 hours was demonstrated. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. The beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach. PMID:19643593

  4. Development and application of a high-throughput sample cleanup process based on 96-well plate for simultaneous determination of 16 steroids in biological matrices using liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanzhong; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-02-01

    A novel high-throughput sample pretreatment system was developed by the integration of protein precipitation (PP), phospholipid removal (PPR), and hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) into two simple 96-well plates and a matching 96-grid lid. With this system, 16 steroids were separated from biological matrices of plasma, milk, and urine and analyzed by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. In the tandem sample cleanup process, the prepositive PP and PPR step preliminarily removed some of the interferences from the biological matrices. The following HF-LPME step kept the residual interference out of the hollow fiber and enriched the steroids in the hollow fiber to achieve high sensitivity. By a series of method optimizations, acetonitrile was chosen as the crash solvent for PP and PPR. A mixture of octanol and toluene (1:1 v/v) was used as the acceptor phase for HF-LPME. The extraction was conducted at 80 rpm for 50 min in a donor phase containing 1 mL 20% sodium chloride at 25 °C. Under these conditions, the limits of detection for the 16 steroids were 3.6-300.0 pg(.)mL(-1) in plasma, 3.0-270.0 pg·mL(-1) in milk, and 2.2-210.0 pg(.)mL(-1) in urine. The recoveries of the 16 steroids were 81.9-97.9% in plasma (relative standard deviation 1.0-8.0%), 80.6-97.7% in milk (relative standard deviation 0.8-5.4%), and 87.3-98.7% in urine (relative standard deviation 1.0-4.9%). Further, the integrated 96-well platform of PP, PPR, and HF-LPME enabled us to run this assay in an automatic and high-throughput fashion. The reliability of the method was further corroborated by evaluation of its applicability in plasma and urine samples from volunteers and fresh bovine milk from local dairy enterprises. PMID:26738495

  5. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  6. Multiplexed chemiluminescent assays in ArrayPlates for high-throughput measurement of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Ralph R.; Rounseville, Matthew P.; Botros, Ihab W.; Seligmann, Bruce E.

    2002-06-01

    Multiplexed Molecular Profiling (MMP) assays for drug discovery are performed in ArrayPlates. ArrayPlates are 96- well microtiter plates that contain a 16-element array at the bottom of each well. Each element within an array measures one analyte in a sample. A CCD imager records the quantitative chemiluminescent readout of all 1,536 elements in a 96-well plate simultaneously. Since array elements are reagent modifiable by the end-user, ArrayPlates can be adapted to a broad range of nucleic acid- and protein-based assays. Such multiplexed assays are rapidly established, flexible, robust, automation-friendly and cost-effective. Nucleic acid assays in ArrayPlates can detect DNA and RNA, including SNPs and ESTs. A multiplexed mRNA assay to measure the expression of 16 genes is described. The assay combines a homogeneous nuclease protection assay with subsequent probe immobilization to the array by means of a sandwich hybridization followed with chemiluminescent detection. This assay was used to examine cells grown and treated in microplates and avoided cloning, transfection, RNA insolation, reverse transcription, amplification and fluorochrome labeling. Standard deviations for the measurement of 16 genes ranged from 3 percent to 13 percent in samples of 30,000 cells. Such ArrayPlates transcription assays are useful in drug discovery and development for target validation, screening, lead optimization, metabolism and toxicity profiling. Chemiluminescent detection provides ArrayPlates assays with high signal-to-noise readout and simplifies imager requirements. Imaging a 2D surface that contains arrays simplifies lens requirements relative to imaging columns of liquid in microtiter plate wells. The Omix imager for ArrayPlates is described.

  7. High-throughput micro plate assays for screening flavonoid content and DPPH-scavenging activity in sorghum bran and flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid, 96-well microtiter assays were compared to conventional assays for quantifying total phenolic content, flavonoid content, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in sorghum grain. The 96-well assays exhibited a correlation of >0.9 to the conventional assays. The 96-well assays allowed for ...

  8. Location dependent biases in automatic 96-well microplate readers.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R O; Hammock, B D

    1988-01-01

    Procedures performed in 96-well microplates and quantitated by automatic readers assume instruments to be precise, accurate, and free of well location dependent bias. Instrument specifications generally focus on precision and accuracy without specifically addressing biases which are dependent on well location. These biases appear to be meniscus dependent and can be demonstrated in varying degrees in automatic readers of many designs by using a reverse plate wet test, which compares repeated readings of a dye loaded plate in normal and reversed positions. This test analyzes differences between readings and is, therefore, independent of pipetting error or other experimental variables such as protein binding or immunoassay variability. Different plates increased or decreased the magnitude of observed errors but did not themselves cause the errors measured by the reverse plate wet test. Error patterns were consistent for each reader and varied widely among the 16 instruments tested. Only 4 of 16 instruments passed an existing manufacturer's specification for precision, and only one of the 16 readers tested passed a similar specification for accuracy. The severest location dependent bias was found in an instrument which exhibited excellent repeatability and consistently passed its built-in diagnostic tests. One reader with significant bias was returned to the manufacturer for routine service and calibration, but it was not demonstrably improved. The reverse plate wet test is an extremely useful diagnostic tool for quality control at all stages of instrument manufacture and use. PMID:3069835

  9. Turbidimetric assay for tetracyclines in feeds using a microtiter plate system.

    PubMed

    Brady, M S; Katz, S E

    1991-01-01

    The microtiter plate system for turbidimetric assay of chlortetracycline (CTC) and oxytetracycline (OTC) levels in feeds uses a 96 well microtiter plate, a multichannel pipette, and an ELISA reader to measure turbidity. Feeds are extracted for both tetracyclines using AOAC extraction systems. For CTC, the range of the standard curve is 0.001-0.005 microgram CTC/mL; for OTC, the range is 0.004-0.016 microgram OTC/mL. Repeatability of CTC assays, as shown by the coefficient of variation (CV), ranged from 0.54 to 5.65% for same-day assays and from 2.01 to 9.39% for assays on different days. For OTC, CVs ranged from 2.69 to 10.01% for same-day assays and 3.24 to 9.08% for different-day assays. Average recoveries for CTC were 108.7% for same-day assays and 106.8% for different-day assays; for OTC, average recoveries were 112.4% and 106.5% for same-day and different-day assays, respectively. PMID:1874689

  10. Optimization of Salmonella Typhi biofilm assay on polypropylene microtiter plates using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ganjali Dashti, M; Abdeshahian, P; Sudesh, K; Phua, K K

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an optimized assay for Salmonella Typhi biofilm that mimics the environment of the gallbladder as an experimental model for chronic typhoid fever. Multi-factorial assays are difficult to optimize using traditional one-factor-at-a-time optimization methods. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize six key variables involved in S. Typhi biofilm formation on cholesterol-coated polypropylene 96-well microtiter plates. The results showed that bile (1.22%), glucose (2%), cholesterol (0.05%) and potassium chloride (0.25%) were critical factors affecting the amount of biofilm produced, but agitation (275 rpm) and sodium chloride (0.5%) had antagonistic effects on each other. Under these optimum conditions the maximum OD reading for biofilm formation was 3.4 (λ600 nm), and the coefficients of variation for intra-plate and inter-plate assays were 3% (n = 20) and 5% (n = 8), respectively. These results showed that RSM is an effective approach for biofilm assay optimization. PMID:26963754

  11. A protein-protein binding assay using coated microtitre plates: increased throughput, reproducibility and speed compared to bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Craig, Tim J; Ciufo, Leonora F; Morgan, Alan

    2004-07-30

    Protein-protein interactions, and the factors affecting them, are of fundamental importance to all biological systems. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITR) are powerful methods for assaying such interactions, but are expensive to implement. In contrast, bead-based pull-down assays using affinity tags such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), require no specialist equipment. As a result, such assays are the most popular method for analysing protein-protein interactions, despite being time-consuming and prone to variability. In respect of these problems, we have modified this form of binding assay, using glutathione-coated 96-well plates rather than glutathione-Sepharose beads to bind the primary bait protein. Quantitation of bound protein utilises ELISA for purified proteins and scintillation counting for in vitro translated proteins, rather than the SDS-PAGE-based detection methods used in traditional bead-based assays. These modifications result in an approximately 10-fold increase in the number of samples that can be assayed daily, and allow results to be obtained within hours as opposed to days. We validate the modified assay by analysing the equilibrium binding of Munc18 and syntaxin, and also demonstrate that association and dissociation kinetics may be measured using this approach. The method we describe is generally applicable to any protein-protein interaction assay based on affinity tags and is amenable to automation, and so should benefit a wide range of biochemical research. PMID:15236910

  12. Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan R. Thomas

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

  13. A microELISA assay for detection of anti-HLA activity of mouse monoclonal antibodies using an Astroscan 2100 automated plate reader.

    PubMed

    Sadler, A M; Krausa, P; Marsh, S G; Heyes, J M; Bodmer, J G

    1992-04-27

    A microenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (microELISA) method has been developed using an Astroscan 2100 system automated plate reader which was initially designed for tissue typing by a two colour fluorescent microcytotoxicity assay. A 96-well plate ELISA used for screening mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against surface HLA antigens has been modified for use with the Astroscan plate reader and 72-well typing trays. The existing substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside (4MUG) has been replaced with fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside (FDG), to provide a wavelength (530 nm) detectable by the Astroscan or other automated plate readers designed for reading microcytotoxicity assay plates. The assay volumes have also been reduced tenfold for use with Terasaki microtest plates. The assay now has the major advantage of requiring only 5 microliters of test supernatant allowing hybridomas to be screened earlier during a fusion and on a wider cell panel. The use of the large panel which includes B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) and mouse L cell transfectants expressing HLA genes, reduces the length of time the hybridomas need to be kept in tissue culture before selection. Other advantages include the reduction in the number of target cells required, smaller volumes of reagents throughout the assay and the ability to screen cytotoxic as well as non-cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies. The sensitivity of this microELISA proved to be comparable with the original assay and so provides an efficient screening method for monoclonal antibodies. PMID:1583310

  14. A microassay for measuring glycogen in 96-well-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lechón, M J; Ponsoda, X; Castell, J V

    1996-05-01

    This study describes a rapid, sensitive, and automated spectrophotometric enzymatic microassay that measures the intracellular glycogen of primary cultured hepatocytes and other cultured cells in 96-well plates and can be adapted for other samples that are transferred to these plates. The procedure involves in situ disruption of cells, followed by hydrolysis of glycogen into glucosyl units by fungal glucoamylase (exo-1.4-alpha-glucosidase, EC 3.2.1.3), and glucose determination with the glucose oxidase colorimetric method. The color intensity can be measured in conventional ELISA readers, and the data can be fed to an on-line computer for rapid processing. The advantages of this method are its simplicity and automation, the reduction in sample handling, and the small number of cells required compared to other conventional methods. PMID:8660508

  15. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. PMID:26343557

  16. Assay of creatine kinase in microtiter plates using thio-NAD to allow monitoring at 405 nM.

    PubMed

    Florini, J R

    1989-11-01

    An assay system for creatine kinase using microtiter plates and a plate reader that records absorbancies at 405 nM has been devised. The system is an adaptation of well-established assays that couple creatine kinase with the reactions catalyzed by hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), to give a measurable increase in reduced pyridine nucleotide quantitated by absorbance at 340 nM. Two features of this system are modified for reading at 405 nM: (i) The thioamido derivative of NAD is used because its reduced form exhibits a substantial increase in absorbance at 405 nM, the most commonly available wavelength on microplate readers; and (ii) glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides is used because it can reduce either NAD or NADP (unlike most other G6PDH enzymes, which require NADP), thus making it unnecessary to use the more expensive thio-NADP. The rate of thio-NAD reduction is linear with enzyme concentration and time over a 20-fold range of concentrations of purified creatine kinase, and the assay also works well with myogenic cells allowed to grow and differentiate in the 96-well plate in which the assay is performed. This system offers considerable savings in cells, time, and material in studies of muscle cell differentiation, for which creatine kinase levels are frequently measured. It also provides a potential method for the convenient and economical measurement of activities of many other enzymes that can be coupled to reduction of thio-NAD. PMID:2610356

  17. Establishment and validation of a method for multi-dose irradiation of cells in 96-well microplates

    SciTech Connect

    Abatzoglou, Ioannis; Zois, Christos E.; Pouliliou, Stamatia

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We established a method for multi-dose irradiation of cell cultures within a 96-well plate. ► Equations to adjust to preferable dose levels are produced and provided. ► Up to eight different dose levels can be tested in one microplate. ► This method results in fast and reliable estimation of radiation dose–response curves. -- Abstract: Microplates are useful tools in chemistry, biotechnology and molecular biology. In radiobiology research, these can be also applied to assess the effect of a certain radiation dose delivered to the whole microplate, to test radio-sensitivity, radio-sensitization or radio-protection. Whether different radiation doses can be accurately applied to a single 96-well plate to further facilitate and accelerated research by one hand and spare funds on the other, is a question dealt in the current paper. Following repeated ion-chamber, TLD and radiotherapy planning dosimetry we established a method for multi-dose irradiation of cell cultures within a 96-well plate, which allows an accurate delivery of desired doses in sequential columns of the microplate. Up to eight different dose levels can be tested in one microplate. This method results in fast and reliable estimation of radiation dose–response curves.

  18. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3-4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15-50 mL) or small bottles. PMID:26818699

  19. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3–4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15–50 mL) or small bottles. PMID:26818699

  20. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  1. Design of a titering assay for lentiviral vectors utilizing direct extraction of DNA from transduced cells in microtiter plates

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michele E; Vin, Chintan D; Slough, Megan M; Gombotz, Wayne R; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna

    2016-01-01

    Using lentiviral vector products in clinical applications requires an accurate method for measuring transduction titer. For vectors lacking a marker gene, quantitative polymerase chain reaction is used to evaluate the number of vector DNA copies in transduced target cells, from which a transduction titer is calculated. Immune Design previously described an integration-deficient lentiviral vector pseudotyped with a modified Sindbis virus envelope for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02, of the ZVex platform). Standard protocols for titering integration-competent lentiviral vectors employ commercial spin columns to purify vector DNA from transduced cells, but such columns are not optimized for isolation of extrachromosomal (nonintegrated) DNA. Here, we describe a 96-well transduction titer assay in which DNA extraction is performed in situ in the transduction plate, yielding quantitative recovery of extrachromosomal DNA. Vector titers measured by this method were higher than when commercial spin columns were used for DNA isolation. Evaluation of the method’s specificity, linear range, and precision demonstrate that it is suitable for use as a lot release assay to support clinical trials with VP02. Finally, the method is compatible with titering both integrating and nonintegrating lentiviral vectors, suggesting that it may be used to evaluate the transduction titer for any lentiviral vector. PMID:26942209

  2. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-12-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts. PMID:25260255

  3. Construction of a Simple, Inexpensive Multiple Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Microdilution Plate Washer

    PubMed Central

    Stobbs, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, plans are given for the construction of an inexpensive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plate washer from readily available materials. The wash unit uses an intermittent wash cycle based on a wash manifold cycling over the microdilution plates for a predetermined time. Laboratory tests showed that the unit provided reliable, rapid washing of plates with tap water, with no detectable contamination between wells. Substrate absorbance values for test samples from machine-washed plates were equal to or greater than absorbance values for corresponding samples from plates washed manually by an accepted protocol, by using either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay wash buffer or tap water. Images PMID:16348216

  4. A 96-well electrochemical method for the screening of enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, Sofiène; Noiriel, Alexandre; Henkens, Robert; Bonaventura, Celia; Blum, Loïc J; Doumèche, Bastien

    2013-04-01

    The rapid electrochemical screening of enzyme activities in bioelectronics is still a challenging issue. In order to solve this problem, we propose to use a 96-well electrochemical assay. This system is composed of 96 screen-printed electrodes on a printed circuit board adapted from a commercial system (carbon is used as the working electrode and silver chloride as the counter/reference electrode). The associated device allows for the measurements on the 96 electrodes to be performed within a few seconds. In this work, we demonstrate the validity of the screening method with the commercial laccase from the fungus Trametes versicolor. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is found to be the best way to analyze the electrochemical signals. The S/N follows a saturation-like mechanism with a dynamic linear range of two decades ranging from 0.5 to 75 ng of laccase (corresponding to enzymatic activities from 62 × 10(-6) to 9.37 × 10(-3) μmol min(-1)) and a sensitivity of 3027 μg(-1) at +100 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Laccase inhibitors (azide and fluoride anions), pH optima, and interfering molecules could also be identified within a few minutes. PMID:23461701

  5. Protocol: high throughput silica-based purification of RNA from Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96-well format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing popularity of systems-based approaches to plant research has resulted in a demand for high throughput (HTP) methods to be developed. RNA extraction from multiple samples in an experiment is a significant bottleneck in performing systems-level genomic studies. Therefore we have established a high throughput method of RNA extraction from Arabidopsis thaliana to facilitate gene expression studies in this widely used plant model. We present optimised manual and automated protocols for the extraction of total RNA from 9-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96 well plate format using silica membrane-based methodology. Consistent and reproducible yields of high quality RNA are isolated averaging 8.9 μg total RNA per sample (~20 mg plant tissue). The purified RNA is suitable for subsequent qPCR analysis of the expression of over 500 genes in triplicate from each sample. Using the automated procedure, 192 samples (2 × 96 well plates) can easily be fully processed (samples homogenised, RNA purified and quantified) in less than half a day. Additionally we demonstrate that plant samples can be stored in RNAlater at -20°C (but not 4°C) for 10 months prior to extraction with no significant effect on RNA yield or quality. Additionally, disrupted samples can be stored in the lysis buffer at -20°C for at least 6 months prior to completion of the extraction procedure providing a flexible sampling and storage scheme to facilitate complex time series experiments. PMID:22136293

  6. MUTAGENICITY OF NITRODIBENZOPYANONES IN THE SALMONELLA PLATE-INCORPORATION AND MICROSUSPENSION ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutagenicity of three isomers of nitro-6-H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one (NDBP), 3-NDBP and 4-NDBP, was characterized in the plate-incorporation (P1) and microsuspension (MS) assays using Salmonella typhimurium tester stains in the presence or absence of S9 mix. n both assays, all ...

  7. Assessment of the integrity of compounds stored in assay-ready plates using a kinase sentinel assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ada; Zhao, Xiaoning; Mercer, Laina; Su, Cheng; Zalameda, Leeanne; Liu, Yichin; Lembke, Amanda; Eastwood, Heather; Dang, Son; Oung, Thim; Xia, Xiaoyang; Young, Stephen W; Xiao, Shouhua; McCarter, John D

    2013-09-01

    Sentinel assays are a convenient adjunct to LC-MS purity assessment to monitor the integrity of compounds in pharmaceutical screening collections over time. To assess the stability of compounds stored both at room temperature and at -20°C in assay-ready plates that were either vacuum pack-sealed using a convenient industrial vacuum sealing method or individually sealed using conventional foil seals, a diverse collection of ~ 5,000 compounds was assayed using a robust biochemical kinase assay at intervals over a one year period. Assay results at each time point were compared to those of initial assay using a series of correlations of compound Percent of Control (POC) values as well as IC50 values of a subset of compounds in 200 nL or 500 nL plates. The fraction of hits in common between initial assays and assays at later time points ranged from 82% to 95% over one year and remained relatively constant over time with all storage temperatures or sealing methods tested. A majority of the hits that exhibited a consistent gradual trend to lower potency over one year storage were shifted to lower potency upon the rapid removal of DMSO solvent. Compound precipitation rather than compound decomposition is the likely reason for trends to lower potency for most such compounds over the storage period. Plates stored at room temperature featured a significantly higher fraction of hits that exhibited a trend to lower apparent potency than those stored at -20°C suggesting that this lower temperature is preferable for longer-term storage. PMID:23651141

  8. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay in low volume.

    PubMed

    Bainor, Anthony; Chang, Lyra; McQuade, Thomas J; Webb, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2011-03-15

    The BCA assay is a colorimetric method for estimating protein concentration. In 96-well plates, the relationship between protein content and absorbance is nearly linear over a wide range; however, performance is reduced in lower volume. To overcome this limitation, we performed the BCA assays in opaque, white 384-well plates. These plates emit fluorescence between 450-600 nm when excited at 430 nm; thus, their fluorescence is quenched by the BCA chromophore (λ(max) 562 nm). This arrangement allowed accurate determination of protein content using only 2 μL of sample. Moreover, soluble flourescein could replace the white plates, creating a homogenous format. PMID:21078286

  9. Development of a new microtiter plate format for clinically relevant assays.

    PubMed

    Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Stanislav S; Whitcombe, Michael J; Chianella, Iva; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2012-02-21

    A new format for the microtiter plate-based assays was proposed. The novelty involves the use of disk-shaped inserts for immobilization of biological and chemical reagents. The internal opening of the disks allows measurements of the reactions by standard microtiter plate readers without any additional steps involving liquid handling. Ideally the plate end-users just have to add the sample and take the measurement without any need of multiple reagent additions or transfer of the liquid to a different plate. The novel assay format also allows handling of reagents which are not soluble in an aqueous environment. As a proof of concept we describe here several model reactions which are compatible with microtiter plate format, such as monitoring enzymatic reactions catalyzed by glucose oxidase (GOx) and urease, measurements of proteins by BCA assay, analysis of pH, and concentration of antioxidants. The "mix and match" approach in the disk-shape format allows multiplexing and could be particularly useful for high throughput screening. One of the potential application areas for this novel assay format could be in a multianalyte system for measurement of clinically relevant analytes in primary care. PMID:22264028

  10. Microbiological plate and turbidimetric assays of chlortetracycline in feeds: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Ragheb, H S

    1977-09-01

    The manual and automated turbidimetric assays and a modified official plate assay for chlortetracycline (CTC-HCl) in feed were collaboratively studied. Three feed samples (swine feed, 100 g CTC-HCl/ton; premix I, 20 g each of CTC-HCl and sulfamethazine/lb, and 10 g penicillin/lb; and premix II, 50 g CTC-HCl/lb) were analyzed at 2 dilutions. Twelve laboratories conducted the plate assay; 8 laboratories the manual turbidimetric method; and 7 laboratories, the Autoturb analysis. Within a method, there was no significant difference between dilutions. Between methods, there was a significant difference between the manual turbidimetric plate assays only for swine feed. However, the same sample dilutions or the average values of the 2 dilutions for both methods showed no statistical difference. Among the collaborators, the slope of CTC-HCl standard curve varied between about 2.0 and 3.0 for the plate method. The turbidimetric assay has been adopted as official first action for feeds containing larger than or equal to 20 g CTC-HCl/lb. PMID:330490

  11. Plate-Dilution Frequency Technique for Assay of Microbial Ecology1

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R. F.; Sommers, L. E.

    1968-01-01

    The plate-dilution frequency technique described facilitates simultaneous enumeration of a wide range of physiologically different microorganisms in complex systems with a precision comparable to dilution tube (most probable number) methods. Replicate microsamples are inoculated from each member of a dilution series onto areas delineated on plates of prepoured solid media; the plates are incubated, and the occurrence of growth or specific biochemical transformation is recorded for each inoculated area. Microbial enumeration is accomplished by reference to appropriate tables. Details of the experimental procedures are described, and tables are presented from which microbial numbers with 95% confidence limits can be obtained and compared for significant difference directly for 10-fold and 4-fold dilution series. Results of experiments in which microbial populations were estimated simultaneously by the plate-dilution frequency and conventional plate count methods are compared. The potential of the technique for broad-spectrum microbial assay is also discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4868864

  12. Protein farnesyltransferase: measurement of enzymatic activity in 96-well format using TopCount microplate scintillation counting technology.

    PubMed

    Harwood, H J

    1995-04-10

    Protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) catalyzes the transfer of the farnesyl group of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to proteins ending with a carboxy-terminal CAAX motif, forming a thioether linkage to the cysteine residue of the protein. A method is described herein for measurement of PFT activity in 96-well format using TopCount microplate scintillation counting technology. This method has the advantages of requiring only a single transfer from reaction vessels or wells of a 96-well reaction plate to the filtration wells of a 96-well Packard UniFilter GF/B filtration plate following acid precipitation and of allowing liquid scintillation counting to be conducted directly in the filtration plate without the need for either removal of the filter from the plate or transfer of the filter to liquid scintillation vials prior to radioactivity assessment. Using rat brain cytosol as the source of PFT, H-ras as the source of farnesyl acceptor protein, and [1-3H]FPP as the farnesyl donor, the incorporation of radiolabeled farnesyl residues into H-ras was found to be a linear function of both the time of incubation at 37 degrees C (up to 75 min) and the concentration of rat brain cytosolic protein present during incubation (up to 40 micrograms protein), and to be dependent on the concentration of H-ras (Km = 1.1 microM) and FPP (Km = 0.6 microM) present in the incubation reaction. In the presence of 4 microM H-ras, 0.5 microM FPP, 4 mM MgCl2, and 20 microM ZnCl2, the specific activity of rat brain cytosolic PFT measured using this methodology was 0.253 +/- 0.036 (SD; n = 30) pmol H-ras farnesylated per minute of incubation at 37 degrees C per milligram cytosolic protein. The signal-to-noise ratio for H-ras farnesylation using this methodology averaged 25 relative to incubation in the absence of H-ras (background farnesylation of cytosolic proteins) and 50 relative to incubation in the absence of both H-ras and rat brain cytosol (background filter associated radioactivity

  13. 96-well format-based microfluidic platform for parallel interconnection of multiple multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Fluri, David A; Kelm, Jens M; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform, compatible with conventional 96-well formats, that enables facile and parallelized culturing and testing of spherical microtissues in a standard incubator. The platform can accommodate multiple microtissues (up to 66) of different cell types, formed externally by using the hanging-drop method, and enables microtissue interconnection through microfluidic channels for continuous media perfusion or dosage of substances. The platform contains 11 separate channels, and each channel has six tissue compartments. Primary rat liver tissues were cultured over 8 days, and multiple tumor tissues (HCT116) were exposed to various concentrations of 5-fluorouracil for platform characterization. PMID:25524491

  14. Miniaturization of mitotic index cell-based assay using "wall-less" plate technology.

    PubMed

    Le Guezennec, Xavier; Phong, Mark; Nor, Liyana; Kim, Namyong

    2014-03-01

    The use of microscopic imaging for the accurate assessment of cells in mitosis is hampered by the round morphology of mitotic cells, which renders them poorly adherent and highly susceptible to loss during the washing stage of cell-based assays. Here, to circumvent these limitations, we make use of DropArray, a recent technology that allows high retention of weakly adherent cells and suspension cells. DropArray offers the competitive advantage of maintaining the classic high throughput format of microtiter plates while reducing classic microwell volume by up to 90% by using a drop format. Here, we present a mitotic index cell-based assay using the mitosis marker phospho histone H3 at serine 10 on a DropArray 384-well plate format. Dose-response curve analysis of the mitotic index assay with an antimitotic drug (docetaxel) on DropArray is presented that shows an effective dosage compared to previous established results similar to those obtained with conventional microtiter plates. The mitotic index assay with DropArray showed a Z-factor >0.6. Our results validate DropArray as a suitable platform for high throughput screening for compounds affecting mitosis or the cell cycle. PMID:24611478

  15. Paper microzone plates.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader. PMID:19572563

  16. Fluorescence assay for the detection of adherent Candida yeasts to target cells in microtest plates.

    PubMed

    Borg-von Zepelin, M; Wagner, T

    1995-01-01

    We describe an assay based on photometric analysis for the measurement of adherence of Candida species to epithelial target cells (Vero cell line). Adherent Candida cells were detected by staining the cells with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white (CFW), which binds to chitin and glucan in the yeasts. The tests were performed on microtest plates, which were analysed automatically by fluorescence plate readers. The assay is based on the following steps: (i) coating of the microtest plates with target cells (e.g. Vero cells); (ii) infection with Candida: (iii) staining of Candida with CFW; (iv) rinsing to remove non-adherent Candida cells and unbound dye; (v) detection of adherent fluorescent Candida cells. The test was able to detect 4 x 10(4) cells ml-1. The standard deviation was +/- 8%. Day-to-day variation was +/- 10% at most. The adherence of strains of different Candida species was assayed by a standard procedure. The results confirmed the order of adherence, with C. albicans ranking first, followed by C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata. PMID:8569807

  17. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition. PMID:26017233

  18. Determination of suvorexant in human plasma using 96-well liquid-liquid extraction and HPLC with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Breidinger, S A; Simpson, R C; Mangin, E; Woolf, E J

    2015-10-01

    A method, using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS), was developed for the determination of suvorexant (MK-4305, Belsomra(®)), a selective dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment insomnia, in human plasma over the concentration range of 1-1000ng/mL. Stable isotope labeled (13)C(2)H3-suvorexant was used as an internal standard. The sample preparation procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction, in the 96-well format, of a 100μL plasma sample with methyl t-butyl ether. The compounds were chromatographed under isocratic conditions on a Waters dC18 (50×2.1mm, 3μm) column with a mobile phase consisting of 30/70 (v/v %) 10mM ammonium formate, pH3/acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. Multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion pairs for suvorexant (m/z 451→186) and (13)C(2)H3-suvorexant (m/z 455→190) on an Applied Biosystems API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer was used for quantitation. Intraday assay precision, assessed in six different lots of control plasma, was within 10% CV at all concentrations, while assay accuracy ranged from 95.6 to 105.0% of nominal. Quality control (QC) samples in plasma were stored at -20°C. Initial within day analysis of QCs after one freeze-thaw cycle showed accuracy within 9.5% of nominal with precision (CV) of 6.7% or less. The plasma QC samples were demonstrated to be stable for up to 25 months at -20°C. The method described has been used to support clinical studies during Phase I through III of clinical development. PMID:26343269

  19. Evaluation of various plastic microtiter plates with measles, toxoplasma, and gamma globulin antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Shekarchi, I C; Sever, J L; Lee, Y J; Castellano, G; Madden, D L

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen lots of microtiter plates which differed in lot, batch, plastic type, or manufacturer were evaluated as solid-phase carriers in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for antibodies to measles, toxoplasma, and human gamma globulin. Most plates of polystyrene or polyvinyl chloride were found to give acceptable binding. The final choice depended on the antigen to be attached. Variations in binding between lots, batches, and types of plastic were found. Well-to-well variation was found to be of greater statistical significance than edge effect and should be a consideration in selection of a plate lot for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Lots of plates should be pretested by the investigator to determine whether there is good binding of the antigen to be used and whether there is low plate-to-plate and well-to-well variation. PMID:6199371

  20. A simple and cost-effective solid-phase protein nano-assay using polyacrylamide-coated glass plates.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A

    2015-02-01

    A new solid-phase protein nano-assay is suggested for simple and sensitive estimation of protein content in sample buffers (a 1-μl sample is sufficient for analysis). The assay is different from conventional "on-filter" assays in that it uses inexpensive fully transparent polyacrylamide gel (PAAG)-coated glass plates as solid support and, thus, combines the convenience of "on-membrane" staining with the sensitivity and ease of documentation of "in-gel" staining (and, therefore, is especially suited for standard lab gel documentation systems). The PAAG plates assay is compatible with all dyes for in-gel protein staining. Depending on the sensitivity of the staining protocol, the assay can be used in macro-, micro-, and nano-assay formats. We also describe a low-cost two-component colloidal Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 (CBB G-250) staining protocol for fast quantitative visualization of proteins spotted on a PAAG plate (the detection limit is up to 2 ng of proteins even when using a Nikon CoolPix digital camera and white light transilluminator instead of a gel scanner). The suggested colloidal CBB G-250 protocol could also be used for visualizing nano-amounts of proteins in polyacrylamide gels. The PAAG plate assay could be useful for proteomic applications and, in general, for all cases where a fast, sensitive, and easily documentable cost-effective solid-phase protein assay is required. PMID:25449300

  1. A Cell-based PDE4 Assay in 1536-well Plate format for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A.; Li, Xiao; Southall, Noel; Lu, Jianming; Inglese, James; Brasch, Michael; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are intracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to their corresponding 5'-nucleotide monophosphates. These enzymes play an important role in controlling cellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides and thus regulate a variety of cellular signaling events. PDEs are emerging as drug targets for several diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Though biochemical assays with purified recombinant PDE enzymes and cAMP or cGMP substrate are commonly used for compound screening, cell-based assays would provide a better assessment of compound activity in a more physiological context. Here we report the development and validation of a new cell-based PDE4 assay using a constitutively active GPCR as a driving force for cAMP production and a cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) cation channel as a biosensor in 1536-well plates. PMID:18591513

  2. Development of a novel 96-well format for liquid-liquid microextraction and its application in the HPLC analysis of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Borijihan, Guirong; Li, Youxin; Gao, Jianguo; Bao, James J

    2014-05-01

    A novel 96-well liquid-liquid microextraction system combined with modern HPLC was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of 96 biological samples. The system made use of hollow fibers, a 96-well plate, and a plastic base with a center hole and a side hole. One end of the hollow fiber was sealed, while the other end was attached to one of the holes positioned at the center for the plastic base. The needle was inserted into the liquid from inside or outside of the hollow fiber through the center or the side holes, respectively. The system was tested with plasma samples containing three compounds, acidic indomethacin, neutral dexamethasone, and basic propafenone. Some parameters, such as the kind and dimension of hollow fiber, pH and salt concentration of the donor phase, the selection of organic solvent for the acceptor phase, and the extraction time were investigated. Under the optimization conditions, the Log D and drug concentration of indomethacin, dexamethasone, and propafenone in plasma and urine samples were analyzed. Then, the methodology was validated. The results demonstrated that ng/mL levels could be exactly and rapidly analyzed by our system, which was equipped with an auto-injection sampler, making sample analysis more convenient. PMID:24574156

  3. Plate reader-based cell viability assays for glioprotection using primary rat optic nerve head astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Levy, Deborah; Zaidi, Danish H.; Altman, Alexa M.; Nawazish, Saba; Ghuman, Jasleen K.; Gerdes, Bryan C.; Moore, Mark A.; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHAs) are the major glia cell type in the non-myelinated optic nerve head where they contribute critically to extracellular matrix synthesis during development and throughout life. In glaucoma, and in related disorders affecting the optic nerve and the optic nerve head, pathological changes include altered astrocyte gene and protein expression resulting in their activation and extracellular matrix remodeling. ONHAs are highly sensitive to mechanical and oxidative stress resulting in the initiation of axon damage early during pathogenesis. Furthermore, ONHAs are crucial for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell physiology and function. Therefore, glioprotective strategies with the goal to preserve and/or restore the structural and functional viability of ONHA in order to slow glaucoma and related pathologies are of high clinical relevance. Herein, we describe the development of standardized methods that will allow for the systematic advancement of such glioprotective strategies. These include isolation, purification and culture of primary adult rat ONHAs, optimized immunocytochemical protocols for cell type validation, as well as plate reader-based assays determining cellular viability, proliferation and the intracellular redox state. We validated and standardized our protocols by performing a glioprotection study using primary ONHAs. Specifically, we measured protection against exogenously-applied oxidative stress using tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as a model of disease-mediated oxidative stress in the retina and optic nerve head by the prototypic antioxidant, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox). Levels of oxidative stress were increased in the response to exogenously applied tBHP and were assessed by 6-carboxy-2′, 7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. Normalized DCFDA fluorescence showed a maximal 5.1-fold increase; the half-maximal effect (EC50) for tBHP was 212 ± 25

  4. Soluble penicillin-binding protein 2a: beta-lactam binding and inhibition by non-beta-lactams using a 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Toney, J H; Hammond, G G; Leiting, B; Pryor, K D; Wu, J K; Cuca, G C; Pompliano, D L

    1998-01-01

    High level methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the acquisition of the mecA gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a). PBP2a is a member of a family of peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzymes involved in assembly of the cell wall in bacteria and is poorly inactivated by beta-lactam antibiotics. We describe a 96-well-filter binding assay using recombinant, soluble PBP2a which allows for kinetic measurement of penicillin binding. The deacylation rate constant for the PBP2a-penicillin G covalent complex was found to be 5.7 +/- 1.0 x 10(-5) s-1 at 30 degrees C (half-life of approximately 200 min). For the PBP2a acylation reaction, the value of K(m) (penicillin G) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 mM and kcat = 1 x 10(-3) s-1, which yields a second-order rate constant (kcat/K(m)) for inactivation of 2.0 M-1 s-1. Using this assay, several non-beta-lactam inhibitors including Cibacron blue have been found which exhibit IC50 values between 10 and 30 microM. The binding affinities of several carbapenems and beta-lactams correlated well between the filter binding assay described in this report and an electrophoretic assay for PBP2a using membranes prepared form methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:9448849

  5. Automated cytopathic effect (CPE) assays.

    PubMed

    McAleer, W J; Miller, W J; Hurni, W M; Machlowitz, R A; Hilleman, M R

    1983-07-01

    An automated CPE procedure has been developed that increases the precision and ease of performing titrations of measles, mumps and rubella viruses in vaccine materials. By this procedure, additions of cell suspensions and reagents and the dilution of samples are performed automatically by a modified Dynatiter instrument, using 96-well microtitre plates. Cell monolayers are stained with carbolfuchsin dye to eliminate the need for microscopic examination. Finally, the trays are read in an optical scanner and the end points calculated automatically by a programmable calculator. The increased accuracy and precision attained by performing greater numbers of replicate assays at reasonable cost will be of particular value to vaccine manufacturers. PMID:6885830

  6. Time-correlated single photon counting: an advancing technique in a plate reader for assay development and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näther, Dirk U.; Fenske, Roger; Hurteaux, Reynald; Majno, Sandra; Smith, S. Desmond

    2006-10-01

    A new plate reader (Nanotaurus) has been developed by Edinburgh Instruments that has the principle design features of a confocal microscope and utilises the technique of Time Correlated Single Photon Counting for data acquisition. The advantages of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in the nanosecond time scale and analysis methods to recover lifetime parameters are discussed based on experimental data. First working assays using changes of lifetime parameters are presented that clearly demonstrate the advantages of the new instrument for biochemical assays and show strong promise for cell-based assays, by utilising the independence of lifetime parameters from sample volume and concentration.

  7. Application of a fish DNA damage assay as a biological toxicity screening tool for metal plating wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Zong, M.; Meier, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The utility of a fish DNA damage assay as a rapid monitoring tool was investigated. Metal plating wastewater was chosen as a sample because it contains various genotoxic metal species. Fish DNA damage assay results were compared to data generated from the conventional whole effluent toxicity (WET) test procedure. The Microtox{reg_sign} assay (Azur Environmental, Carlsbad, CA, USA) using Vibrio fischeri was also employed. Eleven samples from two metal plating companies were collected for this evaluation. For the fish DNA damage assay, 7-d-old fathead minnow larvae, Pimephales promelas, were utilized. They were exposed to a series of dilutions at 20 C for 2 h. Whole effluent toxicity tests conducted in this study included two acute toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and fathead minnows and two chronic toxicity tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows. The fish DNA damage assay showed good correlations with both the acute and chronic WET test results, especially with those obtained with fathead minnows. The kappa values, an index of agreement, between the fish DNA damage assay and WET tests were shown to be acceptable. These findings imply that this novel fish DNA damage assay has use as an expedient toxicity screening procedure since it produces comparable results to those of the acute and chronic fathead minnow toxicity tests.

  8. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies--Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR)--we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be

  9. Sandwich assay for mixed-sequence recognition of double-stranded DNA: Invader-based detection of targets specific to food pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Denn, Benjamin; Karmakar, Saswata; Guenther, Dale C.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    A 96-well plate sandwich assay based on Invader capture/signalling probes is used to recognize 28-mer mixed-sequence dsDNA targets specific to Salmonella, Campylobacter and Escherichia coli. Targets are detected at 20-55 pM concentration with excellent binding specificity. PMID:24036937

  10. Neutral red assay in minimum fungicidal concentrations of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, T; Naka, W; Tajima, S; Nishikawa, T

    1996-01-01

    We assayed the fungicidal effects of antifungal agents using neutral red staining. Fungal elements of Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum were treated with various concentrations of antifungal agents in 96-well filtration plates and then stained with neutral red. The amount of neutral red incorporated by the surviving viable cells was determined from the automated spectrophotometric readings at 550 nm. The minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of antifungal agents determined by this assay correlated well with those determined by conventional assay. This newly developed procedure should provide a rapid, reproducible, quantitative, qualitative and semi-automated susceptibility test for determination of the MFCs of the fungicidal agents. PMID:8912170

  11. Fast carbohydrate analysis via liquid chromatography coupled with ultra violet and electrospray ionization ion trap detection in 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Rühmann, Broder; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2014-07-11

    A fast carbohydrate screening platform processible in 96-well format is described. The method is suitable for the determination of various carbohydrates out of complex mixtures as obtained by acidic hydrolysis of carbohydrates polymers. The chromatographic conditions for an efficient separation (12min) and the derivatization process with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) were optimized for high resolution separation and simultaneous determination of deoxy-, amino-, anhydro-sugars as well as hexoses, pentoses, dimers, uronic acids and degradation products like furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The potential to quantify with UV- and MS-detector in the same range has been demonstrated for 20 different compounds. Finally, the matrix effects of the hydrolysis were positively evaluated. The micro scale hydrolysis and PMP-derivatization without any extraction or drying steps, both in 96-well format, result in a fast and intuitive sample preparation. In combination with a fast liquid chromatography coupled to UV and electrospray ionization ion trap detection (LC-UV-ESI-MS/MS) for the qualification and quantification of various sugars, dimers and degradation products, this method shows great performance in carbohydrate analysis. PMID:24861788

  12. Simultaneous determination of a novel KDR kinase inhibitor and its N-oxide metabolite in human plasma using 96-well solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Du, Lihong; Soli, Eric D; Braun, Matthew P; Dean, Dennis C; Musson, Donald G

    2005-03-25

    To support pharmacokinetic studies, a selective and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of a novel KDR kinase inhibitor (1) and its active metabolite (2) in human plasma. The method is fully automated using a Packard MultiPROBE II system and a TomTec Quadra 96 liquid handling workstation to perform sample preparation and solid-phase extraction (SPE). Following the extraction on a mixed-mode SPE using Oasis MCX 96-well plate, the analytes were separated on a Aquasil C18 column (50 mm x 2.1 mm, i.d., 3 microm) with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile/ammonium acetate buffer (5 mM, pH 5.0) (60/40, v/v). The run time for each injection was 4.5 min with the retention times of approximately 2.0 and 2.7 min for 1 and 2 respectively, at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. A tandem mass spectrometric detection was conducted using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) under the positive ion mode with a turbo ion-spray interface. The linear ranges of the calibration curves were 0.05-400 ng/mL for 1 and 0.1-400 ng/mL for 2 on a PE Sciex API 4000 LC-MS/MS system. The lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) of the assay were 0.05 and 0.1 ng/mL for 1 and 2 respectively, when 0.4 mL of plasma was processed. Intra-day assay precision (using five standard curves prepared by spiking compounds to five lots of plasma) was less than 4.9% for 1 and less than 9.6% for 2 on each concentration. Assay accuracy was found to be 95.1-104.6% of nominal for 1 standards and 93.5-105.6% for 2 standards. QC samples were stable when kept at room temperature for 4 h, at -70 degrees C for 10 days, and after three freeze-thaw cycles. The extraction recoveries were 80%, 83% and 84% for 1 and 2 and I.S. respectively, and no significant matrix effects were observed. The method was successfully applied to plasma samples from clinical studies after oral administration of compound 1. PMID:15686997

  13. Development of a high-throughput assay for measuring lipase activity using natural triacylglycerols coated on microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Verger, Robert; Rodriguez, Jorge A; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2013-09-21

    We have designed a convenient, specific, sensitive and continuous lipase assay based on the use of natural triacylglycerols (TAGs) from the Aleurites fordii seed oil which contains α-eleostearic acid (9,11,13,cis,trans,trans-octadecatrienoic acid) and which was coated in the wells of microtiter plates. The coated TAG film cannot be desorbed by the various buffers used during the lipase assay. Upon lipase action, α-eleostearic acid is liberated and desorbed from the interface and then solubilized into the micellar phase. Consequently, the UV absorbance of the α-eleostearic acid is considerably enhanced due to the transformation from an adsorbed to a water soluble state. The lipase activity can be measured continuously by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra. The rate of lipolysis was monitored by measuring the increase of OD at 272 nm, which was found to be linear with time and directly proportional to the amount of added lipase. This microtiter plate lipase assay, based on coated TAGs, presents various advantages as compared to the classical systems: (i) coated TAGs on the microtiter plates could be stored for a long-time at 4 °C, (ii) higher sensitivity in lipase detection, (iii) good reproducibility, and (iv) increase of signal to noise ratio due to high UV absorption after transfer of α-eleostearic acid from an adsorbed to a soluble state. Low concentrations, down to 1 pg mL(-1) of pure Thermomyces lanuginosus or human pancreatic lipase, could be detected under standard assay conditions. The detection sensitivity of this coated method is around 1000 times higher as compared to those obtained with the classical emulsified systems. This continuous high throughput lipase assay could be used to screen new lipases and/or lipase inhibitors present in various biological samples. PMID:23851449

  14. The BUME method: a novel automated chloroform-free 96-well total lipid extraction method for blood plasma[S

    PubMed Central

    Löfgren, Lars; Ståhlman, Marcus; Forsberg, Gun-Britt; Saarinen, Sinikka; Nilsson, Ralf; Hansson, Göran I.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid extraction from biological samples is a critical and often tedious preanalytical step in lipid research. Primarily on the basis of automation criteria, we have developed the BUME method, a novel chloroform-free total lipid extraction method for blood plasma compatible with standard 96-well robots. In only 60 min, 96 samples can be automatically extracted with lipid profiles of commonly analyzed lipid classes almost identically and with absolute recoveries similar or better to what is obtained using the chloroform-based reference method. Lipid recoveries were linear from 10–100 µl plasma for all investigated lipids using the developed extraction protocol. The BUME protocol includes an initial one-phase extraction of plasma into 300 µl butanol:methanol (BUME) mixture (3:1) followed by two-phase extraction into 300 µl heptane:ethyl acetate (3:1) using 300 µl 1% acetic acid as buffer. The lipids investigated included the most abundant plasma lipid classes (e.g., cholesterol ester, free cholesterol, triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin) as well as less abundant but biologically important lipid classes, including ceramide, diacylglycerol, and lyso-phospholipids. This novel method has been successfully implemented in our laboratory and is now used daily. We conclude that the fully automated, high-throughput BUME method can replace chloroform-based methods, saving both human and environmental resources. PMID:22645248

  15. An enzyme-amplified microtiter plate assay for ethanol: Its application to the detection of peanut ethanol and alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Vercellotti, J.R.; Sanders, T.H.

    1995-12-01

    A calorimetric microliter plate assay for ethanol amplified by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was developed. In the assay ethanol from a sample took part in a chain-reaction catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and amplified by ALDH in the presence of NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, and p-ibdonitrotetrazolium-violet (INT-violet)(a precursor of red product). The resultant reaction gave a red color, the intensity of which was proportional to the amount of ethanol present. Using the technique, the content of activity from peanuts of differing maturity and curing stages were determined respectively. Data showed that immature peanuts had a higher level of ethanol and a lower ADH activity than mature peanuts, and that the level of ethanol and ADH activity decreased with the curing time. This indicates that peanut maturity and curing have an effect on ethanol. Also, this implies that other peanut volatiles could be affected in the same way as ethanol, a major volatile in peanuts.

  16. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases – pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase – was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  17. High-throughput microtitre plate-based assay for DNA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Burton, Nicolas P; Maxwell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a rapid, high-throughput assay for measuring the catalytic activity (DNA supercoiling or relaxation) of DNA topoisomerases. The assay utilizes intermolecular triplex formation between an immobilized triplex-forming oligo (TFO) and a triplex-forming region inserted into the plasmid substrate (pNO1), and capitalizes on the observation that supercoiled DNA forms triplexes more readily than relaxed DNA. Thus, supercoiled DNA is preferentially retained by the TFO under triplex-forming conditions while relaxed DNA can be washed away. Due to its high speed of sample analysis and reduced sample handling over conventional gel-based techniques, this assay can be used to screen chemical libraries for novel inhibitors of topoisomerases. PMID:22130995

  18. Quantitative assay for mutation in diploid human lymphoblasts using microtiter plates

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, E.A.; Thilly, W.G.; Penman, B.W.; Liber, H.L.; Rand, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    A microtiter plating technique which eliminates the need for soft agar and fibroblast feeder layers to determine the colony-forming ability of diploid human lymphoblast lines was described. The calculation of cloning efficiency is based on the Poisson distribution, and a statistical method for calculating confidence intervals is presented. This technique has been applied to the comcomitant examination of induced mutation at the putative loci for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, thymidine, kinase, and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ adenosine triphosphatase.

  19. Fluorescent protein-based cellular assays analyzed by laser-scanning microplate cytometry in 1536-well plate format.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Johnson, Ronald L; Zhang, Ya-qin; Veith, Henrike; Jadhav, Ajit; Yasgar, Adam; Simeonov, Anton; Zheng, Wei; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Westwick, John K; Austin, Christopher P; Inglese, James

    2006-01-01

    Microtiter plate readers have evolved from photomultiplier and charged-coupled device-based readers, where a population-averaged signal is detected from each well, to microscope-based imaging systems, where cellular characteristics from individual cells are measured. For these systems, speed and ease of data analysis are inversely proportional to the amount of data collected from each well. Microplate laser cytometry is a technology compatible with a 1536-well plate format and capable of population distribution analysis. Microplate cytometers such as the Acumen Explorer can monitor up to four fluorescent signals from single objects in microtiter plates with densities as high as 1536 wells. These instruments can measure changes in fluorescent protein expression, cell shape, or simple cellular redistribution events such as cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation. To develop high-throughput screening applications using laser-scanning microplate cytometry, we used green fluorescent protein- and yellow fluorescent protein-expressing cell lines designed to measure diverse biological functions such as nuclear translocation, epigenetic signaling, and G protein-coupled receptor activation. This chapter illustrates the application of microplate laser cytometry to these assays in a manner that is suitable for screening large compound collections in high throughput. PMID:17110211

  20. Implementation and development of an automated, ultra-high-capacity, acoustic, flexible dispensing platform for assay-ready plate delivery.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Dylan; Northwood, Roger; Owen, Paul; Simkiss, Ellen; Brierley, Andrew; Cross, Kevin; Slaney, Andrew; Davis, Miranda; Bath, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Compound management faces the daily challenge of providing high-quality samples to drug discovery. The advent of new screening technologies has seen demand for liquid samples move toward nanoliter ranges, dispensed by contactless acoustic droplet ejection. Within AstraZeneca, a totally integrated assay-ready plate production platform has been created to fully exploit the advantages of this technology. This enables compound management to efficiently deliver large throughputs demanded by high-throughput screening while maintaining regular delivery of smaller numbers of compounds in varying plate formats for cellular or biochemical concentration-response curves in support of hit and lead optimization (structure-activity relationship screening). The automation solution, CODA, has the capability to deliver compounds on demand for single- and multiple-concentration ranges, in batch sizes ranging from 1 sample to 2 million samples, integrating seamlessly into local compound and test management systems. The software handles compound orders intelligently, grouping test requests together dependent on output plate type and serial dilution ranges so that source compound vessels are shared among numerous tests, ensuring conservation of sample, reduced labware and costs, and efficiency of work cell logistics. We describe the development of CODA to address the customer demand, challenges experienced, learning made, and subsequent enhancements. PMID:22922543

  1. Enhanced binding of capsular polysaccharides of Cryptococcus neoformans to polystyrene microtitration plates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, R; Cheeseman, M M; Reyes, G H; Reiss, E; Todaro, F

    1988-01-01

    A sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibodies against capsular polysaccharide was developed, based on the enhanced binding of polysaccharide to polystyrene microtitration plates. The wells of the microtitration plate were primed with an adipic acid dihydrazide derivative of bovine serum albumin (AH-BSA) (100 micrograms/mL, 0.01 M NaPO4-0.14 M NaCl, pH 7.2 (PBS]. Capsular polysaccharide, the glucuronoxylomannan of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A, was oxidized with NaIO4 for 5 min; the reaction was then quenched with ethylene glycol. The partially oxidized polysaccharide was dialyzed vs. PBS, and its concentration was adjusted to 50 micrograms/mL with PBS. This solution (100 microL/well) was covalently bound to the AH-BSA primed microtitration plates through formation of a Schiff base between the hydrazide group on the AH-BSA and the aldehyde groups on the polysaccharide. Antimouse IgG-alkaline phosphatase conjugate was used in an indirect ELISA to measure captured murine monoclonal antibodies directed against glucuronoxylomannan. Mean absorbances, after 15 min, were 0.13 in negative control wells, and greater than 0.7 in test wells. No intermediate steps were required to block nonspecific binding of antibody. PMID:3064947

  2. High-throughput micro plate vanillin assay for determination of tannin in sorghum grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum tannins are phenolic compounds that offer health promoting antioxidant properties. The conventional HCl-vanillin assay for determining tannin content is a time-consuming method for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeder nursery samples. The objective of ...

  3. An Enzymatic Assay for High-Throughput Screening of Cytidine-Producing Microbial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Liu, Yongfei; Zu, Xin; Li, Ning; Li, Feiran; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Cytidine is an industrially useful precursor for the production of antiviral compounds and a variety of industrial compounds. Interest in the microbial production of cytidine has grown recently and high-throughput screening of cytidine over-producers is an important approach in large-scale industrial production using microorganisms. An enzymatic assay for cytidine was developed combining cytidine deaminase (CDA) and indophenol method. CDA catalyzes the cleavage of cytidine to uridine and NH3, the latter of which can be accurately determined using the indophenol method. The assay was performed in 96-well plates and had a linear detection range of cytidine of 0.058 - 10 mM. This assay was used to determine the amount of cytidine in fermentation flasks and the results were compared with that of High Perfomance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method. The detection range of the CDA method is not as wide as that of the HPLC, furthermore the correlation factor of CDA method is not as high as that of HPLC. However, it was suitable for the detection of large numbers of crude samples and was applied to high-throughput screening for high cytidine-producing strains using 96-well deep-hole culture plates. This assay was proved to be simple, accurate, specific and suitable for cytidine detection and high-throughput screening of cytidine-producing strains in large numbers of samples (96 well or more). PMID:25816248

  4. Adapting the medaka embryo assay to a high-throughput approach for developmental toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Oxendine, Sharon L; Cowden, John; Hinton, David E; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-09-01

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro methods are useful for screening, these methods do not replicate all the intricacies of embryonic development and should ideally be complemented by an in vivo screening strategy. In this study, we modify a medaka fish embryo assay to meet the requirements of high-throughput, developmental toxicant testing in vivo. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) offers several advantages over traditional mammalian model systems, including economic husbandry, high fecundity, and rapid ex utero development. In most studies where fish eggs are exposed to a chemical, the exposure takes place in a common vessel, with many embryos being exposed to the same solution. This type of design is not amenable to high-throughput methodology, does not allow the investigator to follow the same embryo throughout gestation, and may confound statistical analysis of the results. Therefore, we developed a 96-well microtiter plate method to facilitate exposure of individual medaka embryos in single wells and compared this approach to the common vessel method using the industrial solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the test compound. At lower DMSO concentrations (0% or 1%), the 96-well microtiter plate assay replicated results obtained using the common vessel exposure method. There was, however, increased lethality and decreased hatching rate in the bottle-reared embryos treated with the higher DMSO concentrations (5% or 10%). Because the embryos reared in the 96-well microtiter plates never showed increased adverse effects (as compared to the bottle-reared embryos) at any DMSO concentration, we conclude that the 96-well microtiter plate assay provides a rapid and efficient alternative for developmental toxicity screens that

  5. Comparison of methods of immobilization to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates for the detection of sugar chains.

    PubMed

    Satoh, A; Fukui, E; Yoshino, S; Shinoda, M; Kojima, K; Matsumoto, I

    1999-11-15

    The immobilization of carbohydrates for solid-phase assays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), is difficult because they are hydrophilic. We developed four new methods for the immobilization of oligosaccharides. ELISA plates were first coated with methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride copolymer (MMAC) and an excess of active anhydride groups was introduced. They were subsequently reacted, in four different ways, to bind oligosaccharides. In method 1, the anhydride groups were reacted with hydrazide groups, in the presence of adipic acid dihydrazide, and then coupled to the reducing ends of sugar chains by reductive amination. In method 2, the anhydride groups were reacted with p-aminophenyl glycoside obtained by reduction with p-nitrophenyl glycoside. In method 3, the anhydride groups were reacted with 1, 6-hexamethylenediamine. Aminooxy groups were coupled to the amino groups introduced and then aminooxyacetic acid with carbodiimide and ligated to oligosaccharides by oxime formation. In method 4, stereospecifically aminated oligosaccharides reacted with the anhydride groups. We compared, in solid-phase assays systems, the ability of lectins to detect oligosaccharides immobilized with either one of these four new methods or one of the two methods previously described. Detection of sugars with lectins is useful because, in most cases, they recognize sugars stereospecifically. The immobilization method should therefore be carefully selected to avoid changing the configuration and substitution in C-1. PMID:10552909

  6. Microscale 3D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen P; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption into high-throughput screening (HTS) has been lagging, in part because of the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden prepolymer solutions into 2D well plates is a potential solution but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which (1) increases costs, (2) makes drug penetration variable and (3) complicates imaging. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3D microgels using automated liquid-handling systems and standard, nonpatterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of a ~2.5 mm diameter microwell with no concerns about evaporation or meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. The cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics was monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrated that 3D cultures confer chemoresistance as compared with similar 2D cultures. Hence, these data demonstrate the importance of culturing cells in 3D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provides a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  7. Microscale 3-D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Brendan M.; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard 2-D monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption in high throughput screening (HTS) have been lagging, in part due to the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden pre-polymer solutions into 2-D well-plates is a potential solution, but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which increases cost, makes drug penetration variable and imaging complex. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3-D ‘microgels’ using automated liquid handling systems and standard, non-patterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of ~2.5 mm-diameter microwell with no concerns over evaporation and meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. Cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics were monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrates that 3-D cultures confer chemoresistance, as compared to similar 2-D culture. This data hence, demonstrates the importance of culturing cells in 3-D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provided a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3-D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  8. Development of resazurin-based assay in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strain STIB 900 for the identification of potential anti-trypanosomal agents.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kah Tee; Zahari, Zuriati; Amanah, Azimah; Zainuddin, Zafarina; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2016-03-01

    To accelerate the discovery of novel leads for the treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), it is necessary to have a simple, robust and cost-effective assay to identify positive hits by high throughput whole cell screening. Most of the fluorescence assay was made in black plate however in this study the HTS assay developed in 384-well format using clear plate and black plate, for comparison. The HTS assay developed is simple, sensitive, reliable and reproducible in both types of plates. Assay robustness and reproducibility were determined under the optimized conditions in 384-well plate was well tolerated in the HTS assay, including percentage of coefficient of variation (% CV) of 4.68% and 4.74% in clear and black 384-well plate, signal-to-background ratio (S/B) of 12.75 in clear 384-well plate and 12.07 in black 384-well plate, Z' factor of 0.79 and 0.82 in clear 384-well plate and black 384-well plate, respectively and final concentration of 0.30% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in both types of plate. Drug sensitivity was found to be comparable to the reported anti-trypanosomal assay in 96-well format. The reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay make it compliant to automated liquid handler use in HTS applications. PMID:26772786

  9. Solubilization and bio-conjugation of quantum dots and bacterial toxicity assays by growth curve and plate count.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Nadeau, Jay

    2012-01-01

    previous study, we showed that coupling of antibiotics to CdTe can increase toxicity to bacteria but decrease toxicity to mammalian cells, due to decreased production of reactive oxygen species from the conjugates. Although it is unlikely that cadmium-containing compounds will be approved for use in humans, such preparations could be used for disinfection of surfaces or sterilization of water. In this protocol, we give a straightforward approach to solubilizing CdTe QDs with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The QDs are ready to use within an hour. We then demonstrate coupling to an antimicrobial agent. The second part of the protocol demonstrates a 96-well bacterial inhibition assay using the conjugated and unconjugated QDs. The optical density is read over many hours, permitting the effects of QD addition and light exposure to be evaluated immediately as well as after a recovery period. We also illustrate a colony count for quantifying bacterial survival. PMID:22824953

  10. FIPRONIL EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE COPEPOD (AMPHIASCUS TENUIREMIS) DEVELOPMENT, FERTILITY, AND REPRODUCTION: A RAPID LIFE-CYCLE ASSAY IN 96-WELL MICROPLATE FORMAT. (R827397)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. A Liquid-Based Colorimetric Assay of Lysine Decarboxylase and Its Application to Enzymatic Assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Kim, Hyun Joong; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Yun-Gon; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-12-28

    A liquid-based colorimetric assay using a pH indicator was introduced for high-throughput monitoring of lysine decarboxylase activity. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol purple, measured at 595 nm in liquid reaction mixture, due to an increase of pH by the production of cadaverine. Bromocresol purple was selected as the indicator because it has higher sensitivity than bromothymol blue and pheonol red within a broad range and shows good linearity within the applied pH. We applied this for simple determination of lysine decarboxylase reusability using 96-well plates, and optimization of conditions for enzyme overexpression with different concentrations of IPTG on lysine decarboxylase. This assay is expected to be applied for monitoring and quantifying the liquid-based enzyme reaction in biotransformation of decarboxylase in a high-throughput way. PMID:26282689

  12. Evaluation of microtiter-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the analysis of triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides in rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomes, M.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Triazine and chloroacetanilide concentrations in rainfall samples collected from a 23-state region of the United States were analyzed with microtiter-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thirty-six percent of rainfall samples (2072 out of 5691) were confirmed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to evaluate the operating performance of ELISA as a screening test. Comparison of ELISA to GC/MS results showed that the two ELISA methods accurately reported GC/MS results (m = 1), but with more variability evident with the triazine than with the chloroacetanilide ELISA. Bayes's rule, a standardized method to report the results of screening tests, indicated that the two ELISA methods yielded comparable predictive values (80%), but the triazine ELISA yielded a false- positive rate of 11.8% and the chloroacetanilide ELISA yielded a false- negative rate of 23.1%. The false-positive rate for the triazine ELISA may arise from cross reactivity with an unknown triazine or metabolite. The false-negative rate of the chloroacetanilide ELISA probably resulted from a combination of low sensitivity at the reporting limit of 0.15 ??g/L and a distribution characterized by 75% of the samples at or below the reporting limit of 0.15 ??g/L.Triazine and chloroacetanilide concentrations in rainfall samples collected from a 23-state region of the United States were analyzed with microtiter-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thirty-six percent of rainfall samples (2072 out of 5691) were confirmed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to evaluate the operating performance of ELISA as a screening test. Comparison of ELISA to GC/MS results showed that the two ELISA methods accurately reported GC/MS results (m = 1), but with more variability evident with the triazine than with the chloroacetanilide ELISA. Bayes's rule, a standardized method to report the results of screening tests, indicated that the two ELISA methods yielded comparable predictive

  13. Isothermal microcalorimetry accurately detects bacteria, tumorous microtissues, and parasitic worms in a label-free well-plate assay

    PubMed Central

    Braissant, Olivier; Keiser, Jennifer; Meister, Isabel; Bachmann, Alexander; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Bonkat, Gernot; Wadsö, Ingemar

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is a label-free assay that allows monitoring of enzymatic and metabolic activities. The technique has strengths, but most instruments have a low throughput, which has limited their use for bioassays. Here, an isothermal microcalorimeter, equipped with a vessel holder similar to a 48-well plate, was used. The increased throughput of this microcalorimeter makes it valuable for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our results show that the sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of 3 × 104 bacteria per vial. Growth of P. mirabilis in Luria Broth medium was detected between 2 and 9 h with decreasing inoculum. The culture released 2.1J with a maximum thermal power of 76 μW. The growth rate calculated using calorimetric and spectrophotometric data were 0.60 and 0.57 h–1, respectively. Additional insight on protease activities of P. mirabilis matching the last peak in heat production could be gathered as well. Growth of tumor microtissues releasing a maximum thermal power of 2.1 μW was also monitored and corresponds to a diameter increase of the microtissues from ca. 100 to 428 μm. This opens new research avenues in cancer research, diagnostics, and development of new antitumor drugs. For parasitic worms, the technique allows assessment of parasite survival using motor and metabolic activities even with a single worm. PMID:25511812

  14. Isothermal microcalorimetry accurately detects bacteria, tumorous microtissues, and parasitic worms in a label-free well-plate assay.

    PubMed

    Braissant, Olivier; Keiser, Jennifer; Meister, Isabel; Bachmann, Alexander; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Bonkat, Gernot; Wadsö, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is a label-free assay that allows monitoring of enzymatic and metabolic activities. The technique has strengths, but most instruments have a low throughput, which has limited their use for bioassays. Here, an isothermal microcalorimeter, equipped with a vessel holder similar to a 48-well plate, was used. The increased throughput of this microcalorimeter makes it valuable for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our results show that the sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of 3 × 10(4) bacteria per vial. Growth of P. mirabilis in Luria Broth medium was detected between 2 and 9 h with decreasing inoculum. The culture released 2.1J with a maximum thermal power of 76 μW. The growth rate calculated using calorimetric and spectrophotometric data were 0.60 and 0.57 h(-1) , respectively. Additional insight on protease activities of P. mirabilis matching the last peak in heat production could be gathered as well. Growth of tumor microtissues releasing a maximum thermal power of 2.1 μW was also monitored and corresponds to a diameter increase of the microtissues from ca. 100 to 428 μm. This opens new research avenues in cancer research, diagnostics, and development of new antitumor drugs. For parasitic worms, the technique allows assessment of parasite survival using motor and metabolic activities even with a single worm. PMID:25511812

  15. A Colloidal Stability Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Ali, M Monsur; Yang, Songtao; Dong, Xiaofei; Pelton, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A library of 32 polystyrene copolymer latexes, with diameters ranging between 53 and 387 nm, was used to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput assay using a 96-well microplate platform to measure critical coagulation concentrations, a measure of colloidal stability. The most robust assay involved an automated centrifugation-decantation step to remove latex aggregates before absorbance measurements, eliminating aggregate interference with optical measurements made through the base of the multiwell plates. For smaller nanoparticles (diameter <150 nm), the centrifugation-decantation step was not required as the interference was less than with larger particles. Parallel measurements with a ChemiDoc MP plate scanner gave indications of aggregation; however, the results were less sensitive than the absorbance measurements. PMID:26857643

  16. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  17. A Chromogenic Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Determination of Limit Dextrinase Activity in Barley Malt Extracts.

    PubMed

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Marri, Lucia; Lok, Finn; Hindsgaul, Ole

    2015-12-23

    Twenty-four malt samples were assayed for limit dextrinase activity using a chromogenic assay developed recently in our group. The assay utilizes a small soluble chromogenic substrate which is hydrolyzed selectively by limit dextrinase in a coupled assay to release the chromophore 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol. The release of the chromophore, corresponding to the activity of limit dextrinase, can be followed by measuring the UV absorption at 405 nm. The 24 malt samples represented a wide variation of limit dextrinase activities, and these activities could be clearly differentiated by the assay. The results obtained were comparable with the results obtained from a commercially available assay, Limit-Dextrizyme from Megazyme International Ireland. Furthermore, the improved assay uses a soluble substrate. That makes it well suited for high-throughput screening as it can be handled in a 96-well plate format. PMID:26615836

  18. Novel Fungitoxicity Assays for Inhibition of Germination-Associated Adhesion of Botrytis cinerea and Puccinia recondita Spores

    PubMed Central

    Slawecki, Richard A.; Ryan, Eileen P.; Young, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea and Puccinia recondita spores adhere strongly to polystyrene microtiter plates coincident with germination. We developed assays for inhibition of spore adhesion in 96-well microtiter plates by using sulforhodamine B staining to quantify the adherent spores. In both organisms, fungicides that inhibited germination strongly inhibited spore adhesion, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) comparable to those for inhibition of germination. In contrast, fungicides that acted after germination in B. cinerea inhibited spore adhesion to microtiter plates only at concentrations much higher than their EC50s for inhibition of mycelial growth. Similarly, in P. recondita the ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors myclobutanil and fenbuconazole acted after germination and did not inhibit spore adhesion. The assays provide a rapid, high-throughput alternative to traditional spore germination assays and may be applicable to other fungi. PMID:11823196

  19. Kynetic resazurin assay (KRA) for bacterial quantification of foodborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Yaxal; Mandel, Arkady; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Fast detection of bacterial concentrations is important for the food industry and for healthcare. Early detection of infections and appropriate treatment is essential since, the delay of treatments for bacterial infections tends to be associated with higher mortality rates. In the food industry and in healthcare, standard procedures require the count of colony-forming units in order to quantify bacterial concentrations, however, this method is time consuming and reports require three days to be completed. An alternative is metabolic-colorimetric assays which provide time efficient in vitro bacterial concentrations. A colorimetric assay based on Resazurin was developed as a time kinetic assay (KRA) suitable for bacterial concentration measurements. An optimization was performed by finding excitation and emission wavelengths for fluorescent acquisition. A comparison of two non-related bacteria, foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, was performed in 96 well plates. A metabolic and clonogenic dependence was established for fluorescent kinetic signals.

  20. Quantitation of virus using laser-based scanning of near-infrared fluorophores replaces manual plate reading in a virus titration assay.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Sally K; Mischnick, Shawn L; Urlacher, Teresa M; Ambroz, Kristi L H

    2010-09-01

    A method was developed for quantitation of a virus titration assay for minimally cytopathic and noncytopathic viruses that utilizes laser-based scanning of near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores. This automated method bypasses the need for manual plate reading thus eliminating human bias and error. The image data is translated by LI-COR's Odyssey software into numerical data which is used directly in the virus titer calculations. PMID:20438762

  1. Resazurin Microtiter Assay Plate Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Susceptibilities to Second-Line Drugs: Rapid, Simple, and Inexpensive Method

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anandi; Camacho, Mirtha; Portaels, Françoise; Palomino, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis calls for new, rapid drug susceptibility tests. We have tested 150 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates against the second-line drugs ethionamide, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, and para-aminosalicylic acid by the colorimetric resazurin microtiter assay and the proportion method. By visual reading, MICs were obtained after 8 days. A very good correlation between results by the colorimetric resazurin microtiter assay and the proportion method was obtained. The colorimetric resazurin microtiter assay is inexpensive, rapid, and simple to perform, and implementation of the assay is feasible for low-resource countries. PMID:14576129

  2. A High Sensitivity Micro Format Chemiluminescence Enzyme Inhibition Assay for Determination of Hg(II)

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Kanchanmala; Mishra, Rupesh K.; Bhand, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific enzyme inhibition assay based on alcohol oxidase (AlOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for determination of mercury Hg(II) in water samples has been presented. This article describes the optimization and miniaturization of an enzymatic assay using a chemiluminescence reaction. The analytical performance and detection limit for determination of Hg(II) was optimized in 96 well plates and further extended to 384 well plates with a 10-fold reduction in assay volume. Inhibition of the enzyme activity by dissolved Hg(II) was found to be linear in the range 5–500 pg·mL−1 with 3% CV in inter-batch assay. Due to miniaturization of assay in 384 well plates, Hg(II) was measurable as low as 1 pg·mL−1 within 15 min. About 10-fold more specificity of the developed assay for Hg(II) analysis was confirmed by challenging with interfering divalent metal ions such as cadmium Cd(II) and lead Pb(II). Using the proposed assay we could successfully demonstrate that in a composite mixture of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II), inhibition by each metal ion is significantly enhanced in the presence of the others. Applicability of the proposed assay for the determination of the Hg(II) in spiked drinking and sea water resulted in recoveries ranging from 100–110.52%. PMID:22163555

  3. Layer plate CAS assay for the quantitation of siderophore production and determination of exudation patterns for fungi.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-02-01

    The chrome azurol S (CAS) assay measures the chelating activity of siderophores, but its application (especially to fungi) is limited by toxicity issues. In this note, we describe a modified version of the CAS assay that is suitable for quantifying siderophore exudation for microorganisms, including fungi. PMID:26712125

  4. Colorimetric assay of blood coagulation factor XIII in plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, K N; Birckbichler, P J; Patterson, M K

    1988-05-01

    In this new colorimetric assay for Factor XIII in plasma, 5-(biotinamido)pentylamine is used as the amine substrate. Factor XIII, a zymogen, is transformed by thrombin and Ca2+ to active Factor XIIIa, and the incorporation of 5-(biotinamido)pentylamine into N,N-dimethylcasein is used to measure catalytically active Factor XIIIa. The biotinylated enzymatic product is immobilized onto 96-well microtiter plates, complexed with streptavidin-beta-galactosidase, and the absorbance at 405 nm is monitored for production of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside. Concentrations of N,N-dimethylcasein, 5-(biotinamido)pentylamine, Ca2+, and thrombin were chosen to allow near-maximum velocity of amine incorporation. A linear relationship was obtained between assay product and plasma volume, from 0.5 to 50 microL of plasma. Results correlated well (r greater than 0.924) with those from the most frequently utilized radiometric filter-paper assay for Factor XIII. The method appears to be ideal for routine diagnostic estimation of Factor XIII in plasma because of its simplicity, its lack of use of radioisotopes, and its potential for assay of large numbers of samples by use of microtiter plates and automated plate readers. PMID:2897256

  5. Development of a high-throughput purification method and a continuous assay system for chlorophyllase.

    PubMed

    Arkus, Kiani A J; Jez, Joseph M

    2006-06-01

    In the degradation of chlorophyll, chlorophyllase catalyzes the initial hydrolysis of the phytol moiety from the pigment. Since chlorophyll degradation is a defining feature of plant senescence, compounds inhibiting chlorophyllase activity may delay senescence, thereby improving shelf life and appearance of plant products. Here we describe the development of a 96-well plate-based purification and assay system for measuring chlorophyllase activity. Integrated lysis and immobilized metal affinity chromatography plates were used for purifying recombinant hexahistidine-tagged Triticum aestivum (wheat) chlorophyllase from Escherichia coli. Chlorophyllase assays using chlorophyll as a substrate showed that the immobilized fusion protein displayed kinetic parameters similar to those of recombinant enzyme purified by affinity chromatography; however, the need to extract reaction products from a multiwell plate limits the value of this assay for high-throughput screening applications. Replacing chlorophyll with p-nitrophenyl-ester substrates eliminates the extraction step and allows for continuous measurement of chlorophyllase activity in a multiwell plate format. Determination of steady state kinetic constants, pH rate profile, the inhibitory effects of metal ions and esterase inhibitors, and the effect of functional group-modifying reagents validated the utility of the plate-based system. The combined purification and assay system provides a convenient and rapid method for the assessment of chlorophyllase activity. PMID:16643837

  6. High-throughput radiometric CYP2C19 inhibition assay using tritiated (S)-mephenytoin.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Annalise; Cellucci, Antonella; Chaudhary, Ashok; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Laufer, Ralph

    2007-10-01

    A rapid and sensitive radiometric assay for assessing the potential of drugs to inhibit cytochrome P450 (P450) 2C19 in human liver microsomes is described. The new assay, which does not require high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation or mass spectrometric detection, is based on the release of tritium as tritiated water that occurs upon CYP2C19-mediated 4'-hydroxylation of (S)-mephenytoin labeled with tritium in the 4' position. Because this reaction is subject to an NIH shift, tritium was also introduced into the 3'- and 5'-positions of the tracer to enhance formation of a tritiated water product. Tritiated water was separated from the substrate using 96-well solid-phase extraction plates. The reaction is NADPH-dependent and sensitive to CYP2C19 inhibitors. IC(50) values for 15 diverse drugs differed less than 2.5-fold from those determined by quantification of the unlabeled 4'-hydroxy-(S)-mephenytoin product, using HPLC coupled to mass spectrometric detection. All of the steps of the new assay, namely incubation, product separation, and radioactivity counting, are performed in a 96-well format and can be automated. This assay represents a non-HPLC, high-throughput version of the classic (S)-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation assay, which is the most widely used method to assess the potential for CYP2C19 inhibition of new chemical entities. PMID:17600081

  7. Semi-microdroplet assay for cell adhesion molecules. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, Lawrence Shinzo

    1988-01-01

    A new cell-to-cell adhesion assay was devised. Using dissociated embryos of the sea urchin, this procedure involves rotating a 0.100 ml suspension of single cells with 0.100 ml of the solution to be tested in the bulb portion of a transfer pipet with the tip removed. After 1 hour of rotation at 60 rpm at 15 C, the contents of each bulb were transferred into individual wells of a 96 well flat bottom plate. After the plate was incubated for 1 hour at 15 C, black and white photographs were taken with a 35 mm camera attached to an inverted photomicroscope. Examining a proof sheet of the negatives directly allowed a rapid evaluation of suspected cell adhesion promoting factors. A ranking system was used to evaluate all samples. The assay was tested by examining the effect of specific solutions on the aggregation of single cells obtained from dissociated 23 hour embryos.

  8. Development of fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assays: choice of appropriate instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, David J.; Alder, Elisabeth; Fan, Yi-Hong; McKeegan, Evelyn; Warrior, Usha; Beutel, Bruce

    1998-04-01

    Fluorescence-based assays have become increasingly popular in high throughput screening for a variety of reasons (e.g. sensitivity). However, new screening technologies are pushing the limits of conventional fluorescence plate readers. For example, instruments that have optical sensitivities beyond most of the commercially available plate readers are required to reproducibly measure the fluorescence generated by the green fluorescent protein (GFP)--a novel reporter gene. Also, miniaturization of screening formats (with densities higher than the conventional 96-well plate) requires high resolution instrumentation to measure fluorescence. Several assays based on optical fluorescence measurements have been developed and screened in our Biological Screening group. These assays include various fluorescence-based protease assays (standard end-point and kinetic modes) and a functional cell-based screen using the green fluorescent protein as a reporter gene. The choice of instrumentation was the critical factor in the performance and success of each of these arrays. Data will be presented for the cell- based reporter assay including the type of instrumentation (fluorescence plate readers; fluorescence imaging systems) used for detection of GFP fluorescence.

  9. Real-time thermal imaging of microwave accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF) based assays on sapphire plates.

    PubMed

    Previte, Michael J R; Zhang, Yongxia; Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we describe an optical geometry that facilitates our further characterization of the temperature changes above silver island films (SiFs) on sapphire plates, when exposed to microwave radiation. Since sapphire transmits IR, we designed an optical scheme to capture real-time temperature images of a thin water film on sapphire plates with and without SiFs during the application of a short microwave pulse. Using this optical scheme, we can accurately determine the temperature profile of solvents in proximity to metal structures when exposed to microwave irradiation. We believe that this optical scheme will provide us with a basis for further studies in designing metal structures to further improve plasmonic-fluorescence clinical sensing applications, such as those used in microwave accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF). PMID:17902038

  10. High-throughput micro-plate HCL-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum contains tannin which is a phenolic compound that offers health promoting antioxidant capacity. The HCl-vanillin assay is a common and time consuming method for determining tannin content, but is not efficient for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeding ...

  11. A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BOISE, IDAHO, AMBIENT AIR FINE PARTICLE SAMPLES USING THE PLATE AND MICROSUSPENSION SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study is to characterize the genotoxic potential of the ambient air aerosols collected within an air shed impacted primarily by wood smoke and automotive emissions. The study also examines the relative merits of a microsuspension assay and the standa...

  12. Whole-cell microtiter plate screening assay for terminal hydroxylation of fatty acids by P450s.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Martin J; Notonier, Sandra; Lang, Sarah-Luise; Otte, Konrad B; Herter, Susanne; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    A readily available galactose oxidase (GOase) variant was used to develop a whole cell screening assay. This endpoint detection system was applied in a proof-of-concept approach by screening a focussed mutant library. This led to the discovery of the thus far most active P450 Marinobacter aquaeolei mutant catalysing the terminal hydroxylation of fatty acids. PMID:27074906

  13. A Miniaturized Glycan Microarray Assay for Assessing Avidity and Specificity of Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; de Vries, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinins recognize sialic acids on the cell surface as functional receptors to gain entry into cells. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir for IAV, but IAV can cross the species barrier to poultry, swine, horses and humans. Avian viruses recognize sialic acid attached to a penultimate galactose by a α2-3 linkage (avian-type receptors) whereas human viruses preferentially recognize sialic acid with a α2-6 linkage (human-type receptors). To monitor if avian viruses are adapting to human type receptors, several methods can be used. Glycan microarrays with diverse libraries of synthetic sialosides are increasingly used to evaluate receptor specificity. However, this technique is not used for measuring avidities. Measurement of avidity is typically achieved by evaluating the binding of serially diluted hemagglutinin or virus to glycans adsorbed to conventional polypropylene 96-well plates. In this assay, glycans with α2-3 or α2-6 sialic acids are coupled to biotin and adsorbed to streptavidin plates, or are coupled to polyacrylamide (PAA) which directly adsorb to the plastic. We have significantly miniaturized this assay by directly printing PAA-linked sialosides and their non PAA-linked counterparts on micro-well glass slides. This set-up, with 48 arrays on a single slide, enables simultaneous assays of 6 glycan binding proteins at 8 dilutions, interrogating 6 different glycans, including two non-sialylated controls. This is equivalent to 18x 96-well plates in the traditional plate assay. The glycan array format decreases consumption of compounds and biologicals and thus greatly enhances efficiency. PMID:27284789

  14. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, L.J.; Dayton, B.D.; Moore, M.L.; Shu, A.Y.; Heys, J.R.; Meek, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources.

  15. Development of a microtitre plate-based assay for lipid-linked glycosyltransferase products using the mycobacterial cell wall rhamnosyltransferase WbbL.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewicz, Anna E; Ma, Yufang; Jones, Victoria; Crick, Dean; Liav, Avraham; McNeil, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis a rhamnosyltransferase (WbbL) catalyses the transfer of an alpha-L-Rhap residue from dTDP-L-rhamnose (dTDP-Rha) to decaprenyldiphosphoryl-alpha-D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc-P-P-DP) to form alpha-L-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-D-GlcNAc-P-P-DP, which is then further elongated with Galf and Araf units, and finally mycolylated and attached to the peptidoglycan. This enzyme is essential for M. tuberculosis viability and at the same time absent in eukaryotic cells, and is therefore a good target for the development of new antituberculosis therapeutics. Here, we report a microtitre plate-based method for the assay of this enzyme using a crude membrane preparation from an Escherichia coli strain overexpressing wbbL as an enzyme source and the natural acceptor substrate GlcNAc-P-P-DP. Initial characterization of the enzyme included unequivocal identification of the product Rha-GlcNAc-P-P-DP by liquid chromatography (LC)-MS, and the facts that WbbL shows an absolute requirement for divalent cations and that its activity is stimulated by beta-mercaptoethanol. Its pH optimum and basic kinetic parameters were also determined, and the kinetic analysis showed that WbbL uses a ternary complex mechanism. The microtitre plate-based assay for this enzyme was developed by taking advantage of the lipophilic nature of the product. This assay should be readily transferable to other glycosyltransferases which use lipid-based acceptors and aid greatly in obtaining inhibitors of such glycosyltransferases for new drug development. PMID:19047740

  16. A rapid, efficient and sensitive plate assay for detection and screening of l-asparaginase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Richi V; Saran, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajendra K; Srivastava, Ayush K

    2013-04-01

    l-Asparaginase-producing microbes are conventionally screened on phenol red l-asparagine-containing plates. However, sometimes the contrast of the zone obtained (between yellow and pink) is not very sharp and distinct. In the present investigation, an improved method for screening of the microorganisms producing extracellular l-asparaginase is reported wherein bromothymol blue (BTB) is incorporated as pH indicator in l-asparagine-containing medium instead of phenol red. Plates containing BTB at acidic pH are yellow and turn dark blue at alkaline pH. Thus, a dense dark blue zone is formed around microbial colonies producing l-asparaginase, differentiating between enzyme producers and non-producers. The present method is more sensitive and accurate than the conventional method for screening of both fungi and bacteria producing extracellular l-asparaginase. Furthermore, BTB gives a transient green colour at neutral pH (7.0) and dark blue colour at higher pH 8.0-9.0, indicating the potency of the microorganism for l-asparaginase production. PMID:23398626

  17. High Throughput Danio Rerio Energy Expenditure Assay.

    PubMed

    Williams, Savannah Y; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are an important model organism with inherent advantages that have the potential to make zebrafish a widely applied model for the study of energy homeostasis and obesity. The small size of zebrafish allows for assays on embryos to be conducted in a 96- or 384-well plate format, Morpholino and CRISPR based technologies promote ease of genetic manipulation, and drug treatment by bath application is viable. Moreover, zebrafish are ideal for forward genetic screens allowing for novel gene discovery. Given the relative novelty of zebrafish as a model for obesity, it is necessary to develop tools that fully exploit these benefits. Herein, we describe a method to measure energy expenditure in thousands of embryonic zebrafish simultaneously. We have developed a whole animal microplate platform in which we use 96-well plates to isolate individual fish and we assess cumulative NADH2 production using the commercially available cell culture viability reagent alamarBlue. In poikilotherms the relationship between NADH2 production and energy expenditure is tightly linked. This energy expenditure assay creates the potential to rapidly screen pharmacological or genetic manipulations that directly alter energy expenditure or alter the response to an applied drug (e.g. insulin sensitizers). PMID:26863590

  18. Determination of the HIV integrase inhibitor, MK-0518 (raltegravir), in human plasma using 96-well liquid-liquid extraction and HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Merschman, S A; Vallano, P T; Wenning, L A; Matuszewski, B K; Woolf, E J

    2007-09-15

    An HPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of MK-0518 (raltegravir), an HIV integrase inhibitor, in human plasma over the concentration range of 2-1000 ng/mL. Stable isotope labeled (13)C(6)-MK-0518 was used as an internal standard. The sample preparation procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction with hexane:methylene chloride in the 96-well format with a 200 microL plasma sample size. The compounds were chromatographed on an Ace C(18) (50 x 3.0 mm, 3 microm, titanium frits) column with 42.5/57.5 (v/v %) 0.1mM EDTA in 0.1% formic acid/methanol mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion pairs for MK-0518 (m/z 445-->109) and (13)C(6)-MK-0518 (m/z 451-->367) on an Applied Biosystem API 4000 HPLC-MS/MS was used for quantitation. Intraday precision of standard curve concentrations in five different lots of control plasma was within 3.2%, while accuracy ranged from 94.8 to 106.8%. The mean extraction recovery of spiked plasma samples was 87%. Quality control (QC) samples were stored at -20 degrees C. Initial within day analysis showed QC accuracy within 7.5% of nominal with precision of 3.1% or less. The plasma QC samples were demonstrated to be stable for up to 23 months at -20 degrees C. The method described has been used to support over 18 clinical studies during Phase I through III of clinical development. PMID:17644453

  19. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR

    PubMed Central

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the proform of the nerve growth factor (proNGF) is crucial for eliminating superfluous cells during neuronal development it also promotes apoptosis following brain trauma and neuronal injury. The apoptotic signal is elicited upon formation of a trimeric receptor complex also containing the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75NTR in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making use of a pair of FRET standard constructs. As a result, the effect of proNGF on the interaction between sortilin and p75NTR can be evaluated in live cells allowing for screening and selection of therapeutic compounds interfering with proNGF-induced cell death. PMID:26823987

  20. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR).

    PubMed

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the proform of the nerve growth factor (proNGF) is crucial for eliminating superfluous cells during neuronal development it also promotes apoptosis following brain trauma and neuronal injury. The apoptotic signal is elicited upon formation of a trimeric receptor complex also containing the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75(NTR) in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making use of a pair of FRET standard constructs. As a result, the effect of proNGF on the interaction between sortilin and p75(NTR) can be evaluated in live cells allowing for screening and selection of therapeutic compounds interfering with proNGF-induced cell death. PMID:26823987

  1. Development and Comparative Evaluation of a Plate Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant Outer Membrane Antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  2. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for rubella immunoglobulin G: new method for attachment of antigens to microtiter plates.

    PubMed Central

    Skurrie, I J; Gilbert, G L

    1983-01-01

    Many of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques previously described for detection of rubella-specific antibodies employ complex technology not available in routine diagnostic laboratories. The method described allows the use of commercially available rubella hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antigen. Passive adsorption of these antigens to plastic is variable, but with the use of albumin as a bridge, it is possible to attach the antigen reliably to the plastic wells. Over 1,500 sera were tested by both HI and ELISA techniques to detect the presence of rubella antibodies. These sera were selected with a bias towards those with low levels of rubella-specific antibody, since it has been demonstrated that it is in this range that discrepancies are more likely to occur between HI and ELISA techniques. In 99% of the sera tested, the results of both techniques were in agreement. On the basis of these results, the technique offers a useful alternative to the routine rubella HI test and other ELISA techniques which need sophisticated antigen preparations. PMID:6863497

  3. Label-free cytotoxicity screening assay by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Jonas; Shaffer, Etienne; Mena, Julien; Breton, Billy; Parent, Jérôme; Rappaz, Benjamin; Chambon, Marc; Emery, Yves; Magistretti, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Marquet, Pierre; Turcatti, Gerardo

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a label-free technology based on digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with applicability for screening by imaging, and we demonstrate its capability for cytotoxicity assessment using mammalian living cells. For this first high content screening compatible application, we automatized a digital holographic microscope for image acquisition of cells using commercially available 96-well plates. Data generated through both label-free DHM imaging and fluorescence-based methods were in good agreement for cell viability identification and a Z'-factor close to 0.9 was determined, validating the robustness of DHM assay for phenotypic screening. Further, an excellent correlation was obtained between experimental cytotoxicity dose-response curves and known IC50 values for different toxic compounds. For comparable results, DHM has the major advantages of being label free and close to an order of magnitude faster than automated standard fluorescence microscopy. PMID:23062077

  4. Microfluidic System for Automated Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip J; Ghorashian, Navid; Gaige, Terry A; Hung, Paul J

    2007-12-01

    Microfluidic cell culture is a promising technology for applications in the drug screening industry. Key benefits include improved biological function, higher quality cell-based data, reduced reagent consumption, and lower cost. In this work, we demonstrate how a microfluidic cell culture design was adapted to be compatible with the standard 96-well plate format. Key design features include the elimination of tubing and connectors, the ability to maintain long term continuous perfusion cell culture using a passive gravity driven pump, and direct analysis on the outlet wells of the microfluidic plate. A single microfluidic culture plate contained 8 independent flow units, each with 10(4) cells at a flow rate of 50 μl/day (6 minute residence time). The cytotoxicity of the anti-cancer drug etoposide was measured on HeLa cells cultured in this format, using a commercial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) plate reader assay. The integration of microfluidic cell culture methods with commercial automation capabilities offers an exciting opportunity for improved cell-based screening. PMID:18172509

  5. A comparison of titers of anti-Brucella antibodies of naturally infected and healthy vaccinated cattle by standard tube agglutination test, microtiter plate agglutination test, indirect hemagglutination assay, and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anju; Saxena, Hari Mohan; Malhotra, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We determined the antibody response in cattle naturally infected with brucellosis and normal healthy adult cattle vaccinated during calf hood with strain 19. Materials and Methods: The antibody titers were measured by standard tube agglutination test (STAT), microtiter plate agglutination test (MAT), indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) as per standard protocols. Results: The mean STAT titers were 1.963±0.345 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was extremely significant (p<0.0001). The mean MAT titers were 2.244±0.727 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was very significant (p<0.005). The mean IHA titers in infected cattle were 2.284±0.574, and those in healthy vaccinated cattle were 1.200±0.155. The difference was extremely significant (p=0.0002). However, the difference in mean iELISA titers of infected cattle (1.3678±0.014) and healthy vaccinated cattle (1.367±0.014) was non-significant. The infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. However, it cannot be ascertained whether these antibodies are due to vaccine or response to infection. Since the infected animals had been vaccinated earlier, the current infection may suggest that vaccination was unable to induce protective levels of antibody. The heightened antibody response after infection may also indicate a secondary immune response to the antigens common to the vaccine strain and wild Brucella organisms. Conclusion: The brucellosis infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. PMID:27536032

  6. Development of a multi-product leached protein A assay for bioprocess samples containing recombinant human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ren, Diya; Darlucio, Maria R; Chou, Judy H

    2011-03-01

    The detection of low level of protein A leached from monoclonal antibody downstream purification process is often interfered by the presence of excess amount of product antibody. In order to prevent this interference, we developed a new multi-product leached protein A assay that used acidification to completely dissociate the IgG-ProteinA complex, followed by neutralization under selected condition to prevent re-formation of the IgG-ProteinA complex. The amount of protein A was then determined by a sandwich immunoassay using Meso Scale Discovery technology. The assay takes approximately 3h to complete for one 96-well plate of samples, and this has been successfully applied to samples containing different monoclonal antibody products examined so far. The data demonstrates that this assay is robust and efficient in determining leached protein A contamination during purification of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. PMID:21315722

  7. Expression, essentiality, and a microtiter plate assay for mycobacterial GlmU, the bifunctional glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyltransferase and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Jones, Victoria C.; Scherman, Michael S.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean; Bhamidi, Suresh; Xin, Yi; McNeil, Michael R.; Ma, Yufang

    2008-01-01

    UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) is an essential precursor of peptidoglycan and the rhamnose-GlcNAc linker region of mycobacterial cell wall. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv genome, Rv1018c shows strong homology to the GlmU protein involved in the formation of UDP-GlcNAc from other bacteria. GlmU is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes two sequential steps in UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis. Glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyl transferase catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate, and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase catalyzes the formation of UDP-GlcNAc. Since inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis often results in cell lysis, M. tuberculosis GlmU is a potential anti-tuberculosis drug target. In this study we cloned M. tuberculosis Rv1018c (glmU gene) and expressed soluble GlmU protein in E. coli BL21(DE3). Enzymatic assays showed that M. tuberculosis GlmU protein exhibits both glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyltransferase and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase activities. We also investigated the effect on Mycobacterium smegmatis when the activity of GlmU is fully removed or reduced via a genetic approach. The results showed that activity of GlmU is required for growth of M. smegmatis as the bacteria did not grow in the absence of active GlmU enzyme. As the amount of functional GlmU enzyme was gradually reduced in a temperature shift experiment, the M. smegmatis cells became non-viable and their morphology changed from a normal rod shape to stubby-rounded morphology and in some cases they lysed. Finally a microtiter plate based assay for GlmU activity with an OD340 read out was developed. These studies therefore support the further development of M. tuberculosis GlmU enzyme as a target for new anti-tuberculosis drugs. PMID:18573680

  8. Chromogenic nitrophenolate-based substrates for light-driven hybrid P450 BM3 enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    Lam, Quan; Cortez, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Truc; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The incorporation of a p-nitrophenoxy moiety in substrates has enabled the development of colorimetric assays to rapidly screen for O-demethylation activity of P450 enzymes. For the light-driven hybrid P450 BM3 enzymes, where a Ru(II) photosensitizer powers the enzyme upon visible light irradiation, we have investigated a family of p-nitrophenoxy derivatives as useful chromogenic substrates compatible with the light-driven approach. The validation of this assay and its adaptability to a 96-well plate format will enable the screening of the next generation of hybrid P450 BM3 enzymes towards C-H bond functionalization of non-natural substrates. PMID:26712653

  9. Evaluation of high-throughput assays for in vitro drug susceptibility testing of Tritrichomonas foetus trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Bader, Chris; Jesudoss Chelladurai, Jeba; Thompson, Kylie; Hall, Cindy; Carlson, Steve A; Brewer, Matthew T

    2016-06-15

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a sexually transmitted protozoan parasite that causes abortions in cattle and results in severe economic losses. In the United States, there are no safe and effective treatments for this parasite and infected animals are typically culled. In order to expedite drug discovery efforts, we investigated in vitro trophozoite killing assays amenable to high-throughput screening in 96 well plate formats. We evaluated the reduction of resorufin, incorporation of propidium iodide, and a luminescence-based ATP detection assay. Of these methods, reduction of resorufin was found to be the most reliable predictor of trophozoite concentrations. We further validated this method by conducting dose-response experiments suitable for calculation of EC50 values for two established compounds with known activity against trophozoites in vitro, namely, metronidazole and ronidazole. Our results demonstrate that the resorufin method is suitable for high-throughput screening and could be used to enhance efforts targeting new treatments for bovine trichomoniasis. PMID:27198774

  10. In situ screening assay for cell viability using a dimeric cyanine nucleic acid stain.

    PubMed

    Becker, B; Clapper, J; Harkins, K R; Olson, J A

    1994-08-15

    A rapid and sensitive assay is described for the determination of cell viability of adherent and nonadherent cells that can be performed in situ in 96-well microtiter plates using fluorescence plate scanners. The assay, based on dye exclusion, utilizes a plasma membrane-impermeable, dimeric cyanine dye (YOYO-1). YOYO-1 fluoresces brightly only when bound to nucleic acids. Cells are incubated with YOYO-1, and fluorescence is measured before and after the addition of detergent, which allows the dye to enter the cells. The fluorescence before detergent treatment originates from nonviable cells that have membrane damage and take up YOYO-1. The fluorescence after detergent treatment originates from all cells in the sample. The ratio of the two fluorescence values is used as an indicator of cell viability. The cell viability results of this microplate assay closely resemble those of dye exclusion studies by flow cytometry and are similar but not identical to those of the thiazolyl blue assay, which uses a metabolic indicator of cell death. Because the assay can be performed in situ, without removing the medium, disintegrated cells, cell aggregates, and cells that stick to culture vessel walls are all included in the measurement. PMID:7527190

  11. Alteration of the aPA ELISA by UV exposure of polystyrene microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J S; Wagenknecht, D R; McIntyre, J A

    1996-01-01

    Interlaboratory inconsistencies in antiphospholipid antibody (aPA) solid phase assays have prompted controversy in clinical laboratory testing for aPA. We found that the aPA ELISA can be influenced by the type of microtiter plate utilized and by the conditions in which the plates are stored. By exposing 96-well, flat-bottom polystyrene microtiter plates to short wave UV light (254 nm), the aPA ELISA signal decreased in a UV dose-dependent manner. No effect was seen with long wave UV light (366 nm). These results were independent of the antibody isotype under study or the phospholipid (PL) antigen used: anionic phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL), or zwitterionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Purified human beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2 GPI), a known cofactor for anionic PL, and rabbit anti-beta 2 GPI antisera were used to demonstrate that beta 2 GPI bound equally to UV treated and untreated microtiter plates. In contrast, recognition of beta 2 GPI on an anionic PL surface was decreased on UV treated plates, suggesting that UV exposure alters the lipid binding properties of the microliter plate. To determine whether UV exposure inhibited PL binding directly or caused a change in the way the PL was bound, the amount of PL bound to UV treated and untreated plates was measured by using fluorescent labeled PS and a fluorimeter. PS binding was decreased by 53% in UV treated wells as compared to untreated wells. These data show that short wave UV exposure reduces PL binding to polystyrene microtiter plates, thereby reducing the amount of beta 2 GPI bound to PL coated ELISA plates. Thus by using UV exposed microtiter plates, decreased or false-negative a PA ELISA results may be obtained for aPA positive plasmas. PMID:8887002

  12. Improved assay for measuring heparin binding to bull sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Ax, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of heparin to sperm has been used to study capacitation and to rank relative fertility of bulls. Previous binding assays were laborious, used 10/sup 7/ sperm per assay point, and required large amounts of radiolabeled heparin. A modified heparin-binding assay is described that used only 5 x 10/sup 4/ cells per incubation well and required reduced amounts of (/sup 3/H) heparin. The assay was performed in 96-well Millititer plates, enabling easy incubation and filtering. Dissociation constants and concentrations of binding sites did not differ if analyzed by Scatchard plots, Woolf plots, or by log-logit transformed weighted nonlinear least squares regression, except in the case of outliers. In such cases, Scatchard analysis was more sensitive to outliers. Nonspecific binding was insignificant using nonlinear logistic fit regression and a proportion graph. The effects were tested of multiple free-thawing of sperm in either a commercial egg yolk extender, 40 mM Tris buffer with 8% glycerol, or 40 mM Tris buffer without glycerol. Freeze-thawing in extender did not affect the dissociation constant or the concentration of binding sites. However, freeze-thawing three times in 40 mM Tris reduced the concentration of binding sites and lowered the dissociation constant (raised the affinity). The inclusion of glycerol in the 40 mM Tris did not significantly affect the estimated dissociation constant or the concentration of binding sites as compared to 40 mM Tris without glycerol.

  13. Detection of miRNA Targets in High-throughput Using the 3'LIFE Assay.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Justin M; Kotagama, Kasuen; Babb, Cody S; Mangone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Luminescent Identification of Functional Elements in 3'UTRs (3'LIFE) allows the rapid identification of targets of specific miRNAs within an array of hundreds of queried 3'UTRs. Target identification is based on the dual-luciferase assay, which detects binding at the mRNA level by measuring translational output, giving a functional readout of miRNA targeting. 3'LIFE uses non-proprietary buffers and reagents, and publically available reporter libraries, making genome-wide screens feasible and cost-effective. 3'LIFE can be performed either in a standard lab setting or scaled up using liquid handling robots and other high-throughput instrumentation. We illustrate the approach using a dataset of human 3'UTRs cloned in 96-well plates, and two test miRNAs, let-7c and miR-10b. We demonstrate how to perform DNA preparation, transfection, cell culture and luciferase assays in 96-well format, and provide tools for data analysis. In conclusion 3'LIFE is highly reproducible, rapid, systematic, and identifies high confidence targets. PMID:26066857

  14. A rapid assay for assessment of sphingosine kinase inhibitors and substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kharel, Yugesh; Mathews, Thomas P.; Kennedy, Andrew J.; Houck, Joseph D.; Macdonald, Timohy L.; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases catalyze the transfer of phosphate from ATP to sphingosine to generate sphingosine 1-phosphate, an important bioactive lipid molecule that mediates a diverse range of cell signaling processes. The conventional assay of sphingosine kinase enzymatic activity uses [γ-32P]ATP and sphingosine as substrates with the radiolabeled S1P product recovered by organic extraction, displayed by thin-layer chromatography and quantified by liquid scintillation counting. While this assay is sensitive and accurate, it is slow and labor intensive and thus precludes the simultaneous screening of more than a few inhibitor compounds. Herein we describe a 96 well assay for sphingosine kinases that is rapid and reproducible. Our method, which takes advantage of the limited solubility of S1P, detects radioactive S1P adhering to the plate by scintillation proximity counting. Our procedure obviates extraction into organic solvents, post-reaction transfers and chromatography. Further, our assay enables assessment of both inhibitors and substrates, and can detect endogenous sphingosine kinase activity in cell and tissue extracts. The sphingosine kinase kinetic parameter, Km, and the Ki values of inhibitors determined with our assay and the conventional assay were indistinguishable. These results document that our assay is well suited for the screening of chemical libraries of sphingosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:21216217

  15. High-throughput quantitation of metabolically labeled anionic glycoconjugates by scintillation proximity assay utilizing binding to cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rees-Milton, Karen J; Anastassiades, Tassos P

    2006-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative methods suited to a large number of samples are required for studies into the determination of disease etiology and in the evaluation of drugs and biological agents. This chapter describes an assay for anionic glycoconjugates (GCs), including glycosaminoglycans, which are major gene products of chondrocytes appearing in the extracellular matrix. The assay utilizes the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate and carboxyl groups of anionic GCs synthesized and secreted by chondrocytes with the cationic dye Alcian blue, immobilized to scintillant-coated 96-well plates. Metabolic labeling with D-[1, 6-3H (N)]-glucosamine allows all anionic GCs, including cartilage-specific and hyperglycosylated variants of fibronectin, to be quantitated. If Na235SO4 is used for the metabolic labeling instead, only glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans will be quantitated. The samples are counted using a multi-detector instrument for scintillation proximity assays, such as the Wallac 1450 Microbeta Trilux, designed for detection of samples in 96-well plates and, as such, can be a high-throughput system. The bound anionic GCs can be visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after quantitation by elution with denaturing buffers. The method can be modified to include predigestion of the sample with a specific lyase, e.g., chondroitinase ABC or testicular hyaluronidase. To separate polyanions from other digested material after ethanol precipitation, the sample can be assayed as described in this chapter for a particular subtype of anionic GC. This assay addresses the need for high-throughput applications in arthritis and other medical and biological problems. PMID:17072016

  16. Cell lysis with dimethyl sulphoxide produces stable homogeneous solutions in the dichlorofluorescein oxidative stress assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guqi; Gong, Yu; Burczynski, Frank J; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2008-05-01

    The oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, DCFH) to a fluorescent product, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), is commonly used to quantitatively measure oxidative stress in cells using a fluorescence microplate reader. However, many cell lines tend to grow non-uniformly in the wells. This non-uniform distribution results in a high degree of variability in the fluorescence signal and decreases the precision of the method. Also, samples treated in large culture plates, dishes or flasks cannot be assayed directly in fluorescence microplate readers. This study reports an improved DCF assay method that lyses cells with DMSO/PBS (90% dimethyl sulphoxide/10% phosphate buffered saline). Oxidative stress was induced with either hydrogen peroxide or an hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment. Cell lysis with DMSO/PBS resulted in highly stable fluorescence signals in comparison to Triton X-100/PBS lysed cells. The precision of DCF fluorescence measurements of DMSO/PBS lysed cells was much better than for attached cells measured directly in 96-well plates. While DCF fluorescence in PBS was strongly quenched by albumin, no quenching occurred in DMSO/PBS. In conclusion this study describes a more convenient and accurate method for measuring cellular oxidative stress that also makes it possible to assay cells treated in large culture plates. PMID:18484276

  17. A simple micro-growth assay for enumerating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Jeffrey D

    2003-04-01

    A simple method for nonspecific determination of bacteria concentrations in a variety of liquid samples was developed. The assay was based on the time required for a sample grown in liquid media to reach a threshold turbidity. Samples were combined with media in a covered 96-well microwell plate and the turbidity was monitored in real time as the bacteria grew in a temperature-controlled plate reader. A significant problem with growth in microwells was condensation on the cover, which prevented accurate turbidity measurement. This problem was overcome by coating the cover with a small amount of surface-active agent. Salmonella and E. coli concentrations could be determined with a relative error of approximately 20% at levels from 10 to 10(6) cells/ml (eight replicates). An assay of 10 samples with standards required 10 min to set up and 20 min for data processing using a computer spreadsheet program. Growth time at 37 degrees C ranged from 4 h for samples at 10(7) cells/ml to 16 h for samples at 10 cells/ml. PMID:12609726

  18. Development of a Multiplex Assay for Studying Functional Selectivity of Human Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors and Identification of Active Compounds by High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alba; Lage, Sonia; Cadavid, Maria Isabel; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist as collections of conformations in equilibrium, and the efficacy of drugs has been proposed to be associated with their absolute and relative affinities for these different conformations. The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor regulates multiple physiological functions, is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and serves as an important target of atypical antipsychotic drugs. This receptor was one of the first GPCRs for which the functional selectivity phenomenon was observed, with its various ligands exerting differential effects on the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. We aimed to develop a multiplex functional assay in 96-well plates for the simultaneous measurement of the PLA2 and PLC pathways coupled to 5-HT2A receptors; this approach enables the detection of either functional selectivity or cooperativity phenomena in early drug screening stages. The suitability of the method for running screening campaigns was tested using the Prestwick Chemical Library, and 22 confirmed hits with activities of more than 90% were identified; 11 of these hits produced statistically significant differences between the two effector pathways. Thus, we have developed a miniaturized multiplex assay in 96-well plates to measure functional selectivity for 5-HT2A receptors in the early stages of the drug discovery process. PMID:27095818

  19. Development of a no-wash assay for mitochondrial membrane potential using the styryl dye DASPEI.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian H R; Rekling, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several diseases and may also result from drugs with unwanted side effects on mitochondrial biochemistry. The mitochondrial membrane potential is a good indicator of mitochondrial function. Here, the authors have developed a no-wash mitochondrial membrane potential assay using 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI), a rarely used mitochondrial potentiometric probe, in a 96-well format using a fluorescent plate reader. The assay was validated using 2 protonophores (CCCP, DNP), which are known uncouplers, and the neuroleptic thioridazine, which is a suspected mitochondrial toxicant. CCCP and DNP have short-term depolarizing effects, and thioridazine has long-term hyperpolarizing effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The assay also detected changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential in CHO cells exposed to cobalt (mimicking hypoxia) and in PC12 cells exposed to amyloid β, demonstrating that the assay can be used in cellular models of hypoxia and Alzheimer's disease. The assay needs no washing steps, has a Z' value >0.5, can be used on standard fluorometers, has good post liquid-handling stability, and thus is suitable for large-scale screening efforts. In summary, the DASPEI assay is simple and rapid and may be of use in toxicological testing, drug target discovery, and mechanistic models of diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:20713988

  20. Cellular assay optimization: part II: the use of a simple integrated robotic work cell to allow the multiplexed batching of cellular assays.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Marie A; Orme, Jonathan P; Roberts, Karen

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the implementation of an automated work cell with commercially available hardware and software, capable of handling up to 15 separate reagents for performing 96-well or 384-well assays but with a small footprint and only a single liquid dispenser and two plate washers. Extremely flexible software was used to enable this simple work cell to perform processes that would traditionally require a much larger, more expensive automation platform. With the development of the C-Myc assays for the targets DYRK, BMX, PERK, and FAK, the authors describe a software solution to multibatch assays to run simultaneously, reducing reagent dead volume and increasing the efficiency of running multiple assays such that the time to generate data across multiple targets was significantly shortened. Although a larger automated system with multiple robotic arms and extensive equipment would also be able to process multiple assays simultaneously, the work cell we have described represents an inexpensive and flexible, easily upgradable option suitable for a wider range of labs. PMID:21844326

  1. Development of a novel hepatitis B virus encapsidation detection assay by viral nucleocapsid-captured quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong-Kyun; Ahn, Yeji; Ryu, Wang-Shick; Windisch, Marc P

    2015-11-01

    After encapsidation, where pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) is packaged into viral nucleocapsids, hepatitis B virus (HBV) uses the pgRNA as a template to replicate its DNA genome by reverse transcription. To date, there are only two encapsidation detection methods for evaluating the amount of pgRNA packaged into nucleocapsids: (i) the RNase protection assay and (ii) the native agarose gel electrophoresis assay. However, these methods are complex and laborious because they require multiple pgRNA purification steps followed by detection via an isotope-labeled probe. Moreover, both assays are unsuitable for evaluating a large number of antiviral agents in a dose-dependent manner. To overcome these limitations, we devised a novel HBV encapsidation assay in a 96-well plate format using nucleocapsid capture plates coated with an anti-HBV core (HBc) antibody, usually employed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, to immobilize viral nucleocapsids. Viral pgRNA is then detected by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). This strategy allows fast, convenient, and quantitative analysis of multiple viral RNA samples to evaluate encapsidation inhibitors. Furthermore, our protocol is potentially suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds targeting HBV pgRNA encapsidation. PMID:26554506

  2. Optimizing Two-Color Semiconductor Nanocrystal Immunoassays in Single Well Microtiter Plate Formats

    PubMed Central

    Sapsford, Kim E.; Spindel, Samantha; Jennings, Travis; Tao, Guoliang; Triulzi, Robert C.; Algar, W. Russ; Medintz, Igor L.

    2011-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of two analytes, chicken IgY (IgG) and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), in the single well of a 96-well plate is demonstrated using luminescent semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystal (NC) tracers. The NC-labeled antibodies were prepared via sulfhydryl-reactive chemistry using a facile protocol that took <3 h. Dose response curves for each target were evaluated in a single immunoassay format and compared to Cy5, a fluorophore commonly used in fluorescent immunoassays, and found to be equivalent. Immunoassays were then performed in a duplex format, demonstrating multiplex detection in a single well with limits of detection equivalent to the single assay format: 9.8 ng/mL chicken IgG and 7.8 ng/mL SEB. PMID:22164051

  3. Detection of miRNA Targets in High-throughput Using the 3′LIFE Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Justin M.; Kotagama, Kasuen; Babb, Cody S.; Mangone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Luminescent Identification of Functional Elements in 3′UTRs (3′LIFE) allows the rapid identification of targets of specific miRNAs within an array of hundreds of queried 3′UTRs. Target identification is based on the dual-luciferase assay, which detects binding at the mRNA level by measuring translational output, giving a functional readout of miRNA targeting. 3′LIFE uses non-proprietary buffers and reagents, and publically available reporter libraries, making genome-wide screens feasible and cost-effective. 3′LIFE can be performed either in a standard lab setting or scaled up using liquid handling robots and other high-throughput instrumentation. We illustrate the approach using a dataset of human 3′UTRs cloned in 96-well plates, and two test miRNAs, let-7c and miR-10b. We demonstrate how to perform DNA preparation, transfection, cell culture and luciferase assays in 96-well format, and provide tools for data analysis. In conclusion 3′LIFE is highly reproducible, rapid, systematic, and identifies high confidence targets. PMID:26066857

  4. A natural substrate-based fluorescence assay for inhibitor screening on diacylglycerol lipase α

    PubMed Central

    van der Wel, Tom; Janssen, Freek J.; Baggelaar, Marc P.; Deng, Hui; den Dulk, Hans; Overkleeft, Herman S.; van der Stelt, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is predominantly biosynthesized by sn-1-diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGL-α) in the CNS. Selective inhibitors of DAGL-α will provide valuable insights in the role of 2-AG in endocannabinoid signaling processes and are potential therapeutics for the treatment of obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we describe the development of a natural substrate-based fluorescence assay for DAGL-α, using a coupled enzyme approach. The continuous setup of our assay allows monitoring of DAGL-α activity in real-time and in a 96-well plate format. This constitutes a major improvement to the currently available radiometric and LC/MS-based methods, which can be executed only in low-throughput formats. In addition, our assay circumvents the use of radioactive material. We demonstrate that our assay can be used to screen inhibitors of DAGL-α activity, using 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol as the physiologically relevant natural substrate of DAGL-α. Furthermore, our method can be employed to measure DAGL activity and inhibition in the mouse brain membrane proteome. Consequently, our assay should serve as a valuable tool for rapid hit validation and lead optimization of DAGL-α inhibitors. PMID:25684760

  5. A fluorescence-based assay for human type II phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, S G; Harris, C O; Parks, D J

    1994-11-01

    A fluorescence assay for quantitation of human Type II Phospholipase A2 activity is described. Hydrolysis of 1-Acyl-2-(N-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxo-1,3-diazole)aminododecanoyl Phosphatidylethanolamine is accompanied by an increase in fluorescence intensity that is linearly proportional to enzyme activity. Substrate is prepared in the absence of detergents as a sonicated dispersion in aqueous buffer. Hydrolysis of the corresponding phosphatidylcholine derivative is more than an order of magnitude slower under identical assay conditions. A plot of initial rate versus substrate concentration could be fit to a simple Michaelis-Menten relationship with Km = 13 microM. In contrast to commonly used radiochemical assays for this enzyme, the method described here is continuous and allows estimation of enzyme activity without separation of substrate from product. Thus, the method is suitable for both kinetic analysis and large-scale screening using automated readers for 96-well tissue culture plates. The fluorescence-based assay displays advantages over other continuous assays for human Type II Phospholipase A2 based on (a) high sensitivity and (b) the use of a commercially available substrate. PMID:7864369

  6. A competitive enzyme hybridization assay for plasma determination of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Deverre, J R; Boutet, V; Boquet, D; Ezan, E; Grassi, J; Grognet, J M

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme competitive hybridization assay was developed and validated for determination of mouse plasma concentrations of a 15mer antisense phosphodiester oligodeoxyribonucleotide and of two phosphorothioate analogs. Assays were performed in 96-well microtiter plates. The phosphodiester sense sequence was covalently bound to the microwells. The 5'-biotinylated antisense sequence was used as tracer. The principle of the assay involves competitive hybridization of tracer and antisense nucleotide to the solid phase-immobilized sense oligonucleotide. Solid phase- bound tracer oligonucleotide was assayed after reaction with a streptavidin-acetylcholinesterase conjugate, using the colorimetric method of Ellman. As in competitive enzyme immunoassays, coloration was inversely related to the amount of analyte initially present in the sample. The limit of quantification was 900 pM for phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotide using a 100 microl volume of plasma without extraction. Cross-reactivity was negligible after a four base deletion in either the 3'or 5'position. The assay was simple and sensitive, suitable for in vitro screening of oligonucleotide hybridization potency in biological fluids and for measuring the plasma pharmacokinetics of phosphorothioate and phosphodiester sequences. PMID:9278477

  7. Improved flow cytometry based cytotoxicity and binding assay for clinical antibody HLA crossmatching.

    PubMed

    Alheim, Mats; Paul, Prashanta Kumer; Hauzenberger, Dan-Mikael; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    The presence of preformed donor-specific HLA antibodies leads to early antibody mediated kidney allograft rejection. Therefore, detection and avoidance of donor reactive HLA antibodies prior to transplantation is of outmost importance in order to minimize the risk of rejection. Detection of pre-formed HLA antibodies is currently performed using complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay alone or together with a flow cytometry based crossmatch (FCXM). This study was initiated to further evaluate our recently developed flow cytometry based procedure for determination of both cytotoxicity of and IgG binding to donor-derived lymphocytes by HLA antibodies. Highly enriched immuno-magnetic bead purified T and B lymphocytes were used as target cells for patient sera using 96-well plates. Importantly, the assay shows high sensitivity and specificity as determined by HLA typed donor cells and serum with defined HLA antibody IgG and C1q. Based on this and additional data generated in this paper, such as evaluation of appropriate serum and complements incubation times and assay reproducibility and stability, will enable us to more rapidly implement this assay in our clinical laboratory routines. In addition, we demonstrate that FCtox crossmatching of deceased donor cells has superior specificity compared to conventional CDC assay especially regarding high frequencies of false-positive reactions. PMID:26429307

  8. An in-house enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay for human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Nazaimoon, W; Ng, M L; Bak, K

    1993-06-01

    A simple, non-isotopic in-house enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) for human growth hormone (GH) was developed. The assay involved using in-house polyclonal anti-GH adsorbed onto 96-well microtitre plates, commercially prepared mouse monoclonal anti-GH, and goat anti-mouse IgG horseradish peroxidase detection system. Results of recovery and parallelism studies ranged from 95%-106% and 98%-101% respectively, of the expected values. The detection limit of the assay was 0.008 mIU/well or the equivalent to 0.4 mIU/L of undiluted serum. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variations were 4.8%-7.9% and 6.5%-8.7% respectively. Serum GH levels measured in this assay correlated well with those measured in established in-house radioimmunoassays (r = 0.985, p < 0.001) and immunoradiometric assay from NETRIA (r = 0.984, p < 0.001). PMID:8277795

  9. A simple and rapid microplate assay for glycoprotein-processing glycosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, M.S.; Zwolshen, J.H.; Harry, B.S.; Sunkara, P.S. )

    1989-08-15

    A simple and convenient microplate assay for glycosidases involved in the glycoprotein-processing reactions is described. The assay is based on specific binding of high-mannose-type oligosaccharide substrates to concanavalin A-Sepharose, while monosaccharides liberated by enzymatic hydrolysis do not bind to concanavalin A-Sepharose. By the use of radiolabeled substrates (( 3H)glucose for glucosidases and (3H)mannose for mannosidases), the radioactivity in the liberated monosaccharides can be determined as a measure of the enzymatic activity. This principle was employed earlier for developing assays for glycosidases previously reported. These authors have reported the separation of substrate from the product by concanavalin A-Sepharose column chromatography. This procedure is handicapped by the fact that it cannot be used for a large number of samples and is time consuming. We have simplified this procedure and adapted it to the use of a microplate (96-well plate). This would help in processing a large number of samples in a short time. In this report we show that the assay is comparable to the column assay previously reported. It is linear with time and enzyme concentration and shows expected kinetics with castanospermine, a known inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase I.

  10. A high-throughput screening assay to identify bacterial antagonists against Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput antagonistic assay was developed to screen for bacterial isolates capable of controlling the maize fungal phytopathogen Fusarium verticillioides. This assay combines a straightforward methodology, in which the fungus is challenged with bacterial isolates in liquid medium, with a novel approach that uses the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) coupled to a fluorophore (Alexa-Fluor® 488) under the commercial name of WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. The assay is performed in a 96-well plate format, which reduces the required laboratory space and streamlines quantitation and automation of the process, making it fast and accurate. The basis of our assay is that fungal biomass can be assessed by WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate staining, which recognizes the chitin in the fungal cell wall and thus permits the identification of potential antagonistic bacteria that inhibit fungal growth. This principle was validated by chitin-competition binding assays against WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate; confocal laser microscopy confirmed that the fluorescent WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate binds to the chitin of the fungal cell wall. The majority of bacterial isolates did not bind to the WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. Furthermore, including washing steps significantly reduced any bacterial staining to background levels, even in the rare cases where bacterial isolates were capable of binding to WGA. Confirmatory conventional agar plate antagonistic assays were also conducted to validate our technique. We are now successfully employing this large-scale antagonistic assay as a pre-screening step for potential fungal antagonists in extensive bacteria collections (on the order of thousands of isolates). PMID:23787812

  11. β-Cyclodextrin enhanced on-line organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of ambroxol in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Bi, Youwei; Wang, Li; Sun, Fanlu; Chen, Zhao; Xu, Guili; Fan, Guorong

    2012-07-01

    A field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method is described for the quantification of ambroxol hydrochloride in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format. The separation was carried out at 25 °C in a 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 6.25 mM borate-25 mM phosphate (pH 3.0) and 1mM β-cyclodextrin. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Clean-up and preconcentration of plasma biosamples were developed by 96-well format liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). In this study, FASS in combination with β-cyclodextrin enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 fold in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision, extraction recovery and robustness. The calibration graph was linear for ambroxol hydrochloride from 2 to 500 ng/ml. The lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day precisions of lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 9.61 and 11.80%, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to the evaluation of clinical pharmacokinetic study of ambroxol hydrochloride tablet after oral administration to 12 healthy volunteers. PMID:22464560

  12. New concepts for chip-supported multi-well-plates: realization of a 24-well-plate with integrated impedance-sensors for functional cellular screening applications and automated microscope aided cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Ressler, J; Grothe, H; Motrescu, E; Wolf, B

    2004-01-01

    Based on the experience with multiparametric bioelectronic sensor chips for the monitoring of living cells, we have combined the established multi-well-format with the advantages of microelectronic sensors. The result is a 24-well-plate where the bottom of the wells is replaced by glass-based chips with integrated IDES (interdigital electrode structure). By using IDES it is possible to detect adhesion and morphological changes of adherent growing cell cultures. Up to now these measurements were inaccessible in conjunction with multi-well-plates, especially in high throughput applications. If microscopic monitoring of the cell culture is required, the IDES can be fabricated using transparent conductor materials like ITO (indium tin oxide). Both the transparent material for the sensors and the sensor-carrier make the multi-well-plate also applicable for all kinds of fluorescence and luminescence biological tests. In addition to the impedance-sensors optical read-out sensor layers for pH and pO2 can be integrated. For this reason there are many possible fields of application in biological and biomedical areas such as drug screening, chemosensitive testing and environmental toxicology as well as in biosensing for biological and chemical warfare. Especially the possibility of using this multi-well-plate together with automated imaging-systems has the great advantage of combining optical and sensory monitoring accessible to high-throughput-applications. PMID:17272129

  13. Microtiter plate-based antibody microarrays for bacteria and toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has focused on the development of rapid biosensor-based, high-throughput, and multiplexed detection of pathogenic bacteria in foods. Specifically, antibody microarrays in 96-well microtiter plates have been generated for the purpose of selective detection of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (...

  14. Limitations and relative utility of screening assays to assess engineered nanoparticle toxicity in a human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro-Riviere, N.A.; Inman, A.O.; Zhang, L.W.

    2009-01-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), fullerenes (C{sub 60}), carbon black (CB), nC{sub 60}, and quantum dots (QD) have been studied in vitro to determine their toxicity in a number of cell types. Here, we report that classical dye-based assays such as MTT and neutral red (NR) that determine cell viability produce invalid results with some NM (nanomaterials) due to NM/dye interactions and/or NM adsorption of the dye/dye products. In this study, human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) were exposed in vitro to CB, SWCNT, C{sub 60}, nC{sub 60}, and QD to assess viability with calcein AM (CAM), Live/Dead (LD), NR, MTT, Celltiter 96 AQueous One (96 AQ), alamar Blue (aB), Celltiter-Blue (CTB), CytoTox One{sup TM} (CTO), and flow cytometry. In addition, trypan blue (TB) was quantitated by light microscopy. Assay linearity (R{sup 2} value) was determined with HEK plated at concentrations from 0 to 25,000 cells per well in 96-well plates. HEK were treated with serial dilutions of each NM for 24 h and assessed with each of the viability assays. TB, CAM and LD assays, which depend on direct staining of living and/or dead cells, were difficult to interpret due to physical interference of the NM with cells. Results of the dye-based assays varied a great deal, depending on the interactions of the dye/dye product with the carbon nanomaterials (CNM). Results show the optimal high throughput assay for use with carbon and noncarbon NM was 96 AQ. This study shows that, unlike small molecules, CNM interact with assay markers to cause variable results with classical toxicology assays and may not be suitable for assessing nanoparticle cytotoxicity. Therefore, more than one assay may be required when determining nanoparticle toxicity for risk assessment.

  15. Simultaneous runs of the Bayer VERSANT HIV-1 version 3.0 and HCV bDNA version 3.0 quantitative assays on the system 340 platform provide reliable quantitation and improved work flow.

    PubMed

    Elbeik, Tarek; Markowitz, Norman; Nassos, Patricia; Kumar, Uday; Beringer, Scott; Haller, Barbara; Ng, Valerie

    2004-07-01

    Branched DNA (bDNA) assays to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) consist of three distinct steps, including sample processing, hybridization, and detection, and utilize the System 340 platform for plate incubation and washing. Sample processing differs: HIV-1 from 1 ml of plasma is concentrated by high-speed centrifugation, whereas HCV plasma or serum samples are used without concentration. The first step of hybridization involves viral lysis at 63 degrees C: HIV-1 is performed in a heat block, whereas HCV is performed in System 340. The remaining hybridization and detection steps are similar for HIV-1 and HCV and executed on System 340. In the present study, the HIV-1 bDNA assay was adapted for viral lysis in the System 340 platform. The adaptation, test method 2, includes a 20-s vortex of concentrated viral pellet and lysis working solution, transfer of viral lysate to the 96-well capture plate, and transfer to System 340 programmed for HCV assay specifications. With test method 2, specificity and quantification were within assay specifications. HCV bDNA methodology remains unchanged. Hence, an HIV-1 and an HCV bDNA can be run simultaneously on System 340. With simultaneous testing, laboratories can run full plates, as well as combinations of full and partial plates. Also, simultaneous HIV-1 and HCV bDNA permits labor consolidation and improved workflow while maintaining multitasking and rapid patient result turnaround. PMID:15243070

  16. A Sensitive and Versatile Fluorescent Activity Assay for ABHD12.

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Juha R; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Laitinen, Jarmo T

    2016-01-01

    Despite great progress in identifying and deorphanizing members of the human metabolic serine hydrolase (mSH) family, the fundamental role of numerous enzymes in this large protein class has remained unclear. One recently found mSH is α/β-hydrolase domain containing 12 (ABHD12) enzyme, whose natural substrate in vivo appears to be the lysophospholipid lysophosphatidylserine (LPS). In vitro, ABHD12 together with monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and ABHD6 hydrolyzes also monoacylglycerols (MAGs) such as the primary endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG). Traditional approaches for determining 2-AG hydrolase activity are rather laborious, and often utilize unnatural substrates. Here, we describe a sensitive fluorescent assay of ABHD12 activity in a 96-well-plate format that allows simultaneous testing of inhibitor activities of up to 40 compounds in a single assay. The method utilizes lysates of HEK293 cells transiently overexpressing human ABHD12 as the enzymatic source, and kinetically monitors glycerol liberated in the hydrolysis of 1(3)-AG, the preferred MAG substrate of this enzyme. Glycerol output is coupled to an enzymatic cascade generating the fluorescent end-product resorufin. This methodology has helped to identify the first class of inhibitors showing selectivity for ABHD12 over the other mSHs. PMID:27245904

  17. A high throughput fluorescence polarization assay for inhibitors of the GoLoco motif/G-alpha interaction.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Yasgar, Adam; Hughes, Mark; Jadhav, Ajit; Willard, Francis S; Muller, Robin E; Austin, Christopher P; Inglese, James; Ibeanu, Gordon C; Siderovski, David P; Simeonov, Anton

    2008-06-01

    The GoLoco motif is a short Galpha-binding polypeptide sequence. It is often found in proteins that regulate cell-surface receptor signaling, such as RGS12, as well as in proteins that regulate mitotic spindle orientation and force generation during cell division, such as GPSM2/LGN. Here, we describe a high throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay using fluorophore-labeled GoLoco motif peptides for identifying inhibitors of the GoLoco motif interaction with the G-protein alpha subunit Galpha (i1). The assay exhibits considerable stability over time and is tolerant to DMSO up to 5%. The Z'-factors for robustness of the GPSM2 and RGS12 GoLoco motif assays in a 96-well plate format were determined to be 0.81 and 0.84, respectively; the latter assay was run in a 384-well plate format and produced a Z'-factor of 0.80. To determine the screening factor window (Z-factor) of the RGS12 GoLoco motif screen using a small molecule library, the NCI Diversity Set was screened. The Z-factor was determined to be 0.66, suggesting that this FP assay would perform well when developed for 1,536-well format and scaled up to larger libraries. We then miniaturized to a 4 microL final volume a pair of FP assays utilizing fluorescein- (green) and rhodamine- (red) labeled RGS12 GoLoco motif peptides. In a fully-automated run, the Sigma-Aldrich LOPAC(1280) collection was screened three times with every library compound being tested over a range of concentrations following the quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) paradigm; excellent assay performance was noted with average Z-factors of 0.84 and 0.66 for the green- and red-label assays, respectively. PMID:18537560

  18. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  19. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Steven B; Noel, Brett M; Parker, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  20. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  1. A Rapid Method for Assaying Thiaminase I Activity in Diverse Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Clifford E.; Gordon, Eric R. L.; Angert, Esther R.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiencies can lead to neurological disorders, reproductive failure and death in wild and domestic animal populations. In some cases, disease is brought about by the consumption of foods high in thiaminase I activity. Levels of thiaminase activity in these foods are highly variable and the factors leading to production of this enzyme are poorly understood. Here we describe improvements in a spectrophotometric thiaminase I activity assay that measures the disappearance of 4-nitrothiophenol, a favored nucleophile co-substrate that replaces the thiazole portion of thiamine during the inactivation of thiamine by the enzyme. Scalable sample processing protocols and a 96-well microtiter plate format are presented that allow the rapid evaluation of multiple, replicated samples in the course of only a few hours. Observed levels of activity in bacterial culture supernatant, fish, ferns and molluscs using this colorimetric assay were similar to previously published reports that employed a radiometric method. Organisms devoid of thiaminase I, based upon previous work, showed no activity with this assay. In addition, activity was found in a variety of fishes and one fern species from which this enzyme had not previously been reported. Overall, we demonstrate the suitability of this technique for measuring thiaminase I activity within small amounts of tissue and environmental samples with replication levels that were heretofore prohibitive. The assay provides a considerable improvement in the ability to examine and understand the properties of an enzyme that has a substantial influence on organism and ecosystem health. PMID:24675843

  2. An Assay for Thiaminase I in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Jeremiah W.; Kraft, Clifford E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative method for measuring thiaminase I activity in complex samples is described. This assay is based on the selective consumption of the highly chromophoric 4-nitrothiophenolate by thiaminase I resulting in a large decrease in absorbance at 411 nm. This new assay is simple and sensitive and requires only readily available chemicals and a visible region spectrophotometer. In addition, the assay is optimized for high throughput analysis in 96-well format with complex biological samples. PMID:17603991

  3. Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Shiratori, Tomomi; An, Le Van; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a ‘3D well’ was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26184194

  4. A single-islet microplate assay to measure mouse and human islet insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Truchan, Nathan A; Brar, Harpreet K; Gallagher, Shannon J; Neuman, Joshua C; Kimple, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    One complication to comparing β-cell function among islet preparations, whether from genetically identical or diverse animals or human organ donors, is the number of islets required per assay. Islet numbers can be limiting, meaning that fewer conditions can be tested; other islet measurements must be excluded; or islets must be pooled from multiple animals/donors for each experiment. Furthermore, pooling islets negates the possibility of performing single-islet comparisons. Our aim was to validate a 96-well plate-based single islet insulin secretion assay that would be as robust as previously published methods to quantify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from mouse and human islets. First, we tested our new assay using mouse islets, showing robust stimulation of insulin secretion 24 or 48 h after islet isolation. Next, we utilized the assay to quantify mouse islet function on an individual islet basis, measurements that would not be possible with the standard pooled islet assay methods. Next, we validated our new assay using human islets obtained from the Integrated Islet Distribution Program (IIDP). Human islets are known to have widely varying insulin secretion capacity, and using our new assay we reveal biologically relevant factors that are significantly correlated with human islet function, whether displayed as maximal insulin secretion response or fold-stimulation of insulin secretion. Overall, our results suggest this new microplate assay will be a useful tool for many laboratories, expert or not in islet techniques, to be able to precisely quantify islet insulin secretion from their models of interest. PMID:26452321

  5. Application of a novel microtitre plate-based assay for the discovery of new inhibitors of DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase VI.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are highly exploited targets for antimicrobial drugs. The spread of antibiotic resistance represents a significant threat to public health and necessitates the discovery of inhibitors that target topoisomerases in novel ways. However, the traditional assays for topoisomerase activity are not suitable for the high-throughput approaches necessary for drug discovery. In this study we validate a novel assay for screening topoisomerase inhibitors. A library of 960 compounds was screened against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and archaeal Methanosarcina mazei DNA topoisomerase VI. Several novel inhibitors were identified for both enzymes, and subsequently characterised in vitro and in vivo. Inhibitors from the M. mazei topoisomerase VI screen were tested for their ability to inhibit Arabidopsis topoisomerase VI in planta. The data from this work present new options for antibiotic drug discovery and provide insight into the mechanism of topoisomerase VI. PMID:23469129

  6. Methodological considerations for using umu assay to assess photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cupi, Denisa; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-15

    In this study we investigated the feasibility of high-throughput (96-well plate) umu assay to test the genotoxic effect of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) under UV light (full spectrum) and visible light (455 nm). Exposure of TiO2 ENPs to up to 60 min of UV light induced a photocatalytic production of ROS. However, UV light itself caused cytotoxic damage to Salmonella typhimurium at exposures >15 min and a genotoxic effect at exposures >0.5 min; and use of UV filters did not lower this effect. No genotoxicity of TiO2 ENPs was observed under visible light conditions at concentrations up to 100 μg mL(-1); or under dark conditions at concentrations up to 667 μg mL(-1), though cytotoxicity was seen at the higher concentrations. Additionally, the growth factor calculation was influenced by a shading effect due to ENPs, and was corrected by considering the pre-incubation OD readings of Plate B. Recommendations provided in this paper, as well as investigation of the effect of the light sources should be considered when using the umu assay to quantify the photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:26778507

  7. Generation of orientation tools for automated zebrafish screening assays using desktop 3D printing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The zebrafish has been established as the main vertebrate model system for whole organism screening applications. However, the lack of consistent positioning of zebrafish embryos within wells of microtiter plates remains an obstacle for the comparative analysis of images acquired in automated screening assays. While technical solutions to the orientation problem exist, dissemination is often hindered by the lack of simple and inexpensive ways of distributing and duplicating tools. Results Here, we provide a cost effective method for the production of 96-well plate compatible zebrafish orientation tools using a desktop 3D printer. The printed tools enable the positioning and orientation of zebrafish embryos within cavities formed in agarose. Their applicability is demonstrated by acquiring lateral and dorsal views of zebrafish embryos arrayed within microtiter plates using an automated screening microscope. This enables the consistent visualization of morphological phenotypes and reporter gene expression patterns. Conclusions The designs are refined versions of previously demonstrated devices with added functionality and strongly reduced production costs. All corresponding 3D models are freely available and digital design can be easily shared electronically. In combination with the increasingly widespread usage of 3D printers, this provides access to the developed tools to a wide range of zebrafish users. Finally, the design files can serve as templates for other additive and subtractive fabrication methods. PMID:24886511

  8. Cellphone-Based Hand-Held Microplate Reader for Point-of-Care Testing of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Yan-Lok; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-08-25

    Standard microplate based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are widely utilized for various nanomedicine, molecular sensing, and disease screening applications, and this multiwell plate batched analysis dramatically reduces diagnosis costs per patient compared to nonbatched or nonstandard tests. However, their use in resource-limited and field-settings is inhibited by the necessity for relatively large and expensive readout instruments. To mitigate this problem, we created a hand-held and cost-effective cellphone-based colorimetric microplate reader, which uses a 3D-printed opto-mechanical attachment to hold and illuminate a 96-well plate using a light-emitting-diode (LED) array. This LED light is transmitted through each well, and is then collected via 96 individual optical fibers. Captured images of this fiber-bundle are transmitted to our servers through a custom-designed app for processing using a machine learning algorithm, yielding diagnostic results, which are delivered to the user within ∼1 min per 96-well plate, and are visualized using the same app. We successfully tested this mobile platform in a clinical microbiology laboratory using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests using a total of 567 and 571 patient samples for training and blind testing, respectively, and achieved an accuracy of 99.6%, 98.6%, 99.4%, and 99.4% for mumps, measles, HSV-1, and HSV-2 tests, respectively. This cost-effective and hand-held platform could assist health-care professionals to perform high-throughput disease screening or tracking of vaccination campaigns at the point-of-care, even in resource-poor and field-settings. Also, its intrinsic wireless connectivity can serve epidemiological studies, generating spatiotemporal maps of disease prevalence and immunity. PMID:26159546

  9. Novel Luminex Assay for Telomere Repeat Mass Does Not Show Well Position Effects Like qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length is a potential biomarker of aging and risk for age-related diseases. For measurement of relative telomere repeat mass (TRM), qPCR is typically used primarily due to its low cost and low DNA input. But the position of the sample on a plate often impacts the qPCR-based TRM measurement. Recently we developed a novel, probe-based Luminex assay for TRM that requires ~50ng DNA and involves no DNA amplification. Here we report, for the first time, a comparison among TRM measurements obtained from (a) two singleplex qPCR assays (using two different primer sets), (b) a multiplex qPCR assay, and (c) our novel Luminex assay. Our comparison is focused on characterizing the effects of sample positioning on TRM measurement. For qPCR, DNA samples from two individuals (K and F) were placed in 48 wells of a 96-well plate. For each singleplex qPCR assay, we used two plates (one for Telomere and one for Reference gene). For the multiplex qPCR and the Luminex assay, the telomere and the reference genes were assayed from the same well. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the TRM for Luminex (7.2 to 8.4%) was consistently lower than singleplex qPCR (11.4 to 14.9%) and multiplex qPCR (19.7 to 24.3%). In all three qPCR assays the DNA samples in the left- and right-most columns showed significantly lower TRM than the samples towards the center, which was not the case for the Luminex assay (p = 0.83). For singleplex qPCR, 30.5% of the variation in TL was explained by column-to-column variation and 0.82 to 27.9% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. In contrast, only 5.8% of the variation in TRM for the Luminex assay was explained by column-to column variation and 50.4% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. Our novel Luminex assay for TRM had good precision and did not show the well position effects of the sample that were seen in all three of the qPCR assays that were tested. PMID:27182778

  10. Novel Luminex Assay for Telomere Repeat Mass Does Not Show Well Position Effects Like qPCR.

    PubMed

    Kibriya, Muhammad G; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length is a potential biomarker of aging and risk for age-related diseases. For measurement of relative telomere repeat mass (TRM), qPCR is typically used primarily due to its low cost and low DNA input. But the position of the sample on a plate often impacts the qPCR-based TRM measurement. Recently we developed a novel, probe-based Luminex assay for TRM that requires ~50ng DNA and involves no DNA amplification. Here we report, for the first time, a comparison among TRM measurements obtained from (a) two singleplex qPCR assays (using two different primer sets), (b) a multiplex qPCR assay, and (c) our novel Luminex assay. Our comparison is focused on characterizing the effects of sample positioning on TRM measurement. For qPCR, DNA samples from two individuals (K and F) were placed in 48 wells of a 96-well plate. For each singleplex qPCR assay, we used two plates (one for Telomere and one for Reference gene). For the multiplex qPCR and the Luminex assay, the telomere and the reference genes were assayed from the same well. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the TRM for Luminex (7.2 to 8.4%) was consistently lower than singleplex qPCR (11.4 to 14.9%) and multiplex qPCR (19.7 to 24.3%). In all three qPCR assays the DNA samples in the left- and right-most columns showed significantly lower TRM than the samples towards the center, which was not the case for the Luminex assay (p = 0.83). For singleplex qPCR, 30.5% of the variation in TL was explained by column-to-column variation and 0.82 to 27.9% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. In contrast, only 5.8% of the variation in TRM for the Luminex assay was explained by column-to column variation and 50.4% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. Our novel Luminex assay for TRM had good precision and did not show the well position effects of the sample that were seen in all three of the qPCR assays that were tested. PMID:27182778

  11. Quantitative RT-PCR assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of drugs against the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed a qRT-PCR assay to assess drug efficacy on the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro by detecting the levels of parasite 18S rRNA. This approach displayed up to four orders of magnitude of linear dynamic range and was much less labor-intensive than the traditional microscopic methods. However, conventional qRT-PCR protocol is not very amendable to high-throughput analysis when total RNA needs to be purified by lengthy, multi-step procedures. Recently, several commercial reagents are available for preparing cell lysates that could be directly used in downstream qRT-PCR analysis (e.g., Ambion Cell-to-cDNA kit and Bio-Rad iScript sample preparation reagent). Using these reagents, we are able to adapt the qRT-PCR assay into high-throughput screening of drugs in vitro (i.e., 96-well and 384-well formats for the cultivation of parasites and qRT-PCR detection, respectively). This qRT-PCR protocol is able to give a >150-fold linear dynamic range using samples isolated from cells infected with various numbers of parasites. The new assay is also validated by the NIH-recommended intra-plate, inter-plate, and inter-day uniformity tests. The robustness and effectiveness of the assay are also confirmed by evaluating the anti-cryptosporidial efficacy of paromomycin and by a small scale screening of compounds. PMID:26441920

  12. A digital microfluidic method for multiplexed cell-based apoptosis assays.

    PubMed

    Bogojevic, Dario; Chamberlain, M Dean; Barbulovic-Nad, Irena; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-02-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a fluid-handling technique in which picolitre-microlitre droplets are manipulated electrostatically on an array of electrodes, has recently become popular for applications in chemistry and biology. DMF devices are reconfigurable, have no moving parts, and are compatible with conventional high-throughput screening infrastructure (e.g., multiwell plate readers). For these and other reasons, digital microfluidics has been touted as being a potentially useful new tool for applications in multiplexed screening. Here, we introduce the first digital microfluidic platform used to implement parallel-scale cell-based assays. A fluorogenic apoptosis assay for caspase-3 activity was chosen as a model system because of the popularity of apoptosis as a target for anti-cancer drug discovery research. Dose-response profiles of caspase-3 activity as a function of staurosporine concentration were generated using both the digital microfluidic method and conventional techniques (i.e., pipetting, aspiration, and 96-well plates.) As expected, the digital microfluidic method had a 33-fold reduction in reagent consumption relative to the conventional technique. Although both types of methods used the same detector (a benchtop multiwell plate reader), the data generated by the digital microfluidic method had lower detection limits and greater dynamic range because apoptotic cells were much less likely to de-laminate when exposed to droplet manipulation by DMF relative to pipetting/aspiration in multiwell plates. We propose that the techniques described here represent an important milestone in the development of digital microfluidics as a useful tool for parallel cell-based screening and other applications. PMID:22159547

  13. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z' factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening. PMID:22290227

  14. A high content assay for biosensor validation and for examining stimuli that affect biosensor activity

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Scott D.; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors are valuable tools used to monitor many different protein behaviors in vivo. Demand for new biosensors is high, but their development and characterization can be difficult. During biosensor design, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of different biosensor structures on specificity, brightness, and fluorescence responses. By co-expressing the biosensor with upstream proteins that either stimulate or inhibit the activity reported by the biosensor, one can determine the difference between the biosensor’s maximally activated and inactivated state, and examine response to specific proteins. This involves considerable labor and expense, as expression conditions must be optimized to saturate the biosensor with the regulator, and multiple replicates and controls are required. We describe here a protocol for biosensor validation in a 96-well plate format using an automated microscope. This protocol produces dose-response curves, enables efficient examination of many parameters, and unlike cell suspension assays allows visual inspection (eg for cell health and biosensor or regulator localization). Optimization of single chain and dual chain Rho GTPase biosensors is addressed, but the assay is applicable to any biosensor that can be expressed or otherwise loaded in adherent cells. The assay can also be used for purposes other than biosensor validation, using a well-characterized biosensor as a readout for variations in upstream molecules. PMID:25447074

  15. Multipurpose high-throughput filtering microarrays (HiFi) for DNA and protein assays.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Desmet, Cloé; Brès, Jean-Charles; Rigal, Dominique; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2010-12-15

    We are reporting here a low cost colorimetric device for high-throughput multiplexed blood group genotyping and allergy diagnosis, displayed as an automated 96-well microtiter plate format. A porous polymeric membrane sealed at the bottom of each well accounts for the sensor support. For each sensing unit, a 6×6 matrix of specific probes is spotted on the external surface of the membrane resulting in 5 mm(2) microarrays. Thanks to the membrane porosity, reagents dispensed into the well can be eliminated through vacuum soaking. This unusual design drastically reduces the assay background signal. The system was first validated on robust models composed of either two complementary oligonucleotide sequences or one allergen/specific rabbit IgG pair. The quality of both oligonucleotide and protein immobilisation on the membrane substrate was then demonstrated together with the capacity to use the arrayed biomolecules as probes for the quantitative detection of specific targets (respectively complementary oligonucleotide and specific antibody). On the basis of these good results, two multiplex assays were developed for crude biological samples testing, focussing on two human in vitro diagnosis applications: a hybridisation assay for multiplex blood group genotyping and a multiparametric immunoassay for allergy diagnosis. In both cases, the transfer to crude biological samples testing was successful i.e. high signal to noise ratio of the stained membranes, reproducibility and good correlation with results obtained using routine testing procedures. PMID:20663657

  16. A novel high-throughput image based rapid Folin-Ciocalteau assay for assessment of reducing capacity in foods.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Mohamed; M Arribas, Silvia; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2016-05-15

    The aim of the presented work was to develop and validate a novel high-throughput rapid Folin-Ciocalteau assay for the quantification of reducing capacity of foods based on image scanner (Image-F-C assay). The original rapid F-C assay using a 96-well plate was improved by adding a neutralization step that stabilizes the formed color, enabling image acquisition using a flatbed scanner. Although the scanner has been already used in other analytical applications, no analysis has been reported regarding the effect of the scanner model, the plate orientation or the reaction volume. In the present study, we establish that the mentioned parameters do affect the linearity and precision of image based Folin-Ciocalteau assay, and provide the optimal scanning conditions for the analyzed scanner models. Euclidean distance calculated from R (Red), G (Green) and B (Blue) values was chosen, based on linearity and sensitivity, in order to quantify the reducing capacity. An in-house program using free ImageJ macro language was written to calculate automatically the RGB values of each well. The Image-F-C assay is linear within the range of 0-20 mg L(-1) of gallic acid (R(2)≥0.9939). We compared reducing capacity values from real samples quantified by the image F-C assay and by a microplate reader and an inter-day relative standard error<8% was observed. Bland-Altman and correlation analyzes showed that there were no significant differences between the two methods. PMID:26992497

  17. Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for preformulation.

    PubMed

    Alsenz, Jochem; Haenel, Elisabeth; Anedda, Aline; Du Castel, Pauline; Cirelli, Giorgio

    2016-05-25

    This study describes a novel Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for measuring disk intrinsic dissolution rates (DIDR). In MINDISS, compacted mini disks of drugs (2-5mg/disk) are prepared in custom made holders with a surface area of 3mm(2). Disks are immersed, pellet side down, into 0.35ml of appropriate dissolution media per well in 96-well microtiter plates, media are stirred and disk-holders are transferred to new wells after defined periods of time. After filtration, drug concentration in dissolution media is quantified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and solid state property of the disk is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. MINDISS was identified as an easy-to-use tool for rapid, parallel determination of DIDR of compounds that requires only small amounts of compound and of dissolution medium. Results obtained with marketed drugs in MINDISS correlate well with large scale DIDR methods and indicate that MINDISS can be used for (1) rank-ordering of compounds by intrinsic dissolution in late phase discovery and early development, (2) comparison of polymorphic forms and salts, (3) screening and selection of appropriate dissolution media, and (4) characterization of the intestinal release behavior of compounds along the gastro intestinal tract by changing biorelevant media during experiments. PMID:26360839

  18. A robust electrochemiluminescence immunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen detection based on a microtiter plate as a bridge and Au@Pd nanorods as a peroxidase mimic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Pang, Xuehui; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Yan, Zhaoqing; Zhang, Jiatao; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The common drawbacks of most traditional electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassays are the strict storage conditions for the ECL electrode and the steric hindrance caused by bovine serum albumin and antigen. The strict storage conditions require that the modified electrode must be stored at 4 °C before measurement, which may cause the degradation of protein molecules and low reproducibility as the time goes by. The steric hindrance can hinder electron transfer between the electrode and the electrochemical active substance unable to transmit proteins on the electrode surface. The current study takes a 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) as a bridge for analyte pre-treatment and Au@Pd nanorods as a peroxidase mimic to assemble a simple and robust ECL immunoassay. Advantages of such assay include not only high sensitivity but also robust detection circumstance. We demonstrated the method by detecting carcinoembryonic antigen from human serum and obtained a good detection limit of 3 fg mL(-1). PMID:26609799

  19. Validation of a sensitive and automated 96-well solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of desloratadine and 3-hydroxydesloratadine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyu; Clement, Robert P; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Reyderman, Larisa; Beaudry, Francis; Grandmaison, Charles; Di Donato, Lorella; Masse, Robert; Rudewicz, Patrick J

    2003-07-25

    To support clinical development, a liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of desloratadine (descarboethoxyloratadine) and 3-OH desloratadine (3-hydroxydescarboethoxyloratadine) concentrations in human plasma. The method consisted of automated 96-well solid-phase extraction for sample preparation and liquid chromatography/turbo ionspray tandem mass spectrometry for analysis. [2H(4)]Desloratadine and [2H(4)]3-OH desloratadine were used as internal standards (I.S.). A quadratic regression (weighted 1/concentration(2)) gave the best fit for calibration curves over the concentration range of 25-10000 pg/ml for both desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine. There was no interference from endogenous components in the blank plasma tested. The accuracy (%bias) at the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was -12.8 and +3.4% for desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine, respectively. The precision (%CV) for samples at the LLOQ was 15.1 and 10.9% for desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine, respectively. For quality control samples at 75, 1000 and 7500 pg/ml, the between run %CV was

  20. FtsZ Polymerization Assays: Simple Protocols and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Król, Ewa; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    During bacterial cell division, the essential protein FtsZ assembles in the middle of the cell to form the so-called Z-ring. FtsZ polymerizes into long filaments in the presence of GTP in vitro, and polymerization is regulated by several accessory proteins. FtsZ polymerization has been extensively studied in vitro using basic methods including light scattering, sedimentation, GTP hydrolysis assays and electron microscopy. Buffer conditions influence both the polymerization properties of FtsZ, and the ability of FtsZ to interact with regulatory proteins. Here, we describe protocols for FtsZ polymerization studies and validate conditions and controls using Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis FtsZ as model proteins. A low speed sedimentation assay is introduced that allows the study of the interaction of FtsZ with proteins that bundle or tubulate FtsZ polymers. An improved GTPase assay protocol is described that allows testing of GTP hydrolysis over time using various conditions in a 96-well plate setup, with standardized incubation times that abolish variation in color development in the phosphate detection reaction. The preparation of samples for light scattering studies and electron microscopy is described. Several buffers are used to establish suitable buffer pH and salt concentration for FtsZ polymerization studies. A high concentration of KCl is the best for most of the experiments. Our methods provide a starting point for the in vitro characterization of FtsZ, not only from E. coli and B. subtilis but from any other bacterium. As such, the methods can be used for studies of the interaction of FtsZ with regulatory proteins or the testing of antibacterial drugs which may affect FtsZ polymerization. PMID:24300445

  1. Convenient, multi-well plate-based DNA damage response analysis using DT40 mutants is applicable to a high-throughput genotoxicity assay with characterization of modes of action

    PubMed Central

    Ridpath, John R.; Takeda, Shunichi; Swenberg, James A.; Nakamura, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Chemists continually synthesize myriad new chemicals (~2000/yr), some of which make their way into the environment or otherwise pose possible threats to humans who potentially become exposed to the compounds. Regulators must determine whether these, along with the glut (~80,000) of existing, chemicals are toxic and at what exposure levels. An important component of this determination is to ascertain the mode of action (MOA) of each compound as it relates to the pathway the compound uses to induce genotoxicity. Several assays have traditionally been used to reveal these effects to the genome: the Ames test, tests with yeast and mammalian cell lines, and animal studies. Previously, we described a new multi-well plate-based method which makes use of the DT40 isogenic cell line and its dozens of available mutants knocked out in DNA repair and cell cycle pathways and we now provide a detailed protocol of the further improvement of the assay. Although the DT40 line has existed for some time and has been used in numerous studies of DNA repair pathways, little use has been made of this valuable resource for toxicological investigations. Our method introduces the XTT dye scheme determination of cell survival in a manner that greatly increases throughput and reduces cost while maintaining reasonable sensitivity. Although this new genotoxicity assay requires validation with many more mutagens before becoming an established, regulatory decision-making analysis tool, we believe that this method will be very advantageous if eventually added to the repertoire of those investigating MOAs of potentially genotoxic substances. PMID:20839229

  2. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of almonds in foods.

    PubMed

    Hlywka, J J; Hefle, S L; Taylor, S L

    2000-02-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to detect almonds as potential allergenic contaminants in food. Polyclonal antibodies directed against roasted almonds were partially purified from immunized sheep and rabbits and used as capture and secondary antibodies, respectively, in a sandwich-type, 96-well plate format. Food samples and almond-spiked samples were extracted 1:10 in phosphate-buffered saline at 60 degrees C for 2 h, centrifuged, and applied to wells coated with sheep anti-almond antibody. After incubation, washing, and the addition of rabbit anti-almond antibody, the amount of almond present was detected with the subsequent addition of goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate substrate. Plate absorbances were read at 410 nm, and standard curves were developed in all matrices to quantify unknowns. Antibodies developed were specific for almond; however, some cross-reactivity was observed with extracts of some tree nuts and sesame seeds. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting indicated that sheep anti-almond antibody recognized proteins extracted from black walnuts, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pistachios, and sesame seeds in addition to those from almond. The assay was optimized to detect less than 1 ppm of almond and was used successfully to determine almond residues in cereal and chocolate without cross-reacting interferences. A retail survey of 20 brands of cereal demonstrated that the assay produced statistically consistent results. This assay provides a useful quality control tool for the food industry for the protection of consumers allergic to almonds. PMID:10678432

  3. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity. PMID:16834534

  4. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  5. Assessment of a recombinant androgen receptor binding assay: initial steps towards validation.

    PubMed

    Freyberger, Alexius; Weimer, Marc; Tran, Hoai-Son; Ahr, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of research in the field of endocrine active compounds with affinity for the androgen receptor (AR), still no validated recombinant AR binding assay is available, although recombinant AR can be obtained from several sources. With funding from the European Union (EU)-sponsored 6th framework project, ReProTect, we developed a model protocol for such an assay based on a simple AR binding assay recently developed at our institution. Important features of the protocol were the use of a rat recombinant fusion protein to thioredoxin containing both the hinge region and ligand binding domain (LBD) of the rat AR (which is identical to the human AR-LBD) and performance in a 96-well plate format. Besides two reference compounds [dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androstenedione] ten test compounds with different affinities for the AR [levonorgestrel, progesterone, prochloraz, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, flutamide, norethynodrel, o,p'-DDT, dibutylphthalate, vinclozolin, linuron] were used to explore the performance of the assay. At least three independent experiments per compound were performed. The AR binding properties of reference and test compounds were well detected, in terms of the relative ranking of binding affinities, there was good agreement with published data obtained from experiments using recombinant AR preparations. Irrespective of the chemical nature of the compound, individual IC(50)-values for a given compound varied by not more than a factor of 2.6. Our data demonstrate that the assay reliably ranked compounds with strong, weak, and no/marginal affinity for the AR with high accuracy. It avoids the manipulation and use of animals, as a recombinant protein is used and thus contributes to the 3R concept. On the whole, this assay is a promising candidate for further validation. PMID:19833195

  6. A novel, sensitive assay for high-throughput molecular detection of plasmodia for active screening of malaria for elimination.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhibin; Sun, Xiaodong; Yang, Ye; Wang, Heng; Zheng, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Although malaria remains one of the leading infectious diseases in the world, the decline in malaria transmission in some area makes it possible to consider elimination of the disease. As countries approach elimination, malaria diagnosis needs to change from diagnosing ill patients to actively detecting infections in all carriers, including asymptomatic and low-parasite-load patients. However, few of the current diagnostic methods have both the throughput and the sensitivity required. We adopted a sandwich RNA hybridization assay to detect genus Plasmodium 18S rRNA directly from whole-blood samples from Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax patients without RNA isolation. We tested the assay with 202 febrile patients from areas where malaria is endemic, using 20 μl of each blood sample in a 96-well plate format with a 2-day enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-like work flow. The results were compared with diagnoses obtained using microscopy, a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), and genus-specific real-time PCR. Our assay identified all 66 positive samples diagnosed by microscopy, including 49 poorly stored samples that underwent multiple freeze-thaw cycles due to resource limitation. The assay uncovered three false-negative samples by microscopy and four false-negative samples by RDT and agreed completely with real-time PCR diagnosis. There was no negative sample by our assay that would show a positive result when tested with other methods. The detection limit of our assay for P. falciparum was 0.04 parasite/μl. The assay's simple work flow, high throughput, and sensitivity make it suitable for active malaria screening. PMID:23100347

  7. Characterization of the mouse cold-menthol receptor TRPM8 and vanilloid receptor type-1 VR1 using a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR) assay.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, H-J; Germann, T; Gillen, C; Hatt, H; Jostock, R

    2004-02-01

    1. TRPM8 (CMR1) is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel, which can be activated by low temperatures, menthol, eucalyptol and icilin. It belongs to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family, and therefore is related to vanilloid receptor type-1 (VR1, TRPV1). We tested whether substances which are structurally related to menthol, or which produce a cooling sensation, could activate TRPM8, and compared the responses of TRPM8 and VR1 to these ligands. 2. The effects of 70 odorants and menthol-related substances on recombinant mouse TRPM8 (mTRPM8), expressed in HEK293 cells, were examined using a FLIPR assay. In all, 10 substances (linalool, geraniol, hydroxycitronellal, WS-3, WS-23, FrescolatMGA, FrescolatML, PMD38, CoolactP and Cooling Agent 10) were found to be agonists. 3. The EC(50) values of the agonists defined their relative potencies: icilin (0.2+/-0.1 microM)>FrescolatML (3.3+/-1.5 microM) > WS-3 (3.7+/-1.7 microM) >(-)menthol (4.1+/-1.3 microM) >frescolatMAG (4.8+/-1.1 microM) > cooling agent 10 (6+/-2.2 microM) >(+)menthol (14.4+/-1.3 microM) > PMD38 (31+/-1.1 microM) > WS-23 (44+/-7.3 microM) > Coolact P (66+/-20 microM) > geraniol (5.9+/-1.6 mM) > linalool (6.7+/-2.0 mM) > eucalyptol (7.7+/-2.0 mM) > hydroxycitronellal (19.6+/-2.2 mM). 4. Known VR1 antagonists (BCTC, thio-BCTC and capsazepine) were also able to block the response of TRPM8 to menthol (IC(50): 0.8+/-1.0, 3.5+/-1.1 and 18+/-1.1 microM, respectively). 5. The Ca(2+) response of hVR1-transfected HEK293 cells to the endogenous VR1 agonist N-arachidonoyl-dopamine was potentiated by low pH. In contrast, menthol- and icilin-activated TRPM8 currents were suppressed by low pH. 6. In conclusion, in the present study, we identified 10 new agonists and three antagonists of TRPM8. We found that, in contrast to VR1, TRPM8 is inhibited rather than potentiated by protons. PMID:14757700

  8. Increased sensitivity of 3D-Well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for infectious disease detection using 3D-printing fabrication technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Le Van, An; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay or ELISA -based diagnostics are considered the gold standard in the demonstration of various immunological reaction including in the measurement of antibody response to infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification with application potential in infectious disease outbreaks and individual patients' treatment and clinical care. The rapid prototyping of ELISA-based diagnostics using available 3D printing technologies provides an opportunity for a further exploration of this platform into immunodetection systems. In this study, a '3D-Well' was designed and fabricated using available 3D printing platforms to have an increased surface area of more than 4 times for protein-surface adsorption compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity in designing-product development-feedback cycle offered through 3D printing platforms provided an opportunity for its rapid assessment, in which a chemical etching process was used to make the surface hydrophilic followed by validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA for infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The higher sensitivity of the 3D-Well (3-folds higher) compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for laboratory or field diagnosis of infectious diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26406036

  9. Development of a Rapid Streptavidin Capture-Based Assay for the Tyrosine Phosphorylated CSF-1R in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Dell, Elayne; Siegel, Derick; Brittingham, Gregory; Seetharam, Shobha

    2013-01-01

    A novel assay was developed to measure ratio of p-FMS (phospho FMS) to FMS using the Meso Scale Discovery® (MSD) technology and compared to the routinely used, IP-Western based approach. The existing IP-Western assay used lysed PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) that were immunoprecipitated (IP) overnight, and assayed qualitatively by Western analysis. This procedure takes three days for completion. The novel IP-MSD method described in this paper employed immunoprecipitation of the samples for one hour, followed by assessment of the samples by a ruthenium labeled secondary antibody on a 96-well Streptavidin-coated MSD plate. This IP-MSD method was semi-quantitative, could be run in less than a day, required one-eighth the volume of sample, and compared well to the IP-Western method. In order to measure p-FMS/FMS, samples from healthy volunteers (HV) were first stimulated with CSF-1(Macrophage colony-stimulating factor) to initiate the changes in the phosphotyrosyl signaling complexes in FMS. The objective of the present work was to develop a high throughput assay that measured p-FMS/FMS semi-quantitatively, with minimal sample requirement, and most importantly compared well to the current IP-Western assay. PMID:24339731

  10. Determination of the CYP1A-inducing potential of single substances, mixtures and extracts of samples in the micro-EROD assay with H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Schiwy, Andreas; Brinkmann, Markus; Thiem, Ines; Guder, Gabriele; Winkens, Kerstin; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Nüßer, Leonie; Thalmann, Beat; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Thoms, Brigitte; Hollert, Henner

    2015-11-01

    This protocol describes a quantitative and robust 96-well-plate-reader-based assay for the measurement of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity using the rat hepatoma cell line H4IIE. The assay can be used to determine the cytochrome P450 subfamily 1A (CYP1A)-inducing potential of single substances, as well as of mixtures and extracts of samples. It is based on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes (subfamily 1A) in cells after exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. One enzymatic reaction catalyzed by CYP1A is the deethylation of the exogenous substrate 7-ethoxyresorufin to the fluorescent product resorufin, which is measured as EROD activity in the assay. The CYP1A-inducing potential of a sample can be reliably quantified by comparing the EROD activity with the concentration-response curve of the standard substance 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, which can be detected at concentrations down to the picogram per liter range. A researcher familiar with the procedure can process up to 160 samples with four wells each within 3 d. The series described uses four plates with three concentrations per sample, which can be easily scaled to accommodate different sample sizes. PMID:26448361

  11. High Throughput Screen for Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70/DnaK): ATPase Assay in Low Volume By Exploiting Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Yoshinari; Chang, Lyra; Bainor, Anthony; McQuade, Thomas J.; Walczak, Christopher P.; Zhang, Yaru; Larsen, Martha J.; Kirchhoff, Paul; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of molecular chaperones are emerging as potential therapeutic targets. Their ATPase activity has classically been measured using colorimetric phosphate-detection reagents, such as quinaldine red (QR). While such assays are suitable for 96-well plate formats, they typically lose sensitivity when attempted in lower volume due to path length and meniscus effects. These limitations and Hsp70’s weak enzymatic activity have combined to create significant challenges in high throughput screening. To overcome these difficulties, we have adopted an energy transfer strategy that was originally reported by Zuck et al. (Anal. Biochem. 2005, 342:254–259). Briefly, white 384-well plates emit fluorescence when irradiated at 430 nm. In turn, this intrinsic fluorescence can be quenched by energy transfer with the QR-based chromophore. Using this more sensitive approach, we tested 55,400 compounds against DnaK, a prokaryotic member of the Hsp70 family. The assay performance was good (Z′ ~ 0.6, CV ~8%) and at least one promising new inhibitor was identified. In secondary assays, this compound specifically blocked stimulation of DnaK by its co-chaperone, DnaJ. Thus, this simple and inexpensive adaptation of a colorimetric method might be suitable for screening against Hsp70-family members. PMID:20926844

  12. Identification of RFPL3 Protein as a Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Modulating the Integration Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Type 1 Preintegration Complex Using a Microtiter Plate-based Assay*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Beng Hui; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Ying, Pamela Ho Rui; Takahashi, Chikako; Han, Qi'En; Chin, Wei Xin; Chao, Sheng-Hao; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Youichi

    2014-01-01

    Integration, one of the hallmarks of retrovirus replication, is mediated by a nucleoprotein complex called the preintegration complex (PIC), in which viral DNA is associated with many protein components that are required for completion of the early phase of infection. A striking feature of the PIC is its powerful integration activity in vitro. The PICs from a freshly isolated cytoplasmic extract of infected cells are able to insert viral DNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro. Therefore, a PIC-based in vitro assay is a reliable system for assessing protein factors influencing retroviral integration. In this study, we applied a microtiter plate-based in vitro assay to a screening study using a protein library that was produced by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system. Using a library of human E3 ubiquitin ligases, we identified RFPL3 as a potential stimulator of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) PIC integration activity in vitro. This enhancement of PIC activity by RFPL3 was likely to be attributed to its N-terminal RING domain. To further understand the functional role of RFPL3 in HIV infection, we created a human cell line overexpressing RFPL3. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that RFPL3 was associated with the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 PICs in infected cells. More importantly, single-round HIV-1 infection was enhanced significantly by RFPL3 expression. Our proteomic approach displays an advantage in the identification of new cellular proteins affecting the integration activity of the PIC and, therefore, contributes to the understanding of functional interaction between retroviral integration complexes and host factors. PMID:25107902

  13. A study on reference standard for cytotoxicity assay of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Nakamura, M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to find a standard substance for use as a reference in the cytotoxicity assay of biomaterials, as an alternative to animal experiments in recent years. Eight kinds of rubber were made in a plate shape to keep their surface area at 1 cm2 against 10 ml of extract volume. They were extracted by the following three extraction methods (a) dynamic extraction at 200 rpm gyration on alumina balls at 37 degrees C for 24 h; (b) static extraction at 37 degrees C for 24 h and (c) extraction by heating in an autoclave at 121 degrees C for 60 min. At the end of each period each extract was examined for cell viability based on an evaluation by neutral red uptake. These methods were repeated up to seven times. Two kinds of chemicals were also tested. The extracts obtained were used to treat human gingival fibroblasts that have been cultured with DMEM supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum into a 96 well tissue culture plate by 1 x 10(5) cells/ml, in an incubator aerated with 5% CO2, and 95% humidified air at 37 degrees C for 48 h. The extracts of ethylene-propylene, butyl, nitrile rubbers, and two kinds of chemicals yielded strong cytotoxicity in all three kinds of extraction methods, while chloroprene, fluorine-contained, isoprene, India, and silicone rubbers showed little cytotoxicity. The results obtained by the three kinds of extraction methods revealed no differences in the order of cytotoxicity of the materials tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7950880

  14. Isolation and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin from complex matrices using the BoTest matrix assays.

    PubMed

    Dunning, F Mark; Piazza, Timothy M; Zeytin, Füsûn N; Tucker, Ward C

    2014-01-01

    Accurate detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in complex matrices is required for pharmaceutical, environmental, and food sample testing. Rapid BoNT testing of foodstuffs is needed during outbreak forensics, patient diagnosis, and food safety testing while accurate potency testing is required for BoNT-based drug product manufacturing and patient safety. The widely used mouse bioassay for BoNT testing is highly sensitive but lacks the precision and throughput needed for rapid and routine BoNT testing. Furthermore, the bioassay's use of animals has resulted in calls by drug product regulatory authorities and animal-rights proponents in the US and abroad to replace the mouse bioassay for BoNT testing. Several in vitro replacement assays have been developed that work well with purified BoNT in simple buffers, but most have not been shown to be applicable to testing in highly complex matrices. Here, a protocol for the detection of BoNT in complex matrices using the BoTest Matrix assays is presented. The assay consists of three parts: The first part involves preparation of the samples for testing, the second part is an immunoprecipitation step using anti-BoNT antibody-coated paramagnetic beads to purify BoNT from the matrix, and the third part quantifies the isolated BoNT's proteolytic activity using a fluorogenic reporter. The protocol is written for high throughput testing in 96-well plates using both liquid and solid matrices and requires about 2 hr of manual preparation with total assay times of 4-26 hr depending on the sample type, toxin load, and desired sensitivity. Data are presented for BoNT/A testing with phosphate-buffered saline, a drug product, culture supernatant, 2% milk, and fresh tomatoes and includes discussion of critical parameters for assay success. PMID:24638074

  15. A quantitative and high-throughput assay of human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, David; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome is accomplished by the two viral proteins E1 and E2 in concert with host DNA replication factors. HPV DNA replication is an established model of eukaryotic DNA replication and a potential target for antiviral therapy. Assays to measure the transient replication of HPV DNA in transfected cells have been developed, which rely on a plasmid carrying the viral origin of DNA replication (ori) together with expression vectors for E1 and E2. Replication of the ori-plasmid is typically measured by Southern blotting or PCR analysis of newly replicated DNA (i.e., DpnI digested DNA) several days post-transfection. Although extremely valuable, these assays have been difficult to perform in a high-throughput and quantitative manner. Here, we describe a modified version of the transient DNA replication assay that circumvents these limitations by incorporating a firefly luciferase expression cassette in cis of the ori. Replication of this ori-plasmid by E1 and E2 results in increased levels of firefly luciferase activity that can be accurately quantified and normalized to those of Renilla luciferase expressed from a control plasmid, thus obviating the need for DNA extraction, digestion, and analysis. We provide a detailed protocol for performing the HPV type 31 DNA replication assay in a 96-well plate format suitable for small-molecule screening and EC50 determinations. The quantitative and high-throughput nature of the assay should greatly facilitate the study of HPV DNA replication and the identification of inhibitors thereof. PMID:25348316

  16. Direct comparison of the Ames microplate format (MPF) test in liquid medium with the standard Ames pre-incubation assay on agar plates by use of equivocal to weakly positive test compounds.

    PubMed

    Flückiger-Isler, Sini; Kamber, Markus

    2012-08-30

    The Ames microplate format (MPF™) test, which uses liquid media and in 384-well microplates with a readout based on a colour-change, has been used for over 10 years at several major pharmaceutical companies for screening the genotoxic potential of early drug candidates when compound supply is minimal. Meanwhile, Xenometrix has adapted this screen from the two-strain Ames II test for use with five tester strains, in compliance with OECD Guideline 471. A set of 15 equivocal to weakly positive chemicals selected from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) database was tested simultaneously in the Ames microplate format (MPF) and the standard Ames pre-incubation method on agar plates. Such a direct comparison of the two test methods with the same overnight culture(s), chemicals and S9-mix preparation should exclude external variability factors. Thirteen of the 15 chemicals showed concordant results in both tests despite the choice of chemicals that showed varying inter- and even intra-laboratory results in the NTP studies. These results indicate that the Ames MPF™ assay is a reliable predictive tool that can be used like the regular Ames test to evaluate compounds for mutagenicity. PMID:22579797

  17. A high-throughput in vivo micronucleus assay for genome instability screening in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Karp, Natasha A; Ng, Bee Ling; Jackson, Stephen P; Adams, David J; McIntyre, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    We describe a sensitive, robust, high-throughput method for quantifying the formation of micronuclei, markers of genome instability, in mouse erythrocytes. Micronuclei are whole chromosomes or chromosome segments that have been separated from the nucleus. Other methods of detection rely on labour-intensive, microscopy-based techniques. Here, we describe a 2-d, 96-well plate-based flow cytometric method of micronucleus scoring that is simple enough for a research technician experienced in flow cytometry to perform. The assay detects low levels of genome instability that cannot be readily identified by classic phenotyping, using 25 μl of blood. By using this assay, we have screened >10,000 blood samples and discovered novel genes that contribute to vertebrate genome maintenance, as well as novel disease models and mechanisms of genome instability disorders. We discuss experimental design considerations, including statistical power calculation, we provide troubleshooting tips, and we discuss factors that contribute to a false-positive increase in the number of micronucleated red blood cells and to experimental variability. PMID:25551665

  18. Progesterone receptor chaperone complex-based highthroughput screening assay: identification of capsaicin as inhibitor of Hsp90 machine

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Alfa, Eyad; Lu, Su; Chadli, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 and its co-chaperones are known to be important for cancer cell survival. The N-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 that are in ongoing clinical trials as anti-tumor agents have unfortunately shown disappointing efficacies in the clinic. Thus, novel inhibitors of the Hsp90 machine with different mechanism of action are urgently needed. We report here the development of a novel high-throughput drug-screening (HTS) assay platform to identify small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones. This assay quantitatively measures the ability of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones to refold/protect the progesterone receptor (PR), a physiological client of Hsp90, in 96-well plate format. We screened the NIH clinical collection drug library and identified capsaicin as a hit molecule. Capsaicin is an FDA-approved drug for topical use in pain management. Cell survival assays showed that capsaicin selectively kills cancer cells and destabilizes several Hsp90 client proteins. Thus, our data may explain the seemingly pleotropic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25184514

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Experimental Use in Detection of Antibodies to Lawsonia intracellularis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, J. J.; Eichmeyer, M. A.; Schaeffer, M. L.; McOrist, S.; Harris, D. L.; Roof, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Lawsonia intracellularis was developed and compared with a whole-cell antigen-based immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT). The antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was derived from Percoll gradient purified cultures of L. intracellularis by using a modification of the Westphal hot phenol procedure. The antigen was bound directly to polystyrene 96-well microtiter plates, and the assay was performed in an indirect ELISA format. Specificity and sensitivity values based on 80 known positive and 80 known negative serum samples from controlled experimental trials were 93.7% and 88.7%, respectively. Serological results from a controlled L. intracellularis challenge exposure study confirmed the high specificity and sensitivity of this assay (100% and 99.5%, respectively). Comparisons between the LPS ELISA and the IFAT in detecting anti-Lawsonia antibodies in this controlled study revealed significantly more LPS ELISA-positive pigs than IFAT-positive pigs on days 21, 28, 35, and 42 (P = 0.003, 0.030, 0.002, and 0.006, respectively). This indirect ELISA (LPS ELISA) test is an improved method of detecting antibodies in pigs soon after exposure to L. intracellularis, regardless of isolate type (vaccine or wild type) in experimental studies. The LPS ELISA may be used as a tool to support future research trials on vaccine efficacy and to further understand the immune response induced by L. intracellularis. PMID:15939742

  20. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity. PMID:27185215

  1. Rapid mercury assays

    SciTech Connect

    Szurdoki, S.; Kido, H.; Hammock, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    We have developed rapid assays with the potential of detecting mercury in environmental samples. our methods combine the simple ELISA-format with the selective, high affinity complexation of mercuric ions by sulfur-containing ligands. The first assay is based on a sandwich chelate formed by a protein-bound ligand immobilized on the wells of a microliter plate, mercuric ion of the analyzed sample, and another ligand conjugated to a reporter enzyme. The second assay involves competition between mercuric ions and an organomercury-conjugate to bind to a chelating conjugate. Several sulfur containing chelators (e.g., dithiocarbamates) and organomercurials linked to macromolecular carriers have been investigated in these assay formats. The assays detect mercuric ions in ppb/high ppt concentrations with high selectivity.

  2. A Multiplexed Cell-Based Assay for the Identification of Modulators of Pre-Membrane Processing as a Target against Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stolp, Zachary D.; Smurthwaite, Cameron A.; Reed, Connor; Williams, Wesley; Dharmawan, Andre; Djaballah, Hakim

    2015-01-01

    The DenV pre-membrane protein (prM) is a crucial chaperone for the viral envelope protein, preventing premature fusion with vesicles during viral export. prM molecules in immature particles are cleaved by host proteases, leading to mature fusogenic virions. Blockade of prM cleavage would restrict fusion and represents a novel druggable opportunity against DenV. We have thus established a cell-based platform to monitor prM processing that relies on an engineered two-tag scaffold that travels to the cell surface through the secretory pathway. The assay discriminates between a single cell-surface tag when prM is cleaved and two tags when it is not, as detected through fluorescent-coupled antibodies by flow cytometry. The assay, miniaturized into a 96-well plate format, was multiplexed with the HIV-1 envelope boundary, also cleaved in the same pathway. A pilot screen against 1280 compounds was executed, leading to the identification of a potential active and corroborating the robustness of our assay for large-scale screening. We describe for the first time a cell-based assay that monitors DenV prM processing within the classical secretory pathway, which was exploited to identify a potential novel drug against DenV. PMID:25724189

  3. A Multiplexed Cell-Based Assay for the Identification of Modulators of Pre-Membrane Processing as a Target against Dengue Virus.

    PubMed

    Stolp, Zachary D; Smurthwaite, Cameron A; Reed, Connor; Williams, Wesley; Dharmawan, Andre; Djaballah, Hakim; Wolkowicz, Roland

    2015-06-01

    The DenV pre-membrane protein (prM) is a crucial chaperone for the viral envelope protein, preventing premature fusion with vesicles during viral export. prM molecules in immature particles are cleaved by host proteases, leading to mature fusogenic virions. Blockade of prM cleavage would restrict fusion and represents a novel druggable opportunity against DenV. We have thus established a cell-based platform to monitor prM processing that relies on an engineered two-tag scaffold that travels to the cell surface through the secretory pathway. The assay discriminates between a single cell-surface tag when prM is cleaved and two tags when it is not, as detected through fluorescent-coupled antibodies by flow cytometry. The assay, miniaturized into a 96-well plate format, was multiplexed with the HIV-1 envelope boundary, also cleaved in the same pathway. A pilot screen against 1280 compounds was executed, leading to the identification of a potential active and corroborating the robustness of our assay for large-scale screening. We describe for the first time a cell-based assay that monitors DenV prM processing within the classical secretory pathway, which was exploited to identify a potential novel drug against DenV. PMID:25724189

  4. Confocal fluorescence detection expanded to UV excitation: the first continuous fluorimetric assay of human steroid sulfatase in nanoliter volume.

    PubMed

    Billich, Andreas; Bilban, Melitta; Meisner, Nicole-Claudia; Nussbaumer, Peter; Neubauer, Andreas; Jäger, Stefan; Auer, Manfred

    2004-02-01

    Steroid sulfatase is an enzyme that currently enjoys considerable interest as a potential drug target in the treatment of estrogen- and androgen-dependent diseases, in particular breast cancer. We have purified human steroid sulfatase to apparent homogeneity from recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells, and we established an assay with a new fluorogenic substrate, 3,4-benzocoumarin-7-O-sulfate (1). Substrate 1 features a K(m) value of 22.5 microM, which is close to the value for the natural substrate dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (26 microM) and much lower than the K(m) values of other synthetic substrates (276-736 microM). Importantly, the cleavage of substrate 1 can be monitored continuously during the enzymatic cleavage, since a change in fluorescence intensity is detectable at the pH where the enzyme is active; in contrast, all other synthetic substrates described so far require alkalization to reveal a measurable absorbance or fluorescence signal. The adaptation of the assay to the 96-well format allows continuous monitoring of multiple wells in a microplate fluorescence reader. Applications of the assay for the determination of IC(50) and K(i) values of novel steroid sulfatase inhibitors are presented. Most importantly the assay was transferred to the nanoscale format (1-microl assay volume) in 2080-well plates with confocal fluorescence detection. This miniaturization will permit screening with a minimum throughput of 20000 compounds per day. The system presented demonstrates that the confocal detection platform used for nanoscreening can be successfully adapted to assays for which conventional ultraviolet dyes like coumarins are necessary. This strongly broadens the application range of confocal readers in drug screening. PMID:15090207

  5. An antigen-specific, four-color, B-cell FluoroSpot assay utilizing tagged antigens for detection.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Peter; Bengtsson, Theresa; Zuber, Bartek; Färnert, Anna; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    The FluoroSpot assay, a variant of ELISpot utilizing fluorescent detection, has so far been used primarily for assessment of T cells, where simultaneous detection of several cytokines has allowed a more qualitative analysis of functionally distinct T cells. The potential to measure multiple analytes also presents several advantages when analyzing B cells. Our aim was to develop a B-cell FluoroSpot assay adaptable to studies of a variety of antigens. The assay utilizes anti-IgG antibodies immobilized in 96-well filter membrane plates. During cell culture, IgG antibodies secreted by antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are captured in the vicinity of each of these cells and the specificity of single ASCs is defined using antigens for detection. The antigens were labeled with biotin or peptide tags enabling secondary detection with fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin or tag-specific antibodies. The assay, utilizing up to four different tag systems and fluorophores simultaneously, was evaluated using hybridomas and immunized splenocytes as ASCs. Assay variants were developed that could: i) identify multiple ASCs with different antigen specificities; ii) detect ASCs showing cross-reactivity with different but related antigens; and iii) define the antigen-specificity and, by including anti-IgG subclass detection reagents, simultaneously determine the IgG subclass of antibodies secreted by ASCs. As demonstrated here, the B-cell FluoroSpot assay using tag-based detection systems provides a versatile and powerful tool to investigate antibody responses by individual cells that can be readily adapted to studies of a variety of antigen-specific ASCs. PMID:26930550

  6. Quantitative assessment of the proliferation of the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus using a bioluminescence assay for ATP content.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Surekha; Hassan, Kolaleh; Sullivan, David J; Vasta, Gerardo R; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2013-12-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a protozoan parasite that causes "Dermo" disease in the eastern oyster Crasssostrea virginica in coastal areas of the USA. Until now, intervention strategies against the parasite have found limited success, and Dermo still remains one of the main hurdles for the restoration of oyster populations. We adapted a commercial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) content-based assay to assess the in vitro proliferation of P. marinus in a 96-well plate format, and validated the method by measuring the effects of potential anti-proliferative compounds. The sensitivity (1.5-3.1 × 10(4) cells/well), linearity (R (2) = 0.983), and signal stability (60 min) support the reliability of the assay for assessing cell proliferation. Validation of the assay by culturing P. marinus in the presence of increasing concentrations of triclosan showed a dose-response profile. The IC50 value obtained was higher than that reported earlier, possibly due to the use of different viability assay methods and a different P. marinus strain. The antibiotics G418 and tetracycline and the herbicide fluridone were active against P. marinus proliferation; the IC50 of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and atrazine was relatively high suggesting either off-target effects or inability to reach the targets. The validation of the ATP-based assay, together with significant advantages of the Perkinsus culture methodology (homogeneity, reproducibility, and high cell densities), underscores the value of this assay for developing high-throughput screens for the identification of novel leader compounds against Perkinsus species, and most importantly, for the closely-related apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24533297

  7. Quantitative assessment of the proliferation of the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus using a bioluminescence assay for ATP content

    PubMed Central

    Shridhar, Surekha; Hassan, Kolaleh; Sullivan, David J.; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Fernández Robledo, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a protozoan parasite that causes “Dermo” disease in the eastern oyster Crasssostrea virginica in coastal areas of the USA. Until now, intervention strategies against the parasite have found limited success, and Dermo still remains one of the main hurdles for the restoration of oyster populations. We adapted a commercial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) content-based assay to assess the in vitro proliferation of P. marinus in a 96-well plate format, and validated the method by measuring the effects of potential anti-proliferative compounds. The sensitivity (1.5–3.1 × 104 cells/well), linearity (R2 = 0.983), and signal stability (60 min) support the reliability of the assay for assessing cell proliferation. Validation of the assay by culturing P. marinus in the presence of increasing concentrations of triclosan showed a dose–response profile. The IC50 value obtained was higher than that reported earlier, possibly due to the use of different viability assay methods and a different P. marinus strain. The antibiotics G418 and tetracycline and the herbicide fluridone were active against P. marinus proliferation; the IC50 of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and atrazine was relatively high suggesting either off-target effects or inability to reach the targets. The validation of the ATP-based assay, together with significant advantages of the Perkinsus culture methodology (homogeneity, reproducibility, and high cell densities), underscores the value of this assay for developing high-throughput screens for the identification of novel leader compounds against Perkinsus species, and most importantly, for the closely-related apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24533297

  8. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assays for the detection of activity and inhibition of phosphatase enzymes employing phosphorescently labeled peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Desmond J; O'Riordan, Tomás C; O'Sullivan, Paul J; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2007-02-01

    A rapid, homogenous, antibody-free assay for phosphatase enzymes was developed using the phosphorescent platinum (II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) and time-resolved fluorescent detection. An internally quenched decameric peptide substrate containing a phospho-tyrosine residue, labeled with PtCP-maleimide and dabcyl-NHS at its termini was designed. Phosphatase catalysed dephosphorylation of the substrate resulted in a minor increase in PtCP signal, while subsequent cleavage by chymotrypsin at the dephosphorylated Tyr-Leu site provided a 3.5 fold enhancement of PtCP phosphorescence. This phosphorescence phosphatase enhancement assay was optimized to a 96 well plate format with detection on a commercial TR-F plate reader, and applied to measure the activity and inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, recombinant human CD45, and tyrosine phosphatases in Jurkat cell lysates within 40 min. Parameters of these enzymatic reactions such as Km's, limits of detection (L.O.D's) and IC50 values for the non-specific inhibitor sodium orthovanadate were also determined. PMID:17386566

  9. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J. David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days—about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU—fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  10. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-10-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days-about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU-fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  11. Miniaturized plate readers for low-cost, high-throughput phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Paul A; Dougherty, Bonnie V; Moutinho, Thomas J; Papin, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    We present a miniaturized plate reader for measuring optical density in 96-well plates. Our standalone reader fits in most incubators, environmental chambers, or biological containment suites, allowing users to leverage their existing laboratory infrastructure. The device contains no moving parts, allowing an entire 96-well plate to be read several times per second. We demonstrate how the fast sampling rate allows our reader to detect small changes in optical density, even when the device is placed in a shaking incubator. A wireless communication module allows remote monitoring of multiple devices in real time. These features allow easy assembly of multiple readers to create a scalable, accurate solution for high-throughput phenotypic screening. PMID:25366331

  12. Miniaturized Plate Readers for Low-Cost, High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Paul A.; Dougherty, Bonnie V.; Moutinho, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a miniaturized plate reader for measuring optical density in 96-well plates. Our standalone reader fits in most incubators, environmental chambers, or biological containment suites, allowing users to leverage their existing laboratory infrastructure. The device contains no moving parts, allowing an entire 96-well plate to be read several times per second. We demonstrate how the fast sampling rate allows our reader to detect small changes in optical density, even when the device is placed in a shaking incubator. A wireless communication module allows remote monitoring of multiple devices in real time. These features allow easy assembly of multiple readers to create a scalable, accurate solution for high-throughput phenotypic screening. PMID:25366331

  13. Use of a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader in high-throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebe, Duncan R.; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha; Hahn, Holly; Warrior, Usha; Traphagen, Linda; Burns, David J.

    1999-04-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) efforts at Abbott Laboratories have been greatly facilitated by the use of a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader. The FLIPR consists of an incubated cabinet with integrated 96-channel pipettor and fluorometer. An argon laser is used to excite fluorophores in a 96-well microtiter plate and the emitted fluorometer. An argon laser is used to excite fluorophores in a 96-well microtiter plate and the emitted fluorescence is imaged by a cooled CCD camera. The image data is downloaded from the camera and processed to average the signal form each well of the microtiter pate for each time point. The data is presented in real time on the computer screen, facilitating interpretation and trouble-shooting. In addition to fluorescence, the camera can also detect luminescence form firefly luciferase.

  14. New high-throughput screening protease assay based upon supramolecular self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, David G.; Tang, Yanli; Zhou, Zhijun; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2008-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that the supramolecular self-assembly of cyanines could be useful for developing fluorescent enzymatic assays. We took that concept a step further by synthesizing a covalent adduct of the tetrapeptide Asp-Glu-Val-Asp (DEVD) and a cyanine (DEVD-cyanine). The DEVD-cyanine due to its canonical sequence was recognized and hydrolyzed by the proteases, Caspase-3 and -7 in 96- or 384-microwell plate reactions. The catalytically liberated cyanine self-assembled upon scaffolds of carboxymethylamylose (CMA), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), or a mixture of CMA and CMC resulting in a J aggregate exhibiting bright fluorescence at a 470 nm emission wavelength (optimum signal/background using excitation wavelengths of 415-440 nm). The fluorescence intensity increased with enzyme and substrate concentrations or reaction time and exhibited classical saturation profiles of a rectangular hyperbola. Saturation of the reaction was at 30 U/mL (1 {micro}g/mL) Caspase-3 and 250 {micro}M DEVD-cyanine. The reaction kinetics was linear between 1 and 20 min and saturated at 60 min. The affinity constant (Km) for DEVD-cyanine was 23 {micro}M, similar to those of previously reported values for other DEVD substrates of Caspase-3. Maximal fluorescence emission was observed by using a mixture of CMA and CMC scaffolds at 65 and 35 {micro}M, respectively. The reaction kinetics of Caspase-7 executed in a 384-well plate was similar to the reaction kinetics of Caspase-3 conducted in a 96-well plate. We believe that this is the first demonstration of a cyanine liberated from a covalent adduct due to protease action, leading to supramolecular self-assembly and the detection of protease activity.

  15. Development of a differential scanning fluorimetry based high throughput screening assay for the discovery of affinity binders against an anthrax protein.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Fiona J; Greenwood, Gemma K; Birchall, Kristian; Chen, Beining

    2010-09-01

    The anthrax protein protective antigen (PA) is responsible for cell-surface recognition and aids the delivery of the toxic anthrax enzymes into host cells. By targeting PA and preventing it from binding to host cells, it is hoped that the delivery of toxins into the cell will be inhibited. The current assay reported for PA is a low throughput functional assay. Here, the high throughput screening method using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) was developed and optimized to screen a number of libraries from various sources including a selection of FDA-approved drugs as well as hits selected by a virtual screening campaign. DSF is a rapid technique that uses fluorescence to monitor the thermal unfolding of proteins using a standard QPCR instrument. A positive shift in the calculated melting temperature (Tm), of the protein in the presence of a compound, relative to the Tm of the unbound protein, indicates that stabilization of the protein by ligand binding may have occurred. Optimization of the melting assay showed SYPRO Orange to be an ideal dye as a marker and lead to the reduction of DMSO concentration to <1% (v/v) in the final assay. The final assay volume was minimized to 25 L with 5 g protein per well of 96-well plate. In addition, a buffer, salt and additive screen lead to the selection of 10 mM HEPES-NaOH pH 7.5, 100 mM NaCl as the assay buffer. This method has been shown here to be useful as a primary method for the detection of small-molecule PA ligands, giving a hit rate of approximately 7%. These ligands can then be studied further using PA functional assays to confirm their biological activities before being selected as lead compounds for the treatment of anthrax. PMID:20376913

  16. A Sensitive Microplate Assay for Lipase Activity Measurement Using Olive Oil Emulsion Substrate: Modification of the Copper Soap Colorimetric Method.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ahmad; Karmali, Amin; Abdelmoez, Wael

    2016-01-01

    The present work involves a sensitive high-throughput microtiter plate based colorimetric assay for estimating lipase activity using cupric acetate pyridine reagent (CAPR). In the first approach, three factors two levels factorial design methodology was used to evaluate the interactive effect of different parameters on the sensitivity of the assay method. The optimization study revealed that the optimum CAPR concentration was 7.5% w/v, the optimum solvent was heptane and the optimum CAPR pH was 6. In the second approach, the optimized colorimetric microplate assay was used to measure lipase activity based on enzymatic hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion substrate at 37°C and 150 rpm. The emulsion substrates were formulated by using olive oil, triton X-100 (10% v/v in pH 8) and sodium phosphate buffer of pH 8 in ratio of 1:1:1 in the case of Candida sp. lipase. While in the case of immobilized lipozyme RMIM, The emulsion substrates were formulated by using olive oil, triton X-100 (1% v/v in pH 8) and sodium phosphate buffer of pH 8 in ratio of 2:1:1. Absorbance was measured at 655 nm. The stability of this assay (in terms of colored heptane phase absorbance readings) retained more than 92.5% after 24 h at 4°C compared to the absorbance readings measured at zero time. In comparison with other lipase assay methods, beside the developed sensitivity, the reproducibility and the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the proposed method, it permits analyzing of 96 samples at one time in a 96-well microplate. Furthermore, it consumes small quantities of chemicals and unit operations. PMID:27581492

  17. Phenotypic assays to identify agents that induce reactive gliosis: a counter-screen to prioritize compounds for preclinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Samuel R; Jimenez, Joaquin E; Shi, Yan; Al-Ali, Hassan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2015-09-01

    Astrocyte phenotypes change in a process called reactive gliosis after traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury. Astrogliosis is characterized by expansion of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) cytoskeleton, adoption of stellate morphologies, and differential expression of some extracellular matrix molecules. The astrocytic response immediately after injury is beneficial, but in the chronic injury phase, reactive astrocytes produce inhibitory factors (i.e., chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs]) that limit the regrowth of injured axons. There are no drugs that promote axon regeneration or functional recovery after CNS trauma in humans. To develop novel therapeutics for the injured CNS, we screened various libraries in a phenotypic assay to identify compounds that promote neurite outgrowth. However, the effects these compounds have on astrocytes are unknown. Specifically, we were interested in whether compounds could alter astrocytes in a manner that mimics the glial reaction to injury. To test this hypothesis, we developed cell-based phenotypic bioassays to measure changes in (1) GFAP morphology/localization and (2) CSPG expression/immunoreactivity from primary astrocyte cultures. These assays were optimized for six-point dose-response experiments in 96-well plates. The GFAP morphology assay is suitable for counter-screening with a Z-factor of 0.44±0.03 (mean±standard error of the mean; N=3 biological replicates). The CSPG assay is reproducible and informative, but does not satisfy common metrics for a "screenable" assay. As proof of principle, we tested a small set of hit compounds from our neurite outgrowth bioassay and identified one that can enhance axon growth without exacerbating the deleterious characteristics of reactive gliosis. PMID:26230074

  18. Toxicity Screening of the ToxCast Phase II Chemical Library Using a Zebrafish Developmental Assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the chemical screening and prioritization research program of the US EPA, the ToxCast Phase II chemicals were assessed using a vertebrate screen for developmental toxicity. Zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were exposed in 96-well plates from late-blastula stage (6hr pos...

  19. Using an Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescent Assay to Determine Effective Antibiotic Combinations against Carbapenem-Resistant Gram Negative Bacteria within 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yiying; Leck, Hui; Lim, Tze Peng; Teo, Jocelyn; Lee, Winnie; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien; Tan, Thuan Tong; Tan, Thean-Yen; Kwa, Andrea Lay-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Current in vitro combination testing methods involve enumeration by bacterial plating, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Measurement of bioluminescence, released when bacterial adenosine triphosphate binds to firefly luciferin-luciferase, has been proposed as a surrogate for bacterial counts. We developed an ATP bioluminescent combination testing assay with a rapid turnaround time of 24h to determine effective antibiotic combinations. Methods 100 strains of carbapenem-resistant (CR) GNB [30 Acinetobacter baumannii (AB), 30 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and 40 Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP)] were used. Bacterial suspensions (105 CFU/ml) were added to 96-well plates containing clinically achievable concentrations of multiple single and two-antibiotic combinations. At 24h, the luminescence intensity of each well was measured. Receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to determine optimal luminescence threshold (TRLU) to discriminate between inhibitory/non-inhibitory combinations when compared to viable plating. The unweighted accuracy (UA) [(sensitivity + specificity)/2] of TRLU values was determined. External validation was further done using 50 additional CR-GNB. Results Predictive accuracies of TRLU were high for when all antibiotic combinations and species were collectively analyzed (TRLU = 0.81, UA = 89%). When individual thresholds for each species were determined, UA remained high. Predictive accuracy was highest for KP (TRLU = 0.81, UA = 91%), and lowest for AB (TRLU = 0.83, UA = 87%). Upon external validation, high overall accuracy (91%) was observed. The assay distinguished inhibitory/non-inhibitory combinations with UA of 80%, 94% and 93% for AB, PA and KP respectively. Conclusion We developed an assay that is robust at identifying useful combinations with a rapid turn-around time of 24h, and may be employed to guide the timely selection of effective antibiotic combinations. PMID:26460891

  20. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (Inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  1. Fluorometric microplate assay to measure glutathione S-transferase activity in insects and mites using monochlorobimane.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Stumpf, Natascha

    2002-04-15

    Elevated levels of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides and acaricides in resistant pest insects and mites, respectively. Such compounds are either detoxicated directly via phase I metabolism or detoxicated by phase II metabolism of metabolites as formed by microsomal monooxygenases. Here we used monochlorobimane (MCB) as an artificial substrate and glutathione to determine total GST activity in equivalents of single pest insects and spider mites in a sensitive 96-well plate-based assay system by measuring the enzymatic conversion of MCB to its fluorescent bimane-glutathione adduct. The differentiation by their GST activity between several strains of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), with different degrees of resistance to numerous acaricides was more sensitive with MCB compared to the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Compared to an acaricide-susceptible reference strain, one field population of T. urticae showed a more than 10-fold higher GST activity measured with MCB, in contrast to a less than 2-fold higher activity when CDNB was used. Furthermore, we showed that GST activity can be sensitively assessed with MCB in homogenates of pest insects such as Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). PMID:11950219

  2. A fluorescence-based helicase assay: application to the screening of G-quadruplex ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Oscar; Gueddouda, Nassima Meriem; Boulé, Jean-Baptiste; Bourdoncle, Anne; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Helicases, enzymes that unwind DNA or RNA structure, are present in the cell nucleus and in the mitochondrion. Although the majority of the helicases unwind DNA or RNA duplexes, some of these proteins are known to resolve unusual structures such as G-quadruplexes (G4) in vitro. G4 may form stable barrier to the progression of molecular motors tracking on DNA. Monitoring G4 unwinding by these enzymes may reveal the mechanisms of the enzymes and provides information about the stability of these structures. In the experiments presented herein, we developed a reliable, inexpensive and rapid fluorescence-based technique to monitor the activity of G4 helicases in real time in a 96-well plate format. This system was used to screen a series of G4 structures and G4 binders for their effect on the Pif1 enzyme, a 5′ to 3′ DNA helicase. This simple assay should be adaptable to analysis of other helicases and G4 structures. PMID:25765657

  3. Towards non-invasive 3D hepatotoxicity assays with optical coherence phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Treskes, Philipp; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue-engineered models are increasingly recognised as more physiologically-relevant than standard 2D cell culture for pre-clinical drug toxicity testing. However, many types of conventional toxicity assays are incompatible with dense 3D tissues. This study investigated the use of optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) as a novel approach to assess cell death in 3D tissue culture. For 3D micro-spheroid formation Human hepatic C3A cells were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid gels and cultured in 100μl MEME/10%FBS in 96-well plates. After spheroid formation the 3D liver constructs were exposed to acetaminophen on culture day 8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in 3D cultures was evaluated using standard biochemical assays. An inverted OCPM in common path configuration was developed with a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlabs), centred at 930nm and a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and statistics on the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, were analysed over the acquisition time interval to retrieve overall cell viability. OCPM intensity (cell cluster size) and phase fluctuation statistics were directly compared with biochemical assays. In this study, we investigated optical coherence phase tomography to assess cell death in a 3d liver model after exposure to a prototypical hepatotoxin, acetaminophen. We showed that OCPM has the potential to assess noninvasively and label-free drug toxicity in 3D tissue models.

  4. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  5. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  6. The inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir1.1: development of functional assays to identify and characterize channel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Felix, John P; Priest, Birgit T; Solly, Kelli; Bailey, Timothy; Brochu, Richard M; Liu, Chou J; Kohler, Martin G; Kiss, Laszlo; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Tang, Haifeng; Pasternak, Alexander; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2012-10-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel is a member of the inwardly rectifying family of potassium (Kir) channels. ROMK (Kir1.1) is predominantly expressed in kidney where it plays a major role in the salt reabsorption process. Loss-of-function mutations in the human Kir1.1 channel are associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome type II, a life-threatening salt and water balance disorder. Heterozygous carriers of Kir1.1 mutations associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome have reduced blood pressure and a decreased risk of developing hypertension by age 60. These data suggest that Kir1.1 inhibitors could represent novel diuretics for the treatment of hypertension. Because little is known about the molecular pharmacology of Kir1.1 channels, assays that provide a robust, reliable readout of channel activity-while operating in high-capacity mode-are needed. In the present study, we describe high-capacity, 384- and 1,536-well plate, functional thallium flux, and IonWorks electrophysiology assays for the Kir1.1 channel that fulfill these criteria. In addition, 96-well (86)Rb(+) flux assays were established that can operate in the presence of 100% serum, and can provide an indication of the effect of a serum shift on compound potencies. The ability to grow Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing Kir1.1 in Transwell supports provides a polarized cell system that can be used to study the mechanism of Kir1.1 inhibition by different agents. All these functional Kir1.1 assays together can play an important role in supporting different aspects of drug development efforts during lead identification and/or optimization. PMID:22881347

  7. Evaluation of a High-Throughput Peptide Reactivity Format Assay for Assessment of the Skin Sensitization Potential of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chin Lin; Lam, Ai-Leen; Smith, Maree T.; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-01-01

    The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) is a validated method for in vitro assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. In the present work, we describe a peptide reactivity assay using 96-well plate format and systematically identified the optimal assay conditions for accurate and reproducible classification of chemicals with known sensitizing capacity. The aim of the research is to ensure that the analytical component of the peptide reactivity assay is robust, accurate, and reproducible in accordance with criteria that are used for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Analytical performance was evaluated using quality control samples (QCs; heptapeptides at low, medium, and high concentrations) and incubation of control chemicals (chemicals with known sensitization capacity, weak, moderate, strong, extreme, and non-sensitizers) with each of three synthetic heptapeptides, viz Cor1-C420 (Ac-NKKCDLF), cysteine- (Ac-RFAACAA), and lysine- (Ac-RFAAKAA) containing heptapeptides. The optimal incubation temperature for all three heptapeptides was 25°C. Apparent heptapeptide depletion was affected by vial material composition. Incubation of test chemicals with Cor1-C420, showed that peptide depletion was unchanged in polypropylene vials over 3-days storage in an autosampler but this was not the case for borosilicate glass vials. For cysteine-containing heptapeptide, the concentration was not stable by day 3 post-incubation in borosilicate glass vials. Although the lysine-containing heptapeptide concentration was unchanged in both polypropylene and borosilicate glass vials, the apparent extent of lysine-containing heptapeptide depletion by ethyl acrylate, differed between polypropylene (24.7%) and glass (47.3%) vials. Additionally, the peptide-chemical complexes for Cor1-C420-cinnamaldehyde and cysteine-containing heptapeptide-2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene were partially reversible during 3-days of autosampler storage. These observations further highlight

  8. A high throughput colorimetric assay of β-1,3-D-glucans by Congo red dye.

    PubMed

    Semedo, Magda C; Karmali, Amin; Fonseca, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Mushroom strains contain complex nutritional biomolecules with a wide spectrum of therapeutic and prophylactic properties. Among these compounds, β-d-glucans play an important role in immuno-modulating and anti-tumor activities. The present work involves a novel colorimetric assay method for β-1,3-d-glucans with a triple helix tertiary structure by using Congo red. The specific interaction that occurs between Congo red and β-1,3-d-glucan was detected by bathochromic shift from 488 to 516 nm (>20 nm) in UV-Vis spectrophotometer. A micro- and high throughput method based on a 96-well microtiter plate was devised which presents several advantages over the published methods since it requires only 1.51 μg of polysaccharides in samples, greater sensitivity, speed, assay of many samples and very cheap. β-D-Glucans of several mushrooms (i.e., Coriolus versicolor, Ganoderma lucidum, Pleurotus ostreatus, Ganoderma carnosum, Hericium erinaceus, Lentinula edodes, Inonotus obliquus, Auricularia auricular, Polyporus umbellatus, Cordyseps sinensis, Agaricus blazei, Poria cocos) were isolated by using a sequence of several extractions with cold and boiling water, acidic and alkaline conditions and quantified by this microtiter plate method. FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the structural features of β-1,3-D-glucans in these mushroom samples as well as the specific interaction of these polysaccharides with Congo red. The effect of NaOH on triple helix conformation of β-1,3-D-glucans was investigated in several mushroom species. PMID:25555819

  9. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  10. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  11. A Compact Immunoassay Platform Based on a Multicapillary Glass Plate

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Shuhua; Zeng, Hulie; Yang, Jianmin; Nakajima, Hizuru; Uchiyama, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    A highly sensitive, rapid immunoassay performed in the multi-channels of a micro-well array consisting of a multicapillary glass plate (MCP) and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) slide is described. The micro-dimensions and large surface area of the MCP permitted the diffusion distance to be decreased and the reaction efficiency to be increased. To confirm the concept of the method, human immunoglobulin A (h-IgA) was measured using both the proposed immunoassay system and the traditional 96-well plate method. The proposed method resulted in a 1/5-fold decrease of immunoassay time, and a 1/56-fold cut in reagent consumption with a 0.05 ng/mL of limit of detection (LOD) for IgA. The method was also applied to saliva samples obtained from healthy volunteers. The results correlated well to those obtained by the 96-well plate method. The method has the potential for use in disease diagnostic or on-site immunoassays. PMID:24859022

  12. A validated enantioselective LC-MS/MS assay for quantification of a major chiral metabolite of an achiral 11-β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase 1 inhibitor in human plasma: Application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Michael T; Ji, Qin C; Iacono, Lisa; Dang, Oanh; Noren, Marzena; Bruce, John; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Arnold, Mark E

    2016-06-01

    BMS-823778 is a potent 11-β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase 1 (11βHSD-1) inhibitor and a potential therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay was developed and validated to enable reliable separation and quantification of both enantiomers of a chiral hydroxy metabolite (BMT-094817) in human plasma. Following liquid-liquid extraction in a 96-well plate format, chromatographic separation of the metabolite enantiomers was achieved by isocratic elution on a Chiralpak IA-3 column. Chromatographic conditions were optimized to ensure separation of both metabolite enantiomers. Metabolite enantiomers and stable isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standards were detected by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The LC-MS/MS assay was validated over a concentration range of 0.200-200ng/mL. Intra- and inter-assay precision values for replicate quality control samples were less than 9.9% for both enantiomers during the assay validation. Mean quality control accuracy values were within ±7.3%. Assay recoveries were high (>75%) and consistent across the assay range. The metabolite enantiomers were stable in human blood for 2h on ice. The analytes were also stable in human plasma for 25h at room temperature, 34days at -20°C and -70°C, and following five freeze-thaw cycles. No interconversion of the metabolite enantiomers was detected under any bioanalytical stress conditions, from blood collection/processing through extracted sample storage. The validated assay was successfully applied to the quantification of both metabolite enantiomers in human plasma in support of a human pharmacokinetic study. PMID:27100678

  13. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  14. Competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum antibodies to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus: diagnostic tool for successful eradication.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Lynn M; Cheevers, William P; McGuire, Travis C; Adams, D Scott; Hutton, Melinda M; Gavin, William G; Knowles, Donald P

    2003-03-01

    A competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was evaluated for the detection of serum antibodies to the surface envelope (SU) of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) in goats. This assay utilized 96-well microtiter plates containing CAEV-63 SU captured by monoclonal antibody (MAb) F7-299 and measured the competitive displacement of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated MAb GPB 74A binding by undiluted goat sera (F. Ozyörük, W. P. Cheevers, G. A. Hullinger, T. C. McGuire, M. Hutton, and D. P. Knowles, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 8:44-51, 2001). Two hundred serum samples from goats in the United States were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of cELISA based on the immunoprecipitation (IP) of [(35)S]methionine-labeled viral antigens as a standard of comparison. A positive cELISA was defined as >33.2% inhibition of MAb 74A binding based on 2 standard deviations above the mean percent inhibition of 140 IP-negative serum samples. At this cutoff value, there were 0 of 60 false-negative sera (100% sensitivity) and 5 of 140 false-positive sera (96.4% specificity). Additional studies utilized IP-monitored cELISA to establish a CAEV-free herd of 1,640 dairy goats. PMID:12626453

  15. Laboratory assessment of anti-thrombotic therapy in heart failure, atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease: insights using thrombelastography and a micro-titre plate assay of thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y C; Xiong, Q; Ranjit, P; Lip, G Y H; Blann, A D

    2016-08-01

    As heart failure, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation all bring a risk of thrombosis, anti-thrombotic therapy is recommended. Despite such treatment, major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke still occur, implying inadequate suppression of thrombus formation. Accordingly, identification of patients whose haemostasis remains unimpaired by treatment is valuable. We compared indices for assessing thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis by two different techniques in patients on different anti-thrombotic agents, i.e. aspirin or warfarin. We determined fibrin clot formation and fibrinolysis by a microplate assay and thromboelastography, and platelet marker soluble P selectin in 181 patients with acute or chronic heart failure, coronary artery disease who were taking either aspirin or warfarin. Five thromboelastograph indices and four microplate assay indices were different on aspirin versus warfarin (p < 0.05). In multivariate regression analysis, only microplate assay indices rate of clot formation and rate of clot dissolution were independently related to aspirin or warfarin use (p ≤ 0.001). Five microplate assay indices, but no thrombelastograph index, were different (p < 0.001) in aspirin users. Three microplate assay indices were different (p ≤ 0.002) in warfarin users. The microplate assay indices of lag time and rate of clot formation were abnormal in chronic heart failure patients on aspirin, suggesting increased risk of thrombosis despite anti-platelet use. Soluble P selectin was lower in patients on aspirin (p = 0.0175) but failed to correlate with any other index of haemostasis. The microplate assay shows promise as a tool for dissecting thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis in cardiovascular disease, and the impact of antithrombotic therapy. Prospective studies are required to determine a role in predicting thrombotic risk. PMID:26942726

  16. One plate, two plates, a thousand plates. How crystallisation changes with large numbers of samples.

    PubMed

    Newman, Janet

    2011-09-01

    Turning commercial lab automation into a high-throughput centre requires an underlying process, and implementing checks to ensure that the process is working as it should. At the Collaborative Crystallisation Centre (C3), protein samples from local, national and international groups are set up in crystallisation screening and optimisation experiments with two thousand 96 well plates being set up each year. During its five years of operation, the C3 has implemented a series of enabling protocols - from simple 'reality checks' to determine if a screen has evaporated during storage to more sophisticated systems such as a sample labelling and tracking system. The most important - and perhaps surprising - lesson has been how much effort is required to effectively communicate between the centre and its clients, as well as between the centre's staff members. It is easy to confuse the concept of 'high throughput' in any field with the idea of setting up an experiment quickly. Although automation can be used to set up a single experiment more rapidly than can be done by hand, the distinguishing feature of a high throughput technology is the sustainability of the increased rate. PMID:21571072

  17. Transwell(®) invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John

    2011-01-01

    The need to identify inhibitors of cancer invasion has driven the development of quantitative in vitro invasion assays. The most common assays used are based on the original Boyden assay system. Today commercially available plastic inserts for multi-well plates, which possess a cell-permeable membrane, as typified by Transwell(®) Permeable Supports, permit accurate repeatable invasion assays. When placed in the well of a multi-well tissue culture plate these inserts create a two-chamber system separated by the cell-permeable membrane. To create an invasion assay the pores in the membrane are blocked with a gel composed of extracellular matrix that is meant to mimic the typical matrices that tumour cells encounter during the invasion process in vivo. By placing the cells on one side of the gel and a chemoattractant on the other side of the gel, invasion is determined by counting those cells that have traversed the cell-permeable membrane having invaded towards the higher concentration of chemoattractant. In this chapter, in addition to protocols for performing Transwell invasion assays, there is consideration of the limitations of current assay designs with regard to available matrices and the absence of tumour microenvironment cells. PMID:21748672

  18. Optimization of cytotoxicity assay by real-time, impedance-based cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Quereda, J J; Mendonça, L; Majado, M J; Gomez-Coelho, K; Mrowiec, A; Herrero-Medrano, J M; Abellaneda, J M; Pallares, F J; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an optimized procedure for assessing an immune-mediated cytotoxicity, produced after the addition of human and baboon serum to transgenic porcine fibroblasts. This procedure is performed with the xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analyzer (RTCA). The xCELLigence system measures the impedance variations in the culture media of a 96-well microelectronic plate, and shows the changes in cell number and morphology in a real-time plot. However, different factors need to be optimized before developing an RTCA assay. Thus, we studied the influence of several variables, such as the number of cells seeded, the time the cells were allowed to grow before the tests, the serum concentration and the addition of rabbit complement. The findings were confirmed by the WST-1 classical cytotoxicity test. The results showed that 7.5 × 10(3) cells seeded per well produced the adequate CI in 10 h. The area under the curve and the CImin versus concentration values showed a very high correlation index (r(2) = 0.966 and r(2) = 0.92 for the first 50 h after challenge, respectively), proving that CI variations are directly proportional to the quantity of serum added. The addition of complement resulted in lower CImin values. Therefore, both the cytolysis level with and without exogenous complement addition had to be assessed. There was a high correlation between the relative cytotoxicity assessed by WST-1 and the CI obtained by RTCA when exogenous complement was not added (r(2) = 0.827; p < 0.001). The correlation was average when rabbit complement was added (r(2) = 0.523; p = 0.046). In conclusion, culture conditions have an important influence on RTCA cytotoxicity assays. PMID:23887614

  19. Assessment of the repeatability and border-plate effects of the B158/B60 enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay for the detection of circulating antigens (Ag-ELISA) of Taenia saginata.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Famke; Dorny, Pierre; Berkvens, Dirk; Van Hul, Anke; Van den Broeck, Nick; Makay, Caroline; Praet, Nicolas; Gabriël, Sarah

    2016-08-30

    The monoclonal antibody-based circulating antigen detecting ELISA (B158/B60 Ag-ELISA) has been used elaborately in several studies for the diagnosis of human, bovine and porcine cysticercosis. Interpretation of test results requires a good knowledge of the test characteristics, including the repeatability and the effect of the borders of the ELISA plates. Repeatability was tested for 4 antigen-negative and 5 antigen-positive reference bovine serum samples by calculating the Percentage Coefficient of Variation (%CV) within and between plates, within and between runs, overall, for two batches of monoclonal antibodies and by 2 laboratory technicians. All CV values obtained were below 20% (except one: 24.45%), which indicates a good repeatability and a negligible technician error. The value of 24.45% for indicating the variability between batches of monoclonal antibodies for one positive sample is still acceptable for repeatability measures. Border effects were determined by calculating the %CV values between the inner and outer wells of one plate for 2 positive serum samples. Variability is a little more present in the outer wells but this effect is very small and no significant border effect was found. PMID:27523940

  20. Microtissue Culture Plaque Assay for Herpesvirus saimiri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Emerson W.; Dunkel, Virginia C.

    1973-01-01

    A microtissue culture method for the plaque assay of Herpesvirus saimiri has been developed. Virus titrations carried out in Microtest II tissue culture plates (Falcon) yielded reproducible results that agreed well with those obtained by employing macrocultures. The described method is quantitative, reproducible, economical, and suitable for routine assay of large numbers of virus samples. Images PMID:4201642

  1. Genotoxic mode of action predictions from a multiplexed flow cytometric assay and a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Steven M; Bernacki, Derek T; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2016-04-01

    Several endpoints associated with cellular responses to DNA damage as well as overt cytotoxicity were multiplexed into a miniaturized, "add and read" type flow cytometric assay. Reagents included a detergent to liberate nuclei, RNase and propidium iodide to serve as a pan-DNA dye, fluorescent antibodies against γH2AX, phospho-histone H3, and p53, and fluorescent microspheres for absolute nuclei counts. The assay was applied to TK6 cells and 67 diverse reference chemicals that served as a training set. Exposure was for 24 hrs in 96-well plates, and unless precipitation or foreknowledge about cytotoxicity suggested otherwise, the highest concentration was 1 mM. At 4- and 24-hrs aliquots were removed and added to microtiter plates containing the reagent mix. Following a brief incubation period robotic sampling facilitated walk-away data acquisition. Univariate analyses identified biomarkers and time points that were valuable for classifying agents into one of three groups: clastogenic, aneugenic, or non-genotoxic. These mode of action predictions were optimized with a forward-stepping process that considered Wald test p-values, receiver operator characteristic curves, and pseudo R(2) values, among others. A particularly high performing multinomial logistic regression model was comprised of four factors: 4 hr γH2AX and phospho-histone H3 values, and 24 hr p53 and polyploidy values. For the training set chemicals, the four-factor model resulted in 94% concordance with our a priori classifications. Cross validation occurred via a leave-one-out approach, and in this case 91% concordance was observed. A test set of 17 chemicals that were not used to construct the model were evaluated, some of which utilized a short-term treatment in the presence of a metabolic activation system, and in 16 cases mode of action was correctly predicted. These initial results are encouraging as they suggest a machine learning strategy can be used to rapidly and reliably predict new chemicals

  2. Automated assay for screening the enzymatic release of reducing sugars from micronized biomass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To reduce the production cost of bioethanol obtained from fermentation of the sugars provided by degradation of lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., second generation bioethanol), it is necessary to screen for new enzymes endowed with more efficient biomass degrading properties. This demands the set-up of high-throughput screening methods. Several methods have been devised all using microplates in the industrial SBS format. Although this size reduction and standardization has greatly improved the screening process, the published methods comprise one or more manual steps that seriously decrease throughput. Therefore, we worked to devise a screening method devoid of any manual steps. Results We describe a fully automated assay for measuring the amount of reducing sugars released by biomass-degrading enzymes from wheat-straw and spruce. The method comprises two independent and automated steps. The first step is the making of "substrate plates". It consists of filling 96-well microplates with slurry suspensions of micronized substrate which are then stored frozen until use. The second step is an enzymatic activity assay. After thawing, the substrate plates are supplemented by the robot with cell-wall degrading enzymes where necessary, and the whole process from addition of enzymes to quantification of released sugars is autonomously performed by the robot. We describe how critical parameters (amount of substrate, amount of enzyme, incubation duration and temperature) were selected to fit with our specific use. The ability of this automated small-scale assay to discriminate among different enzymatic activities was validated using a set of commercial enzymes. Conclusions Using an automatic microplate sealer solved three main problems generally encountered during the set-up of methods for measuring the sugar-releasing activity of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes: throughput, automation, and evaporation losses. In its present set-up, the robot can autonomously

  3. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  4. An imaging assay to analyze primary neurons for cellular neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Götte, Marjo; Hofmann, Gabriele; Michou-Gallani, Anne-Isabelle; Glickman, J Fraser; Wishart, William; Gabriel, Daniela

    2010-09-30

    The development of high-content screening technologies including automated immunostaining, automated image acquisition and automated image analysis have enabled higher throughput of cellular imaging-based assays. Here we used high-content imaging to thoroughly characterize the cultures of primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). We describe procedures to isolate and cultivate the CGNs in 96-well and 384-well format, as well as a procedure to freeze and thaw the CGNs. These methods allow the use of CGNs in 96-well format analyzing 2500 samples per experiment using freshly isolated cells. Down-scaling to 384-well format and freezing and thawing of the CGNs allow even higher throughput. A cellular assay with rat CGN cultures was established to study the neurotoxicity of compounds in order to filter out toxic compounds at an early phase of drug development. The imaging-based toxicity assay was able to reveal adverse effects of compounds on primary neurons which were not detected in neuroblastoma or other cell lines tested. PMID:20620166

  5. Development of a luciferase based viral inhibition assay to evaluate vaccine induced CD8 T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Fernandez-Fernandez, Natalia; Kappes, John C.; Hayes, Peter; Ahmed, Tina; Icyuz, Mert; Edmonds, Tara G.; Bergin, Philip; Anzala, Omu; Hanke, Tomas; Clark, Lorna; Cox, Josephine H.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Gilmour, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of SIV and HIV specific CD8 T cells has been shown to correlate with control of in vivo replication. Poor correlation between IFN-γ ELISPOT responses and in vivo control of the virus has triggered the development of more relevant assays to assess functional HIV-1 specific CD8 T-cell responses for the evaluation and prioritization of new HIV-1 vaccine candidates. We previously established a viral inhibition assay (VIA) that measures the ability of vaccine-induced CD8 T-cell responses to inhibit viral replication in autologous CD4 T cells. In this assay, viral replication is determined by measuring p24 in the culture supernatant. Here we describe the development of a novel VIA, referred to as IMC LucR VIA that exploits replication-competent HIV-1 infectious molecular clones (IMCs) in which the complete proviral genome is strain-specific and which express the Renilla luciferase (LucR) gene to determine viral growth and inhibition. The introduction of the luciferase readout does provide significant improvement of the read out time. In addition to switching to the LucR read out, changes made to the overall protocol resulted in the miniaturization of the assay from a 48 to a 96-well plate format, which preserved sample and allowed for the introduction of replicates. The overall assay time was reduced from 13 to 8 days. The assay has a high degree of specificity, and the previously observed non-specific background inhibition in cells from HIV-1 negative volunteers has been reduced dramatically. Importantly, we observed an increase in positive responses, indicating an improvement in sensitivity compared to the original VIA. Currently, only a limited number of “whole-genome” IMC-LucR viruses are available and our efforts will focus on expanding the panel to better evaluate anti-viral breadth. Overall, we believe the IMC LucR VIA provides a platform to assess functional CD8 T-cell responses in large-scale clinical trial testing, which will enhance the ability

  6. Determining the size and concentration dependence of gold nanoparticles in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) test using WST-1 assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Nur Shafawati binti; Rahman, Azhar Abdul; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Shamsuddin, Shaharum

    2015-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) received a great deal of attention for biomedical applications, especially in diagnostic imaging and therapeutics. Even though AuNPs have potential benefits in biomedical applications, the impact of AuNPs on human and environmental health still remains unclear. The use of AuNPs which is a high-atomic-number materials, provide advantages in terms of radiation dose enhancement. However, before this can become a clinical reality, cytotoxicity of the AuNPs has to be carefully evaluated. Cytotoxicity test is a rapid, standardized test that is very sensitive to determine whether the nanoparticles produced are harmful or benign on cellular components. In this work the size and concentration dependence of AuNPs cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) are tested by using WST-1 assay. The sizes of AuNPs tested were 13 nm, 50 nm, and 70 nm. The cells were seeded in the 96-well plate and were treated with different concentrations of AuNPs by serial dilution for each size of AuNPs. The high concentration of AuNPs exhibit lower cell viability compared to low concentration of AuNPs. We quantified the toxicity of AuNPs in MCF-7 cell lines by determining the IC50 values in WST-1 assays. The IC50 values (inhibitory concentrations that effected 50% growth inhibition) of 50 nm AuNPs is lower than 13 nm and 70 nm AuNPs. Mean that, 50nm AuNPs are more toxic to the MCF-7 cells compared to smaller and larger sizes AuNPs. The presented results clearly indicate that the cytotoxicity of AuNPs depend not only on the concentration, but also the size of the nanoparticles.

  7. Use of beta-maltosides (p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-maltoside, 2-chloro-4- nitrophenyl-beta-D-maltoside and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-maltoside) as substrates for the assay of neutral alpha-glucosidase from human kidney and urine.

    PubMed

    Lukomskaya, I S; Voznyi, Y V; Lanskaya, I M; Podkidisheva, E I

    1996-01-31

    The method of assay of neutral alpha-glucosidase from human kidney and urine using beta-maltosides (p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-maltoside [NP-beta-D-maltoside], 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-beta-D-maltoside]) [CNP-beta-D-maltoside] and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-maltosides ([MU-beta-D-maltoside]) as substrates and beta-glucosidase as an auxiliary enzyme is proposed. All three beta-maltosides are suitable substrates for the determination of neutral alpha-glucosidase activity but MU-beta-D-maltoside is the most sensitive due to its methylumbelliferyl moiety. The method is simple, convenient and 10-fold more sensitive than the commonly used alpha-glucosidase assay procedure with the corresponding synthetic alpha-glucosides, p-nitrophenyl- alpha-D-glucoside (NP-alpha-D-glucoside) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-glucoside (MU-alpha-D-glucoside). A modification of the method, with p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-maltoside as substrate, was applied to the semiautomatic assay of urinary alpha-glucosidase in 96-well microtitre plates. PMID:8714432

  8. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Hornung, Michael W; Crofton, Kevin M; Simmons, Steven O

    2014-03-17

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein, we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluorescent peroxidase substrate, Amplex UltraRed (AUR), were employed in an end-point assay for comparison to the existing kinetic guaiacol (GUA) oxidation assay. Following optimization of assay metrics, including Z', dynamic range, and activity, using methimazole (MMI), the assay was tested with a 21-chemical training set. The potency of MMI-induced TPO inhibition was greater with AUR compared to GUA. The dynamic range and Z' score with MMI were as follows: 127-fold and 0.62 for the GUA assay, 18-fold and 0.86 for the 96-well AUR assay, and 11.5-fold and 0.93 for the 384-well AUR assay. The 384-well AUR assay drastically reduced animal use, requiring one-tenth of the rat thyroid microsomal protein needed for the GUA 96-well format assay. Fourteen chemicals inhibited TPO, with a relative potency ranking of MMI > ethylene thiourea > 6-propylthiouracil > 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone > 2-mercaptobenzothiazole > 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole > genistein > 4-propoxyphenol > sulfamethazine > daidzein > 4-nonylphenol > triclosan > iopanoic acid > resorcinol. These data demonstrate the capacity of this assay to detect diverse TPO inhibitors. Seven chemicals acted as negatives: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diethylphthalate, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol, methyl 2-methyl-benzoate, and sodium perchlorate. This assay could be used to screen large numbers of chemicals as an integral component of a tiered TH-disruptor screening approach. PMID:24383450

  9. Helicase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Diaz, Jason; You, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Helicases are a class of enzymes which are motor proteins using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move directionally along a nucliec acid phosphodiester backbone (such as DNA, RNA and DNA-RNA hybrids) and separate two annealed nucleic acid strands. Many cellular processes, such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair involve helicase activity. Here, we provide a protocol to analyze helicase activities in vitro. In this protocol, the DNA helicase protein Merkel cell polyomavirus large T-antigen was expressed in the mammalian cell line HEK293 and immoblized on an IgG resin. The helicase assay is performing while the protein is immoblized on IgG resin.

  10. Angiogenesis Assays.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  11. Yeast-based assays for the high-throughput screening of inhibitors of coronavirus RNA cap guanine-N7-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Wang, Zidao; Tao, Jiali; Wang, Yi; Wu, Andong; Yang, Ziwen; Wang, Kaimei; Shi, Liqiao; Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2014-04-01

    The 5'-cap structure is a distinct feature of eukaryotic mRNAs and is important for RNA stability and protein translation by providing a molecular signature for the distinction of self or non-self mRNA. Eukaryotic viruses generally modify the 5'-end of their RNAs to mimic the cellular mRNA structure, thereby facilitating viral replication in host cells. However, the molecular organization and biochemical mechanisms of the viral capping apparatus typically differ from its cellular counterpart, which makes viral capping enzymes attractive targets for drug discovery. Our previous work showed that SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) non-structural protein 14 represents a structurally novel and unique guanine-N7-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) that is able to functionally complement yeast cellular N7-MTase. In the present study, we developed a yeast-based system for identifying and screening inhibitors against coronavirus N7-MTase using both 96-well and 384-well microtiter plates. The MTase inhibitors previously identified by in vitro biochemical assays were tested, and some, such as sinefungin, effectively suppressed N7-MTase in the yeast system. However, other compounds, such as ATA and AdoHcy, did not exert an inhibitory effect within a cellular context. These results validated the yeast assay system for inhibitor screening yet also demonstrated the difference between cell-based and in vitro biochemical assays. The yeast system was applied to the screening of 3000 natural product extracts, and three were observed to more potently inhibit the activity of coronavirus than human N7-MTase. PMID:24530452

  12. Development of a neutralization assay for influenza virus using an endpoint assessment based on quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Teferedegne, Belete; Lewis, Andrew M; Peden, Keith; Murata, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    A microneutralization assay using an ELISA-based endpoint assessment (ELISA-MN) is widely used to measure the serological response to influenza virus infection and vaccination. We have developed an alternative microneutralization assay for influenza virus using a quantitative reverse transcription PCR-based endpoint assessment (qPCR-MN) in order to improve upon technical limitations associated with ELISA-MN. For qPCR-MN, infected MDCK-London cells in 96-well cell-culture plates are processed with minimal steps such that resulting samples are amenable to high-throughput analysis by downstream one-step quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; SYBR Green chemistry with primers targeting a conserved region of the M1 gene of influenza A viruses). The growth curves of three recent vaccine strains demonstrated that the qRT-PCR signal detected at 6 hours post-infection reflected an amplification of at least 100-fold over input. Using ferret antisera, we have established the feasibility of measuring virus neutralization at 6 hours post-infection, a duration likely confined to a single virus-replication cycle. The neutralization titer for qPCR-MN was defined as the highest reciprocal serum dilution necessary to achieve a 90% inhibition of the qRT-PCR signal; this endpoint was found to be in agreement with ELISA-MN using the same critical reagents in each assay. qPCR-MN was robust with respect to assay duration (6 hours vs. 12 hours). In addition, qPCR-MN appeared to be compliant with the Percentage Law (i.e., virus neutralization results appear to be consistent over an input virus dose ranging from 500 to 12,000 TCID(50)). Compared with ELISA-MN, qPCR-MN might have inherent properties conducive to reducing intra- and inter-laboratory variability while affording suitability for automation and high-throughput uses. Finally, our qRT-PCR-based approach may be broadly applicable to the development of neutralization assays for a wide variety of viruses. PMID:23437084

  13. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  14. 384-Well Multiplexed Luminex Cytokine Assays for Lead Optimization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huaping; Panemangalore, Reshma; Yarde, Melissa; Zhang, Litao; Cvijic, Mary Ellen

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines serve as a major mechanism of communication between immune cells and are the functional molecules at the end of immune pathways. Abnormalities in cytokines are involved in a wide variety of diseases, including chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. Cytokines are not only direct targets of therapeutics but also important biomarkers for assessing drug efficacy and safety. Traditionally, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were most popular for identifying and quantifying cytokines. However, ELISA is expensive, labor intensive, and low throughput. Here, we report the development of a miniaturized Luminex (Austin, TX) assay platform to establish a panel of high-throughput, multiplexed assays for measuring cytokines in human whole blood. The miniaturized 384-well Luminex assay uses <25% of the assay reagents compared with the 96-well assay. The development and validation of the 384-well Luminex cytokine assays enabled high-throughput screening of compounds in primary cells using cytokines as physiologically relevant readouts. Furthermore, this miniaturized multiplexed technology platform allows for high-throughput biomarker profiling of biofluids from animal studies and patient samples for translational research. PMID:27095819

  15. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  16. C. elegans chemotaxis assay.

    PubMed

    Margie, Olivia; Palmer, Chris; Chin-Sang, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms use chemotaxis to seek out food sources, avoid noxious substances, and find mates. Caenorhabditis elegans has impressive chemotaxis behavior. The premise behind testing the response of the worms to an odorant is to place them in an area and observe the movement evoked in response to an odorant. Even with the many available assays, optimizing worm starting location relative to both the control and test areas, while minimizing the interaction of worms with each other, while maintaining a significant sample size remains a work in progress (1-10). The method described here aims to address these issues by modifying the assay developed by Bargmann et al.(1). A Petri dish is divided into four quadrants, two opposite quadrants marked "Test" and two are designated "Control". Anesthetic is placed in all test and control sites. The worms are placed in the center of the plate with a circle marked around the origin to ensure that non-motile worms will be ignored. Utilizing a four-quadrant system rather than one 2 or two 1 eliminates bias in the movement of the worms, as they are equidistant from test and control samples, regardless of which side of the origin they began. This circumvents the problem of worms being forced to travel through a cluster of other worms to respond to an odorant, which can delay worms or force them to take a more circuitous route, yielding an incorrect interpretation of their intended path. This method also shows practical advantages by having a larger sample size and allowing the researcher to run the assay unattended and score the worms once the allotted time has expired. PMID:23644543

  17. A direct LC/MS/MS method for the determination of ciclopirox penetration across human nail plate in in vitro penetration studies.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wei; Fan, Xiaoqing; Sexton, Holly; Heyman, Irwin

    2010-01-01

    Due to severe chelating effect caused by N-hydroxylpyridone group of ciclopirox, there is no published direct HPLC or LC/MS/MS method for the determination of ciclopirox in any in vitro or in vivo matrix. Instead, the time-consuming pre-column derivatization methods have been adapted for indirect analysis of ciclopirox. After overcoming the chelating problem by using K(2)EDTA coated tubes, a direct, sensitive and high-throughput LC/MS/MS method was successfully developed and validated to determine the amount of ciclopirox that penetrated across the nail plate during in vitro nail penetration studies. The method involved adding a chemical analog, chloridazon as internal standard (IS) in K(2)EDTA coated tubes, mixing IS with ciclopirox in a 96-well plate and then proceeding to LC/MS/MS analysis. The MS/MS was selected to monitor m/z 208.0-->135.8 and 221.8-->77.0 for ciclopirox and IS, respectively, using positive electrospray ionization. The method was validated over a concentration range of 8-256 ng/mL, yielding calibration curves with correlation coefficients greater than 0.9991 with a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 8 ng/mL. The assay precision and accuracy were evaluated using quality control (QC) samples at three concentration levels. Analyzed concentrations ranged from 101% to 113% of their respective nominal concentration levels with coefficients of variation (CV) below 10.6%. The average recovery of ciclopirox from nail matrix was 101%. The validated method was successfully used to analyze the ciclopirox formulation and in vitro nail penetration samples. PMID:19744810

  18. Plates made with solid waste from the recycled paper industry.

    PubMed

    Pelegrini, M; Gohr Pinheiro, I; Valle, J A B

    2010-02-01

    The results of assays carried out on plates used in the construction industry, manufactured entirely with solid wastes of a recycled paper plant, are presented and compared with the results obtained using agglomerated wood and plywood plates. Previous results had shown that wastes are composed essentially of polymers when these wastes are generated by recycled paper produced with the "waved type II" shavings. These solid wastes were placed in a mold that was heated and pressed with a hydraulic press in order to obtain the plates. The waste-produced plates were submitted to tests for humidity, swelling, water absorption, density, modulus of rupture-static bending, modulus of elasticity and direct screw withdrawal. These same assays had been carried out on two types of commercial wood plates, agglomerated wood and plywood, in order to compare the results with those obtained with the waste plate. Waste plates had similar behavior to the agglomerated wood plate, but it was possible to distinguish greater flexibility in the waste-produced plate and a significant difference in the tests for swelling and water absorption which showed the waste plate had a better performance than the agglomerated wood and plywood plates. PMID:19793642

  19. MerMade: An Oligodeoxyribonucleotide Synthesizer for High Throughput Oligonucleotide Production in Dual 96-Well Plates

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Simon; Brignac, Stafford; Bumeister, Ron; Belosludtsev, Yuri; Ward, Travis; Grant, O’dell; O’Brien, Kevin; Evans, Glen A.; Garner, Harold R.

    1998-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a machine that synthesizes two standard 96-well plates of oligonucleotides in a single run using standard phosphoramidite chemistry. The machine is capable of making a combination of standard, degenerate, or modified oligos in a single plate. The run time is typically 17 hr for two plates of 20-mers and a reaction scale of 40 nm. The reaction vessel is a standard polypropylene 96-well plate with a hole drilled in the bottom of each well. The two plates are placed in separate vacuum chucks and mounted on an xy table. Each well in turn is positioned under the appropriate reagent injection line and the reagent is injected by switching a dedicated valve. All aspects of machine operation are controlled by a Macintosh computer, which also guides the user through the startup and shutdown procedures, provides a continuous update on the status of the run, and facilitates a number of service procedures that need to be carried out periodically. Over 25,000 oligos have been synthesized for use in dye terminator sequencing reactions, polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), hybridization, and RT–PCR. Oligos up to 100 bases in length have been made with a coupling efficiency in excess of 99%. These machines, working in conjunction with our oligo prediction code are particularly well suited to application in automated high throughput genomic sequencing. PMID:9685322

  20. Efficient DNA sequencing on microtiter plates using dried reagents and Bst DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Earley, J J; Kuivaniemi, H; Prockop, D J; Tromp, G

    1993-01-01

    Sequenase, Taq DNA polymerase and Bst DNA polymerase were tested for sequencing of DNA on microtiter plates using dried down reagents. Several parameters were investigated to expedite the drying process while minimizing damage to the enzyme. Sequenase did not tolerate drying very well, and frequently generated sequences with weak signals and many sites of premature termination. With Taq DNA polymerase it was possible to obtain sequences of good quality. However, there was considerable variation of results between experiments and between batches of microtiter plates. Bst DNA polymerase generated sequences of excellent quality. It was stable for more than a week in dried-down state at -20 degrees C and at least overnight at room temperature. The method described here using Bst DNA polymerase is well suited for laboratory robots and workstations that typically employ 96-well microtiter plates. PMID:8173079

  1. A novel approach for high throughput cultivation assays and the isolation of planktonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Alke; Hoffelner, Herbert; Overmann, Jörg

    2003-07-01

    Abstract Using the MicroDrop((R)) microdispenser system, a novel approach for high throughput cultivation assays for the determination of numbers of culturable bacteria, and for the isolation of bacteria in liquid media was established. The MicroDrop device works similar to an ink jet printer. Droplets of 150-200 pl are created at the nozzle of a glass micropipette by means of a computer-driven piezo transducer, and are dispensed automatically at predetermined positions with the aid of a XYZ-positioning system. The actual drop volume is highly reproducible and is determined by the pulse duration, the pulse frequency and the micropipette geometry. Culture media in 96-well microtiter plates were inoculated with constant numbers of bacteria from three different natural freshwater lakes. The number of culturable bacteria in the sample can be calculated from the frequency of wells showing bacterial growth, based on a binomial distribution of culturable cells. Our method was compared to the conventional most probable number (MPN) approach, the technique presently most often used for the determination of bacterial culturability and for the isolation of numerically dominant culturable bacteria. As opposed to the MPN technique, our approach yields data with much higher statistical significance (i.e. a 10 times lower standard deviation) due to the higher number of parallels which can be performed in each microtiter plate. The values of culturable bacteria as determined by the MPN and MicroDrop techniques were only weakly correlated (r(2)=0.570, n=42, P<0.001). Cultivation efficiencies obtained with the MicroDrop technique were systematically lower than MPN values by a factor of 2.7, indicating a significant overestimation of culturability by the latter method. The composition of the cultured bacterial fraction was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting of 16S rDNA fragments and sequencing. This demonstrated that phylogenetically similar bacteria

  2. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  3. ASSEMBLY OF PARALLEL PLATES

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Lennox, D.H.

    1963-04-23

    This invention is concerned with a rigid assembly of parallel plates in which keyways are stamped out along the edges of the plates and a self-retaining key is inserted into aligned keyways. Spacers having similar keyways are included between adjacent plates. The entire assembly is locked into a rigid structure by fastening only the outermost plates to the ends of the keys. (AEC)

  4. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence. PMID:17799689

  5. Plating Tank Control Software

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  6. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  7. Determining the size and concentration dependence of gold nanoparticles in vitro cytotoxicity (IC{sub 50}) test using WST-1 assay

    SciTech Connect

    Rosli, Nur Shafawati binti; Rahman, Azhar Abdul; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Shamsuddin, Shaharum

    2015-04-24

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) received a great deal of attention for biomedical applications, especially in diagnostic imaging and therapeutics. Even though AuNPs have potential benefits in biomedical applications, the impact of AuNPs on human and environmental health still remains unclear. The use of AuNPs which is a high-atomic-number materials, provide advantages in terms of radiation dose enhancement. However, before this can become a clinical reality, cytotoxicity of the AuNPs has to be carefully evaluated. Cytotoxicity test is a rapid, standardized test that is very sensitive to determine whether the nanoparticles produced are harmful or benign on cellular components. In this work the size and concentration dependence of AuNPs cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) are tested by using WST-1 assay. The sizes of AuNPs tested were 13 nm, 50 nm, and 70 nm. The cells were seeded in the 96-well plate and were treated with different concentrations of AuNPs by serial dilution for each size of AuNPs. The high concentration of AuNPs exhibit lower cell viability compared to low concentration of AuNPs. We quantified the toxicity of AuNPs in MCF-7 cell lines by determining the IC{sub 50} values in WST-1 assays. The IC{sub 50} values (inhibitory concentrations that effected 50% growth inhibition) of 50 nm AuNPs is lower than 13 nm and 70 nm AuNPs. Mean that, 50nm AuNPs are more toxic to the MCF-7 cells compared to smaller and larger sizes AuNPs. The presented results clearly indicate that the cytotoxicity of AuNPs depend not only on the concentration, but also the size of the nanoparticles.

  8. Rapid and Thiol-Specific High-Throughput Assay for Simultaneous Relative Quantification of Total Thiols, Protein Thiols, and Nonprotein Thiols in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thiol groups in biological molecules play a significant role in various physiological functions and pathological conditions. Thiols are divided into two major groups: protein thiols and nonprotein thiols. Numerous methods have been reported for thiol assays. Most of these methods have been developed for glutathione, the principal nonprotein thiol, despite the fact that cellular protein thiols are more abundant than glutathione. Further, these methods usually involve a process of biological sample preparation followed by a separation method, and they are time-consuming. We reported previously a series of thiol-specific fluorogenic benzofurazan sulfides. These nonfluorescent benzofurazan sulfides react rapidly and specifically with a thiol to form a strong fluorescent thiol adduct. The rapid reaction, thiol-specific and fluorogenic nature of the sulfides successfully yielded an application of one of the sulfides for relative quantitation of total thiols in live cells through fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we employed the same compound to develop the first high-throughput method for simultaneous monitoring of protein thiols, nonprotein thiols, and total thiols in cells in a 96-well plate on a fluorescence microplate reader at λex = 430 nm and λem = 520 nm, respectively. The method is rapid and sensitive, and has been validated by an HPLC thiol assay method. The method can detect thiols with cell concentrations as low as 500 cells/well. We also demonstrated that the method can readily monitor changes in cellular thiol levels. Although the method cannot provide an absolute quantification for thiols because fluorescence intensity of different thiol adducts varies, it provides an accurate measurement of relative quantification, relative to the control. The method will be a valuable tool in thiol-related biomedical/pharmaceutical research. PMID:25423115

  9. Virus replicon particle based Chikungunya virus neutralization assay using Gaussia luciferase as readout

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has been responsible for large epidemic outbreaks causing fever, headache, rash and severe arthralgia. So far, no specific treatment or vaccine is available. As nucleic acid amplification can only be used during the viremic phase of the disease, serological tests like neutralization assays are necessary for CHIKV diagnosis and for determination of the immune status of a patient. Furthermore, neutralization assays represent a useful tool to validate the efficacy of potential vaccines. As CHIKV is a BSL3 agent, neutralization assays with infectious virus need to be performed under BSL3 conditions. Our aim was to develop a neutralization assay based on non-infectious virus replicon particles (VRPs). Methods VRPs were produced by cotransfecting baby hamster kidney-21 cells with a CHIKV replicon expressing Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and two helper RNAs expressing the CHIKV capsid protein or the remaining structural proteins, respectively. The resulting single round infectious particles were used in CHIKV neutralization assays using secreted Gluc as readout. Results Upon cotransfection of a CHIKV replicon expressing Gluc and the helper RNAs VRPs could be produced efficiently under optimized conditions at 32°C. Infection with VRPs could be measured via Gluc secreted into the supernatant. The successful use of VRPs in CHIKV neutralization assays was demonstrated using a CHIKV neutralizing monoclonal antibody or sera from CHIKV infected patients. Comparison of VRP based neutralization assays in 24- versus 96-well format using different amounts of VRPs revealed that in the 96-well format a high multiplicity of infection is favored, while in the 24-well format reliable results are also obtained using lower infection rates. Comparison of different readout times revealed that evaluation of the neutralization assay is already possible at the same day of infection. Conclusions A VRP based CHIKV neutralization assay using Gluc as readout

  10. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    PubMed

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  11. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  12. A modified in vitro larvae migration inhibition assay using rumen fluid to evaluate Haemonchus contortus viability.

    PubMed

    Whitney, T R; Lee, A E; Klein, D R; Scott, C B; Craig, T M; Muir, J P

    2011-03-10

    Anthelmintic effects of plant secondary compounds may be occurring in the rumen, but in vitro larvae migration inhibition (LMI) methods using rumen fluid and forage material have not been widely used. Forage material added to an in vitro system can affect rumen pH, ammonia N, and volatile fatty acids, which may affect larvae viability (LV). Validating a LMI assay using rumen fluid and a known anthelmintic drug (Ivermectin) and a known anthelmintic plant extract (Quebracho tannins; QT) is important. Rumen fluid was collected and pooled from 3 goats, mixed with buffer solution and a treatment (1 jar/treatment), and placed into an anaerobic incubator for 16h. Ensheathed larvae (<3 months old) were then anaerobically incubated with treatment rumen fluid for 2, 4, or 16h depending on the trial. Larvae (n=15-45) were then transferred onto a screen (n=4-6 wells/treatment) within a multi-screen 96-well plate that contained treatment rumen fluid. Larvae were incubated overnight and those that passed through the 20-μm screen were considered viable. Adding dry or fresh juniper material reduced (P<0.05) pH, ammonia N, and isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids, and increased (P<0.001) acetic, propionic, and total VFA. Including 4.5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG) in rumen fluid mixture with or without forage material reduced (P<0.01) LV. However, LV was similar at all PEG concentrations tested (0-2%, w/v; 89.4, 78.9, 76.5, 75.5, and 77.5% viable). Q. tannin concentrations from 0 to 1.2% (w/v) quadratically reduced (P<0.001) LV; 89.4, 65.5, 22.8, and 9.2%. Ivermectin concentrations from 0 to 15μg/mL quadratically reduced (P<0.001) LV; 90.2, 82.6, 73.6, 66.3, 51.9, 56.5, 43.5, 41.9, 29.3, and 19.9% viable, respectively. Effects of altering in vitro rumen fluid pH, ammonia N, and VFA and using PEG when evaluating LV need to be further investigated. In vitro rumen fluid assays using QT and Ivermectin resulted in decreased LV, validating the efficacy of this

  13. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  14. Catch me if you can: a biotinylated proteoliposome affinity assay for the investigation of assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Verchère, Alice; Phan, Gilles; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Efflux pumps are membrane transporters that actively extrude various substrates, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we have designed a new test that allows investigating the assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from the Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The method relies on the streptavidin-mediated pull-down of OprM proteoliposomes upon interaction with MexAB proteoliposomes containing a biotin function carried by lipids. We give clear evidence for the importance of MexA in promoting and stabilizing the assembly of the MexAB-OprM complex. In addition, we have investigated the effect of the role of the lipid anchor of MexA as well as the role of the proton motive force on the assembly and disassembly of the efflux pump. The assay presented here allows for an accurate investigation of the assembly with only tens of microgram of protein and could be adapted to 96 wells plates. Hence, this work provides a basis for the medium-high screening of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). PMID:26082762

  15. Catch me if you can: a biotinylated proteoliposome affinity assay for the investigation of assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Verchère, Alice; Phan, Gilles; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Efflux pumps are membrane transporters that actively extrude various substrates, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we have designed a new test that allows investigating the assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from the Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The method relies on the streptavidin-mediated pull-down of OprM proteoliposomes upon interaction with MexAB proteoliposomes containing a biotin function carried by lipids. We give clear evidence for the importance of MexA in promoting and stabilizing the assembly of the MexAB-OprM complex. In addition, we have investigated the effect of the role of the lipid anchor of MexA as well as the role of the proton motive force on the assembly and disassembly of the efflux pump. The assay presented here allows for an accurate investigation of the assembly with only tens of microgram of protein and could be adapted to 96 wells plates. Hence, this work provides a basis for the medium-high screening of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). PMID:26082762

  16. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  17. Development of a new colorimetric assay for lipoxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiqiang; Zhao, Xue; Xu, Zhongyu; Dong, Ningning; Zou, Shien; Shen, Xu; Huang, Jin

    2013-10-15

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are a family of non-heme iron-containing dioxygenases that catalyze the hydroperoxidation of lipids, containing a cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene structure. A rapid and reliable colorimetric assay for determination of the activity of three human functional lipoxygenase isoforms (5-lipoxygenase, platelet 12-lipoxygenase, and 15-lipoxygenase-1) is developed in this article. In the new assay, LOX-derived lipid hydroperoxides oxidize the ferrous ion (Fe²⁺) to the ferric ion (Fe³⁺), the latter of which binds with thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to generate a red ferrithiocyanate (FTC) complex. The absorbance of the FTC complex can be easily measured at 480 nm. Because 5-LOX can be stimulated by many cofactors, the effects of its cofactors (Ca²⁺, ATP, dithiothreitol, glutathione, L-α-phosphatidylcholine, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) on the color development of the FTC complex are also determined. The assay is adaptive for purified LOXs and cell lysates containing active LOXs. We use the new colorimetric assay in a 96-well format to evaluate several well-known LOX inhibitors, the IC₅₀ values of which are in good agreement with previously reported data. The reliability and reproducibility of the assay make it useful for in vitro screening for inhibitors of LOXs and, therefore, should accelerate drug discovery for clinical application. PMID:23811155

  18. A Rapid and Versatile Assay for Ago2-Mediated Cleavage by Using Branched Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Marlen; Arenz, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Micro RNA (miRNA) research has evolved into an essential part of investigating gene regulation in which deregulation of numerous miRNAs is associated with various cellular dysfunction and diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and homogenous assay for Ago2-mediated target RNA cleavage, based on branched rolling circle amplification (BRCA). In particular, the ability to investigate small molecule binders for inhibition of miRNA function is within the potential of our assay. This method uses no artificial fluorescence labeling of RNA components, which can be an advantage in screening of potential inhibitors. To visualize cleavage of RNA substrate by Ago2, we developed a two-step assay composed of Ago2-mediated cleavage and BRCA-based detection. The assay is cost-effective and practicable and can be performed in 96-well format by using a standard qPCR machine. PMID:26677110

  19. High-throughput screening assays for antibacterial and antifungal activities of Lactobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Inglin, Raffael C; Stevens, Marc J A; Meile, Lukas; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2015-07-01

    We describe high-throughput screening techniques to rapidly detect either antimicrobial activity, using an agar-well diffusion assay in microtiter plates, or antifungal activity using an agar-spot assay in 24-well plates. 504 Lactobacillus isolates were screened with minimal laboratory equipment and screening rates of 2000-5000 individual antimicrobial interactions. PMID:25937247

  20. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  1. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  2. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  3. Plating methods, a survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, J. B.; Emerson, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive search of the literature available, much of which has been generated by the research centers of NASA and its contractors, on plating and coating methods and techniques. Methods covered included: (1) electroplating from aqueous solutions; (2) electroplating from nonaqueous solutions; (3) electroplating from fused-salt baths; (4) electroforming; (5) electroless plating, immersion plating, and mirroring; (6) electroplating from gaseous plasmas; and (7) anodized films and conversion coatings.

  4. CALUTRON FACE PLATE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-08-25

    The construction of a removable cover plate for a calutron tank is described. The plate is fabricated of a rectangular frame member to which is welded a bowed or dished plate of thin steel, reinforced with transverse stiffening ribs. When the tank is placed between the poles of a magnet, the plate may be pivoted away from the tank and magnet and is adapted to support the ion separation mechanism secured to its inner side as well as the vacuum load within the tank.

  5. PLATES WITH OXIDE INSERTS

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Schumar, J.F.

    1958-06-10

    Planar-type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors are described, particularly those comprising fuel in the oxide form such as thoria and urania. The fuel assembly consists of a plurality of parallel spaced fuel plate mennbers having their longitudinal side edges attached to two parallel supporting side plates, thereby providing coolant flow channels between the opposite faces of adjacent fuel plates. The fuel plates are comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending tubular sections connected by web portions, the tubular sections being filled with a plurality of pellets of the fuel material and the pellets being thermally bonded to the inside of the tubular section by lead.

  6. A novel microculture kinetic assay (MiCK assay) for malignant cell growth and chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, V D

    1994-01-01

    The THERMOmax microplate reader was adapted for monitoring the growth kinetics of human leukaemic OCI/AML-2 and mouse tumour J-774.1 cell lines in continuous culture. Fluid evaporation from wells, CO2 escape and contamination were prevented by hermetic sealing of the microcultures in wells of a 96-well microplate, thus enabling the cells to grow exponentially for 72 h under the conditions of the incubated microplate reader. For both OCI/AML-2 cells, which grow in suspension, and adherent J-774.1 cells, a linear correlation was demonstrated between the number of unstained cells seeded in a given microplate well and the optical density (OD) of that well. Therefore, the OD/time curve of the culture could be deemed to be its growth curve. By the use of the linear fit equation, the actual number of the cells in the wells was computable at any time point of the assay. In the chemosensitivity test, an inhibitory effect of ARA-C on the growth of the cells could be estimated by viewing of the growth curves plotted on the screen. The maximum kinetic rates (Vmax) of the curves in the control and the ARA-C-treated wells were compared, yielding a growth inhibition index (GII). Comparison of results of the kinetic chemosensitivity assay with those of a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay revealed that the novel assay is suitable for precise quantitation of the cell chemosensitivity, is more informative and has the added technical advantage of performance without recourse to radioactive or chemically hazardous substances. PMID:7833120

  7. Preparation, imaging, and quantification of bacterial surface motility assays.

    PubMed

    Morales-Soto, Nydia; Anyan, Morgen E; Mattingly, Anne E; Madukoma, Chinedu S; Harvey, Cameron W; Alber, Mark; Déziel, Eric; Kearns, Daniel B; Shrout, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial surface motility, such as swarming, is commonly examined in the laboratory using plate assays that necessitate specific concentrations of agar and sometimes inclusion of specific nutrients in the growth medium. The preparation of such explicit media and surface growth conditions serves to provide the favorable conditions that allow not just bacterial growth but coordinated motility of bacteria over these surfaces within thin liquid films. Reproducibility of swarm plate and other surface motility plate assays can be a major challenge. Especially for more "temperate swarmers" that exhibit motility only within agar ranges of 0.4%-0.8% (wt/vol), minor changes in protocol or laboratory environment can greatly influence swarm assay results. "Wettability", or water content at the liquid-solid-air interface of these plate assays, is often a key variable to be controlled. An additional challenge in assessing swarming is how to quantify observed differences between any two (or more) experiments. Here we detail a versatile two-phase protocol to prepare and image swarm assays. We include guidelines to circumvent the challenges commonly associated with swarm assay media preparation and quantification of data from these assays. We specifically demonstrate our method using bacteria that express fluorescent or bioluminescent genetic reporters like green fluorescent protein (GFP), luciferase (lux operon), or cellular stains to enable time-lapse optical imaging. We further demonstrate the ability of our method to track competing swarming species in the same experiment. PMID:25938934

  8. Preparation, Imaging, and Quantification of Bacterial Surface Motility Assays

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Soto, Nydia; Anyan, Morgen E.; Mattingly, Anne E.; Madukoma, Chinedu S.; Harvey, Cameron W.; Alber, Mark; Déziel, Eric; Kearns, Daniel B.; Shrout, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial surface motility, such as swarming, is commonly examined in the laboratory using plate assays that necessitate specific concentrations of agar and sometimes inclusion of specific nutrients in the growth medium. The preparation of such explicit media and surface growth conditions serves to provide the favorable conditions that allow not just bacterial growth but coordinated motility of bacteria over these surfaces within thin liquid films. Reproducibility of swarm plate and other surface motility plate assays can be a major challenge. Especially for more “temperate swarmers” that exhibit motility only within agar ranges of 0.4%-0.8% (wt/vol), minor changes in protocol or laboratory environment can greatly influence swarm assay results. “Wettability”, or water content at the liquid-solid-air interface of these plate assays, is often a key variable to be controlled. An additional challenge in assessing swarming is how to quantify observed differences between any two (or more) experiments. Here we detail a versatile two-phase protocol to prepare and image swarm assays. We include guidelines to circumvent the challenges commonly associated with swarm assay media preparation and quantification of data from these assays. We specifically demonstrate our method using bacteria that express fluorescent or bioluminescent genetic reporters like green fluorescent protein (GFP), luciferase (lux operon), or cellular stains to enable time-lapse optical imaging. We further demonstrate the ability of our method to track competing swarming species in the same experiment. PMID:25938934

  9. Fast micromethod DNA single-strand-break assay.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heinz C; Batel, Renato; Schwertner, Heiko; Boreiko, Oleksandra; Müller, Werner E G

    2006-01-01

    The Fast Micromethod is a convenient and quick fluorimetric microplate assay for the assessment of DNA single-strand breaks and their repair. This method measures the rate of unwinding of cellular DNA on exposure to alkaline conditions using a fluorescent dye which preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA, but not to single-stranded DNA or protein. The advantages of this method are that it requires only minute amounts of material (30 ng of DNA or about 3000 cells per single well), it allows simultaneous measurements of multiple samples, and it can be performed within 3 h or less (for one 96-well microplate). The Fast Micromethod can be used for the routine determination of DNA damage in cells and tissue samples after irradiation, exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents, or chemotherapy. PMID:16673889

  10. Fluorimetric screening assay for protein carbonyl evaluation in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Stocker, P; Ricquebourg, E; Vidal, N; Villard, C; Lafitte, D; Sellami, L; Pietri, S

    2015-08-01

    Many assays are available for the detection of protein carbonyls (PCs). Currently, the measurement of PC groups after their derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenol hydrazine (DNPH) is widely used for measuring protein oxidation in biological samples. However, this method includes several washing steps. In this context, we have developed a rapid, sensitive, and accurate fluorimetric method adapted to 96-well microplates for the convenient assessment of protein carbonyl level in biological samples. The method reported here is based on the reaction of carbonyl content in proteins with 7-hydrazino-4-nitrobenzo-2,1,3-oxadiazole (NBDH) to form highly fluorescent derivatives via hydrazone formation. PCs were determined using the DNPH and NBDH assays in fully reduced bovine serum albumin (BSA) and plasma and liver homogenates obtained from healthy control rats up the addition of various amounts of HOCl-oxidized BSA (OxBSA). Using the NBDH assay, PC concentrations as low as 0.2 nmol/mg were detected with precision as low as 5%. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy was used to successfully identify the formation of the NBDH adducts after derivatization with standard oxidized peptides. Finally, the two methods were further used for PC determination in plasma and liver samples from diabetic and normal rats, showing that the NBDH assay can be reliably used in biological experiments. PMID:25933703

  11. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  12. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  13. Evaluation of a range of anti-proliferative assays for the preclinical screening of anti-psoriatic drugs: a comparison of colorimetric and fluorimetric assays with the thymidine incorporation assay.

    PubMed

    George, Suja Elizabeth; Anderson, Rosaleen J; Cunningham, Anne; Donaldson, Michael; Groundwater, Paul W

    2010-06-01

    Established treatments for psoriasis are generally based on antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, or differentiation-modifying activity, or a combination of these effects. New agents for the treatment of psoriasis could be identified by high-throughput screening (HTS) of large compound libraries using keratinocyte proliferation models. Although several new proliferation assays have been developed, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay is still considered to be the gold standard for the evaluation of keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. In this study, we compare a number of simple, and reliable, colorimetric (MTT, NRU, SRB, and CVS), and fluorimetric (CAM and AB) methods with the [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay for the measurement of keratinocyte proliferation in the exponential growth phase in 96-well formats. The concentrations that induced 50% growth inhibition (GI(50)) were determined by each assay for the established antipsoriatics, dithranol, and methotrexate. Strong correlations were observed between the percentage growth inhibitions determined by the radioactive and the colorimetric assays, with no significant differences (P > 0.05) between their GI(50) values. The colorimetric assays are thus suitable alternatives to the radioactive assay for quantifying keratinocyte growth inhibition. We have also validated the use of the HaCaT cell line as a representative of the hyperproliferative psoriatic epidermis, in the preclinical screening of experimental anti-psoriatic agents. PMID:20482335

  14. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  15. Gas chromatography fractionation platform featuring parallel flame-ionization detection and continuous high-resolution analyte collection in 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Willem; Clarijs, Bas; de Witte, Susannah L; van Velzen, Martin; de Koning, Sjaak; Schaap, Jaap; Somsen, Govert W; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a superior separation technique for many compounds. However, fractionation of a GC eluate for analyte isolation and/or post-column off-line analysis is not straightforward, and existing platforms are limited in the number of fractions that can be collected. Moreover, aerosol formation may cause serious analyte losses. Previously, our group has developed a platform that resolved these limitations of GC fractionation by post-column infusion of a trap solvent prior to continuous small-volume fraction collection in a 96-wells plate (Pieke et al., 2013 [17]). Still, this GC fractionation set-up lacked a chemical detector for the on-line recording of chromatograms, and the introduction of trap solvent resulted in extensive peak broadening for late-eluting compounds. This paper reports advancements to the fractionation platform allowing flame ionization detection (FID) parallel to high-resolution collection of a full GC chromatograms in up to 384 nanofractions of 7s each. To this end, a post-column split was incorporated which directs part of the eluate towards FID. Furthermore, a solvent heating device was developed for stable delivery of preheated/vaporized trap solvent, which significantly reduced band broadening by post-column infusion. In order to achieve optimal analyte trapping, several solvents were tested at different flow rates. The repeatability of the optimized GC fraction collection process was assessed demonstrating the possibility of up-concentration of isolated analytes by repetitive analyses of the same sample. The feasibility of the improved GC fractionation platform for bioactivity screening of toxic compounds was studied by the analysis of a mixture of test pesticides, which after fractionation were subjected to a post-column acetylcholinesterase (AChE) assay. Fractions showing AChE inhibition could be unambiguously correlated with peaks from the parallel-recorded FID chromatogram. PMID:27485151

  16. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  17. Lohse's historic plate archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M.; Tsvetkova, K.; Richter, G.; Scholz, G.; Böhm, P.

    The description and the analysis of Oswald Lohse's astrophotographic plates, collected at the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam in the period 1879 - 1889, are presented. 67 plates of the archive, taken with the greatest instrument of the observatory at that time - the refractor (D = 0.30 m, F = 5.40 m, scale = 38''/mm) and with the second heliographic objective (D = 0.13 m, F = 1.36 m, scale = 152''/mm) - - survived two world wars in relative good condition. The plate emulsions are from different manufacturers in the beginning of astrophotography (Gädicke, Schleussner, Beernaert, etc.). The sizes of the plates are usually 9x12 cm2, which corresponds to fields of 1.2deg and 5deg respectively for each instrument mentioned above. The average limiting magnitude is 13.0(pg). Besides of the plates received for technical experiments (work on photographic processes, testing of new instruments and methods of observations), the scientific observations follow programs for studies of planet surfaces, bright stars, some double stars, stellar clusters and nebulous objects. Lohse's archive is included into the Wide Field Plate Database (http://www.skyarchive.org) as the oldest systematic one, covering the fields of Orion (M42/43), Pleiades, h & chi Persei, M37, M3, M11, M13, M92, M31, etc. With the PDS 2020 GM+ microdensitometer of Münster University 10 archive plates were digitized.

  18. Cavity-Enhanced Immunoassay Measurements in Microtiter Plates Using BBCEAS.

    PubMed

    Bajuszova, Zuzana; Ali, Zulfiqur; Scott, Simon; Seetohul, L Nitin; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-17

    We report on the first detailed use of broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) as a detection system for immunoassay. A vertical R ≥ 0.99 optical cavity was integrated with a motorized XY stage, which functioned as a receptacle for 96-well microtiter plates. The custom-built cavity enhanced microplate reader was used to make measurements on a commercially available osteocalcin sandwich ELISA kit. A 30-fold increase in path length was obtained with a minimum detectable change in the absorption coefficient, αmin(t), of 5.3 × 10(-5) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). This corresponded to a 39-fold increase in the sensitivity of measurement when directly compared to measurements in a conventional microplate reader. Separate measurements of a standard STREP-HRP colorimetric reaction in microtiter plates of differing optical quality produced an increase in sensitivity of up to 115-fold compared to a conventional microplate reader. The sensitivity of the developed setup compared favorably with previous liquid-phase cavity enhanced studies and approaches the sensitivity of typical fluorometric ELISAs. It could benefit any biochemical test which uses single pass absorption as a detection method, through either the label free detection of biologically important molecules at lower concentrations or the reduction in the amount of expensive biochemicals needed for a particular test, leading to cheaper tests. PMID:27089516

  19. Evaluation of Pregnancy Malaria Vaccine Candidates: The Binding Inhibition Assay.

    PubMed

    Saveria, Tracy; Duffy, Patrick E; Fried, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The parasite-binding inhibition assay is designed to evaluate the acquisition of naturally acquired functional antibodies that block Plasmodium falciparum binding to endothelial or placental receptors. The assay is also used to assess functional activity by antibodies induced by immunization, for example antibodies raised against pregnancy malaria vaccine candidates like VAR2CSA. Here we describe a plate-based assay to measure the levels of adhesion-blocking antibodies. This assay format can be adapted to any lab that is minimally equipped for short-term parasite culture. PMID:26450393

  20. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  1. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  2. Plate tectonics: Metamorphic myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clear evidence for subduction-induced metamorphism, and thus the operation of plate tectonics on the ancient Earth has been lacking. Theoretical calculations indicate that we may have been looking for something that cannot exist.

  3. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  4. Positive battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

  5. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  6. Phononic plate waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Sun, Jia-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In the past two decades, phononic crystals (PCs) which consist of periodically arranged media have attracted considerable interest because of the existence of complete frequency band gaps and maneuverable band structures. Recently, Lamb waves in thin plates with PC structures have started to receive increasing attention for their potential applications in filters, resonators, and waveguides. This paper presents a review of recent works related to phononic plate waves which have recently been published by the authors and coworkers. Theoretical and experimental studies of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plate structures are covered. On the theoretical side, analyses of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plates using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and finite-element (FE) method are addressed. These methods were applied to study the complete band gaps of Lamb waves, characteristics of the propagating and localized wave modes, and behavior of anomalous refraction, called negative refraction, in the PC plates. The theoretical analyses demonstrated the effects of PC-based negative refraction, lens, waveguides, and resonant cavities. We also discuss the influences of geometrical parameters on the guiding and resonance efficiency and on the frequencies of waveguide and cavity modes. On the experimental side, the design and fabrication of a silicon-based Lamb wave resonator which utilizes PC plates as reflective gratings to form the resonant cavity are discussed. The measured results showed significant improvement of the insertion losses and quality factors of the resonators when the PCs were applied. PMID:21989878

  7. Mitigation of microtiter plate positioning effects using a block randomization scheme.

    PubMed

    Roselle, Christopher; Verch, Thorsten; Shank-Retzlaff, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Microtiter plate-based assays are a common tool in biochemical and analytical labs. Despite widespread use, results generated in microtiter plate-based assays are often impacted by positional bias, in which variability in raw signal measurements are not uniform in all regions of the plate. Since small positional effects can disproportionately affect assay results and the reliability of the data, an effective mitigation strategy is critical. Commonly used mitigation strategies include avoiding the use of outer regions of the plate, replicating treatments within and between plates, and randomizing placement of treatments within and between plates. These strategies often introduce complexity while only partially mitigating positional effects and significantly reducing assay throughput. To reduce positional bias more effectively, we developed a novel block-randomized plate layout. Unlike a completely randomized layout, the block randomization scheme coordinates placement of specific curve regions into pre-defined blocks on the plate based on key experimental findings and assumptions about the distribution of assay bias and variability. Using the block-randomized plate layout, we demonstrated a mean bias reduction of relative potency estimates from 6.3 to 1.1 % in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used for vaccine release. In addition, imprecision in relative potency estimates decreased from 10.2 to 4.5 % CV. Using simulations, we also demonstrated the impact of assay bias on measurement confidence and its relation to replication strategies. We outlined the underlying concepts of the block randomization scheme to potentially apply to other microtiter-based assays. PMID:27116421

  8. Microplate Assay for Colletotrichum Spore Production

    PubMed Central

    Slade, S. J.; Harris, R. F.; Smith, C. S.; Andrews, J. H.; Nordheim, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    A simple microplate method was devised to assay spore production by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides by growing the fungus on 1 ml of solid media in the wells of tissue culture plates. Growth and sporulation on microplates were compared at days 4 and 8 with growth and sporulation in 100-ml liquid batch cultures that involved 11 common media. Spore production per unit volume of medium was the same for solid and liquid forms of the media. Qualitative assessment of mycelial growth measured on microplates agreed with that of growth measured in liquid cultures. The microplate assay indicated that V8 juice was the best medium and that an organic content of about 6 mg/ml was optimal for high sporulation and low mycelium production. The assay provides a convenient, rapid, and inexpensive means of screening media for the production of fungal conidia in large numbers, to be used, for example, in biological control programs. PMID:16347310

  9. Microbiological assay of ketoconazole in shampoo.

    PubMed

    Staub, Inara; Schapoval, Elfrides E S; Bergold, Ana M

    2005-03-23

    Ketoconazole, an anti-fungal agent, is often incorporated in several pharmaceutical forms and in shampoo formulation it is known to be effective against fungal infection on the scalp. This paper describes a method to quantify ketoconazole in shampoo by comparing the cylinder plate assay and the HPLC method. The test organism used for the agar diffusion assay was Candida albicans ATCC 10231. Three different concentrations of ketoconazole were used for the diffusion assay. A mean zone diameter was obtained for each concentration. A standard curve was obtained by plotting the three values derived from the zone diameters. A prospective validation of the method showed that the method was linear (r = 0.9982), precise (R.S.D. = 2.57%) and accurate. The results obtained by the two methods were statistically evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the results obtained indicate that there is no significant difference between these two methods. PMID:15725566

  10. Miniaturization of hydrolase assays in thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Severino A; Moraes, Caroline S; Costa, Samara G; de Souza, Wanderley; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S; Genta, Fernando A

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the protocols of reducing sugar measurements with dinitrosalicylic acid and bicinchoninic acid for thermocyclers and their use in enzymatic assays for hydrolases such as amylase and β-1,3-glucanase. The use of thermocyclers for these enzymatic assays resulted in a 10 times reduction in the amount of reagent and volume of the sample needed when compared with conventional microplate protocols. We standardized absorbance readings from the polymerase chain reaction plates, which allowed us to make direct readings of the techniques above, and a β-glycosidase assay was also established under the same conditions. Standardization of the enzymatic reaction in thermocyclers resulted in less time-consuming temperature calibrations and without loss of volume through leakage or evaporation from the microplate. Kinetic parameters were successfully obtained, and the use of the thermocycler allowed the measurement of enzymatic activities in biological samples from the field with a limited amount of protein. PMID:23123426

  11. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  12. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  13. Using Plate Mapping to Examine Portion Size and Plate Composition for Large and Small Divided Plates

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, David E.; Sobal, Jeffery; Wansink, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Does the size of a plate influence the serving of all items equally, or does it influence the serving of some foods – such as meat versus starch versus vegetables – very differently? To examine this, we utilize a promising new plate mapping method where people drew a meal on a paper plate to examine sensitivity to small versus large three-compartment divided plates in portion size and meal composition in a sample of 109 university students. The total drawn meal area was 37% bigger on large plates than small plates, that is, the portion of plate coverage did not differ by plate size. Men and women drew bigger vegetable portions and men drew bigger meat portions on large plates when compared to small plates. These results suggest that men and women are differentially sensitive to plate size for overall meal size and for meal composition. Implications for decreasing portion size and improving meal balance are discussed. PMID:25280373

  14. Cadmium plating replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  15. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  16. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having through-plate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with led spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  19. Enzyme activity deviates due to spatial and temporal temperature profiles in commercial microtiter plate readers.

    PubMed

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Sieben, Michaela; Lattermann, Clemens; Kauffmann, Kira; Büchs, Jochen; Spieß, Antje C

    2016-03-01

    Microtiter plates (MTP) and automatized techniques are increasingly applied in the field of biotechnology. However, the susceptibility of MTPs to edge effects such as thermal gradients can lead to high variation of measured enzyme activities. In an effort to enhance experimental reliability, to quantify, and to minimize instrument-caused deviations in enzyme kinetics between two MTP-readers, we comprehensively quantified temperature distribution in 96-well MTPs. We demonstrated the robust application of the absorbance dye cresol red as easily applicable temperature indicator in cuvettes and MTPs and determined its accuracy to ±0.16°C. We then quantified temperature distributions in 96-well MTPs revealing temperature deviations over single MTP of up to 2.2°C and different patterns in two commercial devices (BioTek Synergy 4 and Synergy Mx). The obtained liquid temperature was shown to be substantially controlled by evaporation. The temperature-induced enzyme activity variation within MTPs amounted to about 20 %. Activity deviations between MTPs and to those in cuvettes were determined to 40 % due to deviations from the set temperature in MTPs. In conclusion, we propose a better control of experimental conditions in MTPs or alternative experimental systems for reliable determination of kinetic parameters for bioprocess development. PMID:26709721

  20. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Vitek, John Michael; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Connors, Dan; Rakowski, Jim; Gervasio, Don

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  1. Plate-mantle coupling from post-Pangea plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle that involves plates at the surfaces gives rise to plate velocities that vary through time and depend on the balance of plate boundary forces, with the present-day providing a snapshot of this ongoing process. However, present-day plate velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative timeframes and thus cannot be used to evaluate factors limiting plate velocities. Previous studies investigated the effects of continental keels on plate speeds by either using the present-day snapshot or a limited number of reconstructed plate configurations, often leading to conflicting results. For example, an early assumption was that continental keels (especially cratons) were unlikely to impede fast plate motions because India's velocity approached ~20 cm/yr in the Eocene prior to the collision with Eurasia. We employ a modern plate reconstruction approach with evolving global topological plate boundaries for the post-Pangea timeframe (since 200 Ma) to evaluate factors controlling plate velocities. Plate boundary configurations and plate velocities are extracted from the open-source and cross-platform plate reconstruction package GPlates (www.gplates.org) at 1 Myr intervals. For each plate, at each timestep, the area of continental and cratonic lithosphere is calculated to evaluate the effect on plate velocities. Our results support that oceanic plates tend to be 2-3 times faster than plates with large portion of continental plate area, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The fastest plates (~8.5 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by oceanic plate area and high subducting portion of plate perimeter, while the slowest plates (~2.6-2.8 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by continental plate area and bounded by transforms and mid-oceanic ridge segments. Importantly, increasing cratonic fractions (both Proterozoic and Archean lithosphere) significantly impede plate velocities, suggesting that deep continental

  2. Reduced Plating Ignitron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A (Inventor); Pearson, J Boise (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An ignitron apparatus has an airtight tubular housing having a first sealed end and a second sealed end. An anode is connected at the first sealed end, projecting into the housing, and a recess at the second sealed and forms a well which contains a quantity of liquid gallium or gallium alloy making up the cathode. An ignitor projects through the liquid metal and into the housing. The inner surface of the housing includes at least one plating-reduction structure to prevent electrical shorting of the apparatus caused by plating of the liquid metal.

  3. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  4. A high-capacity streptavidin-coated microtitration plate.

    PubMed

    Välimaa, Lasse; Pettersson, Kim; Vehniäinen, Markus; Karp, Matti; Lövgren, Timo

    2003-01-01

    A majority of current immunoassays rely on capturing a specific analyte on a solid phase to allow the separation of the bound analyte from nonbound components. Streptavidin-coated microtitration plates are widely used for immobilization of capturing antibodies, since they provide a generic surface for immobilization of any biotinylated molecule and preserve biomolecule activity much better than direct passive adsorption. Our trials to further improve the properties of the plates resulted in a development of a modified plate, which has higher binding capacity than currently used control plate. The modified coat was prepared by cross-linking streptavidin chemically prior to adsorption onto the microtitration well surfaces. The binding capacities of the plates were measured with biotinylated, europium-labeled molecules and labeled antigen. The immunoassay performance of the plates was studied with noncompetitive, sandwich-type assays of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The maximum immobilization capacity of the modified plate was up to 2.5 times higher than that of the control plate. The higher binding capacity was especially emphasized with small-size molecules. The modified high capacity plate increased the linear ranges of the immunoassays and thus delayed the high-dose hook effect. At high antigen concentrations the signal increased up to 59%, and at the conventional linear ranges of the assays, the increase was up to 29%. We conclude that the modified coating method will be valuable for the future miniaturized systems, where high immobilization capacity is needed at limited areas. PMID:12526699

  5. High-throughput assays for DNA gyrase and other topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Anthony; Burton, Nicolas P; O'Hagan, Natasha

    2006-01-01

    We have developed high-throughput microtitre plate-based assays for DNA gyrase and other DNA topoisomerases. These assays exploit the fact that negatively supercoiled plasmids form intermolecular triplexes more efficiently than when they are relaxed. Two assays are presented, one using capture of a plasmid containing a single triplex-forming sequence by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by staining with a DNA-specific fluorescent dye. The other uses capture of a plasmid containing two triplex-forming sequences by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by a second oligonucleotide that is radiolabelled. The assays are shown to be appropriate for assaying DNA supercoiling by Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and DNA relaxation by eukaryotic topoisomerases I and II, and E.coli topoisomerase IV. The assays are readily adaptable to other enzymes that change DNA supercoiling (e.g. restriction enzymes) and are suitable for use in a high-throughput format. PMID:16936317

  6. An assay for screening microbial cultures for chalkophore production.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Kraemer, Stephan M; Dispirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2010-04-01

    Methanotrophs, bacteria that utilize methane as their sole carbon and energy source, are known to have high requirements for copper. These bacteria have recently been found to synthesize a copper-chelating agent, or chalkophore, termed methanobactin. To aid in screening methanobactin production by methanotrophs, a plate assay developed from the chrome azurol S (CAS) assay for siderophore production, was modified. In the typical CAS assay, a colour change from blue to orange in iron-CAS plates is observed as iron (III) ion weakly bound to CAS is sequestered by siderophores with higher affinities. In our modified assay, iron (III) chloride of the original CAS solution was substituted with copper (II) chloride, and removal of copper from CAS caused a colour change from blue to yellow. Assay results indicated that of the four tested methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, Methylomicrobium album BG8 and Methylocystis parvus OBBP), only M. trichosporium OB3b, M. capsulatus Bath and M. album BG8 produced chalkophores capable of competing with CAS for copper, while M. parvus OBBP did not or did not export sufficient concentrations of methanobactin for detection by this assay. It was also found using Fe-CAS plates that at least M. trichosporium OB3b and M. album BG8 produce siderophores. These results may be expanded for the detection of chalkophores in other microorganisms as well as for screening of putative mutants of chalkophore synthesis. PMID:23766081

  7. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  8. Growth Plate Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... or crushed, the growth plate may close prematurely, forming a bony bridge or “bar.” The risk of ... this publication: James S. Panagis, M.D., M.P.H., NIAMS/NIH; R. Tracy Ballock, M.D., Case ...

  9. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  10. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  11. Unitary plate electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor); Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Josefowicz, Jack Y. (Inventor); Sibert, John W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The unitary electrode (10) comprises a porous sheet (12) of fiberglass the strands (14) of which contain a coating (16) of conductive tin oxide. The lower portion of the sheet contains a layer (18) of resin and the upper layer (20) contains lead dioxide forming a positive active electrode on an electrolyte-impervious layer. The strands (14) form a continuous conduction path through both layers (16, 18). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating the surface of the plate facing the negative electrode with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (130) of lead or graphite filled resin adhered to the plate with a layer (31) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten resin from kettle (60) onto a sheet of glass wool (56) overlying a sheet of lead foil and then applying positive active paste from hopper (64) into the upper layer (68). The plate can also be formed by passing an assembly of a sheet ( 80) of resin, a sheet (86) of sintered glass and a sheet (90) of lead between the nip (92) of heated rollers (93, 95) and then filling lead oxide into the pores (116) of the upper layer (118).

  12. Immunochromatographic assay on thread.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gina; Mao, Xun; Juncker, David

    2012-09-18

    Lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays are low-cost, simple-to-use, rapid tests for point-of-care screening of infectious diseases, drugs of abuse, and pregnancy. However, lateral flow assays are generally not quantitative, give a yes/no answer, and lack multiplexing. Threads have recently been proposed as a support for transporting and mixing liquids in lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays, but their use for quantitative high-sensitivity immunoassays has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we introduce the immunochromatographic assay on thread (ICAT) in a cartridge format that is suitable for multiplexing. The ICAT is a sandwich assay performed on a cotton thread knotted to a nylon fiber bundle, both of which are precoated with recognition antibodies against one target analyte. Upon sample application, the assay results become visible to the eye within a few minutes and are quantified using a flatbed scanner. Assay conditions were optimized, the binding curves for C-reactive protein (CRP) in buffer and diluted serum were established and a limit of detection of 377 pM was obtained. The possibility of multiplexing was demonstrated using three knotted threads coated with antibodies against CRP, osteopontin, and leptin proteins. The performance of the ICAT was compared with that of the paper-based and conventional assays. The results suggest that thread is a suitable support for making low-cost, sensitive, simple-to-use, and multiplexed diagnostic tests. PMID:22889381

  13. Use of the spiral Salmonella assay to detect the mutagenicity of complex environmental mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, V.S.; Early, G.; Claxton, L.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The success demonstrated by the spiral Salmonella assay in a recent study of 20 pure prompted us to examine the effectiveness of this automated bacterial mutagenicity assay for testing complex environmental mixtures. Three sets of combustion emissions were selected for evaluation: automotive diesel exhaust, woodsmoke, and a coal combustion emission. Each sample was tested in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay according to standard protocol (plate incorporation) and spiral assay techniques. In the spiral assay, a specialized plating instrument dispenses the bacteria, test agent, and S9 mix in a spiral pattern onto a minimal agar plate supplemented with histidine and biotin. The components of the assay are administered in such a way that a uniform density of bacteria is exposed to a concentration gradient of the test agent on a single plate. When results are analyzed, a dose-response curve comprised of 13 data points is generated. A comparison of results from the two assays demonstrated the following: (1) Diesel exhaust was generally the most mutagenically potent sample in both assays, followed closely by the coal combustion emission. The woodsmoke sample was only weakly mutagenic in the standard assay but demonstrated higher mutagenic activity in the spiral assay. (2) Samples were more mutagenic on rev/microgram basis in the spiral assay, especially when metabolic activation was added. This disparity presumably was due to differences in the relative amounts of S9 administered across the dose range. (3) The spiral assay required 1/20 the sample mass of the standard assay to test equivalent doses; in addition, for some samples, 50 times more sample mass was required by the standard assay to generate a comparable dose response. (4) Dichloromethane extracts of the complex mixtures could be tested for mutagenicity in the spiral assay.

  14. High-content screening for biofilm assays.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fubing; Hoek, Eric M V; Damoiseaux, Robert

    2010-08-01

    The authors describe a novel high-throughput screening platform that provides rapid, reliable, quantitative assessment of biofilm formation and removal on engineered surfaces. Unlike traditional biofilm assays based on plate readers, this assay platform is based on high-content screening, which allows for multiplexing to simultaneously quantify the number of bacterial adhesions per unit area and the viability of adhered cells using fluorescent dye combinations. This platform is fully automated and has a throughput of more than 10,000 wells per day. The authors used this platform to examine the influence of different assay buffer systems on bacterial adhesion, viability, and removal on cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol coating films synthesized directly onto the bottoms of 384-well plates. The results indicated that water chemistry, bacteria cell type, and film chemistry combine to govern biofilm formation. In general, both reversible and irreversible bacterial adhesion increased with the extent of cross-linking in coating films, which correlates strongly with coating film cross-linking degree and hydrophobicity, which is closely related. The high-throughput platform offers a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of fouling-resistant coating films in addition to elucidation of fundamental mechanisms governing bacterial adhesion. PMID:20639506

  15. New In Vitro Phenotypic Assay for Epilepsy: Fluorescent Measurement of Synchronized Neuronal Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pacico, Nathalie; Mingorance-Le Meur, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Research in the epilepsy field is moving from a primary focus on controlling seizures to addressing disease pathophysiology. This requires the adoption of resource- and time-consuming animal models of chronic epilepsy which are no longer able to sustain the testing of even moderate numbers of compounds. Therefore, new in vitro functional assays of epilepsy are needed that are able to provide a medium throughput while still preserving sufficient biological context to allow for the identification of compounds with new modes of action. Here we describe a robust and simple fluorescence-based calcium assay to measure epileptiform network activity using rat primary cortical cultures in a 96-well format. The assay measures synchronized intracellular calcium oscillations occurring in the population of primary neurons and is amenable to medium throughput screening. We have adapted this assay format to the low magnesium and the 4-aminopyridine epilepsy models and confirmed the contribution of voltage-gated ion channels and AMPA, NMDA and GABA receptors to epileptiform activity in both models. We have also evaluated its translatability using a panel of antiepileptic drugs with a variety of modes of action. Given its throughput and translatability, the calcium oscillations assay bridges the gap between simplified target-based screenings and compound testing in animal models of epilepsy. This phenotypic assay also has the potential to be used directly as a functional screen to help identify novel antiepileptic compounds with new modes of action, as well as pathways with previously unknown contribution to disease pathophysiology. PMID:24416277

  16. Clinical comparison of two assays for rapid detection of cytomegalovirus early nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Woods, G L; Johnson, A M; Thiele, G M

    1990-03-01

    Three methods for detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 218 clinical specimens were compared: (1) shell vial assay to detect the early nuclear antigen after incubation for 16 hours and 40 hours (Syva Company); (2) 24-well plate assay to detect the early nuclear antigen after incubation for 16 hours (DuPont); and (3) convention tissue cell culture. CMV was detected in 26 specimens (12%) by one or more of these methods. With the shell vial assay, 12 (46%) and 15 (58%) specimens were positive after incubation for 16 hours and 40 hours, respectively. CMV was detected in 17 specimens (65%) by the 24-well plate assay. There was no significant difference in the detection of CMV between these assays. CMV was identified by conventional tissue culture in 15 of 22 (68%) evaluable cultures after an average of 14.2 days. More specimens were positive by conventional culture than by the 16-hour shell vial assay (P = 0.035). For optimal detection of CMV in clinical specimens, both conventional tissue cell culture and an early antigen assay should be performed. The two early antigen assays evaluated in this study yielded comparable results. However, the 24-well plates are more easily manipulated, and the 24-well plate assay, as performed, was easier to interpret and more cost efficient. PMID:2155527

  17. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  18. MyPlate Food Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... follow throughout your life. 2. Fruits Like veggies, fruits contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The red section of MyPlate is slightly smaller than the green, but together fruits and veggies should fill half your plate. Whole ...

  19. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  20. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  1. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  2. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  3. North American plate dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Randall M.; Reding, Lynn M.

    1991-01-01

    Deformation within the North American plate in response to various tectonic processes is modeled using an elastic finite element analysis. The tectonic processes considered in the modeling include ridge forces associated with the normal thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, shear and normal stresses transmitted across transforms, normal stresses transmitted across convergent boundaries, stresses due to horizontal density contrasts within the continent, and shear tractions applied along the base of the plate. Model stresses are calculated with respect to a lithostatic reference stress state. Shear stresses transmitted across transform boundaries along the San Andreas and Caribbean are small, of the order of 5-10 MPa. Also, compressive stresses of the order of 5-10 MPa transmitted across the major transforms improve the fit to the data. Compressive stresses across convergent margins along the Aleutians and the Middle America trench are important.

  4. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  5. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  6. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having throughplate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with lead spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  7. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Smov FOS Plate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1994-01-01

    The goal is to measure the precise plate scale and orientation. This will be acheived by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the 4.3 arcsec aperture. The edges of the aperture should be avoided to prevent vignetting effects. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors. We will also determine the offset between the two detectors.

  9. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  10. Martian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1994-03-01

    The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction occured beneath Arabia Terra and east dipping subduction beneath Tharsis Montes and Tempe Terra. Lineations associated with Gordii Dorsum are attributed to ridge-parallel structures, while Phelegra Montes and Scandia Colles are interpreted as transfer-parallel structures or ridge-fault-fault triple junction tracks. Other than for these few features, there is little topographic roughness in the lowlands. Seafloor spreading, if it occurred, must have been relatively rapid. Quantitative estimates of spreading rate are obtained by considering the physics of seafloor spreading in the lower (approx. 0.4 g) gravity of Mars, the absence of vertical scarps from age differences across fracture zones, and the smooth axial topography. Crustal thickness at a given potential temperature in the mantle source region scales inversely with gravity. Thus, the velocity of the rough-smooth transition for axial topography also scales inversely with gravity. Plate reorganizations where young crust becomes difficult to subduct are another constraint on spreading age. Plate tectonics, if it occurred, dominated the thermal and stress history of the planet. A geochemical implication is that the lower gravity of Mars allows deeper hydrothermal circulation through cracks and hence more hydration of oceanic crust so that more water is easily subducted than on the Earth. Age and structural relationships from photogeology as well as median wavelength gravity anomalies across the now dead breakup and subduction margins are the data most likely to test and modify hypotheses

  11. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  12. Plates with Incompatible Prestrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lewicka, Marta; Schäffner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We study effective elastic behavior of the incompatibly prestrained thin plates, where the prestrain is independent of thickness and uniform through the plate's thickness h. We model such plates as three-dimensional elastic bodies with a prescribed pointwise stress-free state characterized by a Riemannian metric G, and seek the limiting behavior as {h to 0}. We first establish that when the energy per volume scales as the second power of h, the resulting {Γ} -limit is a Kirchhoff-type bending theory. We then show the somewhat surprising result that there exist non-immersible metrics G for whom the infimum energy (per volume) scales smaller than h 2. This implies that the minimizing sequence of deformations carries nontrivial residual three-dimensional energy but it has zero bending energy as seen from the limit Kirchhoff theory perspective. Another implication is that other asymptotic scenarios are valid in appropriate smaller scaling regimes of energy. We characterize the metrics G with the above property, showing that the zero bending energy in the Kirchhoff limit occurs if and only if the Riemann curvatures R 1213, R 1223 and R 1212 of G vanish identically. We illustrate our findings with examples; of particular interest is an example where {G_{2 × 2}}, the two-dimensional restriction of G, is flat but the plate still exhibits the energy scaling of the Föppl-von Kármán type. Finally, we apply these results to a model of nematic glass, including a characterization of the condition when the metric is immersible, for {G = Id3 + γ n ⊗ n} given in terms of the inhomogeneous unit director field distribution { n in R^3}.

  13. Fluorescence Assay for Evaluating Microbicidal Activity of Hand Antiseptics

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M.; Mariscal-Lopez, Eloisa; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a fluorescent β-d-glucuronidase activity (BGA)-based assay for detecting and quantifying Escherichia coli in samples to assess the biocide efficacy of hand antiseptics. The fluorescence level is proportional to the number of viable E. coli organisms present. We compared our assay results to those of the E. coli plate count method specified by the European standard for testing hygienic hand rub disinfectant products (EN1500). The plate count method requires excessive handling and materials and is not valid if the number of organisms per plate is too low or high for counting in many of the samples. We optimized the fluorescent assay based on the cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide by adding 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, a nonfluorogenic BGA substrate, to induce glucuronidase activity and reduce assay time. Furthermore, our method can be automated and eliminates the need for multiple dilutions. Fluorescence was temporally monitored, and the time required to reach a specific value of fluorescence was correlated with the initial number of viable E. coli organisms on the samples. There was a positive correlation (P < 0.05) with a high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.82) between the E. coli counts by plate count and fluorescence methods. Reported effects in fluorescent BGA were compared to the EN1500 plate count method with five hand disinfectants. We found our method more advantageous, because it was as sensitive as the EN1500 method, requires less time to complete, and is less expensive and less laborious than conventional plating techniques. PMID:26276114

  14. Lateral flow assays

    PubMed Central

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  15. Development and validation of a UHPLC-MS/MS assay for colistin methanesulphonate (CMS) and colistin in human plasma and urine using weak-cation exchange solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Miao; Wu, Xiao-Jie; Fan, Ya-Xin; Guo, Bei-Ning; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-30

    A rapid ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) assay method was developed for determination of CMS and formed colistin in human plasma and urine. After extraction on a 96-well SPE Supra-Clean Weak Cation Exchange (WCX) plate, the eluents were mixed and injected into the UHPLC-MS/MS system directly. A Phonomenex Kinetex XB-C18 analytical column was employed with a mobile phase consisting of solution "A" (acetonitrile:methanol, 1:1, v/v) and solution "B" (0.1% formic acid in water, v/v). The flow rate was 0.4mL/min with gradient elution over 3.5min. Ions were detected in ESI positive ion mode and the precursor-product ion pairs were m/z 390.7/101.3 for colistin A, m/z 386.0/101.2 for colistin B, and m/z 402.3/101.2 for polymyxin B1 (IS), respectively. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.0130 and 0.0251mg/L for colistin A and colistin B in both plasma and urine with accuracy (relative error, %)<±12.6% and precision (relative standard deviation, %)<±10.8%. Stability of CMS was demonstrated in biological samples before and during sample treatment, and in the extract. This new analytical method provides high-throughput treatment and optimized quantification of CMS and colistin, which offers a highly efficient tool for the analysis of a large number of clinical samples as well as routine therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:26970986

  16. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  17. Lecithin-agar assay for lecithinase antibodies in serum.

    PubMed

    Sibinovic, K H; Brown, F A; Pettigrew, K D; Vought, R L

    1971-01-01

    A technique for assay of lecithinase antibodies in serum was developed in this laboratory by using a lecithin-agar plate diffusion procedure based on a combination of described plate assays. Egg yolk lipoprotein composed primarily of lecithin was used as a substrate for reaction with free or non-neutralized lecithinase C after incubation of known amounts of lecithinase C with various dilutions of control and test sera. It was found that the size of the reaction zone was a function of enzyme concentration and inversely proportional to the antibody concentration. Accuracy and precision of the assay were determined. In addition, lecithinase antibody levels in sera from experimentally inoculated rats and rabbits and sera from randomly selected human patients were studied. PMID:4322282

  18. Lecithin-Agar Assay for Lecithinase Antibodies in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Sibinovic, Kyle H.; Brown, Freddie A.; Pettigrew, Karen D.; Vought, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    A technique for assay of lecithinase antibodies in serum was developed in this laboratory by using a lecithin-agar plate diffusion procedure based on a combination of described plate assays. Egg yolk lipoprotein composed primarily of lecithin was used as a substrate for reaction with free or non-neutralized lecithinase C after incubation of known amounts of lecithinase C with various dilutions of control and test sera. It was found that the size of the reaction zone was a function of enzyme concentration and inversely proportional to the antibody concentration. Accuracy and precision of the assay were determined. In addition, lecithinase antibody levels in sera from experimentally inoculated rats and rabbits and sera from randomly selected human patients were studied. Images PMID:4322282

  19. SNAP Assay Technology.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    The most widely used immunoassay configuration is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) because the procedure produces highly sensitive and specific results and generally is easy to use. By definition, ELISAs are immunoassays used to detect a substance (typically an antigen or antibody) in which an enzyme is attached (conjugated) to one of the reactants and an enzymatic reaction is used to amplify the signal if the substance is present. Optimized ELISAs include several steps that are performed in sequence using a defined protocol that typically includes application of sample and an enzyme-conjugated antibody or antigen to an immobilized reagent, followed by wash and enzyme reaction steps. The SNAP assay is an in-clinic device that performs each of the ELISA steps in a timed sequential fashion with little consumer interface. The components and mechanical mechanism of the assay device are described. Detailed descriptions of features of the assay, which minimize nonspecific binding and enhance the ability to read results from weak-positive samples, are given. Basic principles used in assays with fundamentally different reaction mechanisms, namely, antigen-detection, antibody-detection, and competitive assays are given. Applications of ELISA technology, which led to the development of several multianalyte SNAP tests capable of testing for up to 6 analytes using a single-sample and a single-SNAP device are described. PMID:27154596

  20. Origin of Small Tectonic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, C.; Coltice, N.; Seton, M.; Müller, D.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    The plate tectonic theory allowed to split the Earth surface into 6 (Le Pichon 1968) to 52 tectonic plates (Bird 2003). These plates are separated into two groups: the first of 7 large plates and the second of numerous smaller plates (Morra et al 2013). Previous studies using the reconstruction of the past 200 My, suggest that the size of large plates is driven by mantle flow. But the tools employed are descriptive (Morra et al 2013, Sornette and Pisarenko 2003), hence ignoring forces and physical principles within the lithosphere and the mantle. The processes at the origin of small plates remain unknown. We developed a new approach to explain the plate sizes. We demonstrate that the physics of convection drives it. We applied plate tectonics theory on 3D spherical convection models generating plate-like motions, which give access to a complete survey of data: velocities, viscosity and heat flow. Our data show that (1) the large plates depend on the dominating scale of the convective flow due to the initiation or the shutdown of subductions; (2) the smaller plates are generated thanks to large variability of regional stresses along subduction zone by slab pull and suction influenced by the geometry of trenches. Our results are consistent with the quick reorganizations of back-arc basins occuring synchronously with the modification of subduction zones geometry around the Pacific plate (Sdrolias et al 2004). Hence, we conclude that (1) the decreasing number of small plates in the plate reconstructions back in time is an artifact induced by their short lifetime, that is why they are artificially ignored; (2) the geometry of past trenches is simplified leading to an underestimation of the length of subduction zones.

  1. Review of lignocellulolytic enzyme activity analyses and scale-down to microplate-based assays.

    PubMed

    Mansour, A A; Da Costa, A; Arnaud, T; Lu-Chau, T A; Fdz-Polanco, Maria; Moreira, M T; Cacho Rivero, J A

    2016-04-01

    With the increasing use of enzymes in environmental applications, there is a need for analytical methods adapted to large factorial experiments. Existing reference methods are chemical and labor intensive and unsuitable to analyze in parallel a large number of samples. Based on an extensive literature review and on experimental results, this work compares reference and microplate adapted methods to define the most adequate filter paper, carboxymethylcellulase, β-glucosidase and xylanase activity tests. In the adapted methods, the total reaction volume was reduced from 2.2-24.5 mL to 0.21-0.24 mL. Statistical analysis of the activities measured on enzyme mixtures by applying the 96-well plate reduced methods showed that they were not significantly different to the activities obtained with reference tests. PMID:26838452

  2. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  3. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  4. Longitudinal study of the in vivo hprt mutant frequency in human T-lymphocytes as determined by a cell cloning assay

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Sullivan, L.M.; Booker, J.K.; Pornelos, B.S.; Falta, M.T.; Greene, C.J.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo frequency of mutants resulting from mutation at the hprt locus in human T-lymphocytes can be determined by a cloning assay. This assay quantifies the frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant (TG{sup r}) T-cells through growth of colonies in 96-well microtiter dishes. The reproducibility of the TG{sup r} mutant frequency values has now been assessed in a longitudinal study of six individuals employing 4-5 blood samples over a 26-37 week time period. Cloning assays were performed with both fresh and cryopreserved cell samples. No significant differences were found among the mutant frequency values for multiple samples from each individual with both fresh and cryopreserved cell samples. These results demonstrate the reproducibility of this cloning assay for in vivo mutant frequency determinations in human T-lymphocytes.

  5. Fuel cell end plate structure

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  6. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors. PMID:26551162

  7. Homogeneous assay technology based on upconverting phosphors.

    PubMed

    Kuningas, Katri; Rantanen, Terhi; Ukonaho, Telle; Lövgren, Timo; Soukka, Tero

    2005-11-15

    Upconversion photoluminescence can eliminate problems associated with autofluorescence and scattered excitation light in homogeneous luminescence-based assays without need for temporal resolution. We have demonstrated a luminescence resonance energy-transfer-based assay utilizing inorganic upconverting (UPC) lanthanide phosphor as a donor and fluorescent protein as an acceptor. UPC phosphors are excited at near-infrared and they have narrow-banded anti-Stokes emission at visible wavelengths enabling measurement of the proximity-dependent sensitized emission with minimal background. The acceptor alone does not generate any direct emission at shorter wavelengths under near-infrared excitation. A competitive model assay for biotin was constructed using streptavidin-conjugated Er3+,Yb3+-doped UPC phosphor as a donor and biotinylated phycobiliprotein as an acceptor. UPC phosphor was excited at near-infrared (980 nm) and sensitized acceptor emission was measured at red wavelength (600 nm) by using a microtitration plate fluorometer equipped with an infrared laser diode and suitable excitation and emission filters. Lower limit of detection was in the subnanomolar concentration range. Compared to time-resolved fluorometry, the developed assay technology enabled simplified instrumentation. Excitation at near-infrared and emission at red wavelengths render the technology also suitable to analysis of strongly colored and fluorescent samples, which are often of concern in clinical immunoassays and in high-throughput screening. PMID:16285685

  8. A High Throughput In Vivo Assay for Taste Quality and Palatability

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, R. Kyle; Long, Daniel; Brennan, Francis; Buber, Tulu; Bryant, Robert; Salemme, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Taste quality and palatability are two of the most important properties measured in the evaluation of taste stimuli. Human panels can report both aspects, but are of limited experimental flexibility and throughput capacity. Relatively efficient animal models for taste evaluation have been developed, but each of them is designed to measure either taste quality or palatability as independent experimental endpoints. We present here a new apparatus and method for high throughput quantification of both taste quality and palatability using rats in an operant taste discrimination paradigm. Cohorts of four rats were trained in a modified operant chamber to sample taste stimuli by licking solutions from a 96-well plate that moved in a randomized pattern beneath the chamber floor. As a rat’s tongue entered the well it disrupted a laser beam projecting across the top of the 96-well plate, consequently producing two retractable levers that operated a pellet dispenser. The taste of sucrose was associated with food reinforcement by presses on a sucrose-designated lever, whereas the taste of water and other basic tastes were associated with the alternative lever. Each disruption of the laser was counted as a lick. Using this procedure, rats were trained to discriminate 100 mM sucrose from water, quinine, citric acid, and NaCl with 90-100% accuracy. Palatability was determined by the number of licks per trial and, due to intermediate rates of licking for water, was quantifiable along the entire spectrum of appetitiveness to aversiveness. All 96 samples were evaluated within 90 minute test sessions with no evidence of desensitization or fatigue. The technology is capable of generating multiple concentration–response functions within a single session, is suitable for in vivo primary screening of tastant libraries, and potentially can be used to evaluate stimuli for any taste system. PMID:23951319

  9. A microtiterplate-based screening assay to assess diverse effects on cytochrome P450 enzyme activities in primary rat hepatocytes by various compounds.

    PubMed

    Schaeffner, I; Petters, J; Aurich, H; Frohberg, P; Christ, B

    2005-02-01

    During the development of potential drugs it is useful to identify pharmacological and/or toxicological side effects of a compound as early as possible in order to exclude them from further development for reasons of time and cost. Activation or inactivation of members of the cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase system (CYP450) might indicate potential undesired effects of a given compound. However, results using CYP450 assay systems are often inconsistent because of different experimental settings. Therefore, it was the goal of the present study to optimize the CYP450 assay in primary rat hepatocytes with respect to the time point of addition of and duration of exposure to alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF) and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) as well as trans-resveratrol (RES), which have well-described stimulatory and inhibitory effects on CYP450 enzymes of the 1A and 2B family, respectively. Hepatocytes were also treated with putative lipoxygenase (LOX)/cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors with unknown impact on CYP450 enzyme activity in order to detect potential side effects. Cells were cultured for up to 7 days on 96-well microtiter plates, and enzyme activity was determined by a conventional fluorescence spectroscopy assay. ANF and BNF, given to the cells after 4 days of culture, stimulated CYP1A and 2B activities significantly in a concentration-dependent fashion after long-term exposure for at least 1 day. However, during short-term exposure for 1-6 h, CYP1A activity was inhibited, while CYP2B was increased weakly by ANF but not BNF. RES inhibited CYP1A activity during short- and long-term exposure without affecting CYP2B activity. From the results it was concluded that primary rat hepatocytes should be cultured for at least 3-4 days but no longer prior to the assay. The assay should be performed at two different time points of exposure, i.e., 6 h for short-term and 24 h for long-term exposure. The compounds under investigation should be applied at two different

  10. Evaluation of two commercial real-time PCR assays for detecting Campylobacter in broiler carcass rinses.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional plating methods are reliable means for Campylobacter identification from poultry samples but automated gene-based detection systems now available can reduce assay time, data collection and analysis. Bio-Rad and DuPont Qualicon recently introduced Campylobacter assays for their real-time ...

  11. A titer plate-based polymer microfluidic platform for high throughput nucleic acid purification.

    PubMed

    Park, D S-W; Hupert, M L; Witek, M A; You, B H; Datta, P; Guy, J; Lee, J-B; Soper, S A; Nikitopoulos, D E; Murphy, M C

    2008-02-01

    A 96-well solid-phase reversible immobilization (SPRI) reactor plate was designed to demonstrate functional titer plate-based microfluidic platforms. Nickel, large area mold inserts were fabricated using an SU-8 based, UV-LIGA technique on 150 mm diameter silicon substrates. Prior to UV exposure, the prebaked SU-8 resist was flycut to reduce the total thickness variation to less than 5 mum. Excellent UV lithography results, with highly vertical sidewalls, were obtained in the SU-8 by using an UV filter to remove high absorbance wavelengths below 350 nm. Overplating of nickel in the SU-8 patterns produced high quality, high precision, metal mold inserts, which were used to replicate titer plate-based SPRI reactors using hot embossing of polycarbonate (PC). Optimized molding conditions yielded good feature replication fidelity and feature location integrity over the entire surface area. Thermal fusion bonding of the molded PC chips at 150 degrees C resulted in leak-free sealing, which was verified in leakage tests using a fluorescent dye. The assembled SPRI reactor was used for simple, fast purification of genomic DNA from whole cell lysates of several bacterial species, which was verified by PCR amplification of the purified genomic DNA. PMID:17659445

  12. Wobble plate engine

    SciTech Connect

    Derderian, H.; Pronovost, J.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a conventional Stirling cycle engine of the type characterized by an elongated cylinder having a closed end and an open end, means for applying heat to the exterior of the cylinder to heat gas in the interior of the cylinder at the closed end thereof, a displacer piston mounted for a reciprocation within the closed end of the cylinder and a power piston axially aligned with the displacer piston and mounted for coaxial reciprocation between the displacer piston and the open end of the cylinder, the reciprocation of the displacer piston leading the corresponding stroke of the power piston by a predetermined phase angle, the improved means for properly phasing the reciprocation of the two pistons and for converting the reciprocation of the power piston into rotation of an output shaft which is parallel to the axis of reciprocation comprising: a supporting frame; an output shaft mounted on said frame for rotation about a first axis which is parallel to the axis of reciprocation of the two pistons, said shaft having an inclined cylindrical bearing surface the axis of which intersects said first axis at an acute angle; gimbal means pivotally mounted on said supporting frame for oscillation about a second axis perpendicular to and intersecting first axis; a wobble plate pivotally mounted on a third axis within said gimbal means for oscillation with said gimbal means and for further oscillation about said third axis which is mutually perpendicular to and intersecting said first and second axes, said wobble plate being rotatably mounted on said inclined cylindrical bearing surface in a plane which is perpendicular to said axis of said bearing surface whereby said output shaft can rotate about said first axis as said wobble plate oscillates about said second and third axes.

  13. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  14. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  15. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Megan Y.; Santelli, Cara M.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  16. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  17. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-03-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  18. Shuttle plate braiding machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, Jr., Cecil O. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for moving yarn in a selected pattern to form a braided article. The apparatus includes a segmented grid of stationary support elements and a plurality of shuttles configured to carry yarn. The shuttles are supported for movement on the grid assembly and each shuttle includes a retractable plunger for engaging a reciprocating shuttle plate that moves below the grid assembly. Such engagement at selected times causes the shuttles to move about the grid assembly in a selected pattern to form a braided article of a particular geometry.

  19. Reduced hydrogen cadmium plating

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeller, T.; Ross, L. ); Varma, R. ); Agarwala, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the advantages of using a periodic reverse pulse plating method, incorporating a fast cathodic pulse which is separated from the subsequent anodic/cathodic pulses by a long rest period in producing silvery cadmium coatings on steel from aqueous fluoroborate electrolyte. Also, the deposition obtained by combination of pulse currents and turbulent electrolyte flow system (forced convection of electrolyte, Re {approximately} 20-25,000) result in a near hydrogen-free electrodeposition of fine- grained cadmium. This is confirmed by the determination of diffusible hydrogen by the electrochemical (Barnach Electrode) method.

  20. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  1. Ultrafast microchannel plate photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Kume, H; Koyama, K; Nakatsugawa, K; Suzuki, S; Fatlowitz, D

    1988-03-15

    Performance characteristics of several new types of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) with microchannel plates (MCP) are presented in this paper. They are the MCP-PMT with 6-microm diam channels, MCP-PMT with an S-l photocathode, and MCP-PMT with multi (discrete) anode and gatable MCP-PMT. Important requirements of an optical detector for picosecond lasers, fluorescence measurements, and material analysis are low light detectability, ultrafast time response, and versatile operation including modulation. The basic configuration, characteristics, and practical results of these detectors are described. PMID:20531532

  2. Rover waste assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  4. Lateral flow strip assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  5. Multiple MTS Assay as the Alternative Method to Determine Survival Fraction of the Irradiated HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arab-Bafrani, Zahra; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abbasian, Mahdi; Fesharaki, Mehrafarin

    2016-01-01

    A multiple colorimetric assay has been introduced to evaluate the proliferation and determination of survival fraction (SF) of irradiated cells. The estimation of SF based on the cell-growth curve information is the major advantage of this assay. In this study, the utility of multiple-MTS assay for the SF estimation of irradiated HT-29 colon cancer cells, which were plated before irradiation, was evaluated. The SF of HT-29 colon cancer cells under irradiation with 9 MV photon was estimated using multiple-MTS assay and colony assay. Finally, the correlation between two assays was evaluated. Results showed that there are no significant differences between the SF obtained by two assays at different radiation doses (P > 0.05), and the survival curves have quite similar trends. In conclusion, multiple MTS-assay can be a reliable method to determine the SF of irradiated colon cancer cells that plated before irradiation. PMID:27186539

  6. A High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay for Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Walter; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    When a disk of filter paper is impregnated with a cytotoxic or cytostatic drug and added to solid medium seeded with yeast, a visible clear zone forms around the disk whose size depends on the concentration and potency of the drug. This is the traditional "halo" assay and provides a convenient, if low-throughput, read-out of biological activity that has been the mainstay of antifungal and antibiotic testing for decades. Here, we describe a protocol for a high-throughput version of the halo assay, which uses an array of 384 pins to deliver ∼200 nL of stock solutions from compound plates onto single-well plates seeded with yeast. Using a plate reader in the absorbance mode, the resulting halos can be quantified and the data archived in the form of flat files that can be connected to compound databases with standard software. This assay has the convenience associated with the visual readout of the traditional halo assay but uses far less material and can be automated to screen thousands of compounds per day. PMID:27587777

  7. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  8. Localised Plate Motion on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R. C.

    1996-03-01

    The volcanic and tectonic features observed in Dali Vinculum, Parga Vinculum and Imdr Regio are concentrated at long, narrow, curvilinear zones, with relatively minor volcanism and tectonism between these zones. These zones, whilst more diffuse than terrestrial plate boundaries, nevertheless define the margins of tectonic plates. In contrast to Earth, however, it appears that venusian plates are neither created nor destroyed by lateral motion. Rather, plates are thinned and intruded at vincula plate boundaries, vertically accreted by small-scale intra-plate (planitia) volcanism and perhaps destroyed by delamination of thickened crust in tesserae and montane regions such as Thetis Regio and Ishtar Terra. The diversity in age both between and within these three areas together with the evidence for infrequent, small scale resurfacing in the planitiae are difficult to reconcile with a non-uniformitarian geological process.

  9. Two Types of Assays for Detecting Frog Sperm Chemoattraction

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Lindsey A.; Tholl, Nathan; Chandler, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Sperm chemoattraction in invertebrates can be sufficiently robust that one can place a pipette containing the attractive peptide into a sperm suspension and microscopically visualize sperm accumulation around the pipette1. Sperm chemoattraction in vertebrates such as frogs, rodents and humans is more difficult to detect and requires quantitative assays. Such assays are of two major types - assays that quantitate sperm movement to a source of chemoattractant, so-called sperm accumulation assays, and assays that actually track the swimming trajectories of individual sperm. Sperm accumulation assays are relatively rapid allowing tens or hundreds of assays to be done in a single day, thereby allowing dose response curves and time courses to be carried out relatively rapidly. These types of assays have been used extensively to characterize many well established chemoattraction systems - for example, neutrophil chemotaxis to bacterial peptides and sperm chemotaxis to follicular fluid. Sperm tracking assays can be more labor intensive but offer additional data on how chemoattractancts actually alter the swimming paths that sperm take. This type of assay is needed to demonstrate the orientation of sperm movement relative to the chemoattrractant gradient axis and to visualize characteristic turns or changes in orientation that bring the sperm closer to the egg. Here we describe methods used for each of these two types of assays. The sperm accumulation assay utilized is called a "two-chamber" assay. Amphibian sperm are placed in a tissue culture plate insert with a polycarbonate filter floor having 12 μm diameter pores. Inserts with sperm are placed into tissue culture plate wells containing buffer and a chemoatttractant carefully pipetted into the bottom well where the floor meets the wall (see Fig. 1). After incubation, the top insert containing the sperm reservoir is carefully removed, and sperm in the bottom chamber that have passed through the membrane are removed

  10. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  11. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  12. Macroautophagic cargo sequestration assays.

    PubMed

    Seglen, Per O; Luhr, Morten; Mills, Ian G; Sætre, Frank; Szalai, Paula; Engedal, Nikolai

    2015-03-01

    Macroautophagy, the process responsible for bulk sequestration and lysosomal degradation of cytoplasm, is often monitored by means of the autophagy-related marker protein LC3. This protein is linked to the phagophoric membrane by lipidation during the final steps of phagophore assembly, and it remains associated with autophagic organelles until it is degraded in the lysosomes. The transfer of LC3 from cytosol to membranes and organelles can be measured by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence microscopy, but these assays provide no information about functional macroautophagic activity, i.e., whether the phagophores are actually engaged in the sequestration of cytoplasmic cargo and enclosing this cargo into sealed autophagosomes. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggest that macroautophagy can proceed independently of LC3. There is therefore a need for alternative methods, preferably effective cargo sequestration assays, which can monitor actual macroautophagic activity. Here, we provide an overview of various approaches that have been used over the last four decades to measure macroautophagic sequestration activity in mammalian cells. Particular emphasis is given to the so-called "LDH sequestration assay", which measures the transfer of the autophagic cargo marker enzyme LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) from the cytosol to autophagic vacuoles. The LDH sequestration assay was originally developed to measure macroautophagic activity in primary rat hepatocytes. Subsequently, it has found use in several other cell types, and in this article we demonstrate a further validation and simplification of the method, and show that it is applicable to several cell lines that are commonly used to study autophagy. PMID:25576638

  13. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, L.P.

    1981-02-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  14. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  15. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  16. Ion plating for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1981-01-01

    The ion plating techniques are classified relative to the instrumental set up, evaporation media, and mode of transport. A distinction is drawn between the low vacuum (plasma) and high vacuum (ion beam) techniques. Ion plating technology is discussed at the fundamental and industrial level. At the fundamental level, the capabilities and limitations of the plasma (evaporant flux) and film characteristics are evaluated. And on the industrial level, the performance and potential uses of ion plated films are discussed.

  17. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  18. Carbon-assisted flyer plates

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, David B.; Paisley, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    A laser driven flyer plate utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited.

  19. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  20. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  1. Laser-driven flyer plate

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma. 2 figures.

  2. Laser-driven flyer plate

    DOEpatents

    Paisley, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma.

  3. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  4. An Optimized High Throughput Clean-Up Method Using Mixed-Mode SPE Plate for the Analysis of Free Arachidonic Acid in Plasma by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Qin, Suzi; Li, Linsen; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Qunjie; Wei, Junfu

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput sample preparation method was developed utilizing mixed-mode solid phase extraction (SPE) in 96-well plate format for the determination of free arachidonic acid in plasma by LC-MS/MS. Plasma was mixed with 3% aqueous ammonia and loaded into each well of 96-well plate. After washing with water and methanol sequentially, 3% of formic acid in acetonitrile was used to elute arachidonic acid. The collected fraction was injected onto a reversed phase column at 30°C with mobile phase of acetonitrile/water (70 : 30, v/v) and detected by LC-MS/MS coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve ranged from 10 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (r2 = 0.9999). The recoveries were in the range of 99.38% to 103.21% with RSD less than 6%. The limit of detection is 3 ng/mL. PMID:25873969

  5. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J; Sidransky, Ellen; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  6. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  7. 10. DETAIL OF BUILDER'S PLATE AT NORTH PORTAL. PLATE READS: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF BUILDER'S PLATE AT NORTH PORTAL. PLATE READS: 1889, BUILT BY THE BERLIN IRON BRIDGE CO. EAST BERLIN CONN. DOUGLAS & JARVIS PAT. APT. 16, 1878, AP'L 17, 1885. A.P. FORESMAN, WM. S. STARR, T.J. STREBEIGH, COMMISSIONERS. - Pine Creek Bridge, River Road spanning Pine Creek, Jersey Shore, Lycoming County, PA

  8. A Microplate Format Assay for Real-Time Screening for New Aldolases that Accept Aryl-Substituted Acceptor Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huan; Enugala, Thilak Reddy; Widersten, Mikael

    2015-12-01

    Aldolases are potentially important biocatalysts for asymmetric synthesis of polyhydroxylated compounds. Fructose 6-phosphate aldolase (FSA) is of particular interest by virtue of its unusually relaxed dependency on phosphorylated substrates. FSA has been reported to be a promising catalyst of aldol addition involving aryl-substituted acceptors such as phenylacetaldehyde that can react with donor ketones such as hydroxyacetone. Improvement of the low intrinsic activity with bulky acceptor substrates of this type is of great interest but has been hampered by the lack of powerful screening protocols applicable in directed evolution strategies. Here we present a new screen allowing for direct spectrophotometric recording of retro-aldol cleavage. The assay utilizes an aldehyde reductase produced in vitro by directed evolution; it reduces the aldehyde product formed after cleavage of the aldol by FSA. The assay is suitable both for steady-state enzyme kinetics and for real-time activity screening in a 96-well format. PMID:26449620

  9. Measuring Ca²⁺ changes in multiwell format using the Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR(®)).

    PubMed

    Marshall, Ian C B; Owen, Davina E; McNulty, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    The Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR) has made a significant contribution to drug discovery programs. The key advantage of FLIPR over conventional plate readers is the ability to measure fluorescence emission from multiple wells (96 wells or 384 wells) simultaneously and with high temporal resolution. Consequently, FLIPR has been used extensively to record dynamic intracellular processes such as changes in intracellular Ca(2+) ion concentration, membrane potential, and pH. Since FLIPR is used to measure a functional response in cells, it is rapidly able to distinguish full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists at a target of interest, making the system a valuable screening tool for interrogation of compound libraries. Automated FLIPR systems for ultra high throughput have also become available that employ integrated plate stackers, washers and specialized stages to allow users to shuttle cell and compound plates from incubators or storage magazines onto the FLIPR system itself. In this chapter generic methods for assessing intracellular Ca(2+) on the FLIPR are described. PMID:23007581

  10. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  11. Quantitation of microRNAs using a modified Invader assay.

    PubMed

    Allawi, Hatim T; Dahlberg, James E; Olson, Sarah; Lund, Elsebet; Olson, Marilyn; Ma, Wu-Po; Takova, Tsetska; Neri, Bruce P; Lyamichev, Victor I

    2004-07-01

    The short lengths of microRNAs (miRNAs) present a significant challenge for detection and quantitation using conventional methods for RNA analysis. To address this problem, we developed a quantitative, sensitive, and rapid miRNA assay based on our previously described messenger RNA Invader assay. This assay was used successfully in the analysis of several miRNAs, using as little as 50-100 ng of total cellular RNA or as few as 1,000 lysed cells. Its specificity allowed for discrimination between miRNAs differing by a single nucleotide, and between precursor and mature miRNAs. The Invader miRNA assay, which can be performed in unfractionated detergent lysates, uses fluorescence detection in microtiter plates and requires only 2-3 h incubation time, allowing for parallel analysis of multiple samples in high-throughput screening analyses. PMID:15208450

  12. Improved assays for xenosensor activation based on reverse transfection.

    PubMed

    Küblbeck, Jenni; Anttila, Teemu; Pulkkinen, Juha T; Honkakoski, Paavo

    2015-10-01

    Discovery of receptor-dependent mechanisms for regulation of drug metabolism has provided a new way to evaluate the propensity of drug candidates to cause induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Therefore, receptor-based reporter assays have become common in early stages of drug development projects and in mechanistic studies. Here, we report a reverse transfection system to conduct activation assays for human xenosensors AhR, CAR and PXR. The assay format is based on long-term stability and uniformity of DNA/carrier complexes on culture plates, avoiding multiple stages and variation inherent in conventional transfection methods. Consequently, these improved assays are streamlined, reproducible and formally validated with Z' factors exceeding 0.5. This novel reverse transfection system is expected to find use in diverse areas of early drug development such prediction of CYP induction, evaluation of species differences and in mechanistic studies. PMID:26187274

  13. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera

    PubMed Central

    Babrak, Lmar; Lin, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hnasko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL−1 limit of detection (LOD) of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings. PMID:26742073

  14. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera.

    PubMed

    Babrak, Lmar; Lin, Alice; Stanker, Larry H; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hnasko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL(-1) limit of detection (LOD) of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings. PMID:26742073

  15. High-throughput assay comparison and standardization for metal chelating capacity screening: A proposal and application.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jânio Sousa; Alvarenga Brizola, Vitor Rafael; Granato, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Aiming to standardize the experimental protocols to assess the ability to chelate Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) using 96-well microplates, we analyzed Brazilian coffees (n=20) as a study-case in relation to their antioxidant activity using conventional methods (DPPH and FRAP assays) and correlated the results with the total phenolic content (TPC) using bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches. Complementarily, we assessed the repeatability, reproducibility, recovery, and linearity of both methods. Data showed that the proposed assays presented a good repeatability and reproducibility (<7% RSD) and mean recovery values of 96.66% and 98.91% for the iron and copper assays, respectively. Both methods were linear in the range of 0-100mg EDTA equivalents/L. Cu(2+)-chelating ability was significantly correlated to FRAP, DPPH, and TPC, while sparse (p<0.05) correlations were obtained with Fe(2+)-chelating ability. Overall, both micro assays can be used to assess the ability of plant-based extracts to chelate Fe(2+) and Cu(2+)in vitro. PMID:27507505

  16. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  17. ASSESSMENT OF STANDARD REFERENCE COMPOUNDS FOR COMPARATIVE STUDIES USING THE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM MUTAGENICITY ASSAY: II. WITH EXOGENOUS ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the variability in the mutagenic response of potential standard reference chemicals that require exogenous metabolic activation in the standard plate; incorporation Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and to develop ranking criteria for muta...

  18. High Throughput Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Assay for Mercapturic Acids of Acrolein and Crotonaldehyde in Cigarette Smokers’ Urine

    PubMed Central

    Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Zarth, Adam; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    3-Hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3-HPMA) and 3-hydroxy-1-methylpropylmercapturic acid (HMPMA) are urinary metabolites of the toxicants acrolein and crotonaldehyde, respectively. Virtually all human urine samples contain these metabolites, resulting from the action of glutathione-S-transferases on acrolein and crotonaldehyde, which are lipid peroxidation products, environmental and dietary contaminants, and constituents of cigarette smoke. We have developed a high throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantitative analysis of 3-HPMA and HMPMA in large numbers of small urine samples, as would be required in molecular epidemiology and clinical studies relating levels of these metabolites to cancer risk. Solid-phase extraction on mixed mode reverse phase-anion exchange 96-well plates provided sufficient purification for LC-MS/MS analysis, which was performed by auto-injection using a 96-well format, and resulted in clean, readily interpretable chromatograms, with detection limits of 4.5 pmol/mL urine for 3-HPMA and 3.5 pmol/mL urine for HMPMA. Accuracy was 92% for 3-HPMA and 97% for HMPMA while inter-day precision was 9.1% (coefficient of variation) for 3-HPMA and 11.0% for HMPMA. The method was applied to more than 2600 urine samples from smokers; mean levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA were 4800 ± 5358 (S.D.) pmol/ml and 3302 ± 3341 pmol/ml, respectively. PMID:23934173

  19. Development of a solid-phase assay for measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, J.; Johnson, K.; Kaplan, J.

    1980-09-15

    A solid-phase, plate assay was developed for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity. In this assay procedure, radiolabeled substrates were dried onto the surface of microtiter wells. Following drying, the wells were washed two times with saline to remove the nonadherent substrate. When proteolytic enzymes were added to the wells, protein hydrolysis occurred, releasing radioactivity into the supernatant fluid. The amount of protein hydrolysis that occurred was reflected by the amount of radioactivity in the supernatant fluid. When /sup 125/I-hemoglobin was used as the substrate, it was as susceptible to hydrolysis by trypsin in the solid-phase assay as it was in solution in a standard assay procedure. Protease activity from a variety of sources (including from viable cells as well as from extracellular sources) were also able to hydrolyze the hemoglobin on the plate. /sup 125/I-Labeled serum albumen, fibrinogen, and rat pulmonary basement membrane were also susceptible to hydrolysis by trypsin in the solid phase. When (/sup 14/C)elastin was dried onto the plate, it behaved in a similar manner to elastin in solution. It was resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin but was highly susceptible to hydrolysis by elastase. The solid-phase plate assay has several features which recommended it for routine use. It is as sensitive as standard tube assays (and much more sensitive than routinely used colormetric assays). It is quick and convenient; there are no precipitation, centrifugation, or filtration steps. In addition, very small volumes of radioactive wastes are generated. Another advantage of the solid-phase plate assay is the resistance of the dried substrates to spontaneous breakdown and to microbial contamination. Finally, this assay is suitable for use with viable cells as well as for extracellular proteases.

  20. Custom Multiwell Plate Design for Rapid Assembly of Photopatterned Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Schober, Joseph; Hill, Lindsay; Zustiak, Silviya P

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix provides both mechanical support and biochemical cues that influence cellular behavior. Matrix stiffness, in particular, has been found to regulate cellular morphology, motility, proliferation, differentiation, and drug responses among other behaviors. Thus, biomaterial platforms that exhibit wide range of stiffness and are available in a semi high-throughput format such as a multiwell plate would be useful for elucidating cell-substrate relationships. Polyacrylamide (PA) gels have been widely used as cell platforms since they span a range of stiffness between 0.3 and 300 kPa in Young's modulus, which encompasses all soft tissues. However, PA gels are time consuming and labor intensive to prepare, and are not amenable to a multiwell plate format. In this study, we present a novel custom multiwell plate design that allows for a one-step stiffness assay assembly that reduces preparation time and labor intensity by several fold. Gel stiffness is controlled by ultraviolet light intensity and exposure time to achieve a wide stiffness range from a single gel precursor solution. The geometry of the gels is defined by a custom photomask and gel thickness is controlled by spacers. A multiwell plate upper structure is designed similar to a regular multiwell plate such that a gel fits in each well and cells and media are added on top. The upper structure design allows for adequate gas exchange and minimum evaporation. Comparison between cell behaviors seeded in the custom and a standard multiwell plate demonstrated the suitability of the design as a cell culture platform. In summary, we describe and validate a novel custom design for an easy and rapid assembly of photopolymerizable PA-based stiffness assay. PMID:27059131

  1. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  2. Radioreceptor assay for oxyphenonium.

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The development of a radioreceptor assay for the quaternary anticholinergic drug, oxyphenonium, in plasma is reported. It is based on competition between this drug and 3H-dexetimide for binding to muscarinic receptors. After ion pair extraction and reextraction, the drug can be determined in plasma at concentrations down to a value of 100 pg/ml. This permits pharmacokinetic studies to be made after inhalation of oxyphenonium. PMID:6428927

  3. Stepped conical zone plate antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.

    2001-07-01

    The Fresnel zone plate lens was invented and developed for optical frequencies. However, fabrication difficulties at the short optical wavelengths have prevented obtain good efficiencies. At longer microwave or millimeter-wavelengths fabrication is easier and phase correcting zone plate antennas have been used to obtain good efficiencies. This paper describes a new type of phase correcting zone plate having even better efficiency, namely a diffraction efficiency of 99 percent compared to a true lens, and an overall efficiency much better than a true lens. For the usual zone plate antenna employed at microwave or millimeter wavelengths, path length adjustment is accomplished by cutting different depths in a dielectric plate or by using two or more dielectrics having different dielectric constants. The new design uses a tilted cut in a dielectric plate, which more accurately matches the shape of a true lens and produces much lower phase error. The construction is still near and can be made for example, by a milling machine with a tilted bit. For a circular zone plate, the lens is a stepped conical or tapered shape. Because the phase steps are small, the far-field antenna pattern is excellent and sidelobe-levels are very low. Analysis of typical configurations will be given, showing that phase errors are small, lower than those for an eighth-wave corrected phase zone plate.

  4. ChooseMyPlate.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day You don’t have to be an Olympic athlete to be active. Taking the stairs instead of the elevator, mowing the lawn, and gardening count too! TWITTER FEED 2 days ChooseMyPlate.gov @MyPlate Make family dinner more fun with a game or activity. Challenge kids to solve a riddle ...

  5. Micro-channel plate detector

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  6. Robust quantitative scratch assay

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Andrea; Angeli, Marc; Pastrello, Chiara; McQuaid, Rosanne; Li, Han; Jurisicova, Andrea; Jurisica, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing assay (or scratch assay) is a technique frequently used to quantify the dependence of cell motility—a central process in tissue repair and evolution of disease—subject to various treatments conditions. However processing the resulting data is a laborious task due its high throughput and variability across images. This Robust Quantitative Scratch Assay algorithm introduced statistical outputs where migration rates are estimated, cellular behaviour is distinguished and outliers are identified among groups of unique experimental conditions. Furthermore, the RQSA decreased measurement errors and increased accuracy in the wound boundary at comparable processing times compared to previously developed method (TScratch). Availability and implementation: The RQSA is freely available at: http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RQSA_Scripts.zip. The image sets used for training and validation and results are available at: (http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/trainingSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/validationSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSetResults.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975Results.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip). Supplementary Material is provided for detailed description of the development of the RQSA. Contact: juris@ai.utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26722119

  7. Aseptic Laboratory Techniques: Plating Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Erin R.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: ● Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. ● Isolate single bacterial colonies by the

  8. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  9. Impact damage of composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model to study low velocity transverse impact of thin plates made of fiber-reinforced composite material, in particular T300/5208 graphite-epoxy was discussed. This model predicts the coefficient of restitution, which is a measure of the energy absorbed by the target during an impact event. The model is constructed on the assumption that the plate is inextensible in the fiber direction and that the material is incompressible in the z-direction. Such a plate essentially deforms by shear, hence this model neglects bending deformations of the plate. The coefficient of restitution is predicted to increase with large interlaminar shear strength and low transverse shear modulus of the laminate. Predictions are compared with the test results of impacted circular and rectangular clamped plates. Experimentally measured values of the coefficient of restitution are found to agree with the predicted values within a reasonable error.

  10. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.; Farrell, T.; Goodwin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  11. Statistical tests of additional plate boundaries from plate motion inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S.; Gordon, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the F-ratio test, a standard statistical technique, to the results of relative plate motion inversions has been investigated. The method tests whether the improvement in fit of the model to the data resulting from the addition of another plate to the model is greater than that expected purely by chance. This approach appears to be useful in determining whether additional plate boundaries are justified. Previous results have been confirmed favoring separate North American and South American plates with a boundary located beween 30 N and the equator. Using Chase's global relative motion data, it is shown that in addition to separate West African and Somalian plates, separate West Indian and Australian plates, with a best-fitting boundary between 70 E and 90 E, can be resolved. These results are generally consistent with the observation that the Indian plate's internal deformation extends somewhat westward of the Ninetyeast Ridge. The relative motion pole is similar to Minster and Jordan's and predicts the NW-SE compression observed in earthquake mechanisms near the Ninetyeast Ridge.

  12. Sub-Plate Overlap Code Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Zarate, N.

    1997-01-01

    An expansion of the plate overlap method of astrometric data reduction to a single plate has been proposed and successfully tested. Each plate is (artificially) divided into sub-plates which can then be overlapped. This reduces the area of a 'plate' over which a plate model needs to accurately represent the relationship between measured coordinates and standard coordinates. Application is made to non-astrographic plates such as Schmidt plates and to wide-field astrographic plates. Indeed, the method is completely general and can be applied to any type of recording media.

  13. Development and Application of a High Throughput Protein Unfolding Kinetic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Waterhouse, Nicklas; Feyijinmi, Olusegun; Dominguez, Matthew J.; Martinez, Lisa M.; Sharp, Zoey; Service, Rachel; Bothe, Jameson R.; Stollar, Elliott J.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of folding and unfolding underlie protein stability and quantification of these rates provides important insights into the folding process. Here, we present a simple high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assay using a plate reader that is applicable to the studies of the majority of 2-state folding proteins. We validate the assay by measuring kinetic unfolding data for the SH3 (Src Homology 3) domain from Actin Binding Protein 1 (AbpSH3) and its stabilized mutants. The results of our approach are in excellent agreement with published values. We further combine our kinetic assay with a plate reader equilibrium assay, to obtain indirect estimates of folding rates and use these approaches to characterize an AbpSH3-peptide hybrid. Our high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assays allow accurate screening of libraries of mutants by providing both kinetic and equilibrium measurements and provide a means for in-depth ϕ-value analyses. PMID:26745729

  14. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  15. Balanced Orifice Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An orifice plate for use in a conduit through which fluid flows is defined by a central circular region having a radius R, and a ring-shaped region surrounding the central circular region. The ring-shaped region has holes formed therethrough with those holes centered at each radius R thereof satisfying a relationship A(sub R)=al(X(sub R)V(sub R)(sup b)) where A(sub R) is a sum of areas of those holes having centers at radius R, X(sub R) is a flow coefficient at radius R, V(sub R) is a velocity of the fluid that is to flow through the conduit at radius R, b is a constant selected to make at least one process variable (associated with the fluid that is to flow through the conduit) approximately equal at each radius R, and a is a constant that is equal to (X(sub R)A(sub R)V(sub R)(sup b)) at each radius R.

  16. Mantle convection with plates and mobile, faulted plate margins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, S; Gurnis, M

    1995-02-10

    A finite-element formulation of faults has been incorporated into time-dependent models of mantle convection with realistic rheology, continents, and phase changes. Realistic tectonic plates naturally form with self-consistent coupling between plate and mantle dynamics. After the initiation of subduction, trenches rapidly roll back with subducted slabs temporarily laid out along the base of the transition zone. After the slabs have penetrated into the lower mantle, the velocity of trench migration decreases markedly. The inhibition of slab penetration into the lower mantle by the 670-kilometer phase change is greatly reduced in these models as compared to models without tectonic plates. PMID:17813909

  17. An evaluation of 25 selected ToxCast chemicals in medium-throughput assays to detect genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Andrew D; Young, Robert R; Stankowski, Leon F; Pant, Kamala; Lawlor, Tim; Aardema, Marilyn J; Houck, Keith A

    2015-06-01

    ToxCast is a multiyear effort to develop a cost-effective approach for the US EPA to prioritize chemicals for toxicity testing. Initial evaluation of more than 500 high-throughput (HT) microwell-based assays without metabolic activation showed that most lacked high specificity and sensitivity for detecting genotoxicants. Thus, EPA initiated a pilot project to investigate the use of standard genotoxicity endpoints using medium-throughput genotoxicity (MTG) assays in the context of a large testing program. Twenty-five chemicals were selected from the ToxCast program based in part on their known genotoxicity. The two MTG assays used were the Ames II(™) assay and 96-well In Vitro MicroFlow(®) Micronucleus (MN) assay. The Ames II assay showed a reasonable correlation with published Ames test data and industry submissions, though specificity was much better than sensitivity due to restraints on top concentrations as prescribed by ToxCast. Overall concordance was 73% both with and without metabolic activation. The flow MN assay had concordances of 71% and 58% with and without metabolic activation, respectively, when compared to published data and submissions. Importantly, a comparison of results without S9 from the MTG assays to an HT ToxCast p53 activation assay showed a fairly good degree of concordance (67%). The results reported here indicate that assays for genotoxicity endpoints can be conducted in a MT format and have the potential to add to the interpretation of results from large-scale testing programs such as EPA's ToxCast program. Inherent limitations such as the top concentrations used in large scale testing programs are discussed. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:468-476, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25537651

  18. The Golosyiv plate archive digitisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, T. P.; Sergeev, A. V.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Yatsenko, A. I.

    2007-08-01

    The plate archive of the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Golosyiv, Kyiv) includes about 85 000 plates which have been taken in various observational projects during 1950-2005. Among them are about 25 000 of direct northern sky area plates and more than 600 000 plates containing stellar, planetary and active solar formations spectra. Direct plates have a limiting magnitude of 14.0-16.0 mag. Since 2002 we have been organising the storage, safeguarding, cataloguing and digitization of the plate archive. The very initial task was to create the automated system for detection of astronomical objects and phenomena, search of optical counterparts in the directions of gamma-ray bursts, research of long period, flare and other variable stars, search and rediscovery of asteroids, comets and other Solar System bodies to improve the elements of their orbits, informational support of CCD observations and space projects, etc. To provide higher efficiency of this work we have prepared computer readable catalogues and database for 250 000 direct wide field plates. Now the catalogues have been adapted to Wide Field Plate Database (WFPDB) format and integrated into this world database. The next step will be adaptation of our catalogues, database and images to standards of the IVOA. Some magnitude and positional accuracy estimations for Golosyiv archive plates have been done. The photometric characteristics of the images of NGC 6913 cluster stars on two plates of the Golosyiv's double wide angle astrograph have been determined. Very good conformity of the photometric characteristics obtained with external accuracies of 0.13 and 0.15 mag. has been found. The investigation of positional accuracy have been made with A3± format fixed bed scanner (Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL TMA). It shows that the scanner has non-detectable systematic errors on the X-axis, and errors of ± 15 μm on the Y-axis. The final positional errors are about ± 2 μm (

  19. Microcoupon Assay Of Adhesion And Growth Of Bacterial Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Koenig, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Microbiological assay technique facilitates determination of some characteristics of sessile bacteria like those that attach to and coat interior walls of water-purification systems. Biofilms cause sickness and interfere with purification process. Technique enables direct measurement of rate of attachment of bacterial cells, their metabolism, and effects of chemicals on them. Used to quantify effects of both bactericides and growth-stimulating agents and in place of older standard plate-count and tube-dilution techniques.

  20. High-throughput Saccharification assay for lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Leonardo D; Whitehead, Caragh; Roberts, Philip; McQueen-Mason, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharides that make up plant lignocellulosic biomass can be broken down to produce a range of sugars that subsequently can be used in establishing a biorefinery. These raw materials would constitute a new industrial platform, which is both sustainable and carbon neutral, to replace the current dependency on fossil fuel. The recalcitrance to deconstruction observed in lignocellulosic materials is produced by several intrinsic properties of plant cell walls. Crystalline cellulose is embedded in matrix polysaccharides such as xylans and arabinoxylans, and the whole structure is encased by the phenolic polymer lignin, that is also difficult to digest (1). In order to improve the digestibility of plant materials we need to discover the main bottlenecks for the saccharification of cell walls and also screen mutant and breeding populations to evaluate the variability in saccharification (2). These tasks require a high throughput approach and here we present an analytical platform that can perform saccharification analysis in a 96-well plate format. This platform has been developed to allow the screening of lignocellulose digestibility of large populations from varied plant species. We have scaled down the reaction volumes for gentle pretreatment, partial enzymatic hydrolysis and sugar determination, to allow large numbers to be assessed rapidly in an automated system. This automated platform works with milligram amounts of biomass, performing ball milling under controlled conditions to reduce the plant materials to a standardised particle size in a reproducible manner. Once the samples are ground, the automated formatting robot dispenses specified and recorded amounts of material into the corresponding wells of 96 deep well plate (Figure 1). Normally, we dispense the same material into 4 wells to have 4 replicates for analysis. Once the plates are filled with the plant material in the desired layout, they are manually moved to a liquid handling station (Figure 2

  1. Validation of erythromycin microbiological assay using an alternative experimental design.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Felipe Rebello; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus Andreoli

    2007-01-01

    The agar diffusion method, widely used in antibiotic dosage, relates the diameter of the inhibition zone to the dose of the substance assayed. An experimental plan is proposed that may provide better results and an indication of the assay validity. The symmetric or balanced assays (2 x 2) as well as those with interpolation in standard curve (5 x 1) are the main designs used in the dosage of antibiotics. This study proposes an alternative experimental design for erythromycin microbiological assay with the evaluation of the validation parameters of the method referring to linearity, precision, and accuracy. The design proposed (3 x 1) uses 3 doses of standard and 1 dose of sample applied in a unique plate, aggregating the characteristics of the 2 x 2 and 5 x 1 assays. The method was validated for erythromycin microbiological assay through agar diffusion, revealing its adequacy to linearity, precision, and accuracy standards. Likewise, the statistical methods used demonstrated their accordance with the method concerning the parameters evaluated. The 3 x 1 design proved to be adequate for the dosage of erythromycin and thus a good alternative for erythromycin assay. PMID:17760348

  2. Radon assay for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  3. Radon assay for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  4. Difficulties encountered removing locked plates

    PubMed Central

    Raja, S; Imbuldeniya, AM; S, Garg; Groom, G

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Locked plates are commonly used to obtain fixation in periarticular and comminuted fractures. Their use has also gained popularity in repairing fractures in osteoporotic bone. These plates provide stable fixation and promote biological healing. Over the last 3 years, we have used over 150 locked plates with varying success to fix periarticular fractures involving mainly the knee and ankle. In this study, we report our clinical experience and the difficulties encountered when removing locked plates in adult patients with a variety of indications including implant failure, infection, non-union and a palpable symptomatic implant. METHODS A retrospective analysis was performed of patients enrolled prospectively into a database. Included in the study were 36 consecutive adult patients who each underwent the procedure of locked plate removal in a single inner city level 1 trauma centre. Data collected included primary indication for fixation, indication for implant removal, time of the implant in situ, grade of operating surgeon and difficulties encountered during the procedure. RESULTS Implant removal was associated with a complication rate of 47%. The major problems encountered were difficulty in removing the locked screws and the implant itself. A total of ten cold welded screws were found in eight cases. Removal was facilitated by high speed metal cutting burrs and screw removal sets in all but one case, where a decision was made to leave the plate in situ. CONCLUSIONS The majority of studies investigating implant removal and problems encountered in doing so report a relatively high complication rate. With the advent of locking plates and their growing popularity, difficulties are now being seen intra-operatively when removing them. There is a paucity of data, however, specifically directed at locking plate removal. We recommend that surgeons should be aware of the potential complications while removing locked plates. Fluoroscopic control and all

  5. Biosensors: Viruses for ultrasensitive assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional assay based on genetically engineered viral nanoparticles and nickel nanohairs can detect much lower levels of protein markers associated with heart attacks than conventional assays.

  6. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  7. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  8. Development of a microplate-based, electrophoretic fluorescent protein kinase a assay: comparison with filter-binding and fluorescence polarization assay formats.

    PubMed

    Miick, Siobhan M; Jalali, Shila; Dwyer, Brian P; Havens, John; Thomas, Donald; Jimenez, Manuel A; Simpson, Mathew T; Zile, Betsy; Huss, Karen L; Campbell, Robert M

    2005-06-01

    A microplate-based electrophoretic assay has been developed for the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase A (PKA). The ElectroCapture PKA assay developed uses a positively charged, lissamine-rhodamine-labeled kemptide peptide substrate for the kinase reaction and Nanogen's ElectroCapture HTS Workstation and 384-well laminated membrane plates to electrophoretically separate the negatively charged phosphorylated peptide product from the kinase reaction mix. After the electrophoretic separation, the amount of rhodamine-labeled phosphopeptide product was quantified using a Tecan Ultra384 fluorescence reader. The ElectroCapture PKA assay was validated with both known PKA inhibitors and library compounds. The pK(iapp) results obtained in the ElectroCapture PKA assay were comparable to those generated with current radioactive filter-binding assay and antibody-based competitive fluorescence polarization PKA assay formats. PMID:15964934

  9. A miniaturized fibrinolytic assay for plasminogen activators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Damron, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a micro-clot lysis assay (MCLA) for evaluating fibrinolytic activity of plasminogen activators (PA). Fibrin clots were formed in wells of microtiter plates. Lysis of the clots by PA, indicated by change in turbidity (optical density, OD), was monitored with a microplate reader at five minutes intervals. Log-log plots of PA dilution versus endpoint, the time at which the OD value was halfway between the maximum and minimum value for each well, were linear over a broad range of PA concentrations (2-200 International units/ml). The MCLA is a modification and miniaturization of well established fibrinolytic methods. The significant practical advantages of the MCLA are that it is a simple, relatively sensitive, non-radioactive, quantitative, kinetic, fibrinolytic micro-technique which can be automated.

  10. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  11. A protein chip membrane-capture assay for botulinum neurotoxin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, Severine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Berthomieu, Maelys; Kozaki, Shunji; Miquelis, Raymond; Boucraut, Jose; Seagar, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins A and B (BoNT/A and B) are neuromuscular blocking agents which inhibit neurotransmission by cleaving the intra-cellular presynaptic SNARE proteins SNAP-25 and VAMP2, localized respectively in plasma membrane and synaptic vesicles. These neurotoxins are both dangerous pathogens and powerful therapeutic agents with numerous clinical and cosmetic applications. Consequently there is a need for in vitro assays of their biological activity to screen for potential inhibitors and to replace the widely used in vivo mouse assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure membrane vesicle capture by antibodies against SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Substrate cleavage by BoNTs modified capture providing a method to assay toxin activity. Firstly using synaptic vesicles as a substrate, a comparison of the EC{sub 50}s for BoNT/B obtained by SPR, ELISA or flow cytometry indicated similar sensitivity although SPR assays were more rapid. Sonication of brain or neuronal cultures generated plasma membrane fragments with accessible intra-cellular epitopes adapted to measurement of BoNT/A activity. SPR responses were proportional to antigen concentration permitting detection of as little as 4 pM SNAP-25 in crude lysates. BoNT/A activity was assayed using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize a SNAP-25 epitope generated by the proteolytic action of the toxin. Incubation of intact primary cultured neurons with BoNT/A yielded an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 pM. The SPR biosensor method was sensitive enough to monitor BoNT/A and B activity in cells cultured in a 96-well format providing an alternative to experimental animals for toxicological assays.

  12. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeballos, E. Cerron; Crotty, I.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Valverde, J. Lamas; Neupane, S.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  13. Quaternions as astrometric plate constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferys, William H.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for solving problems in relative astrometry is proposed. In it, the relationship between the measured quantities and the components of the position vector of a star is modeled using quaternions, in effect replacing the plate constants of a standard four-plate-constant solution with the four components of a quaternion. The method allows a direct solution for the position vectors of the stars, and hence for the equatorial coordinates. Distortions, magnitude, and color effects are readily incorporated into the formalism, and the method is directly applicable to overlapping-plate problems. The advantages of the method include the simplicity of the resulting equations, their freedom from singularities, and the fact that trigonometric functions and tangential point transformations are not needed to model the plate material. A global solution over the entire sky is possible.

  14. Carbon-assisted flyer plates

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, D.B.; Paisley, D.L.

    1994-04-12

    A laser driven flyer plate is described utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited. 2 figures.

  15. High-throughput Assay to Phenotype Salmonella enterica Typhimurium Association, Invasion, and Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Pugh, Roberta; Laughlin, Richard C.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; McClelland, Michael; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Adams, L. Garry

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella species are zoonotic pathogens and leading causes of food borne illnesses in humans and livestock1. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Salmonella-host interactions are important to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of Salmonella infection. The Gentamicin protection assay to phenotype Salmonella association, invasion and replication in phagocytic cells was adapted to allow high-throughput screening to define the roles of deletion mutants of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in host interactions using RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Under this protocol, the variance in measurements is significantly reduced compared to the standard protocol, because wild-type and multiple mutant strains can be tested in the same culture dish and at the same time. The use of multichannel pipettes increases the throughput and enhances precision. Furthermore, concerns related to using less host cells per well in 96-well culture dish were addressed. Here, the protocol of the modified in vitro Salmonella invasion assay using phagocytic cells was successfully employed to phenotype 38 individual Salmonella deletion mutants for association, invasion and intracellular replication. The in vitro phenotypes are presented, some of which were subsequently confirmed to have in vivo phenotypes in an animal model. Thus, the modified, standardized assay to phenotype Salmonella association, invasion and replication in macrophages with high-throughput capacity could be utilized more broadly to study bacterial-host interactions. PMID:25146526

  16. Pulse plating of nickel deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stimetz, C.J.; Stevenson, M.F.

    1980-02-01

    Pulse plated and conventional nickel deposits have been compared for differences in morphology, mechanical properties, and microstructure. The deposits were obtained from nickel sulfamate, nickel chloride, and Watts nickel plating solutions. No significant differences were found in the direct and pulse current deposits from the sulfamate and chloride solutions; however, significant differences in microstructure, yield strength, and microhardness were observed in deposits from the Watts nickel solution.

  17. Rapid exposure assessment of PSII herbicides in surface water using a novel chlorophyll a fluorescence imaging assay.

    PubMed

    Muller, Renee; Schreiber, Ulrich; Escher, Beate I; Quayle, Pamela; Bengtson Nash, Susan M; Mueller, Jochen F

    2008-08-15

    Recently a new Maxi-Imaging-PAM (Max-I-PAM) instrument for phytotoxicity assessment via chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was introduced. This new instrument allows rapid detection of the effects of PS II inhibiting herbicides which are high use agricultural chemicals frequently detected in surface waters in Australia and elsewhere. Several studies have applied the new instrument for detection of phytotoxicants in water using microalgae suspensions; however, these use preliminary protocols and to date no validated method is available for high throughput testing of environmental samples in 96-well plates. Here we developed and applied a new protocol allowing dose-response assessment of four samples within 2 h (8 dilutions in duplicate). The technique was found to be sensitive, with a detection limit of 2.3 ng l(-1) for the herbicide diuron when testing solid phase extracts (SPE) of 1000 ml water samples, and reproducible both between experiments (coefficient of variation (CV)=0.30) and within the 96-well plate (CV=0.06). Relative potencies were determined for four reference PS II impacting herbicides (diuron>hexazinone>atrazine>simazine). Extracts from 1000 ml environmental samples and diuron spiked ultrapure water as well as passive sampler extracts were evaluated and good agreement was found between diuron equivalent concentrations calculated from bioassay results (DEQ(IPAM)) and DEQ(CHEM) values calculated from LCMS chemical analysis of the four reference compounds in the same samples. Overall, the technique provides a valuable bioanalytical tool for rapid and inexpensive effects-based assessment of PS II impacting herbicides in environmental mixtures. PMID:18501956

  18. Assessing vehicle effects on skin absorption using artificial membrane assays.

    PubMed

    Karadzovska, Daniela; Riviere, Jim E

    2013-12-18

    A vast number of variations in drug/vehicle combinations may come into contact with skin. Evaluating the effect of potential drug, vehicle and skin interactions for all possible combinations is a daunting task. A practical solution is a rapid screening technique amenable to high throughput approaches (e.g. 96-well plates). In this study, three artificial membranes (isopropyl myristate (IPM), certramides and Strat-M™) were evaluated for their ability to predict the skin permeability of caffeine, cortisone, diclofenac sodium, mannitol, salicylic acid and testosterone applied in propylene glycol, water and ethanol as unsaturated and saturated concentrations. Resultant absorption data was compared to porcine skin diffusion cell data. The correlations (r(2)) between membrane and diffusion cell data from saturated and unsaturated concentrations were 0.38, 0.47 and 0.56 for the Strat-M™, certramide and IPM membranes, respectively. This relationship improved when only saturated concentrations were evaluated (r(2) = 0.60, 0.63 and 0.66 for the Strat-M™, certramide and IPM membranes, respectively). A correlation between membrane retention and the amount remaining in skin had r(2) values of 0.73 (Strat-M™), 0.67 (certramides), and 0.67 (IPM). Quantitative structure-permeability relationship models for each membrane identified different physicochemical factors influencing the absorption process. Although further investigations exploring complex topical formulations are required, these results suggest potential use as an initial screening approach to assist in narrowing the selection of formulations to be evaluated with a more biologically intact model, thereby assisting in the development of new topical formulations. PMID:23474357

  19. Impact on multilayered composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, B. S.; Moon, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    Stress wave propagation in a multilayer composite plate due to impact was examined by means of the anisotropic elasticity theory. The plate was modelled as a number of identical anisotropic layers and the approximate plate theory of Mindlin was then applied to each layer to obtain a set of difference-differential equations of motion. Dispersion relations for harmonic waves and correction factors were found. The governing equations were reduced to difference equations via integral transforms. With given impact boundary conditions these equations were solved for an arbitrary number of layers in the plate and the transient propagation of waves was calculated by means of a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The multilayered plate problem was extended to examine the effect of damping layers present between two elastic layers. A reduction of the interlaminar normal stress was significant when the thickness of damping layer was increased but the effect was mostly due to the softness of the damping layer. Finally, the problem of a composite plate with a crack on the interlaminar boundary was formulated.

  20. HIV-1 Fusion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cavrois, Marielle; Neidleman, Jason; Greene, Warner C.

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 fusion assay measures all steps in the HIV-1 life cycle up to and including viral fusion. It relies on the incorporation of a β-lactamase Vpr (BlaM-Vpr) protein chimera into the virion and the subsequent transfer of this chimera into the target cell by fusion (Figure 1). The transfer is monitored by the enzymatic cleavage of CCF2, a fluorescent dye substrate of β-lactamase, loaded into the target cells. Cleavage of the β-lactam ring in CCF2 by β-lactamase changes the fluorescence emission spectrum of the dye from green (520 nm) to blue (447 nm). This change reflects virion fusion and can be detected by flow cytometry (Figure 2).

  1. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis. PMID:26498795

  2. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  3. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction. PMID:12364804

  4. Plate mode velocities in graphite/epoxy plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Gorman, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the velocities of the extensional and flexural plate modes were made along three directions of propagation in four graphite/epoxy composite plates. The acoustic signals were generated by simulated acoustic emission events (pencil lead breaks or Hsu-Neilson sources) and detected by by broadband ultrasonic transducers. The first arrival of the extensional plate mode, which is nondispersive at low frequencies, was measured at a number of different distances from the source along the propagation direction of interest. The velocity was determined by plotting the distance versus arrival time and computing its slope. Because of the large dispersion of the flexural mode, a Fourier phase velocity technique was used to characterize this mode. The velocity was measured up to a frequency of 160 kHz. Theoretical predictions of the velocities of these modes were also made and compared with experimental observations. Classical plate theory yields good agreement with the measured extensional velocities. For predictions of the dispersion of the flexural mode, Mindlin plates theory, which includes the effects of shear deformation and rotatory inertia was shown to give better agreement with the experimental measurements.

  5. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with enzyme-linked fluorescence assay with automated readers for detection of rubella virus antibody and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Shekarchi, I C; Sever, J L; Nerurkar, L; Fuccillo, D

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with the enzyme-linked fluorescence assay (ELFA) for the detection of rubella antibody and herpes simplex virus antigen. Test parameters, specimens, antigen or antibody, and conjugates for the two types of assays were identical except that p-nitrophenyl phosphate was used as the substrate for the ELISA and 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate was used as the substrate for ELFA. Automated readers were used for both assays. Antibody titers and sensitivity of antigen detection were quite similar for ELISA and ELFA. ELFA for rubella antibody, however, could be conducted with less antigen or shorter substrate incubation time (5 min for ELFA versus 30 min for ELISA). For herpes simplex virus antigen detection, ELFA could also be read after a shorter substrate incubation time (15 min for ELFA versus 30 min for ELISA). Clear polystyrene microtiter plates routinely used for ELISA could be used for ELFA, but clear polyvinyl chloride plates had high background fluorescence. Black polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride plates gave lower background fluorescence than did clear plates. ELFA is of particular value as a substitute for ELISAs in which long substrate incubations are required or antigens of only low titer are available. PMID:2981902

  6. Rapid measurements of intracellular calcium using a fluorescence plate reader.

    PubMed

    Lin, K; Sadée, W; Quillan, J M

    1999-02-01

    Intracellular calcium is a universal second messenger that can serve as a broad-based measure of receptor activity. Recent developments in multi-well plate fluorescence readers facilitate measurement of intracellular free-calcium levels and reduce reliance on slower, more cumbersome or expensive data collection methods. In this report, we describe a rapid and sensitive method to assay intracellular calcium ions in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells from multi-well plates using a fluorometer equipped with on-line injectors. We examine the compatibility of visible-light excitable dyes Calcium Green-1 and Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1. Using this assay, we were able to detect and quantify activity from muscarinic and beta-adrenergic receptors endogenous to HEK293 cells and detect calcium signals generated by activation of Gi-coupled recombinant mu-opioid and dopamine D2L receptors, and the Gs-coupled melanocortin subtype 4 (MC4) receptor. Fluorescence signals, stable in HEK293 cells, required the use of Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and an inhibitor of organic anion transport in CHO cells. Under appropriate conditions, both cell types can be used to collect complete concentration-response data for a variety of receptors (including a recombinant muscarinic M1 receptor expressed in CHO cells) from a single plate of dye-loaded cells. PMID:10023544

  7. Wide-Field Plate Database: Included Ukrainian Plate Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, Katya; Sergeeva, Tetyana

    2007-08-01

    We present the basic information for the archives of the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, included into the Wide-Field Plate Database last two years with total number of plates - 11260. The plates were obtained with the 0.40m Double Wide-angle Astrograph (DWA); 10cm, 11cm and 15cm Three Cameras Astrograph (TCA) and 12 cm Double Short focus Astrograph (DSA) in the period 1949-1998 in the frames of the following observing programmes: Photographic Survey of the Northern Sky; Investigation of the kinematics and the structure in the main meridian section of the Galaxy; selection of reference stars, minor planets observations, comet investigations.

  8. 30 CFR 20.13 - Approval plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plate shall be satisfactory to MSHA. (a) Purpose of approval plate. The approval plate is a label which.... By it the manufacturer can point out that his lamp complies with specifications of MSHA and that it... place MSHA's approval plate on his lamp obligates the manufacturer to maintain the quality of...

  9. 49 CFR 451.23 - Plate specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plate specifications. 451.23 Section 451.23... SECURITY SAFETY APPROVAL OF CARGO CONTAINERS TESTING AND APPROVAL OF CONTAINERS Safety Approval Plate § 451.23 Plate specifications. (a) The safety approval plate must be of the size and in the...

  10. 49 CFR 451.23 - Plate specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plate specifications. 451.23 Section 451.23... SECURITY SAFETY APPROVAL OF CARGO CONTAINERS TESTING AND APPROVAL OF CONTAINERS Safety Approval Plate § 451.23 Plate specifications. (a) The safety approval plate must be of the size and in the...

  11. 49 CFR 451.23 - Plate specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plate specifications. 451.23 Section 451.23... SECURITY SAFETY APPROVAL OF CARGO CONTAINERS TESTING AND APPROVAL OF CONTAINERS Safety Approval Plate § 451.23 Plate specifications. (a) The safety approval plate must be of the size and in the...

  12. 49 CFR 451.23 - Plate specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plate specifications. 451.23 Section 451.23... SECURITY SAFETY APPROVAL OF CARGO CONTAINERS TESTING AND APPROVAL OF CONTAINERS Safety Approval Plate § 451.23 Plate specifications. (a) The safety approval plate must be of the size and in the...

  13. Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

  14. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1980-02-01

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests.

  15. Plates for vacuum thermal fusion

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  16. An impedance-based cellular assay using human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to quantify modulators of cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clay W; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Abi-Gerges, Najah; Lamore, Sarah D; Abassi, Yama A; Peters, Matthew F

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity, a prominent reason for late-stage failures in drug development, has resulted in a demand for in vitro assays that can predict this liability in early drug discovery. Current in vitro cardiovascular safety testing primarily focuses on ion channel modulation and low throughput cardiomyocyte (CM) contractility measurements. We evaluated both human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs (hiPSC-CMs) and rat neonatal CMs (rat CMs) on the xCELLigence Cardio system which uses impedance technology to quantify CM beating properties in a 96-well format. Forty-nine compounds were tested in concentration-response mode to determine potency for modulation of CM beating, a surrogate biomarker for contractility. These compounds had previously been tested in vivo and in a low throughput in vitro optical-based contractility assay that measures sarcomere shortening in electrically paced dog CMs. In comparison with in vivo contractility effects, hiPSC-CM impedance had assay sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 90%, 74%, and 82%, respectively. These values compared favorably to values reported for the dog CM optical assay (83%, 84%, and 82%) and were slightly better than impedance using rat CMs (77%, 74%, and 74%). The potency values from the hiPSC-CM and rat CM assays spanned four orders of magnitude and correlated with values from the dog CM optical assay (r(2 )= 0.76 and 0.70, respectively). The Cardio system assay has >5× higher throughput than the optical assay. Thus, hiPSC-CM impedance testing can help detect the human cardiotoxic potential of novel therapeutics early in drug discovery, and if a hazard is identified, has sufficient throughput to support the design-make-test-analyze cycle to mitigate this liability. PMID:25237062

  17. An assay for adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, D. W.

    1968-01-01

    Adult mice injected with an adequate amount of a non-immunogenic antigen progress to a specific state of immunological paralysis, unless a substance with `extrinsic' adjuvanticity is injected before the induction of paralysis is completed. Consequently incipiently paralysed mice can be used to assay substances for adjuvanticity. Conventional adjuvants such as Freund's adjuvant and pertussis possess adjuvanticity; other substances with varying degrees of adjuvanticity are listed in the tables. It has been shown that the adjuvanticity effect of an injection of pertussis lasts for only a few days, although the effect of such an injection of pertussis on phagocytosis of carbon particles does not reach a maximum until 2 weeks after the injection. The dose-effectiveness of alum precipitated (highly phagocytosable) bovine γ-globulin was greatly increased by the intraperitoneal injection of pertussis. The evidence is considered to be incompatible with increased phagocytosis being either an essential factor in the role of pertussis as a conventional adjuvant, or in the adjuvanticity effect of pertussis. PMID:4179956

  18. Membrane Flotation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Dorothee A; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Many postitive-stranded RNA viruses, such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV), highjack cellular membranes, including the Golgi, ER, mitchondria, lipid droplets, and utilize them for replication of their RNA genome or assembly of new virions. By investigating how viral proteins associate with cellular membranes we will better understand the roles of cellular membranes in the viral life cycle. Our lab has focused specifically on the role of lipid droplets and lipid-rich membranes in the life cycle of HCV. To analyze the role of lipid-rich membranes in HCV RNA replication, we utilized a membrane flotation assay based on an 10–20–30% iodixanol density gradient developed by Yeaman et al. (2001). This gradient results in a linear increase in density over almost the entire length of the gradient, and membrane particles are separated in the gradient based on their buoyant characteristics. To preserve membranes in the lysate, cells are broken mechanically in a buffer lacking detergent. The cell lysate is loaded on the bottom of the gradient, overlaid with the gradient, and membranes float up as the iodixanol gradient self-generates. The lipid content of membranes and the concentration of associated proteins will determine the separation of different membranes within the gradient. After centrifugation, fractions can be sampled from the top of the gradient and analyzed using standard SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis for proteins of interest.

  19. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  20. Insert metering plates for gas turbine nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven S.; Itzel, Gary; Chopra, Sanjay; Abuaf, Nesim; Correia, Victor H.

    2004-05-11

    The invention comprises a metering plate which is assembled to an impingement insert for use in the nozzle of a gas turbine. The metering plate can have one or more metering holes and is used to balance the cooling flow within the nozzle. A metering plate with multiple holes reduces static pressure variations which result from the cooling airflow through the metering plate. The metering plate can be assembled to the insert before or after the insert is inserted into the nozzle.