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Sample records for 96-well polycarbonate-based microfluidic

  1. 96-Well Polycarbonate-Based Microfluidic Titer Plate for High-Throughput Purification of DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Witek, Małgorzata A.; Hupert, Mateusz L.; Park, Daniel S.-W.; Fears, Kirby; Murphy, Michael C.; Soper, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    We report a simple and effective method for the high-throughput purification of a variety of nucleic acids (NAs) from whole cell lysates or whole blood using a photactivated polycarbonate solid-phase reversible immobilization (PPC-SPRI) microfluidic chip. High-throughput operation was achieved by placing 96 purification beds, each containing an array of 3800 20 µm diameter posts, on a single 3″ × 5″ polycarbonate (PC) wafer fabricated by hot embossing. All beds were interconnected through a common microfluidic network that permitted parallel access through the use of a vacuum and syringe pump for delivery of immobilization buffer (IB) and effluent. The PPC-SPRI purification was accomplished by condensation of NAs onto a UV-modified PC surface in the presence of the IB comprised of polyethylene glycol, NaCl, and ethanol with a composition dependent on the length of the NAs to be isolated and the identity of the sample matrix. The performance of the device was validated by quantification of the recovered material following PCR (for DNA) or RT-PCR (for RNA). The extraction bed load capacity of NAs was 206 ± 93 ng for gDNA and 165 ± 81 ng for TRNA from Escherichia coli. Plate-to-plate variability was found to be 35 ± 10%. The purification process was fast (>30 min) and easy to automate, and the low cost of wafer fabrication makes it appropriate for single-use applications. PMID:18355091

  2. Electrothermal micromixing in 96 well plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Loire, Sophie; Mezic, Igor

    2011-11-01

    Diagnostic and pharmacology processes could be greatly accelerated by appropriate mixing. Here electrothermal flows are explored to provide mixing of conductive physiological solutions (=1.6 S/m) in a 96 well plate. Three interdigitated electrodes provide an electric field (< 15Vpp, 1MHz) beneath each well. Polarization and conduction phenomenon of the fluid in a well will be first modeled numerically and compared to an electrical circuit model. Due to high conductivity and permittivity of the fluid, the impedance of the array of filled wells collapse dramatically (96 wells: R = 1Ohm, C=250nF). The power supply challenges accordingly raised by arrays of electrothermal micromixers will be then analyzed. The efficiency of different methods of mixing in those wells will be also compared: the addition of low frequency signal leading to AC electro-osmotic perturbations, a blinking vortices method. The experimental results will be compared to simulations.

  3. An automated 96-well-plate loader for FACScan.

    PubMed

    Illges, H

    1999-01-01

    Staining multiple samples for data acquisition with a flow cytometer is done in 96-well plates to save time and make large data assessment in one working day possible. However, the inability of the FACScan to take up the samples from 96-well plates is a major drawback. In order to avoid the individual transfer of samples to tubes, we have developed a system, which allows using the FACScan with 96-well plates. The machine consists of a programmable control module and a loader which moves the 96-well plate in 3 axis well by well along the sample collector. The machine is equipped with a wash buffer tank to avoid cross contamination of samples and a shaking option to avoid sedimentation of cells during acquisition. The machine can be further developed into a full automatic loader if connected to the FACS Station. In 24 hours about 7,000 samples with 10,000 cells each can be acquired.

  4. 96-well electroporation method for transfection of mammalian central neurons.

    PubMed

    Buchser, William J; Pardinas, Jose R; Shi, Yan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2006-11-01

    Manipulating gene expression in primary neurons has been a goal for many scientists for over 20 years. Vertebrate central nervous system neurons are classically difficult to transfect. Most lipid reagents are inefficient and toxic to the cells, and time-consuming methods such as viral infections are often required to obtain better efficiencies. We have developed an efficient method for the transfection of cerebellar granule neurons and hippocampal neurons with standard plasmid vectors. Using 96-well electroporation plates, square-wave pulses can introduce 96 different plasmids into neurons in a single step. The procedure results in greater than 20% transfection efficiencies and requires only simple solutions of nominal cost. In addition to enabling the rapid optimization of experimental protocols with multiple parameters, this procedure enables the use of high content screening methods to characterize neuronal phenotypes.

  5. 96-Well electroporation method for transfection of mammalian central neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Shi, Yan; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulating gene expression in primary neurons has been a goal for many scientists for over 20 years. Vertebrate central nervous system neurons are classically difficult to transfect. Most lipid reagents are inefficient and toxic to the cells, and time-consuming methods such as viral infections are often required to obtain better efficiencies. We have developed an efficient method for the transfection of cerebellar granule neurons and hippocampal neurons with standard plasmid vectors. Using 96-well electroporation plates, square-wave pulses can introduce 96 different plasmids into neurons in a single step. The procedure results in greater than 20% transfection efficiencies and requires only simple solutions of nominal cost. In addition to enabling the rapid optimization of experimental protocols with multiple parameters, this procedure enables the use of high content screening methods to characterize neuronal phenotypes. PMID:17140120

  6. A Novel 96well-formatted Micro-gap Plate Enabling Drug Response Profiling on Primary Tumour Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Yuan; Hsiung, Lo-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ho; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wo, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Drug-based treatments are the most widely used interventions for cancer management. Personalized drug response profiling remains inherently challenging with low cell count harvested from tumour sample. We present a 96well-formatted microfluidic plate with built-in micro-gap that preserves up to 99.2% of cells during multiple assay/wash operation and only 9,000 cells needed for a single reagent test (i.e. 1,000 cells per test spot x 3 selected concentration x triplication), enabling drug screening and compatibility with conventional automated workstations. Results with MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines showed that no statistical significance was found in dose-response between the device and conventional 96-well plate control. Primary tumour samples from breast cancer patients tested in the device also showed good IC50 prediction. With drug screening of primary cancer cells must consider a wide range of scenarios, e.g. suspended/attached cell types and rare/abundant cell availability, the device enables high throughput screening even for suspended cells with low cell count since the signature microfluidic cell-trapping feature ensures cell preservation in a multiple solution exchange protocol.

  7. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid and sensitive detection of organophosphate insecticides using a 96 well plate format is reported. Several features of this assay make it attractive for development as a laboratory-based or field screening assay. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was stabilized in a gelati...

  8. An improved 96-well turbidity assay for T4 lysozyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Tasha B.; Nguyen, Thao P.; Watt, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    T4 lysozyme (T4L) is an important model system for investigating the relationship between protein structure and function. Despite being extensively studied, a reliable, quantitative activity assay for T4L has not been developed. Here, we present an improved T4L turbidity assay as well as an affinity-based T4L expression and purification protocol. This assay is designed for 96-well format and utilizes conditions amenable for both T4L and other lysozymes. This protocol enables easy, efficient, and quantitative characterization of T4L variants and allows comparison between different lysozymes. Our method: • Is applicable for all lysozymes, with enhanced sensitivity for T4 lysozyme compared to other 96-well plate turbidity assays; • Utilizes standardized conditions for comparing T4 lysozyme variants and other lysozymes; and • Incorporates a simplified expression and purification protocol for T4 lysozyme. PMID:26150996

  9. 96-Well plate assays for measuring collagenase activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen.

    PubMed

    Koshy, P J; Rowan, A D; Life, P F; Cawston, T E

    1999-11-15

    We describe two alternative assays for measuring collagenolytic activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen. Both assays have been developed for the 96-well plate format and measure the amount of radiolabeled collagen fragments released into the supernatant from an insoluble (3)H-acetylated collagen fibril preparation. The first method separates digested solubilized fragments from the intact fibril by sedimentation of the undigested collagen by centrifugation. The second method achieves this separation by filtration of the supernatant through the membrane of a 96-well filtration plate which retains the undigested collagen fibril. Both methods give linear dose- and time-dependent responses of collagenase activity > or = 70% of total collagen lysis. In addition, both assays can be simply modified to measure tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibitory activity, which is also linear between 20 and 75% of total collagen lysis with the amount of TIMP added.

  10. A 96-well plate assay for CYP4503A induction using cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kamiguchi, Naomi; Aoyama, Eiji; Okuda, Teruaki; Moriwaki, Toshiya

    2010-11-01

    A reliable and practical CYP3A induction assay with cryopreserved human hepatocytes in a 96-well format was developed. Various 96-well plates with different basement membrane were evaluated using prototypical inducers, rifampicin, phenytoin, and carbamazepine. Thin-layer (TL) Matrigel was found to yield the highest basal and induced levels of CYP3A activity as determined by testosterone 6β-hydroxylation. Concentration-dependent CYP3A induction of rifampicin was reproducible with the EC(50) values of 0.36 ± 0.28 μM from four batches of human hepatocytes using the 96-well plate with TL Matrigel. The rank order of induction potency for nine inducers or noninducers at a concentration of 10 μM were well comparable among the multiple donors, by expressing the results as percentage of change compared with the positive control, 10 μM rifampicin. Cotreatment of avasimibe or efavirenz with 10 μM rifampicin was found to reduce CYP3A activities induced by rifampicin at a lower rate than treatment with rifampicin alone, whereas treatment with phenobarbital and carbamazepine had no effect. From a comparison of induced CYP3A activities and gene expression levels, there were compounds that would cause induction of CYP3A4 mRNA but not activity, presumably due to their inhibitory effect on CYP3A activity. The cotreatment assay of test compound with rifampicin allows us to exclude the false-negative results caused by the cytotoxicity and/or the mechanism-based inactivation, when the drug candidate's ability for CYP3A induction is evaluating the enzyme activity. This 96-well plate assay, which is robust, reproducible, and convenient, has demonstrated the paramount applicability to the early drug discovery stage.

  11. Stretch Injury of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neurons in a 96 Well Format

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Sydney A.; Phillips, Jack K.; Costa, J. Tighe; Cho, Frances S.; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Finan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with limited therapeutic options. Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is an important component of TBI pathology. It is difficult to reproduce TAI in animal models of closed head injury, but in vitro stretch injury models reproduce clinical TAI pathology. Existing in vitro models employ primary rodent neurons or human cancer cell line cells in low throughput formats. This in vitro neuronal stretch injury model employs human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons (hiPSCNs) in a 96 well format. Silicone membranes were attached to 96 well plate tops to create stretchable, culture substrates. A custom-built device was designed and validated to apply repeatable, biofidelic strains and strain rates to these plates. A high content approach was used to measure injury in a hypothesis-free manner. These measurements are shown to provide a sensitive, dose-dependent, multi-modal description of the response to mechanical insult. hiPSCNs transition from healthy to injured phenotype at approximately 35% Lagrangian strain. Continued development of this model may create novel opportunities for drug discovery and exploration of the role of human genotype in TAI pathology. PMID:27671211

  12. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3-4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15-50 mL) or small bottles.

  13. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3–4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15–50 mL) or small bottles. PMID:26818699

  14. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  15. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay. PMID:28240272

  16. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-02-27

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay.

  17. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds.

  18. Urine sample preparation in 96-well filter plates for quantitative clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Suh, Moo-Jin; Sikorski, Patricia; Kwon, Keehwan; Nelson, Karen E; Pieper, Rembert

    2014-06-03

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ~10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700-900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics.

  19. Urine Sample Preparation in 96-Well Filter Plates for Quantitative Clinical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ∼10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700–900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics. PMID:24797144

  20. Development of a rapid, 96-well alkaline based differential DNA extraction method for sexual assault evidence.

    PubMed

    Hudlow, William R; Buoncristiani, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    We present a rapid alkaline lysis procedure for the extraction of DNA from sexual assault evidence that generates purified sperm fraction extracts that yield STR typing results similar to those obtained from the traditional organic/dithiothreitol differential extraction. Specifically, a sodium hydroxide based differential extraction method has been developed in a single-tube format and further optimized in a 96-well format. The method yields purified extracts from a small sample set (≈ 2-6 swabs) in approximately 2h and from a larger sample set (up to 96 swabs) in approximately 4h. While conventional differential extraction methods require vigorous sample manipulation to remove the spermatozoa from the substrate, the method described here exploits the propensity of sperm to adhere to a substrate and does not require any manipulation of the substrate after it is sampled. For swabs, sample handling is minimized by employing a process where the tip of the swab, including the shaft, is transferred to the appropriate vessel eliminating the need for potentially hazardous scalpels to separate the swab material from the shaft. The absence of multiple handling steps allows the process to be semi-automated, however the procedure as described here does not require use of a robotic system. This method may provide forensic laboratories a cost-effective tool for the eradication of backlogs of sexual assault evidence, and more timely service to their client agencies. In addition, we have demonstrated that a modification of the procedure can be used to retrieve residual sperm-cell DNA from previously extracted swabs.

  1. UV-curable low surface energy fluorinated polycarbonate-based polyurethane dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyeon-Deuk; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2011-10-15

    UV-curable low surface energy fluorinated polycarbonate-based polyurethane dispersions were synthesized by incorporating a hydroxy-terminated perfluoropolyether (PFPE) into the soft segment of polyurethane. The effects of the PFPE content on the UV-curing behavior, physical, surface, thermal properties and refractive index were investigated. The UV-curing behavior was analyzed by photo-differential scanning calorimetry. The surface free energy of the UV-cured film, which is related to the water or oil repellency, was calculated from contact angle measurements using the Lewis acid-base three liquids method. The surface free energy decreased significantly with increasing fluorine concentration because PFPE in the soft segment was tailored to the surface and produced a UV-cured film with a hydrophobic fluorine enriched surface, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With increasing the fluorine content, the refractive indices of UV-cured films decreased. However, the UV-curing rate and final conversion was decreased with increasing contents of PFPE, which resulted in the decrease of the glass transition temperature (T(g)), crosslink density, tensile strength and surface hardness.

  2. Ion transport in polycarbonate based solid polymer electrolytes: experimental and computational investigations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Mindemark, Jonas; Morozov, Evgeny V; Costa, Luciano T; Bergman, Martin; Johansson, Patrik; Fang, Yuan; Furó, István; Brandell, Daniel

    2016-04-14

    Among the alternative host materials for solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs), polycarbonates have recently shown promising functionality in all-solid-state lithium batteries from ambient to elevated temperatures. While the computational and experimental investigations of ion conduction in conventional polyethers have been extensive, the ion transport in polycarbonates has been much less studied. The present work investigates the ionic transport behavior in SPEs based on poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) and its co-polymer with ε-caprolactone (CL) via both experimental and computational approaches. FTIR spectra indicated a preferential local coordination between Li(+) and ester carbonyl oxygen atoms in the P(TMC20CL80) co-polymer SPE. Diffusion NMR revealed that the co-polymer SPE also displays higher ion mobilities than PTMC. For both systems, locally oriented polymer domains, a few hundred nanometers in size and with limited connections between them, were inferred from the NMR spin relaxation and diffusion data. Potentiostatic polarization experiments revealed notably higher cationic transference numbers in the polycarbonate based SPEs as compared to conventional polyether based SPEs. In addition, MD simulations provided atomic-scale insight into the structure-dynamics properties, including confirmation of a preferential Li(+)-carbonyl oxygen atom coordination, with a preference in coordination to the ester based monomers. A coupling of the Li-ion dynamics to the polymer chain dynamics was indicated by both simulations and experiments.

  3. UV Induced Degradation of Polycarbonate-Based Lens Materials and Implications for the Heath Care Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkay, J. Russell; Henry, Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Experimental undergraduate research at Keene State College has utilized facilities in physics and chemistry and at Polyonics, a local firm to study the effects of mono- and polychromatic UV radiation from various sources, including a Deuterium lamp, a solarization unit, a monochromator, and natural sunlight to study the photodegradation of polycarbonate-based lens materials used to produce eyewear using spectrophotometry and FTIR analysis. Ophthalmologic literature indicates a correlation between exposure to the UVB band of sunlight and the onset of cataract formation and macular degeneration. It is well known that polycarbonate plastic ``yellows'' when exposed to intense sunlight and, particularly, UV light either via photo-Fries rearrangement or by a photo oxidative process, forming polyconjugated systems and is a concern primarily for cosmetic reasons. Our data indicates that the ``yellowing'' is an indication of a more sinister problem in the case of eyeglasses in that spectrophotometric comparison shows it is accompanied by an increase in transmissivity in the UVB band where the wearer expects and needs protection. FTIR results indicate a degradation of molecular stabilizers and the appearance of free radicals that indicate a breakdown of the resin's chemical structure. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.B1.4

  4. UV Induced Degradation of Polycarbonate-Based Lens Materials and Implications for the Heath Care Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkay, J. R.; Henry, Jerry

    2006-10-01

    Experimental research is being carried out at Keene State at the undergraduate level that utilizes facilities in both physics and chemistry to study the effects of mono- and polychromatic UV radiation from various sources, including a Deuterium lamp, a solarization unit (at Polyonics, a local industry), and the Sun, to study the photodegradation of polycarbonate-based lens materials used to produce eyewear. Literature in the field of optometry and ophthalmology indicates a correlation between exposure to the UVB band of natural sunlight and the onset of cataract formation, as well as other eye disorders. The public is usually advised that plastic eyeglass lenses will provide protection from this damaging radiation. It is well known that polycarbonate plastic ``yellows'' when exposed to intense sunlight and, particularly, UV light^1,2, either via photo-Fries rearrangement or by a photooxidative process, forming polyconjugated systems and is an industrial concern primarily for cosmetic reasons. We have preliminary data, however, that indicates that the yellowing'' is an indication of a more sinister problem in the case of eyeglasses in that it is accompanied by an increase in transmissivity in the UVB band where the wearer expects and needs protection. Our group includes a local optometrist who will share results with peers in his field. [1] A. Andrady, J. Polymer Sci., 42, 1991 [2] E. P. Gorelov, Inst. Khim. Fiz., Russian Federation

  5. Nitrotyrosine Density of Rabbit Urinary Bladder Muscle and Mucosa Measured via Western Blotting and 96-Well Plate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Brittany; Schuler, Catherine; Leggett, Robert E; Levin, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Nitrotyrosine was quantitated in rabbit bladder muscle and mucosa using two analytical systems: Western blotting analyses and a 96-well plate quantitative analysis kit. Materials and Methods. Rabbit bladder muscle and mucosa were obtained from control rabbits. For the Western analysis, the samples were loaded into a SDS page gel and then transferred to a PVDF membrane. The optical density was measured using a Kodak Scanner. Using the 96-well plate, the samples and standards were loaded, incubated with primary and secondary antibody, washed and vacuumed with 10x wash buffer three times between each incubation period. Stop buffer was added to the plate and the results were quantified via the plate reader. Results. For both muscle and mucosa tissue, the optical density readings were linear with tissue concentration; the concentration of nitrotyrosine in the mucosa was significantly higher than in the muscle. However, whereas the Western blot analysis is based on relative optical densities, the 96-well plate kit provides a truly quantitative analysis. Discussion. Mucosa tissue displayed a higher density of nitrotyrosine than did detrusor muscle tissue. This may well be due to the significantly higher metabolic activity of the mucosa compared to the muscle.

  6. A 96-well screen filter plate for high-throughput biological sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sean X; Cousineau, Martin; Juzwin, Stephen J; Ritchie, David M

    2006-01-01

    A novel 96-well screen filter plate (patent pending) has been invented to eliminate a time-consuming and labor-intensive step in preparation of in vivo study samples--to remove blood or plasma clots. These clots plug the pipet tips during a manual or automated sample-transfer step causing inaccurate pipetting or total pipetting failure. Traditionally, these blood and plasma clots are removed by picking them out manually one by one from each sample tube before any sample transfer can be made. This has significantly slowed the sample preparation process and has become a bottleneck for automated high-throughput sample preparation using robotic liquid handlers. Our novel screen filter plate was developed to solve this problem. The 96-well screen filter plate consists of 96 stainless steel wire-mesh screen tubes connected to the 96 openings of a top plate so that the screen filter plate can be readily inserted into a 96-well sample storage plate. Upon insertion, the blood and plasma clots are excluded from entering the screen tube while clear sample solutions flow freely into it. In this way, sample transfer can be easily completed by either manual or automated pipetting methods. In this report, three structurally diverse compounds were selected to evaluate and validate the use of the screen filter plate. The plasma samples of these compounds were transferred and processed in the presence and absence of the screen filter plate and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS methods. Our results showed a good agreement between the samples prepared with and without the screen filter plate, demonstrating the utility and efficiency of this novel device for preparation of blood and plasma samples. The device is simple, easy to use, and reusable. It can be employed for sample preparation of other biological fluids that contain floating particulates or aggregates.

  7. Ice-Cap: a method for growing Arabidopsis and tomato plants in 96-well plates for high-throughput genotyping.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Clark, Katie A; Gibbs, Nicole M; Bush, Susan M; Krysan, Patrick J

    2011-11-09

    It is becoming common for plant scientists to develop projects that require the genotyping of large numbers of plants. The first step in any genotyping project is to collect a tissue sample from each individual plant. The traditional approach to this task is to sample plants one-at-a-time. If one wishes to genotype hundreds or thousands of individuals, however, using this strategy results in a significant bottleneck in the genotyping pipeline. The Ice-Cap method that we describe here provides a high-throughput solution to this challenge by allowing one scientist to collect tissue from several thousand seedlings in a single day (1,2). This level of throughput is made possible by the fact that tissue is harvested from plants 96-at-a-time, rather than one-at-a-time. The Ice-Cap method provides an integrated platform for performing seedling growth, tissue harvest, and DNA extraction. The basis for Ice-Cap is the growth of seedlings in a stacked pair of 96-well plates. The wells of the upper plate contain plugs of agar growth media on which individual seedlings germinate. The roots grow down through the agar media, exit the upper plate through a hole, and pass into a lower plate containing water. To harvest tissue for DNA extraction, the water in the lower plate containing root tissue is rapidly frozen while the seedlings in the upper plate remain at room temperature. The upper plate is then peeled away from the lower plate, yielding one plate with 96 root tissue samples frozen in ice and one plate with 96 viable seedlings. The technique is named "Ice-Cap" because it uses ice to capture the root tissue. The 96-well plate containing the seedlings can then wrapped in foil and transferred to low temperature. This process suspends further growth of the seedlings, but does not affect their viability. Once genotype analysis has been completed, seedlings with the desired genotype can be transferred from the 96-well plate to soil for further propagation. We have demonstrated

  8. Streptomycetes in micro-cultures: growth, production of secondary metabolites, and storage and retrieval in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Minas, W; Bailey, J E; Duetz, W

    2000-12-01

    Mycelium-forming Streptomyces strains were grown in one milliliter liquid micro-cultures in square deep-well microtiter plates. Growth was evaluated with respect to biomass formation and production of secondary metabolites which were found to be very similar in the micro-cultures, bioreactor, and shake flask cultivations, respectively. Despite repetitive sampling and extensive growth on the walls of the wells, no cross contamination occurred. Furthermore, we successfully employed cold storage at -20 degrees C of spore suspensions (in the 96-well format), directly prepared from cultures grown on agar in the microtitre plate. Cultures were retrieved by replicating aliquots from the frozen spore suspensions.

  9. Protocol: high throughput silica-based purification of RNA from Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96-well format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing popularity of systems-based approaches to plant research has resulted in a demand for high throughput (HTP) methods to be developed. RNA extraction from multiple samples in an experiment is a significant bottleneck in performing systems-level genomic studies. Therefore we have established a high throughput method of RNA extraction from Arabidopsis thaliana to facilitate gene expression studies in this widely used plant model. We present optimised manual and automated protocols for the extraction of total RNA from 9-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96 well plate format using silica membrane-based methodology. Consistent and reproducible yields of high quality RNA are isolated averaging 8.9 μg total RNA per sample (~20 mg plant tissue). The purified RNA is suitable for subsequent qPCR analysis of the expression of over 500 genes in triplicate from each sample. Using the automated procedure, 192 samples (2 × 96 well plates) can easily be fully processed (samples homogenised, RNA purified and quantified) in less than half a day. Additionally we demonstrate that plant samples can be stored in RNAlater at -20°C (but not 4°C) for 10 months prior to extraction with no significant effect on RNA yield or quality. Additionally, disrupted samples can be stored in the lysis buffer at -20°C for at least 6 months prior to completion of the extraction procedure providing a flexible sampling and storage scheme to facilitate complex time series experiments. PMID:22136293

  10. Mass Spectrometric N-Glycan Analysis of Haptoglobin from Patient Serum Samples Using a 96-Well Plate Format.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Haidi; Marrero, Jorge; Lubman, David M

    2015-11-06

    Alterations in glycosylation of serum glycoproteins can provide unique and highly specific fingerprints of malignancy. Our previous mass spectrometric study revealed that the bifucosylation level of serum haptoglobin was distinctly increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients versus liver cirrhosis of all three major etiologies. We have thus developed a method for the analysis of large numbers of serum samples based on a 96-well plate platform for the evaluation of fucosylation changes of serum haptoglobin between HCC versus cirrhosis. Haptoglobin was isolated from the serum of individual patient samples based on an HPLC column immobilized with antihaptoglobin antibody via hydrazide immobilization chemistry. Only 10 μL of serum was required for glycan extraction and processing for MALDI-QIT mass spectrometry analysis using the 96-well plate format. The bifucosylation degrees of haptoglobin in individuals were calculated using a quantitative glycomics method. The MS data confirmed that the bifucosylated tetra-anntenary glycan was upregulated in HCC samples of all etiologies. This study provides a parallel method for processing glycan content for haptoglobin and evaluating detailed changes in glycan structures for a potentially large cohort of clinical serum samples.

  11. Performance evaluation of 3D polystyrene 96-well plates with human neural stem cells in a calcium assay.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yinzhi; Kisaalita, William S

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we have generated a high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible 3D cell culture platform by chemically "welding" polystyrene scaffolds into standard 2D polystyrene 96-well plates. The variability of scaffolds was minimized by introducing automation into the fabrication process. The fabricated 3D cell culture plates were compared with several commercially available 3D cell culture platforms with light and scanning electron microscopy. Voltage-gated calcium channel functionality was used to access the Z' factors of all plates, including a 2D standard plate control. It was found that with the No-Wash Fluo-4 calcium assay and neural progenitor cells, all plates display acceptable Z' factors for use in HTS. The plates with "welded" polystyrene scaffolds have several advantages, such as being versatile and economical, and are ready to use off the shelf. These characteristics are especially desired in HTS preclinical drug discovery applications.

  12. Development and validation of a 96-well cellular assay for the discovery of ALDH1A1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ming, Wenyu; Ma, Wenzhen; Chen, Lisa H; Volk, Catherine; Michael, Mervyn Dodson; Xu, Yanping; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Xiaojun

    2013-07-01

    Retinoic acid, the active metabolite of vitamin A, plays important roles in various physiological and pathological processes. The two-step production of retinoic acid from vitamin A (retinol) is catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potential therapeutic targets for numerous diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Currently, the lack of a suitable high-throughput cellular assay hinders efforts to identify therapeutic small molecular inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenase, such as ALDH1A1. In this report, we utilized high-content imaging technology and a commercially available cell permeable ALDH substrate to develop a 96-well cellular ALDH1A1 assay. This assay has a robust and sensitive readout and is amenable to automation. With this cellular assay, we identified potent selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors to explore the role of retinoic acid production in various preclinical disease models.

  13. Development of a novel bead-based 96-well filtration plate competitive immunoassay for the detection of Gentamycin.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tien Yu Jessica; Chan, Chia-Chung; Chan, KinGho; Wang, Yu Chieh; Lin, Jing-Tang; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2013-11-15

    We developed a sensitive, simple, inexpensive and rapid bead-based immunoassay platform, composed of liposomal nanovesicle amplification system, Gentamycin sulfate beads and 96-well filtration plates. In the beginning of the assay, Gentamycin sulfate beads, Gentamycin sulfate and Gentamycin specific antibody were incubated in a bottom-sealed 96-well filtration plate. After incubation, washing was done by running washing buffer through the unsealed filtration plate with only gravity and the antibody-Gentamycin bead complexes were retained in the plate. Fluorescent dye-loaded protein G-liposomal nanovesicles were then added to specifically bind to antibodies on the retained beads. After washing unbound nanovesicles, millions of fluorescent dye molecules were released by adding a detergent solution to lyse liposomal nanovesicles. The limit of detection (LOD) of this novel detection platform in TBS and in skim milk were 52.65 ng/mL and 14.16 ng/mL, which are both sufficient for detecting the 200 ng/mL Codex maximum residual level (MRL). The dynamic ranges were both from each of their LODs to 100 μg/mL. The 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) in TBS and skim milk were 199.66 ng/mL and 360.81 ng/mL, respectively. We also demonstrated the good specificity of this platform by comparing detection results between pure Gentamycin solution and a mixture solution of 6 different antibiotics including Gentamycin in skim milk. The entire assay with 60 samples was conducted within 2h. In sum, this novel biosensing platform not only fulfilled most benefits of magnetic bead-based assays, but also was inexpensive and convenient by replacing the magnetic separation with filtration plate separation.

  14. Scalable 96-well Plate Based iPSC Culture and Production Using a Robotic Liquid Handling System.

    PubMed

    Conway, Michael K; Gerger, Michael J; Balay, Erin E; O'Connell, Rachel; Hanson, Seth; Daily, Neil J; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2015-05-14

    Continued advancement in pluripotent stem cell culture is closing the gap between bench and bedside for using these cells in regenerative medicine, drug discovery and safety testing. In order to produce stem cell derived biopharmaceutics and cells for tissue engineering and transplantation, a cost-effective cell-manufacturing technology is essential. Maintenance of pluripotency and stable performance of cells in downstream applications (e.g., cell differentiation) over time is paramount to large scale cell production. Yet that can be difficult to achieve especially if cells are cultured manually where the operator can introduce significant variability as well as be prohibitively expensive to scale-up. To enable high-throughput, large-scale stem cell production and remove operator influence novel stem cell culture protocols using a bench-top multi-channel liquid handling robot were developed that require minimal technician involvement or experience. With these protocols human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were cultured in feeder-free conditions directly from a frozen stock and maintained in 96-well plates. Depending on cell line and desired scale-up rate, the operator can easily determine when to passage based on a series of images showing the optimal colony densities for splitting. Then the necessary reagents are prepared to perform a colony split to new plates without a centrifugation step. After 20 passages (~3 months), two iPSC lines maintained stable karyotypes, expressed stem cell markers, and differentiated into cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. The system can perform subsequent high-throughput screening of new differentiation protocols or genetic manipulation designed for 96-well plates. This technology will reduce the labor and technical burden to produce large numbers of identical stem cells for a myriad of applications.

  15. Scalable 96-well Plate Based iPSC Culture and Production Using a Robotic Liquid Handling System

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Michael K.; Gerger, Michael J.; Balay, Erin E.; O'Connell, Rachel; Hanson, Seth; Daily, Neil J.; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Continued advancement in pluripotent stem cell culture is closing the gap between bench and bedside for using these cells in regenerative medicine, drug discovery and safety testing. In order to produce stem cell derived biopharmaceutics and cells for tissue engineering and transplantation, a cost-effective cell-manufacturing technology is essential. Maintenance of pluripotency and stable performance of cells in downstream applications (e.g., cell differentiation) over time is paramount to large scale cell production. Yet that can be difficult to achieve especially if cells are cultured manually where the operator can introduce significant variability as well as be prohibitively expensive to scale-up. To enable high-throughput, large-scale stem cell production and remove operator influence novel stem cell culture protocols using a bench-top multi-channel liquid handling robot were developed that require minimal technician involvement or experience. With these protocols human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were cultured in feeder-free conditions directly from a frozen stock and maintained in 96-well plates. Depending on cell line and desired scale-up rate, the operator can easily determine when to passage based on a series of images showing the optimal colony densities for splitting. Then the necessary reagents are prepared to perform a colony split to new plates without a centrifugation step. After 20 passages (~3 months), two iPSC lines maintained stable karyotypes, expressed stem cell markers, and differentiated into cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. The system can perform subsequent high-throughput screening of new differentiation protocols or genetic manipulation designed for 96-well plates. This technology will reduce the labor and technical burden to produce large numbers of identical stem cells for a myriad of applications. PMID:26068617

  16. 96-Well Plate Colorimetric Assay for K(sub i) Determination of (plusmn)-2-Benzylsuccinic Acid, an Inhibitor of Carboxypeptidase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentland, Mark P.; Raza, Shaan; Yingtong Gao

    2004-01-01

    An appropriate assay to determine the inhibition potency of carboxypeptidase A (CPA) in 96-well format to illustrate how high throughput screening is used in modern drug discovery to identify bioactive molecules is developed. Efforts in developing a colorimetric 96-well plate assay for determination of the K(sub i) for inhibition of CPA by…

  17. Equilibrium drug solubility measurements in 96-well plates reveal similar drug solubilities in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and human intestinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Tiina; Karjalainen, Milja; Ojala, Krista; Partola, Kirsi; Lammert, Frank; Augustijns, Patrick; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo; Peltonen, Leena; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2011-02-28

    This study was conducted to develop a high throughput screening (HTS) method for the assessment of equilibrium solubility of drugs. Solid-state compounds were precipitated from methanol in 96-well plates, in order to eliminate the effect of co-solvent. Solubility of twenty model drugs was analyzed in water and aqueous solutions (pH 1.2 and 6.8) in 96-well plates and in shake-flasks (UV detection). The results obtained with the 96-well plate method correlated well (R(2)=0.93) between the shake-flask and 96-well plates over the wide concentration scale of 0.002-169.2mg/ml. Thereafter, the solubility tests in 96-well plates were performed using fasted state human intestinal fluid (HIF) from duodenum of healthy volunteers. The values of solubility were similar in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) and HIF over the solubility range of 10(2)-10(5)μg/ml. The new 96-well plate method is useful for the screening of equilibrium drug solubility during the drug discovery process and it also allows the use of human intestinal fluid in solubility screening.

  18. Assessment of a 96-Well Plate Assay of Quantitative Drug Susceptibility Testing for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex in China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Zheng, Yang; Zhao, Bing; van den Hof, Susan; Cobelens, Frank; Zhao, YanLin

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of the Sensitire MYCOTB MIC Plate (MYCOTB) which could measure the twelve anti-tuberculosis drugs susceptibility on one 96-wells plate. Methods A total of 140 MDR-TB strains and 60 non-MDR strains were sub-cultured and 193 strains were finally tested for drug resistance using MYCOTB and agar proportion method (APM) and another 7 strains failed of subculture. The drugs included ofloxacin (Ofx), moxifloxacin (Mfx), rifampin (RFP), amikacin (Am), rifabutin (Rfb), para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), ethionamide (Eth), isoniazid (INH), kanamycin (Km), ethambutol (EMB), streptomycin (Sm), and cycloserine(Cs). The categorical agreement, conditional agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MYCOTB were assessed in comparison with APM. For strains with inconsistent results between MYCOTB and APM, the drug resistance related gene fragments were amplified and sequenced: gyrA for Ofx and Mfx; rpoB for RFP and Rfb; embB for EMB; rpsl for Sm; katG and the promoter region of inhA for INH, ethA and the promoter region of inhA for Eth. The sequence results were compared with results of MYCOTB and APM to analyze the consistency between sequence results and MYCOTB or APM. Results The categorical agreement between two methods for each drug ranged from 88.6% to 100%. It was the lowest for INH (88.6%). The sensitivity and specificity of MYCOTB ranged from 71.4% to 100% and 84.3% to 100%, respectively. The sensitivity was lowest for Cs(71.4%), EMB at 10μg/ml (80.0%) and INH at 10.0μg/ml (84.6%). The specificity was lowest for Rfb (84.3%). Overall discordance between the two phenotypic methods was observed for 96 strains, of which 63 (65.6%) were found susceptible with APM and resistant with MYCOTB and the remaining 33(34.4%) strains were resistant by APM and susceptible with MYCOTB. 34/52 (65.4%) sequenced APM susceptible and MYCOTB resistant(APM-S/MYCOTB-R) strains had mutations or insertions in the amplified regions. 20/30 (66.7%) sequenced APM

  19. Suspended microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Bischel, Lauren L; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-06-18

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics.

  20. A new approach to the application of solid phase extraction disks with LC-MS/MS for the analysis of drugs on a 96-well plate format.

    PubMed

    Cudjoe, Erasmus; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-11-01

    A new 96-well disk solid phase extraction sample preparation technique which does not involve vacuum pumps integrated with liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) was developed for high throughput determination of benzodiazepines (nordiazepam, diazepam, lorazepam and oxazepam). In addition, the method completely allows the re-use of the SPE disk membranes for subsequent analyses after re-conditioning. The method utilizes a robotic autosampler for parallel extractions in a 96-well plate format. Results have been presented for independent extractions from three matrices; phosphate buffer solution, urine, and plasma. Factors affecting data reproducibility, extraction kinetics, sample throughput, and reliability of the system were investigated and optimized. A total time required per sample was 0.94 min using 96-well format. Method reproducibility was < or =9% relative standard deviation for all three matrices. Limits of detection and quantitation recorded were respectively in the range 0.02-0.15 and 0.2-2.0 ng/mL with linearity ranging from 0.2 to 500 ng/mL for all matrices.

  1. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  2. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format. PMID:27886235

  3. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format.

  4. 96-well plate-to-plate gravity fluorous solid-phase extraction (F-SPE) for solution-phase library purification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Yimin

    2007-01-01

    Large particle size (125_210 microm) fluorous silica gel bonded with a -SiCH2CH2C8F17 stationary phase has been employed for gravity-driven fluorous solid-phase extraction (F-SPE) on two types of 96-well plates. A 1 or 0.75 g portion of fluorous silica is packed to each well of the 3.5-mL Ex-Blok and the 2.2-mL deep-well filtration plates, respectively. Up to 50 mg of reaction mixture is loaded and then eluted with a fluorophobic solvent (DMSO, DMF, or 85:15 DMF-H2O). Products collected in 96-well receiving plates are directly concentrated on a GeneVac vacuum centrifuge. This simple and highly efficient plate-to-plate F-SPE technique has been demonstrated in the purification of four 96-compound libraries produced by scavenging reactions with 1-(perfluoroctyl)propyl isatoic anhydride (F-IA), amide coupling reactions with 2-chloro-4,6-bis[(perfluorooctyl)propyloxy]-1,3,5-triazine (F-CDMT) or 2,4-dichloro-6-(perfluorooctyl)propyloxy-1,3,5-triazine (F-DCT), and Mitsunobu reactions with fluorous diethyl azodicarboxylate (F-DEAD) and triphenylphosphine (F-TPP). Approximately 80% of products in each library have greater than 85% purity after F-SPE without conducting chromatography.

  5. Higher throughput bioanalysis by automation of a protein precipitation assay using a 96-well format with detection by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Watt, A P; Morrison, D; Locker, K L; Evans, D C

    2000-03-01

    Generic methodology for the automated preparation and analysis of drug levels in plasma samples within a drug discovery environment was achieved through the redesign of a protein precipitation assay to a microtiter (96-well) plate format and the application of robotic liquid handling for performance of all transfer and pipetting steps. Validation studies revealed that the application of robotics to sample preparation, in general, maintained the analytical accuracy and precision compared with preparing samples manually. The use of rapid gradient LC-MS/MS for analysis coupled with flow diversion of the solvent front allowed the introduction of protein-precipitated samples into the mass spectrometer without the necessity for source cleaning. The problem inherent in automatically pipetting plasma, caused by fibrinogen clots, was overcome by storing samples at -80 degrees C and thus precluding clot formation. The resulting methodology allowed sample preparation for a 96-well plate designed to accommodate 54 unknowns, duplicate 12-point calibration curves, and 6 sets of quality controls at three levels in approximately 2 h. This approach allowed an increase in throughput of sample preparation and analysis to >400 samples per day per LC-MS/MS instrument with minimal manual intervention. Overall, substantial time savings were realized, demonstrating that automation is an increasingly essential tool in a drug discovery bioanalytical environment.

  6. High-throughput 96-well solvent mediated sonic blending synthesis and on-plate solid/solution stability characterization of pharmaceutical cocrystals.

    PubMed

    Luu, Van; Jona, Janan; Stanton, Mary K; Peterson, Matthew L; Morrison, Henry G; Nagapudi, Karthik; Tan, Helming

    2013-01-30

    A 96-well high-throughput cocrystal screening workflow has been developed consisting of solvent-mediated sonic blending synthesis and on-plate solid/solution stability characterization by XRPD. A strategy of cocrystallization screening in selected blend solvents including water mixtures is proposed to not only manipulate solubility of the cocrystal components but also differentiate physical stability of the cocrystal products. Caffeine-oxalic acid and theophylline-oxalic acid cocrystals were prepared and evaluated in relation to saturation levels of the cocrystal components and stability of the cocrystal products in anhydrous and hydrous solvents. AMG 517 was screened with a number of coformers, and solid/solution stability of the resulting cocrystals on the 96-well plate was investigated. A stability trend was observed and confirmed that cocrystals comprised of lower aqueous solubility coformers tended to be more stable in water. Furthermore, cocrystals which could be isolated under hydrous solvent blending condition exhibited superior physical stability to those which could only be obtained under anhydrous condition. This integrated HTS workflow provides an efficient route in an API-sparing approach to screen and identify cocrystal candidates with proper solubility and solid/solution stability properties.

  7. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-11-25

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format.

  8. A high-throughput approach for the determination of pesticide residues in cucumber samples using solid-phase microextraction on 96-well plate.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Es'haghi, Ali; Es-haghi, Ali; Mesbahi, Noushin

    2012-08-31

    A high-throughput solid-phase microextraction (SPME) on 96-well plate together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the determination of some selected pesticides in cucumber samples. Pieces with the length of 1.0 cm of silicon tubing were precisely prepared and then coated on the end part of stainless steel wires. The prepared fibers were positioned in a home-made polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based constructed ninety-six holes block to have the possibility of simultaneous immersion of the SPME fibers into the center of individual wells. Pesticides such as diazinon, penconazol, tebuconazol, bitertanol, malathion, phosalone and chlorpyrifos-methyl were selected for their highly application in cucumber field. The performances of the SPME fibers, such as intra and inter-fibers reproducibility, were evaluated and the results showed a good similarity in extraction yields. A volume of 1 mL of the aquatic supernatant of the cucumber samples was transferred into the 96-well plate and the array of SPME fibers was applied for the extraction of the selected pesticides. The important parameters influencing the whole extraction process including, organic solvent percent, salt addition, dilution factor, stirring rate and extraction time were optimized. The inter- and intra-day RSD% were found to be less than 15.4%. Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) were below 60 and 180 μg kg(-1), respectively. The coefficient of determination was satisfactory (r(2)>0.99) for all the studied analytes. The developed method was successfully applied to the monitoring of several samples gathered from local markets.

  9. Development of cystic embryoid bodies with visceral yolk-sac-like structures from mouse embryonic stem cells using low-adherence 96-well plate.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Emiko; Seki, Yuji; Higuchi, Takatoshi; Nakashima, Fumio; Noda, Tomozumi; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2009-04-01

    Cystic embryoid bodies with visceral yolk-sac-like structure (cystic EB-Vs) are used as a model for the study of early extraembryonic tissue formation containing visceral endoderm-like derivatives. In this study, we optimized the cell density of embryonic stem (ES) cells for developing cystic EB-Vs in a low-adherence 96-well plate. When ES cells were seeded at a density of 4000 cells/well, the cystic EB-Vs were most efficiently developed from ES cells via forming multicellular spherical aggregates called embryoid bodies (EBs). The suspension culture in the low-adherence plate was preferable for developing EBs into cystic EB-Vs rather than the attachment culture in the plate coated with 0.1% gelatin. The seeding cell density of 4000 cells/well was always superior to 1000 cells/well in the efficiency of cystic EB-V development. Because the high-cell density culture generally raises the limitation of oxygen and nutrient supplies, we investigated the effects of low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions on the development of cystic EB-Vs. It was found that low oxygen tension was not a factor for promoting the development of cystic EB-Vs. It was suggested that a low-nutrient medium is preferred for developing cystic EB-Vs rather than a sufficient-nutrient medium. In conclusion, the suspension culture in the low-adherence 96-well plate seeded with 4000 ES cells/well was optimum for developing cystic EB-Vs. The low-nutrient condition may be one of the factors for promoting the development of cystic EB-Vs.

  10. High-throughput determination of fudosteine in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, following protein precipitation in the 96-well plate format.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Wu, Yiwen; Zhang, Linli; Qi, Yunpeng; Fan, Guorong; Wu, Yutian; Li, Zhen

    2008-05-01

    A 96-well protein precipitation, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and fully validated for the determination of fudosteine in human plasma. After protein precipitation of the plasma samples (50 microL) by the methanol (150 microL) containing the internal standard (IS), erdosteine, the 96-well plate was vortexed for 5 min and centrifuged for 15 min. The 100 microL supernatant and 100 microL mobile phase were added to another plate and mixed and then the mixture was directly injected into the LC-MS/MS system in the negative ionization mode. The separation was performed on a XB-CN column for 3.0 min per sample using an eluent of methanol-water (60:40, v/v) containing 0.005% formic acid. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using the precursor-product ion transitions m/z 178-->91 and m/z 284-->91 was performed to quantify fudosteine and erdosteine, respectively. The method was sensitive with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.02 microg mL(-1), with good linearity (r>0.999) over the linear range of 0.02-10 microg mL(-1). The within- and between-run precision was less than 5.5% and accuracy ranged from 94.2 to 106.7% for quality control (QC) samples at three concentrations of 0.05, 1 and 8 microg mL(-1). The method was employed in the clinical pharmacokinetic study of fudosteine formulation product after oral administration to healthy volunteers.

  11. Evaluation of drug load and polymer by using a 96-well plate vacuum dry system for amorphous solid dispersion drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Ran, Yingqing; Chou, Kang-Jye; Cui, Yong; Sambrone, Amy; Chan, Connie; Hart, Ryan

    2012-06-01

    It is well recognized that poor dissolution rate and solubility of drug candidates are key limiting factors for oral bioavailability. While numerous technologies have been developed to enhance solubility of the drug candidates, poor water solubility continuously remains a challenge for drug delivery. Among those technologies, amorphous solid dispersions (SD) have been successfully employed to enhance both dissolution rate and solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. This research reports a high-throughput screening technology developed by utilizing a 96-well plate system to identify optimal drug load and polymer using a solvent casting approach. A minimal amount of drug was required to evaluate optimal drug load in three different polymers with respect to solubility improvement and solid-state stability of the amorphous drug-polymer system. Validation of this method was demonstrated with three marketed drugs as well as with one internal compound. Scale up of the internal compound SD by spray drying further confirmed the validity of this method, and its quality was comparable to a larger scale process. Here, we demonstrate that our system is highly efficient, cost-effective, and robust to evaluate the feasibility of spray drying technology to produce amorphous solid dispersions.

  12. A Quantitative High-Throughput 96-well plate Fluorescence Assay for Mechanism-Based Inactivators of Cytochromes P450 Exemplified using CYP2B6

    PubMed Central

    Kenaan, Cesar; Zhang, Haoming; Hollenberg, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanism-based inactivators such as bergamottin are useful chemical tools for identifying the roles of specific active-site amino acid residues in the reactions catalyzed by the cytochromes P450 (CYPs or P450s) that are responsible for the metabolism of a wide variety of drugs and endogenous substrates. In clinical settings mechanism-based inactivation of P450s involved in xenobiotic metabolism has the potential to lead to adverse drug-drug interactions and assays to identify and characterize drug candidates as P450 inactivators are important in drug discovery and development. Here we present a quantitative high-throughput protocol for investigating cytochrome P450 mechanism-based inactivators using the example of CYP2B6 and bergamottin to illustrate the finer points of this protocol. This protocol details the adaptation of a 7-ethoxytrifluoromethyl coumarin (7-EFC) O-deethylation fluorescence activity assay to a 96-well microtiter plate format and uses a plate-reader to detect the fluorescence of the product. Compared to previous methods, this protocol requires less P450 and takes significantly less time while greatly increasing throughput. The protocol as written takes approximately two hours to complete. The principles and procedures outlined in this protocol can be easily adapted to other inactivators, P450 isoforms, substrates and plate-readers. PMID:20885377

  13. A semi-automated 96-well protein precipitation method for the determination of montelukast in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography/fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Chester J; Wang, Amy Q; Musson, Donald G; Yang, Amy Y; Fisher, Alison L

    2003-03-26

    A simple, semi-automated, protein precipitation assay for the determination of montelukast (SINGULAIR, MK-0476) in human plasma has been developed. Montelukast is a potent and selective antagonist of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor used for the treatment of asthma. A Packard MultiPROBE II EX is used to transfer 300 microl of plasma from sample, standard, and QC sample tubes to a microtiter plate (96-well). After addition of the internal standard by a repeating pipettor, a Tomtec QUADRA 96 adds 400 microl of acetonitrile to all plasma sample wells, simultaneously, in the microtiter plate. The Tomtec is also used to transfer the acetonitrile supernatant from the plasma protein precipitation step, batchwise, to another microtiter plate for analysis by HPLC with fluorescence detection. This assay has been validated and implemented for a clinical study of over 1300 plasma samples and is comparable to manual assays in the LLOQ (lower limit of quantitation, 3 ng/ml) and in stability. This is the first semi-automated protein precipitation assay published for the analysis of montelukast in human plasma and it results in significant time savings over the manual methods, both in sample preparation and in HPLC run time.

  14. Induction of apoptosis by intracellular potassium ion depletion: using the fluorescent dye PBFI in a 96-well plate method in cultured lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B; Janson, V; Behnam-Motlagh, P; Henriksson, R; Grankvist, K

    2006-09-01

    Depletion of intracellular potassium ions (K+) is necessary for cells to shrink, activate caspases and induce DNA fragmentation, events which are features of apoptosis. Here we describe a 96-well plate method using the cell permeable form of K+ binding benzofuran isophtalate (PBFI-AM) to measure intracellular K+ content in relation to untreated control. Cultured human pulmonary mesothelioma cells (P31) and small-cell lung cancer cells (U1690) were treated with K+ flux modulators in order to deprive the cells of intracellular K+. The combination of K+ influx inhibition with 10 micromol/L bumetanide plus 10 micromol/L ouabain and K+ efflux stimulation with 3 mg/L amphotericin B or 5 micromol/L nigericin efficiently reduced the intracellular K+ content after 3 h. Manipulation of K+ fluxes with subsequent intracellular K+ depletion induced apoptosis of lung cancer cells, as detected by caspase-3 activity after 3 h K+ depletion followed by 24 h proliferation and TUNEL positive staining after 48 h proliferation. We concluded that the PBFI-AM assay was a useful tool to determine intracellular K+ content in relation to untreated control, and that intracellular K+ depletion of lung cancer cells by clinically used drugs of relevant concentrations induced apoptosis. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of lung cancer.

  15. Simplified method for determination of clarithromycin in human plasma using protein precipitation in a 96-well format and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaekyu; Pauly, Daniel F; Johnson, Julie A; Frye, Reginald F

    2008-08-01

    A simplified method to determine clarithromycin concentrations in human plasma using protein precipitation in a 96-well plate and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. Plasma proteins were precipitated with acetonitrile and roxithromycin was used as the internal standard. After vortex mixing and centrifugation, the supernatants were directly injected onto a Phenomenex Luna Phenyl-Hexyl column (50 mm x 2.0 mm ID, 3 microm). The mobile phase consisted of water and methanol (30:70, v/v) containing 0.1% formic acid and 5mM ammonium acetate. The flow rate was 0.22 mL/min and the total run time (injection to injection) was less than 3 min. Detection of the analytes was achieved using positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The linear standard curve ranged from 100 to 5000 ng/mL and the precision and accuracy (inter- and intra-run) were within 7.9% and 4.9%, respectively. The method was successfully used to determine clarithromycin concentrations in human plasma samples obtained from healthy subjects who were given clarithromycin 500 mg for 3 days. The method is rapid, simple, precise and directly applicable to clarithromycin pharmacokinetic studies.

  16. Soluble penicillin-binding protein 2a: beta-lactam binding and inhibition by non-beta-lactams using a 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Toney, J H; Hammond, G G; Leiting, B; Pryor, K D; Wu, J K; Cuca, G C; Pompliano, D L

    1998-01-01

    High level methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the acquisition of the mecA gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a). PBP2a is a member of a family of peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzymes involved in assembly of the cell wall in bacteria and is poorly inactivated by beta-lactam antibiotics. We describe a 96-well-filter binding assay using recombinant, soluble PBP2a which allows for kinetic measurement of penicillin binding. The deacylation rate constant for the PBP2a-penicillin G covalent complex was found to be 5.7 +/- 1.0 x 10(-5) s-1 at 30 degrees C (half-life of approximately 200 min). For the PBP2a acylation reaction, the value of K(m) (penicillin G) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 mM and kcat = 1 x 10(-3) s-1, which yields a second-order rate constant (kcat/K(m)) for inactivation of 2.0 M-1 s-1. Using this assay, several non-beta-lactam inhibitors including Cibacron blue have been found which exhibit IC50 values between 10 and 30 microM. The binding affinities of several carbapenems and beta-lactams correlated well between the filter binding assay described in this report and an electrophoretic assay for PBP2a using membranes prepared form methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

  17. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  18. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W.

    2004-09-27

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  19. Method development for the quantitation of ABT-578 in rabbit artery tissue by 96-well liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qin C; Zhang, Jun; Rodila, Ramona; Watson, Pamela; El-Shourbagy, Tawakol

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative determination of drug concentrations in tissue samples can provide critical information for drug metabolism, kinetics, and toxicity evaluations. For analysis of tissue samples using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection, homogenization is a critical step in achieving good assay performance. Assay performance can be closely evaluated by spiking the drug directly into tissue samples prior to homogenization. It is especially important to include this assay evaluation for the analysis of artery tissue samples because artery tissue is very elastic, making it quite a challenge to develop an effective procedure for homogenization. An LC/MS/MS assay in 96-well format using liquid-liquid extraction was developed for analyzing ABT-578 in rabbit artery samples. Tissue quality control samples were prepared by spiking ABT-578 stock solutions directly into the tissue before homogenization. The usage of the tissue control samples gives a thorough evaluation of the sample preparation process that includes both homogenization and sample extraction. A 20% blood in saline solution was used as a homogenization solution. Calibration standards were made by spiking ABT-578 into rabbit whole blood. Blood quality control samples were also prepared by spiking ABT-578 into rabbit whole blood. These blood QC samples were used to confirm the validity of the calibration curve. A lower limit of quantitation of 0.050 ng/mL was achieved. The linear dynamic range of blood standards was from 0.050-30.3 ng/mL with the correlation coefficient (r) ranging from 0.9969-0.9996. Overall %CV was between 1.3 and 7.0%, and analytical recovery was between 98.2 and 105.8% for blood QC samples. The %CVs for tissue QC samples were between 6.7 and 13.0%, and analytical recovery after correction was between 93.5 and 114.3%.

  20. A high-throughput protein refolding screen in 96-well format combined with design of experiments to optimize the refolding conditions.

    PubMed

    Dechavanne, Vincent; Barrillat, Nicolas; Borlat, Frederic; Hermant, Aurélie; Magnenat, Laurent; Paquet, Mikael; Antonsson, Bruno; Chevalet, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Production of correctly folded and biologically active proteins in Escherichiacoli can be a challenging process. Frequently, proteins are recovered as insoluble inclusion bodies and need to be denatured and refolded into the correct structure. To address this, a refolding screening process based on a 96-well assay format supported by design of experiments (DOE) was developed for identification of optimal refolding conditions. After a first generic screen of 96 different refolding conditions the parameters that produced the best yield were further explored in a focused DOE-based screen. The refolding efficiency and the quality of the refolded protein were analyzed by RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE. The results were analyzed by the DOE software to identify the optimal concentrations of the critical additives. The optimal refolding conditions suggested by DOE were verified in medium-scale refolding tests, which confirmed the reliability of the predictions. Finally, the refolded protein was purified and its biological activity was tested in vitro. The screen was applied for the refolding of Interleukin 17F (IL-17F), stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α/CXCL12), B cell-attracting chemokine 1 (BCA-1/CXCL13), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the complement factor C5a. This procedure identified refolding conditions for all the tested proteins. For the proteins where refolding conditions were already available, the optimized conditions identified in the screening process increased the yields between 50% and 100%. Thus, the method described herein is a useful tool to determine the feasibility of refolding and to identify high-yield scalable refolding conditions optimized for each individual protein.

  1. Phospholipid removal combined with a semi-automated 96-well SPE application for determination of budesonide in human plasma with LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Karin; Andersson, Maria; Beck, Olof

    2014-11-01

    A semi-automated method for quantification of budesonide in human plasma was developed, validated, and applied for high-volume analysis of samples in connection with a pharmacokinetic study. Protein and phospholipid removal was performed using an Ostro 96-well filter plate and subsequently combined with C18 solid-phase extraction on a Hamilton Microlab STARlet automation robot. The final extracts were evaporated to dryness and redissolved in 20% acetonitrile/water. The procedure used budesonide-d8 as internal standard and gave a 3.5-fold concentration of plasma to extract. The final extracts (5 μL injected) were analyzed with selected reaction monitoring liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using electrospray ionization in positive mode. The chromatography system used a 100 mm ACQUITY BEH UPLC column and a gradient system consisting of aqueous 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile as organic modifier. Phospholipid removal was found to be needed during method development in order to reduce ion suppression effects from matrix and to increase method sensitivity. The measuring range was 50-5000 pg/mL with and LOD 24 pg/mL. Calibration response showed good linearity (correlation coefficients<0.99) over the measuring range. The absolute recovery over the sample preparation procedure was estimated to 67%. Total imprecision was <9% at three levels and accuracy was between 98.9 and 103%. The method was successfully applied for analysis of 864 study samples in a short time. The quality control samples at concentration levels 200 and 2000 pg/mL gave a total imprecision of 7.4% and 4.2%, respectively, (n=95).

  2. A 96-well single-pot liquid-liquid extraction, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of muraglitazar in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y-J; Liu, Jane; Unger, Steve

    2006-06-07

    A single-pot liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of muraglitazar, a hydrophobic diabetes drug, in human plasma. To 0.050 ml of each plasma sample in a 96-well plate, the internal standard solution in acetonitrile and toluene were added to extract the compound of interest. The plate was vortexed, followed by centrifugation. The organic layer was then directly injected into an LC/MS/MS system. Chromatographic separation was achieved isocratically on a Thermohypersil_Keystone, Hypersil silica column (3 mmx50 mm, 3 microm). The mobile phase contained 85% of methyl t-butyl ether and 15% of 90/10 (v/v) acetonitrile/water with 0.3% trifluoroacetic acid. Post-column mobile phase of 50/50 (v/v) acetonitrile/water containing 0.1% formic acid was added. Detection was by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry on a Sciex API 4000. The standard curve, ranged from 1 to 1000 ng/ml, was fitted to a 1/x weighted quadratic regression model. This single-pot LLE approach effectively eliminated time-consuming organic layer transfer, dry-down, and sample reconstitution steps, which are essential for a conventional liquid-liquid extraction procedure. The modified mobile phase was more compatible with the direct injection of the commonly used extraction solvents in LLE. Furthermore, the modified mobile phase improved the retention of muraglitazar, a hydrophobic compound, on the normal phase silica column. The validation results demonstrated that this method was rugged and suitable for analyzing muraglitazar in human plasma. In comparison with a revised-phase LC/MS/MS method, this single-pot LLE, HILIC/MS/MS method improved the detection sensitivity by more than four-fold based upon the LLOQ signal to noise ratio. This approach may be applied to other hydrophobic compounds with proper modification of the mobile phase compositions.

  3. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  4. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  5. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  6. Microfluidic waves

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s−1 result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  7. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  8. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  9. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices, and which incorporates a molded ring or seal set into a ferrule cartridge, with or without a compression screw. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  10. A prototypic microfluidic platform generating stepwise concentration gradients for real-time study of cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wen; Zheng, Yizhe; Luo, Kathy Qian; Wu, Hongkai

    2010-04-16

    This work describes the development of a prototypic microfluidic platform for the generation of stepwise concentration gradients of drugs. A sensitive apoptotic analysis method is integrated into this microfluidic system for studying apoptosis of HeLa cells under the influence of anticancer drug, etoposide, with various concentrations in parallel; it measures the yellow fluorescent proteincyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal that responds to the activation of caspase-3, an indicator of cell apoptosis. Sets of microfluidic valves on the chip generate stepwise concentration gradient of etoposide in various cell-culture microchambers. The FRET signals from multiple chambers are simultaneously monitored under a fluorescent microscope for long-time observation and the on-chip results are compared with those from 96-well plate study and the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The microfluidic platform shows several advantages including high-throughput capacity, low drug consumption, and high sensitivity.

  11. Quantitative analysis of simvastatin and its beta-hydroxy acid in human plasma using automated liquid-liquid extraction based on 96-well plate format and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanyan; Yang, Amy; Rogers, John Douglas; Zhao, Jamie J

    2004-01-27

    An assay based on automated liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) has been developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of simvastatin (SV) and its beta-hydroxy acid (SVA) in human plasma. A Packard MultiProbe II workstation was used to convert human plasma samples collected following administration of simvastatin and quality control (QC) samples from individual tubes into 96-well plate format. The workstation was also used to prepare calibration standards and spike internal standards. A Tomtec Quadra 96-channel liquid handling workstation was used to perform LLE based on 96-well plates including adding solvents, separating organic from aqueous layer and reconstitution. SV and SVA were separated through a Kromasil C18 column (50 mm x 2 mm i.d., 5 microm) and detected by tandem mass spectrometry with a TurboIonspray interface. Stable isotope-labeled SV and SVA, 13CD(3)-SV and 13 CD(3)-SVA, were used as the internal standards for SV and SVA, respectively. The automated procedures reduced the overall analytical time (96 samples) to 1/3 of that of manual LLE. Most importantly, an analyst spent only a fraction of time on the 96-well LLE. A limit of quantitation of 50 pg/ml was achieved for both SV and SVA. The interconversion between SV and SVA during the 96-well LLE was found to be negligible. The assay showed very good reproducibility, with intra- and inter-assay precision (%R.S.D.) of less than 7.5%, and accuracy of 98.7-102.3% of nominal values for both analytes. By using this method, sample throughput should be enhanced at least three-fold compared to that of the manual procedure.

  12. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  13. Tunable Microfluidic Microlasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    particularly convenient material for microfluidic experiments with LC. Figure 7: A droplet of E7 nematic liquid crystal on a PDMS...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0039 TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS Francesco Simoni Universita Politecnica delle Marche...DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 June 2010 – 15 June 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655

  14. Comparison of turbulent-flow chromatography with automated solid-phase extraction in 96-well plates and liquid-liquid extraction used as plasma sample preparation techniques for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, D; Pickard, V; Czembor, W; Müller, C

    1999-08-27

    Turbulent flow chromatography (TFC) combined with the high selectivity and sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) is a new technique for the fast direct analysis of drugs from crude plasma. TFC in the 96-well plate format reduces significantly the time required for sample clean-up in the laboratory. For example, for 100 samples the workload for a technician is reduced from about 8 h by a manual liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) assay to about 1 h in the case of TFC. Sample clean-up and analysis are performed on-line on the same column. Similar chromatographic performance and validation results were achieved using HTLC Turbo-C18 columns (Cohesive Technologies) and Oasis HLB extraction columns (Waters). One 96-well plate with 96 plasma samples is analyzed within 5.25 h, corresponding to 3.3 min per sample. Compared to this LLE and analysis of 96 samples takes about 16 h. Two structurally different and highly protein bound compounds, drug A and drug B, were analyzed under identical TFC conditions and the assays were fully validated for the application to toxicokinetics studies (compliant with Good Laboratory Practices-GLP). The limit of quantitation was 1.00 microg/l and the linear working range covered three orders of magnitude for both drugs. In the case of drug A the quality of analysis by TFC was similar to the reference LLE assay and slightly better than automated solid-phase extraction in 96-well plates. The accuracy was -3.1 to 6.7% and the precision was 3.1 to 6.8% in the case of drug A determined for dog plasma by TFC-MS-MS. For drug B the accuracy was -3.7 to 3.5% and the precision was 1.6 to 5.4% for rat plasma, which is even slightly better than what was achieved with the validated protein precipitation assay.

  15. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  16. Development of a microfluidic device for detection of pathogens in oral samples using upconverting phosphor technology (UPT).

    PubMed

    Abrams, William R; Barber, Cheryl A; McCann, Kurt; Tong, Gary; Chen, Zongyuan; Mauk, Michael G; Wang, Jing; Volkov, Alex; Bourdelle, Pete; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Zuiderwijk, Michel; Kardos, Keith; Li, Shang; Tanke, Hans J; Sam Niedbala, R; Malamud, Daniel; Bau, Haim

    2007-03-01

    Confirmatory detection of diseases, such as HIV and HIV-associated pathogens in a rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnostic remains a goal for disease control, prevention, and therapy. If a sample could be analyzed onsite with a verified result, the individual could be counseled immediately and appropriate therapy initiated. Our group is focused on developing a microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" that will simultaneously identify antigens, antibodies, RNA, and DNA using a single oral sample. The approach has been to design individual modules for each assay that uses similar components (e.g., valves, heaters, metering chambers, mixers) installed on a polycarbonate base with a common reporter system. Assay miniaturization reduces the overall analysis time, increases accuracy by simultaneously identifying multiple targets, and enhances detector sensitivity by upconverting phosphor technology (UPT). Our microfluidic approach employs four interrelated components: (1) sample acquisition-OraSure UPlink collectors that pick-up and release bacteria, soluble analytes, and viruses from an oral sample; (2) microfluidic processing-movement of microliter volumes of analyte, target analyte extraction and amplification; (3) detection of analytes using UPT particles in a lateral flow system; and (4) software for processing the results. Ultimately, the oral-based microscale diagnostic system will detect viruses and bacteria, associated pathogen antigens and nucleic acids, and antibodies to these pathogens.

  17. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric bioanalysis using normal-phase columns with aqueous/organic mobile phases - a novel approach of eliminating evaporation and reconstitution steps in 96-well SPE.

    PubMed

    Naidong, Weng; Shou, Wilson Z; Addison, Thomas; Maleki, Saber; Jiang, Xiangyu

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical methods using automated 96-well solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. SPE methods typically require manual steps of drying of the eluates and reconstituting of the analytes with a suitable injection solvent possessing elution strength weaker than the mobile phase. In this study, we demonstrated a novel approach of eliminating these two steps in 96-well SPE by using normal-phase LC/MS/MS methods with low aqueous/high organic mobile phases, which consisted of 70-95% organic solvent, 5-30% water, and small amount of volatile acid or buffer. While the commonly used SPE elution solvents (i.e. acetonitrile and methanol) have stronger elution strength than a mobile phase on reversed-phase chromatography, they are weaker elution solvents than a mobile phase for normal-phase LC/MS/MS and therefore can be injected directly. Analytical methods for a range of polar pharmaceutical compounds, namely, omeprazole, metoprolol, fexofenadine, pseudoephedrine as well as rifampin and its metabolite 25-desacetyl-rifampin, in biological fluids, were developed and optimized based on the foregoing principles. As a result of the time saving, a batch of 96 samples could be processed in one hour. These bioanalytical LC/MS/MS methods were validated according to "Guidance for Industry - Bioanalytical Method Validation" recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States.

  18. β-Cyclodextrin enhanced on-line organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of ambroxol in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Bi, Youwei; Wang, Li; Sun, Fanlu; Chen, Zhao; Xu, Guili; Fan, Guorong

    2012-07-01

    A field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method is described for the quantification of ambroxol hydrochloride in human plasma, following liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format. The separation was carried out at 25 °C in a 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 6.25 mM borate-25 mM phosphate (pH 3.0) and 1mM β-cyclodextrin. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Clean-up and preconcentration of plasma biosamples were developed by 96-well format liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). In this study, FASS in combination with β-cyclodextrin enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 fold in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision, extraction recovery and robustness. The calibration graph was linear for ambroxol hydrochloride from 2 to 500 ng/ml. The lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day precisions of lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 9.61 and 11.80%, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to the evaluation of clinical pharmacokinetic study of ambroxol hydrochloride tablet after oral administration to 12 healthy volunteers.

  19. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  20. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  1. Microfluidics and Coagulation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Tormoen, Garth W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of blood ex vivo can occur in closed or open systems, with or without flow. Microfluidic devices facilitate measurements of platelet function, coagulation biology, cellular biorheology, adhesion dynamics, pharmacology, and clinical diagnostics. An experimental session can accommodate 100s to 1000s of unique clotting events. Using microfluidics, thrombotic events can be studied on defined surfaces of biopolymers, matrix proteins, and tissue factor under constant flow rate or constant pressure drop conditions. Distinct shear rates can be created on a device with a single perfusion pump. Microfluidic devices facilitated the determination of intraluminal thrombus permeability and the discovery that platelet contractility can be activated by a sudden decrease in flow. Microfluidics are ideal for multicolor imaging of platelets, fibrin, and phosphatidylserine and provide a human blood analog to the mouse injury models. Overall, microfluidic advances offer many opportunities for research, drug testing under relevant hemodynamic conditions, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23642241

  2. A simple 96-well liquid-liquid extraction with a mixture of acetonitrile and methyl t-butyl ether for the determination of a drug in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y-J; Pursley, Janice; Arnold, Mark E

    2004-02-04

    A simple 96-well plate liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of a basic drug candidate in human plasma. Against the wisdom of conventional approaches, an aqueous/organic miscible solvent, acetonitrile, was used for liquid-liquid extraction along with methyl t-butyl ether. The use of acetonitrile effectively eliminated the formation of the irregular emulsion between aqueous/organic interfaces and modulated the polarity of the extraction solvents to achieve the desired recovery. This approach, which solved the emulsion problem, permitted the method to be automated using standard 96-well plate technology. A practical application was demonstrated through the use of this technique in the measurement of a novel drug in human plasma samples by LC/MS/MS. Chromatographic separation was achieved isocratically on a Phenomenox C18(2) Luna column (2 mm x 50 mm, 5 microm). The mobile phase contained 60% of 0.1% formic acid and 40% acetonitrile. Detection was by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The standard curve, which ranged from 1.22 to 979ng/ml, was fitted to a 1/x2 weighted quadratic regression model. The validation results show that this method was very rugged and had excellent precision and accuracy. The actual sample analysis results further demonstrated that this extraction procedure is well suited for real life applications. It is expected that with some modifications, this approach can be applied for the extraction of similar compounds from various biological fluids.

  3. A 96-well single-pot protein precipitation, liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the determination of muraglitazar, a novel diabetes drug, in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y-J; Liu, Jane; Pursley, Janice; Unger, Steve

    2006-02-02

    A 96-well single-pot protein precipitation, liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of muraglitazar, a PPAR alpha/gamma dual agonist, in human plasma. The internal standard, a chemical analogue, was dissolved in acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid. The solvent system was also served as a protein precipitation reagent. Human plasma samples (0.1 mL) and the internal standard solution (0.3 mL) were added to a 96-well plate. The plate was vortexed for 1 min and centrifuged for 5 min. Then the supernatant layers were directly injected into the LC/MS/MS system. The chromatographic separation was achieved isocratically on a Phenomenox C18(2) Luna column (2 mm x 50 mm, 5 microm). The mobile phase contained 20/80 (v/v) of water and acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid. Detection was by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry on a Sciex API 3000. The standard curve, which ranged from 1 to 1000 ng/mL, was fitted to a 1/x weighted quadratic regression model. This single-pot approach effectively eliminated three time consuming sample preparation steps: sample transfer, dry-down, and reconstitution before the injection, while it preserved all the benefits of the traditional protein precipitation. By properly adjusting the autosampler needle offset level, only the supernatant was injected, without disturbing the precipitated proteins in the bottom. As a result, the quality of chromatography and column life were not compromised. After more than 600 injections, there was only slightly increase of column back-pressure. The validation results demonstrated that this method was rugged and provide satisfactory precision and accuracy. The method has been successfully applied to analyze human plasma samples in support of a first-in-man study. This method has also been validated in monkey and mouse plasma for the determination of muraglitazar.

  4. High-throughput sample preparation for the quantitation of acephate, methamidophos, omethoate, dimethoate, ethylenethiourea, and propylenethiourea in human urine using 96-well-plate automated extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jayatilaka, Nayana K; Angela Montesano, M; Whitehead, Ralph D; Schloth, Sara J; Needham, Larry L; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2011-07-01

    Acephate, methamidophos, o-methoate, and dimethoate are organophosphorus pesticides, and ethylenethiouria and propylenethiourea are two metabolites from the bisdithiocarbamate fungicide family. They are some of the most widely used pesticides and fungicides in agriculture both domestically and abroad. The existing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method for the measurement of these compounds in human urine was improved by using a 96-well plate format sample preparation; the use of HPLC-MS/MS was comparable with a concentration range of 0.125 to 50 ng/ml. Deuterium-labeled acephate, ethylenethiouria, and methamidophos were used as internal standards. The sample preparation procedure, in the 96-well format with a 0.8-ml urine sample size, uses lyophilization of samples, followed by extraction with dichloromethane. The analytes were chromatographed on a Zorbax SB-C3 (4.6 × 150 mm, 5.0-μm) column with gradient elution by using 0.1% formic acid in aqueous solution (solvent A) and 0.1% formic acid in methanol (solvent B) mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. Quantitative analysis was performed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in positive ion mode using multiple-reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion pairs for the analytes on a TSQ Quantum Ultra HPLC-MS/MS. Repeated analyses of urine samples spiked with high (15 ng/ml), medium (5 ng/ml), and low (1 ng/ml) concentrations of the analytes gave relative SDs of <13%. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.004-0.01 ng/ml. The method also has high accuracy, high precision, and excellent extraction recovery. Furthermore, the improved sample preparation method decreased the cost and labor required while effectively doubling the analytic throughput with minimal matrix effect.

  5. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  6. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  7. Droplet Microfluidic System with On-Demand Trapping and Releasing of Droplet for Drug Screening Applications.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Matthew; Chen, Xiaoming; Chan, Sarah; Mohamed, Tarek; Rao, Praveen P N; Ren, Carolyn L

    2017-01-03

    96-Well plate has been the traditional method used for screening drug compounds libraries for potential bioactivity. Although this method has been proven successful in testing dose-response analysis, the microliter consumption of expensive reagents and hours of reaction and analysis time call for innovative methods for improvements. This work demonstrates a droplet microfluidic platform that has the potential to significantly reduce the reagent consumption and shorten the reaction and analysis time by utilizing nanoliter-sized droplets as a replacement of wells. This platform is evaluated by applying it to screen drug compounds that inhibit the tau-peptide aggregation, a phenomena related to Alzheimer's disease. In this platform, sample reagents are first dispersed into nanolitre-sized droplets by an immiscible carrier oil and then these droplets are trapped on-demand in the downstream of the microfluidic device. The relative decrease in fluorescence through drug inhibition is characterized using an inverted epifluorescence microscope. Finally, the trapped droplets are released on-demand after each test by manipulating the applied pressures to the channel network which allows continuous processing. The testing results agree well with that obtained from 96-well plates with much lower sample consumption (∼200 times lower than 96-well plate) and reduced reaction time due to increased surface volume ratio (2.5 min vs 2 h).

  8. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    PubMed

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-07

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  9. Applying microfluidics to electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs.

  10. Development and application of a high-throughput sample cleanup process based on 96-well plate for simultaneous determination of 16 steroids in biological matrices using liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanzhong; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-02-01

    A novel high-throughput sample pretreatment system was developed by the integration of protein precipitation (PP), phospholipid removal (PPR), and hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) into two simple 96-well plates and a matching 96-grid lid. With this system, 16 steroids were separated from biological matrices of plasma, milk, and urine and analyzed by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. In the tandem sample cleanup process, the prepositive PP and PPR step preliminarily removed some of the interferences from the biological matrices. The following HF-LPME step kept the residual interference out of the hollow fiber and enriched the steroids in the hollow fiber to achieve high sensitivity. By a series of method optimizations, acetonitrile was chosen as the crash solvent for PP and PPR. A mixture of octanol and toluene (1:1 v/v) was used as the acceptor phase for HF-LPME. The extraction was conducted at 80 rpm for 50 min in a donor phase containing 1 mL 20% sodium chloride at 25 °C. Under these conditions, the limits of detection for the 16 steroids were 3.6-300.0 pg(.)mL(-1) in plasma, 3.0-270.0 pg·mL(-1) in milk, and 2.2-210.0 pg(.)mL(-1) in urine. The recoveries of the 16 steroids were 81.9-97.9% in plasma (relative standard deviation 1.0-8.0%), 80.6-97.7% in milk (relative standard deviation 0.8-5.4%), and 87.3-98.7% in urine (relative standard deviation 1.0-4.9%). Further, the integrated 96-well platform of PP, PPR, and HF-LPME enabled us to run this assay in an automatic and high-throughput fashion. The reliability of the method was further corroborated by evaluation of its applicability in plasma and urine samples from volunteers and fresh bovine milk from local dairy enterprises.

  11. Automated 96-well solid phase extraction and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the analysis of cetirizine (ZYRTEC) in human plasma--with emphasis on method ruggedness.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Junga, Heiko; Tang, Yong; Li, Austin C; Addison, Tom; McCort-Tipton, Melanie; Beato, Brian; Naidong, Weng

    2005-01-05

    A high-throughput bioanalytical method based on automated sample transfer, automated solid phase extraction, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) analysis, has been developed for the determination of cetirizine, a selective H(1)-receptor antagonist. Deuterated cetirizine (cetirizine-d(8)) was synthesized as described and was used as the internal standard. Samples were transferred into 96-well plates using an automated sample handling system. Automated solid phase extraction was carried out using a 96-channel programmable liquid-handling workstation. Solid phase extraction 96-well plate on polymer sorbent (Strata X) was used to extract the analyte. The extracted samples were injected onto a Betasil silica column (50 x 3, 5 microm) using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid-trifluroacetic acid (93:7:1:0.025, v/v/v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. The chromatographic run time is 2.0 min per injection, with retention time of cetirizine and cetirizine-d(8) both at 1.1 min. The system consisted of a Shimadzu HPLC system and a PE Sciex API 3000 or API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer with (+) ESI. The method has been validated over the concentration range of 1.00-1000 ng/ml cetirizine in human plasma, based on a 0.10-ml sample size. The inter-day precision and accuracy of the quality control (QC) samples demonstrated <3.0% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) and <6.0% relative error (RE). Stability of cetirizine in stock solution, in plasma, and in reconstitution solution was established. The absolute extraction recovery was 85.8%, 84.5%, and 88.0% at 3, 40, and 800 ng/ml, respectively. The recovery for the internal standard was 84.1%. No adverse matrix effects were noticed for this assay. The automation of the sample preparation steps not only increased the analysis throughput, but also increased method ruggedness. The use of a stable isotope-labeled internal standard further improved the method ruggedness

  12. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  13. Microfluidic multiplexing in bioanalyses.

    PubMed

    Araz, M Kursad; Tentori, Augusto M; Herr, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    The importance of biological assays spans from clinical diagnostics to environmental monitoring. Simultaneous detection of multiple analytes enhances the efficacy of bioassays by providing more data per assay under standardized conditions. Nevertheless, simultaneous handling and assaying of multiple samples, targets, and experimental conditions can be laborious, reagent consuming, and time intensive. Given these demands, microfluidic platforms have emerged over the past two decades as well-suited approaches for multiplexed assays. Microfluidic design supports integration of assay steps and reproducible sample manipulation across large sets of conditions--all relevant to multiplexed assays. Taken together, reduced reagent consumption, faster assay times, and potential for automation stemming from microfluidic assay design are attractive and needed multiplexed assay performance attributes. This review highlights recent advances in multiplexed bioanalyses benefitting from microfluidic integration.

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  16. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; GALAMBOS, PAUL C.

    2002-06-01

    Electro-microfluidics is experiencing explosive growth in new product developments. There are many commercial applications for electro-microfluidic devices such as chemical sensors, biological sensors, and drop ejectors for both printing and chemical analysis. The number of silicon surface micromachined electro-microfluidic products is likely to increase. Manufacturing efficiency and integration of microfluidics with electronics will become important. Surface micromachined microfluidic devices are manufactured with the same tools as IC's (integrated circuits) and their fabrication can be incorporated into the IC fabrication process. In order to realize applications for devices must be developed. An Electro-Microfluidic Dual In-line Package (EMDIP{trademark}) was developed surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices, a practical method for getting fluid into these to be a standard solution that allows for both the electrical and the fluidic connections needed to operate a great variety of electro-microfluidic devices. The EMDIP{trademark} includes a fan-out manifold that, on one side, mates directly with the 200 micron diameter Bosch etched holes found on the device, and, on the other side, mates to lager 1 mm diameter holes. To minimize cost the EMDIP{trademark} can be injection molded in a great variety of thermoplastics which also serve to optimize fluid compatibility. The EMDIP{trademark} plugs directly into a fluidic printed wiring board using a standard dual in-line package pattern for the electrical connections and having a grid of multiple 1 mm diameter fluidic connections to mate to the underside of the EMDIP{trademark}.

  17. Flock-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Lovchik, Robert D; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2013-05-21

    Flock-based microfluidics are created by depositing hydrophilic microfibers on an adhesive-coated substrate using an electric field. This enables the fabrication of self-powered microfluidics from one or more different kinds of fibers that form 2D and 3D flowpaths, which can wick 40 microliters of liquid per square centimeter. With this approach, large areas of functional wicking materials can be produced at extremely low cost.

  18. Automated liquid-liquid extraction based on 96-well plate format in conjunction with ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the quantitation of methoxsalen in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manish; Contractor, Pritesh; Upadhyay, Vivek; Gupta, Ajay; Guttikar, Swati; Singhal, Puran; Goswami, Sailendra; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive, specific and high throughput bioanalytical method using automated sample processing via 96-well plate liquid-liquid extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of methoxsalen in human plasma. Plasma samples with ketoconazole as internal standard (IS) were prepared by employing 0.2 mL human plasma in ethyl acetate:dichloromethane (80:20, v/v). The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using isocratic mobile phase, consisting of 10 mM ammonium formate and acetonitrile (60:40, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The linear dynamic range was established over the concentration range 1.1-213.1 ng/mL for methoxsalen. The method was rugged and rapid with a total run time of 1.5 min. It was successfully applied to a pivotal bioequivalence study in 12 healthy human subjects after oral administration of 10 mg extended release methoxsalen formulation under fasting condition.

  19. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  20. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  1. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  2. Hybrid microfluidic systems: combining a polymer microfluidic toolbox with biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Kirsch, Stefanie; Anton, Birgit; Becker, Holger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present polymer based microfluidic chips which contain functional elements (electrodes, biosensors) made out of a different material (metals, silicon, organic semiconductors). These hybrid microfluidic devices allow the integration of additional functionality other than the simple manipulation of liquids in the chip and have been developed as a reaction to the increasing requirement for functional integration in microfluidics.

  3. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  4. Validation of a sensitive and automated 96-well solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of desloratadine and 3-hydroxydesloratadine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyu; Clement, Robert P; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Reyderman, Larisa; Beaudry, Francis; Grandmaison, Charles; Di Donato, Lorella; Masse, Robert; Rudewicz, Patrick J

    2003-07-25

    To support clinical development, a liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of desloratadine (descarboethoxyloratadine) and 3-OH desloratadine (3-hydroxydescarboethoxyloratadine) concentrations in human plasma. The method consisted of automated 96-well solid-phase extraction for sample preparation and liquid chromatography/turbo ionspray tandem mass spectrometry for analysis. [2H(4)]Desloratadine and [2H(4)]3-OH desloratadine were used as internal standards (I.S.). A quadratic regression (weighted 1/concentration(2)) gave the best fit for calibration curves over the concentration range of 25-10000 pg/ml for both desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine. There was no interference from endogenous components in the blank plasma tested. The accuracy (%bias) at the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was -12.8 and +3.4% for desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine, respectively. The precision (%CV) for samples at the LLOQ was 15.1 and 10.9% for desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine, respectively. For quality control samples at 75, 1000 and 7500 pg/ml, the between run %CV was

  5. Validation and application of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the determination of GDC-0834 and its metabolite in human plasma using semi-automated 96-well protein precipitation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young G; Jones, Steve A; Murakami, Stan C; Liu, Lichuan; Wong, Harvey; Buonarati, Michael H; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2012-11-01

    A liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of GDC-0834 and its amide hydrolysis metabolite (M1) in human plasma to support clinical development. The method consisted of semi-automated 96-well protein precipitation extraction for sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis in positive ion mode using TurboIonSpray® for analysis. D6-GDC-0834 and D6-M1 metabolite were used as internal standards. A linear regression (weighted 1/concentration(2) ) was used to fit calibration curves over the concentration range of 1 - 500 ng/mL for both GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite. The accuracy (percentage bias) at the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was 5.20 and 0.100% for GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite, respectively. The precision (CV) for samples at the LLOQ was 3.13-8.84 and 5.20-8.93% for GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite, respectively. For quality control samples at 3, 200 and 400 ng/mL, the between-run CV was ≤ 7.38% for GDC-0834 and ≤ 8.20% for M1 metabolite. Between run percentage bias ranged from -2.76 to 6.98% for GDC-0834 and from -6.73 to 2.21% for M1 metabolite. GDC-0834 and M1 metabolite were stable in human plasma for 31 days at -20 and -70°C. This method was successfully applied to support a GDC-0834 human pharmacokinetic-based study.

  6. Development, validation and application of a 96-well enzymatic assay based on LC-ESI-MS/MS quantification for the screening of selective inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Giulia; Ubiali, Daniela; Calleri, Enrica; Rabuffetti, Marco; Höfner, Georg C; Wanner, Klaus T; De Moraes, Marcela C; Martinelli, Leonardo K B; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Speranza, Giovanna; Massolini, Gabriella

    2016-11-02

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP, EC 2.4.2.1) has been identified as a target for the development of specific inhibitors with potential antimycobacterial activity. We hereby described the development and validation of a new 96-well LC-ESI-MS/MS method to assess the inhibition activity of nucleoside analogues towards MtbPNP and the human PNP (HsPNP). Enzyme activity was determined by monitoring the phosphorolysis of inosine (Ino) to hypoxanthine (Hpx). The enzymatic assay (v = 0.5 mL, enzyme<0.2 μg/well, T = 37 °C) was performed with an overall time of about 15 min/plate for sample processing and 2 min/sample for LC-MS analysis. Validation of the quantification method met the criteria of the CDER guidance of FDA. Kinetic parameters were in agreement with those reported in literature (HsPNP KM = 0.150 ± 0.020 mM vs 0.133 ± 0.015 mM; MtbPNP KM = 0.060 ± 0.009 mM vs 0.040 ± 0.003 mM for Ino), thus demonstrating the reliability of the newly developed enzymatic assay. Preliminary inhibition assays confirmed the effects reported for Acyclovir (Acv) and Formycin A (FA) against HsPNP and MtbPNP. The validated enzymatic assay was applied to the evaluation of a set of 8-halo-, 8-amino-, 8-O-alkyl-substituted purine ribonucleosides synthesized on purpose as potential inhibitors against MtbPNP. The assayed 8-substituted ribonucleosides did not exert a significant inhibitory effect against the tested enzymes up to 1 mM.

  7. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  8. A digital microfluidic method for multiplexed cell-based apoptosis assays.

    PubMed

    Bogojevic, Dario; Chamberlain, M Dean; Barbulovic-Nad, Irena; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-02-07

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a fluid-handling technique in which picolitre-microlitre droplets are manipulated electrostatically on an array of electrodes, has recently become popular for applications in chemistry and biology. DMF devices are reconfigurable, have no moving parts, and are compatible with conventional high-throughput screening infrastructure (e.g., multiwell plate readers). For these and other reasons, digital microfluidics has been touted as being a potentially useful new tool for applications in multiplexed screening. Here, we introduce the first digital microfluidic platform used to implement parallel-scale cell-based assays. A fluorogenic apoptosis assay for caspase-3 activity was chosen as a model system because of the popularity of apoptosis as a target for anti-cancer drug discovery research. Dose-response profiles of caspase-3 activity as a function of staurosporine concentration were generated using both the digital microfluidic method and conventional techniques (i.e., pipetting, aspiration, and 96-well plates.) As expected, the digital microfluidic method had a 33-fold reduction in reagent consumption relative to the conventional technique. Although both types of methods used the same detector (a benchtop multiwell plate reader), the data generated by the digital microfluidic method had lower detection limits and greater dynamic range because apoptotic cells were much less likely to de-laminate when exposed to droplet manipulation by DMF relative to pipetting/aspiration in multiwell plates. We propose that the techniques described here represent an important milestone in the development of digital microfluidics as a useful tool for parallel cell-based screening and other applications.

  9. Microfluidic platforms for mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Polacheck, William J.; Li, Ran; Uzel, Sebastien G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanotransduction has been a topic of considerable interest since early studies demonstrated a link between mechanical force and biological response. Until recently, studies of fundamental phenomena were based either on in vivo experiments with limited control or direct access, or on large-scale in vitro studies lacking many of the potentially important physiological factors. With the advent of microfluidics, many of the previous limitations of in vitro testing were eliminated or reduced through greater control or combined functionalities. At the same time, imaging capabilities were tremendously enhanced. In this review, we discuss how microfluidics has transformed the study of mechanotransduction. This is done in the context of the various cell types that exhibit force-induced responses and the new biological insights that have been elucidated. We also discuss new microfluidic studies that could produce even more realistic models of in vivo conditions by combining multiple stimuli or creating a more realistic microenvironment. PMID:23649165

  10. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  11. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT-PZT-PC and Cu-PZT-PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu-PZT-PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT-PZT-PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  12. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  13. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  14. Experimental Microfluidic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Christopher; Gonda, Steve; Ramsey, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate microfluidic devices with NASA's space bioreactor systems. In such a system, the microfluidic device would provide realtime feedback control of the bioreactor by monitoring pH, glucose, and lactate levels in the cell media; and would provide an analytical capability to the bioreactor in exterrestrial environments for monitoring bioengineered cell products and health changes in cells due to environmental stressors. Such integrated systems could be used as biosentinels both in space and on planet surfaces. The objective is to demonstrate the ability of microfabricated devices to repeatedly and reproducibly perform bead cytometry experiments in micro, lunar, martian, and hypergravity (1.8g).

  15. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  16. Magnetic digital microfluidics - a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2017-03-14

    A digital microfluidic platform manipulates droplets on an open surface. Magnetic digital microfluidics utilizes magnetic forces for actuation and offers unique advantages compared to other digital microfluidic platforms. First, the magnetic particles used in magnetic digital microfluidics have multiple functions. In addition to serving as actuators, they also provide a functional solid substrate for molecule binding, which enables a wide range of applications in molecular diagnostics and immunodiagnostics. Second, magnetic digital microfluidics can be manually operated in a "power-free" manner, which allows for operation in low-resource environments for point-of-care diagnostics where even batteries are considered a luxury item. This review covers research areas related to magnetic digital microfluidics. This paper first summarizes the current development of magnetic digital microfluidics. Various methods of droplet manipulation using magnetic forces are discussed, ranging from conventional magnetic particle-based actuation to the recent development of ferrofluids and magnetic liquid marbles. This paper also discusses several new approaches that use magnetically controlled flexible substrates for droplet manipulation. In addition, we emphasize applications of magnetic digital microfluidics in biosensing and medical diagnostics, and identify the current limitations of magnetic digital microfluidics. We provide a perspective on possible solutions to close these gaps. Finally, the paper discusses the future improvement of magnetic digital microfluidics to explore potential new research directions.

  17. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  18. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  19. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  20. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  1. Microfluidic device, and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making a microfluidic device is provided. The method features patterning a permeable wall on a substrate, and surrounding the permeable wall with a solid, non-permeable boundary structure to establish a microfluidic channel having a cross-sectional dimension less than 5,000 microns and a cross-sectional area at least partially filled with the permeable wall so that fluid flowing through the microfluidic channel at least partially passes through the permeable wall.

  2. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  3. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  4. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  5. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  6. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications. PMID:24781785

  7. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  8. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  9. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  10. Microfluidic serial dilution circuit.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Grover, William H; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Joyce, Gerald F

    2006-11-01

    In vitro evolution of RNA molecules requires a method for executing many consecutive serial dilutions. To solve this problem, a microfluidic circuit has been fabricated in a three-layer glass-PDMS-glass device. The 400-nL serial dilution circuit contains five integrated membrane valves: three two-way valves arranged in a loop to drive cyclic mixing of the diluent and carryover, and two bus valves to control fluidic access to the circuit through input and output channels. By varying the valve placement in the circuit, carryover fractions from 0.04 to 0.2 were obtained. Each dilution process, which is composed of a diluent flush cycle followed by a mixing cycle, is carried out with no pipeting, and a sample volume of 400 nL is sufficient for conducting an arbitrary number of serial dilutions. Mixing is precisely controlled by changing the cyclic pumping rate, with a minimum mixing time of 22 s. This microfluidic circuit is generally applicable for integrating automated serial dilution and sample preparation in almost any microfluidic architecture.

  11. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  12. Droplet based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  13. Electronic Sensing for Microfluidic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-08

    D. J. Insect cell culture in microfluidic channels. Biomedical Microdevices 4, 161-166 (2002). 8 20. Walker, G. M., Zeringue, H. C. & Beebe, D. J...engineering. Biomedical Microdevices 4, 167-175 (2002). 23. Moorthy, J. & Beebe, D. J. Organic and biomimetic designs for microfluidic systems

  14. Inertial microfluidic physics.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamed; Lee, Wonhee; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-08-07

    Microfluidics has experienced massive growth in the past two decades, and especially with advances in rapid prototyping researchers have explored a multitude of channel structures, fluid and particle mixtures, and integration with electrical and optical systems towards solving problems in healthcare, biological and chemical analysis, materials synthesis, and other emerging areas that can benefit from the scale, automation, or the unique physics of these systems. Inertial microfluidics, which relies on the unconventional use of fluid inertia in microfluidic platforms, is one of the emerging fields that make use of unique physical phenomena that are accessible in microscale patterned channels. Channel shapes that focus, concentrate, order, separate, transfer, and mix particles and fluids have been demonstrated, however physical underpinnings guiding these channel designs have been limited and much of the development has been based on experimentally-derived intuition. Here we aim to provide a deeper understanding of mechanisms and underlying physics in these systems which can lead to more effective and reliable designs with less iteration. To place the inertial effects into context we also discuss related fluid-induced forces present in particulate flows including forces due to non-Newtonian fluids, particle asymmetry, and particle deformability. We then highlight the inverse situation and describe the effect of the suspended particles acting on the fluid in a channel flow. Finally, we discuss the importance of structured channels, i.e. channels with boundary conditions that vary in the streamwise direction, and their potential as a means to achieve unprecedented three-dimensional control over fluid and particles in microchannels. Ultimately, we hope that an improved fundamental and quantitative understanding of inertial fluid dynamic effects can lead to unprecedented capabilities to program fluid and particle flow towards automation of biomedicine, materials

  15. Motion in microfluidic ratchets.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Katuri, J; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-11-15

    The ubiquitous random motion of mesoscopic active particles, such as cells, can be "rectified" or directed by embedding the particles in systems containing local and periodic asymmetric cues. Incorporated on lab-on-a-chip devices, these microratchet-like structures can be used to self-propel fluids, transport particles, and direct cell motion in the absence of external power sources. In this Focus article we discuss recent advances in the use of ratchet-like geometries in microfluidics which could open new avenues in biomedicine for applications in diagnosis, cancer biology, and bioengineering.

  16. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  17. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a-Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments.

  18. Jamming in Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Carlos; Daniels, Karen; Riehn, Robert

    2009-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow of a colloid through a microfluidic device. The glass microfluidic device consists of a wide channel with spatially periodic funnels manufactured with photolithographic methods. The device was etched to a depth of about 1 micron that restricts the solid phase of the colloid, fluorescent polystyrene spheres with sub-micron radii, to quasi-2D motion. The liquid phase of the colloid is an aqueous solution with trace amounts of a non-ionic surfactant and with a pH about 2 units above the pKa of the surface groups on the polystyrene spheres to maintain a stable colloid at concentrations high enough to produce jamming. The flow rate of the colloid is controlled by a computer interfaced syringe pump with two controllable modes of operation: a continuous, steady mode that provides a plug-like velocity profile and a discrete, jerky mode that sends compressional waves of specifiable sizes through the colloid. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observe the interactions between the colloid and the glass funnels and investigate how the interaction depends on the funnel geometry. In particular, we investigate the jamming transition from a liquid-like flowing state to a solid-like stationary state.

  19. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  20. Fabrication and optimisation of a fused filament 3D-printed microfluidic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tothill, A. M.; Partridge, M.; James, S. W.; Tatam, R. P.

    2017-03-01

    A 3D-printed microfluidic device was designed and manufactured using a low cost (2000) consumer grade fusion deposition modelling (FDM) 3D printer. FDM printers are not typically used, or are capable, of producing the fine detailed structures required for microfluidic fabrication. However, in this work, the optical transparency of the device was improved through manufacture optimisation to such a point that optical colorimetric assays can be performed in a 50 µl device. A colorimetric enzymatic cascade assay was optimised using glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase for the oxidative coupling of aminoantipyrine and chromotropic acid to produce a blue quinoneimine dye with a broad absorbance peaking at 590 nm for the quantification of glucose in solution. For comparison the assay was run in standard 96 well plates with a commercial plate reader. The results show the accurate and reproducible quantification of 0–10 mM glucose solution using a 3D-printed microfluidic optical device with performance comparable to that of a plate reader assay.

  1. A tetra-layer microfluidic system for peptide affinity screening through integrated sample injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhi; Huang, Yanyan; Jin, Yulong; Liu, Guoquan; Chen, Yi; Ma, Huimin; Zhao, Rui

    2013-05-21

    A novel integrated microfluidic system was designed and fabricated for affinity peptide screening with in situ detection. A tetra-layer microfluidic hybrid chip containing two top eccentric diffluent layers, an inter-layer and a bottom screening layer, was developed as the core device of the system. The eccentric diffluent layers were ingeniously invented for the vertical sample delivery from 2 top-inlets into 12 bottom-inlets, which eliminated the use of excessive accessories and complicated pipelines currently used in other systems. By using six pH gradient generators, the magnetic bead-based screening in 36 parallel chambers was simultaneously carried out under 6 different pH conditions from 5.4 to 8.2. This allowed simultaneous screening of 6 compounds and each under 6 different pH conditions. The fabricated chip system was applied to screening of affinity peptides towards β-endorphin antibody. The affinities of the peptide ligands to the antibody were assessed by on-chip confocal detection. The results from the screening study using this system indicated that the pentapeptide with the sequence of YGGFL had the highest affinity towards β-endorphin antibody at pH 7.1, which was further confirmed by the ELISA assay using a 96-well plate format. This microfluidic screening system is automatic, low-cost and reusable for not only peptide screening but also other bioactive compounds screening towards target molecules.

  2. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera

    PubMed Central

    Babrak, Lmar; Lin, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hnasko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL−1 limit of detection (LOD) of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings. PMID:26742073

  3. Microfluidic technology for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics have helped to improve the lives of millions of patients worldwide by allowing clinicians to diagnose patients earlier as well as providing better ongoing therapies. Point-of-care (POC) testing can bring these laboratory-based techniques to the patient in a home setting or to remote settings in the developing world. However, despite substantial progress in the field, there still remain many challenges. Progress in molecular diagnostics has benefitted greatly from microfluidic technology. This chapter aims to summarise the more recent advances in microfluidic-based molecular diagnostics. Sections include an introduction to microfluidic technology, the challenges of molecular diagnostics, how microfluidic advances are working to solve these issues, some alternative design approaches, and detection within these systems.

  4. Emergence of microfluidic wearable technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-10-18

    There has been an intense interest in the development of wearable technologies, arising from increasing demands in the areas of fitness and healthcare. While still at an early stage, incorporating microfluidics in wearable technologies has enormous potential, especially in healthcare applications. For example, current microfluidic fabrication techniques can be innovatively modified to fabricate microstructures and incorporate electrically conductive elements on soft, flexible and stretchable materials. In fact, by leverarging on such microfabrication and liquid manipulation techniques, the developed flexible microfluidic wearable technologies have enabled several biosensing applications, including in situ sweat metabolites analysis, vital signs monitoring, and gait analysis. As such, we anticipate further significant breakthroughs and potential uses of wearable microfluidics in active drug delivery patches, soft robotics sensing and control, and even implantable artificial organs in the near future.

  5. Bioanalysis in structured microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Ros, Alexandra; Hellmich, Wibke; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Anselmetti, Dario

    2006-07-01

    Microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices have attracted widespread interest in separation sciences and bioanalysis. Recent designs in microfluidic devices extend common separation concepts by exploiting new phenomena for molecular dynamics on a length scale of 10 mum and below, giving rise to novel manipulation tools and nonintuitive phenomena for microseparations. Here, we focus on three very recent developments for bioseparations based on tailored microfluidic systems: Single cell navigation, trapping and steering with subsequent on-chip lysis, protein separation and LIF detection (Section 3.1), then we report dielectrophoretic trapping and separation of large DNA fragments in structured microfluidic devices (Section 3.2). Finally, a paradoxial migration phenomenon based on thermal fluctuations, periodically arranged microchannels and a biased alternating current electric field is presented in Section 3.3.

  6. Towards printable open air microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Collord, Andrew; Cook, Adam W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Fenton, Kyle Ross; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Branson, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel microfluidic technique for aqueous media, which uses super-hydrophobic materials to create microfluidic channels that are open to the atmosphere. We have demonstrated the ability to perform traditional electrokinetic operations such as ionic separations and electrophoresis using these devices. The rate of evaporation was studied and found to increase with decreasing channel size, which places a limitation on the minimum size of channel that could be used for such a device.

  7. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  8. Microfluidic serial dilution ladder.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Siavash; Hwang, Michelle; Duncan, Philip N; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-07

    Serial dilution is a fundamental procedure that is common to a large number of laboratory protocols. Automation of serial dilution is thus a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip systems. While a handful of different microfluidic strategies for serial dilution have been reported, approaches based on continuous flow mixing inherently consume larger amounts of sample volume and chip real estate. We employ valve-driven circulatory mixing to address these issues and also introduce a novel device structure to store each stage of the dilution process. The dilution strategy is based on sequentially mixing the rungs of a ladder structure. We demonstrate a 7-stage series of 1 : 1 dilutions with R(2) equal to 0.995 in an active device area of 1 cm(2).

  9. Enhanced Microfluidic Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovangrandi, Laurent (Inventor); Ricco, Antonio J. (Inventor); Kovacs, Gregory (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for enhanced microfluidic impedance spectroscopy include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. Flow in the channel is laminar. A dielectric constant of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than a dielectric constant of the core fluid. Electrical impedance is measured in the channel between at least a first pair of electrodes. In some embodiments, enhanced optical measurements include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. An optical index of refraction of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than an optical index of refraction of the core fluid. An optical property is measured in the channel.

  10. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  11. Inertial focusing in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-07-11

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future.

  12. Parallel imaging microfluidic cytometer.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Daniel J; McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Sherr, David H; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FCM) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity, and (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in ∼6-10 min, about 30 times the speed of most current FCM systems. In 1D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times for the sample throughput of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take.

  13. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  14. Parallel electromembrane extraction in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Eibak, Lars Erik Eng; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Oiestad, Elisabeth Leere; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2014-05-30

    The repeatability and extraction recoveries of parallel electromembrane extraction (Pa-EME) was thoroughly investigated in the present project. Amitriptyline, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were isolated from eight samples of pure water, undiluted human plasma, and undiluted human urine, respectively; in total 24 samples were processed in parallel. The repeatability was found to be independent of the different sample matrices (pure water samples, human plasma, and water) processed in parallel, although the respective samples contained different matrix components. In another experiment seven of the 24 wells were perforated. Even though the perforation caused the total current level in the Pa-EME setup to increase, the intact circuits were unaffected by the collapse in seven of the circuits. In another approach, exhaustive extraction of amitriptyline, fluoxetine, and haloperidol was demonstrated from pure water samples. Amitriptyline and haloperidol were also isolated exhaustively from undiluted human plasma samples; the extraction recovery of fluoxetine from undiluted human plasma was 81%. Finally, the sample throughput was increased with the Pa-EME configuration. The extraction recoveries were investigated by processing 1, 8, 68, or 96 samples in parallel in 10min; neither the extraction recoveries nor the repeatability was affected by the total numbers of samples. Eventually, the Pa-EME was combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) to combine high-throughput sample preparation with high-throughput analytical instrumentation. The aim of the present investigation was to demonstrate the potential of electromembrane extraction as a high throughput sample preparation platform; and hopefully to increase the interest for EME in the bioanalytical field to solve exisiting and novel analytical challenges.

  15. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  16. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin; Qin, Lidong

    2016-04-20

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed.

  17. Machine vision for digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    Machine vision is widely used in an industrial environment today. It can perform various tasks, such as inspecting and controlling production processes, that may require humanlike intelligence. The importance of imaging technology for biological research or medical diagnosis is greater than ever. For example, fluorescent reporter imaging enables scientists to study the dynamics of gene networks with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such high-throughput imaging is increasingly demanding the use of machine vision for real-time analysis and control. Digital microfluidics is a relatively new technology with expectations of becoming a true lab-on-a-chip platform. Utilizing digital microfluidics, only small amounts of biological samples are required and the experimental procedures can be automatically controlled. There is a strong need for the development of a digital microfluidics system integrated with machine vision for innovative biological research today. In this paper, we show how machine vision can be applied to digital microfluidics by demonstrating two applications: machine vision-based measurement of the kinetics of biomolecular interactions and machine vision-based droplet motion control. It is expected that digital microfluidics-based machine vision system will add intelligence and automation to high-throughput biological imaging in the future.

  18. Microfluidic photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica; Chen, Chun Hao; Tsai, Frank S.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-11-01

    We report on the development of an inexpensive, portable lab-on-a-chip flow cytometer system in which microfluidics, photonics, and acoustics are integrated together to work synergistically. The system relies on fluid-filled twodimensional on-chip photonic components such as lenses, apertures, and slab waveguides to allow for illumination laser beam shaping, light scattering and fluorescence signal detection. Both scattered and fluorescent lights are detected by photodetectors after being collected and guided by the on-chip optics components (e.g. lenses and waveguides). The detected light signal is imported and amplified in real time and triggers the piezoelectric actuator so that the targeted samples are directed into desired reservoir for subsequent advanced analysis. The real-time, closed-loop control system is developed with field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) implementation. The system enables high-throughput (1- 10kHz operation), high reliability and low-powered (<1mW) fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) on a chip. The microfabricated flow cytometer can potentially be used as a portable, inexpensive point-of-care device in resource poor environments.

  19. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  20. Microfluidic Compartmentalized Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paegel, Brian M.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Directed evolution studies often make use of water-in-oil compartments, which conventionally are prepared by bulk emulsification, a crude process that generates non-uniform droplets and can damage biochemical reagents. A microfluidic emulsification circuit was devised that generates uniform water-in-oil droplets (21.9 ± 0.8 μm radius) with high throughput (107–108 droplets per hour). The circuit contains a radial array of aqueous flow nozzles that intersect a surrounding oil flow channel. This device was used to evolve RNA enzymes with RNA ligase activity, selecting enzymes that could resist inhibition by neomycin. Each molecule in the population had the opportunity to undergo 108-fold selective amplification within its respective compartment. Then the progeny RNAs were harvested and used to seed new compartments. During five rounds of this procedure, the enzymes acquired mutations that conferred resistance to neomycin and caused some enzymes to become dependent on neomycin for optimal activity. PMID:20659684

  1. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  2. Microfluidic reflow pumps.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Bryan; Tsai, Long-Fang; Anderson, Ryan R; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2015-07-01

    A new microfluidic pump, termed a reflow pump, is designed to operate with a sub-μl sample volume and transport it back and forth between two pneumatically actuated reservoirs through a flow channel typically containing one or more sensor surfaces. The ultimate motivation is to efficiently use the small sample volume in conjunction with convection to maximize analyte flux to the sensor surface(s) in order to minimize sensor response time. In this paper, we focus on the operational properties of the pumps themselves (rather than the sensor surfaces), and demonstrate both two-layer and three-layer polydimethylsiloxane reflow pumps. For the three-layer pump, we examine the effects of reservoir actuation pressure and actuation period, and demonstrate average volumetric flow rates as high as 500 μl/min. We also show that the two-layer design can pump up to 93% of the sample volume during each half period and demonstrate integration of a reflow pump with a single-chip microcantilever array to measure maximum flow rate.

  3. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  4. Designing Colloidal Molecules with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bingqing; Ricouvier, Joshua; Malloggi, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The creation of new colloidal materials involves the design of functional building blocks. Here, a microfluidic method for designing building blocks one by one, at high throughput, with a broad range of shapes is introduced. The method exploits a coupling between hydrodynamic interactions and depletion forces that controls the configurational dynamics of droplet clusters traveling in microfluidic channels. Droplet clusters can be solidified in situ with UV. By varying the flow parameters, clusters are prescribed a given size, geometry, chemical and/or magnetic heterogeneities enabling local bonding. Compact structures (chains, triangles, diamonds, tetrahedrons,...) and noncompact structures, such as crosses and T, difficult to obtain with current techniques are produced. Size dispersions are small (2%) and throughputs are high (30 000 h−1). The work opens a new pathway, based on microfluidics, for designing colloidal building blocks with a potential to enable the creation of new materials. PMID:27840804

  5. Microfluidic tools toward industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline F; Pessoa, Amanda C S N; Bastos, Reinaldo G; de la Torre, Lucimara G

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidics is a technology that operates with small amounts of fluids and makes possible the investigation of cells, enzymes, and biomolecules and encapsulation of biocatalysts in a greater variety of conditions than permitted using conventional methods. This review discusses technological possibilities that can be applied in the field of industrial biotechnology, presenting the principal definitions and fundamental aspects of microfluidic parameters to better understand advanced approaches. Specifically, concentration gradient generators, droplet-based microfluidics, and microbioreactors are explored as useful tools that can contribute to industrial biotechnology. These tools present potential applications, inclusive as commercial platforms to optimizing in bioprocesses development as screening cells, encapsulating biocatalysts, and determining critical kinetic parameters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1372-1389, 2016.

  6. Rapid prototyping of glass microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, Frederik; Plewa, Klaus; Bauer, Werner; Hanemann, Thomas; Waldbaur, Ansgar; Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2015-03-01

    In academia the rapid and flexible creation of microfluidic chips is of great importance for microfluidic research. Besides polymers glass is a very important material especially when high chemical and temperature resistance are required. However, glass structuring is a very hazardous process which is not accessible to most members of the microfluidic community. We therefore sought a new method for the rapid and simple creation of transparent microfluidic glass chips by structuring and sintering amorphous silica suspensions. The whole process from a digital mask layout to a microstructured glass sheet can be done within two days. In this paper we show the applicability of this process to fabricate capillary driven microfluidic systems.

  7. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  8. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  9. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  10. Design and fabrication of polymer-based microfluidic platforms for BioMEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Siyi

    The goal of this study is to design and fabricate polymer microfluidic devices for BioMEMS applications. The emphasis is on the design of microfluidic functions and the development of a new packaging technique. A microfluidic platform was designed on a compact disk (CD) for medical diagnostics, which includes functions such as pumping, valving, sample/reagent loading, mixing, metering, and separation. The fluid propulsion was based on the centrifugal force. A passive capillary valve, which is based on a pressure barrier that develops when the cross-section of the capillary expands abruptly, was used to control the fluid flow. Micromixing was achieved by impinging mixing and bend-induced vortices. Integration of these microfluidic functions was applied in a two-point calibration system for medical diagnostics and a cascade micromixer for protein reconstitution. A specific application was for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). It has been demonstrated successfully to realize the necessary microfluidic functions for the ELISA process on a CD. The preliminary analysis of rat IgG from hybridoma culture showed that the microchip-based ELISA has the same detection range as the conventional method on the 96-well microtiter plate, and has advantages such as less reagent consumption and shorter assay time over the conventional one. A new resin-gas injection technique was developed for bonding and surface modification of polymer microfluidic devices. This method can easily bond biochips with complex flow patterns. By adding surface modification agents, the interfacial free energy of the substrate with water can be controlled. Local modification of the channel surface can also be achieved through sequential resin-gas injection in conjunction with the masking technique. For application, this technique was used to form a layer of dry monolithic stationary hydrogel on the walls of a microchannel, serving as a sieving material for electrophoresis separation of DNA

  11. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  12. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  13. Bioinspired multicompartmental microfibers from microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yao; Zheng, Fuyin; Lu, Jie; Shang, Luoran; Xie, Zhuoying; Zhao, Yuanjin; Chen, Yongping; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-08-13

    Bioinspired multicompartmental microfibers are generated by novel capillary microfluidics. The resultant microfibers possess multicompartment body-and-shell compositions with specifically designed geometries. Potential use of these microfibers for tissue-engineering applications is demonstrated by creating multifunctional fibers with a spatially controlled encapsulation of cells.

  14. Microfluidic-integrated DNA nanobiosensors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M I Haque; Hassan, Shabir; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    Over the last few decades, an increased demand has emerged for integrating biosensors with microfluidic- and nanofluidic-based lab-on-chip (LOC) devices for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, in the medical industry and environmental monitoring of pathogenic threat agents. Such a merger of microfluidics with biosensing technologies allows for the precise control of volumes, as low as one nanolitre and the integration of various types of bioassays on a single miniaturized platform. This integration offers several favorable advantages, such as low reagent consumption, automation of sample preparation, reduction in processing time, low cost analysis, minimal handling of hazardous materials, high detection accuracy, portability and disposability. This review provides a synopsis of the most recent developments in the microfluidic-integrated biosensing field by delineating the fundamental theory of microfluidics, fabrication techniques and a detailed account of the various transduction methods that are employed. Lastly, the review discusses state-of-the-art DNA biosensors with a focus on optical DNA biosensors.

  15. Osteocyte culture in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chao; Fan, Beiyuan; Chen, Deyong; Wei, Yuanchen; Huo, Bo; You, Lidan; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device (poly-dimethylsiloxane micro channels bonded with glass slides) enabling culture of MLO-Y4 osteocyte like cells. In this study, on-chip collagen coating, cell seeding and culture, as well as staining were demonstrated in a tubing-free manner where gravity was used as the driving force for liquid transportation. MLO-Y4 cells were cultured in microfluidic channels with and without collagen coating where cellular images in a time sequence were taken and analyzed, confirming the positive effect of collagen coating on phenotype maintaining of MLO-Y4 cells. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen based proliferation assay was used to study cellular proliferation, revealing a higher proliferation rate of MLO-Y4 cells seeded in microfluidic channels without collagen coating compared to the substrates coated with collagen. Furthermore, the effects of channel dimensions (variations in width and height) on the viability of MLO-Y4 cells were explored based on the Calcein-AM and propidium iodide based live/dead assay and the Hoechst 33258 based apoptosis assay, locating the correlation between the decrease in channel width or height and the decrease in cell viability. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new cell culture model enabling studies of osteocytes. PMID:25713691

  16. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  17. Active, Universal Particle Micromanipulators: CPUs for Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezic, Igor; Bottausci, Frederic

    2007-11-01

    Current designs for Lab-on-a-Chip applications consist of a variety of separate microfluidic chambers and channels for functions such as concentration, separation, reaction and mixing of bioparticles in liquids. Here we advance an alternative concept, named μfCPU, the Microfluidic Central Processing Unit, where the key microfluidic operations are performed within a single enclosure, using software-based inputs rather than physical hardware changes, thus emulating the role of the Central Processing Unit in computers and cells in living organisms. We present an experimental embodiment of such a device and describe a variety of microfluidic manipulation tasks achieved in it by the use of a suite of electromotive and fluidic forces in a time-dependent way to produce on-demand functionality. We also discuss a new microfluidic devices architecture that utilizes μfCPU as the basic processing unit and uses centralized pumping instead of integrated microfluidic pumps.

  18. Microfluidic Approaches for Protein Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes two microfluidic-based protein crystallization methods, protein crystallization behavior in the microfluidic devices, and their applications for X-ray crystal structure analysis. Microfluidic devices provide many advantages for protein crystallography; they require small sample volumes, provide high-throughput screening, and allow control of the protein crystallization. A droplet-based protein crystallization method is a useful technique for high-throughput screening and the formation of a single crystal without any complicated device fabrication process. Well-based microfluidic platforms also enable effective protein crystallization. This review also summarizes the protein crystal growth behavior in microfluidic devices as, is known from viewpoints of theoretical and experimental approaches. Finally, we introduce applications of microfluidic devices for on-chip crystal structure analysis.

  19. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    PubMed

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  20. [Recent development of microfluidic diagnostic technologies].

    PubMed

    Li, Haifang; Zhang, Qianyun; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-04-01

    Microfluidic devices exhibit a great promising development in clinical diagnosis and disease screening due to their advantages of precise controlling of fluid flow, requirement of miniamount sample, rapid reaction speed and convenient integration. In this paper, the improvements of microfluidic diagnostic technologies in recent years are reviewed. The applications and developments of on-chip disease marker detection, microfluidic cell selection and cell drug metabolism, and diagnostic micro-devices are discussed.

  1. A microfluidic D-subminiature connector.

    PubMed

    Scott, Adina; Au, Anthony K; Vinckenbosch, Elise; Folch, Albert

    2013-06-07

    Standardized, affordable, user-friendly world-to-chip interfaces represent one of the major barriers to the adoption of microfluidics. We present a connector system for plug-and-play interfacing of microfluidic devices to multiple input and output lines. The male connectors are based on existing standardized housings from electronics that are inexpensive and widely available. The female connectors are fabricated using familiar replica molding techniques that can easily be adopted by microfluidic developers.

  2. Advances in microfluidics for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jana C; Emory, Jason M; Henry, Charles S

    2012-01-07

    During the past few years, a growing number of groups have recognized the utility of microfluidic devices for environmental analysis. Microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages and in many respects are ideally suited to environmental analyses. Challenges faced in environmental monitoring, including the ability to handle complex and highly variable sample matrices, lead to continued growth and research. Additionally, the need to operate for days to months in the field requires further development of robust, integrated microfluidic systems. This review examines recently published literature on the applications of microfluidic systems for environmental analysis and provides insight in the future direction of the field.

  3. An integrated sample-in-answer-out microfluidic chip for rapid human identification by STR analysis.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Delphine; Root, Brian E; Hickey, Jeffrey A; Scott, Orion N; Tsuei, Anchi; Li, Jingyi; Saul, David J; Chassagne, Luc; Landers, James P; de Mazancourt, Philippe

    2014-11-21

    A fully integrated microfluidic chip for human identification by short tandem repeat (STR) analysis that includes a unique enzymatic liquid preparation of the DNA, microliter non-contact PCR, and a polymer that allows a high-resolution separation within a compact microchip footprint has been developed. A heat-activated enzyme that digests biological materials is employed to generate the target yield of DNA from a buccal swab or FTA paper. The microfluidic architecture meters an aliquot of the liberated DNA and mixes it with the PCR reagents prior to non-contact IR-mediated PCR amplification. The products of PCR amplification are mixed with a sizing standard (ladder) and the 18-plex STR amplicons are separated in an effective length (Leff) of just 7 cm. The development, optimization and integration of each of these processes within the microfluidic chip are described. The device is able to generate genetic profiles in approximately 2 hours that match the profiles from the conventional processes performed using separate conventional instruments. Analysis is performed on a single plastic microchip with a size similar to that of a 96-well plate and only a few mm thick with no pretreatment of any of the functional domains. This is significant advancement in terms of ease of fabrication over glass microdevices or polymeric systems assembled from multiple components. Consequently, this fully integrated sample-in-answer-out microchip is an important step toward generation of a rapid micro-total analysis system for point-of-collection human identification based on genetic analysis.

  4. Microfluidics-integrated time-lapse imaging for analysis of cellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Dirk R; Underhill, Gregory H; Resnikoff, Joshua; Mendelson, Avital; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Shah, Jagesh V

    2010-06-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms regulating cellular responses has recently been augmented by innovations enabling the observation of phenotypes at high spatio-temporal resolution. Technologies such as microfluidics have sought to expand the throughput of these methods, although assimilation with advanced imaging strategies has been limited. Here, we describe the pairing of high resolution time-lapse imaging with microfluidic multiplexing for the analysis of cellular dynamics, utilizing a design selected for facile fabrication and operation, and integration with microscopy instrumentation. This modular, medium-throughput platform enables the long-term imaging of living cells at high numerical aperture (via oil immersion) by using a conserved 96-well, approximately 6 x 5 mm(2) imaging area with a variable input/output channel design chosen for the number of cell types and microenvironments under investigation. In the validation of this system, we examined fundamental features of cell cycle progression, including mitotic kinetics and spindle orientation dynamics, through the high-resolution parallel analysis of model cell lines subjected to anti-mitotic agents. We additionally explored the self-renewal kinetics of mouse embryonic stem cells, and demonstrate the ability to dynamically assess and manipulate stem cell proliferation, detect rare cell events, and measure extended time-scale correlations. We achieved an experimental throughput of >900 cells/experiment, each observed at >40x magnification for up to 120 h. Overall, these studies illustrate the capacity to probe cellular functions and yield dynamic information in time and space through the integration of a simple, modular, microfluidics-based imaging platform.

  5. Implementation of microfluidic sandwich ELISA for superior detection of plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thaitrong, Numrin; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and economical screening of plant pathogens is a high-priority need in the seed industry. Crop quality control and disease surveillance demand early and accurate detection in addition to robustness, scalability, and cost efficiency typically required for selective breeding and certification programs. Compared to conventional bench-top detection techniques routinely employed, a microfluidic-based approach offers unique benefits to address these needs simultaneously. To our knowledge, this work reports the first attempt to perform microfluidic sandwich ELISA for Acidovorax citrulli (Ac), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV) screening. The immunoassay occurs on the surface of a reaction chamber represented by a microfluidic channel. The capillary force within the microchannel draws a reagent into the reaction chamber as well as facilitates assay incubation. Because the underlying pad automatically absorbs excess fluid, the only operation required is sequential loading of buffers/reagents. Buffer selection, antibody concentrations, and sample loading scheme were optimized for each pathogen. Assay optimization reveals that the 20-folds lower sample volume demanded by the microchannel structure outweighs the 2- to 4-folds higher antibody concentrations required, resulting in overall 5-10 folds of reagent savings. In addition to cutting the assay time by more than 50%, the new platform offers 65% cost savings from less reagent consumption and labor cost. Our study also shows 12.5-, 2-, and 4-fold improvement in assay sensitivity for Ac, WSMoV, and MYSV, respectively. Practical feasibility is demonstrated using 19 real plant samples. Given a standard 96-well plate format, the developed assay is compatible with commercial fluorescent plate readers and readily amendable to robotic liquid handling systems for completely hand-free assay automation.

  6. Microfluidic studies of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Günther, Axel; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-07-28

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration, storage and recycling will greatly benefit from comprehensive studies of physical and chemical gas-liquid processes involving CO2. Over the past five years, microfluidics emerged as a valuable tool in CO2-related research, due to superior mass and heat transfer, reduced axial dispersion, well-defined gas-liquid interfacial areas and the ability to vary reagent concentrations in a high-throughput manner. This Minireview highlights recent progress in microfluidic studies of CO2-related processes, including dissolution of CO2 in physical solvents, CO2 reactions, the utilization of CO2 in materials science, and the use of supercritical CO2 as a "green" solvent.

  7. Self-assembly via microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Sánchez, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic building blocks has attracted extensive interest in myriad fields in recent years, due to their great potential in the nanoscale design of functional hybrid materials. Microfluidic techniques provide an intriguing method to control kinetic aspects of the self-assembly of molecular amphiphiles by the facile adjustment of the hydrodynamics of the fluids. Up to now, there have been several reports about one-step direct self-assembly of different building blocks with versatile and multi-shape products without templates, which demonstrated the advantages of microfluidics. These assemblies with different morphologies have great applications in various areas such as cancer therapy, micromotor fabrication, and controlled drug delivery.

  8. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxide during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.

  9. Superhydrophobicity for antifouling microfluidic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, N J; Roach, P

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of surfaces is often problematic in microfluidic devices, particularly when using protein or -enzymatic solutions. Various coating methods have been investigated to reduce the tendency for protein molecules to adsorb, mostly relying on hydrophobic surface chemistry or the antifouling ability of -polyethylene glycol. Here we present the potential use of superhydrophobic surfaces to not only reduce the amount of surface contamination but also to induce self-cleaning under flow conditions. The methodology is presented in order to prepare superhydrophobic surface coatings having micro- and nanoscale feature dimensions, as well as a step-by-step guide to quantify adsorbed protein down to nanogram levels. The fabrication of these surfaces as coatings via silica sol-gel and copper nano-hair growth is presented, which can be applied within microfluidic devices manufactured from various materials.

  10. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxidemore » during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.« less

  11. Microfluidic hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo You; Zhou, Li Hong; Zhang, Qian Cheng; Chen, Yong Mei; Sun, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-03-01

    With advanced properties similar to the native extracellular matrix, hydrogels have found widespread applications in tissue engineering. Hydrogel-based cellular constructs have been successfully developed to engineer different tissues such as skin, cartilage and bladder. Whilst significant advances have been made, it is still challenging to fabricate large and complex functional tissues due mainly to the limited diffusion capability of hydrogels. The integration of microfluidic networks and hydrogels can greatly enhance mass transport in hydrogels and spatiotemporally control the chemical microenvironment of cells, mimicking the function of native microvessels. In this review, we present and discuss recent advances in the fabrication of microfluidic hydrogels from the viewpoint of tissue engineering. Further development of new hydrogels and microengineering technologies will have a great impact on tissue engineering.

  12. Microfluidic preparation of polymer nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Israfil; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2014-12-01

    In this work, solid polymer nanospheres with their surface tailored for drug adhesion were prepared using a V-shaped microfluidic junction. The biocompatible polymer solutions were infused using two channels of the microfluidic junction which was also simultaneously fed with a volatile liquid, perfluorohexane using the other channel. The mechanism by which the nanospheres are generated is explained using high speed camera imaging. The polymer concentration (5-50 wt%) and flow rates of the feeds (50-300 µl min-1) were important parameters in controlling the nanosphere diameter. The diameter of the polymer nanospheres was found to be in the range of 80-920 nm with a polydispersity index of 11-19 %. The interior structure and surfaces of the nanospheres prepared were studied using advanced microscopy and showed the presence of fine pores and cracks on surface which can be used as drug entrapment locations.

  13. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics.

  14. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:26392832

  15. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  16. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  17. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  18. Continuous Flow Microfluidic Bioparticle Concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Smith, Kyle C.; Dlamini, Mcolisi; Pletcher, Kendall; Yang, Jennifer; Karabacak, Murat; Haber, Daniel A.; Kapur, Ravi; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Innovative microfluidic technology has enabled massively parallelized and extremely efficient biological and clinical assays. Many biological applications developed and executed with traditional bulk processing techniques have been translated and streamlined through microfluidic processing with the notable exception of sample volume reduction or centrifugation, one of the most widely utilized processes in the biological sciences. We utilize the high-speed phenomenon known as inertial focusing combined with hydraulic resistance controlled multiplexed micro-siphoning allowing for the continuous concentration of suspended cells into pre-determined volumes up to more than 400 times smaller than the input with a yield routinely above 95% at a throughput of 240 ml/hour. Highlighted applications are presented for how the technology can be successfully used for live animal imaging studies, in a system to increase the efficient use of small clinical samples, and finally, as a means of macro-to-micro interfacing allowing large samples to be directly coupled to a variety of powerful microfluidic technologies. PMID:26061253

  19. Continuous Flow Microfluidic Bioparticle Concentrator.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Smith, Kyle C; Dlamini, Mcolisi; Pletcher, Kendall; Yang, Jennifer; Karabacak, Murat; Haber, Daniel A; Kapur, Ravi; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-06-10

    Innovative microfluidic technology has enabled massively parallelized and extremely efficient biological and clinical assays. Many biological applications developed and executed with traditional bulk processing techniques have been translated and streamlined through microfluidic processing with the notable exception of sample volume reduction or centrifugation, one of the most widely utilized processes in the biological sciences. We utilize the high-speed phenomenon known as inertial focusing combined with hydraulic resistance controlled multiplexed micro-siphoning allowing for the continuous concentration of suspended cells into pre-determined volumes up to more than 400 times smaller than the input with a yield routinely above 95% at a throughput of 240 ml/hour. Highlighted applications are presented for how the technology can be successfully used for live animal imaging studies, in a system to increase the efficient use of small clinical samples, and finally, as a means of macro-to-micro interfacing allowing large samples to be directly coupled to a variety of powerful microfluidic technologies.

  20. Continuous Flow Microfluidic Bioparticle Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Joseph M.; Smith, Kyle C.; Dlamini, Mcolisi; Pletcher, Kendall; Yang, Jennifer; Karabacak, Murat; Haber, Daniel A.; Kapur, Ravi; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Innovative microfluidic technology has enabled massively parallelized and extremely efficient biological and clinical assays. Many biological applications developed and executed with traditional bulk processing techniques have been translated and streamlined through microfluidic processing with the notable exception of sample volume reduction or centrifugation, one of the most widely utilized processes in the biological sciences. We utilize the high-speed phenomenon known as inertial focusing combined with hydraulic resistance controlled multiplexed micro-siphoning allowing for the continuous concentration of suspended cells into pre-determined volumes up to more than 400 times smaller than the input with a yield routinely above 95% at a throughput of 240 ml/hour. Highlighted applications are presented for how the technology can be successfully used for live animal imaging studies, in a system to increase the efficient use of small clinical samples, and finally, as a means of macro-to-micro interfacing allowing large samples to be directly coupled to a variety of powerful microfluidic technologies.

  1. Materials for microfluidic chip fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2013-11-19

    Through manipulating fluids using microfabricated channel and chamber structures, microfluidics is a powerful tool to realize high sensitive, high speed, high throughput, and low cost analysis. In addition, the method can establish a well-controlled microenivroment for manipulating fluids and particles. It also has rapid growing implementations in both sophisticated chemical/biological analysis and low-cost point-of-care assays. Some unique phenomena emerge at the micrometer scale. For example, reactions are completed in a shorter amount of time as the travel distances of mass and heat are relatively small; the flows are usually laminar; and the capillary effect becomes dominant owing to large surface-to-volume ratios. In the meantime, the surface properties of the device material are greatly amplified, which can lead to either unique functions or problems that we would not encounter at the macroscale. Also, each material inherently corresponds with specific microfabrication strategies and certain native properties of the device. Therefore, the material for making the device plays a dominating role in microfluidic technologies. In this Account, we address the evolution of materials used for fabricating microfluidic chips, and discuss the application-oriented pros and cons of different materials. This Account generally follows the order of the materials introduced to microfluidics. Glass and silicon, the first generation microfluidic device materials, are perfect for capillary electrophoresis and solvent-involved applications but expensive for microfabriaction. Elastomers enable low-cost rapid prototyping and high density integration of valves on chip, allowing complicated and parallel fluid manipulation and in-channel cell culture. Plastics, as competitive alternatives to elastomers, are also rapid and inexpensive to microfabricate. Their broad variety provides flexible choices for different needs. For example, some thermosets support in-situ fabrication of

  2. Cytotoxicity studies of CdSeS/ZnS quantum dots on cell culture in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haczyk, Maja; Grabowska-Jadach, Ilona; Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Malinowska, ElŻbieta; Brzózka, Zbigniew

    2014-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) semi-conducting nanocrystals have found numerous applications in many fields of science. Nowadays one can observe a growing perspective to use them in biomedicine. Thanks to QDs unique fluorescence properties (narrow emission spectra, high extinction coefficients, high quantum yields, photostability) and possibility to form conjugates with bioactive molecules, they can become a chance for better cancer cells imaging in cancer therapy. Therefore there is a need for better understanding of biological interactions between QDs and cancer cells in vitro. For this purpose we performed cytotoxicity tests of CdSeS/ZnS quantum dots stabilized with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) ligand, on human lung cancer cell line (A549) in vitro in macro- (96-well plate) and micro-scale (a specially designed and fabricated microfluidic device). The results obtained demonstrated a little extent of cytotoxic effect of selected solutions of QDs to A549 cells.

  3. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  4. Opportunities for microfluidic technologies in synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Shelly; Rouilly, Vincent; Niu, Xize; Chappell, James; Kitney, Richard I.; Edel, Joshua B.; Freemont, Paul S.; deMello, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce microfluidics technologies as a key foundational technology for synthetic biology experimentation. Recent advances in the field of microfluidics are reviewed and the potential of such a technological platform to support the rapid development of synthetic biology solutions is discussed. PMID:19474079

  5. Microfluidic tools for cell biological research

    PubMed Central

    Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Le Berre, Maël; Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microfluidic technology is creating powerful tools for cell biologists to control the complete cellular microenvironment, leading to new questions and new discoveries. We review here the basic concepts and methodologies in designing microfluidic devices, and their diverse cell biological applications. PMID:21152269

  6. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  7. Microfluidic opportunities in the field of nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Kiehne, Justin; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition has always been closely related to human health, which is a constant motivational force driving research in a variety of disciplines. Over the years, the rapidly emerging field of microfluidics has been pushing forward the healthcare industry with the development of microfluidic-based, point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices. Though a great deal of work has been done in developing microfluidic platforms for disease diagnoses, potential microfluidic applications in the field of nutrition remain largely unexplored. In this Focus article, we would like to investigate the potential chances for microfluidics in the field of nutrition. We will first highlight some of the recent advances in microfluidic blood analysis systems that have the capacity to detect biomarkers of nutrition. Then we will examine existing examples of microfluidic devices for the detection of specific biomarkers of nutrition or nutrient content in food. Finally, we will discuss the challenges in this field and provide some insight into the future of applied microfluidics in nutrition. PMID:24056522

  8. Smartphone quantifies Salmonella from paper microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Park, Tu San; Li, Wenyue; McCracken, Katherine E; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-12-21

    Smartphone-based optical detection is a potentially easy-to-use, handheld, true point-of-care diagnostic tool for the early and rapid detection of pathogens. Paper microfluidics is a low-cost, field-deployable, and easy-to-use alternative to conventional microfluidic devices. Most paper-based microfluidic assays typically utilize dyes or enzyme-substrate binding, while bacterial detection on paper microfluidics is rare. We demonstrate a novel application of smartphone-based detection of Salmonella on paper microfluidics. Each paper microfluidic channel was pre-loaded with anti-Salmonella Typhimurium and anti-Escherichia coli conjugated submicroparticles. Dipping the paper microfluidic device into the Salmonella solutions led to the antibody-conjugated particles that were still confined within the paper fibers to immunoagglutinate. The extent of immunoagglutination was quantified by evaluating Mie scattering from the digital images taken at an optimized angle and distance with a smartphone. A smartphone application was designed and programmed to allow the user to position the smartphone at an optimized angle and distance from the paper microfluidic device, and a simple image processing algorithm was implemented to calculate and display the bacterial concentration on the smartphone. The detection limit was single-cell-level and the total assay time was less than one minute.

  9. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called tissue microfluidics because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets. The proposed principles represent a paradigm shift in microfluidic technology in three important ways: Microfluidic devices are to be directly integrated with, onto, or around tissue samples, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample extraction followed by sample insertion in microfluidic devices. Architectural and operational principles of microfluidic devices are to be subordinated to suit specific tissue structure and needs, in contrast to the conventional method of building devices according to fluidic function alone and without regard to tissue structure. Sample acquisition from tissue is to be performed on-chip and is to be integrated with the diagnostic measurement within the same device, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample prep and

  10. Microfluidics: a new cosset for neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyi; Ren, Li; Li, Li; Liu, Wenming; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Wenhao; Tong, Denwen; Chen, Shulin

    2009-03-07

    Recently, microfluidic systems have shown great potential in the study of molecular and cellular biology. With its excellent properties, such as miniaturization, integration and automation, to name just a few, microfluidics creates new opportunities for the spatial and temporal control of cell growth and environmental stimuli in vitro. In the field of neuroscience, microfluidic devices offer precise control of the microenvironment surrounding individual cells, and the delivery of biochemical or physical cues to neural networks or single neurons. The intent of this review is to outline recent advances in microfluidic-based applications in neurobiology, with emphasis on neuron culture, neuron manipulation, neural stem cell differentiation, neuropharmacology, neuroelectrophysiology, and neuron biosensors. It also aims to stimulate development of microfluidic-based applications in neurobiology by involving scientists from various disciplines, especially neurobiology and microtechnology.

  11. Microfluidics for food, agriculture and biosystems industries.

    PubMed

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Wu, Dan; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lin, Francis

    2011-05-07

    Microfluidics, a rapidly emerging enabling technology has the potential to revolutionize food, agriculture and biosystems industries. Examples of potential applications of microfluidics in food industry include nano-particle encapsulation of fish oil, monitoring pathogens and toxins in food and water supplies, micro-nano-filtration for improving food quality, detection of antibiotics in dairy food products, and generation of novel food structures. In addition, microfluidics enables applications in agriculture and animal sciences such as nutrients monitoring and plant cells sorting for improving crop quality and production, effective delivery of biopesticides, simplified in vitro fertilization for animal breeding, animal health monitoring, vaccination and therapeutics. Lastly, microfluidics provides new approaches for bioenergy research. This paper synthesizes information of selected microfluidics-based applications for food, agriculture and biosystems industries.

  12. New materials for microfluidics in biology.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Chen, Yin; Wu, Hongkai

    2014-02-01

    With its continuous progress, microfluidics has become a key enabling technology in biological research. During the past few years, the major growth of microfluidics shifted to the introduction of new materials in making microfluidic chips, primarily driven by the demand of versatile strategies to interface microfluidics with biological cell studies. Although polydimethylsiloxane is still used as primary frame material, hydrogels have been increasingly employed in cell-culture related applications. Moreover, plastics and paper are attracting more attention in commercial device fabrication. Aiming to reflect this trend, current review focuses on the progress of microfluidic chip materials over the time span of January 2011 through June 2013, and provides critical discussion of the resulting major new tools in biological research.

  13. Recent developments in microfluidics for cell studies.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Bin; Ren, Kangning; Shu, Yiwei; Chen, Yin; Shen, Bo; Wu, Hongkai

    2014-08-20

    As a technique for precisely manipulating fluid at the micrometer scale, the field of microfluidics has experienced an explosive growth over the past two decades, particularly owing to the advances in device design and fabrication. With the inherent advantages associated with its scale of operation, and its flexibility in being incorporated with other microscale techniques for manipulation and detection, microfluidics has become a major enabling technology, which has introduced new paradigms in various fields involving biological cells. A microfluidic device is able to realize functions that are not easily imaginable in conventional biological analysis, such as highly parallel, sophisticated high-throughput analysis, single-cell analysis in a well-defined manner, and tissue engineering with the capability of manipulation at the single-cell level. Major advancements in microfluidic device fabrication and the growing trend of implementing microfluidics in cell studies are presented, with a focus on biological research and clinical diagnostics.

  14. Electrorheological fluid and its applications in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limu; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics is a low-cost technique for fast-diagnosis and microsynthesis. Within a decade it might become the foundation of point-of-care and lab-on-a-chip applications. With microfluidic chips, high-throughput sample screening and information processing are made possible. The picoliter droplet runs in microfluidic chips are ideal miniaturized vessels for microdetection and microsynthesis. Meanwhile, individual manipulation of microdroplets remains a challenge: the shortcomings in automatic, reliable, and scalable methods for logic control prevent further integration of microfluidic applications. The giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is a kind of "smart" colloid, has tunable viscosity under the influence of external electric field. Therefore, GERF is introduced as the active controlling medium, with real-time response in on-chip fluid control. This review article introduces the working principles and fabrication methods of different types of electrorheological fluid, and extensively describes the strategies of GERF-assisted microfluidic controlling schemes.

  15. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, S H; van den Berg, A; Odijk, M

    2015-09-07

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination offers several new opportunities in comparison to macro-scale desalination, such as providing a platform to increase fundamental knowledge of ion transport on the nano- and microfluidic scale and new microfluidic sample preparation methods. This approach has also lead to the development of new desalination techniques, based on micro/nanofluidic ion-transport phenomena, which are potential candidates for up-scaling to (portable) drinking water devices. This review assesses microfluidic desalination techniques on their applications and is meant to contribute to further implementation of microfluidic desalination techniques in the lab-on-chip community.

  16. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menying; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized.

  17. Surface-micromachined microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat; Montague, Stephen; Smith, James H.; Paul, Phillip H.; Krygowski, Thomas W.; Allen, James J.; Nichols, Christopher A.; Jakubczak, II, Jerome F.

    2003-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  18. Microfluidics and the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The field of microfluidics, often also referred to as "Lab-on-a-Chip" has made significant progress in the last 15 years and is an essential tool in the development of new products and protocols in the life sciences. This article provides a broad overview on the developments on the academic as well as the commercial side. Fabrication technologies for polymer-based devices are presented and a strategy for the development of complex integrated devices is discussed, together with an example on the use of these devices in pathogen detection.

  19. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-07

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup.

  20. Microfluidic Applications of Soft Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Krulevitch, P; Hamilton, J

    2001-04-10

    The soft lithography fabrication technique was applied to three microfluidic devices. The method was used to create an original micropump design and retrofit to existing designs for a DNA manipulation device and a counter biological warfare sample preparation device. Each device presented unique and original challenges to the soft lithography application. AI1 design constraints of the retrofit devices were satisfied using PDMS devices created through variation of soft lithography methods. The micropump utilized the versatility of PDMS, creating design options not available with other materials. In all cases, the rapid processing of soft lithography reduced the fabrication time, creating faster turnaround for design modifications.

  1. Magneto-Hydrodynamics Based Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    In microfluidic devices, it is necessary to propel samples and reagents from one part of the device to another, stir fluids, and detect the presence of chemical and biological targets. Given the small size of these devices, the above tasks are far from trivial. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) offers an elegant means to control fluid flow in microdevices without a need for mechanical components. In this paper, we review the theory of MHD for low conductivity fluids and describe various applications of MHD such as fluid pumping, flow control in fluidic networks, fluid stirring and mixing, circular liquid chromatography, thermal reactors, and microcoolers. PMID:20046890

  2. Microfluidics and cancer: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-08-01

    More than two decades ago, microfluidics began to show its impact in biological research. Since then, the field of microfluidics has evolving rapidly. Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Microfluidics holds great promise in cancer diagnosis and also serves as an emerging tool for understanding cancer biology. Microfluidics can be valuable for cancer investigation due to its high sensitivity, high throughput, less material-consumption, low cost, and enhanced spatio-temporal control. The physical laws on microscale offer an advantage enabling the control of physics, biology, chemistry and physiology at cellular level. Furthermore, microfluidic based platforms are portable and can be easily designed for point-of-care diagnostics. Developing and applying the state of the art microfluidic technologies to address the unmet challenges in cancer can expand the horizons of not only fundamental biology but also the management of disease and patient care. Despite the various microfluidic technologies available in the field, few have been tested clinically, which can be attributed to the various challenges existing in bridging the gap between the emerging technology and real world applications. We present a review of role of microfluidics in cancer research, including the history, recent advances and future directions to explore where the field stand currently in addressing complex clinical challenges and future of it. This review identifies four critical areas in cancer research, in which microfluidics can change the current paradigm. These include cancer cell isolation, molecular diagnostics, tumor biology and high-throughput screening for therapeutics. In addition, some of our lab's current research is presented in the corresponding sections.

  3. Inertial microfluidics for flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-08-01

    Inertial components of the Navier-Stokes equations are usually not considered in microfluidic flows but have recently been shown to be of great practical use for continuous manipulation of particles and cells. After introducing the physical basis of the counter-intuitive self focusing of particles in a single inlet flow, I will discuss our current best focusing systems, and I will present results on using inertial focusing to create an extreme throughput flow cytometer for blood analysis. This system is an imaging cytometer implementation that can image 1 million focused blood cells per second, with the capability to increase to 20 million cells per second with appropriate wide-field of view imaging systems. The microfluidic device consists of 256 parallel high-aspect ratio microchannels in each of which two streams of focused cells assemble. These cells also form regular trains in the direction of flow such that cell coincidence is a rare occurrence, far below Poisson statistics suggest. Controlled inertially focused streams of particles are poised to provide next-generation filter-less filters and simplified flow cytometry instruments which ultimately may aid in water treatment environmental cleanup and cost-effective medical diagnostics.

  4. Microfluidic approaches to malaria detection.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Peter; Satayavivad, Jutamaad; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2004-02-01

    Microfluidic systems are under development to address a variety of medical problems. Key advantages of micrototal analysis systems based on microfluidic technology are the promise of small size and the integration of sample handling and measurement functions within a single, automated device having low mass-production costs. Here, we review the spectrum of methods currently used to detect malaria, consider their advantages and disadvantages, and discuss their adaptability towards integration into small, automated micro total analysis systems. Molecular amplification methods emerge as leading candidates for chip-based systems because they offer extremely high sensitivity, the ability to recognize malaria species and strain, and they will be adaptable to the detection of new genotypic signatures that will emerge from current genomic-based research of the disease. Current approaches to the development of chip-based molecular amplification are considered with special emphasis on flow-through PCR, and we present for the first time the method of malaria specimen preparation by dielectrophoretic field-flow-fractionation. Although many challenges must be addressed to realize a micrototal analysis system for malaria diagnosis, it is concluded that the potential benefits of the approach are well worth pursuing.

  5. Phonons in active microfluidic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    One-dimensional crystals of driven particles confined in quasi two-dimensional microfluidic channels have been shown to exhibit propagating sound waves in the form of 'phonons', including both transverse and longitudinal normal modes. Here, we focus on one-dimensional crystals of motile particles in uniform external flows. We study the propagation of phonons in the context of an idealized model that accounts for hydrodynamic interactions among the motile particles. We obtain a closed-form analytical expression for the dispersion relation of the phonons. In the moving frame of reference of the crystals, the traveling directions of the phonons depend on the intensity of the external flow, and are exactly opposite for the transverse and longitudinal modes. We further investigate the stability of the phonons and show that the longitudinal mode is linearly stable, whereas the transverse mode is subject to an instability arising from the activity and orientation dynamics of the motile particles. These findings are important for understanding the propagation of disturbances and instabilities in confined motile particles, and could generate practical insights into the transport of motile cells in microfluidic devices.

  6. Surface-Micromachined Microfluidic Devices

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat; Montague, Stephen; Smith, James H.; Paul, Phillip H.; Krygowski, Thomas W.; Allen, James J.; Nichols, Christopher A.; Jakubczak, II, Jerome F.

    2004-09-28

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators. Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  7. All-aqueous multiphase microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Sauret, Alban; Cheung Shum, Ho

    2013-01-01

    Immiscible aqueous phases, formed by dissolving incompatible solutes in water, have been used in green chemical synthesis, molecular extraction and mimicking of cellular cytoplasm. Recently, a microfluidic approach has been introduced to generate all-aqueous emulsions and jets based on these immiscible aqueous phases; due to their biocompatibility, these all-aqueous structures have shown great promises as templates for fabricating biomaterials. The physico-chemical nature of interfaces between two immiscible aqueous phases leads to unique interfacial properties, such as an ultra-low interfacial tension. Strategies to manipulate components and direct their assembly at these interfaces needs to be explored. In this paper, we review progress on the topic over the past few years, with a focus on the fabrication and stabilization of all-aqueous structures in a multiphase microfluidic platform. We also discuss future efforts needed from the perspectives of fluidic physics, materials engineering, and biology for fulfilling potential applications ranging from materials fabrication to biomedical engineering. PMID:24454609

  8. Enzymatic Reactions in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristenpart, W. D.; Wan, J.; Stone, H. A.

    2008-11-01

    We establish simple scaling laws for enzymatic reactions in microfluidic devices, and we demonstrate that kinetic parameters obtained conventionally using multiple stop-flow experiments may instead be extracted from a single microfluidic experiment. Introduction of an enzyme and substrate species in different arms of a Y-shaped channel allows the two species to diffuse across the parallel streamlines and to begin reacting. Measurements of the product concentration versus distance down the channel provide information about the kinetics of the reaction. In the limit where the enzyme is much larger (and thus less diffusive) than the substrate, we show that near the entrance the total amount of product (P) formed varies as a power law in the distance x down the channel. For reactions that follow standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the power law takes the form P˜(Vmax/Km) x^5/2, where Vmax and Km are the maximum reaction rate and Michaelis constant respectively. If a large excess of substrate is used, then Km is identified by measuring Vmax far downstream where the different species are completely mixed by diffusion. Numerical simulations and experiments using the bioluminescent reaction between luciferase and ATP as a model system are both shown to accord with the model. We discuss the implications for significant savings in the amount of time and enzyme required for determination of kinetic parameters.

  9. Nanoembossing of thermoplastic polymers for microfluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, V.; Pépin, A.; Chen, Y.

    2002-05-01

    We present a method for the fabrication of plastic microfluidic devices based on nanoembossing and thermal bonding. By nanoembossing of thermoplastic polymer pellets, both microfluidic deep channels and high resolution features can be formed using a silicon mold fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. By thermal bonding with another plastic sheet, the fabricated microfluidic devices can be sealed without clogging. Observation of pressure driven and electrokinetic flows through high density pillar arrays indicates the feasibility of nanofluidic analysis using plastic devices.

  10. High-Voltage CMOS Controller for Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, M; Behnam, M; van den Berg, L; Backhouse, C J; Elliott, D G

    2009-04-01

    A high-voltage microfluidic controller designed using DALSA semiconductor's 0.8-mum low-voltage/high-voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor/double diffused metal-oxide semiconductor process is presented. The chip's four high-voltage output drivers can switch 300 V, and the dc-dc boost converter can generate up to 68 V using external passive components. This integrated circuit represents an advancement in microfluidic technology when used in conjunction with a charge coupling device (CCD)-based optical system and a glass microfluidic channel, enabling a portable and cost-efficient platform for genetic analysis.

  11. [Application of microfluidic-chip in biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Bi, Ying-Nan; Zhang, Hui-Jing

    2006-01-01

    As a novel analytical technology, the research of Micro total analysis systems (micro-TAS) has been spreading rapidly. micro-TAS has been widely used to perform chemical and biochemical analysis. Microfluidic-based analytical system as micro-TAS's manily direction develops very fast in terms of it's reaction speed, reagent consumption, miniaturization, cost, and automation. After having proven the value of microfluidics for genetic, proteomic and cytomics analysis, this article also anticipates the development tendency of this technology in the biology medicine domain. It has demonstrated that a truly, easy-to-handle Microfluidic-based analytical device will be emerged in the future.

  12. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-07

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

  13. Polycarbonate-Based Blends for Optical Non-linear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, F.; Stanculescu, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents some investigations on the optical and morphological properties of the polymer (matrix):monomer (inclusion) composite materials obtained from blends of bisphenol A polycarbonate and amidic monomers. For the preparation of the composite films, we have selected monomers characterised by a maleamic acid structure and synthesised them starting from maleic anhydride and aniline derivatives with -COOH, -NO2, -N(C2H5)2 functional groups attached to the benzene ring. The composite films have been deposited by spin coating using a mixture of two solutions, one containing the matrix and the other the inclusion, both components of the composite system being dissolved in the same solvent. The optical transmission and photoluminescence properties of the composite films have been investigated in correlation with the morphology of the films. The scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy have revealed a non-uniform morphology characterised by the development of two distinct phases. We have also investigated the generation of some optical non-linear (ONL) phenomena in these composite systems. The composite films containing as inclusions monomers characterised by the presence of one -COOH or two -NO2 substituent groups to the aromatic nucleus have shown the most intense second-harmonic generation (SHG). The second-order optical non-linear coefficients have been evaluated for these films, and the effect of the laser power on the ONL behaviour of these materials has also been emphasised.

  14. Real-time, continuous detection of maltose using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) on a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Gel, Murat; Zhu, Yonggang; Dacres, Helen; Anderson, Alisha; Trowell, Stephen C

    2014-12-15

    We have previously shown that a genetically encoded bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) biosensor, comprising maltose binding protein (MBP) flanked by a green fluorescent protein (GFP(2)) at the N-terminus and a variant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc2) at the C-terminus, has superior sensitivity and limits of detection for maltose, compared with an equivalent fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor. Here, we demonstrate that the same MBP biosensor can be combined with a microfluidic system for detection of maltose in water or beer. Using the BRET-based biosensor, maltose in water was detected on a microfluidic chip, either following a pre-incubation step or in real-time with similar sensitivity and dynamic range to those obtained using a commercial 96-well plate luminometer. The half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 2.4×10(-7)M and 1.3×10(-7) M for maltose detected in pre-incubated and real-time reactions, respectively. To demonstrate real-time detection of maltose in a complex medium, we used it to estimate maltose concentration in a commercial beer sample in a real-time, continuous flow format. Our system demonstrates a promising approach to in-line monitoring for applications such as food and beverage processing.

  15. Microfluidic Tools for Protein Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Bahige G.

    X-ray crystallography is the most widely used method to determine the structure of proteins, providing an understanding of their functions in all aspects of life to advance applications in fields such as drug development and renewable energy. New techniques, namely serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), have unlocked the ability to unravel the structures of complex proteins with vital biological functions. A key step and major bottleneck of structure determination is protein crystallization, which is very arduous due to the complexity of proteins and their natural environments. Furthermore, crystal characteristics govern data quality, thus need to be optimized to attain the most accurate reconstruction of the protein structure. Crystal size is one such characteristic in which narrowed distributions with a small modal size can significantly reduce the amount of protein needed for SFX. A novel microfluidic sorting platform was developed to isolate viable ~200 nm -- ~600 nm photosystem I (PSI) membrane protein crystals from ~200 nm -- ~20 ?m crystal samples using dielectrophoresis, as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), and dynamic light scattering. The platform was scaled-up to rapidly provide 100s of microliters of sorted crystals necessary for SFX, in which similar crystal size distributions were attained. Transmission electron microscopy was used to view the PSI crystal lattice, which remained well-ordered postsorting, and SFX diffraction data was obtained, confirming a high-quality, viable crystal sample. Simulations indicated sorted samples provided accurate, complete SFX datasets with 3500-fold less protein than unsorted samples. Microfluidic devices were also developed for versatile, rapid protein crystallization screening using nanovolumes of sample. Concentration gradients of protein and precipitant were generated to crystallize PSI, phycocyanin, and lysozyme using modified counterdiffusion

  16. Macroporous materials: microfluidic fabrication, functionalization and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingjie; Prinsen, Pepijn; Wang, Huizhi; Bai, Zhishan; Wang, Hualin; Luque, Rafael; Xuan, Jin

    2017-02-06

    This article provides an up-to-date highly comprehensive overview (594 references) on the state of the art of the synthesis and design of macroporous materials using microfluidics and their applications in different fields.

  17. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  18. Overview of the microfluidic diagnostics commercial landscape.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lily

    2013-01-01

    Since its birth in the late 1980s, the field of microfluidics has continued to mature, with a growing number of companies pursuing diagnostic applications. In 2009 the worldwide in vitro diagnostics market was estimated at >$40 billion USD, and microfluidic diagnostics are poised to reap a significant part of this market across a range of areas including laboratory diagnostics, point-of-care diagnostics, cancer diagnostics, and others. The potential economic advantages of microfluidics are numerous and compelling: lower reagent and/or sample volumes, lower equipment costs, improved portability, increased automation, and increased measurement speed. All of these factors may help put more information in the hands of doctors and patients sooner, enabling earlier disease detection and more tailored, effective treatments. This chapter reviews the microfluidic diagnostics commercial landscape and discusses potential commercialization challenges and opportunities.

  19. Replaceable Microfluidic Cartridges for a PCR Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin; Sullivan, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a replaceable microfluidic cartridge that is a component of a miniature biosensor that detects target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. The biosensor utilizes (1) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to multiply the amount of DNA to be detected, (2) fluorogenic polynucleotide probe chemicals for labeling the target DNA sequences, and (3) a high-sensitivity epifluorescence-detection optoelectronic subsystem. Microfluidics is a relatively new field of device development in which one applies techniques for fabricating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to miniature systems for containing and/or moving fluids. Typically, microfluidic devices are microfabricated, variously, from silicon or polymers. The development of microfluidic devices for applications that involve PCR and fluorescence-based detection of PCR products poses special challenges

  20. Microfluidics for single-cell genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Paguirigan, A L; Kreutz, J E; Radich, J P; Chiu, D T

    2014-09-07

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information to cellular phenotypes will provide the kind of detailed insight into human physiology and disease pathways that is not possible to infer from bulk cell analysis. Microfluidic technologies are attractive for single-cell manipulation due to precise handling and low risk of contamination. Additionally, microfluidic single-cell techniques can allow for high-throughput and detailed genetic analyses that increase accuracy and decrease reagent cost compared to bulk techniques. Incorporating these microfluidic platforms into research and clinical laboratory workflows can fill an unmet need in biology, delivering the highly accurate, highly informative data necessary to develop new therapies and monitor patient outcomes. In this perspective, we describe the current and potential future uses of microfluidics at all stages of single-cell genetic analysis, including cell enrichment and capture, single-cell compartmentalization and manipulation, and detection and analyses.

  1. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  2. Bistable diverter valve in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, V.; Bandalusena, H. C. H.

    2011-05-01

    Bistable diverter valves are useful for a large number of no-moving-part flow control applications, and there is a considerable interest in using them also in microfluidics, especially for handling small pressure-driven flows. However, with decreasing Reynolds number, the Coanda effect—on which the flow diverting effect depends—becomes less effective. Authors performed a study, involving flow visualisation, PIV experiments, measurements of the flow rates, and numerical flowfield computations, aimed at clarifying behaviour of a typical fluidic valve at low Reynolds numbers. A typical fluidic valve originally developed for high Re operation was demonstrated to be useful, though with progressively limited efficiency, down to surprisingly low Re values as small as Re = 800. Also observed was a previously not reported discontinuation in the otherwise monotonic decrease in performance at Re between 1,500 and 2,000.

  3. Microfluidic organs-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Ingber, Donald E

    2014-08-01

    An organ-on-a-chip is a microfluidic cell culture device created with microchip manufacturing methods that contains continuously perfused chambers inhabited by living cells arranged to simulate tissue- and organ-level physiology. By recapitulating the multicellular architectures, tissue-tissue interfaces, physicochemical microenvironments and vascular perfusion of the body, these devices produce levels of tissue and organ functionality not possible with conventional 2D or 3D culture systems. They also enable high-resolution, real-time imaging and in vitro analysis of biochemical, genetic and metabolic activities of living cells in a functional tissue and organ context. This technology has great potential to advance the study of tissue development, organ physiology and disease etiology. In the context of drug discovery and development, it should be especially valuable for the study of molecular mechanisms of action, prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing and biomarker identification.

  4. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  5. 3D printed microfluidics for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chee Meng Benjamin; Ng, Sum Huan; Li, King Ho Holden; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The term "Lab-on-a-Chip," is synonymous with describing microfluidic devices with biomedical applications. Even though microfluidics have been developing rapidly over the past decade, the uptake rate in biological research has been slow. This could be due to the tedious process of fabricating a chip and the absence of a "killer application" that would outperform existing traditional methods. In recent years, three dimensional (3D) printing has been drawing much interest from the research community. It has the ability to make complex structures with high resolution. Moreover, the fast building time and ease of learning has simplified the fabrication process of microfluidic devices to a single step. This could possibly aid the field of microfluidics in finding its "killer application" that will lead to its acceptance by researchers, especially in the biomedical field. In this paper, a review is carried out of how 3D printing helps to improve the fabrication of microfluidic devices, the 3D printing technologies currently used for fabrication and the future of 3D printing in the field of microfluidics.

  6. Finger-Powered Electro-Digital-Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Portable microfluidic devices are promising for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis and bio- and environmental surveillance in resource-constrained or non-laboratory environments. Lateral-flow devices, some built off paper or strings, have been widely developed but the fixed layouts of their underlying wicking/microchannel structures limit their flexibility and present challenges in implementing multistep reactions. Digital microfluidics can circumvent these difficulties by addressing discrete droplets individually. Existing approaches to digital microfluidics, however, often require bulky power supplies/batteries and high voltage circuits. We present a scheme to drive digital microfluidic devices by converting mechanical energy of human fingers to electrical energy using an array of piezoelectric elements. We describe the integration our scheme into two promising digital microfluidics platforms: one based on the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon and the other on the electrophoretic control of droplet (EPD). Basic operations of droplet manipulations, such as droplet transport, merging and splitting, are demonstrated using the finger-powered digital-microfluidics.

  7. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  8. Acoustic Microfluidics for Bioanalytical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    This talk will present new methods the use of ultrasonic standing waves in microfluidic systems to manipulate microparticles for the purpose of bioassays and bioseparations. We have recently developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles into many parallel flow streams and have demonstrated the potential of such flow cells in the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers. These experiments show the potential for the creation of high throughput flow cytometers in applications requiring high flow rates and rapid detection of rare cells. This talk will also present the development of elastomeric capture microparticles and their use in acoustophoretic separations. We have developed simple methods to form elastomeric particles that are surface functionalized with biomolecular recognition reagents. These compressible particles exhibit negative acoustic contrast in ultrasound when suspended in aqueous media, blood serum or diluted blood. These particles can be continuously separated from cells by flowing them through a microfluidic device that uses an ultrasonic standing wave to align the blood cells, which exhibit positive acoustic contrast, at a node in the acoustic pressure distribution while aligning the negative acoustic contrast elastomeric particles at the antinodes. Laminar flow of the separated particles to downstream collection ports allows for collection of the separated negative contrast particles and cells. Separated elastomeric particles were analyzed via flow cytometry to demonstrate nanomolar detection for prostate specific antigen in aqueous buffer and picomolar detection for IgG in plasma and diluted blood samples. This approach has potential applications in the development of rapid assays that detect the presence of low concentrations of biomarkers (including biomolecules and cells) in a number of biological sample types. We acknowledge support through the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC.

  9. High-throughput, semi-automated determination of a cyclooxygenase II inhibitor in human plasma and urine using solid-phase extraction in the 96-well format and high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Matthews, C Z; Woolf, E J; Lin, L; Fang, W; Hsieh, J; Ha, S; Simpson, R; Matuszewski, B K

    2001-02-25

    Compound I, 5-chloro-3-(4-methanesulfonylphenyl)-6'-methyl-[2,3']bipyridinyl, has been found to be a specific inhibitor of the enzyme cyclooxygenase II (COX II). The anti-inflammatory properties of this compound are currently being investigated. HPLC assays for the determination of this analyte in human plasma and human urine have been developed. Isolation of I and the internal standard (II) was achieved by solid-phase extraction (SPE) in the 96-well format. A C8 SPE plate was used for the extraction of the drug from human plasma (recovery >90%) while a mixed-mode (C8/Cation) SPE plate was used to isolate the analytes from human urine (recovery approximately 71%). The analyte and internal standard were chromatographed on a Keystone Scientific Prism-RP guard column (20 x 4.6 mm) connected to a Prism-RP analytical column (150 x 4.6 mm), using a mobile phase consisting of 45% acetonitrile in 10 mM acetate buffer (pH = 4); the analytes eluted at retention times of 5.2 and 6.9 min for I and II, respectively. Compounds I and II were found to form highly fluorescent products after exposure to UV light (254 nm). Thus, the analytes were detected by fluorescence (lambda(ex) = 260 nm, lambda(em) =375 nm) following post-column photochemical derivatization. Eight point calibration curves over the concentration range of 5-500 ng/ml for human plasma and human urine yielded a linear response (R2>0.99) when a 1/y weighted linear regression model was employed. Based on the replicate analyses (n = 5) of spiked standards, the within-day precision for both assays was better than 7% C.V. at all points on the calibration curve; within-day accuracy was within 5% of nominal at all standard concentrations. The between-run precision and accuracy of the assays, as calculated from the results of the analysis of quality control samples, was better than 8% C.V. and within 8% of nominal. I was found to be stable in human plasma and urine for at least 8 and 2 months, respectively. In addition, the

  10. Rapid microfluidic thermal cycler for nucleic acid amplification

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Vafai, Kambiz

    2015-10-27

    A system for thermal cycling a material to be thermal cycled including a microfluidic heat exchanger; a porous medium in the microfluidic heat exchanger; a microfluidic thermal cycling chamber containing the material to be thermal cycled, the microfluidic thermal cycling chamber operatively connected to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at first temperature; a first system for transmitting the working fluid at first temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at a second temperature, a second system for transmitting the working fluid at second temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a pump for flowing the working fluid at the first temperature from the first system to the microfluidic heat exchanger and through the porous medium; and flowing the working fluid at the second temperature from the second system to the heat exchanger and through the porous medium.

  11. Microfluidic devices with thick-film electrochemical detection

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Tian, Baomin; Sahlin, Eskil

    2005-04-12

    An apparatus for conducting a microfluidic process and analysis, including at least one elongated microfluidic channel, fluidic transport means for transport of fluids through the microfluidic channel, and at least one thick-film electrode in fluidic connection with the outlet end of the microfluidic channel. The present invention includes an integrated on-chip combination reaction, separation and thick-film electrochemical detection microsystem, for use in detection of a wide range of analytes, and methods for the use thereof.

  12. Microfluidic Flow Injection Analysis with Thermal Lens Microscopic Detection for Determination of NGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanović, Tatjana; Liu, Mingqiang; Likar, Polona; Klemenc, Matjaž; Franko, Mladen

    2015-06-01

    A combined microfluidic flow injection analysis-thermal lens microscopy (FIA-TLM) system was applied for determination of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)—a biomarker of acute kidney injury. NGAL was determined following a commercial ELISA assay and transfer of the resulting solution into the FIA-TLM system with a 100 m deep microchannel. At an excitation power of 100 mW, the FIA-TLM provided about seven times lower limits of detection (1.5 pg as compared to a conventional ELISA test, and a sample throughput of six samples per minute, which compares favorably with sample throughput of the microtiter plate reader, which reads 96 wells in about 30 min. Comparison of results for NGAL in plasma samples from healthy individuals and for NGAL dynamics in patients undergoing coronary angiography measured with transmission mode spectrometry on a microtiter plate reader and with FIA-TLM showed good agreement. In addition to improved LOD, the high sensitivity of FIA-TLM offers possibilities of a further reduction of the total reaction time of the NGAL ELISA test by sacrificing some of the sensitivity while reducing the duration of individual incubation steps.

  13. [Research Progress of Application of Microfluidics Techniques in Cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nanfeng; Yang, Yun; Zhou, Xinli

    2015-06-01

    Microfluidics technology may be an effective method to solve some problems in cryopreservation. This review presents the research progress of microfluidics technology in the field of cell membrane transport properties, cryoprotectant addition and washout and the vitrification for cryopreservation of biological materials. Existing problems of microfluidics technology in the application of cryopreservation are summarized and future research directions are indicated as well.

  14. Alternative Energy: A New Frontier for Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Cullen

    2011-03-01

    Microfuidics is classified as the physics of fluid manipulation at sub-mm length scales. Typically, microfluidic techniques benefit from small sample volumes, low power consumption, and increased surface-to-volume ratio. Because of their high surface to volume ratio, microfluidic systems often utilize surface phenomena such as wettability (i.e. droplet microfluidics) and surface charge (i.e. electrokinetics) for actuation. To date, most applications of microfluidics are in medicine or biology with the purpose of creating ``lab on a chip'' devices. However, the scale of microfluidics is favorable for other engineering problems as well. In this talk we will discuss how phenomena typically applied to lab on a chip devices can be used to enhance energy systems. Specifically, we explore electric field driven fluid and particle flows such as electrophoresis, electroosmosis, and dielectrophoresis. We will show how these phenomena can solve a diverse array of problems, from water management in fuel cells to the selection of microorganisms for bio-energy applications.

  15. Microfluidic devices for cell cultivation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tehranirokh, Masoomeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Francis, Paul S.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technology provides precise, controlled-environment, cost-effective, compact, integrated, and high-throughput microsystems that are promising substitutes for conventional biological laboratory methods. In recent years, microfluidic cell culture devices have been used for applications such as tissue engineering, diagnostics, drug screening, immunology, cancer studies, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurite guidance. Microfluidic technology allows dynamic cell culture in microperfusion systems to deliver continuous nutrient supplies for long term cell culture. It offers many opportunities to mimic the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions of tissues by creating gradient concentrations of biochemical signals such as growth factors, chemokines, and hormones. Other applications of cell cultivation in microfluidic systems include high resolution cell patterning on a modified substrate with adhesive patterns and the reconstruction of complicated tissue architectures. In this review, recent advances in microfluidic platforms for cell culturing and proliferation, for both simple monolayer (2D) cell seeding processes and 3D configurations as accurate models of in vivo conditions, are examined. PMID:24273628

  16. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Maghribi, Mariam; Hamilton, Julie; Rose, Klint; Wang, Amy W.

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  17. Microfluidic Dynamic Interfacial Tensiometry (μDIT).

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Quentin; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-05-07

    We designed, developed and characterized a microfluidic method for the measurement of surfactant adsorption kinetics via interfacial tensiometry on a microfluidic chip. The principle of the measurement is based on the deformability of droplets as a response to hydrodynamic forcing through a series of microfluidic expansions. We focus our analysis on one perfluoro surfactant molecule of practical interest for droplet-based microfluidic applications. We show that although the adsorption kinetics is much faster than the kinetics of the corresponding pendant drop experiment, our droplet-based microfluidic system has a sufficient time resolution to obtain quantitative measurement at the sub-second time-scale on nanoliter droplet volumes, leading to both a gain by a factor of ∼10 in time resolution and a downscaling of the measurement volumes by a factor of ∼1000 compared to standard techniques. Our approach provides new insight into the adsorption of surfactant molecules at liquid-liquid interfaces in a confined environment, relevant to emulsification, encapsulation and foaming, and the ability to measure adsorption and desorption rate constants.

  18. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  19. Next-generation integrated microfluidic circuits.

    PubMed

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Park, Joong Yull; Burns, Mark A; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-09-07

    This mini-review provides a brief overview of recent devices that use networks of elastomeric valves to minimize or eliminate the need for interconnections between microfluidic chips and external instruction lines that send flow control signals. Conventional microfluidic control mechanisms convey instruction signals in a parallel manner such that the number of instruction lines must increase as the number of independently operated valves increases. The devices described here circumvent this "tyranny of microfluidic interconnects" by the serial encoding of information to enable instruction of an arbitrary number of independent valves with a set number of control lines, or by the microfluidic circuit-embedded encoding of instructions to eliminate control lines altogether. Because the parallel instruction chips are the most historical and straightforward to design, they are still the most commonly used approach today. As requirements for instruction complexity, chip-to-chip communication, and real-time on-chip feedback flow control arise, the next generation of integrated microfluidic circuits will need to incorporate these latest interconnect flow control approaches.

  20. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  1. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings.

  2. Rapid wasted-free microfluidic fabrication based on ink-jet approach for microfluidic sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Amarit, Rattasart; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2016-11-01

    Realizing that current microfluidic chip fabrication techniques are time consuming and labor intensive as well as always have material leftover after chip fabrication, this research work proposes an innovative approach for rapid microfluidic chip production. The key idea relies on a combination of a widely-used inkjet printing method and a heat-based polymer curing technique with an electronic-mechanical control, thus eliminating the need of masking and molds compared to typical microfluidic fabrication processes. In addition, as the appropriate amount of polymer is utilized during printing, there is much less amount of material wasted. Our inkjet-based microfluidic printer can print out the desired microfluidic chip pattern directly onto a heated glass surface, where the printed polymer is suddenly cured. Our proof-of-concept demonstration for widely-used single-flow channel, Y-junction, and T-junction microfluidic chips shows that the whole microfluidic chip fabrication process requires only 3 steps with a fabrication time of 6 minutes.

  3. Microfluidic mixing using contactless dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Shafiee, Hadi; Davalos, Rafael V; Stremler, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    The first experimental evidence of mixing enhancement in a microfluidic system using contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) is presented in this work. Pressure-driven flow of deionized water containing 0.5 μm beads was mixed in various chamber geometries by imposing a dielectrophoresis (DEP) force on the beads. In cDEP the electrodes are not in direct contact with the fluid sample but are instead capacitively coupled to the mixing chamber through thin dielectric barriers, which eliminates many of the problems encountered with standard DEP. Four system designs with rectangular and circular mixing chambers were fabricated in PDMS. Mixing tests were conducted for flow rates from 0.005 to 1 mL/h subject to an alternating current signal range of 0-300 V at 100-600 kHz. When the time scales of the bulk fluid motion and the DEP motion were commensurate, rapid mixing was observed. The rectangular mixing chambers were found to be more efficient than the circular chambers. This approach shows potential for mixing low diffusivity biological samples, which is a very challenging problem in laminar flows at small scales.

  4. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  5. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  6. Packaging of electro-microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.; Galambos, Paul C.; Emerson, John A.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Giunta, Rachel K.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A new architecture for packaging surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices is presented. This architecture relies on two scales of packaging to bring fluid to the device scale (picoliters) from the macro-scale (microliters). The architecture emulates and utilizes electronics packaging technology. The larger package consists of a circuit board with embedded fluidic channels and standard fluidic connectors (e.g. Fluidic Printed Wiring Board). The embedded channels connect to the smaller package, an Electro-Microfluidic Dual-Inline-Package (EMDIP) that takes fluid to the microfluidic integrated circuit (MIC). The fluidic connection is made to the back of the MIC through Bosch-etched holes that take fluid to surface micromachined channels on the front of the MIC. Electrical connection is made to bond pads on the front of the MIC.

  7. Packaging of electro-microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.; Galambos, Paul C.; Emerson, John A.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Giunta, Rachel K.; Zamora, David Lee; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-04-15

    A new architecture for packaging surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices is presented. This architecture relies on two scales of packaging to bring fluid to the device scale (picoliters) from the macro-scale (microliters). The architecture emulates and utilizes electronics packaging technology. The larger package consists of a circuit board with embedded fluidic channels and standard fluidic connectors (e.g. Fluidic Printed Wiring Board). The embedded channels connect to the smaller package, an Electro-Microfluidic Dual-Inline-Package (EMDIP) that takes fluid to the microfluidic integrated circuit (MIC). The fluidic connection is made to the back of the MIC through Bosch-etched holes that take fluid to surface micromachined channels on the front of the MIC. Electrical connection is made to bond pads on the front of the MIC.

  8. MEMS and microfluidics for diagnostics devices.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Y; Gurman, P

    2010-06-01

    There are conditions in clinical medicine demanding critical therapeutic decisions. These conditions necessitate accuracy, rapidity, accessibility, cost-effectiveness and mobility. New technologies have been developed in order to address these challenges. Microfluidics and Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems are two of such technologies. Microfluidics, a discipline that involves processing fluids at the microscale in etched microchannels, is being used to build lab- on-a-chip systems to run chemical and biological assays. These systems are being transformed into handheld devices designed to be used at remote settings or at the bedside. MEMS are microscale electromechanical elements integrated in lab chip systems or used as individual components. MEMS based sensors represents a highly developed field with successful commercialized products currently being incorporated into vitro,ex vivo and in vivo devices. In the present paper several examples of microfluidic devices and MEMS sensors are introduced together with some current examples of commercialized products. Future challenges and trends will be discussed.

  9. Droplet microfluidics in (bio)chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Basova, Evgenia Yu; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-01-07

    Droplet microfluidics may soon change the paradigm of performing chemical analyses and related instrumentation. It can improve not only the analysis scale, possibility for sensitivity improvement, and reduced consumption of chemical and biological reagents, but also the speed of performing a variety of unit operations. At present, microfluidic platforms can reproducibly generate monodisperse droplet populations at kHz or higher rates with droplet sizes suitable for high-throughput experiments, single-cell detection or even single molecule analysis. In addition to being used as microreactors with volume in the micro- to femtoliter range, droplet based systems have also been used to directly synthesize particles and encapsulate biological entities for biomedicine and biotechnology applications. This minireview summarizes various droplet microfluidics operations and applications for (bio)chemical assays described in the literature during the past few years.

  10. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiming; Liu, Songsheng; Jia, Chunping; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  11. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  12. Microfluidic serpentine antennas with designed mechanical tunability.

    PubMed

    Huang, YongAn; Wang, Yezhou; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Huimin; Dong, Wentao; Yin, Zhouping

    2014-11-07

    This paper describes the design and characterization of microfluidic serpentine antennas with reversible stretchability and designed mechanical frequency modulation (FM). The microfluidic antennas are designed based on the Poisson's ratio of the elastomer in which the liquid alloy antenna is embedded, to controllably decrease, stabilize or increase its resonance frequency when being stretched. Finite element modelling was used in combination with experimental verification to investigate the effects of substrate dimensions and antenna aspect ratios on the FM sensitivity to uniaxial stretching. It could be designed within the range of -1.2 to 0.6 GHz per 100% stretch. When the aspect ratio of the serpentine antenna is between 1.0 and 1.5, the resonance frequency is stable under stretching, bending, and twisting. The presented microfluidic serpentine antenna design could be utilized in the field of wireless mobile communication for the design of wearable electronics, with a stable resonance frequency under dynamic applied strain up to 50%.

  13. Microfluidics for research and applications in oncology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Jing, Tengyang; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-21

    Cancer is currently one of the top non-communicable human diseases, and continual research and developmental efforts are being made to better understand and manage this disease. More recently, with the improved understanding in cancer biology as well as the advancements made in microtechnology and rapid prototyping, microfluidics is increasingly being explored and even validated for use in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. With inherent advantages such as small sample volume, high sensitivity and fast processing time, microfluidics is well-positioned to serve as a promising platform for applications in oncology. In this review, we look at the recent advances in the use of microfluidics, from basic research such as understanding cancer cell phenotypes as well as metastatic behaviors to applications such as the detection, diagnosis, prognosis and drug screening. We then conclude with a future outlook on this promising technology.

  14. A perspective on microfluidic biofuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin wook; Kjeang, Erik

    2010-01-01

    This review article presents how microfluidic technologies and biological materials are paired to assist in the development of low cost, green energy fuel cell systems. Miniaturized biological fuel cells, employing enzymes or microorganisms as biocatalysts in an environmentally benign configuration, can become an attractive candidate for small-scale power source applications such as biological sensors, implantable medical devices, and portable electronics. State-of-the-art biofuel cell technologies are reviewed with emphasis on microfabrication compatibility and microfluidic fuel cell designs. Integrated microfluidic biofuel cell prototypes are examined with comparisons of their performance achievements and fabrication methods. The technical challenges for further developments and the potential research opportunities for practical cell designs are discussed. PMID:21139699

  15. Optical detection strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Damien; O'Sullivan, Mary; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic systems have become one of the principal platforms for implementing bioanalytical assays, most notably for biomedical point-of-care diagnostics. These so-called 'lab-on-a-disc' systems primarily utilise the rotationally controlled centrifugal field in combination with capillary forces to automate a range of laboratory unit operations (LUOs) for sample preparation, such as metering, aliquoting, mixing and extraction for biofluids as well as sorting, isolation and counting of bioparticles. These centrifugal microfluidic LUOs have been regularly surveyed in the literature. However, even though absolutely essential to provide true sample-to-answer functionality of lab-on-a-disc platforms, systematic examination of associated, often optical, read-out technologies has been so far neglected. This review focusses on the history and state-of-the-art of optical read-out strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms, arising (commercial) application potential and future opportunities.

  16. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  17. 3D-Printed Microfluidic Automation

    PubMed Central

    Au, Anthony K.; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Chang, Tim C.; Folch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic automation – the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels – generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology’s use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer. PMID:25738695

  18. Microfluidic systems for single DNA dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Danielle J.; Brockman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microfluidics have enabled the molecular-level study of polymer dynamics using single DNA chains. Single polymer studies based on fluorescence microscopy allow for the direct observation of non-equilibrium polymer conformations and dynamical phenomena such as diffusion, relaxation, and molecular stretching pathways in flow. Microfluidic devices have enabled the precise control of model flow fields to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of soft materials, with device geometries including curved channels, cross-slots, and microfabricated obstacles and structures. This review explores recent microfluidic systems that have advanced the study of single polymer dynamics, while identifying new directions in the field that will further elucidate the relationship between polymer microstructure and bulk rheological properties. PMID:23139700

  19. Thermophoresis of DNA determined by microfluidic fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Duhr, S; Arduini, S; Braun, D

    2004-11-01

    We describe a microfluidic all-optical technique to measure the thermophoresis of molecules. Within micrometer-thick chambers, we heat aqueous solutions with a micrometer-sized focus of infrared light. The temperature increase of about 1 K is monitored with temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes. We test the approach in measuring the thermophoresis of DNA. We image the concentration of DNA in a second fluorescence-color channel. DNA is depleted away from the heated spot. The profile of depletion is fitted by the thermophoretic theory to reveal the Soret coefficient. We evaluate the method with numerical 3D calculations of temperature profiles, drift, convection and thermophoretic depletion using finite element methods. The approach opens new ways to monitor thermophoresis at the single molecule level, near boundaries and in complex mixtures. The flexible microfluidic setting is a good step towards microfluidic applications of thermophoresis in biotechnology.

  20. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  1. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yihong; Wang, Jun; Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2009-03-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has raised a lot of interest recently due to its wide applications to screening biological/chemical assays with high throughput. Despite the advances on droplet-based assays involving cells, gene delivery methods that are compatible with the droplet platform have been lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a simple microfluidic device that encapsulates cells into aqueous droplets and then electroporates the encapsulated cells. The electroporation occurs when the cell-containing droplets (in oil) flow through a pair of microelectrodes with a constant voltage established in between. We investigate the parameters and characteristics of the electroporation. We demonstrate delivering enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We envision the application of this technique to high-throughput functional genomics studies based on droplet microfluidics.

  2. Microfluidic platforms for plant cells studies.

    PubMed

    Sanati Nezhad, A

    2014-09-07

    Conventional methods of plant cell analysis rely on growing plant cells in soil pots or agarose plates, followed by screening the plant phenotypes in traditional greenhouses and growth chambers. These methods are usually costly, need a large number of experiments, suffer from low spatial resolution and disorderly growth behavior of plant cells, with lack of ability to locally and accurately manipulate the plant cells. Microfluidic platforms take advantage of miniaturization for handling small volume of liquids and providing a closed environment, with the purpose of in vitro single cell analysis and characterizing cell response to external cues. These platforms have shown their ability for high-throughput cellular analysis with increased accuracy of experiments, reduced cost and experimental times, versatility in design, ability for large-scale and combinatorial screening, and integration with other miniaturized sensors. Despite extensive research on animal cells within microfluidic environments for high-throughput sorting, manipulation and phenotyping studies, the application of microfluidics for plant cells studies has not been accomplished yet. Novel devices such as RootChip, RootArray, TipChip, and PlantChip developed for plant cells analysis, with high spatial resolution on a micrometer scale mimicking the internal microenvironment of plant cells, offering preliminary results on the capability of microfluidics to conquer the constraints of conventional methods. These devices have been used to study different aspects of plant cell biology such as gene expression, cell biomechanics, cellular mechanism of growth, cell division, and cells fusion. This review emphasizes the advantages of current microfluidic systems for plant science studies, and discusses future prospects of microfluidic platforms for characterizing plant cells response to diverse external cues.

  3. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  4. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-02-15

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation, have been developed and allow automation and integration of complex assay protocols in lab-on-a-disc systems. Besides liquid handling, the detection strategy for reading out the assay is crucial for developing a fully integrated system. In this review, we focus on biosensors and readout methods for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles.

  5. Fabrication and Testing of Microfluidic Optomechanical Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kewen; Kim, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Junhwan; Lee, Wonsuk; Liu, Jing; Fan, Xudong; Carmon, Tal; Bahl, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics experiments that parametrically couple the phonon modes and photon modes have been investigated in various optical systems including microresonators. However, because of the increased acoustic radiative losses during direct liquid immersion of optomechanical devices, almost all published optomechanical experiments have been performed in solid phase. This paper discusses a recently introduced hollow microfluidic optomechanical resonator. Detailed methodology is provided to fabricate these ultra-high-Q microfluidic resonators, perform optomechanical testing, and measure radiation pressure-driven breathing mode and SBS-driven whispering gallery mode parametric vibrations. By confining liquids inside the capillary resonator, high mechanical- and optical- quality factors are simultaneously maintained. PMID:24962013

  6. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  7. Self-propelled autonomous nanomotors meet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kherzi, Bahareh; Pumera, Martin

    2016-10-14

    Self-propelled autonomous nano/micromotors are in the forefront of current materials science and technology research. These small machines convert chemical energy from the environment into propulsion, and they can move autonomously in the environment and are capable of chemotaxis or magnetotaxis. They can be used for drug delivery, microsurgeries or environmental remediation. It is of immense interest from a future biomedical application point of view to understand the motion of the nano/micromotors in microfluidic channels. In this minireview, we review the progress on the use of nano/micromotors in microfluidic channels and lab-on-chip devices.

  8. Integrated Microfluidic Gas Sensors for Water Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Sniadecki, N.; DeVoe, D. L.; Beamesderfer, M.; Semancik, S.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based microhotplate tin oxide (SnO2) gas sensor integrated into a polymer-based microfluidic system for monitoring of contaminants in water systems is presented. This device is designed to sample a water source, control the sample vapor pressure within a microchannel using integrated resistive heaters, and direct the vapor past the integrated gas sensor for analysis. The sensor platform takes advantage of novel technology allowing direct integration of discrete silicon chips into a larger polymer microfluidic substrate, including seamless fluidic and electrical interconnects between the substrate and silicon chip.

  9. Microfluidic Assessment of Frying Oil Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Xie, Shaorong; Ge, Ji; Xu, Zhensong; Wu, Zhizheng; Ru, Changhai; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the quality of frying oil is important for the health of consumers. This paper reports a microfluidic technique for rapidly quantifying the degradation of frying oil. The microfluidic device generates monodispersed water-in-oil droplets and exploits viscosity and interfacial tension changes of frying oil samples over their frying/degradation process. The measured parameters were correlated to the total polar material percentage that is widely used in the food industry. The results reveal that the steady-state length of droplets can be used for unambiguously assessing frying oil quality degradation. PMID:27312884

  10. Rapid Protein Separations in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Z. H.; Das, Champak; Xia, Zheng; Stoyanov, Alexander V.; Fredrickson, Carl K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication of glass and plastic microfluidic devices for protein separations. Although the long-term goal is to develop a microfluidic device for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, this paper focuses on the first dimension-isoelectric focusing (IEF). A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system has been built for imaging an entire channel in an IEF device. The whole-channel imaging eliminates the need to migrate focused protein bands, which is required if a single-point detector is used. Using the devices and the imaging system, we are able to perform IEF separations of proteins within minutes rather than hours in traditional bench-top instruments.

  11. Microfluidic fuel cells for energy generation.

    PubMed

    Safdar, M; Jänis, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-08-07

    Sustainable energy generation is of recent interest due to a growing energy demand across the globe and increasing environmental issues caused by conventional non-renewable means of power generation. In the context of microsystems, portable electronics and lab-on-a-chip based (bio)chemical sensors would essentially require fully integrated, reliable means of power generation. Microfluidic-based fuel cells can offer unique advantages compared to conventional fuel cells such as high surface area-to-volume ratio, ease of integration, cost effectiveness and portability. Here, we summarize recent developments which utilize the potential of microfluidic devices for energy generation.

  12. Microfluidic Assessment of Frying Oil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei; Xie, Shaorong; Ge, Ji; Xu, Zhensong; Wu, Zhizheng; Ru, Changhai; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring the quality of frying oil is important for the health of consumers. This paper reports a microfluidic technique for rapidly quantifying the degradation of frying oil. The microfluidic device generates monodispersed water-in-oil droplets and exploits viscosity and interfacial tension changes of frying oil samples over their frying/degradation process. The measured parameters were correlated to the total polar material percentage that is widely used in the food industry. The results reveal that the steady-state length of droplets can be used for unambiguously assessing frying oil quality degradation.

  13. Microfluidics and Raman microscopy: current applications and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Chrimes, Adam F; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Stoddart, Paul R; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2013-07-07

    Raman microscopy systems are becoming increasingly widespread and accessible for characterising chemical species. Microfluidic systems are also progressively finding their way into real world applications. Therefore, it is anticipated that the integration of Raman systems with microfluidics will become increasingly attractive and practical. This review aims to provide an overview of Raman microscopy-microfluidics integrated systems for researchers who are actively interested in utilising these tools. The fundamental principles and application strengths of Raman microscopy are discussed in the context of microfluidics. Various configurations of microfluidics that incorporate Raman microscopy methods are presented, with applications highlighted. Data analysis methods are discussed, with a focus on assisting the interpretation of Raman-microfluidics data from complex samples. Finally, possible future directions of Raman-microfluidic systems are presented.

  14. Recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiandong; Wu, Xun; Lin, Francis

    2013-07-07

    Microfluidic devices can better control cellular microenvironments compared to conventional cell migration assays. Over the past few years, microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies showed a rapid growth. New strategies were developed to explore cell migration in manipulated chemical gradients. In addition to expanding the use of microfluidic devices for a broader range of cell types, microfluidic devices were used to study cell migration and chemotaxis in complex environments. Furthermore, high-throughput microfluidic chemotaxis devices and integrated microfluidic chemotaxis systems were developed for medical and commercial applications. In this article, we review recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies and discuss the new trends in this field observed over the past few years.

  15. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-07

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  16. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  17. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Krisna C.; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry. PMID:25246553

  18. Microfluidic/SERS Detection of Trace Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    1 Microfluidic/SERS Detection of Trace Explosives Carl Meinhart ,a Brian Piorek,a Seung Joon Lee,b Martin Moskovitsb, Craig Cummingsc...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADM002187. Proceedings of the Army Science Conference (26th) Held in Orlando, Florida on 1-4 December 2008, The original

  19. Rare cell isolation and analysis in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuchao; Li, Peng; Huang, Po-Hsun; Xie, Yuliang; Mai, John D.; Wang, Lin; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Rare cells are low-abundance cells in a much larger population of background cells. Conventional benchtop techniques have limited capabilities to isolate and analyze rare cells because of their generally low selectivity and significant sample loss. Recent rapid advances in microfluidics have been providing robust solutions to the challenges in the isolation and analysis of rare cells. In addition to the apparent performance enhancements resulting in higher efficiencies and sensitivity levels, microfluidics provides other advanced features such as simpler handling of small sample volumes and multiplexing capabilities for high-throughput processing. All of these advantages make microfluidics an excellent platform to deal with the transport, isolation, and analysis of rare cells. Various cellular biomarkers, including physical properties, dielectric properties, as well as immunoaffinities, have been explored for isolating rare cells. In this Focus article, we discuss the design considerations of representative microfluidic devices for rare cell isolation and analysis. Examples from recently published works are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the different techniques. Various applications of these techniques are then introduced. Finally, a perspective on the development trends and promising research directions in this field are proposed. PMID:24406985

  20. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  1. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system.

  2. Understanding cell passage through constricted microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartas-Ayala, Marco A.; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-11-01

    Recently, several microfluidic platforms have been proposed to characterize cells based on their behaviour during cell passage through constricted channels. Variables like transit time have been analyzed in disease states like sickle cell anemia, malaria and sepsis. Nevertheless, it is hard to make direct comparisons between different platforms and cell types. We present experimental results of the relationship between solid deformable particle properties, i.e. stiffness and relative particle size, and flow properties, i.e. particle's velocity. We measured the hydrodynamic variables during the flow of HL-60 cells, a white myeloid cell type, in narrow microfluidic square channels using a microfluidic differential manometer. We measured the flow force required to move cells of different sizes through microchannels and quantified friction forces opposing cell passage. We determined the non-dimensional parameters that influence the flow of cells and we used them to obtain a non dimensional expression that can be used to predict the forces needed to drive cells through microchannels. We found that the friction force needed to flow HL-60 through a microfluidic channel is the sum of two parts. The first part is a static friction force that is proportional to the force needed to keep the force compressed. The second part is a factor that is proportional to the cell velocity, hence a dynamic term, and slightly sensitive to the compressive force. We thank CONACYT (Mexican Science and Technology Council) for supporting this project, grant 205899.

  3. The promise of microfluidic artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Potkay, Joseph A

    2014-11-07

    Microfluidic or microchannel artificial lungs promise to enable a new class of truly portable, therapeutic artificial lungs through feature sizes and blood channel designs that closely mimic those found in their natural counterpart. These new artificial lungs could potentially: 1) have surface areas and priming volumes that are a fraction of current technologies thereby decreasing device size and reducing the foreign body response; 2) contain blood flow networks in which cells and platelets experience pressures, shear stresses, and branching angles that copy those in the human lung thereby improving biocompatibility; 3) operate efficiently with room air, eliminating the need for gas cylinders and complications associated with hyperoxemia; 4) exhibit biomimetic hydraulic resistances, enabling operation with natural pressures and eliminating the need for blood pumps; and, 5) provide increased gas exchange capacity enabling respiratory support for active patients. This manuscript reviews recent research efforts in microfluidic artificial lungs targeted at achieving the advantages above, investigates the ultimate performance and scaling limits of these devices using a proven mathematical model, and discusses the future challenges that must be overcome in order for microfluidic artificial lungs to be applied in the clinic. If all of these promising advantages are realized and the remaining challenges are met, microfluidic artificial lungs could revolutionize the field of pulmonary rehabilitation.

  4. Integrated Microfluidic Platform for Oral Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    HERR, AMY E.; HATCH, ANSON V.; GIANNOBILE, WILLIAM V.; THROCKMORTON, DANIEL J.; TRAN, HUU M.; BRENNAN, JAMES S.; SINGH, ANUP K.

    2008-01-01

    While many point-of-care (POC) diagnostic methods have been developed for blood-borne analytes, development of saliva-based POC diagnostics is in its infancy. We have developed a portable microfluidic device for detection of potential biomarkers of periodontal disease in saliva. The device performs rapid microfluidic chip-based immunoassays (<3–10 min) with low sample volume requirements (10 μL) and appreciable sensitivity (nM–pM). Our microfluidic method facilitates hands-free saliva analysis by integrating sample pretreatment (filtering, enrichment, mixing) with electrophoretic immunoassays to quickly measure analyte concentrations in minimally pretreated saliva samples. The microfluidic chip has been integrated with miniaturized electronics, optical elements, such as diode lasers, fluid-handling components, and data acquisition software to develop a portable, self-contained device. The device and methods are being tested by detecting potential biomarkers in saliva samples from patients diagnosed with periodontal disease. Our microchip-based analysis can readily be extended to detection of biomarkers of other diseases, both oral and systemic, in saliva and other oral fluids. PMID:17435142

  5. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  6. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Krisna C; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry.

  7. Integrated multifunctional microfluidics for automated proteome analyses.

    PubMed

    Osiri, John K; Shadpour, Hamed; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics is a challenging field for realizing totally integrated microfluidic systems for complete proteome processing due to several considerations, including the sheer number of different protein types that exist within most proteomes, the large dynamic range associated with these various protein types, and the diverse chemical nature of the proteins comprising a typical proteome. For example, the human proteome is estimated to have >10(6) different components with a dynamic range of >10(10). The typical processing pipeline for proteomics involves the following steps: (1) selection and/or extraction of the particular proteins to be analyzed; (2) multidimensional separation; (3) proteolytic digestion of the protein sample; and (4) mass spectral identification of either intact proteins (top-down proteomics) or peptide fragments generated from proteolytic digestions (bottom-up proteomics). Although a number of intriguing microfluidic devices have been designed, fabricated and evaluated for carrying out the individual processing steps listed above, work toward building fully integrated microfluidic systems for protein analysis has yet to be realized. In this chapter, information will be provided on the nature of proteomic analysis in terms of the challenges associated with the sample type and the microfluidic devices that have been tested to carry out individual processing steps. These include devices such as those for multidimensional electrophoretic separations, solid-phase enzymatic digestions, and solid-phase extractions, all of which have used microfluidics as the functional platform for their implementation. This will be followed by an in-depth review of microfluidic systems, which are defined as units possessing two or more devices assembled into autonomous systems for proteome processing. In addition, information will be provided on the challenges involved in integrating processing steps into a functional system and the approaches adopted for device

  8. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations.

  9. Microfluidic immunomagnetic cell separation from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanendran Nair Gourikutty, Sajay; Chang, Chia-Pin; Puiu, Poenar Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Immunomagnetic-based separation has become a viable technique for the separation of cells and biomolecules. Here we report on the design and analysis of a simple and efficient microfluidic device for high throughput and high efficiency capture of cells tagged with magnetic particles. This is made possible by using a microfluidic chip integrated with customized arrays of permanent magnets capable of creating large magnetic field gradients, which determine the effective capturing of the tagged cells. This method is based on manipulating the cells which are under the influence of a combination of magnetic and fluid dynamic forces in a fluid under laminar flow through a microfluidic chip. A finite element analysis (FEA) model is developed to analyze the cell separation process and predict its behavior, which is validated subsequently by the experimental results. The magnetic field gradients created by various arrangements of magnetic arrays have been simulated using FEA and the influence of these field gradients on cell separation has been studied with the design of our microfluidic chip. The proof-of-concept for the proposed technique is demonstrated by capturing white blood cells (WBCs) from whole human blood. CD45-conjugated magnetic particles were added into whole blood samples to label WBCs and the mixture was flown through our microfluidic device to separate the labeled cells. After the separation process, the remaining WBCs in the elute were counted to determine the capture efficiency, and it was found that more than 99.9% WBCs have been successfully separated from whole blood. The proposed design can be used for positive selection as well as for negative enrichment of rare cells.

  10. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  11. Microfluidics on liquid handling stations (μF-on-LHS): a new industry-compatible microfluidic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittelmann, Jörg; Radtke, Carsten P.; Waldbaur, Ansgar; Neumann, Christiane; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2014-03-01

    Since the early days microfluidics as a scientific discipline has been an interdisciplinary research field with a wide scope of potential applications. Besides tailored assays for point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics, microfluidics has been an important tool for large-scale screening of reagents and building blocks in organic chemistry, pharmaceutics and medical engineering. Furthermore, numerous potential marketable products have been described over the years. However, especially in industrial applications, microfluidics is often considered only an alternative technology for fluid handling, a field which is industrially mostly dominated by large-scale numerically controlled fluid and liquid handling stations. Numerous noteworthy products have dominated this field in the last decade and have been inhibited the widespread application of microfluidics technology. However, automated liquid handling stations and microfluidics do not have to be considered as mutually exclusive approached. We have recently introduced a hybrid fluidic platform combining an industrially established liquid handling station and a generic microfluidic interfacing module that allows probing a microfluidic system (such as an essay or a synthesis array) using the instrumentation provided by the liquid handling station. We term this technology "Microfluidic on Liquid Handling Stations (μF-on-LHS)" - a classical "best of both worlds"- approach that allows combining the highly evolved, automated and industry-proven LHS systems with any type of microfluidic assay. In this paper we show, to the best of our knowledge, the first droplet microfluidics application on an industrial LHS using the μF-on-LHS concept.

  12. Microfluidics as a tool for C. elegans research.

    PubMed

    San-Miguel, Adriana; Lu, Hang

    2013-09-24

    Microfluidics has emerged as a set of powerful tools that have greatly advanced some areas of biological research, including research using C. elegans. The use of microfluidics has enabled many experiments that are otherwise impossible with conventional methods. Today there are many examples that demonstrate the main advantages of using microfluidics for C. elegans research, achieving precise environmental conditions and facilitating worm handling. Examples range from behavioral analysis under precise chemical or odor stimulation, locomotion studies in well-defined structural surroundings, and even long-term culture on chip. Moreover, microfluidics has enabled coupling worm handling and imaging thus facilitating genetic screens, optogenetic studies, and laser ablation experiments. In this article, we review some of the applications of microfluidics for C. elegans research and provide guides for the design, fabrication, and use of microfluidic devices for C. elegans research studies.

  13. Manufacturing methods and applications of membranes in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueye; Shen, Jienan; Hu, Zengliang; Huo, Xuyao

    2016-12-01

    Applications of membranes in microfluidics solved many thorny problems for analytical chemistry and bioscience, so that the use of membranes in microfluidics has been a topic of growing interest. Many different examples have been reported, demonstrating the versatile use of membranes. This work reviews a lot of applications of membranes in microfluidics. Membranes in microfluidics for applications including chemical reagents detection, gas detection, drug screening, cell, protein, microreactor, electrokinetical fluid, pump and valve and fluid transport control and so on, have been analyzed and discussed. In addition, the definition and basic concepts of membranes are summed up. And the methods of manufacturing membranes in microfluidics are discussed. This paper will provide a helpful reference to researchers who want to study applications of membranes in microfluidics.

  14. Optical systems for integration with microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Jessica M.

    My thesis research has focused on means of integrating optical systems into microfluidic chips, specifically for the creation of lab-on-a-chip flow cytometers. The benefits of microfluidics are perhaps most often applied to biological assays, which frequently employ optical readout of fluorescence or light scatter. By integrating the optical system onto the microfluidic chip, we can facilitate chip interfacing while ensuring optical alignment to a tiny sample. Integrated optical systems also offer the ability to collect light from a localized area, allowing for the collection of true angular light scatter (which carries much information about cells) and can furthermore significantly improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) relative to simple fiber or waveguide based approaches to integrated light collection. This work explores both the unique challenges and advantages encountered when creating optical systems integrated with mold-replicated microfluidic devices. The first contribution presented is the demonstration of fluid-filled lenses integrated alongside microfluidic channels using a slab waveguiding structure. The use of fluid represents an important tradeoff between lens power and Fresnel reflections. The creation of a slab waveguiding structure is critically important to control light losses when utilizing lens systems for light collection. The second contribution in this work is the demonstration of a microfluidic chip emplying a number of lenses to perform both localized excitation of the samples as well as light collection from localized areas defined by a specific angular range. Sample coefficients of variation (CVs) ranged from 9-16% for a single bead population, far exceeding previously-published CVs of 25-35%. The last contribution is an atypical approach to optical systems based on the unique advantages offered by microfabricated architectures, namely small sizes and close proximities to the sample. Using only custom-shaped total internal reflection

  15. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  16. Digital microfluidic processing of mammalian embryos for vitrification.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Derek G; Liu, Jun; Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Sun, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation is a key technology in biology and clinical practice. This paper presents a digital microfluidic device that automates sample preparation for mammalian embryo vitrification. Individual micro droplets manipulated on the microfluidic device were used as micro-vessels to transport a single mouse embryo through a complete vitrification procedure. Advantages of this approach, compared to manual operation and channel-based microfluidic vitrification, include automated operation, cryoprotectant concentration gradient generation, and feasibility of loading and retrieval of embryos.

  17. Virtual microfluidics for digital quantification and single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyi; Brito, Ilana L; Alm, Eric J; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-09-01

    We have developed hydrogel-based virtual microfluidics as a simple and robust alternative to complex engineered microfluidic systems for the compartmentalization of nucleic acid amplification reactions. We applied in-gel digital multiple displacement amplification (dMDA) to purified DNA templates, cultured bacterial cells and human microbiome samples in the virtual microfluidics system, and demonstrated whole-genome sequencing of single-cell MDA products with excellent coverage uniformity and markedly reduced chimerism compared with products of liquid MDA reactions.

  18. Expanding imaging capabilities for microfluidics: applicability of darkfield internal reflection illumination (DIRI) to observations in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yoshihiro; Otsuka, Chino; Sanzo, James; Higgins, Christopher; Nirei, Tatsuo; Schilling, Tobias; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is used increasingly for engineering and biomedical applications due to recent advances in microfabrication technologies. Visualization of bubbles, tracer particles, and cells in a microfluidic device is important for designing a device and analyzing results. However, with conventional methods, it is difficult to observe the channel geometry and such particles simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, we developed a Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI) system that improved the drawbacks of a conventional darkfield illuminator. This study was performed to investigate its utility in the field of microfluidics. The results showed that the developed system could clearly visualize both microbubbles and the channel wall by utilizing brightfield and DIRI illumination simultaneously. The methodology is useful not only for static phenomena, such as clogging, but also for dynamic phenomena, such as the detection of bubbles flowing in a channel. The system was also applied to simultaneous fluorescence and DIRI imaging. Fluorescent tracer beads and channel walls were observed clearly, which may be an advantage for future microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) analysis, especially near a wall. Two types of cell stained with different colors, and the channel wall, can be recognized using the combined confocal and DIRI system. Whole-slide imaging was also conducted successfully using this system. The tiling function significantly expands the observing area of microfluidics. The developed system will be useful for a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications for the growing field of microfluidics.

  19. Direct synthesis and integration of functional nanostructures in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung; Li, Zhiyong; Park, Inkyu

    2011-06-07

    Integration of functional nanostructures within a microfluidic device can synergize the advantages of both unique properties of nanomaterials and diverse functionalities of microfluidics. In this paper, we report a novel and simple method for the in situ synthesis and integration of ZnO nanowires by controlled hydrothermal reaction within microfluidic devices. By modulating synthesis parameters such as the seed preparation, synthesis time, and heating locations, the morphology and location of synthesized nanowires can be easily controlled. The applications of such nanostructure-integrated microfluidics for particle trapping and chemiresistive pH sensing were demonstrated.

  20. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  1. Microfluidics at the crossroad with point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linder, Vincent

    2007-12-01

    Microfluidic devices have been long advertised as a key candidate to revolutionize point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. Recent advances in this field have addressed some of the most important issues, which limited the deployment of microfluidic devices outside of clinical laboratories. This contribution discusses important technical and economic constraints that microfluidic products must overcome to be adopted by healthcare systems. Two sets of technologies are described which comply with the constraints of the POC environment. As such, these technologies illustrate a possible route for the development of microfluidic devices, which could fulfil the needs of clinicians for disease staging and monitoring.

  2. Fundamentals and applications of inertial microfluidics: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yan, Sheng; Yuan, Dan; Alici, Gursel; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Li, Weihua

    2016-01-07

    In the last decade, inertial microfluidics has attracted significant attention and a wide variety of channel designs that focus, concentrate and separate particles and fluids have been demonstrated. In contrast to conventional microfluidic technologies, where fluid inertia is negligible and flow remains almost within the Stokes flow region with very low Reynolds number (Re ≪ 1), inertial microfluidics works in the intermediate Reynolds number range (~1 < Re < ~100) between Stokes and turbulent regimes. In this intermediate range, both inertia and fluid viscosity are finite and bring about several intriguing effects that form the basis of inertial microfluidics including (i) inertial migration and (ii) secondary flow. Due to the superior features of high-throughput, simplicity, precise manipulation and low cost, inertial microfluidics is a very promising candidate for cellular sample processing, especially for samples with low abundant targets. In this review, we first discuss the fundamental kinematics of particles in microchannels to familiarise readers with the mechanisms and underlying physics in inertial microfluidic systems. We then present a comprehensive review of recent developments and key applications of inertial microfluidic systems according to their microchannel structures. Finally, we discuss the perspective of employing fluid inertia in microfluidics for particle manipulation. Due to the superior benefits of inertial microfluidics, this promising technology will still be an attractive topic in the near future, with more novel designs and further applications in biology, medicine and industry on the horizon.

  3. Fundamentals of microfluidic cell culture in controlled microenvironments†

    PubMed Central

    Young, Edmond W. K.; Beebe, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidics has the potential to revolutionize the way we approach cell biology research. The dimensions of microfluidic channels are well suited to the physical scale of biological cells, and the many advantages of microfluidics make it an attractive platform for new techniques in biology. One of the key benefits of microfluidics for basic biology is the ability to control parameters of the cell microenvironment at relevant length and time scales. Considerable progress has been made in the design and use of novel microfluidic devices for culturing cells and for subsequent treatment and analysis. With the recent pace of scientific discovery, it is becoming increasingly important to evaluate existing tools and techniques, and to synthesize fundamental concepts that would further improve the efficiency of biological research at the microscale. This tutorial review integrates fundamental principles from cell biology and local microenvironments with cell culture techniques and concepts in microfluidics. Culturing cells in microscale environments requires knowledge of multiple disciplines including physics, biochemistry, and engineering. We discuss basic concepts related to the physical and biochemical microenvironments of the cell, physicochemical properties of that microenvironment, cell culture techniques, and practical knowledge of microfluidic device design and operation. We also discuss the most recent advances in microfluidic cell culture and their implications on the future of the field. The goal is to guide new and interested researchers to the important areas and challenges facing the scientific community as we strive toward full integration of microfluidics with biology. PMID:20179823

  4. Microfluidic methods for non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wing-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is a compelling technology that shows considerable promise in applications ranging from gene expression profiling to cell-based assays. Owing to its capacity to enable generation of single droplets and multiple droplet arrays with precisely controlled composition and a narrow size distribution, recently microfluidics has been exploited for delivery of genes. This article provides an overview of recent advances in microfluidic gene delivery, and speculates the prospects for further research. The objectives of this article are to illustrate the potential roles played by microfluidics in gene delivery research, and to shed new light on strategies to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy.

  5. Microfluidics expanding the frontiers of microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Roberto; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, across scales from a single cell to mixed communities. Spatially and temporally varying distributions of organisms and chemical cues that mimic natural microbial habitats can now be established by exploiting physics at the micrometer scale and by incorporating structures with specific geometries and materials. In this article, we review applications of microfluidics that have resulted in insightful discoveries on fundamental aspects of microbial life, ranging from growth and sensing to cell-cell interactions and population dynamics. We anticipate that this flexible multidisciplinary technology will continue to facilitate discoveries regarding the ecology of microorganisms and help uncover strategies to control microbial processes such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance.

  6. Microfluidic PMMA interfaces for rectangular glass capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evander, Mikael; Tenje, Maria

    2014-02-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a polymeric capillary fluidic interface fabricated by micro-milling. The design enables the use of glass capillaries with any kind of cross-section in complex microfluidic setups. We demonstrate two different designs of the interface; a double-inlet interface for hydrodynamic focusing and a capillary interface with integrated pneumatic valves. Both capillary interfaces are presented together with examples of practical applications. This communication shows the design optimization and presents details of the fabrication process. The capillary interface opens up for the use of complex microfluidic systems in single-use glass capillaries. They also enable simple fabrication of glass/polymer hybrid devices that can be beneficial in many research fields where a pure polymer chip negatively affects the device's performance, e.g. acoustofluidics.

  7. Optimization of monolithic columns for microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaduan, Jayson V.; Yang, Weichun; Woolley, Adam T.

    2011-06-01

    Monolithic columns offer advantages as solid-phase extractors because they offer high surface area that can be tailored to a specific function, fast mass transport, and ease of fabrication. Porous glycidyl methacrylate-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate monoliths were polymerized in-situ in microfluidic devices, without pre-treatment of the poly(methyl methacrylate) channel surface. Cyclohexanol, 1-dodecanol and Tween 20 were used to control the pore size of the monoliths. The epoxy groups on the monolith surface can be utilized to immobilize target-specific probes such as antibodies, aptamers, or DNA for biomarker detection. Microfluidic devices integrated with solid-phase extractors should be useful for point-of-care diagnostics in detecting specific biomarkers from complex biological fluids.

  8. Stem cell niche engineering through droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Allazetta, Simone; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells reside in complex niches in which their behaviour is tightly regulated by various biochemical and biophysical signals. In order to unveil some of the crucial stem cell-niche interactions and expedite the implementation of stem cells in clinical and pharmaceutical applications, in vitro methodologies are being developed to reconstruct key features of stem cell niches. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as a promising strategy to build stem cell niche models in a miniaturized and highly precise fashion. This review highlights current advances in using droplet microfluidics in stem cell biology. We also discuss recent efforts in which microgel technology has been interfaced with high-throughput analyses to engender screening paradigms with an unparalleled potential for basic and applied biological studies.

  9. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  10. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  11. Chemical control of Vorticella bioactuator using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Moeto; Ryu, Sangjin; Thorsen, Todd; Matsudaira, Paul; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-21

    In this report, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform to control the stalk contraction and extension of Vorticella convallaria by changing concentration of Ca2+ with pneumatically-actuated elastomeric microvalves. Habitation, extraction and control of V. convallaria were carried out in a PDMS-based microfluidic device. By treating the cells with the permeant saponin, external actuation of cell-anchoring stalk between an extended and contracted state was achieved by cyclic exposure of the cells to a Ca2+ buffer (10(-6) M) and a rinse buffer containing EGTA as a chelation agent. When solutions were switched, the stalk contracted and extended responding to the ambient Ca2+ concentration change. The length of the stalk changed between 20 and 60 microm, resulting in a working distance of about 40 microm.

  12. Bonding PMMA microfluidics using commercial microwave ovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toossi, A.; Moghadas, H.; Daneshmand, M.; Sameoto, D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel low-cost, rapid substrate-bonding technique is successfully applied to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microfluidics bonding for the first time. This technique uses a thin intermediate metallic microwave susceptor layer at the interface of the bonding site (microchannels) which produces localized heating required for bonding during microwave irradiation. The metallic susceptor pattern is designed using a multiphysics simulation model developed in ANSYS Multiphysics software (high-frequency structural simulation (HFSS) coupled with ANSYS-Thermal). In our experiments, the required microwave energy for bonding is delivered using a relatively inexpensive, widely accessible commercial microwave oven. Using this technique, simple PMMA microfluidics prototypes are successfully bonded and sealed in less than 35 seconds with a minimum measured bond strength of 1.375 MPa.

  13. A Microfluidic Chip for ICPMS Sample Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Verboket, Pascal E.; Borovinskaya, Olga; Meyer, Nicole; Günther, Detlef; Dittrich, Petra S.

    2015-01-01

    This protocol discusses the fabrication and usage of a disposable low cost microfluidic chip as sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The chip produces monodisperse aqueous sample droplets in perfluorohexane (PFH). Size and frequency of the aqueous droplets can be varied in the range of 40 to 60 µm and from 90 to 7,000 Hz, respectively. The droplets are ejected from the chip with a second flow of PFH and remain intact during the ejection. A custom-built desolvation system removes the PFH and transports the droplets into the ICPMS. Here, very stable signals with a narrow intensity distribution can be measured, showing the monodispersity of the droplets. We show that the introduction system can be used to quantitatively determine iron in single bovine red blood cells. In the future, the capabilities of the introduction device can easily be extended by the integration of additional microfluidic modules. PMID:25867751

  14. Structural Determination of Biomolecules in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, John C.; Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2004-03-01

    Supramolecular biological complexes are often too large to be crystallized for structural studies. Here, we explore the use of microfluidic arrays to order a model self-assembled cytoskeletal system. Filamentous actin (F-actin) is a negatively charged protein rod and is a key structural component in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. In this context, F-actin can self-assemble with actin binding proteins (ABP) in a highly regulated manner to dynamically form structures for a wide range of biomechanical functions. In this work, we will systematically study the action of 3 types of actin binding proteins (a-actinin, fimbrin, cofilin) on the self-assembled structures of F-actin that have been aligned in microfluidic arrays.

  15. Microfluidic route to generation of celloidosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundabala, Venkata; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Marquez, Samantha; Marquez, Manuel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Microfluidics Team

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a microfluidic method to generate alginate particles with a liquid core and a shell with yeast cells encapsulated in it. This particular class of celloidosomes with cells embedded into the thin shell region at the surface, allows for easy access of oxygen to the cells improving their viability. The liquid core opens the possibility of encapsulating multiple types of cells into the core and the shell. The microfluidic method involving double emulsion technology employed here ensures robust control over the size of the particles and density of the encapsulated cells. The study has shown that the stability of the inner core is very much dependent on the viscosity of the oil used for collecting the emulsion.

  16. Magnetic Tethering of Microswimmers in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawan, Aschvin; Jana, Saikat; Ghosh, Suvojit; Jung, Sunghwan; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Exercising control over animal locomotion is well known in the macro world. In the micro-scale world, such methods require more sophistication. We magnetize Paramecium multimicronucleatum by internalization of magnetite nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This enables control of their motion in a microfluidic device using a magnetic field. Miniature permanent magnets embedded within the device are used to tether the magnetized organisms to specific locations along a micro-channel. Ciliary beatings of the microswimmer generate shear flows nearby. We apply this setup to enhance cross-stream mixing in a microfluidic device by supplementing molecular diffusion. The device is similar to an active micromixer but requires no external power sources or artificial actuators. We optically characterize the effectiveness of the mechanism in a variety of flow situations.

  17. Microfluidic Electroporation for Cellular Analysis and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Electroporation is a simple yet powerful technique for breaching cell membrane barrier. The applications of electroporation can be generally divided into two categories: the release of intracellular proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites for analysis and the delivery of exogenous reagents such as genes, drugs and nanoparticles with therapeutic purposes or for cellular manipulation. In this review, we go over the basic physics associated with cell electroporation and highlight recent technological advances on microfluidic platforms for conducting electroporation. Within the context of its working mechanism, we summarize the accumulated knowledge on how the parameters of electroporation affect its performance for various tasks. We discuss various strategies and designs for conducting electroporation at microscale and then focus on analysis of intracellular contents and delivery of exogenous agents as two major applications of the technique. Finally, an outlook for future applications of microfluidic electroporation in increasingly diverse utilities is presented. PMID:23917998

  18. Evaluation of Manufacturing Processes for Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura Jáuregui, Ana; Siller, Héctor R.; Rodriguez, Ciro A.; Elías-Zúñiga, Alex

    2009-11-01

    In this paper several micro-mechanical manufacturing technologies were studied in order to characterize their performance for making miniaturized geometries known as micro-channels, which are the main geometric features of micro-fluidic devices. The technologies used were Micro-End Milling, Wire Electro Discharge Machiningesol Sandblasting and Abrasive Water Jet. Their capabilities were compared with Lithography capabilities, which is the conventional process for micro-channel manufacturing. The evaluation consists in a comprehensive study of surface quality and topography, made with the help of advanced contact and non-contact devices over each prototype made by each technology. Also economical considerations have been taken into account in order to choose the most appropriate manufacturing process for the prototyping of micro-fluidic devices. The results show that Micro-End Milling process can compete with Lithography, in terms of achieving acceptable levels of product quality and economics.

  19. Microfluidic systems for electrochemical and biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ackler, H., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    Microfluidic devices with microelectrodes have the potential to enable studies of phenomena at size scales where behavior may be dominated by different mechanisms than at macroscales. Through our work developing microfluidic devices for dielectrophoretic separation and sensing of cells and particles, we have fabricated devices from which general or more specialized research devices may be derived. Fluid channels from 80 {micro}m wide X 20 {micro}m deep to 1 mm wide to 200 {micro}m deep have been fabricated in glass, with lithographically patterned electrodes from 10 to 80 {micro}m wide on one or both sides on the channels and over topographies tens of microns in heights. the devices are designed to easily interface to electronic and fluidic interconnect packages that permit reuse of devices, rather than one-time use, crude glue-based methods. Such devices may be useful for many applications of interest to the electrochemical and biological community.

  20. Preparative Microfluidic Electrosynthesis of Drug Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In vivo, a drug molecule undergoes its first chemical transformation within the liver via CYP450-catalyzed oxidation. The chemical outcome of the first pass hepatic oxidation is key information to any drug development process. Electrochemistry can be used to simulate CYP450 oxidation, yet it is often confined to the analytical scale, hampering product isolation and full characterization. In an effort to replicate hepatic oxidations, while retaining high throughput at the preparative scale, microfluidic technology and electrochemistry are combined in this study by using a microfluidic electrochemical cell. Several commercial drugs were subjected to continuous-flow electrolysis. They were chosen for their various chemical reactivity: their metabolites in vivo are generated via aromatic hydroxylation, alkyl oxidation, glutathione conjugation, or sulfoxidation. It is demonstrated that such metabolites can be synthesized by flow electrolysis at the 10 to 100 mg scale, and the purified products are fully characterized. PMID:24900614

  1. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C.; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A.; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials. PMID:23863998

  2. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  3. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  4. Microfluidic devices for terahertz spectroscopy of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    George, Paul A; Hui, Wallace; Rana, Farhan; Hawkins, Benjamin G; Smith, A Ezekiel; Kirby, Brian J

    2008-02-04

    We demonstrate microfluidic devices for terahertz spectroscopy of biomolecules in aqueous solutions. The devices are fabricated out of a plastic material that is both mechanically rigid and optically transparent with near-zero dispersion in the terahertz frequency range. Using a lowpower terahertz time-domain spectrometer, we experimentally measure the absorption spectra of the vibrational modes of bovine serum albumin from 0.5 - 2.5 THz and find good agreement with previously reported data obtained using large-volume solutions and a high-power free-electron laser. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of performing high sensitivity terahertz spectroscopy of biomolecules in aqueous solutions with detectable molecular quantities as small as 10 picomoles using microfluidic devices.

  5. Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Rusconi, Roberto; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The ability afforded by microfluidics to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled and confined microenvironments, across scales from a single cell to mixed communities, has significantly contributed to expand the frontiers of microbial ecology over the last decade. Spatially and temporally varying distributions of organisms and chemical cues that mimic natural microbial habitats can now be established by exploiting physics at the micrometer scale and by incorporating structures with specific geometries and materials. Here we review applications of microfluidics that have resulted in highly insightful discoveries on fundamental aspects of microbial life, ranging from growth and sensing to cell-cell interactions and population dynamics. We anticipate that this flexible, multidisciplinary technology will continue to facilitate discoveries regarding the ecology of microorganisms and help uncover strategies to control phenomena such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:24773019

  6. A microfluidic chip for ICPMS sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Verboket, Pascal E; Borovinskaya, Olga; Meyer, Nicole; Günther, Detlef; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-03-05

    This protocol discusses the fabrication and usage of a disposable low cost microfluidic chip as sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The chip produces monodisperse aqueous sample droplets in perfluorohexane (PFH). Size and frequency of the aqueous droplets can be varied in the range of 40 to 60 µm and from 90 to 7,000 Hz, respectively. The droplets are ejected from the chip with a second flow of PFH and remain intact during the ejection. A custom-built desolvation system removes the PFH and transports the droplets into the ICPMS. Here, very stable signals with a narrow intensity distribution can be measured, showing the monodispersity of the droplets. We show that the introduction system can be used to quantitatively determine iron in single bovine red blood cells. In the future, the capabilities of the introduction device can easily be extended by the integration of additional microfluidic modules.

  7. Picoinjection of Microfluidic Drops Without Metal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, Brian; Tran, Tuan; Sciambi, Adam; Abate, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for picoinjecting reagents into microfluidic drops require metal electrodes integrated into the microfluidic chip. The integration of these electrodes adds cumbersome and error-prone steps to the device fabrication process. We have developed a technique that obviates the needs for metal electrodes during picoinjection. Instead, it uses the injection fluid itself as an electrode, since most biological reagents contain dissolved electrolytes and are conductive. By eliminating the electrodes, we reduce device fabrication time and complexity, and make the devices more robust. In addition, with our approach, the injection volume depends on the voltage applied to the picoinjection solution; this allows us to rapidly adjust the volume injected by modulating the applied voltage. We demonstrate that our technique is compatible with reagents incorporating common biological compounds, including buffers, enzymes, and nucleic acids. PMID:24797680

  8. Microfluidic technologies for studying synthetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benjamin; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-08-01

    Advances in synthetic biology have augmented the available toolkit of biomolecular modules, allowing engineering and manipulation of signaling in a variety of organisms, ranging in complexity from single bacteria and eukaryotic cells to multi-cellular systems. The richness of synthetic circuit outputs can be dramatically enhanced by sophisticated environmental control systems designed to precisely pattern spatial-temporally heterogeneous environmental stimuli controlling these circuits. Moreover, the performance of the synthetic modules and 'blocks' needed to assemble more complicated networks requires more complete characterization as a function of arbitrarily complex environmental inputs. Microfluidic technologies are poised to meet these needs through a variety of innovative designs capitalizing on the unique benefits of manipulating fluids on the micro-scales and nano-scales. This review discusses the utility of microfluidics for the study of synthetic circuits and highlights recent work in the area.

  9. Multiplexed microfluidic approach for nucleic acid enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Langevin, Stanley Alan; Bent, Zachary; Renzi, Ronald F.; Ferko, Scott M.; Van De Vreugde, James L.; Lane, Todd; Patel, Kamlesh; Branda, Steven

    2016-04-26

    A system for enhancing a nucleic acid sample may include a one pump, a denaturing chamber; a microfluidic hydroxyapatite chromatography device configured for performing hydroxyapatite chromatography on the nucleic acid sample, a sample collector, and tubing connecting the pump with the denaturing chamber, the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and the sample collector such that the pump may be used to move the nucleic acid sample from the denaturing chamber to the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and then to the sample collector.

  10. Fluid delivery manifolds and microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.; Hatch, Anson V.; Claudnic, Mark R.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Van de Vreugde, James L.

    2017-02-28

    Embodiments of fluid distribution manifolds, cartridges, and microfluidic systems are described herein. Fluid distribution manifolds may include an insert member and a manifold base and may define a substantially closed channel within the manifold when the insert member is press-fit into the base. Cartridges described herein may allow for simultaneous electrical and fluidic interconnection with an electrical multiplex board and may be held in place using magnetic attraction.

  11. Note: Professional grade microfluidics fabricated simply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Anna; Davis, Mark; Aprelev, Alexey; Ferrone, Frank A.

    2016-10-01

    Microfluidics has found increasingly wide usage in the research and teaching laboratory, but setting up a facility for its production has typically required either significant capital expense or sacrifice of quality. We present an approach to produce devices, without a clean room, using LEDs and spin-coaters, and plasma bonded using a commercial microwave oven. Submicron features can be readily reproduced with good fidelity.

  12. Microfluidics apparatus and methods for use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, John P.; Wiggins, Thomas; Ghosh, Madhushree; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Seminara, Salvatore; Hu, Zhiyu; Seeley, Timothy; Kossek, Sebastian

    2005-08-09

    A microfluidics device includes a plurality of interaction cells and fluid control means including i) means for providing to the interaction cells a preparation fluid, and ii) means for providing to the interaction cells a sample fluid, wherein each interaction cell receives a different sample fluid. A plurality of microcantilevers may be disposed in each of the interaction cells, wherein each of the plurality of microcantilevers configured to deflect in response to an interaction involving a component of the sample fluid.

  13. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  14. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  15. Formation of interconnections to microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Griego, Leonardo

    2003-07-29

    A method is disclosed to form external interconnections to a microfluidic device for coupling of a fluid or light or both into a microchannel of the device. This method can be used to form optical or fluidic interconnections to microchannels previously formed on a substrate, or to form both the interconnections and microchannels during the same process steps. The optical and fluidic interconnections are formed parallel to the plane of the substrate, and are fluid tight.

  16. A capillary valve for microfluidic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Rush, Brian M.

    2004-10-01

    Microfluidic systems are becoming increasingly complicated as the number of applications grows. The use of microfluidic systems for chemical and biological agent detection, for example, requires that a given sample be subjected to many process steps, which requires microvalves to control the position and transport of the sample. Each microfluidic application has its own specific valve requirements and this has precipitated the wide variety of valve designs reported in the literature. Each of these valve designs has its strengths and weaknesses. The strength of the valve design proposed here is its simplicity, which makes it easy to fabricate, easy to actuate, and easy to integrate with a microfluidic system. It can be applied to either gas phase or liquid phase systems. This novel design uses a secondary fluid to stop the flow of the primary fluid in the system. The secondary fluid must be chosen based on the type of flow that it must stop. A dielectric fluid must be used for a liquid phase flow driven by electroosmosis, and a liquid with a large surface tension should be used to stop a gas phase flow driven by a weak pressure differential. Experiments were carried out investigating certain critical functions of the design. These experiments verified that the secondary fluid can be reversibly moved between its 'valve opened' and 'valve closed' positions, where the secondary fluid remained as one contiguous piece during this transport process. The experiments also verified that when Fluorinert is used as the secondary fluid, the valve can break an electric circuit. It was found necessary to apply a hydrophobic coating to the microchannels to stop the primary fluid, an aqueous electrolyte, from wicking past the Fluorinert and short-circuiting the valve. A simple model was used to develop valve designs that could be closed using an electrokinetic pump, and re-opened by simply turning the pump off and allowing capillary forces to push the secondary fluid back into its

  17. Simple Check Valves for Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Harold F.; Smith, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A simple design concept for check valves has been adopted for microfluidic devices that consist mostly of (1) deformable fluorocarbon polymer membranes sandwiched between (2) borosilicate float glass wafers into which channels, valve seats, and holes have been etched. The first microfluidic devices in which these check valves are intended to be used are micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. In this application, it will be necessary to store some liquid samples in reservoirs in the devices for subsequent laboratory analysis, and check valves are needed to prevent cross-contamination of the samples. The simple check-valve design concept is also applicable to other microfluidic devices and to fluidic devices in general. These check valves are simplified microscopic versions of conventional rubber- flap check valves that are parts of numerous industrial and consumer products. These check valves are fabricated, not as separate components, but as integral parts of microfluidic devices. A check valve according to this concept consists of suitably shaped portions of a deformable membrane and the two glass wafers between which the membrane is sandwiched (see figure). The valve flap is formed by making an approximately semicircular cut in the membrane. The flap is centered over a hole in the lower glass wafer, through which hole the liquid in question is intended to flow upward into a wider hole, channel, or reservoir in the upper glass wafer. The radius of the cut exceeds the radius of the hole by an amount large enough to prevent settling of the flap into the hole. As in a conventional rubber-flap check valve, back pressure in the liquid pushes the flap against the valve seat (in this case, the valve seat is the adjacent surface of the lower glass wafer), thereby forming a seal that prevents backflow.

  18. Mixing in microfluidic devices and enhancement methods

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kevin; Fan, Z Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Mixing in microfluidic devices presents a challenge due to laminar flows in microchannels, which result from low Reynolds numbers determined by the channel’s hydraulic diameter, flow velocity, and solution’s kinetic viscosity. To address this challenge, novel methods of mixing enhancement within microfluidic devices have been explored for a variety of applications. Passive mixing methods have been created, including those using ridges or slanted wells within the microchannels, as well as their variations with improved performance by varying geometry and patterns, by changing the properties of channel surfaces, and by optimization via simulations. In addition, active mixing methods including microstirrers, acoustic mixers, and flow pulsation have been investigated and integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance mixing in a more controllable manner. In general, passive mixers are easy to integrate, but difficult to control externally by users after fabrication. Active mixers usually take efforts to integrate within a device and they require external components (e.g. power sources) to operate. However, they can be controlled by users to a certain degree for tuned mixing. In this article, we provide a general overview of a number of passive and active mixers, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and make suggestions on choosing a mixing method for a specific need as well as advocate possible integration of key elements of passive and active mixers to harness the advantages of both types. PMID:26549938

  19. Orientation-Based Control of Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Nazila; Bhakta, Heran C.; Grover, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Most microfluidic chips utilize off-chip hardware (syringe pumps, computer-controlled solenoid valves, pressure regulators, etc.) to control fluid flow on-chip. This expensive, bulky, and power-consuming hardware severely limits the utility of microfluidic instruments in resource-limited or point-of-care contexts, where the cost, size, and power consumption of the instrument must be limited. In this work, we present a technique for on-chip fluid control that requires no off-chip hardware. We accomplish this by using inert compounds to change the density of one fluid in the chip. If one fluid is made 2% more dense than a second fluid, when the fluids flow together under laminar flow the interface between the fluids quickly reorients to be orthogonal to Earth’s gravitational force. If the channel containing the fluids then splits into two channels, the amount of each fluid flowing into each channel is precisely determined by the angle of the channels relative to gravity. Thus, any fluid can be routed in any direction and mixed in any desired ratio on-chip simply by holding the chip at a certain angle. This approach allows for sophisticated control of on-chip fluids with no off-chip control hardware, significantly reducing the cost of microfluidic instruments in point-of-care or resource-limited settings. PMID:26950700

  20. Microfluidic biosensing systems using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-09-09

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. A Microfluidic Platform for Interfacial Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Young Soo; Moran, Jeffrey; Jones, Andrew; Bailey, Eric; Buie, Cullen

    2014-11-01

    Composite membranes of hydrogel and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fabricated using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at the interface of two immiscible liquids in microfluidic channels. Microfluidic channels, which have two parallel electrodes at the walls, are used to create electric fields across the interface of oil and water continuously supplied into the channels. Depending on the Reynolds (Re) and Weber (We) numbers of oil and water, we observe different formations of the interface. Once we find the optimal Re and We to create a planar interface in the channel, we apply an electric field across the interface for EPD of CNTs and/or silver (Ag) nanorods dispersed in water. During EPD, particles migrate to the oil/water interface, where cross-linking of polymers is induced to form composite hydrogel membranes. Properties of the composite hydrogel films are controlled by electric fields, CNT concentrations, and both Re and We numbers, allowing for continuous production. This fabrication method is effective to create composite polymer membranes placed in microfluidic devices with tunable electrical, mechanical, and biological properties. Potential applications include fabrication of doped hydrogels for drug delivery, conductive hydrogels for biological sensing, and electron permeable membranes for water splitting and osmotic power generation.

  2. Graphene-based microfluidics for serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sui, Shuo; Wang, Yuxi; Kolewe, Kristopher W; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schiffman, Jessica D; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Perry, Sarah L

    2016-08-02

    Microfluidic strategies to enable the growth and subsequent serial crystallographic analysis of micro-crystals have the potential to facilitate both structural characterization and dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. However, adapting microfluidic crystallization platforms for micro-crystallography requires a dramatic decrease in the overall device thickness. We report a robust strategy for the straightforward incorporation of single-layer graphene into ultra-thin microfluidic devices. This architecture allows for a total material thickness of only ∼1 μm, facilitating on-chip X-ray diffraction analysis while creating a sample environment that is stable against significant water loss over several weeks. We demonstrate excellent signal-to-noise in our X-ray diffraction measurements using a 1.5 μs polychromatic X-ray exposure, and validate our approach via on-chip structure determination using hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) as a model system. Although this work is focused on the use of graphene for protein crystallography, we anticipate that this technology should find utility in a wide range of both X-ray and other lab on a chip applications.

  3. A metering rotary nanopump for microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Darby, Scott G; Moore, Matthew R; Friedlander, Troy A; Schaffer, David K; Reiserer, Ron S; Wikswo, John P; Seale, Kevin T

    2010-12-07

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a microfabricated metering rotary nanopump for the purpose of driving fluid flow in microfluidic devices. The miniature peristaltic pump is composed of a set of microfluidic channels wrapped in a helix around a central camshaft in which a non-cylindrical cam rotates. The cam compresses the helical channels to induce peristaltic flow as it is rotated. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopump design is able to produce intermittent delivery or removal of several nanolitres of fluid per revolution as well as consistent continuous flow rates ranging from as low as 15 nL min(-1) to above 1.0 µL min(-1). At back pressures encountered in typical microfluidic devices, the pump acts as a high impedance flow source. The durability, biocompatibility, ease of integration with soft-lithographic fabrication, the use of a simple rotary motor instead of multiple synchronized pneumatic or mechanical actuators, and the absence of power consumption or fluidic conductance in the resting state all contribute to a compact pump with a low cost of fabrication and versatile implementation. This suggests that the pump design may be useful for a wide variety of biological experiments and point of care devices.

  4. Microfluidic extensional rheometry using stagnation point flow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the extensional rheometry of fluids with complex microstructures is of great relevance to the optimization of a wide range of industrial applications and for understanding various natural processes, biological functions, and diseases. However, quantitative measurement of the extensional properties of complex fluids has proven elusive to researchers, particularly in the case of low viscosity, weakly elastic fluids. For some time, microfluidic platforms have been recognized as having the potential to fill this gap and various approaches have been proposed. This review begins with a general discussion of extensional viscosity and the requirements of an extensional rheometer, before various types of extensional rheometers (particularly those of microfluidic design) are critically discussed. A specific focus is placed on microfluidic stagnation point extensional flows generated by cross-slot type devices, for which some important developments have been reported during the last 10 years. Additional emphasis is placed on measurements made on relevant biological fluids. Finally, the operating limits of the cross-slot extensional rheometer (chiefly imposed by the onset of elastic and inertial flow instabilities) are discussed. PMID:27099647

  5. A metering rotary nanopump for microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Darby, Scott G.; Moore, Matthew R.; Friedlander, Troy A.; Schaffer, David K.; Reiserer, Ron S.; Wikswo, John P.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a microfabricated metering rotary nanopump for the purpose of driving fluid flow in microfluidic devices. The miniature peristaltic pump is composed of a set of microfluidic channels wrapped in a helix around a central cam shaft in which a non-cylindrical cam rotates. The cam compresses the helical channels to induce peristaltic flow as it is rotated. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopump design is able to produce intermittent delivery or removal of several nanoliters of fluid per revolution as well as consistent continuous flow rates ranging from as low as 15 nL/min to above 1.0 µL/min. At back pressures encountered in typical microfluidic devices, the pump acts as a high impedance flow source. The durability, biocompatibility, ease of integration with soft-lithographic fabrication, the use of a simple rotary motor instead of multiple synchronized pneumatic or mechanical actuators, and the absence of power consumption or fluidic conductance in the resting state all contribute to a compact pump with a low cost of fabrication and versatile implementation. This suggests that the pump design may be useful for a wide variety of biological experiments and point of care devices. PMID:20959938

  6. Mixing in microfluidic devices and enhancement methods.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kevin; Fan, Z Hugh

    2015-09-01

    Mixing in microfluidic devices presents a challenge due to laminar flows in microchannels, which result from low Reynolds numbers determined by the channel's hydraulic diameter, flow velocity, and solution's kinetic viscosity. To address this challenge, novel methods of mixing enhancement within microfluidic devices have been explored for a variety of applications. Passive mixing methods have been created, including those using ridges or slanted wells within the microchannels, as well as their variations with improved performance by varying geometry and patterns, by changing the properties of channel surfaces, and by optimization via simulations. In addition, active mixing methods including microstirrers, acoustic mixers, and flow pulsation have been investigated and integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance mixing in a more controllable manner. In general, passive mixers are easy to integrate, but difficult to control externally by users after fabrication. Active mixers usually take efforts to integrate within a device and they require external components (e.g. power sources) to operate. However, they can be controlled by users to a certain degree for tuned mixing. In this article, we provide a general overview of a number of passive and active mixers, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and make suggestions on choosing a mixing method for a specific need as well as advocate possible integration of key elements of passive and active mixers to harness the advantages of both types.

  7. Mixing in microfluidic devices and enhancement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Kevin; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2015-09-01

    Mixing in microfluidic devices presents a challenge due to laminar flows in microchannels, which result from low Reynolds numbers determined by the channel’s hydraulic diameter, flow velocity, and solution’s kinetic viscosity. To address this challenge, novel methods of mixing enhancement within microfluidic devices have been explored for a variety of applications. Passive mixing methods have been created, including those using ridges or slanted wells within the microchannels, as well as their variations with improved performance by varying geometry and patterns, by changing the properties of channel surfaces, and by optimization via simulations. In addition, active mixing methods including microstirrers, acoustic mixers, and flow pulsation have been investigated and integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance mixing in a more controllable manner. In general, passive mixers are easy to integrate, but difficult to control externally by users after fabrication. Active mixers usually take efforts to integrate within a device and they require external components (e.g. power sources) to operate. However, they can be controlled by users to a certain degree for tuned mixing. In this article, we provide a general overview of a number of passive and active mixers, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and make suggestions on choosing a mixing method for a specific need as well as advocate possible integration of key elements of passive and active mixers to harness the advantages of both types.

  8. Microfluidic Blood Cell Preparation: Now and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Blood plays an important role in homeostatic regulation with each of its cellular components having important therapeutic and diagnostic uses. Therefore, separation and sorting of blood cells has been of a great interest to clinicians and researchers. However, while conventional methods of processing blood have been successful in generating relatively pure fractions, they are time consuming, labor intensive, and are not optimal for processing small volume blood samples. In recent years, microfluidics has garnered great interest from clinicians and researchers as a powerful technology for separating blood into different cell fractions. As microfluidics involves fluid manipulation at the microscale level, it has the potential for achieving high-resolution separation and sorting of blood cells down to a single-cell level, with an added benefit of integrating physical and biological methods for blood cell separation and analysis on the same single chip platform. This paper will first review the conventional methods of processing and sorting blood cells, followed by a discussion on how microfluidics is emerging as an efficient tool to rapidly change the field of blood cell sorting for blood-based therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:24515899

  9. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, C.; Vincent, F.; Homsy, A.; Ehrmann, K.; Boero, G.; Besse, P.-A.; Daridon, A.; Verpoorte, E.; de Rooij, N. F.; Popovic, R. S.

    2003-10-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120, and 470 nL. The achieved sensitivity enables acquisition of an 1H spectrum of 160 μg sucrose in D 2O, corresponding to a proof-of-concept for on-chip NMR spectroscopy. Increase of mass-sensitivity with coil diameter reduction is demonstrated experimentally for planar microcoils. Models that enable quantitative prediction of the signal-to-noise ratio and of the influence of microfluidic channel geometry on spectral resolution are presented and successfully compared to the experimental data. The main factor presently limiting sensitivity for high-resolution applications is identified as being probe-induced static magnetic field distortions. Finally, based on the presented model and measured data, future performance of planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes is extrapolated and discussed.

  10. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Massin, C; Vincent, F; Homsy, A; Ehrmann, K; Boero, G; Besse, P-A; Daridon, A; Verpoorte, E; de Rooij, N F; Popovic, R S

    2003-10-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120, and 470 nL. The achieved sensitivity enables acquisition of an 1H spectrum of 160 microg sucrose in D2O, corresponding to a proof-of-concept for on-chip NMR spectroscopy. Increase of mass-sensitivity with coil diameter reduction is demonstrated experimentally for planar microcoils. Models that enable quantitative prediction of the signal-to-noise ratio and of the influence of microfluidic channel geometry on spectral resolution are presented and successfully compared to the experimental data. The main factor presently limiting sensitivity for high-resolution applications is identified as being probe-induced static magnetic field distortions. Finally, based on the presented model and measured data, future performance of planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes is extrapolated and discussed.

  11. Microfab-less Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis Devices

    PubMed Central

    Segato, Thiago P.; Bhakta, Samir A.; Gordon, Matthew; Carrilho, Emanuel; Willis, Peter A.; Jiao, Hong; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to conventional bench-top instruments, microfluidic devices possess advantageous characteristics including great portability potential, reduced analysis time (minutes), and relatively inexpensive production, putting them on the forefront of modern analytical chemistry. Fabrication of these devices, however, often involves polymeric materials with less-than-ideal surface properties, specific instrumentation, and cumbersome fabrication procedures. In order to overcome such drawbacks, a new hybrid platform is proposed. The platform is centered on the use of 5 interconnecting microfluidic components that serve as the injector or reservoirs. These plastic units are interconnected using standard capillary tubing, enabling in-channel detection by a wide variety of standard techniques, including capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D). Due to the minimum impact on the separation efficiency, the plastic microfluidic components used for the experiments discussed herein were fabricated using an inexpensive engraving tool and standard Plexiglas. The presented approach (named 52-platform) offers a previously unseen versatility: enabling the assembly of the platform within minutes using capillary tubing that differs in length, diameter, or material. The advantages of the proposed design are demonstrated by performing the analysis of inorganic cations by capillary electrophoresis on soil samples from the Atacama Desert. PMID:23585815

  12. Robust fluidic connections to freestanding microfluidic hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Bradly B.; Larsen, Taylor S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds approaching physiological scale, whose size and large cellular load far exceed the limits of diffusion, require incorporation of a fluidic means to achieve adequate nutrient/metabolite exchange. This need has driven the extension of microfluidic technologies into the area of biomaterials. While construction of perfusable scaffolds is essentially a problem of microfluidic device fabrication, functional implementation of free-standing, thick-tissue constructs depends upon successful integration of external pumping mechanisms through optimized connective assemblies. However, a critical analysis to identify optimal materials/assembly components for hydrogel substrates has received little focus to date. This investigation addresses this issue directly by evaluating the efficacy of a range of adhesive and mechanical fluidic connection methods to gelatin hydrogel constructs based upon both mechanical property analysis and cell compatibility. Results identify a novel bioadhesive, comprised of two enzymatically modified gelatin compounds, for connecting tubing to hydrogel constructs that is both structurally robust and non-cytotoxic. Furthermore, outcomes from this study provide clear evidence that fluidic interconnect success varies with substrate composition (specifically hydrogel versus polydimethylsiloxane), highlighting not only the importance of selecting the appropriately tailored components for fluidic hydrogel systems but also that of encouraging ongoing, targeted exploration of this issue. The optimization of such interconnect systems will ultimately promote exciting scientific and therapeutic developments provided by microfluidic, cell-laden scaffolds. PMID:26045731

  13. Manufacturable plastic microfluidic valves using thermal actuation.

    PubMed

    Pitchaimani, Karthik; Sapp, Brian C; Winter, Adam; Gispanski, Austin; Nishida, Toshikazu; Hugh Fan, Z

    2009-11-07

    A low-cost, manufacturable, thermally actuated, plastic microfluidic valve has been developed. The valve contains an encapsulated, temperature-sensitive fluid, which expands, deflecting a thin elastomeric film into a fluidic channel to control fluid flow. The power input for thermal expansion of each microfluidic valve can be controlled using a printed circuit board (PCB)-based controller, which is suitable for mass production and large-scale integration. A plastic microfluidic device with such valves was fabricated using compression molding and thermal lamination. The operation of the valves was investigated by measuring a change in the microchannel's ionic conduction current mediated by the resistance variation corresponding to the deflection of the microvalve. Valve closing was also confirmed by the disappearance of fluorescence when a fluorescent solution was displaced in the valve region. Valve operation was characterized for heater power ranging from 36 mW to 80 mW. When the valve was actuating, the local channel temperature was 10 to 19 degrees C above the ambient temperature depending on the heater power used. Repetitive valve operations (up to 50 times) have been demonstrated with a flow resulting from a hydrostatic head. Valve operation was tested for a flow rate of 0.33-4.7 microL/min.

  14. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students

    PubMed Central

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A.; Oliver, Piercen M.; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid–base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids–bases, and polymers. PMID:25584013

  15. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students.

    PubMed

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A; Oliver, Piercen M; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-01-14

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid-base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids-bases, and polymers.

  16. Microfluidic Biosensing Systems Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24022689

  17. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  18. Microfluidic extensional rheometry using stagnation point flow.

    PubMed

    Haward, S J

    2016-07-01

    Characterization of the extensional rheometry of fluids with complex microstructures is of great relevance to the optimization of a wide range of industrial applications and for understanding various natural processes, biological functions, and diseases. However, quantitative measurement of the extensional properties of complex fluids has proven elusive to researchers, particularly in the case of low viscosity, weakly elastic fluids. For some time, microfluidic platforms have been recognized as having the potential to fill this gap and various approaches have been proposed. This review begins with a general discussion of extensional viscosity and the requirements of an extensional rheometer, before various types of extensional rheometers (particularly those of microfluidic design) are critically discussed. A specific focus is placed on microfluidic stagnation point extensional flows generated by cross-slot type devices, for which some important developments have been reported during the last 10 years. Additional emphasis is placed on measurements made on relevant biological fluids. Finally, the operating limits of the cross-slot extensional rheometer (chiefly imposed by the onset of elastic and inertial flow instabilities) are discussed.

  19. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  20. Wearable tactile sensor based on flexible microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Koh, Zhao Ming; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-08-16

    In this work, we develop a liquid-based thin film microfluidic tactile sensor of high flexibility, robustness and sensitivity. The microfluidic elastomeric structure comprises a pressure sensitive region and parallel arcs that interface with screen-printed electrodes. The microfluidic sensor is functionalized with a highly conductive metallic liquid, eutectic gallium indium (eGaIn). Microdeformation on the pressure sensor results in fluid displacement which corresponds to a change in electrical resistance. By emulating parallel electrical circuitry in our microchannel design, we reduced the overall electrical resistance of the sensor, therefore enhancing its device sensitivity. Correspondingly, we report a device workable within a range of 4 to 100 kPa and sensitivity of up to 0.05 kPa(-1). We further demonstrate its robustness in withstanding >2500 repeated loading and unloading cycles. Finally, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the sensors may be multiplexed to detect forces at multiple regions of the hand. In particular, our sensors registered unique electronic signatures in object grasping, which could provide better assessment of finger dexterity.

  1. Microfluidic probe: a new tool for integrating microfluidic environments and electronic wafer-probing.

    PubMed

    Routenberg, David A; Reed, Mark A

    2010-01-07

    We demonstrate a new tool for integrating microfluidic channels with commonly used electronic probing techniques. The "microfluidic probe" allows rapid and repeatable fluidic and electronic addressing of small die sites on a variety of substrate types without the need for permanent modification or dicing of the device wafers. We also use the probe to demonstrate locally patterned chemical modification of a substrate. The probes are easily fabricated using standard soft-lithography and basic machining making this a widely accessible technique for electronics and fluidics researchers.

  2. Rapid and Specific Drug Quality Testing Assay for Artemisinin and Its Derivatives Using a Luminescent Reaction and Novel Microfluidic Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nga T.; Desai, Darash; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, it is estimated that about 10–30% of pharmaceuticals are of poor quality. Poor-quality drugs lead to long-term drug resistance, create morbidity, and strain the financial structure of the health system. The current technologies for substandard drug detection either are too expensive for low-resource regions or only provide qualitative results. To address the current limitations with point-of-care technologies, we have developed an affordable and robust assay to quantify the amount of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to test product quality. Our novel assay consists of two parts: detection reagent (probe) and a microfluidic testing platform. As antimalarials are of high importance in the global fight against malaria and are often substandard, they are chosen as the model to validate our assay. As a proof-of-concept, we have tested the assay with artesunate pure and substandard samples (Arsuamoon tablets) from Africa and compared with the conventional 96-well plate with spectrophotometer to demonstrate the quantitative efficacy and performance of our system. PMID:25897061

  3. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    Both developed and developing nations have an urgent need to diagnose disease cheaply, reliably, and independently of centralized facilities. Microfulidic platforms are well-positioned to address the need for portable diagnostics, mainly due to their obvious advantage in size. However, most microfluidic methods rely on equipment outside of the chip either for driving fluid flow (e.g., syringe pumps) or for taking measurements (e.g., lasers or microscopes). The energy and space requirements of the whole system inhibit portability and contribute to costs. To capitalize on the strengths of microfluidic platforms and address the serious needs of society, system components need to be miniaturized. Also, miniaturization should be accomplished as simply as possible, considering that simplicity is usually requisite for achieving truly transformative technology. Herein, I attempt to address the issue of controlling fluid flow in portable microfluidic systems. I focus on systems that are driven by elastomer-based membrane valves, since these valves are inherently simple, yet they are capable of sophisticated fluid manipulation. Others have attempted to modify pneumatic microvalves for portable applications, e.g., by transitioning to electromagnetic, thermopneumatic, or piezoelectric actuation principles. However, none of these strategies maintain the proper balance of simplicity, functionality, and ease of integration. My research centers on electrostatic actuators, due to their conceptual simplicity and the efficacy of electrostatic forces on the microscale. To ensure easy integration with polymer-based systems, and to maintain simplicity in the fabrication procedure, the actuators were constructed solely from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the actuators were fabricated exclusively with soft-lithographic techniques. A mathematical model was developed to identify actuator parameters compatible with soft-lithography, and also to

  4. A tunable spherical cap microfluidic electrically small antenna.

    PubMed

    Jobs, Magnus; Hjort, Klas; Rydberg, Anders; Wu, Zhigang

    2013-10-11

    A highly efficient microfluidic 3D electrically small antenna is created using a simple fabrication technique. It is easy to construct simply by pneumatically inflating a planar microfluidic antenna into a spherical cap. It has premium performance around its hemispherical shape, combining a wide working band with high efficiency.

  5. Desktop aligner for fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Yu, Zeta Tak For; Geraldo, Dalton; Weng, Shinuo; Alve, Nitesh; Dun, Wu; Kini, Akshay; Patel, Karan; Shu, Roberto; Zhang, Feng; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Multilayer assembly is a commonly used technique to construct multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices with complex 3D architecture and connectivity for large-scale microfluidic integration. Accurate alignment of structure features on different PDMS layers before their permanent bonding is critical in determining the yield and quality of assembled multilayer microfluidic devices. Herein, we report a custom-built desktop aligner capable of both local and global alignments of PDMS layers covering a broad size range. Two digital microscopes were incorporated into the aligner design to allow accurate global alignment of PDMS structures up to 4 in. in diameter. Both local and global alignment accuracies of the desktop aligner were determined to be about 20 μm cm−1. To demonstrate its utility for fabrication of integrated multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices, we applied the desktop aligner to achieve accurate alignment of different functional PDMS layers in multilayer microfluidics including an organs-on-chips device as well as a microfluidic device integrated with vertical passages connecting channels located in different PDMS layers. Owing to its convenient operation, high accuracy, low cost, light weight, and portability, the desktop aligner is useful for microfluidic researchers to achieve rapid and accurate alignment for generating multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices. PMID:26233409

  6. Desktop aligner for fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Yu, Zeta Tak For; Geraldo, Dalton; Weng, Shinuo; Alve, Nitesh; Dun, Wu; Kini, Akshay; Patel, Karan; Shu, Roberto; Zhang, Feng; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Fu, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Multilayer assembly is a commonly used technique to construct multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices with complex 3D architecture and connectivity for large-scale microfluidic integration. Accurate alignment of structure features on different PDMS layers before their permanent bonding is critical in determining the yield and quality of assembled multilayer microfluidic devices. Herein, we report a custom-built desktop aligner capable of both local and global alignments of PDMS layers covering a broad size range. Two digital microscopes were incorporated into the aligner design to allow accurate global alignment of PDMS structures up to 4 in. in diameter. Both local and global alignment accuracies of the desktop aligner were determined to be about 20 μm cm-1. To demonstrate its utility for fabrication of integrated multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices, we applied the desktop aligner to achieve accurate alignment of different functional PDMS layers in multilayer microfluidics including an organs-on-chips device as well as a microfluidic device integrated with vertical passages connecting channels located in different PDMS layers. Owing to its convenient operation, high accuracy, low cost, light weight, and portability, the desktop aligner is useful for microfluidic researchers to achieve rapid and accurate alignment for generating multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices.

  7. Split and flow: reconfigurable capillary connection for digital microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Florian; Harnois, Maxime; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah; Thomy, Vincent

    2014-09-21

    Supplying liquid to droplet-based microfluidic microsystems remains a delicate task facing the problems of coupling continuous to digital or macro- to microfluidic systems. Here, we take advantage of superhydrophobic microgrids to address this problem. Insertion of a capillary tube inside a microgrid aperture leads to a simple and reconfigurable droplet generation setup.

  8. Microfluidics-Enabled Diagnostic Systems: Markets, Challenges, and Examples.

    PubMed

    Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidics has become an important tool for the commercial product development in diagnostics. This article will focus on current technical demands during the development process such as material and integration challenges. Furthermore, we present data on the diagnostics market as well as examples of microfluidics-enabled systems currently under commercial development or already on the market.

  9. Screening of aptamers on microfluidic systems for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chen-Hsun; Huang, Chao-Jyun; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2012-01-01

    The use of microfluidic systems for screening of aptamers and their biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. Aptamers with different nucleic acid sequences have been extensively studied and the results demonstrated a strong binding affinity to target molecules such that they can be used as promising candidate biomarkers for diagnosis and therapeutics. Recently, the aptamer screening protocol has been conducted with microfluidic-based devices. Furthermore, aptamer affinity screening by a microfluidic-based method has demonstrated remarkable advantages over competing traditional methods. In this paper, we first reviewed microfluidic systems which demonstrated efficient and rapid screening of a specific aptamer. Then, the clinical applications of screened aptamers, also performed by microfluidic systems, are further reviewed. These automated microfluidic systems can provide advantages over their conventional counterparts including more compactness, faster analysis, less sample/reagent consumption and automation. An aptamer-based compact microfluidic system for diagnosis may even lead to a point-of-care device. The use of microfluidic systems for aptamer screening and diagnosis is expected to continue growing in the near future and may make a substantial impact on biomedical applications.

  10. Microfluidic devices and methods for integrated flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-08-16

    Microfluidic devices and methods for flow cytometry are described. In described examples, various sample handling and preparation steps may be carried out within a same microfluidic device as flow cytometry steps. A combination of imaging and flow cytometry is described. In some examples, spiral microchannels serve as incubation chambers. Examples of automated sample handling and flow cytometry are described.

  11. Microfluidics and Microfabrication in a Chemical Engineering Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Shivaun D.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics, the manipulation of fluids in channels with micron dimensions, has emerged as an exciting new field that impacts the broad area of nano/microtechnology. This is an important area to train the next generation of chemical engineers. This paper describes an experiment where students are given a problem to design a microfluidic mixer…

  12. High-throughput injection with microfluidics using picoinjectors

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weitz, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Adding reagents to drops is one of the most important functions in droplet-based microfluidic systems; however, a robust technique to accomplish this does not exist. Here, we introduce the picoinjector, a robust device to add controlled volumes of reagent using electro-microfluidics at kilohertz rates. It can also perform multiple injections for serial and combinatorial additions. PMID:20962271

  13. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Lucumi, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2015-01-15

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dishes, flasks or well-plates. Many decades of heuristic optimization have gone into perfecting conventional cell culture devices and protocols. In comparison, even for the most commonly used microfluidic cell culture devices, such as those fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), collective understanding of the differences in cellular behavior between microfluidic and macroscopic culture is still developing. Moving in vitro culture from macroscopic culture to PDMS based devices can come with unforeseen challenges. Changes in device material, surface coating, cell number per unit surface area or per unit media volume may all affect the outcome of otherwise standard protocols. In this review, we outline some of the advantages and challenges that may accompany a transition from macroscopic to microfluidic cell culture. We focus on decisive factors that distinguish macroscopic from microfluidic cell culture to encourage a reconsideration of how macroscopic cell culture principles might apply to microfluidic cell culture.

  14. Microfluidics-Based PCR for Fusion Transcript Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The microfluidic technology allows the production of network of submillimeter-size fluidic channels and reservoirs in a variety of material systems. The microfluidic-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows automated multiplexing of multiple samples and multiple assays simultaneously within a network of microfluidic channels and chambers that are co-ordinated in controlled fashion by the valves. The individual PCR reaction is performed in nanoliter volume, which allows testing on samples with limited DNA and RNA. The microfluidics devices are used in various types of PCR such as digital PCR and single molecular emulsion PCR for genotyping, gene expression, and miRNA expression. In this chapter, the use of a microfluidics-based PCR for simultaneous screening of 14 known fusion transcripts in patients with leukemia is described.

  15. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules. PMID:26180576

  16. Imaging of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ungerböck, Birgit; Mayr, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    This review gives an overview on the state-of-the-art of oxygen imaging in microfluidics. Oxygen imaging using optical oxygen sensors based on luminescence is a versatile and powerful tool for obtaining profoundly space-resolved information of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems. We briefly introduce the principle of oxygen imaging and present techniques of oxygen imaging applied in microreactors and microfluidic devices, including selection criteria and demands of sensing material and basic set-up for a 2D oxygen sensing system. A detailed review of oxygen imaging in microreactors and microfluidic systems is given on different applications in oxygen gradient monitoring, cell culturing, single-cell analysis and chemical reactions. Finally, we discuss challenges and trends of oxygen imaging in microfluidic systems.

  17. Reagent-loaded plastic microfluidic chips for detecting homocysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Ji Won; Jang, Jae-Young; Cho, Jun-Hyeong

    2008-05-01

    This report describes the preliminary study on plastic microfluidic chips with pre-loaded reagents for detecting homocysteine (Hcy). All reagents needed in an Hcy immunoassay were included in a microfluidic chip to remove tedious assay steps. A simple and cost-effective bonding method was developed to realize reagent-loaded microfluidic chips. This technique uses an intermediate layer between two plastic substrates by selectively patterning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the embossed surface of microchannels and fixing the substrates under pressure. Using this bonding method, the competitive immunoassay for SAH, a converted form of Hcy, was performed without any damage to reagents in chips, and the results showed that the fluorescent signal from antibody antigen binding decreased as the SAH concentration increased. Based on the SAH immunoassay, whole immunoassay steps for Hcy detection were carried out in plastic microfluidic chips with all necessary reagents. These experiments demonstrated the feasibility of the Hcy immunoassay in microfluidic devices.

  18. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  19. Integrated Multi-process Microfluidic Systems for Automating Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weichun; Woolley, Adam T.

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies have been applied extensively in rapid sample analysis. Some current challenges for standard microfluidic systems are relatively high detection limits, and reduced resolving power and peak capacity compared to conventional approaches. The integration of multiple functions and components onto a single platform can overcome these separation and detection limitations of microfluidics. Multiplexed systems can greatly increase peak capacity in multidimensional separations and can increase sample throughput by analyzing many samples simultaneously. On-chip sample preparation, including labeling, preconcentration, cleanup and amplification, can all serve to speed up and automate processes in integrated microfluidic systems. This paper summarizes advances in integrated multi-process microfluidic systems for automated analysis, their benefits and areas for needed improvement. PMID:20514343

  20. Microfluidic Diffusion Viscometer for Rapid Analysis of Complex Solutions.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Hu, Kevin; Aprile, Francesco A; Müller, Thomas; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-04-05

    The viscosity of complex solutions is a physical property of central relevance for a large number of applications in material, biological, and biotechnological sciences. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic technology to measure the viscosity of solutions by following the advection and diffusion of tracer particles under steady-state flow. We validate our method with standard water-glycerol mixtures, and then we apply this microfluidic diffusion viscometer to measure the viscosity of protein solutions at high concentrations as well as of a crude cell lysate. Our approach exhibits a series of attractive features, including analysis time on the order of seconds and the consumption of a few μL of sample, as well as the possibility to readily integrate the microfluidic viscometer in other instrument platforms or modular microfluidic devices. These characteristics make microfluidic diffusion viscometry an attractive approach in automated processes in biotechnology and health-care sciences where fast measurements with limited amount of sample consumption are required.

  1. Microfluidic process monitor for industrial solvent extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Artem; Pereira, Candido; Nichols, Kevin Paul Flood

    2016-01-12

    The present invention provides a system for solvent extraction utilizing a first electrode with a raised area formed on its surface, which defines a portion of a microfluidic channel; a second electrode with a flat surface, defining another portion of the microfluidic channel that opposes the raised area of the first electrode; a reversibly deformable substrate disposed between the first electrode and second electrode, adapted to accommodate the raised area of the first electrode and having a portion that extends beyond the raised area of the first electrode, that portion defining the remaining portions of the microfluidic channel; and an electrolyte of at least two immiscible liquids that flows through the microfluidic channel. Also provided is a system for performing multiple solvent extractions utilizing several microfluidic chips or unit operations connected in series.

  2. Microfluidic chips for point-of-care immunodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Luc; de Rooij, Nico; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2011-06-24

    We might be at the turning point where research in microfluidics undertaken in academia and industrial research laboratories, and substantially sponsored by public grants, may provide a range of portable and networked diagnostic devices. In this Progress Report, an overview on microfluidic devices that may become the next generation of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics is provided. First, we describe gaps and opportunities in medical diagnostics and how microfluidics can address these gaps using the example of immunodiagnostics. Next, we conceptualize how different technologies are converging into working microfluidic POC diagnostics devices. Technologies are explained from the perspective of sample interaction with components of a device. Specifically, we detail materials, surface treatment, sample processing, microfluidic elements (such as valves, pumps, and mixers), receptors, and analytes in the light of various biosensing concepts. Finally, we discuss the integration of components into accurate and reliable devices.

  3. A microfluidic timer for timed valving and pumping in centrifugal microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-03-21

    Accurate timing of microfluidic operations is essential for the automation of complex laboratory workflows, in particular for the supply of sample and reagents. Here we present a new unit operation for timed valving and pumping in centrifugal microfluidics. It is based on temporary storage of pneumatic energy and time delayed sudden release of said energy. The timer is loaded at a relatively higher spinning frequency. The countdown is started by reducing to a relatively lower release frequency, at which the timer is released after a pre-defined delay time. We demonstrate timing for 1) the sequential release of 4 liquids at times of 2.7 s ± 0.2 s, 14.0 s ± 0.5 s, 43.4 s ± 1.0 s and 133.8 s ± 2.3 s, 2) timed valving of typical assay reagents (contact angles 36-78°, viscosities 0.9-5.6 mPa s) and 3) on demand valving of liquids from 4 inlet chambers in any user defined sequence controlled by the spinning protocol. The microfluidic timer is compatible to all wetting properties and viscosities of common assay reagents and does neither require assistive equipment, nor coatings. It can be monolithically integrated into a microfluidic test carrier and is compatible to scalable fabrication technologies such as thermoforming or injection molding.

  4. Microfluidics @ the Beach: Introduction of Microfluidics Technology to the ChE Curriculum at Cal State Long Beach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Roger C.; Bhatia, Hina; Venkatraman, Rahul; Jang, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics involves the study of the behavior of fluids at microscale, fluid manipulations, and the design of the devices that can effectively perform such manipulations. We are developing two new elective courses to include microfluidics in our curriculum at CSULB. Herein, we present the results of the first course, Microfabrication and…

  5. Hydrophilic PEO-PDMS for microfluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mingjin; Fang, Ji

    2012-02-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a popularly used nontoxic and biocompatible material in microfluidic systems, which is relatively cheap and does not break easily like glass. The simple fabrication, optical transparency and elastomeric property make PDMS a handy material to work with. In order to develop different applications of PDMS in microfluidics and bioengineering, it is necessary to modify the PDMS surface nature to improve wetting characteristics, and to have a better control in nonspecific binding of proteins and cells, as well as to increase adhesion. At the moment, the hydrophilic surface modification performance of PDMS is known to recover its hydrophobicity shortly after oxidation modification, which is not stable in the long term (Owen and Smith 1994 J. Adhes. Sci. Technol. 8 1063-75). This paper presents a long-term stable hydrophilic surface modification processing of PDMS. The poly(dimethylsiloxane-ethylene oxide polymeric) (PDMS-b-PEO) is used in this project as a surfactant additive to be added into the PDMS base and the curing agent mixture during polymerization and to create hydrophilic PEO-PDMS. The contact angle can be controlled at 21.5-80.9° with the different mixing ratios and the hydrophilicity will remain stable for two months and then slightly varied later. We also investigate the bonding conditions of the modified PDMS to a silicon wafer and a glass wafer. To demonstrate its applications, we designed a device which consists of microchannels on a silicon wafer, and PEO-PDMS is utilized as a cover sheet. The capillary function was investigated under the different contact angles of PED-PDMS and with different aspect ratios of microchannels. All of the processes and testing data are presented in detail. This easy and cost-effective modified PDMS with a good bonding property can be widely used in the capillary device and systems, and microfluidic devices for fluid flow control of the microchannels in biological, chemical, medical

  6. Microfluidic devices using thiol-ene polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou, Simon J. M. C.; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2013-12-01

    Here, a new polymeric microfluidic platform using off-stoichiometric thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers was developed. Thiolene polymers were chosen as they afford rapid UV curing, low volume shrinkage and optical transparency for use in microfluidic devices. Three different off-stoichiometric thiol-ene polymers with 30% excess allyl, 50% excess thiol and a 90% excess thiol (OSTE Allyl-30, OSTE-50 and OSTE-90, respectively) were fabricated. Attenuated reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state cross polarisation-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed which functional groups (thiol or allyl) were present in excess in the OSTE polymers. The polymers were shown to have a more hydrophilic surface (water contact angle of 65°+/- 3) compared to polydimethylsiloxane (water contact angle of 105° +/- 5). Testing of the mechanical properties showed the glass transition temperatures to be 15.09 °C, 43.15 °C and, 57.48 °C for OSTE-90, OSTE Allyl-30 and, OSTE-50, respectively. The storage modulus was shown to be less than 10 MPa for the OSTE-90 polymer and approximately 1750 MPa for the OSTE Allyl-30 and OSTE-50 polymers. The polymers were then utilised to fabricate microfluidic devices via soft lithography practices and devices sealed using a one-step UV lamination "click" reaction technique. Finally, gold nanoparticles were used to form gold films on the OSTE-90 and OSTE-50 polymers as potential electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and sheet resistances were used to characterise the films.

  7. Microfluidic gene arrays for rapid genomic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jay A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-12-01

    Genomic analysis tools have recently become an indispensable tool for the evaluation of gene expression in a variety of experiment protocols. Two of the main drawbacks to this technology are the labor and time intensive process for sample preparation and the relatively long times required for target/probe hybridization. In order to overcome these two technological barriers we have developed a microfluidic chip to perform on chip sample purification and labeling, integrated with a high density genearray. Sample purification was performed using a porous polymer monolithic material functionalized with an oligo dT nucleotide sequence for the isolation of high purity mRNA. These purified mRNA"s can then rapidly labeled using a covalent fluorescent molecule which forms a selective covalent bond at the N7 position of guanine residues. These labeled mRNA"s can then released from the polymer monolith to allow for direct hybridization with oligonucletide probes deposited in microfluidic channel. To allow for rapid target/probe hybridization high density microarray were printed in microchannels. The channels can accommodate array densities as high as 4000 probes. When oligonucleotide deposition is complete, these channels are sealed using a polymer film which forms a pressure tight seal to allow sample reagent flow to the arrayed probes. This process will allow for real time target to probe hybridization monitoring using a top mounted CCD fiber bundle combination. Using this process we have been able to perform a multi-step sample preparation to labeled target/probe hybridization in less than 30 minutes. These results demonstrate the capability to perform rapid genomic screening on a high density microfluidic microarray of oligonucleotides.

  8. Cell Blebbing in Confined Microfluidic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ibo, Markela; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.; Gagnon, Zachary R.

    2016-01-01

    Migrating cells can extend their leading edge by forming myosin-driven blebs and F-actin-driven pseudopods. When coerced to migrate in resistive environments, Dictyostelium cells switch from using predominately pseudopods to blebs. Bleb formation has been shown to be chemotactic and can be influenced by the direction of the chemotactic gradient. In this study, we determine the blebbing responses of developed cells of Dictyostelium discoideum to cAMP gradients of varying steepness produced in microfluidic channels with different confining heights, ranging between 1.7 μm and 3.8 μm. We show that microfluidic confinement height, gradient steepness, buffer osmolarity and Myosin II activity are important factors in determining whether cells migrate with blebs or with pseudopods. Dictyostelium cells were observed migrating within the confines of microfluidic gradient channels. When the cAMP gradient steepness is increased from 0.7 nM/μm to 20 nM/μm, cells switch from moving with a mixture of blebs and pseudopods to moving only using blebs when chemotaxing in channels with confinement heights less than 2.4 μm. Furthermore, the size of the blebs increases with gradient steepness and correlates with increases in myosin-II localization at the cell cortex. Reduction of intracellular pressure by high osmolarity buffer or inhibition of myosin-II by blebbistatin leads to a decrease in bleb formation and bleb size. Together, our data reveal that the protrusion type formed by migrating cells can be influenced by the channel height and the steepness of the cAMP gradient, and suggests that a combination of confinement-induced myosin-II localization and cAMP-regulated cortical contraction leads to increased intracellular fluid pressure and bleb formation. PMID:27706201

  9. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  10. Application of optical fibers in microfluidic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Dorota; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Dybko, Artur

    2004-09-01

    Two constructions of microfluidic structures are described in this paper. A fiber optic chemical coupler and a microcell for spectrophotometric measurements were designed and tested. The structures were made of polymer optical fibers (PMMA) which were incorporated into polymeric material i.e. poly(dimethylsiloxane). The structures were tested as detectors in refractometric experiment (saccharose solutions with different concentrations were used), in absorbance measurement (solutions of a bromothymol blue with different pH were used) and in fluorescence tests (solution of erythrosine was used).

  11. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  12. Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense active matter, from bacterial suspensions and microtubule bundles driven by motor proteins to cellular monolayers and synthetic Janus particles, is characterized by mesoscale turbulence, which is the emergence of chaotic flow structures. By immersing an ordered array of symmetric rotors in an active fluid, we introduce a microfluidic system that exploits spontaneous symmetry breaking in mesoscale turbulence to generate work. The lattice of rotors self-organizes into a spin state where neighboring discs continuously rotate in permanent alternating directions due to combined hydrodynamic and elastic effects. Our virtual prototype demonstrates a new research direction for the design of micromachines powered by the nematohydrodynamic properties of active turbulence. PMID:27419229

  13. Nanostructured surfaces for microfluidics and sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel Thomas; Piech, Marcin; Schneider, John F.; Vail, Sean; Hayes, Mark A.; Garcia, Anthony A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Gust, D; Yang, Dongqing

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the use of light to move liquids on a photoresponsive monolayer, providing a new method for delivering analyses in lab-on-chip environments for microfluidic systems. The light-driven motion of liquids was achieved on photoresponsive azobenzene modified surfaces. The surface energy components of azobenzene modified surfaces were calculated by Van Oss theory. The motion of the liquid was achieved by generation of a surface tension gradient by isomerization of azobenzene monolayers using UV and Visible light, thereby establishing a surface energy heterogeneity on the edge of the droplet. Contact angle measurements of various solvents were used to demonstrate the requirement for fluid motion.

  14. An automated Teflon microfluidic peptide synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Wang, Weizhi; Li, Xiaojun; Wang, Zihua; Hood, Leroy; Lausted, Christopher; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2013-09-07

    We present a microfluidic synthesizer made entirely of Teflon material for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Solvent-resistant perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) was used to construct chip-sized devices featuring multiple tri-layer pneumatic microvalves. Using these devices, model peptides were automatically synthesized and cleaved in situ in a continuous-flow manner. The total coupling and cleavage time was significantly reduced compared to conventional bulk reactors. The synthesis of a decapeptide, for instance, took less than 6 h using our device while it usually takes more than three days using conventional reactors.

  15. Precise and automated microfluidic sample preparation.

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Robert W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2004-07-01

    Autonomous bio-chemical agent detectors require sample preparation involving multiplex fluid control. We have developed a portable microfluidic pump array for metering sub-microliter volumes at flowrates of 1-100 {micro}L/min. Each pump is composed of an electrokinetic (EK) pump and high-voltage power supply with 15-Hz feedback from flow sensors. The combination of high pump fluid impedance and active control results in precise fluid metering with nanoliter accuracy. Automated sample preparation will be demonstrated by labeling proteins with fluorescamine and subsequent injection to a capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) chip.

  16. Hybrid IC / Microfluidic Chips for the Manipulation of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hakho

    2005-03-01

    A hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip that can manipulate individual biological cells in a fluid with microscopic resolution has been demonstrated. The chip starts with a custom-designed silicon integrated circuit (IC) produced in a foundry using standard processing techniques. A microfluidic chamber is then fabricated on top of the IC to provide a biocompatible environment. The motion of biological cells in the chamber is controlled using a two-dimensional array of micro-scale electromagnets in the IC that generate spatially patterned magnetic fields. A local peak in the magnetic field amplitude will trap a magnetic bead and an attached cell; by moving the peak's location, the bead-bound cell can be moved to any position on the chip surface above the array. By generating multiple peaks, many cells can be moved independently along separate paths, allowing many different manipulations of individual cells. The hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip can be used, for example, to sort cells or to assemble tissue on micrometer length scales. To prove the concept, an IC / Microfluidic chip was fabricated, based on a custom-designed IC that contained a two-dimensional microcoil array with integrated current sources and control circuits. The chip was tested by trapping and moving biological cells tagged with magnetic beads inside the microfluidic chamber over the array. By combining the power of silicon technology with the biocompatibility of microfluidics, IC / Microfluidic chips will make new types of investigations possible in biological and biomedical studies.

  17. A "place n play" modular pump for portable microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Luo, Yahui; Chen, Qiang; Liao, Lingying; Zhao, Jianlong

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents an easy-to-use, power-free, and modular pump for portable microfluidic applications. The pump module is a degassed particle desorption polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) slab with an integrated mesh-shaped chamber, which can be attached on the outlet port of microfluidic device to absorb the air in the microfluidic system and then to create a negative pressure for driving fluid. Different from the existing monolithic degassed PDMS pumps that are generally restricted to limited pumping capacity and are only compatible with PDMS-based microfluidic devices, this pump can offer various possible configures of pumping power by varying the geometries of the pump or by combining different pump modules and can also be employed in any material microfluidic devices. The key advantage of this pump is that its operation only requires the user to place the degassed PDMS slab on the outlet ports of microfluidic devices. To help design pumps with a suitable pumping performance, the effect of pump module geometry on its pumping capacity is also investigated. The results indicate that the performance of the degassed PDMS pump is strongly dependent on the surface area of the pump chamber, the exposure area and the volume of the PDMS pump slab. In addition, the initial volume of air in the closed microfluidic system and the cross-linking degree of PDMS also affect the performance of the degassed PDMS pump. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of this modular pumping method by applying it to a glass-based microfluidic device and a PDMS-based protein crystallization microfluidic device.

  18. Monitoring reactive microencapsulation dynamics using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Polenz, Ingmar; Brosseau, Quentin; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-21

    We use microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices to measure the kinetics of reactive encapsulations occurring at the interface of emulsion droplets. The formation of the polymeric shell is inferred from the droplet deformability measured in a series of expansion-constriction chambers along the microfluidic chip. With this tool we quantify the kinetic processes governing the encapsulation at the very early stage of shell formation with a time resolution of the order of the millisecond for overall reactions occurring in less than 0.5 s. We perform a comparison of monomer reactivities used for the encapsulation. We study the formation of polyurea microcapsules (PUMCs); the shell formation proceeds at the water-oil interface by an immediate reaction of amines dissolved in the aqueous phase and isocyanates dissolved in the oil phase. We observe that both monomers contribute differently to the encapsulation kinetics. The kinetics of the shell formation process at the oil-in-water (O/W) experiments significantly differs from the water-in-oil (W/O) systems; the component dissolved in the continuous phase has the largest impact on the kinetics. In addition, we quantified the retarding effect on the encapsulation kinetics by the interface stabilizing agent (surfactant). Our approach is valuable for quantifying in situ reactive encapsulation processes and provides guidelines to generate microcapsules with soft interfaces of tailored and controllable interfacial properties.

  19. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  20. The microfluidic lighthouse: an omnidirectional gradient generator.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, A; Ishida, M; Fujimori, T; Wakamoto, Y; Sawai, S

    2016-11-01

    Studies of chemotactic cell migration rely heavily on various assay systems designed to evaluate the ability of cells to move in response to attractant molecules. In particular, the development of microfluidics-based devices in recent years has made it possible to spatially distribute attractant molecules in graded profiles that are sufficiently stable and precise to test theoretical predictions regarding the accuracy and efficiency of chemotaxis and the underlying mechanism of stimulus perception. However, because the gradient is fixed in a direction orthogonal to the laminar flow and thus the chamber geometry, conventional devices are limited for the study of cell re-orientation to gradients that move or change directions. Here, we describe the development of a simple radially symmetric microfluidics device that can deliver laminar flow in 360°. A stimulant introduced either from the central inlet or by photo uncaging is focused into the laminar flow in a direction determined by the relative rate of regulated flow from multiple side channels. Schemes for flow regulation and an extended duplexed device were designed to generate and move gradients in desired orientations and speed, and then tested to steer cell migration of Dictyostelium and neutrophil-like HL60 cells. The device provided a high degree of freedom in the positioning and orientation of attractant gradients, and thus may serve as a versatile platform for studying cell migration, re-orientation, and steering.

  1. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-02-19

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX(®), which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX(®) after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes.

  2. Microfluidic droplet enrichment for targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Eastburn, Dennis J.; Huang, Yong; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Sciambi, Adam; Ptáček, Louis J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted sequence enrichment enables better identification of genetic variation by providing increased sequencing coverage for genomic regions of interest. Here, we report the development of a new target enrichment technology that is highly differentiated from other approaches currently in use. Our method, MESA (Microfluidic droplet Enrichment for Sequence Analysis), isolates genomic DNA fragments in microfluidic droplets and performs TaqMan PCR reactions to identify droplets containing a desired target sequence. The TaqMan positive droplets are subsequently recovered via dielectrophoretic sorting, and the TaqMan amplicons are removed enzymatically prior to sequencing. We demonstrated the utility of this approach by generating an average 31.6-fold sequence enrichment across 250 kb of targeted genomic DNA from five unique genomic loci. Significantly, this enrichment enabled a more comprehensive identification of genetic polymorphisms within the targeted loci. MESA requires low amounts of input DNA, minimal prior locus sequence information and enriches the target region without PCR bias or artifacts. These features make it well suited for the study of genetic variation in a number of research and diagnostic applications. PMID:25873629

  3. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  4. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery.

    PubMed

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research.

  5. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research. PMID:26276765

  6. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  7. Monitoring reactive microencapsulation dynamics using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Brosseau, Quentin; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We use microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices to measure the kinetics of reactive encapsulations occurring at the interface of emulsion droplets. The formation of the polymeric shell is inferred from the droplet deformability measured in a series of expansion–constriction chambers along the microfluidic chip. With this tool we quantify the kinetic processes governing the encapsulation at the very early stage of shell formation with a time resolution of the order of the millisecond for overall reactions occurring in less than 0.5 s. We perform a comparison of monomer reactivities used for the encapsulation. We study the formation of polyurea microcapsules (PUMCs); the shell formation proceeds at the water–oil interface by an immediate reaction of amines dissolved in the aqueous phase and isocyanates dissolved in the oil phase. We observe that both monomers contribute differently to the encapsulation kinetics. The kinetics of the shell formation process at the oil-in-water (O/W) experiments significantly differs from the water-in-oil (W/O) systems; the component dissolved in the continuous phase has the largest impact on the kinetics. In addition, we quantified the retarding effect on the encapsulation kinetics by the interface stabilizing agent (surfactant). Our approach is valuable for quantifying in situ reactive encapsulation processes and provides guidelines to generate microcapsules with soft interfaces of tailored and controllable interfacial properties. PMID:25705975

  8. Non-Linear Electrohydrodynamics in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Since the inception of microfluidics, the electric force has been exploited as one of the leading mechanisms for driving and controlling the movement of the operating fluid and the charged suspensions. Electric force has an intrinsic advantage in miniaturized devices. Because the electrodes are placed over a small distance, from sub-millimeter to a few microns, a very high electric field is easy to obtain. The electric force can be highly localized as its strength rapidly decays away from the peak. This makes the electric force an ideal candidate for precise spatial control. The geometry and placement of the electrodes can be used to design electric fields of varying distributions, which can be readily realized by Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication methods. In this paper, we examine several electrically driven liquid handling operations. The emphasis is given to non-linear electrohydrodynamic effects. We discuss the theoretical treatment and related numerical methods. Modeling and simulations are used to unveil the associated electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The modeling based investigation is interwoven with examples of microfluidic devices to illustrate the applications. PMID:21673912

  9. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  10. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Medical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Francis; Rhee, Minsoung; Singh, Anup; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reliable diagnoses are invaluable in clinical care. Samples (e.g., blood, urine, and saliva) are collected and analyzed for various biomarkers to quickly and sensitively assess disease progression, monitor response to treatment, and determine a patient's prognosis. Processing conventional samples entails many manual time-consuming steps. Consequently, clinical specimens must be processed by skilled technicians before antigens or nucleic acids are detected, and these are often present at dilute concentrations. Recently, several automated microchip technologies have been developed that potentially offer many advantages over traditional bench-top extraction methods. The smaller length scales and more refined transport mechanisms that characterize these microfluidic devices enable faster and more efficient biomarker enrichment and extraction. Additionally, they can be designed to perform multiple tests or experimental steps on one integrated, automated platform. This review explores the current research on microfluidic methods of sample preparation that are designed to aid diagnosis, and covers a broad spectrum of extraction techniques and designs for various types of samples and analytes.

  11. Microfluidic chips for protein differential expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Dawoud, Abdulilah A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-04-01

    Biomarker discovery and screening using novel proteomic technologies is an area that is attracting increased attention in the biomedical community. Early detection of abnormal physiological conditions will be highly beneficial for diagnosing various diseases and increasing survivability rates. Clearly, progress in this area will depend on the development of fast, reliable, and highly sensitive and specific sample bioanalysis methods. Microfluidics has emerged as a technology that could become essential in proteomics research as it enables the integration of all sample preparation, separation, and detection steps, with the added benefit of enhanced sample throughput. The combination of these advantages with the sensitivity and capability of MS detection to deliver precise structural information makes microfluidics-MS a very competitive technology for biomarker discovery. The integration of LC microchip devices with MS detection, and specifically their applicability to biomarker screening applications in MCF-7 breast cancer cellular extracts is reported in this manuscript. Loading approximately 0.1-1 microg of crude protein extract tryptic digest on the chip has typically resulted in the reliable identification of approximately 40-100 proteins. The potential of an LC-ESI-MS chip for comparative proteomic analysis of isotopically labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cell extracts is explored for the first time.

  12. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  13. Real-time monitoring system for microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapuppo, F.; Cantelli, G.; Fortuna, L.; Arena, P.; Bucolo, M.

    2007-05-01

    A new non-invasive real-time system for the monitoring and control of microfluidodynamic phenomena is proposed. The general purpose design of such system is suitable for in vitro and in vivo experimental setup and therefore for microfluidic application in the biomedical field such as lab-on-chip and for research studies in the field of microcirculation. The system consists of an ad hoc optical setup for image magnification providing images suitable for image acquisition and processing. The optic system was designed and developed using discrete opto-mechanic components mounted on a breadboard in order to provide an optic path accessible at any point where the information needs to be acquired. The optic sensing, acquisition, and processing were performed using an integrated vision system based on the Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) analogic technology called Focal Plane Processor (FPP, Eye-RIS, Anafocus) and inserted in the optic path. Ad hoc algorithms were implemented for the real-time analysis and extraction of fluido-dynamic parameters in micro-channels. They were tested on images recorded during in vivo microcirculation experiments on hamsters and then they were applied on images optically acquired and processed in real-time during in vitro experiments on a continuous microfluidic device (serpentine mixer, ThinXXS) with a two-phase fluid.

  14. Gray-scale photolithography using microfluidic photomasks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chihchen; Hirdes, Danny; Folch, Albert

    2003-01-01

    The ability to produce three-dimensional (3D) microstructures is of increasing importance in the miniaturization of mechanical or fluidic devices, optical elements, self-assembling components, and tissue-engineering scaffolds, among others. Traditional photolithography, the most widely used process for microdevice fabrication, is ill-suited for 3D fabrication, because it is based on the illumination of a photosensitive layer through a “photomask” (a transparent plate that contains opaque, unalterable solid-state features), which inevitably results in features of uniform height. We have devised photomasks in which the light-absorbing features are made of fluids. Unlike in conventional photomasks, the opacity of the photomask features can be tailored to an arbitrary number of gray-scale levels, and their spatial pattern can be reconfigured in the time scale of seconds. Here we demonstrate the inexpensive fabrication of photoresist patterns that contain features of multiple and/or smoothly varying heights. For a given microfluidic photomask, the developed photoresist pattern can be predicted as a function of the dye concentrations and photomask dimensions. For selected applications, microfluidic photomasks offer a low-cost alternative to present gray-scale photolithography approaches. PMID:12574512

  15. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-02-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes.

  16. Liquid alloy printing of microfluidic stretchable electronics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hagman, Anton; Hjort, Klas; Jobs, Magnus; Sundqvist, Johan; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-11-21

    Recently, microfluidic stretchable electronics has attracted great interest from academia since conductive liquids allow for larger cross-sections when stretched and hence low resistance at longer lengths. However, as a serial process it has suffered from low throughput, and a parallel processing technology is needed for more complex systems and production at low costs. In this work, we demonstrate such a technology to implement microfluidic electronics by stencil printing of a liquid alloy onto a semi-cured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, assembly of rigid active components, encapsulation by pouring uncured PDMS on-top and subsequent curing. The printing showed resolution of 200 μm and linear resistance increase of the liquid conductors when elongated up to 60%. No significant change of resistance was shown for a circuit with one LED after 1000 times of cycling between a 0% and an elongation of 60% every 2 s. A radio frequency identity (RFID) tag was demonstrated using the developed technology, showing that good performance could be maintained well into the radio frequency (RF) range.

  17. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  18. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  19. Magnetically Actuated Cilia for Microfluidic Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Srinivas; Owen, Drew; Ballard, Matt; Hesketh, Peter J.; Alexeev, Alexander; Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Collaboration; Petit InstituteBioengineering; Biosciences Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate magnetic micro-cilia based microfluidic mixing and capture techniques. For this, we use a simple and easy to fabricate high aspect ratio cilia, which are actuated magnetically. These micro-features are fabricated by evaporating NiFe alloy at room temperature, on to patterned photoresist. The evaporated alloy curls upwards when the seed layer is removed to release the cilia, thus making a free standing `C' shaped magnetic microstructure. This is actuated using an external electromagnet or a rotating magnet. The artificial cilia can be actuated upto 20Hz. We demonstrate the active mixing these cilia can produce in the microchannel. Also, we demonstrate the capture of target species in a sample using these fast oscillating cilia. The surface of the cilia is functionalized by streptavidin which binds to biotin labelled fluorescent microspheres and mimic the capture of bacteria. We show very high capture efficiencies by using these methods. These simple to fabricate micro cilia can easily be incorporated into many microfluidic systems which require high mixing and capture efficiencies.

  20. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  1. Droplet position control in digital microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2010-02-01

    Research on so called digital microfluidic systems (DMS) capable of manipulating individual microdroplets on a cell-based structure has enormously increased in the past few years, mainly due to the demand of the technology-dependent biomedical applications. Significant research in this area has been related to the simulation and modeling of droplet motion, demonstration of different drop actuation techniques on laboratory-scale prototypes, and droplet routing and scheduling for more efficient assay procedures. This paper introduces the basics of the control analysis and design of a DMS, which is a relatively unexplored area in digital microfluidics. This paper starts with a discussion on a simplified dynamic model of droplet motion in a planar array of cells, and continues with more complicated dynamic models that are necessary to realize the structure of an appropriate closed-loop control system for the DMS. The control analysis and design includes both the transient and steady-state responses of the DMS under external driving forces. The proposed control analysis and design approach is implemented into SIMULINK models to demonstrate the performance of the DMS through simulation using the system parameters previously reported in the literature.

  2. Droplet-based pyrosequencing using digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Boles, Deborah J; Benton, Jonathan L; Siew, Germaine J; Levy, Miriam H; Thwar, Prasanna K; Sandahl, Melissa A; Rouse, Jeremy L; Perkins, Lisa C; Sudarsan, Arjun P; Jalili, Roxana; Pamula, Vamsee K; Srinivasan, Vijay; Fair, Richard B; Griffin, Peter B; Eckhardt, Allen E; Pollack, Michael G

    2011-11-15

    The feasibility of implementing pyrosequencing chemistry within droplets using electrowetting-based digital microfluidics is reported. An array of electrodes patterned on a printed-circuit board was used to control the formation, transportation, merging, mixing, and splitting of submicroliter-sized droplets contained within an oil-filled chamber. A three-enzyme pyrosequencing protocol was implemented in which individual droplets contained enzymes, deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs), and DNA templates. The DNA templates were anchored to magnetic beads which enabled them to be thoroughly washed between nucleotide additions. Reagents and protocols were optimized to maximize signal over background, linearity of response, cycle efficiency, and wash efficiency. As an initial demonstration of feasibility, a portion of a 229 bp Candida parapsilosis template was sequenced using both a de novo protocol and a resequencing protocol. The resequencing protocol generated over 60 bp of sequence with 100% sequence accuracy based on raw pyrogram levels. Excellent linearity was observed for all of the homopolymers (two, three, or four nucleotides) contained in the C. parapsilosis sequence. With improvements in microfluidic design it is expected that longer reads, higher throughput, and improved process integration (i.e., "sample-to-sequence" capability) could eventually be achieved using this low-cost platform.

  3. Microwave welding of polymeric-microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yussuf, A. A.; Sbarski, I.; Hayes, J. P.; Solomon, M.; Tran, N.

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel technique for bonding polymeric-microfluidic devices using microwave energy and a conductive polymer (polyaniline). The bonding is achieved by patterning the polyaniline features at the polymer joint interface by filling of milled microchannels. The absorbed electromagnetic energy is then converted into heat, facilitating the localized microwave bonding of two polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates. A coaxial open-ended probe was used to study the dielectric properties at 2.45 GHz of the PMMA and polyaniline at a range of temperatures up to 120 °C. The measurements confirm a difference in the dielectric loss factor of the PMMA substrate and the polyaniline, which means that differential heating using microwaves is possible. Microfluidic channels of 200 µm and 400 µm widths were sealed using a microwave power of 300 W for 15 s. The results of the interface evaluations and leak test show that strong bonding is formed at the polymer interface, and there is no fluid leak up to a pressure of 1.18 MPa. Temperature field of microwave heating was found by using direct measurement techniques. A numerical simulation was also conducted by using the finite-element method, which confirmed and validated the experimental results. These results also indicate that no global deformation of the PMMA substrate occurred during the bonding process.

  4. Microfluidic-chip platform for cell sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sarul; Balyan, Prerna; Akhtar, J.; Agarwal, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    Cell sorting and separation are considered to be very crucial preparatory steps for numerous clinical diagnostics and therapeutics applications in cell biology research arena. Label free cell separation techniques acceptance rate has been increased to multifold by various research groups. Size based cell separation method focuses on the intrinsic properties of the cell which not only avoids clogging issues associated with mechanical and centrifugation filtration methods but also reduces the overall cost for the process. Consequentially flow based cell separation method for continuous flow has attracted the attention of millions. Due to the realization of structures close to particle size in micro dimensions, the microfluidic devices offer precise and rapid particle manipulation which ultimately leads to an extraordinary cell separation results. The proposed microfluidic device is fabricated to separate polystyrene beads of size 1 µm, 5 µm, 10 µm and 20 µm. The actual dimensions of blood corpuscles were kept in mind while deciding the particle size of polystyrene beads which are used as a model particles for study.

  5. Microfluidic particle sorting utilizing inertial lift force.

    PubMed

    Nieuwstadt, Harm A; Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2011-02-01

    A simple passive microfluidic device that continuously separates microparticles is presented. Its development is motivated by the need for specific size micro perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets to be used for a novel gas embolotherapy method. The device consists of a rectangular channel in which inertial lift forces are utilized to separate particles in lateral distance. At the entrance of the channel, particles are introduced at the center by focusing the flow from a center channel with flow from two side channels. Downstream, large particles will occupy a lateral equilibrium position in shorter axial distance than small particles. At the exit of the channel, flow containing large particles is separated from flow containing small particles. It is shown that 10.2-μm diameter microspheres can be separated from 3.0-μm diameter microspheres with a separation efficiency of 69-78% and a throughput in the order of 2 ·10⁴ particles per minute. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations were done to calculate flow fields and verify theoretical particle trajectories. Theory underlying this research shows that higher separation efficiencies for very specific diameter cut-off are possible. This microfluidic channel design has a simple structure and can operate without external forces which makes it feasible for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications.

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cell culture in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y. C.; Chen, F.; Zhang, T.; Chen, D. Y.; Jia, X.; Wang, J. B.; Guo, W.; Chen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device enabling culture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) where extracellular matrix coating, VSMC seeding, culture, and immunostaining are demonstrated in a tubing-free manner. By optimizing droplet volume differences between inlets and outlets of micro channels, VSMCs were evenly seeded into microfluidic devices. Furthermore, the effects of extracellular matrix (e.g., collagen, poly-l-Lysine (PLL), and fibronectin) on VSMC proliferation and phenotype expression were explored. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new VSMC culture model enabling VSMC studies. PMID:25379109

  7. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Chandra K; Aguirre, Gerson R

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  8. Laser-Induced Heating for DNA Replication in a Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Min-Sheng; Chen, Chin-Pin

    In this study, we integrated microfluidics and a laser to develop a microfluidic system that performs target DNA replication. To achieve replication of targeted position of DNA, DNA fibers are stretched and both ends immobilized onto an electrode through dielectrophoresis. During the process, 2 designed primers, as well as DNA polymerase and its substrates, are fed into the microfluidics, and a focused infrared laser is used to irradiate the center of the DNA strand. An on-off switching mechanism is used to create thermal cycling. A polymerase chain reaction is then used to confirm the successfully replicated DNA.

  9. Microfluidic electrospinning of biphasic nanofibers with Janus morphology

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Yasmin; Marquez, Manuel; Thorsen, Todd

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a method of electrospinning conducting and nonconducting biphasic Janus nanofibers using microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based manifolds is described. Key benefits of using microfluidic devices for nanofiber synthesis include rapid prototyping, ease of fabrication, and the ability to spin multiple Janus fibers in parallel through arrays of individual microchannels. Biphasic Janus nanofibers of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)+polypyrrole (PPy)∕PVP nanofibers with an average diameter of 250 nm were successfully fabricated using elastomeric microfluidic devices. Fiber characterization and confirmation of the Janus morphology was subsequently carried out using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:19693390

  10. Liposome production by microfluidics: potential and limiting factors

    PubMed Central

    Carugo, Dario; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of microfluidic techniques for the production of nanoscale lipid-based vesicular systems. In particular we focus on the key issues associated with the microfluidic production of liposomes. These include, but are not limited to, the role of lipid formulation, lipid concentration, residual amount of solvent, production method (including microchannel architecture), and drug loading in determining liposome characteristics. Furthermore, we propose microfluidic architectures for the mass production of liposomes with a view to potential industrial translation of this technology. PMID:27194474

  11. Reconfigurable microfluidic nanoparticle trapping using dielectrophoresis for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemmilani, Reza; Piorek, Brian; Moskovits, Martin; Meinhart, Carl

    2016-11-01

    We report a microfluidic particle manipulation platform based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) to capture and release nanoscale particles cyclically via reconfigurable traps. DEP is routinely used in microfluidic devices for capturing and trapping cells and particles of various sizes, however the trapping of small nanoparticles by DEP is challenging due to the inverse relationship of the DEP force with particle size. The architecture we describe uses electrically insulating silica beads of micron scale in conjunction with DEP electrodes configured to manipulate nanoscale particles for microfluidic applications such as filtration and chemical detection. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, United States.

  12. Method for making electro-fluidic connections in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Martinez, David; Manginell, Ronald P.; Heller, Edwin J.; Chanchani, Rajen

    2004-08-10

    A method for forming electro-fluidic interconnections in microfluidic devices comprises forming an electrical connection between matching bond pads on a die containing an active electrical element and a microfluidic substrate and forming a fluidic seal ring that circumscribes the active electrical element and a fluidic feedthrough. Preferably, the electrical connection and the seal ring are formed in a single bonding step. The simple method is particularly useful for chemical microanalytical systems wherein a plurality of microanalytical components, such as a chemical preconcentrator, a gas chromatography column, and a surface acoustic wave detector, are fluidically interconnected on a hybrid microfluidic substrate having electrical connection to external support electronics.

  13. The processing technology of PMMA micro-fluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lili; Rong, Li; Guo, Shuheng; Liu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    In order to enrich the production method of micro-fluidic chip and simplify its processing technology, the paper discussed the double-sided adhesive layer for channel layer, with PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) for fabrication of microfluidic chip with the cover plate and the bottom plate. Taking 40 mm (long) x 20 mm (wide) x 2.2 mm (thick) liquid drop to separate the microfluidic chip as an example, details the design and machining process of the chip. Experiments show that surface quality is high and processing speed is fast when using this technology to process the chip. Thus, it can realize the mass production of micro fluidic chip.

  14. Microfluidics for biological measurements with single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Streets, Aaron M; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-02-01

    Single-molecule approaches in biology have been critical in studies ranging from the examination of physical properties of biological macromolecules to the extraction of genetic information from DNA. The variation intrinsic to many biological processes necessitates measurements with single-molecule resolution in order to accurately recapitulate population distributions. Microfluidic technology has proven to be useful in the facilitation and even enhancement of single-molecule studies because of the precise liquid handling, small volume manipulation, and high throughput capabilities of microfluidic devices. In this review we survey the microfluidic "toolbox" available to the single-molecule specialist and summarize some recent biological applications of single-molecule detection on chip.

  15. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation.

  16. HIGHLY SENSITIVE ASSAY FOR ANTICHOLINESTERASE COMPOUNDS USING 96 WELL PLATE FORMAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the approaches for reducing uncertainties in the assessment of human exposure is to better characterize concentrations of hazardous compounds that may be present in our immediate environment. A significant limitation to this approach, however, is that sampling and labora...

  17. A method for high throughput determination of viable bacteria cell counts in 96-well plates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are several methods for quantitating bacterial cells, each with advantages and disadvantages. The most common method is bacterial plating, which has the advantage of allowing live cell assessment through colony forming unit (CFU) counts but is not well suited for high throughput screening (HTS). On the other hand, spectrophotometry is adaptable to HTS applications but does not differentiate between dead and living bacteria and has low sensitivity. Results Here, we report a bacterial cell counting method termed Start Growth Time (SGT) that allows rapid and serial quantification of the absolute or relative number of live cells in a bacterial culture in a high throughput manner. We combined the methodology of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) calculations with a previously described qualitative method of bacterial growth determination to develop an improved quantitative method. We show that SGT detects only live bacteria and is sensitive enough to differentiate between 40 and 400 cells/mL. SGT is based on the re-growth time required by a growing cell culture to reach a threshold, and the notion that this time is proportional to the number of cells in the initial inoculum. We show several applications of SGT, including assessment of antibiotic effects on cell viability and determination of an antibiotic tolerant subpopulation fraction within a cell population. SGT results do not differ significantly from results obtained by CFU counts. Conclusion SGT is a relatively quick, highly sensitive, reproducible and non-laborious method that can be used in HTS settings to longitudinally assess live cells in bacterial cell cultures. PMID:23148795

  18. Development of a 96-well plate iodine binding assay for amylose content determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal starch amylose/amylopectin (AM/AP) ratios are critical in functional properties for food and industrial applications. Conventional methods for the determination of AM/AP of cereal starches are very time consuming and labor intensive making it very difficult to screen large sample sets. Stud...

  19. Determining cereal starch amylose content using a dual wavelength iodine binding 96 well plate assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal starch amylose/amylopectin (AM/AP) ratios are critical in functional properties for food and industrial applications. Conventional determination of AM/AP of cereal starches are very time consuming and labor intensive making it very difficult to screen large sample sets. Studying these large...

  20. Folate content in fresh-cut vegetable packed products by 96-well microtiter plate microbiological assay.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Violeta; Alonso-Aperte, Elena; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-15

    Ready-to-eat foods have nowadays become a significant portion of the diet. Accordingly, nutritional composition of these food categories should be well-known, in particular its folate content. However, there is a broad lack of folate data in food composition tables and databases. A total of 21 fresh-cut vegetable and fruit packed products were analysed for total folate (TF) content using a validated method that relies on the folate-dependent growth of chloramphenicol-resistant Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus (NCIMB 10463). Mean TF content ranged from 10.0 to 140.9μg/100g for the different matrices on a fresh weight basis. Higher TF quantity, 140.9-70.1μg/100g, was found in spinach, rocket, watercress, chard and broccoli. Significant differences were observed between available data for fresh vegetables and fruits from food composition tables or databases and the analysed results for fresh-cut packed products. Supplied data support the potential of folate-rich fresh-cut ready-to-eat vegetables to increase folate intake significantly.

  1. On demand nanoliter-scale microfluidic droplet generation, injection, and mixing using a passive microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Tangen, Uwe; Sharma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    We here present and characterize a programmable nanoliter scale droplet-on-demand device that can be used separately or readily integrated into low cost single layer rapid prototyping microfluidic systems for a wide range of user applications. The passive microfluidic device allows external (off-the-shelf) electronically controlled pinch valves to program the delivery of nanoliter scale aqueous droplets from up to 9 different inputs to a central outlet channel. The inputs can be either continuous aqueous fluid streams or microliter scale aqueous plugs embedded in a carrier fluid, in which case the number of effective input solutions that can be employed in an experiment is no longer strongly constrained (100 s–1000 s). Both nanoliter droplet sequencing output and nanoliter-scale droplet mixing are reported with this device. Optimization of the geometry and pressure relationships in the device was achieved in several hardware iterations with the support of open source microfluidic simulation software and equivalent circuit models. The requisite modular control of pressure relationships within the device is accomplished using hydrodynamic barriers and matched resistance channels with three different channel heights, custom parallel reversible microfluidic I/O connections, low dead-volume pinch valves, and a simply adjustable array of external screw valves. Programmable sequences of droplet mixes or chains of droplets can be achieved with the device at low Hz frequencies, limited by device elasticity, and could be further enhanced by valve integration. The chip has already found use in the characterization of droplet bunching during export and the synthesis of a DNA library. PMID:25759752

  2. Microfluidic gradient PCR (MG-PCR): a new method for microfluidic DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2010-02-01

    This study develops a new microfluidic DNA amplification strategy for executing parallel DNA amplification in the microfluidic gradient polymerase chain reaction (MG-PCR) device. The developed temperature gradient microfluidic system is generated by using an innovative fin design. The device mainly consists of modular thermally conductive copper flake which is attached onto a finned aluminum heat sink with a small fan. In our microfluidic temperature gradient prototype, a non-linear temperature gradient is produced along the gradient direction. On the copper flake of length 45 mm, width 40 mm and thickness 4 mm, the temperature gradient easily spans the range from 97 to 52 degrees Celsius. By making full use of the hot (90-97 degrees Celsius) and cold (60-70 degrees Celsius) regions on the temperature gradient device, the parallel, two-temperature MG-PCR amplification is feasible. As a demonstration, the MG-PCR from three parallel reactions of 112-bp Escherichia coli DNA fragment is performed in a continuous-flow format, in which the flow of the PCR reagent in the closed loop is induced by the buoyancy-driven nature convection. Although the prototype is not optimized, the MG-PCR amplification can be completed in less than 45 min. However, the MG-PCR thermocycler presented herein can be further scaled-down, and thus the amplification times and reagent consumption can be further reduced. In addition, the currently developed temperature gradient technology can be applied onto other continuous-flow MG-PCR systems or used for other analytical purposes such as parallel and combination measurements, and fluorescent melting curve analysis.

  3. Microfluidic structures and methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2008-04-01

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate which may include microchannels or other features.

  4. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments.

  5. Microfluidic Pneumatic Logic Circuits and Digital Pneumatic Microprocessors for Integrated Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Minsoung

    2010-01-01

    We have developed pneumatic logic circuits and microprocessors built with microfluidic channels and valves in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pneumatic logic circuits perform various combinational and sequential logic calculations with binary pneumatic signals (atmosphere and vacuum), producing cascadable outputs based on Boolean operations. A complex microprocessor is constructed from combinations of various logic circuits and receives pneumatically encoded serial commands at a single input line. The device then decodes the temporal command sequence by spatial parallelization, computes necessary logic calculations between parallelized command bits, stores command information for signal transportation and maintenance, and finally executes the command for the target devices. Thus, such pneumatic microprocessors will function as a universal on-chip control platform to perform complex parallel operations for large-scale integrated microfluidic devices. To demonstrate the working principles, we have built 2-bit, 3-bit, 4-bit, and 8-bit microprecessors to control various target devices for applications such as four color dye mixing, and multiplexed channel fluidic control. By significantly reducing the need for external controllers, the digital pneumatic microprocessor can be used as a universal on-chip platform to autonomously manipulate microfluids in a high throughput manner. PMID:19823730

  6. Microfluidic pneumatic logic circuits and digital pneumatic microprocessors for integrated microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Minsoung; Burns, Mark A

    2009-11-07

    We have developed pneumatic logic circuits and microprocessors built with microfluidic channels and valves in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pneumatic logic circuits perform various combinational and sequential logic calculations with binary pneumatic signals (atmosphere and vacuum), producing cascadable outputs based on Boolean operations. A complex microprocessor is constructed from combinations of various logic circuits and receives pneumatically encoded serial commands at a single input line. The device then decodes the temporal command sequence by spatial parallelization, computes necessary logic calculations between parallelized command bits, stores command information for signal transportation and maintenance, and finally executes the command for the target devices. Thus, such pneumatic microprocessors will function as a universal on-chip control platform to perform complex parallel operations for large-scale integrated microfluidic devices. To demonstrate the working principles, we have built 2-bit, 3-bit, 4-bit, and 8-bit microprocessors to control various target devices for applications such as four color dye mixing, and multiplexed channel fluidic control. By significantly reducing the need for external controllers, the digital pneumatic microprocessor can be used as a universal on-chip platform to autonomously manipulate microfluids in a high throughput manner.

  7. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on

  8. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  9. Compact and controlled microfluidic mixing and biological particle capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Matthew; Owen, Drew; Mills, Zachary Grant; Hesketh, Peter J.; Alexeev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    We use three-dimensional simulations and experiments to develop a multifunctional microfluidic device that performs rapid and controllable microfluidic mixing and specific particle capture. Our device uses a compact microfluidic channel decorated with magnetic features. A rotating magnetic field precisely controls individual magnetic microbeads orbiting around the features, enabling effective continuous-flow mixing of fluid streams over a compact mixing region. We use computer simulations to elucidate the underlying physical mechanisms that lead to effective mixing and compare them with experimental mixing results. We study the effect of various system parameters on microfluidic mixing to design an efficient micromixer. We also experimentally and numerically demonstrate that orbiting microbeads can effectively capture particles transported by the fluid, which has major implications in pre-concentration and detection of biological particles including various cells and bacteria, with applications in areas such as point-of-care diagnostics, biohazard detection, and food safety. Support from NSF and USDA is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Structural characterization of soy protein nanoparticles from high shear microfluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  11. [Application of microfluidics in aquatic environmental pollution analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Wei, Jun-Feng; Zheng, Guo-Xia

    2014-04-01

    Recently, a new type of chip technology, microfluidics, has received global attention for its rapid analysis speed, low reagent consumption, small size and simple operation, etc. Based on a micro-channel network and supported by a Micro-Electro-Mechanic System (MEMS), this technology integrates all the functions of a laboratory into one small piece of chip, which is called "lab on the chip". This paper presented a brief introduction about microfluidics and its representative developments. Future prospects in the aspects of instrument miniaturization, system integration, chip materials, and detection techniques, as well as the implementation of microfluidics in aquatic environmental pollutant analysis were thoroughly discussed. Some problems faced now were put forward. With the rapid progress in the microfluidics, a universal low-cost microchip capable of high speed multi-channel detection and integrated with many kinds of detection methods would be the research focus in the future.

  12. Microfluidics for gametes, embryos, and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, G D; Swain, J E; Bormann, C L

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics is a young but established field that holds significant potential for scientific discovery. The utility of microfluidics can improve our knowledge of basic biology as well as expand our understanding in specialized areas such as assisted reproduction and stem cell developmental biology. This review describes the technology of microfluidics and discusses applications within assisted reproduction technology and embryonic stem cell growth and directed differentiation. Development of an integrated microfluidic platform for assisted reproduction, which can manipulate gametes, embryos, embryonic stem cells, their culture environment, and incorporate biomarker analysis, could have a dramatic impact on the basic understanding of embryo/embryonic stem cell development, as well as provide significant improvements in current technologies used to treat infertility, preserve fertility, and derive therapeutic cells from stem cells.

  13. Characterization of Fluid Flow in Paper-Based Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walji, Noosheen; MacDonald, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have been presented as a viable low-cost alternative with the versatility to accommodate many applications in disease diagnosis and environmental monitoring. Current microfluidic designs focus on the use of silicone and PDMS structures, and several models have been developed to describe these systems; however, the design process for paper-based devices is hindered by a lack of prediction capability. In this work we simplify the complex underlying physics of the capillary-driven flow mechanism in a porous medium and generate a practical numerical model capable of predicting the flow behaviour. We present our key insights regarding the properties that dictate the behaviour of fluid wicking in paper-based microfluidic devices. We compare the results from our model to experiments and discuss the application of our model to design of paper-based microfluidic devices for arsenic detection in drinking water in Bangladesh.

  14. A personal stroll through the historical development of Canadian microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Harrison, D Jed

    2013-07-07

    The historical background of microfluidics research within Canada is discussed, from the period 1990 to the present. The emphasis is on the recollections and perspectives of the author, D. Jed Harrison.

  15. Surface Micromachine Microfluidics: Design, Fabrication, Packaging, and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul; Eaton, William P.; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Sniegowski, Jeffrey J.; Miller, Samuel L.; Guttierez, Daniel

    1999-06-30

    The field of microfluidics is undergoing rapid growth in terms of new device and system development. Among the many methods of fabricating microfluidic devices and systems, surface micromachining is relatively underrepresented due to difficulties in the introduction of fluids into the very small channels produced, packaging problems, and difficulties in device and system characterization. The potential advantages of using surface micromachining including compatibility with the existing integrated circuit tool set, integration of electronic sensing and actuation with microfluidics, and fluid volume minimization. In order to explore these potential advantages we have developed first generation surface micromachined microfluidic devices (channels) using an adapted pressure sensor fabrication process to produce silicon nitride channels, and the SUMMiT process to produce polysilicon channels. The channels were characterized by leak testing and flow rate vs. pressure measurements. The fabrication processes used and results of these tests are reported in this paper.

  16. A truly Lego®-like modular microfluidics platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittayarukskul, Kevin; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2017-03-01

    Ideally, a modular microfluidics platform should be simple to assemble and support 3D configurations for increased versatility. The modular building blocks should also be mass producible like electrical components. These are fundamental features of world-renowned Legos® and why Legos® inspire many existing modular microfluidics platforms. In this paper, a truly Lego®-like microfluidics platform is introduced, and its basic feasibility is demonstrated. Here, PDMS building blocks resembling 2  ×  2 Lego® bricks are cast from 3D-printed master molds. The blocks are pegged and stacked on a traditional Lego® plate to create simple, 3D microfluidic networks, such as a single basket weave. Characteristics of the platform, including reversible sealing and automatic alignment of channels, are also analyzed and discussed in detail.

  17. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers.

  18. Microfluidics for genome-wide studies involving next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Travis W.; Lu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized how molecular biology studies are conducted. Its decreasing cost and increasing throughput permit profiling of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic features for a wide range of applications. Microfluidics has been proven to be highly complementary to NGS technology with its unique capabilities for handling small volumes of samples and providing platforms for automation, integration, and multiplexing. In this article, we review recent progress on applying microfluidics to facilitate genome-wide studies. We emphasize on several technical aspects of NGS and how they benefit from coupling with microfluidic technology. We also summarize recent efforts on developing microfluidic technology for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic studies, with emphasis on single cell analysis. We envision rapid growth in these directions, driven by the needs for testing scarce primary cell samples from patients in the context of precision medicine.

  19. Flow dependent performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, Daniele; Al-Housseiny, Talal T; Shen, Yi; Akinlawon, Fiyinfoluwa O; Al-Housseiny, Saif T; Hobson, Ronald K; Sahu, Amaresh; Bedkowski, Katherine I; DiChristina, Thomas J; Stone, Howard A

    2014-06-28

    The integration of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) in a microfluidic geometry can significantly enhance the power density of these cells, which would have more active bacteria per unit volume. Moreover, microfluidic MFCs can be operated in a continuous mode as opposed to the traditional batch-fed mode. Here we investigate the effect of fluid flow on the performance of microfluidic MFCs. The growth and the structure of the bacterial biofilm depend to a large extent on the shear stress of the flow. We report the existence of a range of flow rates for which MFCs can achieve maximum voltage output. When operated under these optimal conditions, the power density of our microfluidic MFC is about 15 times that of a similar-size batch MFC. Furthermore, this optimum suggests a correlation between the behaviour of bacteria and fluid flow.

  20. USB-driven microfluidic chips on printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Yixuan; Dong, Enkai; Chen, Haosheng

    2014-03-07

    A technology is presented to fabricate a microfluidic chip in which the microchannels and the microelectrodes of sensors are integrated directly into the copper sheet on a printed circuit board. Then, we demonstrate an application of the generation of oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets on this microfluidic chip driven by a USB interface, and the droplet size is detected by the microelectrodes on the downstream microchannel. The integration of the microfluidic chip is improved by the direct connection of the channels to the microelectrodes of the driving unit and of the sensors on the same substrate, and it is a promising way to integrate microfluidics into a more complex micro electrical-mechanical system (MEMS).

  1. A self-powered microfluidic origami electrochemiluminescence biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Li, Jing; Chen, Chaogui; Lou, Baohua; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Erkang

    2013-05-10

    A self-powered 3D microfluidic electrochemiluminescence biosensing platform, integrated with a stable, environmentally-friendly and noble metal-free primary battery, was developed for the first time based on the principle of origami.

  2. Microfluidic parallel circuit for measurement of hydraulic resistance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungyoung; Lee, Myung Gwon; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-08-31

    We present a microfluidic parallel circuit that directly compares the test channel of an unknown hydraulic resistance with the reference channel with a known resistance, thereby measuring the unknown resistance without any measurement setup, such as standard pressure gauges. Many of microfluidic applications require the precise transport of fluid along a channel network with complex patterns. Therefore, it is important to accurately characterize and measure the hydraulic resistance of each channel segment, and determines whether the device principle works well. However, there is no fluidic device that includes features, such as the ability to diagnose microfluidic problems by measuring the hydraulic resistance of a microfluidic component in microscales. To address the above need, we demonstrate a simple strategy to measure an unknown hydraulic resistance, by characterizing the hydraulic resistance of microchannels with different widths and defining an equivalent linear channel of a microchannel with repeated patterns of a sudden contraction and expansion.

  3. Bubble-induced damping in displacement-driven microfluidic flows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongho; Rahman, Faizur; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-08-01

    Bubble damping in displacement-driven microfluidic flows was theoretically and experimentally investigated for a Y-channel microfluidic network. The system was found to exhibit linear behavior for typical microfluidic flow conditions. The bubbles induced a low-pass filter behavior with a characteristic cutoff frequency that scaled proportionally with flow rate and inversely with bubble volume and exhibited a minimum with respect to the relative resistances of the connecting channels. A theoretical model based on the electrical circuit analogy was able to predict experimentally observed damping of fluctuations with excellent agreement. Finally, a flowmeter with high resolution (0.01 μL/min) was demonstrated as an application of the bubble-aided stabilization. This study may aid in the design of many other bubble-stabilized microfluidic systems.

  4. Integration of microfluidics into the synthetic biology design flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyao; Densmore, Douglas

    2014-09-21

    One goal of synthetic biology is to design and build genetic circuits in living cells for a range of applications. Major challenges in these efforts include increasing the scalability and robustness of engineered biological systems and streamlining and automating the synthetic biology workflow of specification-design-assembly-verification. We present here a summary of the advances in microfluidic technology, particularly microfluidic large scale integration, that can be used to address the challenges facing each step of the synthetic biology workflow. Microfluidic technologies allow precise control over the flow of biological content within microscale devices, and thus may provide more reliable and scalable construction of synthetic biological systems. The integration of microfluidics and synthetic biology has the capability to produce rapid prototyping platforms for characterization of genetic devices, testing of biotherapeutics, and development of biosensors.

  5. Characterization of soy protein nanoparticles prepared by high shear microfluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  6. Cell mechanics through analysis of cell trajectories in microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowie, Samuel; Alexeev, Alexander; Sulchek, Todd

    The understanding of dynamic cell behavior can aid in research ranging from the mechanistic causes of diseases to the development of microfluidic devices for cancer detection. Through analysis of trajectories captured from video of the cells moving in a specially designed microfluidic device, insight into the dynamic viscoelastic nature of cells can be found. The microfluidic device distinguishes cells viscoelastic properties through the use of angled ridges causing a series of compressions, resulting in differences in trajectories based on cell stiffness. Trajectories of cell passing through the device are collected using image processing methods and data mining techniques are used to relate the trajectories to cell properties obtained from experiments. Furthermore, numerical simulation of the cell and microfluidic device are used to match the experimental results from the trajectory analysis. Combination of the modeling and experimental data help to uncover how changes in cellular structures result in changes in mechanical properties.

  7. Single-molecule emulsion PCR in microfluidic droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingxia; Guan, Zhichao; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-06-01

    The application of microfluidic droplet PCR for single-molecule amplification and analysis has recently been extensively studied. Microfluidic droplet technology has the advantages of compartmentalizing reactions into discrete volumes, performing highly parallel reactions in monodisperse droplets, reducing cross-contamination between droplets, eliminating PCR bias and nonspecific amplification, as well as enabling fast amplification with rapid thermocycling. Here, we have reviewed the important technical breakthroughs of microfluidic droplet PCR in the past five years and their applications to single-molecule amplification and analysis, such as high-throughput screening, next generation DNA sequencing, and quantitative detection of rare mutations. Although the utilization of microfluidic droplet single-molecule PCR is still in the early stages, its great potential has already been demonstrated and will provide novel solutions to today's biomedical engineering challenges in single-molecule amplification and analysis.

  8. Analysis of 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Lee, Jong Min; Ahrberg, Christian D; Chung, Bong Geun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) simple multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator to create molecular gradients on the centimeter scale with a wide range of flow rates. To create the concentration gradients, a main channel (MC) was orthogonally intersected with vertical side microchannel (SC) in a 3D multi-layer microfluidic device. Through sequential dilution from the SC, a spatial gradient was generated in the MC. Two theoretical models were created to assist in the design of the 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator and to compare its performance against a two-dimensional equivalent. A first mass balance model was used to predict the steady-state concentrations reached, while a second computational fluid dynamic model was employed to predict spatial development of the gradient by considering convective as well as diffusive mass transport. Furthermore, the theoretical simulations were verified through experiments to create molecular gradients in a 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator.

  9. Regenerated bacterial cellulose microfluidic column for glycoproteins separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuntao; Zhu, Chunlin; Huang, Yang; Nie, Ying; Yang, Jiazhi; Shen, Ruiqi; Sun, Dongping

    2016-02-10

    To analysis and separate glycoproteins, a simple strategy to prepare regenerated bacterial cellulose (RBC) column with concanavalin A (Con A) lectin immobilized in microfluidic system was applied. RBC was filled into microchannel to fabricate RBC microcolumn after bacterial cellulose dissolved in NaOH-sulfourea water solution. Lectin Con A was covalently connected onto RBC matrix surface via Schiff-base formation. Lysozyme (non-glycoprotein) and transferrin (glycoprotein) were successfully separated based on their different affinities toward the immobilized Con A. Overall, the RBC microfluidic system presents great potential application in affinity chromatography of glycoproteins analysis, and this research represents a significant step to prepare bacterial cellulose (BC) as column packing material in microfluidic system. What is more, troublesome operations for lectin affinity chromatography were simplified by integrating the microfluidic chip onto a HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) system.

  10. Virtual Microfluidics for digital quantification and single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liyi; Brito, Ilana L.; Alm, Eric J.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in highly parallelized analysis of single molecules and single cells is growing rapidly. Here we develop hydrogel-based virtual microfluidics as a simple alternative to complex engineered microfluidic systems for the compartmentalization of nucleic acid amplification reactions. We applied digital multiple displacement amplification (dMDA) to purified DNA templates, cultured bacterial cells, and human microbiome samples in the virtual microfluidics system and demonstrated recovery and whole-genome sequencing of single-cell MDA products. Our results from control samples showed excellent coverage uniformity and markedly reduced chimerism compared with single-cell data obtained from conventional liquid MDA reactions. We also demonstrate the applicability of the hydrogel method for genomic studies of naturally occurring microbes in human microbiome samples. The virtual microfluidics approach is a simple and robust method that will enable many laboratories to perform single-cell genomic analyses. PMID:27479330

  11. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, Siva A; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-05

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature's most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax-thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remodeling of the cytoskeleton. To understand this intricate coupling between mechanical properties, mechanical function and force-induced biochemical signaling requires tools that are capable of both controlling and manipulating the cell microenvironment and measuring the resulting mechanical response. In this review, the power of microfluidics as a functional tool for research in cell mechanics is highlighted. In particular, current literature is discussed to show that microfluidics powered by soft lithographic techniques offers the following capabilities that are of significance for understanding the mechanical behavior of cells: (i) Microfluidics enables the creation of in vitro models of physiological environments in which cell mechanics can be probed. (ii) Microfluidics is an excellent means to deliver physical cues that affect cell mechanics, such as cell shape, fluid flow, substrate topography, and stiffness. (iii) Microfluidics can also expose cells to chemical cues, such as growth factors and drugs, which alter their mechanical behavior. Moreover, these chemical cues can be delivered either at the whole cell or subcellular level. (iv) Microfluidic devices offer the possibility of measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of cells in a high throughput fashion. (v) Finally, microfluidic methods provide exquisite control over drop size, generation, and manipulation. As a result, droplets are being increasingly used to control the physicochemical environment of cells and as biomimetic analogs of living cells. These powerful attributes of microfluidics should further stimulate novel means of investigating the link between physicochemical cues and the biomechanical

  12. Metering and routing of liquid quanta in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew Charles

    Microchemical systems have become increasingly more intricate and complex, and have been used in a wide variety of interesting applications in recent years. However, further advancement of these devices is currently limited by their lack of any significant detection, routing, and scheduling capabilities for the materials moving throughout them. This limited level of control becomes a significant issue when scaling simple, single-channel microfluidic devices to large arrays. The overall goal of this thesis, therefore, is to create and improve several fundamental microfluidic capabilities, including droplet generation, routing, sensing, and scheduling. The integration of these components into larger arrays will also be demonstrated, and will provide a significant step towards more robust and capable heterogeneous microchemical systems. This thesis describes the development of a number of microfluidic handling techniques, including; (i) the detection of individual liquid droplets using electrical position sensors; (ii) the generation and control over the three major microfluidic segmented laminar flow regimes; (iii) the creation of discrete liquid quanta by entirely chip-driven techniques, including on-chip valves and pumps; (iv) the driving around of those resulting liquid quanta; and (v) the combining of multiple microfluidic peristaltic pumps into a multiplexed arrangement, allowing for many pumps to be controlled by a limited number of external pneumatic connections. These techniques were integrated to create an overall microfluidic droplet routing platform, capable of generating and directing individual liquid elements to arbitrary locations within a large microfluidic A I array, using completely chip-driven actuations. As a testbed application, the microfluidic capabilities developed here were utilized in conjunction with an electrohydrodynamic-jet printing process to generate a high resolution heterogeneous printhead.

  13. Microfluidic tuning of distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Laurent; Lee, Benjamin G.; Behroozi, Peter; Loncar, Marko; Belkin, Mikhail; Capasso, Federico; Aellen, Thierry; Hofstetter, Daniel; Beck, Matthias; Faist, Jerome

    2006-11-01

    In this Letter, we report the tuning of the emission wavelength of a single mode distributed feedback quantum cascade laser by modifying the mode effective refractive index using fluids. A fabrication procedure to encapsulate the devices in polymers for microfluidic delivery is also presented. The integration of microfluidics with semiconductor laser (optofluidics) is promising for new compact and portable lab-on-a-chip applications.

  14. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-07

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    wide application and will enable the study of colloidal/macromolecular transport in physiological systems, such as, blood filtration in the kidney... MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sponsored by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA Order No. E117...Jun 00 – Aug 02 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LATTICE BOLTZMANN SIMULATION OF PARTICLE LADEN FLOWS IN MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS 6. AUTHOR(S) David S

  16. Microfluidic resonant waveguide grating biosensor system for whole cell sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, Natalya; Miller, William; Goral, Vasily; Hepburn, Jerry; Fang, Ye

    2011-04-01

    We report on a fluidic resonant waveguide grating (RWG) biosensor system that enables medium throughput measurements of cellular responses under microfluidics in a 32-well format. Dynamic mass redistribution assays under microfluidics differentiate the cross-desensitization process between the β2-adrenoceptor agonist epinephrine and the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin mediated signaling. This system opens new possibility to study cellular processes that are otherwise difficult to achieve using conventional RWG configurations.

  17. Clear Castable Polyurethane Elastomer for Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Domansky, Karel; Leslie, Daniel C.; McKinney, James; Fraser, Jacob P.; Sliz, Josiah D.; Hamkins-Indik, Tiama; Hamilton, Geraldine A.; Bahinski, Anthony; Ingber, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has numerous desirable properties for fabricating microfluidic devices, including optical transparency, flexibility, biocompatibility, and fabrication by casting; however, partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into the bulk of PDMS hinders industrial acceptance of PDMS microfluidic devices for chemical processing and drug development applications. Here we describe an attractive alternative material that is similar to PDMS in terms of optical transparency, flexibility and castability, but that is also resistant to absorption of small hydrophobic molecules. PMID:23954953

  18. Direct digital manufacturing of autonomous centrifugal microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents strategies that attempt to solve two key problems facing the commercialization of microfluidics: cost reduction in microfluidic chip manufacturing and microfluidic device driver development. To reduce the cost of microfluidic chip manufacturing, we propose to use of three-dimensional (3D) printers for direct digital manufacturing (DDM). An evaluation of 3D micro-scale structure printing using several 3D printers is reported, and some of the technical issues to be addressed in the future are suggested. To evaluate micro-scale printing, three types of 3D printers, with the ability to print structures on the scale of several hundred meters, were selected by first screening six 3D printers. Line and space patterns with line widths of 100-500 µm and an aspect ratio of one were printed and evaluated. The estimated critical dimension was around 200 µm. The manufacturing of a monolithic microfluidic chip with embedded channels was also demonstrated. Monolithic microfluidic chips with embedded microchannels having 500 × 500 and 250 × 250 µm2 cross sections and 2-20 mm lengths were printed, and the fidelity of the channel shape, residual supporting material, and flow of liquid water were evaluated. The liquid flow evaluation showed that liquid water could flow through all of the microchannels with the 500 × 500 µm2 cross section, whereas this was not possible through some of the channels with the 250 × 250 µm2 cross section because of the residual resin or supporting material. To reduce the device-driver cost, we propose to use of the centrifugal microfluidic concept. An autonomous microfluidic device that could implement sequential flow control under a steadily rotating condition was printed. Four-step flow injection under a steadily rotating condition at 1500 rpm was successfully demonstrated without any external triggering such as changing the rotational speed.

  19. Cell-Based Biosensors: Electrical Sensing in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors provide new horizons for medical diagnostics by adopting complex recognition elements such as mammalian cells in microfluidic devices that are simple, cost efficient and disposable. This combination renders possible a new range of applications in the fields of diagnostics and personalized medicine. The review looks at the most recent developments in cell-based biosensing microfluidic systems with electrical and electrochemical transduction, and relevance to medical diagnostics. PMID:26859401

  20. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973