Science.gov

Sample records for 97ru precision measurement

  1. Measurement of the cross section of the residues from the 11B-induced reaction on 89Y and 93Nb: Production of 97Ru and Rhm101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Maiti, Moumita

    2017-06-01

    Background: The heavy-ion induced reactions on intermediate mass targets are complex in nature, even at the low energies. To understand those nuclear reaction phenomena in detail, more experimental studies are required in a wide range of energies. Purpose: Investigation of heavy-ion reactions by measuring production cross sections of the residues produced in the 11B-induced reactions on 89Y and 93Nb at low energies, near and above the barrier, and to check the effectiveness of the different nuclear models to explain them. Further, aim is also to optimize the production parameters of neutron deficient medically relevant 97Ru and Rhm101 radioisotopes produced in those reactions, respectively. Method: The 11B beam was allowed to impinge on 89Y and 93Nb foils supported by an aluminum (Al) catcher foil, arranged in a stack, in 27.5-58.7 and 30.6-62.3 MeV energy range, respectively. The off-line γ -ray spectrometry was carried out after the end of bombardment to measure the activity of the radionuclides produced in each foil and cross sections were calculated. Measured cross-sectional data were analyzed in terms of compound and precompound model calculations. Results: The measured cross sections of Ru,9597, 96,95,94Tc, Mom93, Ym90 radionuclides produced in the 11B+89Y reaction, and 101,100,99Pd, 101m,100,99mRh, 97Ru produced in the 11B+93Nb reaction showed good agreement with the model calculations based on the Hauser-Feshbach formulation and exciton model. Unlike theoretical estimation, consistent production of Ym90 was observed in the 11B+89Y reaction. Substantial pre-equilibrium contribution was noticed in the 3 n reaction channel in both reactions. Conclusions: Theoretical estimations confirmed that major production yields are mostly contributed by the compound reaction process. Pre-equilibrium emissions contributed at the high energy tail of the 3 n channel for both reactions. Moreover, an indirect signature of a direct reaction influence was also observed in the

  2. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.; Goldman, A.G.; Fairchild, R.G.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Richards, P.; Brill, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl.2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(Sn+/sup 2/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensaton of the kidneys.

  3. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl-2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs and in dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(SN/sup 2 +/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensation of the kidneys.

  4. A new radioisotope tracing method of UHMWPE wear particle dispersion using 97Ru.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob A; Gladkis, Laura G; Timmers, Heiko

    2011-07-01

    A new method of radioisotope labelling, using the reaction 92Zr(12C,α3n)97Ru, has been demonstrated. The method places radioactive 97Ru tracer atoms into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The radioisotope 97Ru (half-life t1/2=2.9 days) was implanted in 5 mm×5 mm UHMWPE samples to a maximum depth of 5 μm. The radioisotope is identified via a characteristic gamma-ray emission from its daughter 97Tc at 216 keV. The new method is advantageous since the concentration profile of the 97Ru label is almost constant starting at the surface. In order to show the efficacy of the method for wear measurements on prostheses, the labeled UHMWPE samples were worn in a model system. The model system involved bi-directional sliding actuation on a steel block. Debris transport, via the two pathways linking the polymer with the articulating steel surface and with the lubricant, respectively, has been quantified. Surface roughness of the steel and the load on the steel were varied. Changing the surface roughness of the steel from (110±30) to (340±90) nm increased the amount of debris dispersed in the lubricant from (21±3)% to (67±3)%. Furthermore, changing the load from 1 to 5 kg also increased debris transport along this pathway.

  5. Precision Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radius, Marcie; And Others

    The manual provides information for precision measurement (counting of movements per minute of a chosen activity) of achievement in special education students. Initial sections give guidelines for the teacher, parent, and student to follow for various methods of charting behavior. It is explained that precision measurement is a way to measure the…

  6. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  7. Precision Measurement in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  8. Targets for Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, W.; Yao, L.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Heffner, M.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Laptev, A. B.; Massey, T. N.; Meharchand, R.; Qu, H.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Selhan, B.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.

    2014-05-01

    The general properties needed in targets (sources) for high precision, high accuracy measurements are reviewed. The application of these principles to the problem of developing targets for the Fission TPC is described. Longer term issues, such as the availability of actinide materials, improved knowledge of energy losses and straggling and the stability of targets during irradiation are also discussed.

  9. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  10. Precision surface measurement.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X

    2012-08-28

    Surface size, geometry and texture are some of the most influential subjects in the fields of precision and ultra-precision engineering, defining the functional interface through which emerging products operate. Next-generation products demand super-smooth surfaces, freeform geometries or even deterministically introduced microstructures to provide functional performance. Technological progress using these surfaces types is possible only if the associated manufacturing processes are rigorously controlled and the surfaces are measurable. Metrology for advanced surfaces is not established. The current state of the art is challenged in respect to (i) surface characteristics, extremity of size, ultra precision, quality, geometric complexity, or combinations of these aspects, and (ii) measurement technology for the manufacturing environment, in particular, online, non-contact, high speed, ease of use, small footprint and robustness. This study addresses the challenges in this subject area and discusses some fundaments and principles derived from interdisciplinary research. The combination of these aspects is enabling the creation of manufacturing-environment-based measurement technology. This is expected to facilitate advanced surface manufacture over a wide range of sectors, including large science programmes and high-technology engineering.

  11. Precise Measurement for Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A metrology instrument known as PhaseCam supports a wide range of applications, from testing large optics to controlling factory production processes. This dynamic interferometer system enables precise measurement of three-dimensional surfaces in the manufacturing industry, delivering speed and high-resolution accuracy in even the most challenging environments.Compact and reliable, PhaseCam enables users to make interferometric measurements right on the factory floor. The system can be configured for many different applications, including mirror phasing, vacuum/cryogenic testing, motion/modal analysis, and flow visualization.

  12. Precise measurement of planeness.

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Schwider, J

    1967-06-01

    Interference methods are reviewed-particularly those developed at the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin-with which the deviations of an optically flat surface from the ideal plane can be measured with a high degree of exactness. One aid to achieve this is the relative methods which measure the differences in planeness between two surfaces. These are then used in the absolute methods which determine the absolute planeness of a surface. This absolute determination can be effected in connection with a liquid surface, or (as done by the authors) only by suitable evaluation of relative measurements between unknown plates in various positional combinations. Experimentally, one uses two- or multiple-beam interference fringes of equal thickness(1) or of equal inclination. The fringes are observed visually, scanned, or photographed, and in part several wavelengths or curves of equal density (Aquidensiten) are employed. The survey also brings the following new methods: a relative method, where, with the aid of fringes of superposition, the fringe separation is subdivided equidistantly thus achieving an increase of measuring precision, and an absolute method which determines the deviations of a surface from ideal planeness along arbitrary central sections, without a liquid surface, from four relative interference photographs.

  13. High Precision GPS Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-28

    GNSS Service (IGS) database, and magnetic field vectors from the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model [9]. These combined...Additonal correlations between the higher order range error and geomagnetic activity and seasonal variations are also obtained. Fig. 4 shows...clear correlation between the geomagnetic activity and enhanced higher order error at both sites. High Precision GPS Final Report Page 5 Fig.3

  14. Fundamental Physics and Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, T. W.

    2006-11-01

    "Very high precision physics has always appealed to me. The steady improvement in technologies that afford higher and higher precision has been a regular source of excitement and challenge during my career. In science, as in most things, whenever one looks at something more closely, new aspects almost always come into play …" With these word from the book "How the Laser happened", Charles H. Townes expresses a passion for precision that is now shared by many scientists. Masers and lasers have become indispensible tools for precision measurements. During the past few years, the advent of femtosecond laser frequency comb synthesizers has revolutionized the art of directly comparing optical and microwave frequencies. Inspired by the needs of precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom, such frequency combs are now enabling ultra-precise spectroscopy over wide spectral ranges. Recent laboratory experiments are already setting stringent limits for possible slow variations of fundamental constants. Laser frequency combs also provide the long missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks that may ultimately reach a precision of parts in 1018 and beyond. Such tools will open intriguing new opportunities for fundamental experiments including new tests of special and general relativity. In the future, frequency comb techniques may be extended into the extreme ultraviolet and soft xray regime, opening a vast new spectral territory to precision measurements. Frequency combs have also become a key tool for the emerging new field of attosecond science, since they can control the electric field of ultrashort laser pulses on an unprecedented time scale. The biggest surprise in these endeavours would be if we found no surprise.

  15. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  16. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  17. Precision Mass Measurements at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, D.; van Schelt, J.; Savard, G.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Sternberg, M.; Sun, T.; Zabransky, B. J.; Segel, R.; Sharma, K.

    2010-02-01

    Neutron separation energies (Sn) are essential inputs to models of explosive r-process nucleosynthesis. However, for nuclei farther from stability, the precision of Sn decreases as production decreases and observation of those nuclei become more difficult. Many of the most critical inputs to the models are based on extrapolations from measurements of masses closer to stability than the predicted r-process path. Measuring masses that approach and lie on the predicted r-process path will further constrain the systematic uncertainties in these extrapolated values. The Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (CPT) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has measured the masses of more than 160 nuclei to high precision. A recent move to the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) at ANL has given the CPT unique access to weakly produced nuclei that cannot be easily reached via proton induced fission of ^238U. CARIBU will eventually use a 1 Ci source of ^252Cf to produce these nuclei. Installation of the CPT at CARIBU as well as the first CPT mass measurements of neutron rich nuclei at CARIBU will be discussed. )

  18. Precision Measurement Of Corneal Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Paul R.; Macri, Timothy F.; Telfair, William B.; Bennett, Peter S.; Martin, Clifford A.; Warner, John W.

    1989-05-01

    We describe a new electro-optical device being developed to provide precise measurements of the three-dimensional topography of the human cornea. This device, called a digital keratoscope, is intended primarily for use in preparing for and determining the effect of corneal surgery procedures such as laser refractive keratectomy, radial keratotomy or corneal transplant on the refractive power of the cornea. It also may serve as an aid in prescribing contact lenses. The basic design features of the hardware and of the associated computer software are discussed, the means for alignment and calibration are described and typical results are given.

  19. Precision Measurements in 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anholm, Melissa; Ashery, Daniel; Behling, Spencer; Fenker, Benjamin; Melconian, Dan; Mehlman, Michael; Behr, John; Gorelov, Alexandre; Olchanski, Konstantin; Preston, Claire; Warner, Claire; Gwinner, Gerald

    2015-10-01

    We have performed precision measurements of the kinematics of the daughter particles in the decay of 37K. This isotope decays by β+ emission in a mixed Fermi/Gamow-Teller transition to its isobaric analog, 37Ar. Because the higher-order standard model corrections to this decay process are well understood, it is an ideal candidate for for improving constraints on interactions beyond the standard model. Our setup utilizes a magneto-optical trap to confine and cool samples of 37K, which are then spin-polarized by optical pumping. This allows us to perform measurements on both polarized and unpolarized nuclei, which is valuable for a complete understanding of systematic effects. Precision measurements of this decay are expected to be sensitive to the presence of right-handed vector currents, as well as a linear combination of scalar and tensor currents. Progress towards a final result is presented here. Support provided by: NSERC, NRC through TRIUMF, DOE ER40773, Early Career ER41747, Israel Science Foundation.

  20. Precision moisture generation and measurement.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Irwin, Adriane Nadine

    2010-03-01

    In many industrial processes, gaseous moisture is undesirable as it can lead to metal corrosion, polymer degradation, and other materials aging processes. However, generating and measuring precise moisture concentrations is challenging due to the need to cover a broad concentration range (parts-per-billion to percent) and the affinity of moisture to a wide range surfaces and materials. This document will discuss the techniques employed by the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory of the Materials Reliability Department at Sandia National Laboratories to generate and measure known gaseous moisture concentrations. This document highlights the use of a chilled mirror and primary standard humidity generator for the characterization of aluminum oxide moisture sensors. The data presented shows an excellent correlation in frost point measured between the two instruments, and thus provides an accurate and reliable platform for characterizing moisture sensors and performing other moisture related experiments.

  1. Automatic precision measurement of spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B A; Sansonetti, C J; Andrew, K L

    1978-08-01

    A fully automatic comparator has been designed and implemented to determine precision wavelengths from high-resolution spectrograms. The accuracy attained is superior to that of an experienced operator using a semiautomatic comparator with a photoelectric setting device. The system consists of a comparator, slightly modified for simultaneous data acquisition from two parallel scans of the spectrogram, interfaced to a minicomputer. The software which controls the system embodies three innovations of special interest. (1) Data acquired from two parallel scans are compared and used to separate unknown from standard lines, to eliminate spurious lines, to identify blends of unknown with standard lines, to improve the accuracy of the measured positions, and to flag lines which require special examination. (2) Two classes of lines are automatically recognized and appropriate line finding methods are applied to each. This provides precision measurement for both simple and complex line profiles. (3) Wavelength determination using a least-squares fitted grating equation is supported in addition to polynomial interpolation. This is most useful in spectral regions with sparsely distributed standards. The principles and implementation of these techniques are fully described.

  2. Precision QCD measurements at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirumov, Hayk

    2014-11-01

    A review of recent experimental results on perturbative QCD from the HERA experiments H1 and ZEUS is presented. All inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised ep scattering are combined. They span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and in Bjorken x. This data set is used as the sole input to NLO and NNLO QCD analyses to determine new sets of parton distributions, HERAPDF2.0, with small experimental uncertainties and an estimate of model and parametrisation uncertainties. Also shown are new results on inclusive jet, dijet and trijet differential cross sections measured in neutral current deep inelastic scattering. The precision jet data is used to extract the strong coupling αs at NLO with small experimental errors.

  3. Theoretical investigation of cross sections and astrophysical S-factors for the 92Mo(α,n)95Ru and 94Mo(α,n)97Ru reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Abdullah; Yıldız, Ercan; Sarpün, Ismail Hakki

    2016-11-01

    Molybdenum is commonly applied as a constructive material in different types of nuclear reactors. The cross sections of the 92Mo(α,n)95Ru and 94Mo(α,n)97Ru reactions have been calculated at 5-20 MeV energy ranges. In theoretical calculations, the TALYS1.6 and NONSMOKER codes were used. Also the astrophysical S-factors were calculated. Results of our calculations were checked to the experimental data obtained from EXFOR database.

  4. Precision measurements with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Schlippert, Dennis; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2017-04-01

    Interferometry with matter waves enables precise measurements of rotations, accelerations, and differential accelerations [1-5]. This is exploited for determining fundamental constants [2], in fundamental science as e.g. testing the universality of free fall [3], and is applied for gravimetry [4], and gravity gradiometry [2,5]. At the Institut für Quantenoptik in Hannover, different approaches are pursued. A large scale device is designed and currently being set up to investigate the gain in precision for gravimetry, gradiometry, and fundamental tests on large baselines [6]. For field applications, a compact and transportable device is being developed. Its key feature is an atom chip source providing a collimated high flux of atoms which is expected to mitigate systematic uncertainties [7,8]. The atom chip technology and miniaturization benefits from microgravity experiments in the drop tower in Bremen and sounding rocket experiments [8,9] which act as pathfinders for space borne operation [10]. This contribution will report about our recent results. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the CRC 1128 geo-Q, the RTG 1729, the QUEST-LFS, and by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557. [1] P. Berg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015; I. Dutta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116, 183003, 2016. [2] J. B. Fixler et al., Science 315, 74 (2007); G. Rosi et al., Nature 510, 518, 2014. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Peters et al., Nature 400, 849, 1999; A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011; C. Freier et al., J. of Phys.: Conf. Series 723, 012050, 2016. [5] J. M. McGuirk et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 033608, 2002; P. Asenbaum et al., arXiv:1610.03832. [6] J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011, 2015. [7] H. Ahlers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 173601

  5. Precision Measurements at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.K.; /SLAC

    2006-12-06

    With relatively low backgrounds and a well-determined initial state, the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) would provide a precision complement to the LHC experiments at the energy frontier. Completely and precisely exploring the discoveries of the LHC with such a machine will be critical in understanding the nature of those discoveries and what, if any, new physics they represent. The unique ability to form a complete picture of the Higgs sector is a prime example of the probative power of the ILC and represents a new era in precision physics.

  6. Limits of precision measurements based on interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, G.

    2008-12-01

    Laser interferometric methods are employed in precision measurements and positioning tasks, since they provide the means for attaining high metric resolution and precision, even over large measurement ranges. The most important fundamental principles of heterodyne and homodyne interferometers are discussed. A metrological analysis makes it possible to describe the advantages and limits of laser interferometry. The design and functionality of fibre-coupled miniature interferometers are described. The broad applicability of interferometers to microtechnology, nanotechnology and precision mechatronics is explained.

  7. Towards Precision Measurements at UASLP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzeloui, S.; Arias, N.; Abediyeh, V.; Martínez, D.; Gutiérrez, M.; Uruñuela, E.; del Rio, E.; Cerda-Méndez, E.; Gomez, E.; Valenzuela, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic interferometry is a very sensitive technique to measure small forces. Here we present an overview of the progress towards interferometric measurements in our laboratory. We characterize the magnetic field noise and describe the strategies to minimize the sensitivity to magnetic field fluctuations. We introduce as well a system for Raman excitation with minimum phase noise and the frequency filtering needed to implement it. Finally, we demonstrate atomic interferometry with a frequency sensitivity of 3 Hz.

  8. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrained by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.

  9. Theory of precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1990-03-01

    In these lectures, I will review the theoretical concepts needed to understand the goals and implications of experiments in this new era of weak interactions. I will explain how to compute the most important order-{alpha} radiative corrections to weak interaction processes and discuss the physical implications of these correction terms. I hope that this discussion will be useful to those --- experimentalists and theorists --- who will try to interpret the new data that we will soon receive. This paper is organized as follows: I will review the structure of the standard weak interaction model at zeroth order. I will discuss the measurement of the Z{sup 0} boson mass in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. This measurement is affected by radiative correction to the form of the Z{sup 0} resonance, and so I will review the theory of the resonance line shape. I will briefly review the modifications of the properties of the Z{sup 0} which would be produced by additional neutral gauge bosons. I will review the theory of the renormalization of weak interaction parameters such as sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub {omega}}, concentrating especially on the contributions of the top quark and other heavy, undiscovered particles.

  10. Nucleon measurements at the precision frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Carl E.

    2013-11-07

    We comment on nucleon measurements at the precision frontier. As examples of what can be learned, we concentrate on three topics, which are parity violating scattering experiments, the proton radius puzzle, and the symbiosis between nuclear and atomic physics.

  11. Precision measurement for particle physics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Axions and other light particles are strongly motivated. For example, the axion is the crucial element in the recently proposed solution to the hierarchy problem using dynamical relaxation in the early universe. However, such particles are challenging to search for experimentally. Precision measurement technologies such as atom interferometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, high precision magnetometry, and torsion balances allow novel, highly sensitive experiments for direct detection of such light dark matter and of gravitational waves. Thus precision measurement technologies open new avenues for probing the origin and composition of the universe.

  12. Optimal measurement precision of a nonlinear interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha; Chen, Han

    2012-06-01

    We study the best attainable measurement precision when a double-well trap with bosons inside acts as an interferometer to measure the energy difference of the atoms on the two sides of the trap. We introduce time-independent perturbation theory as the main tool in both analytical arguments and numerical computations. Nonlinearity from atom-atom interactions will not indirectly allow the interferometer to beat the Heisenberg limit, but in many regimes of the operation the Heisenberg limit scaling of measurement precision is preserved in spite of added tunneling of the atoms and atom-atom interactions, often even with the optimal prefactor.

  13. High Precision Pressure Measurement with a Funnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental device for high precision differential pressure measurements is presented. Its working mechanism recalls that of a hydraulic press, where pressure is supplied by insufflating air under a funnel. As an application, we measure air pressure inside a soap bubble. The soap bubble is inflated and connected to a funnel which is…

  14. High Precision Pressure Measurement with a Funnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental device for high precision differential pressure measurements is presented. Its working mechanism recalls that of a hydraulic press, where pressure is supplied by insufflating air under a funnel. As an application, we measure air pressure inside a soap bubble. The soap bubble is inflated and connected to a funnel which is…

  15. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Feiveson, Alan H.; Shackelford, Linda; Rianon, Nahida; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Done Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift, The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values ( < 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  16. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  17. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  18. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  19. A Radiometer for Precision Coherent Radiation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Douglas B.; Zalewski, Edward F.

    1992-01-01

    A radiometer has been designed for precision colierent radiation measurements and tested for long-term repeatability at wavelengths of 488 and 633 nm. The radiometer consists of a pn silicon photodiode maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere with a quartz window designed to eliminate interference problems. Ratio measurements between the radiometer and an absolute type detector were made over a period of 215 d. At 0.5 mW, the standard deviations were 0.008% and 0.009% at 488 and 633 nm, respectively. The maximum deviations from the mean were 0.016% and 0.015% at the respective wavelengths. Measurements were also made on the radiometer with respect to angular and spatial uniformity and linearity. The high precision, simplicity, and portability of the radiometer suggest it for use as a transfer standard for radiometric measurements. PMID:28053435

  20. High precision flux measurements with ENUBET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzato, M.; ENUBET collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The challenges of precision neutrino physics (i.e the study of CP violation) require measurements of absolute ν cross sections at the GeV scale with exquisite (O(1)%) precision. Such precision is presently limited to about 10% by the uncertainties on neutrino flux at the source. A reduction of this uncertainty by one order of magnitude can be achieved monitoring the positron production in the decay tunnel originating from the Ke3 decays of charged kaons in a sign and momentum selected narrow band beam. This novel technique enables the measurement of the most relevant cross-sections for CP violation (νe and {\\displaystyle \\bar{ν }}e) with a precision of 1% and requires a special instrumented beam-line. Such non-conventional beam-line will be developed in the framework of the ENUBET Horizon-2020 Consolidator Grant (PI A. Longhin), recently approved by the European Research Council (grant agreement N° 681647). In this poster, we will present the Project and the early experimental results on ultra-compact calorimeters that can embedded in the instrumented decay tunnel.

  1. Precision measurements of fundamental muon properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debevec, P. T.

    2003-02-01

    The g-factor of the muon differs from two due to the excitation of virtual field quanta and particles. The deviation from two, the g-factor anomaly, can be calculated with high precision in the Standard Model of particle physics. The g-factor anomaly can be measured with high precision by determining the rate at which the spin direction of high-energy muons circulating in a storage ring precesses. The Brookhaven National Laboratory g-2 experiment (BNL g-2 collaboration) has measured g-2 to 1.3 ppm. The result is essentially in agreement with the Standard Model. The result puts interesting constraints on Standard Model extensions. Data under analysis will reduce the uncertainty to the order of 0.5 ppm. The precision timing techniques used in the g-2 experiment are a central element of a new experiment to measure the lifetime of the positive muon. The goal of this experiment is to determine the lifetime to 1 ppm, and the Fermi coupling constant to 0.5 ppm. The high statistics demand of this measurement is satisfied by one of the surface muon beams of the Paul Scherrer Institute. An artificial time structure is imposed on the continuous beam by an electrostatic kicker. The decay positrons are detected in a 180 element quasi-spherical detector. The effective counting rate is of the order of 1 MHz. The experiment is designed to control systematic errors to a level below 1 ppm.

  2. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  3. Precision insolation measurement under field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. S.; Berdahl, C. M.; Gardner, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes a precision insolation instrument - the Mark 3 Kendall Radiometer - developed for field survey work and for use as a calibration transfer standard. The instrument, which can be used to make accurate measurements of solar irradiance, has a windowless black cavity receptor mounted in a massive heat sink and has equal sensitivity to ultraviolet, infrared, and visible radiation. Attention is given to a calibration stability analysis over two years of operation.

  4. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  5. Precise Atomic Beam Spectroscopy Measurements in Thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David; Speck, Andrew; Majumder, Protik

    2000-06-01

    We have begun a series of new high-precision measurements of thallium atomic structure using a newly completed high-flux atomic beam apparatus. These experiments will extend our vapor cell spectroscopy work in which we have measured thallium transition amplitudes and excited-state hyperfine splittings. These experimental results provide important, independent cross-checks on the accuracy of ongoing calculations of parity nonconservation in thallium. We study two ground state transitions: the 6P_1/2-6P_3/2 M1 transition at 1283 nm, and the 6P_1/2 - 7S_1/2 E1 transition at 378 nm. Laser light at the UV wavelength is obtained via external resonant frequency doubling of a 5 mW, 755 nm laser diode system. Our atomic beam apparatus consists of a multiple slit oven source and 20 cm oven-to-interaction region distance, which provides a favorable balance of beam density and modest Doppler narrowing. Our interaction region includes a precisely constructed and calibrated electric field plate/high-voltage system. Using this apparatus in conjunction with an acousto-optic modulator to frequency shift the diode laser, we have begun a high-precision Stark shift measurement within the 378 nm transition. Future experiments that will focus on the 1283 nm M1 transition using the atomic beam apparatus include a sensitive test of long-range T-violating forces in thallium. Current experimental results will be presented.

  6. Low cost automated precise time measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, A.; Liposchak, P.

    1973-01-01

    The Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center (AGMC) has the responsibility for the dissemination of Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) to Air Force timing systems requiring microsecond time. In order to maintain traceability to the USNO Master Clock in Washington D.C., and accomplish efficient logging of time and frequency data on individual precision clocks, a simple automatic means of acquiring precise time has been devised. The Automatic Time Interval Measurement System (ATIMS) consists of a minicomputer (8K Memory), teletype terminal, electronic counter, Loran C receiver, time base generator and locally-manufactured relay matrix panel. During the measurement process, the computer controls the relay matrix which selects for comparison 13 atomic clocks against a reference clock and the reference versus Loran C. Through use of the system teletype, the operator is able to set the system clock (hours, minutes and seconds), examine and/or modify all clock data and constants, and set measurement intervals. This is done in a conversational manner. A logic flow diagram, system schematic, source listing and software components are included in the presentation.

  7. Precise Atomic Beam Spectroscopy Measurements in Thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David; Friedberg, Paul; Majumder, Protik

    2001-05-01

    Current results from a series of new high-precision measurements of thallium atomic structure using a newly completed high-flux atomic beam apparatus will be presented. The experimental results provide important, independent cross-checks on the accuracy of ongoing calculations of parity nonconservation in thallium. We study two ground state transitions: the 6P_1/2-6P_3/2 M1 transition at 1283 nm, and the 6P_1/2 - 7S_1/2 E1 transition at 378 nm. Laser light at the UV wavelength is obtained via external resonant frequency doubling of a 15 mW, 755 nm laser diode system. Our atomic beam apparatus consists of a multiple slit oven source and 20 cm oven-to-interaction region distance. This arrangement can achieve an absorption linewidth of 100 MHz with 10% laser beam absorption. Our interaction region includes a precisely constructed and calibrated electric field plate/high-voltage system. Using this apparatus in conjunction with an acousto-optic modulator to frequency shift the diode laser, we have begun a high-precision Stark shift measurement within the 378 nm transition. Future experiments that will focus on the 1283 nm M1 transition using the atomic beam apparatus include a sensitive test of long-range T-violating forces in thallium.

  8. Precision temperature gradient measurements on window glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikk, G.; Petrie, W.

    1977-01-01

    Surface temperature gradients were measured with miniature thermocouples installed in a 58.5 cm (23-inch) square window. Test measurements at 25 locations were made under vacuum and with the window operating in radiant heat transfer mode. The analysis of thermocouple design and installation is presented along with a lead wire routing scheme to allow for both differential and absolute temperature measurements while using a minimum number of signal feedthru paths through the test chamber wall. Typical test data and operational precautions are presented along with the accuracy analysis for installation effects and measurement effects to support differential temperature measurement precision values of + or - 0.06 C RMS + or - 0.1 F RMS).

  9. Precise delay measurement through combinatorial logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R. (Inventor); Chen, Yuan (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution circuit and method for facilitating precise measurement of on-chip delays for FPGAs for reliability studies. The circuit embeds a pulse generator on an FPGA chip having one or more groups of LUTS (the "LUT delay chain"), also on-chip. The circuit also embeds a pulse width measurement circuit on-chip, and measures the duration of the generated pulse through the delay chain. The pulse width of the output pulse represents the delay through the delay chain without any I/O delay. The pulse width measurement circuit uses an additional asynchronous clock autonomous from the main clock and the FPGA propagation delay can be displayed on a hex display continuously for testing purposes.

  10. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  11. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  12. Precision energy measurement using the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinn, Ian

    2016-09-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is seeking neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) in 76Ge. The 0 νββ signal consists of a peak in a 4 keV region of interest (ROI) at the 76Ge double-beta decay Q-value of 2039 keV. The DEMONSTRATOR will consist of an array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors with a P-type point contact (PPC) geometry. The experiment's goal is to reduce the background in the ROI to < 3 counts/ROI-tonne-yr. Precise calculation of the energy of each event can help to shrink the size of the ROI, thus reducing the background counts. A precise measurement of the response function of the detectors is important for calculating the ROI and controlling systematic errors on the limits produced. This presentation will describe the measurement of the response function using calibration data, along with several techniques used to improve the energy calculations, such as correcting for charge trapping in detectors and digitizer non-linearities. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  13. Precision optical displacement measurements using biphotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Kevin; Pang, Shengshi; Kwiat, Paul G.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and examine the use of biphoton pairs, such as those created in parametric down-conversion or four-wave mixing, to enhance the precision and the resolution of measuring optical displacements by position-sensitive detection. We show that the precision of measuring a small optical beam displacement with this method can be significantly enhanced by the correlation between the two photons, given the same optical mode. The improvement is largest if the correlations between the photons are strong, and falls off as the biphoton correlation weakens. More surprisingly, we find that the smallest resolvable parameter of a simple split detector scales as the inverse of the number of biphotons for small biphoton number ("Heisenberg scaling"), because the Fisher information diverges as the parameter to be estimated decreases in value. One usually sees this scaling only for systems with many entangled degrees of freedom. We discuss the transition for the split-detection scheme to the standard quantum limit scaling for imperfect correlations as the biphoton number is increased. An analysis of an N -pixel detector is also given to investigate the benefit of using a higher resolution detector. The physical limit of these metrology schemes is determined by the uncertainty in the birth zone of the biphoton in the nonlinear crystal.

  14. Research about the high precision temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Yu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zeng, Z.; Deng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    High precision temperature control system is one of most important support conditions for tunable birefringent filter.As the first step,we researched some high precision temperature measurement methods for it. Firstly, circuits with a 24 bit ADC as the sensor's reader were carefully designed; Secondly, an ARM porcessor is used as the centrol processing unit, it provides sufficient reading and procesing ability; Thirdly, three kinds of sensors, PT100, Dale 01T1002-5 thermistor, Wheatstone bridge(constructed by pure copper and manganin) as the senor of the temperature were tested respectively. The resolution of the measurement with these three kinds of sensors are all better than 0.001 that's enough for 0.01 stability temperature control. Comparatively, Dale 01T1002-5 thermistor could get the most accurate temperature of the key point, Wheatstone bridge could get the most accurate mean temperature of the whole layer, both of them will be used in our futrue temperature controll system.

  15. Rapid and precise measurement of flatband voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Ryan, M.; Bates, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The paper outlines the design, principles of operation, and calibration of a five-IC network intended to give a rapid, precise, and automatic determination of the flatband voltage of MOS capacitors. The basic principle of measurement is to compare the analog output voltage of a capacitance meter - which is directly proportional to the capacitance being measured - with a preset or dialed-in voltage proportional to the calculated flatband capacitance by means of a comparator circuit. The bias to the MOS capacitor supplied through the capacitance meter is provided by a ramp voltage going from a negative toward a positive voltage level and vice versa. The network employs two monostable multivibrators for reading and recording the flatband voltage and for resetting the initial conditions and restarting the ramp. The flatband voltage can be held and read on a digital voltmeter.

  16. Rapid and precise measurement of flatband voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Ryan, M.; Bates, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The paper outlines the design, principles of operation, and calibration of a five-IC network intended to give a rapid, precise, and automatic determination of the flatband voltage of MOS capacitors. The basic principle of measurement is to compare the analog output voltage of a capacitance meter - which is directly proportional to the capacitance being measured - with a preset or dialed-in voltage proportional to the calculated flatband capacitance by means of a comparator circuit. The bias to the MOS capacitor supplied through the capacitance meter is provided by a ramp voltage going from a negative toward a positive voltage level and vice versa. The network employs two monostable multivibrators for reading and recording the flatband voltage and for resetting the initial conditions and restarting the ramp. The flatband voltage can be held and read on a digital voltmeter.

  17. Precision measurements in 20F beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Maximilian; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Voytas, Paul; George, Elizabeth; Paulauskas, Stan; Huyan, Xueying

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurements of the shape of the beta particle energy spectrum provide a sensitive window to search for new interactions beyond the standard model. The decay of 20F offers an attractive system due to the simple decay scheme for a coincidence measurement. A beam of 20F ions, produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, was implanted into a beta-detector. A gamma-ray detection system surrounded the beta detector to detect the beta-delayed gammas in coincidence to reduce the background. Preliminary analysis of these data focus on the half-life of 20F due to the statistical inconsistency of previous work. Monte Carlo simulations are ongoing to analyze the shape of the beta energy spectrum. Results of the analysis of the half-life will be presented. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1102511.

  18. Precise geodynamic measurements in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groten, E.

    First high precision gravity measurements carried out in 1984 were repeated in November 1987 when in a wider frame, ranging from Santa Cruz de la Sierra (Bolivia) down to Santiago de Chile and Mendoza (Argentina), a regional densified network in Northern Chile was observed. The carefully monumented regional network extends from the earthquake-active coastal area in Chile up to Salta in Argentina. The repeated measurements are considered as a first step in a longtime study where geometric vertical control will be provided by GPS-measurements. Additional geodynamic information is provided by parallel seismic and other observations. Special interest arose from the fact that briefly after the first observations in 1984 significant earthquake deformation occurred in the area of Mendoza and Santiago de Chile. As far as gravimetry is concerned, all possible error sources are being carefully considered where also absolute measurements in view of scaling errors are planned. Reference is being made with respect to those areas which appear to be decoupled from the well known uplift of the High Andes. A detailed discussion and analysis of gravimetric data is presented. Correlation with geodynamic phenomena is studied. Future prospects of the general concept "GPS-gravimetry" as a geodynamic tool for studying vertical phenomena are interpreted.

  19. Precision Measurements with a Molecular Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew; McDonald, Mickey; McGuyer, Bart; Iwata, Geoffrey; Apfelbeck, Florian; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2015-05-01

    We report on recent results obtained with photoassociated Sr2 molecules confined in a lattice. Sr2 has a range of electronically excited bound states which are readily accessible with optical wavelengths using the narrow 1S0->3P1 intercombination line. As in Nat. Phys. 11, 32, we measure the lifetimes of the narrow, deeply-bound subradiant states in the 1g (1S0+3P1 dissociative limit) potential, allowing for coherent control of molecules and a comparison with theoretical predictions of the lifetimes and transition strengths of these states. Next, we study ultracold photodissociation of Sr2 molecules through abortion of one and two photons near the atomic intercombination line. This allows us to observe the vector character of transition elements through the angular dissociation pattern and to directly measure barrier heights in the excited state potentials. Finally, as shown in PRL 114, 023001, we demonstrate that in a non-magic lattice, a narrow transition can be used to measure the trapped gas temperature through the linewidth of the spectral feature corresponding to the carrier transitions. We use this technique to measure the temperature of Sr2 molecules to 10x higher precision than with standard techniques. We discuss future prospects with this molecular lattice clock. Funding from NIST, ARO, and NSF IGERT.

  20. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    A. Freitas et al.

    2003-09-25

    At future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders, the event rates and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons--allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected for the third generation sfermions opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan {beta} from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses.

  1. KamLAND's precision neutrino oscillation measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Decowski, M. P.

    2016-04-13

    The KamLAND experiment started operation in the Spring of 2002 and is operational to this day. The experiment observes signals from electron antineutrinos from distant nuclear reactors. The program, spanning more than a decade, allowed the determination of LMA-MSW as the solution to the solar neutrino transformation results (under the assumption of CPT invariance) and the measurement of various neutrino oscillation parameters. In particular, the solar mass-splitting Δm221 was determined to high precision. Besides the study of neutrino oscillation, KamLAND started the investigation of geologically produced antineutrinos (geo-ν¯e). As a result, the collaboration also reported on a variety of othermore » topics related to particle and astroparticle physics.« less

  2. KamLAND's precision neutrino oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decowski, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    The KamLAND experiment started operation in the Spring of 2002 and is operational to this day. The experiment observes signals from electron antineutrinos from distant nuclear reactors. The program, spanning more than a decade, allowed the determination of LMA-MSW as the solution to the solar neutrino transformation results (under the assumption of CPT invariance) and the measurement of various neutrino oscillation parameters. In particular, the solar mass-splitting Δ m212 was determined to high precision. Besides the study of neutrino oscillation, KamLAND started the investigation of geologically produced antineutrinos (geo-ν‾e). The collaboration also reported on a variety of other topics related to particle and astroparticle physics.

  3. Facilitating Precision Mass Measurements at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, Daniel; van Schelt, Jon; Savard, Guy; Segel, Ralph; Clark, Jason; Sharma, Kumar; Caldwell, Shane; Gang, Li; Sternberg, Matthew; Greene, John; Levand, Anthony; Zabransky, Bruce

    2011-10-01

    The Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (CPT) has begun a campaign of precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei produced via spontaneous fission of 252Cf as part of the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory. As of the time of submission of this abstract, we have measured neutron rich isotopes of Cs, I, Te, Sb, and Sn. CARIBU is currently running with a 60 mCi source of 252Cf which will be upgraded to a 1 Ci source in the future. In order to make this campaign possible, several upgrades to the CARIBU and CPT system were required including a new Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion buncher to CARIBU's low energy beamline, cryogenic cooling of the RFQ Paul trap below the CPT, and an electrostatic elevator to allow for transport of ion bunches from a 50 kV platform to the CPT system's 2 kV beamline. Construction and commissioning of the buncher and modified Paul Trap will be discussed as well as their impact on the measurements in this campaign. Support from U.S. DOE, Nucl Phys Div and NSERC Canada.

  4. Precision measurements of water droplet evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Ro, P S; Fahlen, T S; Bryant, H C

    1968-05-01

    The rate at which a motionless droplet evaporates can be measured continuously and precisely by determining the period of the intensity fluctuation of laser light reflected off the center of the droplet. The back scattered light is the coherent sum of light reflected from the external and the internal surfaces of the droplet; under typical conditions the back scattered light intensity oscillates at about 2 Hz or 3 Hz. This method is applied to pure water droplets in the diameter range from 0.6 mm to 1.8 mm, supported by bead thermistors and beaded glass fibers, and the results are compared with the quasi-stationary theory of Maxwell. Our measurements show that, after steady state is reached, the rate of change of diameter is inversely proportional to the diameter, as predicted in the quasi-stationary theory. Our experiments give a somewhat slower evaporation rate than the theory predicts; this discrepancy can be eliminated if one assumes that the surface temperature of the droplet is somewhat lower than measured with the bead thermistor. Using the optical method, mechanical resonances of the droplet can be sensitively detected; acoustically induced shape resonances are briefly investigated.

  5. Laser System for Precise, Unambiguous Range Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Range (MSTAR) architecture is the basis of design of a proposed laser-based heterodyne interferometer that could measure a range (distance) as great as 100 km with a precision and resolution of the order of 1 nm. Simple optical interferometers can measure changes in range with nanometer resolution, but cannot measure range itself because interference is subject to the well-known integer-multiple-of-2 -radians phase ambiguity, which amounts to a range ambiguity of the order of 1 m at typical laser wavelengths. Existing rangefinders have a resolution of the order of 10 m and are therefore unable to resolve the ambiguity. The proposed MSTAR architecture bridges the gap, enabling nanometer resolution with an ambiguity range that can be extended to arbitrarily large distances. The MSTAR architecture combines the principle of the heterodyne interferometer with the principle of extending the ambiguity range of an interferometer by using light of two wavelengths. The use of two wavelengths for this purpose is well established in optical metrology, radar, and sonar. However, unlike in traditional two-color laser interferometry, light of two wavelengths would not be generated by two lasers. Instead, multiple wavelengths would be generated as sidebands of phase modulation of the light from a single frequency- stabilized laser. The phase modulation would be effected by applying sinusoidal signals of suitable frequencies (typically tens of gigahertz) to high-speed electro-optical phase modulators. Intensity modulation can also be used

  6. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    SciTech Connect

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a

  7. Precision mechatronics based on high-precision measuring and positioning systems and machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Gerd; Manske, Eberhard; Hausotte, Tino; Mastylo, Rostyslav; Dorozhovets, Natalja; Hofmann, Norbert

    2007-06-01

    Precision mechatronics is defined in the paper as the science and engineering of a new generation of high precision systems and machines. Nanomeasuring and nanopositioning engineering represents important fields of precision mechatronics. The nanometrology is described as the today's limit of the precision engineering. The problem, how to design nanopositioning machines with uncertainties as small as possible will be discussed. The integration of several optical and tactile nanoprobes makes the 3D-nanopositioning machine suitable for various tasks, such as long range scanning probe microscopy, mask and wafer inspection, nanotribology, nanoindentation, free form surface measurement as well as measurement of microoptics, precision molds, microgears, ring gauges and small holes.

  8. High precision neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, Ph.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A.

    2017-06-01

    High precision neutron inelastic scattering cross section data are very important for the development of the new generation of nuclear reactors (Gen IV). Our experiments, performed using the GELINA neutron source and the GAINS spectrometer of the European Commission Joint Research Center, Geel, produce highly reliable and precise cross section data. We will present the details of the setup and the data analysis technique allowing production of such unique results, and we will show examples of two experimental results.

  9. Improving the Precision of Weak Measurements by Postselection Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengshi; Brun, Todd A.

    2015-09-01

    Postselected weak measurement is a useful protocol for amplifying weak physical effects. However, there has recently been controversy over whether it gives any advantage in precision. While it is now clear that retaining failed postselections can yield more Fisher information than discarding them, the advantage of postselection measurement itself still remains to be clarified. In this Letter, we address this problem by studying two widely used estimation strategies: averaging measurement results, and maximum likelihood estimation, respectively. For the first strategy, we find a surprising result that squeezed coherent states of the pointer can give postselected weak measurements a higher signal-to-noise ratio than standard ones while all standard coherent states cannot, which suggests that raising the precision of weak measurements by postselection calls for the presence of "nonclassicality" in the pointer states. For the second strategy, we show that the quantum Fisher information of postselected weak measurements is generally larger than that of standard weak measurements, even without using the failed postselection events, but the gap can be closed with a proper choice of system state.

  10. High precision measurements in crustal dynamic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, F.; Berger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high-precision instrumentation for monitoring benchmark stability and evaluating coseismic strain and tilt signals is reviewed. Laser strainmeter and tilt observations are presented. Examples of coseismic deformation in several geographic locations are given. Evidence suggests that the Earth undergoes elastic response to abrupt faulting.

  11. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Ian M.

    2008-01-01

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a centre-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions B(τ- → π-π-π+ντ) =(8.83±0.01±0.13)%, B(τ- → K-π-π+ντ) =(0.273± 0.002 ± 0.009)%, B(τ- → K-π-K+ντ) =(0.1346 ± 0.0010 ± 0.0036)%, and B(τ- → K-K-K+ντ) =(1.58 ± 0.13 ± 0.12) × 10-5 are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the τ- → π-π-π+ντ , τ- → K-π-π+ντ , τ- → K-π-K+ντ and τ- → K-K-K+ντ decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of B(τ- → φπ-ντ ) =(3.42±0.55±0.25)×10-5, a measurement of B(τ- → φK-ντ) =(3.39±0.20±0.28)× 10-5 and an upper limit on B(τ- → K-K-K+ντ [ex.φ]) ≤ 2.5 × 10-6@90%CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the τ- → K-π-K+ντ and τ- → K-K-K+ντ K+K- invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio B(τ-→K-ντ )/ B(τ-→π-ντ ) is measured to be (6.531±0.056±0.093)×10-2 from which |Vus| is determined to be 0.2255 ± 0.0023. The branching ratio B(τ-→μ-ντ $\\bar{v}$μ)/ B(τ-→e-ντ $\\bar{v}$e) =(9.796 ± 0.016 ± 0.035) × 10-1 is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of

  12. Higgs triplets and limits from precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Dawson, Sally; Krupovnickas, Tadas; /Brookhaven

    2006-04-01

    In this letter, they present the results on a global fit to precision electroweak data in a Higgs triplet model. In models with a triplet Higgs boson, a consistent renormalization scheme differs from that of the Standard Model and the global fit shows that a light Higgs boson with mass of 100-200 GeV is preferred. Triplet Higgs bosons arise in many extensions of the Standard Model, including the left-right model and the Little Higgs models. The result demonstrates the importance of the scalar loops when there is a large mass splitting between the heavy scalars. It also indicates the significance of the global fit.

  13. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  14. Precision Antenna Measurement System (PAMS) Engineering Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    Any variation of these variables are classified as errors. The first step is to divide the sources of error into two groups , namely system and...collecting the data fall into two groups . First, the system and bias errors are measured. These measurements are made with stationary signal sources...becomes available. The s.econd group of measurements will concern themselves with the dynamic errors. This group of measurements can be accomplished

  15. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  16. Machine learning for precise quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Alexander; Sanders, Barry C

    2010-02-12

    Adaptive feedback schemes are promising for quantum-enhanced measurements yet are complicated to design. Machine learning can autonomously generate algorithms in a classical setting. Here we adapt machine learning for quantum information and use our framework to generate autonomous adaptive feedback schemes for quantum measurement. In particular, our approach replaces guesswork in quantum measurement by a logical, fully automatic, programable routine. We show that our method yields schemes that outperform the best known adaptive scheme for interferometric phase estimation.

  17. Precise displacement measurement for a local surface.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sheng Lih; Lin, Shyh Tsong; Chang, Yu Hsin

    2009-11-01

    An optical measurement method to get the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements of a local surface using a laser is proposed. The proposed method simultaneously derives the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements by measuring the shift of interference fringes formed by scattered beams. The average errors of the in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurements are significantly smaller than 10 nm. Moreover, the proposed method uses only low-cost optical elements.

  18. Precision measurement of changes in physical dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W., III; Jacobs, S. F.; Norton, M.

    1977-01-01

    Interferometric method is used to measure small changes in size of optical materials. Error introduced with optical phase shifts occurring with time is overcome by using parts of Fabry-Perot resonators with unequal lengths. Both stability of optical phase shifts upon reflection from multilayer stacks and dimensional stability of optical contacts is measured.

  19. Note: High precision measurements using high frequency gigahertz signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Aohan; Fu, Siyuan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Pullerits, Tõnu; Öwall, Viktor; Karki, Khadga Jung

    2014-12-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5 × 108 to measure signals with very high precision. In this Note, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example, the change in length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in situ virtual metrology in material design.

  20. Note: High precision measurements using high frequency gigahertz signals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Aohan; Fu, Siyuan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Pullerits, Tõnu; Öwall, Viktor; Karki, Khadga Jung

    2014-12-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5 × 10(8) to measure signals with very high precision. In this Note, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example, the change in length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in situ virtual metrology in material design.

  1. Velocity precision measurements using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, D.; Taux, G.; Narjes, L.

    1985-07-01

    A Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was calibrated to determine its applicability to high pressure measurements (up to 10 bars) for industrial purposes. The measurement procedure with LDA and the experimental computerized layouts are presented. The calibration procedure is based on absolute accuracy of Doppler frequency and calibration of interference strip intervals. A four-quadrant detector allows comparison of the interference strip distance measurements and computer profiles. Further development of LDA is recommended to increase accuracy (0.1% inaccuracy) and to apply the method industrially.

  2. Ring lasers in precise measurements: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubovskii, V.R.; Privalov, V.E.

    1995-05-01

    Features of the ring laser offer possibilities for various applications. The special features of frequency stabilization of ring lasers are analyzed. The employment of ring lasers in laser spectroscopy and the development of gas analytical devices on their basis are considered. It is shown that ring lasers offer some advantages for linear angular measurements and measurements of parameters of motion. Ways to optimize the parameters of ring lasers are indicated. 180 refs., 21 figs.

  3. On precision and accuracy (bias) statements for measurement procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, L.A.; Hume, M.W.; Delvin, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurement procedures are often required to contain precision and accuracy of precision and bias statements. This paper contains a glossary that explains various terms that often appear in these statements as well as an example illustrating such statements for a specific set of data. Precision and bias statements are shown to vary according to the conditions under which the data were collected. This paper emphasizes that the error model (an algebraic expression that describes how the various sources of variation affect the measurement) is an important consideration in the formation of precision and bias statements.

  4. Precision QCD measurements in DIS at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    New and recent results on QCD measurements from the H1 and ZEUS experiments at the HERA ep collider are reviewed. The final results on the combined deep-inelastic neutral and charged current cross-sections are presented and their role in the extractions of parton distribution functions (PDFs) is studied. The PDF fits give insight into the compatibility of QCD evolution and heavy flavor schemes with the data as a function of kinematic variables such as the scale Q2. Measurements of jet production cross-sections in ep collisions provide direct proves of QCD and extractions of the strong coupling constants are performed. Charm and beauty cross-section measurements are used for the determination of the heavy quark masses. Their role in PDF fits is investigated. In the regime of diffractive DIS and photoproduction, dijet and prompt photon production cross-sections provide insights into the process of factorization and the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  5. Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-09-01

    Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement should have large calibration volume and be flexible in the actual measurement field. In this paper, we present a high-precision calibration method. Instead of using a large 3D pattern, we use a small planar pattern and a precalibrated matrix camera to obtain plenty of points with a suitable distribution, which would ensure the precision of the calibration results. The matrix camera removes the necessity of precise adjustment and movement and links the line-scan camera to the world easily, both of which enhance flexibility in the measurement field. The method has been verified by experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method gives a practical solution to calibrate line scan cameras for precision measurement.

  6. Precision Measurement of Nuclear Electron Capture Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Haoyu; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The method of accurately measuring the radioactive decay constant of a isotope by measuring the decay rate as a function of time requires that both the detector and environment be stable over time periods comparable to the life-time of the isotope. In addition statistical accuracy requires initial counting rates be high but limited by the dead time capability of the data collection system and the detectors double-event resolving time. A High Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer, sensitive to radiation from 3-KeV to over 3-MeV, has been built to measure radioactive decay constants to a level of 10-5 10-6 at a location only 6 meters from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Such accuracy requires understanding of, background, signal-processing algorithms, and both the double and triple event pile-up in the observed spectrum. The approach taken is to fit the collected energy spectrum with invariant shapes, independent of event rate. By fixing the source-detector geometry and environmental conditions, the invariant shapes are (1) ideal energy spectrum without pile-up and background, (2) the ideal double event pile-up spectrum, (3) the ideal triple event pile-up spectrum, and (4) the stable background spectrum. A method is presented that finds these ideal shapes using the collected data in situ. Taking this approach the HPGe detector photopeak shape in the absence of background and pile-up is presented showing associated structure over a range of 7 orders of magnitude.

  7. Precision measurement of antiproton spectrum with BESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orito, S.; Maeno, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Abe, K.; Anraku, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Fujikawa, M.; Imori, M.; Ishino, M.; Makida, Y.; Matsui, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Mitchell, J.; Mitsui, T.; Moiseev, A.; Motoki, M.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Ormes, J.; Saeki, T.; Sanuki, T.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Sonoda, T.; Streitmatter, R.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Ueda, I.; Yajima, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    The absolute fluxes of the cosmic-ray antiproton are measured at solar minimum in the energy range 0.2 to 3.2 GeV, based on 460 antiprotons unambiguously detected by BESS spectrometer during its '95 and '97 balloon flights from Lynn Lake, Canada. In the resultant antiproton spectrum we have detected a clear peak around 2 GeV and measured its flux to 10 % accuracy. The position and the absolute flux of the peak agree with the prediction of the Standard Leaky Box model for the "secondary" antiprotons. At low energies below 1 GeV, we observe an excess antiproton flux over the simple Standard Leaky Box prediction. This might indicate that the propagation mechanism needs to be modified, or might suggest a contribution of low-energy antiproton component from novel sources such as evaporating primordial black holes or the annihilating neutralino dark matter. Data from '98 and future flights are expected to help us to clarify the situation.

  8. Michelson interferometer for precision angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Ikram, M; Hussain, G

    1999-01-01

    An angle-measuring technique based on an optical interferometer is reported. The technique exploits a Michelson interferometric configuration in which a right-angle prism and a glass strip are introduced into a probe beam. Simultaneous rotation of both components along an axis results in an optical path difference between the reference and the probe beams. In a second arrangement two right-angle prisms and glass strips are introduced into two beams of a Michelson interferometer. The prisms and the strips are rotated simultaneously to introduce an optical path difference between the two beams. In our arrangement, optimization of various parameters makes the net optical path difference between the two beams approximately linear for a rotation as great as +/-20 degrees . Results are simulated that show an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude in error and nonlinearity compared with a previously reported technique.

  9. Covariate Imbalance and Precision in Measuring Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2011-01-01

    Covariate adjustment can increase the precision of estimates by removing unexplained variance from the error in randomized experiments, although chance covariate imbalance tends to counteract the improvement in precision. The author develops an easy measure to examine chance covariate imbalance in randomization by standardizing the average…

  10. High-Precision Measurement of the Proton's Atomic Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiße, F.; Köhler-Langes, F.; Rau, S.; Hou, J.; Junck, S.; Kracke, A.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Ulmer, S.; Werth, G.; Blaum, K.; Sturm, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the precise measurement of the atomic mass of a single proton with a purpose-built Penning-trap system. With a precision of 32 parts per trillion our result not only improves on the current CODATA literature value by a factor of 3, but also disagrees with it at a level of about 3 standard deviations.

  11. High-precision camera distortion measurements with a ``calibration harp''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhongwei; Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Monasse, Pascal; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    This paper addresses the high precision measurement of the distortion of a digital camera from photographs. Traditionally, this distortion is measured from photographs of a flat pattern which contains aligned elements. Nevertheless, it is nearly impossible to fabricate a very flat pattern and to validate its flatness. This fact limits the attainable measurable precisions. In contrast, it is much easier to obtain physically very precise straight lines by tightly stretching good quality strings on a frame. Taking literally "plumb-line methods", we built a "calibration harp" instead of the classic flat patterns to obtain a high precision measurement tool, demonstrably reaching 2/100 pixel precisions. The harp is complemented with the algorithms computing automatically from harp photographs two different and complementary lens distortion measurements. The precision of the method is evaluated on images corrected by state-of-the-art distortion correction algorithms, and by popular software. Three applications are shown: first an objective and reliable measurement of the result of any distortion correction. Second, the harp permits to control state-of-the art global camera calibration algorithms: It permits to select the right distortion model, thus avoiding internal compensation errors inherent to these methods. Third, the method replaces manual procedures in other distortion correction methods, makes them fully automatic, and increases their reliability and precision.

  12. Precision measurement of cosmic magnification from 21 cm emitting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue-Li; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.

    2005-04-01

    We show how precision lensing measurements can be obtained through the lensing magnification effect in high redshift 21cm emission from galaxies. Normally, cosmic magnification measurements have been seriously complicated by galaxy clustering. With precise redshifts obtained from 21cm emission line wavelength, one can correlate galaxies at different source planes, or exclude close pairs to eliminate such contaminations. We provide forecasts for future surveys, specifically the SKA and CLAR. SKA can achieve percent precision on the dark matter power spectrum and the galaxy dark matter cross correlation power spectrum, while CLAR can measure an accurate cross correlation power spectrum. The neutral hydrogen fraction was most likely significantly higher at high redshifts, which improves the number of observed galaxies significantly, such that also CLAR can measure the dark matter lensing power spectrum. SKA can also allow precise measurement of lensing bispectrum.

  13. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  14. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  15. A New Precision Measurement of the Lifetime of ^19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Pattie, Robert; Back, Henning; Young, Albert; Dammalapati, Umakanth; de, Subhadeep; Dendooven, Peter; Dermois, Otto; Huisman, Leo; Jungmann, Klaus; Mol, Aran; Gerco Onderwater, C.; Rogachevskiy, Andrey; Sohani, Moslem; Traykov, Emil; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans

    2008-04-01

    The mixed 12^+->12^+ decay of ^19Ne is an important system for studies of the weak interaction. A measurement of the lifetime of this decay at the 10-4 level combined with the measured value of the β-asymmetry enables a determination of Vud that rivals the precision obtained from 0^+->0^+ superallowed Fermi beta decays. The lifetime is currently known to a precision of about 0.08%, and by utilizing the unique capabilities of the Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: μicro-laboratories for fundamental Physics (TRIμP) facility at the Kernfysich Versneller Instituut (KVI), we can improve this precision by up to a factor of three. We describe recent progress towards a high-precision lifetime measurement and present preliminary results.

  16. Measuring and balancing dynamic unbalance of precision centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yafei; Huo, Xin

    2008-10-01

    A precision centrifuge is used to test and calibrate accelerometer model parameters. Its dynamic unbalance may cause the perturbation of the centrifuge to deteriorate the test and calibration accuracy of an accelerometer. By analyzing the causes of dynamic unbalance, the influences on precision centrifuge from static unbalance and couple unbalance are developed. It is considered measuring and balancing of static unbalance is a key to resolving a dynamic unbalance problem of precision centrifuge with a disk in structure. Measuring means and calculating formulas of static unbalance amount are given, and balancing principle and method are provided. The correctness and effectiveness of this method are confirmed by experiments on a device under tuning, thereby the accurate and high-effective measuring and balancing method of dynamic unbalance of this precision centrifuge was provided.

  17. An instrument for precision magnetic measurements of large magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, D.; Bordas, J.; Campmany, J.; Molins, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Traveria, M.

    2001-02-01

    A high precision-system for measuring the three-dimensional distribution of magnetic fields over large volumes, such as those produced by accelerator magnets, has been designed and commissioned. This instrument can be calibrated to a precision of ±1 G for magnetic fields of up to 1.5 T by means of an NMR system. A moving arm containing a 3D Hall probe scans the volume (up to 500×250×3000 mm 3) with a precision of ±50 μm in any direction. After appropriate identification of the various sources of error, and the optimisation of the various parts of the instrument where they are generated, an overall precision of ±2 G has been achieved, i.e. a relative precision of ±2×10 -4 for a nominal field of 1 T.

  18. Metering gun for dispensing precisely measured charges of fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, T. A.; Scheibe, H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A cyclically operable fluid dispenser for use in dispensing precisely measured charges of potable water aboard spacecraft is described. The dispenser is characterized by (1) a sealed housing adapted to be held within a crewman's palm and coupled with a pressurized source of potable water; (2) a dispensing jet projected from the housing and configured to be received within a crewman's lips; (3) an expansible measuring chamber for measuring charges of drinking water received from the source; (4) and a dispenser actuator including a lever extended from the housing to be digitated for initiating operational cycles, whereby precisely measured charges of potable water selectively are delivered for drinking purposes in a weightless environment.

  19. Precision half-life measurement of 25Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becchetti, F. D.; Blankstein, D.; Brodeur, M.; Burdette, D.; Frentz, B.; Hall, M. R.; Kelly, J. M.; Kolata, J. J.; O'Malley, P. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Strauss, S. Y.; Valverde, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new precision half-life measurement of 25Al was conducted using the TwinSol β -counting station at the University of Notre Dame. The new measured value of t1/2 new=7.1657 (24 ) s is in good agreement with the most recent measurement, while being 3 times more precise. Using these new measurements, an evaluation of the 25Al half-life has been performed, leading to an average half-life of t1/2 world=7.1665 (26 ) s, which is 5 times more precise than it's predecessor and has a more satisfactory Birge ratio of 1.1. To aid in future measurements of correlation parameters, a new Fermi to Gamow-Teller mixing ratio ρ and correlation parameters for this mixed transition have been calculated assuming the standard model validity using the new world half-life.

  20. CCD evaluation for estimating measurement precision in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingcai; Li, Bing; Tian, Ailing; Li, Baopeng

    2013-06-01

    Because of larger measurement ability of wave-front deviation and no need of reference plat, the lateral shearing interferometry based on four step phase shifting has been widely used for wave-front measurement. After installation shearing interferograms are captured by CCD camera, and the actual phase data of wave-front can be calculated by four step phase shift algorithm and phase unwrapping. In this processing, the pixel resolution and gray scale of CCD camera is the vital factor for the measurement precision. In this paper, Based on the structure of lateral shearing surface interferometer with phase shifting, pixel resolution more or less for measurement precision is discussed. Also, the gray scale is 8 bit, 12 bit or 16 bit for measurement precision is illustrated by simulation.

  1. Precision of surface measurements for below-knee residua.

    PubMed

    Commean, P K; Smith, K E; Cheverud, J M; Vannier, M W

    1996-05-01

    To determine the absolute and relative precision of geometric measurements made of below knee (BK) residua and their BK plaster positive casts using calipers, electromagnetic digitizer, optical surface scanner (OSS), and spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT). The experimental measurement protocol for a single measurement session was as follows: Dot markers were placed on the residuum, and volume and distances were measured using water displacement and calipers; residuum was measured using electromagnetic digitizer; residuum was scanned using three-dimensional (3D) OSS; a negative plaster cast of subject's residuum was made; the residuum was scanned using SXCT scanner. These steps were repeated at a second measurement session. Plaster positive casts were constructed and subsequently measured using the same protocol. Thirteen adult below-knee amputee volunteers (subjects) participated in the study, and nine subjects returned for a second measurement session. The study group consisted of 9 men and 4 women; 10 Caucasians and 3 African Americans. Distance measurements for all measurement devices were repeatable within 1% in vivo and within 0.5% on plaster casts; and volumes were within 1% in vivo and within 0.1% on plaster casts. Distance measurements for each device were precise within 3% in vivo and within 1% on plaster casts; and volumes were within 5% in vivo and within 6% on plaster casts when compared with caliper and water displacement measures. These measurement systems were found to be substantially equivalent in terms of repeatability and precision for measurement of lower extremity residua.

  2. The measurement of frequency and frequency stability of precision oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The specification and performance of precision oscillators is discussed as a very important topic to the owners and users of these oscillators. This paper presents at the tutorial level some convenient methods of measuring the frequencies of precision oscillators -- giving advantages and disadvantages of these methods. Further it is shown that by processing the data from the frequency measurements in certain ways, one may be able to state more general characteristics of the oscillators being measured. The goal in this regard is to allow the comparisons of different manufacturers' specifications and more importantly to help assess whether these oscillators will meet the standard of performance the user may have in a particular application.

  3. Precision measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, Daniel; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-05-01

    We report precision measurements of the top quark mass using events collected by the D0 and CDF II detectors from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. Measurements are presented in multiple decay channels. In addition, we present a combination of the most precise measurements in each channel to date: M{sub top} = 172.5 {+-} 1.3{sub stat} {+-} 1.9{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Corrections for Wavelength Variations in Precision Interferometric Displacement Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Phillips, Steven D.; Mandolfo, Gary A.

    1996-01-01

    Precision interferometric displacement measurements require deadpath corrections to account for variations in wavelength during the course of the measurement. This paper discusses common errors in applying deadpath corrections and describes the correction necessary to fully account for variations in wavelength. PMID:27805085

  5. Space camera optical axis pointing precision measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Meng, Fanbo; Yang, Zijun; Guo, Yubo; Ye, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize the space camera which on satellite optical axis pointing precision measurement, a monocular vision measurement system based on object-image conjugate is established. In this system the algorithms such as object-image conjugate vision models and point by point calibration method are applied and have been verified. First, the space camera axis controller projects a laser beam to the standard screen for simulating the space camera's optical axis. The laser beam form a target point and has been captured by monocular vision camera. Then the two-dimensional coordinates of the target points on the screen are calculated by a new vision measurement model which based on a looking-up and matching table, the table has been generated by object-image conjugate algorithm through point by point calibration. Finally, compare the calculation of coordinates offered by measurement system with the theory of coordinate offered by optical axis controller, the optical axis pointing precision can be evaluated. Experimental results indicate that the absolute precision of measurement system up to 0.15mm in 2m×2m FOV. This measurement system overcome the nonlinear distortion near the edge of the FOV and can meet the requirement of space camera's optical axis high precision measurement and evaluation.

  6. High-precision Photogrammetric Surface Figure Measurements under Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Z.; Qian, Y.; Fan, S. H.; Liu, C. R.; Wang, H. R.; Zuo, Y. X.; Cheng, J. Q.; Yang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the working temperature of the measurement equipments, most of the high-precision surface figure measurement techniques cannot be applied under a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the first attempt to measure the surface figure of a high-precision terahertz reflector panel under low temperatures based on photogrammetry. The measurement employs a high resolution industrial camera sitting on an automatic experimental platform which enables photos been taken in an automatic fashion inside a climate chamber. A repeatable accuracy of 2.1 μm rms is achieved under the cryogenic environment. Furthermore, surface figure measured by a three-coordinate measuring machine under room temperature is used to calibrate the thickness variation of the paper targets. By this technique, the surface figure of an aluminum prototype panel of the 5 meter Dome A Terahertz Telescope (DATE5) is measured from room temperature down to -55°C.

  7. Possible higher precision measurement of the muon G-2 value

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, V.W.; Danby, G.T.

    1984-11-15

    The theoretical motivation for and a possible experimental approach to higher precision measurement of the muon g-2 value are discussed. The goal is to measure a = (g-2)/2 to a precision of 0.3 ppm, which would be an improvement by a factor of 20 over the present value from a CERN experiment. The approach would involve a superconducting muon storage ring and would utilize the very high primary proton beam intensity now available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS.

  8. Self-referenced prism deflection measurement schemes with microradian precision

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Rebecca; Paul, Justin; Bergeson, Scott; Durfee, Dallin S

    2005-08-01

    We have demonstrated several inexpensive methods that can be used to measure the deflection angles of prisms with microradian precision. The methods are self-referenced, where various reversals are used to achieve absolute measurements without the need of a reference prism or any expensive precision components other than the prisms under test. These techniques are based on laser interferometry and have been used in our laboratory to characterize parallel-plate beam splitters, penta prisms, right-angle prisms, and corner cube reflectors using only components typically available in an optics laboratory.

  9. Improving the precision of weak measurement by nonclassical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengshi; Brun, Todd A.

    Weak value amplification is a useful protocol to amplify tiny physical effects by postselecting the system in a weak measurement. However, there has been controversy over its precision advantage in parameter estimation recently, since it discards unselected results of the postselection measurement on the system, which may take away useful information. While it is now clear that retaining failed postselections can yield more Fisher information than discarding them, the advantage of postselection measurement itself still remains to be clarified. If a weak measurement with postselection measurement cannot not produce higher precision than without postselection measurement, it would be meaningless to discuss the use of postselection results. In this work, we address this problem by studying the optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of postselected weak measurement. We find a surprising result that when the probe is initially prepared in a proper squeezed coherent state, the postselected weak measurement can give a higher SNR than the standard weak measurement, while such an advantage vanishes when the probe is prepared in a normal coherent state. This suggests that raising the precision of weak measurement by postselection calls for the presence of ``nonclassicality'' in the probe state.

  10. Precision spectroscopic measurements in few-electron ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Church, D.A.; Dinneen, T.P.; Hass, M.; Liu, C.J.; Berrah-Mansour, N.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Young, L.; Zabransky, B.J. ); Curtis, L.J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-01-01

    We describe recent precision experiments in few-electron ions including measurements of the lifetimes of two-photon-emitting levels in Ni{sup 26+} and Ni{sup 27+}, a measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup 3}S{sub 1} level in Br{sup 33+} and measurements of the 2{sup 3}S{sub 1} {yields} 2{sup 3}{sub 0,1,2} transition energies in B{sup 3+}. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Applications of an automated stem measurer for precision forestry

    Treesearch

    N. Clark

    2001-01-01

    Accurate stem measurements are required for the determination of many silvicultural prescriptions, i.e., what are we going to do with a stand of trees. This would only be amplified in a precision forestry context. Many methods have been proposed for optimal ways to evaluate stems for a variety of characteristics. These methods usually involve the acquisition of total...

  12. Precision Measuring Equipment (PME) Individualized Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, William E.; And Others

    Self-paced programed and audiovisual (AV) instructional materials covering portions of the Air Force course, Precision Measuring Equipment (PME) Specialist, were developed, administered, and evaluated as means of assessing the feasibility of individualizing the PME course as part of the Air Force's Advanced Instructional System (AIS). The…

  13. Precise measurement of gravity variations during a total solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-Shen; Yang, Xin-She; Wu, Chuan-Zhen; Guo, Hong-Gang; Liu, Hong-Chen; Hua, Chang-Chai

    2000-08-01

    The variations of gravity were measured with a high precision LaCoste-Romberg D gravimeter during a total solar eclipse to investigate the effect of a solar eclipse on the gravitational field. The observed anomaly (7.0+/-2.7)×10-8 m/s2during the eclipse implies that there may be a shielding property of gravitation.

  14. The precision of higgs boson measurements and their implications

    SciTech Connect

    J. Conway et al.

    2002-12-05

    The prospects for a precise exploration of the properties of a single or many observed Higgs bosons at future accelerators are summarized, with particular emphasis on the abilities of a Linear Collider (LC). Some implications of these measurements for discerning new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) are also discussed.

  15. Precision half-life measurement of 17F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur, M.; Nicoloff, C.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becchetti, F. D.; Gupta, Y. K.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Hu, J.; Kelly, J. M.; Kolata, J. J.; Long, J.; O'Malley, P.; Schultz, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    Background: The precise determination of f t values for superallowed mixed transitions between mirror nuclide are gaining attention as they could provide an avenue to test the theoretical corrections used to extract the Vu d matrix element from superallowed pure Fermi transitions. The 17F decay is particularly interesting as it proceeds completely to the ground state of 17O, removing the need for branching ratio measurements. The dominant uncertainty on the f t value of the 17F mirror transition stems from a number of conflicting half-life measurements. Purpose: A precision half-life measurement of 17F was performed and compared to previous results. Methods: The life-time was determined from the β counting of implanted 17F on a Ta foil that was removed from the beam for counting. The 17F beam was produced by transfers reaction and separated by the TwinSol facility of the Nuclear Science Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame. Results: The measured value of t1/2 new=64.402 (42) s is in agreement with several past measurements and represents one of the most precise measurements to date. In anticipation of future measurements of the correlation parameters for the decay and using the new world average t1/2 world=64.398 (61) s, we present a new estimate of the mixing ratio ρ for the mixed transition as well as the correlation parameters based on assuming Standard Model validity. Conclusions: The relative uncertainty on the new world average for the half-life is dominated by the large χ2=31 of the existing measurements. More precision measurements with different systematics are needed to remedy to the situation.

  16. Precision measurements of positronium decay rate and energy level

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Namba, T.; Suehara, T.; Akimoto, G.; Ishida, A.; Hashimoto, M. M.; Saito, H.; Idehara, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2008-08-08

    Positronium is an ideal system for the research of the bound state QED. New precise measurement of orthopositronium decay rate has been performed with an accuracy of 150 ppm, and the result combined with the last three is 7.0401{+-}0.0007 {mu}s{sup -1}. It is the first result to validate the 2nd order correction. The Hyper Fine Splitting of positronium is sensitive to the higher order corrections of the QED prediction and also to the new physics beyond Standard Model via the quantum oscillation into virtual photon. The discrepancy of 3.5{sigma} is found recently between the measured values and the QED prediction (O({alpha}{sup 3})). It might be due to the contribution of the new physics or the systematic problems in the previous measurements: (non-thermalized Ps and non-uniformity of the magnetic field). We propose new methods to measure HFS precisely without the these uncertainties.

  17. Demonstration of a Fast, Precise Propane Measurement Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Nelson, D. D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Propane is one of the primary components of emissions from natural gas extraction and processing activities. In addition to being an air pollutant, its ratio to other hydrocarbons such as methane and ethane can serve as a "fingerprint" of a particular facility or process, aiding in identifying emission sources. Quantifying propane has typically required laboratory analysis of flask samples, resulting in low temporal resolution and making plume-based measurements infeasible. Here we demonstrate fast (1-second), high precision (<300 ppt) measurements of propane using high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy at 2967 wavenumbers. In addition, we explore the impact of nearby water and ethane absorption lines on the accuracy and precision of the propane measurement. Finally, we discuss development of a dual-laser instrument capable of simultaneous measurements of methane, ethane, and propane (the C1-C3 compounds), all within a small spatial package that can be easily deployed aboard a mobile platform.

  18. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  19. Report of the Working Group on precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond L. Brock et al.

    2001-10-03

    Precision measurements of electroweak quantities are carried out to test the Standard Model (SM). In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, m{sub top}, when combined with precise measurements of the W mass, M{sub W}, and the weak mixing angle, sin{sup 2} {bar {theta}}{sub W}, make it possible to derive indirect constraints on the Higgs boson mass, M{sub H}, via top quark and Higgs boson electroweak radiative corrections to M{sub W}. Comparison of these constraints on M{sub H} with the mass obtained from direct observation of the Higgs boson in future collider experiments will be an important test of the SM. In this report, the prospects for measuring the W parameters (mass and width) and the weak mixing angle in Run II are discussed, and a program for extracting the probability distribution function of M{sub H} is described.

  20. Precision Rosenbluth measurement of the proton elastic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    I. A. Qattan; J. Arrington; R. E. Segel; X. Zheng; K. Aniol; O. K. Baker; R. Beams; E. J. Brash; J. Calarco; A. Camsonne; J.-P. Chen; M. E. Christy; D. Dutta; R. Ent; S. Frullani; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; K. Hafidi; J.-O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; W. Hinton; R. J. Holt; G. M. Huber; H. Ibrahim; L. Jisonna; M. K. Jones; C. E. Keppel; E. Kinney; G. J. Kumbartzki; A. Lung; D. J. Margaziotis; K. McCormick; D. Meekins; R. Michaels; P. Monaghan; P. Moussiegt; L. Pentchev; C. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; R. Ransome; J. Reinhold; B. Reitz; A. Saha; A. Sarty; E. C. Schulte; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; K. Wijesooriya; B. Zeidman

    2004-10-01

    We report the results of a new Rosenbluth measurement of the proton form factors at Q{sup 2} values of 2.64, 3.20 and 4.10 GeV{sup 2}. Cross sections were determined by detecting the recoiling proton in contrast to previous measurements in which the scattered electron was detected. At each Q{sup 2}, relative cross sections were determined to better than 1%. The measurement focused on the extraction of G{sub E}/G{sub M} which was determined to 4-8% and found to approximate form factor scaling, i.e. {mu}{sub p}G{sub E} {approx} G{sub M}. These results are consistent with and much more precise than previous Rosenbluth extractions. However, they are inconsistent with recent polarization transfer measurements of comparable precision, implying a systematic difference between the two techniques.

  1. Precision mass measurements at TITAN with radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Macdonald, T. D.; Andreoiu, C.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the atomic mass further our understanding in many disciplines from metrology to physics beyond the standard model. The accuracy and precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry have been well demonstrated at TITAN, including measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes to investigate three-body forces in nuclear structure and within the island of inversion to study the mechanism of shell quenching and deformation. By charge breeding ions, TITAN has enhanced the precision of the measurement technique. The precision achieved in the measurement of the superallowed β-emitter 74Rb in the 8+ charge state rivaled earlier measurements with singly charged ions in a fraction of the time. By breeding 78Rb to the same charge state, the ground state could be easily distinguished from the isomer. Further developments led to threshold charge breeding, which permitted capturing and measuring isobarically and elementally pure ion samples in the Penning trap. This was demonstrated via the Q-value determination of 71Ge. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent results are presented herein.

  2. Automated high precision secondary pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Stefan, F.; Kristensen, H. B.; Jensen, H. D.; Kawiecki, R.; Wied, C. E.; Kauert, A.; Seidl, B.; Spitzer, P.; Eberhardt, R.; Adel, B.

    2013-04-01

    A new setup for high precision, automated secondary pH measurements together with a reference measurement procedure has been developed and tested in interlaboratory comparisons using buffers pH 4.005, pH 7.000, and pH 10.012 at 25 °C and 37 °C. Using primary buffers as standards, a standard uncertainty in pH better than 0.005 can be reached. The central measuring device is a one piece, thermostatted cell of PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) with a built-in Hamilton® Single Pore™ Glass electrode. Due to its flow-through principle this device allows pH measurements with low consumption of measurement solutions. The very hydrophobic and smooth PFA as construction material facilitates complete emptying of the cell. Furthermore, the tempering unit affords very precise temperature control and hence contributes to the low target uncertainty of the produced secondary buffer solutions. Use of a symmetric measurement sequence and the two point calibration was sufficient to reach high precision and accuracy.

  3. Precision assessment of biofluid viscosity measurements using molecular rotors.

    PubMed

    Akers, Walter J; Haidekker, Mark A

    2005-06-01

    Blood viscosity changes with many pathologic conditions, but its importance has not been fully investigated because the current methods of measurement are poorly suited for clinical applications. The use of viscosity-sensitive fluorescent molecular rotors to determine fluid viscosity in a nonmechanical manner has been investigated recently, but it is unknown how the precision of the fluorescence-based method compares to established mechanical viscometry. Human blood plasma viscosity was modulated with high-viscosity plasma expanders, dextran, pentastarch, and hetastarch. The samples were divided into a calibration and a test set. The relationship between fluorescence emission and viscosity was established using the calibration set. Viscosity of the test set was determined by fluorescence and by cone-and-plate viscometer, and the precision of both methods compared. Molecular rotor fluorescence intensity showed a power law relationship with solution viscosity. Mechanical measurements deviated from the theoretical viscosity value by less than 7.6%, while fluorescence-based measurements deviated by less than 6%. The average coefficient of variation was 6.9% (mechanical measurement) and 3.4% to 3.8% (fluorescence-based measurement, depending on the molecular rotor used). Fluorescence-based viscometry exhibits comparable precision to mechanical viscometry. Fluorescence viscometry does not apply shear and is therefore more practical for biofluids which have apparent non-Newtonian properties. In addition, fluorescence instrumentation makes very fast serial measurements possible, thus promising new areas of application in laboratory and clinical settings.

  4. Precise measurement of magnetization characteristics in high pulsed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahata, Y.; Borkowski, B.; Shimoji, H.; Yamada, K.; Todaka, T.; Enokizono, M.

    2012-04-01

    Permanent magnets, especially Nd-Fe-B magnets, are very important engineering elements that are widely used in many applications. The detailed design of electrical and electronic equipment using permanent magnets requires the precise measurement of magnetization characteristics. High pulsed magnetic fields can be used to measure the magnetization characteristics of permanent magnets in the easy and hard magnetization directions. Errors influencing the measurements stem from the relationship between the tested material, pick-up sensor configuration, and excitation coil. We present an analysis of the effect of the sensor construction on the accuracy of the measurements of the material's magnetic properties. We investigated the coaxial and series types sensor configurations.

  5. High Precision 2-D Grating Groove Density Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ningxiao; McEntaffer, Randall; Tedesco, Ross

    2017-08-01

    Our research group at Penn State University is working on producing X-ray reflection gratings with high spectral resolving power and high diffraction efficiency. To estimate our fabrication accuracy, we apply a precise 2-D grating groove density measurement to plot groove density distributions of gratings on 6-inch wafers. In addition to plotting a fixed groove density distribution, this method is also sensitive to measuring the variation of the groove density simultaneously. This system can reach a measuring accuracy (ΔN/N) of 10-3. Here we present this groove density measurement and some applications.

  6. Navy precision optical interferometer measurements of 10 stellar oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Benson, James A.; Zavala, R. T.; Van Belle, Gerard T.

    2014-02-01

    Using the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer, we measured the angular diameters of 10 stars that have previously measured solar-like oscillations. Our sample covered a range of evolutionary stages but focused on evolved subgiant and giant stars. We combined our angular diameters with Hipparcos parallaxes to determine the stars' physical radii, and used photometry from the literature to calculate their bolometric fluxes, luminosities, and effective temperatures. We then used our results to test the scaling relations used by asteroseismology groups to calculate radii and found good agreement between the radii measured here and the radii predicted by stellar oscillation studies. The precision of the relations is not as well constrained for giant stars as it is for less evolved stars.

  7. Electric Quadrupole Transition Measurements of Hydrogen Molecule with High Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cun-Feng; Wang, Jin; Tan, Yan; Liu, An-Wen; Hu, Shui-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most fundamental, and the only neutral molecule expected to be both calculated and measured with extremely high accuracy. High-precision measurements of its spectroscopy, especially the levels at the electric ground state, play an important role in the examination of precise quantum chemistry calculations and some fundamental physical constants. In the infrared region, H_2, being a homonuclear diatomic molecule, only has very weak electric quadrupole transitions. We established a new spectroscopy approach with ultra-high precision and sensitivity as well, based on a laser-locked cavity ring-down spectrometer. An equivalent absorption path-length of thousands of kilometers and a frequency precision of 10^{-5} cm^{-1} have been achieved. Ro-vibrational spectra of the second overtone of H_2 have been recorded. The obtained results will provide a direct examination of the high-accuracy quantum theory. It also shades light on the determination of fundamental physical constants such as the electron/proton mass ratio in a molecular system.

  8. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  9. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  10. Atom lasers: Production, properties and prospects for precision inertial measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, N. P.; Altin, P. A.; Debs, J. E.; Close, J. D.

    2013-08-01

    We review experimental progress on atom lasers out-coupled from Bose-Einstein condensates, and consider the properties of such beams in the context of precision inertial sensing. The atom laser is the matter-wave analogue of the optical laser. Both devices rely on Bose-enhanced scattering to produce a macroscopically populated trapped mode that is output-coupled to produce an intense beam. In both cases, the beams often display highly desirable properties such as low divergence, high spectral flux and a simple spatial mode that make them useful in practical applications, as well as the potential to perform measurements at or below the quantum projection noise limit. Both devices display similar second-order correlations that differ from thermal sources. Because of these properties, atom lasers are a promising source for application to precision inertial measurements.

  11. High Precision Measurement of the ^19Ne Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Back, H. O.; Boswell, M. S.; Crowell, A. S.; Howell, C. R.; Kidd, M. F.; Pattie, R. W., Jr.; Young, A. R.; Dendooven, P. G.; Giri, G. S.; van der Hoek, D. J.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W. L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Santra, B.; Shidling, P. D.; Sohani, M.; Versolota, O. O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2009-10-01

    Recently, a rigorous review of the T=12 mirror transitions has identified several systems which can contribute to high precision tests exploring deviations from the Standard Model's description of the electroweak interaction. Arguably, one of the best candidates is the &+circ; decay of ^19Ne to ^19F. In this system, the main contribution to the uncertainty of extracted Standard Model parameters is due to the measured value of the lifetime of the decay. In March 2009, a high precision measurement of the lifetime of ^19Ne was made by a collaboration between the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) and the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) at the Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: Microlaboratories for Fundamental Physics (Triμp) facility. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results will be presented.

  12. A precise measurement of the B^0 meson oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; C. Forshaw, D.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; K. Kuonen, A.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; W. Ronayne, J.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The oscillation frequency, Δ m_d, of B^0 mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a D^- or D^{*-} meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0fb^{-1} of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV. A combination of the two decay modes gives Δ m_d = (505.0 ± 2.1 ± 1.0) ns^{-1}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  13. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-11

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2007 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and width and the mass of the top quark.

  14. Precision measurements on the photoionization of neutral atomic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to studies on rare gas atoms, experimental studies of open-shell atoms offers very challenging problems, such as creation of the atom, low signal, purity and stability. Because of this, studies of inner-shell excitations for open shell atoms are limited. In this talk I will discuss precision experimental measurements for photoionization of atomic oxygen, nitrogen, and chlorine over the last two decades on various beamlines at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Advanced Light Source.

  15. Vernier scales and other early devices for precise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2011-04-01

    Vernier scales have been extensively used since the 17th century. They replaced the Nonius scale, a unpopular device due to difficulty in its fabrication and use, and they coexisted alongside other types of scales that increased measurement precision and accuracy in complementary ways. I suggest that the success of Vernier and diagonal scales is due not only to simplicity of fabrication, but also to their exploitation of visual hyperacuities.

  16. New Precise Measurement of the Hyperfine Splitting of Positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, A.

    2015-09-15

    Positronium (Ps) is an ideal system for precision test of bound state quantum electrodynamics. The hyperfine splitting (HFS) of the ground state of Ps, which is one of the most precisely tested quantity, has a large discrepancy of 16 ppm (4.5 σ) between previous experiments and theoretical calculation up to O(α{sup 3}lnα{sup −1}) and part of O(α{sup 3}) corrections. A new experiment which reduces possible systematic uncertainties of Ps thermalization effect and nonuniformity of magnetic field was performed. It revealed that the Ps thermalization effect was as large as 10 ± 2 ppm. Treating the thermalization effect correctly, a new result of 203.3942 ± 0.0016(stat., 8.0 ppm) ± 0.0013(sys., 6.4 ppm) GHz was obtained. This result is consistent with theory within 1.1 σ, whereas it disfavors the previous experimental result by 2.6 σ. It shows that the Ps thermalization effect is crucial for precision measurement of HFS. Future prospects for improved precision are briefly discussed.

  17. Precision Measurement of Cylinder Surface Profile on an Ultra-Precision Machine Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Noh, Y. J.; Arai, Y.; Gao, W.; Park, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of the surface straightness profile of a cylinder workpiece on an ultra-precision machine tool which has a T-base design with a spindle, an X-slide and a Z-slide. The movement range of the X-slide is 220 mm and that of the Z-slide is 150 mm, which have roller bearings in common. Two capacitive sensors are employed to scan a cylinder workpiece mounted on the spindle along the Z-axis. The straightness error motion of the Z-slide is measured to be approximately 100 nm by the reversal method. The straightness profile of the cylinder workpiece is evaluated to be approximately 400 nm by separation of the motion error, simultaneously.

  18. High precision measurements of the free form mirror geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsov, Denis; Rahneberg, Ilko; Pöschel, Wolfgang; Schott, Walter

    2017-06-01

    There are many established technologies for precise characterization of the mirror geometries available. The paper presents a high precision measuring setup based on a single beam homodyne laser interferometer. The single beam interferometer is moved by a linear stage between the reference and measuring surfaces and delivers the differences between them. The reference mirror defines an absolute accuracy of the method. This point based method allows a high spatial resolution of the mirror shape and is suitable for measurements of the free form mirror geometries as long as the radius of curvature does not exceed the maximal toleranced tilt. The measuring results have been obtained for optics with dimensions of up to 50 mm and have been verified both for plan mirrors and for mirrors with radii of curvature in the range between 6 m and 10 m. A repeatability of the measuring results in sub-nanometer range can be shown. Especially for mirrors with a very big radius of curvature the knowledge of the exact position of the each measuring point on the surface is important for minimizing the errors of the mathematical fitting algorithms. Therefore a triple beam interferometer has been used for measurements of the stage position. The tight synchronization between all interferometer channels of 0.1 ns allows very fast "on-the-fly" scans of the surface.

  19. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel P.

    The discovery of Earth-like exoplanets has profound implications for our understanding of the origins and diversity of life in our universe. As such, developing new and improved Doppler radial velocity (RV) spectrometers capable of discovering and characterizing these planets is a high priority in the astronomical community. However, detection of true Earth-analogs remains beyond the technical reach of current Doppler RV instruments. This thesis discusses a number of technological developments designed specifically to overcome classical instrumental limitations of high precision Doppler RV measurements. These technologies are essential components of next generation instruments that aim to achieve the RV precision necessary to detect low-mass planets. This instrumentation research is driven by the development of the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a near-infrared (NIR) Doppler spectrograph currently under development at Penn State that will detect terrestrial-mass planets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs. Furthermore, many technologies discussed will also be applied to the NASA-NSF Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer concept NEID, a Doppler RV instrument for the 3.5 meter WIYN telescope, slated for delivery in 2019. NEID is an ultra-stable, high resolution optical spectrometer also under development at Penn State. This thesis describes new specialized optical fiber delivery systems, designed to significantly improve instrument illumination stability, modal noise suppression systems, which suppress mode interference in optical fibers and allow spectrometers to fully realize the exquisite precision of modern wavelength calibration sources, and new photonic calibration sources, which show significant promise as potential Doppler wavelength references. These technologies represent important steps in enabling next generation instruments to reach precisions sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets orbiting in the Habitable-zones of nearby stars. Improving measurement

  20. Precision measurements and applications of femtosecond frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason

    2002-05-01

    The merging of femtosecond (fs) laser physics with the field of optical f requency metrology over recent years has had a profound impact on both di sciplines. Precision control of the broad frequency bandwidth from fs la sers has enabled new areas of exploration in ultrafast physics and revolu tionized optical frequency measurement and precision spectroscopy. Most recently, the transition frequency of the length standard at 514.7 nm,^ 127I2 P(13) 43-0 a3 has been measured in our lab with an improvement of more than 100 times in precision. Interesting molecular dynamics and s tructure are being explored using absolute frequency map of molecular tra nsitions over a large wavelength range. The iodine transition at 532 nm h as been used to establish an optical atomic clock with a fs comb providin g both an RF standard with stability comparable to the best atomic clocks and millions of optical frequencies across the visible and near IR spect rum, each stable to the Hz level. Work is presently underway to directly compare the iodine optical clocks at JILA with the Hg and Ca optical cloc ks currently being refined at NIST via a direct optical fiber link. A wi dely tunable single frequency laser in combination with a fs comb has bee n employed to realize an optical frequency synthesizer. Frequency combs of two independent ultrafast lasers have been coherently locked, enablin g several different avenues of application such as synthesis of arbitrary waveforms, coherent control of quantum systems, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. This talk will review these recent accompl ishments from our lab and discuss plans for further improving the control and precision of fs laser based measurements. te

  1. High-precision Photogrammetric Surface Figure Measurements under Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lou; Yuan, Qian; Sheng-hong, Fan; Chang-ru, Liu; Hai-ren, Wang; Ying-xi, Zuo; Jin-quan, Cheng; Ji, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Limited by the working temperature of the test equipment, most of high-precision surface figure measurement techniques cannot be put into application under a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the first attempt to measure the surface figure of a high-precision terahertz reflector panel under low temperatures based on photogrammetry. The measurement employs a high-resolution industrial camera sitting on the automatic testing platform which enables photos been taken in an automatic fashion inside a climate chamber. A repeatable accuracy of 2.1 μm (rms) is achieved under the cryogenic environment. Furthermore, the surface figure measured by a three-coordinate measuring machine under the room temperature is used to calibrate the thickness differences of the targets. By this technique, the surface figure of an aluminum prototype panel of the 5 meter Dome A Terahertz Telescope (DATE5) is measured from room temperature down to -55°C to obtain the rule of variation of surface deformation of the panel under low temperatures.

  2. Scatterometry measurement precision and accuracy below 70 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, Matthew; Archie, Charles N.

    2003-05-01

    Scatterometry is a contender for various measurement applications where structure widths and heights can be significantly smaller than 70 nm within one or two ITRS generations. For example, feedforward process control in the post-lithography transistor gate formation is being actively pursued by a number of RIE tool manufacturers. Several commercial forms of scatterometry are available or under development which promise to provide satisfactory performance in this regime. Scatterometry, as commercially practiced today, involves analyzing the zeroth order reflected light from a grating of lines. Normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, 2-theta fixed-wavelength ellipsometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry are among the optical techniques, while library based spectra matching and realtime regression are among the analysis techniques. All these commercial forms will find accurate and precise measurement a challenge when the material constituting the critical structure approaches a very small volume. Equally challenging is executing an evaluation methodology that first determines the true properties (critical dimensions and materials) of semiconductor wafer artifacts and then compares measurement performance of several scatterometers. How well do scatterometers track process induced changes in bottom CD and sidewall profile? This paper introduces a general 3D metrology assessment methodology and reports upon work involving sub-70 nm structures and several scatterometers. The methodology combines results from multiple metrologies (CD-SEM, CD-AFM, TEM, and XSEM) to form a Reference Measurement System (RMS). The methodology determines how well the scatterometry measurement tracks critical structure changes even in the presence of other noncritical changes that take place at the same time; these are key components of accuracy. Because the assessment rewards scatterometers that measure with good precision (reproducibility) and good accuracy, the most precise

  3. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    DOE PAGES

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  4. Precision measurement of a particle mass at the linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Freitas, A.; Schmitt, M.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2007-06-01

    Precision measurement of the stop mass at the ILC is done in a method based on cross-sections measurements at two different center-of-mass energies. This allows to minimize both the statistical and systematic errors. In the framework of the MSSM, a light stop, compatible with electro-weak baryogenesis, is studied in its decay into a charm jet and neutralino, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP), as a candidate of dark matter. This takes place for a small stop-neutralino mass difference.

  5. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  6. Precision sampling measurements using ac programmable Josephson voltage standards.

    PubMed

    Rüfenacht, A; Burroughs, C J; Benz, S P

    2008-04-01

    We have performed a variety of precision measurements by comparing ac and dc waveforms generated by two independent ac programmable Josephson voltage standard (ACPJVS) systems. The objective of these experiments was to demonstrate the effectiveness of using a sampling digital voltmeter to measure small differences between Josephson waveforms for frequencies up to 3.6 kHz. The low uncertainties that we obtained confirm the feasibility of using this differential sampling method for high accuracy comparisons between ACPJVS waveforms and signals from other sources.

  7. Precision Measurements of Top Quark Production with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. It is the only quark that decays before it hadronises which gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks and to test perturbative QCD. This overview will focus on a few recent precision top quark measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC: Fiducial top pair and single top production cross-sections including differential distributions will be presented and compared with QCD predictions. The results include the first top quark measurements at 13 TeV using data from LHC Run 2.

  8. Precise Measurement of Deuteron Tensor Analyzing Powers with BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Kohl, M.; Akdogan, T.; Alarcon, R.; Bertozzi, W.; Booth, E.; Botto, T.; Calarco, J. R.; Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Degrush, A.; Dow, K.; Farkhondeh, M.; Fatemi, R.; Filoti, O.; Franklin, W.; Gao, H.; Geis, E.; Gilad, S.; Hasell, D.; Karpius, P.; Kolster, H.; Lee, T.; Maschinot, A.; Matthews, J.; McIlhany, K.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Rapaport, J.; Redwine, R.; Seely, J.; Shinozaki, A.; Sindile, A.; Širca, S.; Six, E.; Smith, T.; Tonguc, B.; Tschalär, C.; Tsentalovich, E.; Turchinetz, W.; Xiao, Y.; Xu, W.; Zhou, Z.-L.; Ziskin, V.; Zwart, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report a precision measurement of the deuteron tensor analyzing powers T20 and T21 at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. Data were collected simultaneously over a momentum transfer range Q=2.15-4.50fm-1 with the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid using a highly polarized deuterium internal gas target. The data are in excellent agreement with calculations in a framework of effective field theory. The deuteron charge monopole and quadrupole form factors GC and GQ were separated with improved precision, and the location of the first node of GC was confirmed at Q=4.19±0.05fm-1. The new data provide a strong constraint on theoretical models in a momentum transfer range covering the minimum of T20 and the first node of GC.

  9. Precise measurement of velocity dependent friction in rotational motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Junaid; Hassan, Hafsa; Shamim, Sohaib; Mahmood, Waqas; Sabieh Anwar, Muhammad

    2011-09-01

    Frictional losses are experimentally determined for a uniform circular disc exhibiting rotational motion. The clockwise and anticlockwise rotations of the disc, that result when a hanger tied to a thread is released from a certain height, give rise to vertical oscillations of the hanger as the thread winds and unwinds over a pulley attached to the disc. It is thus observed how the maximum height is achieved by the hanger decrements in every bounce. From the decrements, the rotational frictional losses are measured. The precision is enhanced by correlating vertical motion with the angular motion. This method leads to a substantial improvement in precision. Furthermore, the frictional torque is shown to be proportional to the angular speed. The experiment has been successfully employed in the undergraduate lab setting.

  10. Precision Measurements of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2010-08-01

    New high precision polarization measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio in the Q^2 from 0.3 to 0.7 [GeV/c]^2 have been made. These elastic H(e,e'p) measurementswere done in Jefferson Lab's Hall A using 80% longitudinally polarized electrons and recoil polarimetry. For Q^2 greater than 1 [GeV/c]^2, previous polarization data indicated a strong deviation of the form factor ratio from unity which sparked renewed theoretical and experimental interest in how two-photon diagrams have been taken into account. The new high precision data indicate that the deviation from unity, while small, persists even at Q^2 less than 1 [GeV/c]^2.

  11. Precision of the CAESAR scan-extracted measurements.

    PubMed

    Robinette, Kathleen M; Daanen, Hein A M

    2006-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body scanners are increasingly used to derive 1D body dimensions from 3D whole body scans for instance, as input for clothing grading systems to make made-to-measure clothing or for width and depth dimensions of a seated workstation. In this study, the precision of the scanner-derived 1D dimensions from the CAESAR survey, a multinational anthropometric survey, was investigated. Two combinations of scanning teams with 3D whole body scanners were compared, one called the US Team and the other the Dutch Team. Twenty subjects were measured three times by one scanner and one team, and three times by the other combination. The subjects were marked prior to scanning using small dots, and the linear distances between the dots were calculated after processing the scans. The mean absolute difference (MAD) of the repetitions was calculated and this was compared to reported acceptable errors in manual measurements from the US Army's ANSUR survey when similar measurements were available. In addition, the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated for all measurements. The results indicate that the CAESAR scan-extracted measurements are highly reproducible; for most measures the MAD is less than 5mm. In addition, more than 93% of the MAD values for CAESAR are significantly smaller than the ANSUR survey acceptable errors. Therefore, it is concluded that the type of scan-extracted measures used in CAESAR are as good as or better than comparable manual measurements. Scan-extracted measurements that do not use markers or are not straight-line distances are not represented here and additional studies would be needed to verify their precision.

  12. Superallowed nuclear beta decay: Precision measurements for basic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J. C.

    2012-11-20

    For 60 years, superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} nuclear beta decay has been used to probe the weak interaction, currently verifying the conservation of the vector current (CVC) to high precision ({+-}0.01%) and anchoring the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix ({+-}0.06%), a fundamental pillar of the electroweak standard model. Each superallowed transition is characterized by its ft-value, a result obtained from three measured quantities: the total decay energy of the transition, its branching ratio, and the half-life of the parent state. Today's data set is composed of some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from {sup 10}C to {sup 74}Rb. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - a prediction of CVC - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, G{sub V}, has been extracted from the data and used to determine the top left element of the CKM matrix, V{sub ud}. With this result the top-row unitarity test of the CKM matrix yields the value 0.99995(61), a result that sets a tight limit on possible new physics beyond the standard model. To have any impact on these fundamental weak-interaction tests, any measurement must be made with a precision of 0.1% or better - a substantial experimental challenge well beyond the requirements of most nuclear physics measurements. I overview the current state of the field and outline some of the requirements that need to be met by experimentalists if they aim to make measurements with this high level of precision.

  13. Superallowed nuclear beta decay: Precision measurements for basic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    For 60 years, superallowed 0+→0+ nuclear beta decay has been used to probe the weak interaction, currently verifying the conservation of the vector current (CVC) to high precision (±0.01%) and anchoring the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix (±0.06%), a fundamental pillar of the electroweak standard model. Each superallowed transition is characterized by its ft-value, a result obtained from three measured quantities: the total decay energy of the transition, its branching ratio, and the half-life of the parent state. Today's data set is composed of some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from 10C to 74Rb. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - a prediction of CVC - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, GV, has been extracted from the data and used to determine the top left element of the CKM matrix, Vud. With this result the top-row unitarity test of the CKM matrix yields the value 0.99995(61), a result that sets a tight limit on possible new physics beyond the standard model. To have any impact on these fundamental weak-interaction tests, any measurement must be made with a precision of 0.1% or better - a substantial experimental challenge well beyond the requirements of most nuclear physics measurements. I overview the current state of the field and outline some of the requirements that need to be met by experimentalists if they aim to make measurements with this high level of precision.

  14. Note: Precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Park, K.

    2012-11-15

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 Degree-Sign C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s){sup -1} for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s){sup -1} for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 {approx} 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes {approx}30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  15. Note: precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators.

    PubMed

    Lee, I; Park, K; Lee, J

    2012-11-01

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 °C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s)(-1) for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s)(-1) for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 ~ 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes ~30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  16. Note: Precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.; Park, K.; Lee, J.

    2012-11-01

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 °C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s)-1 for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s)-1 for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 ˜ 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes ˜30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  17. A precision measurement of the mass of the top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davis, G. A.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, A.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Van Kooten, R.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2004-06-01

    The standard model of particle physics contains parameters-such as particle masses-whose origins are still unknown and which cannot be predicted, but whose values are constrained through their interactions. In particular, the masses of the top quark (Mt) and W boson (MW) constrain the mass of the long-hypothesized, but thus far not observed, Higgs boson. A precise measurement of Mt can therefore indicate where to look for the Higgs, and indeed whether the hypothesis of a standard model Higgs is consistent with experimental data. As top quarks are produced in pairs and decay in only about 10-24s into various final states, reconstructing their masses from their decay products is very challenging. Here we report a technique that extracts more information from each top-quark event and yields a greatly improved precision (of +/- 5.3GeV/c2) when compared to previous measurements. When our new result is combined with our published measurement in a complementary decay mode and with the only other measurements available, the new world average for Mt becomes 178.0 +/- 4.3GeV/c2. As a result, the most likely Higgs mass increases from the experimentally excluded value of 96 to 117GeV/c2, which is beyond current experimental sensitivity. The upper limit on the Higgs mass at the 95% confidence level is raised from 219 to 251GeV/c2.

  18. Precise Measurement of Drift Velocities in Active-Target Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear experiments with radioactive beams are needed to improve our understanding of nuclei structure far from stability. Radioactive beams typically have low beam rates, but active-target detectors can compensate for these low beam rates. In active-target detectors that are also Time-Projection Chambers (TPC), ionized electrons drift through an electric fieldto a detection device to imagethe trajectory of charged-particle ionization tracks within the chamber's gas volume. The measurement of the ionized electrons' drift velocity is crucial for the accurate imaging of these tracks. In order to measure this drift velocity, we will use a UV laser and photo-sensitive foil in a the ND-Cubedetector we are developing, periodically releasingelectrons from the foil at a known timesand a known distance from the electron detector, thereby precisely measuring the drift velocity in situ. We have surveyed several materials to find a material that will work well with typical solid-state UV lasers on the market. We plan to determine the best material and thickness of the foil to maximize the number of photoelectrons. The precision that will be afforded by this measurement of the drift velocity will allow us to eliminate a source of systematic uncertainty.

  19. Multiply-ionized Atoms at Low Energy for Precise Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Tan, Joseph N.

    2014-05-01

    Recent work at NIST introduced a new system for the slowing, capture and manipulation of multiply-ionized atoms in a controlled environment suitable for precision measurements. As a demonstration of its potentials, we have measured the lifetimes of metastable states in krypton and argon (gases), and are now extending this technique to metals such as iron. Work is also underway on a table-top apparatus that incorporates a miniature electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) coupled to a cryo-cooled, compact Penning trap to enable spectroscopic studies of interest for atomic physics, astrophysics, and metrology. This apparatus will allow charge exchange between laser-excited Rydberg rubidium atoms and isolated bare nuclei, opening the way for precision spectroscopy of one-electron ions in Rydberg states using optical frequency comb technology. Earlier theoretical work at NIST has shown that such measurements would provide a new determination of the Rydberg constant that was independent of the proton radius. Such a measurement could help resolve the proton-radius puzzle. Additional applications could include the study of very-long-lived atomic states proposed for new atomic frequency standards or laboratory studies of potential time variation of the fine structure constant. SFH acknowledges funding through a National Research Council Reseach Associateship award.

  20. Precision lifetime measurements of the 2p levels in lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Kurtz, C.; Tanner, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    These measurements are motivated by the theoretical challenges posed by lithium. The three-electron lithium atom is one of the simplest atomic systems with which to test atomic structure calculations. Recently, there were several ab initio calculations of the lithium 2s-2p oscillator strengths, which agree to 0.15%. However, the theoretical results differ by 5 sigma from the precise fast-beam-laser lifetime measurement of Gaupp and Andra (Berlin). Hence the need for a new independent and precise measurement. Improvements were added to the fast beam laser techniques developed for cesium in order to measure the lithium 2p state lifetime. Although the technique is similar to that of cesium, the lithium atom presents a few new complications. Since the atom is lighter, it travels more quickly through the interaction and detection regions. Therefore, the 670 nm wavelength requires a dye laser to produce sufficient intensity to populate the excited state. Unfortunately, the intensity of the dye laser is inherently less stable than that of a diode laser. Another complication is that the ion-beam intensity is much more sensitive to fluctuations in the accelerating voltage. Two detectors were added: one to monitor the ion-beam intensity, and the other to monitor the laser power. With the information from the additional detectors, a new data analysis scheme was developed. Sufficient data were taken to evaluate the benefits of the new detectors. No additional work is planned at Argonne for this experiment.

  1. Precise measurement of chromium isotopes by MC-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah; Holst, Jesper C; Olsen, Mia B; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We report novel analytical procedures allowing for the concurrent determination of the stable and mass-independent Cr isotopic composition of silicate materials by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). In particular, we focus on improved precision of the measurement of the neutron-rich isotope (54)Cr. Because nitride and oxide interferences are a major obstacle to precise and accurate (54)Cr measurements by MC-ICPMS, our approach is designed to minimize these interferences. Based on repeat measurements of standards, we show that the mass-independent (53)Cr and (54)Cr compositions can be routinely determined with an external reproducibility better than 2.5 and 5.8 ppm (2 sd), respectively. This represents at least a two-fold improvement compared to previous studies. Although this approach uses significantly more Cr (30-60 μg) than analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), our result indicate that it is possible to obtain an external reproducibility of 19 ppm for the μ(54)Cr when consuming amounts similar to that typically analyzed by TIMS (1 μg). In addition, the amount of time required for analysis by MC-ICPMS is much shorter thereby enabling a higher sample throughput. As a result of the improved analytical precision, we identified small apparent mass-independent differences between different synthetic Cr standards and bulk silicate Earth (BSE) when using the kinetic law for the mass bias correction. These differences are attributed to the Cr loss by equilibrium processes during production of the synthetic standards. The stable isotope data concurrently obtained have a precision of 0.05‰ Da (-1), which is comparable to earlier studies. Comparison of the measured isotopic composition of four meteorites with published data indicates that Cr isotope data measured by the technique described here are accurate to stated uncertainties. The stable Cr composition of the Bilanga and NWA 2999 achondrites suggests that the

  2. Precise measurement of chromium isotopes by MC-ICPMS

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah; Holst, Jesper C.; Olsen, Mia B.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We report novel analytical procedures allowing for the concurrent determination of the stable and mass-independent Cr isotopic composition of silicate materials by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). In particular, we focus on improved precision of the measurement of the neutron-rich isotope 54Cr. Because nitride and oxide interferences are a major obstacle to precise and accurate 54Cr measurements by MC-ICPMS, our approach is designed to minimize these interferences. Based on repeat measurements of standards, we show that the mass-independent 53Cr and 54Cr compositions can be routinely determined with an external reproducibility better than 2.5 and 5.8 ppm (2 sd), respectively. This represents at least a two-fold improvement compared to previous studies. Although this approach uses significantly more Cr (30–60 μg) than analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), our result indicate that it is possible to obtain an external reproducibility of 19 ppm for the μ54Cr when consuming amounts similar to that typically analyzed by TIMS (1 μg). In addition, the amount of time required for analysis by MC-ICPMS is much shorter thereby enabling a higher sample throughput. As a result of the improved analytical precision, we identified small apparent mass-independent differences between different synthetic Cr standards and bulk silicate Earth (BSE) when using the kinetic law for the mass bias correction. These differences are attributed to the Cr loss by equilibrium processes during production of the synthetic standards. The stable isotope data concurrently obtained have a precision of 0.05‰ Da −1, which is comparable to earlier studies. Comparison of the measured isotopic composition of four meteorites with published data indicates that Cr isotope data measured by the technique described here are accurate to stated uncertainties. The stable Cr composition of the Bilanga and NWA 2999 achondrites suggests that the

  3. High-precision measurements of global stellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinda, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a brief history of the development of devices and techniques for high-precision measurements of stellar magnetic fields. Two main approaches for the processing of spectral-polarimetric observations are described: the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), which is used to find a mean-weighted average of the normalized polarization profile using a set of spectral lines, and a method in which each individual spectral line is used to determine the magnetic field, viz., the single line method (SL). The advantages and disadvantages of the LSD and SL methods are discussed.

  4. High Precision Oxygen Measurements as a Tool for CCS Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugman, A. T.; Dvonch, C.; Clegg, S. M.; Rahn, T.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 emissions from below ground carbon storage reservoirs can be difficult to discriminate from CO2 produced via natural plant and microbial respiration. However, because respiration produces CO2 and consumes O2 in an approximately 1:1 ratio, it is possible to characterize leakage sources by measurement of simultaneous changes of both O2 and CO2. This approach is complicated by the fact that O2 comprises approximately 21% of the atmosphere, while CO2 is only present in the background atmosphere at ~400 parts per million, making it necessary to accurately measure changes in O2 concentration to six significant figures. Here we describe a portable high precision oxygen measurement system that employs a modified commercial fuel cell analyzer to quantify small changes in O2 concentration. High precision is achieved through precise control of flow and pressure, allowing near part per million precision of O2 and CO2 concentrations. This system has been incorporated into a mobile laboratory and has been deployed to the ZERT controlled release site in Bozeman, Montana and to a natural analog CO2 leak at Soda Springs, Idaho. Samples were collected at ground level, 1 meter, and 3 meters above the CO2 source and are displayed as the ratio of the O2 difference relative to a reference to the CO2 difference in concentration relative to the same reference (ΔO2/ΔCO2). It was observed that at wind speeds ≤ 2 m/s, the ΔO2/ΔCO2 anomaly decreased with height and was still significantly different from background at 3 m. With increasing wind speed, ΔO2/ΔCO2 anomalies decreased to background levels at 1 and 3 m but remained detectable at the ground surface. We will discuss attempts to quantify the CO2 release rate utilizing the measured ΔO2/ΔCO2 elevation profiles and will present complementary eddy covariance data for comparison.

  5. A NEW PRECISE MEASUREMENT OF G-2 OF MUON.

    SciTech Connect

    LOGASHENKO,I.BROWN,H.N.BUNCE,G.CAREY,R.M.CUSHMAN,P.DANBY,G.T.DEBEVEC,P.T.ET ALMUON G - 2 COLLABORATION

    2001-07-12

    The Muon (g-2) Experiment (E821) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) started data taking in 1997. The latest result a{sub {mu}{sup +}} = 11659202(14)(6) x 10{sup -10}, based on statistics of about 1 billion decays collected in 1999, is in good agreement with the previous measurement. With the precision of 1.3 ppm, the result, compared with the Standard Model evaluation a{sub {mu}}(SM) = 11659159.6(6.7) x 10{sup -10}, shows a difference of a{sub {mu}}(exp)-a{sub {mu}}(SM) = 43(16) x 10{sup -10}.

  6. EDITORIAL: Precision Density Measurements of Solids and Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettin, Horst

    2006-10-01

    This special feature is dedicated to methods and applications of density measurements of the highest precision. It contains papers from the 210th PTB Seminar 'Precision Density Measurements of Solids and Liquids', which was held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, on 24 26 October 2005 and was sponsored by the Helmholtz Funds e.V., Germany. More than 55 density experts from 20 countries attended the seminar. The participants came from national metrological institutes, calibration laboratories, verification offices, universities and manufactures of density meters. Thus, many interesting discussions were stimulated between various groups, in particular between those in research and those working on applications. The main topics of the seminar were the realization of the density unit and its dissemination by comparison methods. The research activities for the determination of the Avogadro constant stimulated the development of new methods as well as the improvement of more conventional methods in order to reach density uncertainties below 0.1 ppm. Technical and physical limitations of the methods were discussed as well as applications and future trends. This special feature contains nine papers based on presentations given at the seminar. Two additional papers on liquid density reference standards and compressibility measurements of liquids complete the feature. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the authors who contributed to this special feature, which I hope provides an excellent compendium of the topics discussed at the seminar.

  7. Precision top-quark mass measurement at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-10-12

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1). Using a sample of tt¯ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, M(top)=172.85±0.71(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV/c(2).

  8. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  9. Precise orbit determination based on raw GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Precise orbit determination is an essential part of the most scientific satellite missions. Highly accurate knowledge of the satellite position is used to geolocate measurements of the onboard sensors. For applications in the field of gravity field research, the position itself can be used as observation. In this context, kinematic orbits of low earth orbiters (LEO) are widely used, because they do not include a priori information about the gravity field. The limiting factor for the achievable accuracy of the gravity field through LEO positions is the orbit accuracy. We make use of raw global positioning system (GPS) observations to estimate the kinematic satellite positions. The method is based on the principles of precise point positioning. Systematic influences are reduced by modeling and correcting for all known error sources. Remaining effects such as the ionospheric influence on the signal propagation are either unknown or not known to a sufficient level of accuracy. These effects are modeled as unknown parameters in the estimation process. The redundancy in the adjustment is reduced; however, an improvement in orbit accuracy leads to a better gravity field estimation. This paper describes our orbit determination approach and its mathematical background. Some examples of real data applications highlight the feasibility of the orbit determination method based on raw GPS measurements. Its suitability for gravity field estimation is presented in a second step.

  10. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Precision Measures of the Primordial Abundance of Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.88) damped Lyα system at z abs = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)p = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10-5, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ωb, 0 h 2 = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H)p with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N eff = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N eff = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N eff and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η10) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the 4He primordial mass fraction, Y P: ξD = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H)p observations. Combining this value of ξD with the current best literature measure of Y P, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| <= +0.062. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (VLT program IDs: 68.B-0115(A), 70.A-0425(C), 078.A-0185(A), 085.A-0109(A)), and at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of

  12. Precision measures of the primordial abundance of deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-01-20

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = –2.88) damped Lyα system at z {sub abs} = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H){sub p} = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10{sup –5}, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ω{sub b,} {sub 0} h {sup 2} = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H){sub p} with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N {sub eff} = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N {sub eff} = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N {sub eff} and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η{sub 10}) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the {sup 4}He primordial mass fraction, Y {sub P}: ξ{sub D} = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H){sub p} observations. Combining this value of ξ{sub D} with the current best literature measure of Y {sub P}, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| ≤ +0.062.

  13. Precision of cerebral oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration measurements in neonates measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arri, Sandra Jasminder; Muehlemann, Thomas; Biallas, Martin; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Wolf, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Background and aim: One source of error with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is the assumption that the measured tissue is optically homogeneous. This is not always the case. Our aim is to assess the impact of tissue homogeneity (TH) on the precision of NIRS measurements in neonates. Methods: On 36 term and 27 preterm neonates at least five 1-min measurements are performed on each subject using the OxiplexTS. The sensor position is slightly changed before each measurement while assessing TH. The precision for cerebral tissue oxygenation saturation (StO2) and total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) are calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean StO2 is not significantly different between term and preterm infants. The mean tHb is significantly lower in preterm infants (p < 0.01). With increasing TH, the precision of StO2 increase from 5.6 to 4.6% for preterm and from 11.0 to 2.0% for term infants; the precision of tHb increases from 10.1 to 7.5μM for preterm and from 16.4 to 3.5μM for term infants. The precision for StO2 is higher in term than in preterm infants. The precision for tHb shows no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: The precision of NIRS measurements correlates with tissue homogeneity.

  14. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF MUON G-2 AND ACCELERATOR RELATED ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,H.N.; BUNCE,G.; CAREY,R.M.; CUSHMAN,P.; DANBY,G.T.; DEBEVEC,P.T.; DEILE,M.; DENG,H.; DENINGER,W.; DHAWAN,S.K.; ET AL; MENG,W.

    2001-09-21

    A precision measurement of the anomalous g value, a{sub {mu}}=(g-2)/2, for the positive muon has been made using high intensity protons available at the Brookhaven AGS. The result based on the 1999 data a{sub {mu}}=11659202(14)(6) x 10{sup 10} (1.3ppm) is in good agreement with previous measurements and has an error one third that of the combined previous data. The current theoretical value from the standard model is a{sub {mu}} (SM)=11659159.6(6.7) x 10{sup 10} (0.57 ppm) and differ by over 2.5 standard deviation with experiment. Issues with reducing systematic errors and enhancing the injection and storage efficiencies are discussed.

  15. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  16. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  17. Precision measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant using cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Rosi, G; Sorrentino, F; Cacciapuoti, L; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2014-06-26

    About 300 experiments have tried to determine the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, so far, but large discrepancies in the results have made it impossible to know its value precisely. The weakness of the gravitational interaction and the impossibility of shielding the effects of gravity make it very difficult to measure G while keeping systematic effects under control. Most previous experiments performed were based on the torsion pendulum or torsion balance scheme as in the experiment by Cavendish in 1798, and in all cases macroscopic masses were used. Here we report the precise determination of G using laser-cooled atoms and quantum interferometry. We obtain the value G = 6.67191(99) × 10(-11) m(3) kg(-1) s(-2) with a relative uncertainty of 150 parts per million (the combined standard uncertainty is given in parentheses). Our value differs by 1.5 combined standard deviations from the current recommended value of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology. A conceptually different experiment such as ours helps to identify the systematic errors that have proved elusive in previous experiments, thus improving the confidence in the value of G. There is no definitive relationship between G and the other fundamental constants, and there is no theoretical prediction for its value, against which to test experimental results. Improving the precision with which we know G has not only a pure metrological interest, but is also important because of the key role that G has in theories of gravitation, cosmology, particle physics and astrophysics and in geophysical models.

  18. Picometer Precision Measurements of Fringe Phase and Wavelengths in MAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Shao, M.; Goullioud, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), a micro-arcsecond astrometry mission, is the only mission, either operational or in planning, that will be capable of measuring the mass of extra-solar planets, mass being the fundamental property that determines whether the planet is capable of holding an Earth-like atmosphere. One of the SIM testbeds at JPL, the Micro-Arcsecond Metrology (MAM) testbed, addresses how to measure interferometer fringe phase and wavelengths accurately at the level of picometers (10-12 m). The MAM testbed uses a pathlength modulation scheme for fringe detection, using ten samples per stroke, with stroke-length close to the wavelength of a spectral channel. The MAM testbed has demonstrated the measurement of optical pathlength delays to picometer precision. Longer strokes (tens of microns) enable both fringe and modulation envelope to be detected, yielding accurate wavelength measurements at the picometer level for the first time. This paper describes the fundamental principles of a new technique for calibration and measurement of fringes for targets that have various spectra, in which effective wavelength varies significantly for different spectral channels. Test results and variations with time are analyzed. Conformation of measurenet accuracy and stability are described in this paper.

  19. Precise calibration of binocular vision system used for vision measurement.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Zhou, Fuqiang; Wang, Yexin; Liu, Liu; Gao, He

    2014-04-21

    Binocular vision calibration is of great importance in 3D machine vision measurement. With respect to binocular vision calibration, the nonlinear optimization technique is a crucial step to improve the accuracy. The existing optimization methods mostly aim at minimizing the sum of reprojection errors for two cameras based on respective 2D image pixels coordinate. However, the subsequent measurement process is conducted in 3D coordinate system which is not consistent with the optimization coordinate system. Moreover, the error criterion with respect to optimization and measurement is different. The equal pixel distance error in 2D image plane leads to diverse 3D metric distance error at different position before the camera. To address these issues, we propose a precise calibration method for binocular vision system which is devoted to minimizing the metric distance error between the reconstructed point through optimal triangulation and the ground truth in 3D measurement coordinate system. In addition, the inherent epipolar constraint and constant distance constraint are combined to enhance the optimization process. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, both simulative and real experiments have been carried out and the results show that the proposed method is reliable and efficient to improve measurement accuracy compared with conventional method.

  20. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  1. A neural measure of precision in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Ester, Edward F; Anderson, David E; Serences, John T; Awh, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the temporary storage of visual detail in working memory is mediated by sensory recruitment or sustained patterns of stimulus-specific activation within feature-selective regions of visual cortex. According to a strong version of this hypothesis, the relative "quality" of these patterns should determine the clarity of an individual's memory. Here, we provide a direct test of this claim. We used fMRI and a forward encoding model to characterize population-level orientation-selective responses in visual cortex while human participants held an oriented grating in memory. This analysis, which enables a precise quantitative description of multivoxel, population-level activity measured during working memory storage, revealed graded response profiles whose amplitudes were greatest for the remembered orientation and fell monotonically as the angular distance from this orientation increased. Moreover, interparticipant differences in the dispersion-but not the amplitude-of these response profiles were strongly correlated with performance on a concurrent memory recall task. These findings provide important new evidence linking the precision of sustained population-level responses in visual cortex and memory acuity.

  2. A Neural Measure of Precision in Visual Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Ester, Edward F.; Anderson, David E.; Serences, John T.; Awh, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the temporary storage of visual detail in working memory is mediated by sensory recruitment or sustained patterns of stimulus-specific activation within feature-selective regions of visual cortex. According to a strong version of this hypothesis, the relative “quality” of these patterns should determine the clarity of an individual’s memory. Here, we provide a direct test of this claim. We used fMRI and a forward encoding model to characterize population-level orientation-selective responses in visual cortex while human participants held an oriented grating in memory. This analysis, which enables a precise quantitative description of multivoxel, population-level activity measured during working memory storage, revealed graded response profiles whose amplitudes were greatest for the remembered orientation and fell monotonically as the angular distance from this orientation increased. Moreover, interparticipant differences in the dispersion—but not the amplitude—of these response profiles were strongly correlated with performance on a concurrent memory recall task. These findings provide important new evidence linking the precision of sustained population-level responses in visual cortex and memory acuity. PMID:23469889

  3. Repeated precise gravity measurements on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.; Lambert, A.; Liard, J.

    1981-07-01

    Over the past 3 years, repeated precise gravity measurements have been made on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, to test a practical field technique for precise gravimetric surveys and to monitor possible gravity changes associated with contemporary crustal deformation. In order to obtain a precision for measured gravity differences of a few microgals (1 μGal = 10 nm/s2), rigorous field survey procedures were followed and the operating characteristics and calibration nonlinearities of the LaCoste and Romberg model D gravimeters were taken into account. Instrument evaluations indicate that although the standard error of the mean of several gravity ties is 1.5-2.0 μGal for an individual instrument, the present achievable accuracy of the model D gravimeter for the measurement of temporal gravity changes is 3-4 μGal, provided the dial settings of previous surveys are recovered or both long and short wavelength nonlinearities in calibration can be specified. Semiannual surveys of the central Vancouver Island region indicate significant temporal variations over the past 3 years. Gravity changes as large as 60 μGal at sites adjacent to lake shorelines are caused by the mass effect of changing water levels and can be accounted for by simple model calculations. A gravity effect of seasonal changes in groundwater levels is not identifiable in the data, although easternmost network sites are underlain by porous sediments subject to seasonal water table fluctuations of 1 or 2 m which are expected to cause gravity variations of the order of 10μGal. A spatially coherent pattern of longer-term gravity trends is indicated in the northern network after corrections have been made for known mass changes. These trends can be interpreted in terms of relative elevation changes of the order of 2 cm/a between Buttle Lake and the area to the northwest. Alternatively, a change in density caused by secular changes of water content in fracture zones or by compression through an

  4. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R.B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years. Minor subsidence and small related gravity changes for the period preceeding the Victoria earthquake suggest that in spite of large fluid production rates, the reservoir is being almost completely recharged and that a measurable increase in subsurface density may be taking place. The results of measurements of horizontal ground motions made in this area are discussed in relation to the gravity and subsidence observations.

  5. Prospects for Precision Measurement of CO2 Column from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Burris, John F.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena; Miodek, Marty

    2005-01-01

    In order to address the problem of sources and sinks of CO2 measurements are needed on a global scale. Clearly a satellite is a promising approach to meeting this requirement. Unfortunately, most methods for making a CO2 measurement from space involve the whole column. Since sources and sinks at the surface represent a small perturbation to the total column one is faced with the need to measure the column with a precision better than 1%. No species has ever been measured from space at this level. We have developed over the last 3 years a small instrument based upon a Fabry-Perot interferometer that is very sensitive to atmospheric CO2 and has a high signal to noise ratio. We have tested this instrument in a ground based configuration and from aircraft platforms simulating operation from a satellite. We will present results from these tests and discuss ways that this promising new instrument could be used to improve our understanding of the global carbon budget.

  6. Precision of light intensity measurement in biological optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernas, Tytus; Barnes, David; Asem, Elikplimi K; Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek

    2007-05-01

    Standardization and calibration of optical microscopy systems have become an important issue owing to the increasing role of biological imaging in high-content screening technology. The proper interpretation of data from high-content screening imaging experiments requires detailed information about the capabilities of the systems, including their available dynamic range, sensitivity and noise. Currently available techniques for calibration and standardization of digital microscopes commonly used in cell biology laboratories provide an estimation of stability and measurement precision (noise) of an imaging system at a single level of signal intensity. In addition, only the total noise level, not its characteristics (spectrum), is measured. We propose a novel technique for estimation of temporal variability of signal and noise in microscopic imaging. The method requires registration of a time series of images of any stationary biological specimen. The subsequent analysis involves a multi-step process, which separates monotonic, periodic and random components of every pixel intensity change in time. The technique allows simultaneous determination of dark, photonic and multiplicative components of noise present in biological measurements. Consequently, a respective confidence interval (noise level) is obtained for each level of signal. The technique is validated using test sets of biological images with known signal and noise characteristics. The method is also applied to assess uncertainty of measurement obtained with two CCD cameras in a wide-field microscope.

  7. Precision measurement of the electromagnetic dipole strengths in Be11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.; Summers, N. C.; Hackman, G.; Drake, T. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Chester, A.; Close, A.; Cline, D.; Cross, D. S.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, A.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hayes, A. B.; Laffoley, A. T.; Nano, T.; Navrátil, P.; Pearson, C. J.; Pore, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Svensson, C. E.; Starosta, K.; Thompson, I. J.; Voss, P.; Williams, S. J.; Wang, Z. M.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength in Be11 between the bound states has been measured using low-energy projectile Coulomb excitation at bombarding energies of 1.73 and 2.09 MeV/nucleon on a Pt196 target. An electric dipole transition probability B(E1;1/2-→1/2+)=0.102(2) e2fm was determined using the semi-classical code Gosia, and a value of 0.098(4) e2fm was determined using the Extended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method with the quantum mechanical code FRESCO. These extracted B(E1) values are consistent with the average value determined by a model-dependent analysis of intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements and are approximately 14% lower than that determined by a lifetime measurement. The much-improved precisions of 2% and 4% in the measured B(E1) values between the bound states deduced using Gosia and the Extended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method, respectively, compared to the previous accuracy of ˜10% will help in our understanding of and better improve the realistic inter-nucleon interactions.

  8. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  9. Precise measurement of the performance of thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Chao, Pablo; Muñiz-Piniella, Andrés; Selezneva, Ekaterina; Cuenat, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    The potential exploitation of thermoelectric modules into mass market applications such as exhaust gas heat recovery in combustion engines requires an accurate knowledge of their performance. Further expansion of the market will also require confidence on the results provided by suppliers to end-users. However, large variation in performance and maximum operating point is observed for identical modules when tested by different laboratories. Here, we present the first metrological study of the impact of mounting and testing procedures on the precision of thermoelectric modules measurement. Variability in the electrical output due to mechanical pressure or type of thermal interface materials is quantified for the first time. The respective contribution of the temperature difference and the mean temperature to the variation in the output performance is quantified. The contribution of these factors to the total uncertainties in module characterisation is detailed.

  10. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  11. Precision gravity measurement utilizing Accelerex vibrating beam accelerometer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norling, Brian L.

    Tests run using Sundstrand vibrating beam accelerometers to sense microgravity are described. Lunar-solar tidal effects were used as a highly predictable signal which varies by approximately 200 billionths of the full-scale gravitation level. Test runs of 48-h duration were used to evaluate stability, resolution, and noise. Test results on the Accelerex accelerometer show accuracies suitable for precision applications such as gravity mapping and gravity density logging. The test results indicate that Accelerex technology, even with an instrument design and signal processing approach not optimized for microgravity measurement, can achieve 48-nano-g (1 sigma) or better accuracy over a 48-h period. This value includes contributions from instrument noise and random walk, combined bias and scale factor drift, and thermal modeling errors as well as external contributions from sampling noise, test equipment inaccuracies, electrical noise, and cultural noise induced acceleration.

  12. Precision measurement of the D*0 decay branching fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Using 482 pb-1 of data taken at √{s }=4.009 GeV , we measure the branching fractions of the decays of D*0 into D0π0 and D0γ to be B (D*0→D0π0)=(65.5 ±0.8 ±0.5 )% and B (D*0→D0γ )=(34.5 ±0.8 ±0.5 )% , respectively, by assuming that the D*0 decays only into these two modes. The ratio of the two branching fractions is B (D*0→D0π0)/B (D*0→D0γ )=1.90 ±0.07 ±0.05 , which is independent of the assumption made above. The first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones systematic. The precision is improved by a factor of 3 compared to the present world average values.

  13. High precision metrology based microwave effective linewidth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Nan; Green, Jerome J.; Beitscher, Bailey A.; Patton, Carl E.

    2007-11-15

    A precision microwave effective linewidth measurement technique for magnetic samples has been developed. The measurement utilizes a high-Q cylindrical cavity that contains the sample of interest, a highly stable and programable static magnetic field source, a computer controlled network analyzer for cavity center frequency {omega}{sub c} and quality factor Q{sub c} determinations, and the standard metrological substitution ABA method for accurate relative {omega}{sub c} and Q{sub c} measurements. Sequential long term ABA measurements show that the time and temperature drifts and random errors are the dominant sources of error, with uncertainties in {omega}{sub c}/2{pi} and Q{sub c} in the range of 50 kHz and 25, respectively. The ABA method is applied to eliminate these drifts and minimize the random errors. For measurements over 25 ABA cycles, accuracy is improved to 0.14 kHz for {omega}{sub c}/2{pi} and 3 for Q{sub c}. The temperature variation over a single ABA cycle is generally on the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5} deg. C and there is no need for any further temperature stabilization or correction measures. The overall uncertainty in the 10 GHz effective linewidth determinations for a 3 mm diam, 0.5 mm thick polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) disk is 0.15 Oe or less, well below the intrinsic single crystal YIG linewidth. This represents a factor of 10 improvement in measurement accuracy over previous work.

  14. Precise Frequency Measurements Using a Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Yeh, N.-C.; Jiang, W.; Anderson, V. L.; Asplund, N.

    1999-01-01

    Many physics experiments call on improved resolution to better define the experimental results, thus improving tests of theories. Modern microwave technology combined with high-Q resonators can achieve frequency readout and control with resolutions up to a part in 10(exp 18). When the physical quantity in question in the experiment can be converted to a frequency or a change in frequency, a high-stability microwave oscillator can be applied to obtain state-of-the-art precision. In this work we describe the overall physical concepts and the required experimental procedures for optimizing a high-resolution frequency measurement system that employs a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity and a low-noise frequency synthesizer. The basic approach is to resolve the resonant frequencies of a high-Q (Q > 10(exp 10)) cavity to extremely high precision (one part in 10(exp 17)- 10(exp 18)). Techniques for locking the synthesizer frequency to a resonant frequency of the superconducting cavity to form an ultra-stable oscillator are described. We have recently set up an ultra-high-vacuum high-temperature annealing system to process superconducting niobium cavities, and have been able to consistently achieve Q > 10(exp 9). We have integrated high-Q superconducting cavities with a low-noise microwave synthesizer in a phase-locked-loop to verify the frequency stability of the system. Effects that disturb the cavity resonant frequency (such as the temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations) and methods to mitigate those effects are also considered. Applicability of these techniques to experiments will be discussed, and our latest experimental progress in achieving high-resolution frequency measurements using the superconducting-cavity-stabilized-oscillator will be presented.

  15. Critical tests of line broadening theories by precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S.H.

    1996-02-22

    The spectral line profiles of ionized emitters in plasmas play an important role in the calculation of opacity, for short-wavelength laser studies, and for the diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Sophisticated theoretical methods and modeling have been advanced and applied in recent years to calculate spectral line profiles in the limits where broadening by electron collisions or by ion microfield dominates. Here, the authors describe recent measurements of spectral line profiles of a z-pinch experiment employing precision plasma diagnostic techniques. In particular, the electron-collisional-broadened 2s--2p transitions in B{sub III} have been investigated because their line profiles provide an excellent test for electron-impact line shape theories and electron collision strength calculations. Although they find good agreement with semiclassical calculations, a factor of two discrepancy with the most elaborate quantum-mechanical five-state close coupling calculations is observed. They discuss the experimental error estimates of the various measured quantities and show that the observed discrepancy can not be explained by experimental shortcomings. They further discuss measurements of non-isolated spectral lines of some {Delta}n = 1 transitions in C{sub IV}--O{sub VI}. For these transitions ion broadening dominates. Excellent agreement for the whole line profile with line broadening calculations is obtained for all cases only when including ion dynamic effects. The latter are calculated using the frequency-fluctuation model and account for about 10--25% of the line width of the considered ions.

  16. A Precise measurement of the B0(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-04-01

    The authors report a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{nu}X (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. They have reconstructed 5176 D{sub s}{sup -} {mu}{sup +} signal events, where the D{sub s}{sup -} is identified via the decay D{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Using these events, they have measured the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to be {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.398 {+-} 0.044 (stat){sub -0.025}{sup +0.028}(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to date.

  17. Precision Neutron Scattering Length Measurements with Neutron Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M. G.; Arif, M.; Jacobson, D. L.; Pushin, D. A.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Shahi, C. B.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Black, T. C.

    2011-10-01

    Since its inception, single-crystal neutron interferometry has often been utilized for precise neutron scattering length, b, measurements. Scattering length data of light nuclei is particularly important in the study of few nucleon interactions as b can be predicted by two + three nucleon interaction (NI) models. As such they provide a critical test of the accuracy 2+3 NI models. Nuclear effective field theories also make use of light nuclei b in parameterizing mean-field behavior. The NIST neutron interferometer and optics facility has measured b to less than 0.8% relative uncertainty in polarized 3He and to less than 0.1% relative uncertainty in H, D, and unpolarized 3He. A neutron interferometer consists of a perfect silicon crystal machined such that there are three separate blades on a common base. Neutrons are Bragg diffracted in the blades to produce two spatially separate (yet coherent) beam paths much like an optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A gas sample placed in one of the beam paths of the interferometer causes a phase difference between the two paths which is proportional to b. This talk will focus on the latest scattering length measurement for n-4He which ran at NIST in Fall/Winter 2010 and is currently being analyzed.

  18. High-precision atomic structure measurements in thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, M. H.; Holmes, C. D.; Uhl, R.; Majumder, P. K.

    2004-05-01

    Using a thallium atomic beam apparatus, we are undertaking a series of laser spectroscopy measurements with the goal of providing precise, independent cross-checks on the accuracy of new calculations of parity nonconservation in thallium(M. Kozlov et al.), Phys Rev. A64, 053107 (2001). In our apparatus, a laser beam interacts transversely with a dense, 2-cm-wide thallium beam and reveals roughly tenfold Doppler narrowing of the absorption profile. Having completed a new 0.4% measurement of the Stark shift within the 378 nm 6P_1/2-7S_1/2 E1 transition, we have now begun to study the weak 1283 nm 6P_1/2-6P_3/2 transition in the atomic beam. We seek to determine both Stark shift components, as well as the various components of the Stark-induced amplitude within this mixed M1/E2 transition. Using these existing laser systems, we have also begun a vapor cell spectroscopy study of the 1301 nm 7S_1/2-7P_1/2 E1 transition by means of a two-step excitation from the ground state. To enhance the visibility of these weak absorption signals, we are employing an FM spectroscopy technique. The demodulated laser transmission spectrum provides a low-noise, zero-background signal, and includes replicas of the absorption spectrum separated by the well-known RF sideband frequency, offering built-in frequency scale calibration.

  19. Qweak: A Precision Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    SciTech Connect

    David Armstrong; Todd Averett; James Birchall; James Bowman; Roger Carlini; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Charles Davis; J. Doornbos; James Dunne; Rolf Ent; Jens Erler; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; David Gaskell; Klaus Grimm; C. Hagner; F. Hersman; Maurik Holtrop; Kathleen Johnston; R.T. Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Cynthia Keppel; Elie Korkmaz; Stanley Kowalski; Lawrence Lee; Allison Lung; David Mack; Stanislaw Majewski; Gregory Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Norman Morgan; Allena Opper; Shelley Page; Seppo Penttila; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; William Ramsay; Michael Ramsey-musolf; Julie Roche; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Riad Suleiman; Simon Taylor; Willem Van Oers; Steven Wells; W.S. Wilburn; Stephen Wood; Carl Zorn

    2004-02-05

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam on a proton target. The experiment will measure the weak charge of the proton, and thus the weak mixing angle at low energy scale, providing a precision test of the Standard Model. Since the value of the weak mixing angle is approximately 1/4, the weak charge of the proton Q{sub w}{sup p} = 1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} is suppressed in the Standard Model, making it especially sensitive to the value of the mixing angle and also to possible new physics. The experiment is approved to run at JLab, and the construction plan calls for the hardware to be ready to install in Hall C in 2007. The theoretical context of the experiment and the status of its design are discussed.

  20. Results of precision mass measurements from CARIBU with the CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schelt, J.; Lascar, D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Greene, J. P.; Levand, A. F.; Sun, T.; Zabransky, B. J.; Caldwell, S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Chaudhuri, A.; Sharma, K. S.; Li, G.

    2011-10-01

    An array of neutron-rich nuclides from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) at ANL beyond 132Sn has been subjected to precision mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer, including many never-before-measured nuclides. Neutron-separation energies calculated directly from these results provide essential input to models of the astrophysical r-process. Trends in binding energies far from stability provide input to nuclear mass models and identify regions of deformation. Additional nuclear structure information can be extracted from symmetry energy and observations of isomeric states. Implications for all of these topics will be discussed as well as future plans with the more intense CARIBU source. This work performed under the auspices of NSERC, Canada, application number 216974, and the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Nos. DE-AC02- 06CH11357, DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-98ER41086 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; ...

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  2. Breaking Quantum and Thermal Limits on Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    I will give an overview of our efforts to use correlations and entanglement between many atoms to overcome quantum and thermal limits on precision measurements. In the first portion of my talk, I will present a path toward a 10000 times reduced sensitivity to the thermal mirror motion that limits the linewidth of today's best lasers. By utilizing narrow atomic transitions, the laser's phase information is primarily stored in the atomic gain medium rather than in the vibration-sensitive cavity field. To this end, I will present the first observation of lasing based on the mHz linewidth optical-clock transition in a laser-cooled ensemble of strontium atoms. In the second portion of my talk, I will describe how we use collective measurements to surpass the standard quantum limit on phase estimation 1 /√{ N} for N unentangled atoms. We achieve a directly observed reduction in phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit of as much as 17.7(6) dB. Supported by DARPA QuASAR, NIST, ARO, and NSF PFC. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1125844 Physics Frontier Center.

  3. Precise Measurement of the K - to Pi -E E- Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Munday, D.J.; Slater, M.W.; Wotton, S.A.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bocquet, G.; Cabibbo, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Cundy, D.; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; Norton, A.; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Vienna, OAW

    2011-11-22

    A sample of 7253 K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}e{sup +}e{sup -}({gamma}) decay candidates with 1.0% background contamination has been collected by the NA 48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, which allowed a precise measurement of the decay properties. The branching ratio in the full kinematic range was measured to be BR = (3.11 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -7}, where the uncertainty includes also the model dependence. The shape of the form factor W(z), where z = (M{sub ee}/M{sub K}){sup 2}, was parameterized according to several models, and, in particular, the slope {delta} of the linear form factor W(z) = W{sub 0}(1 + {delta}z) was determined to be {delta} = 2.32 {+-} 0.18. A possible CP violating asymmetry of K{sup +} and K{sup -} decay widths was investigated, and a conservative upper limit of 2.1 x 10{sup -2} at 90% CL was established.

  4. Precision measurement of the muon decay parameters {rho} and {delta}

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, R. P.; Gaponenko, A.; Quraan, M. A.; Bayes, R.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Faszer, W.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Grossheim, A.; Gumplinger, P.; Henderson, R. S.; Hillairet, A.; Hu, J.; Kitching, P.; Marshall, G. M.; Mischke, R. E.; Nozar, M.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Openshaw, R.

    2008-08-01

    The TWIST Collaboration has performed new measurements of two of the parameters that describe muon decay: {rho}, which governs the shape of the overall momentum spectrum, and {delta}, which governs the momentum dependence of the parity-violating decay asymmetry. This analysis gives the results {rho}=0.750 14{+-}0.000 17(stat){+-}0.000 44(syst){+-}0.000 11({eta}), where the last uncertainty arises from the correlation between {rho} and the decay parameter {eta}, and {delta}=0.750 67{+-}0.000 30(stat){+-}0.000 67(syst). These are consistent with the value of 3/4 given for both parameters in the standard model of particle physics, and are a factor of two more precise than the measurements previously published by TWIST. A new global analysis of all available muon decay data incorporating these results is presented. Improved lower and upper limits on the decay parameter P{sub {mu}}{sup {pi}}{xi} of 0.995 24

  5. Measuring Crustal Deformation in Europe by High Precision Geodetic VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Nothnagel, A.; Vennebusch, M.

    2002-06-01

    At the western tip of the Eurasian plate, the European continent is besieged by thrusting and receding neighbour plates causing deformations and ruptures of the Earth's crust evidenced by earthquakes and volcanic outbursts. Measuring the extent and progress of crustal deformation has become one of the primary tasks of geodesists and geophysicists. Realizing that Europe enjoys one of the densest networks of radio telescopes especially equipped for high precision, geodetic VLBI has provided the incentive to organise a campaign of regular geodetic VLBI observations in the European network of fixed radio telescopes. The measurements have been carried out since the late eighties at an average rate of six sessions per year. From these data, site coordinates, baseline length changes and station velocity vectors have been derived with steadily increasing accuracy. The overall picture of the observed present-day site motions emulates quite well the pattern of tectonic motions inferred from the geotectonic setting of central Europe and the western Mediterranean. Interesting details are emerging for horizontal motions of the three stations in Italy, which are strongly affected by the complex interactions between the different tectonic regimes in this area. The accuracy of the vertical components is also improving with increasing length of the observational record, allowing to detect significant trends among the relative vertical motions of the sites. The geodetic VLBI network operations have received supportive funding by the European Union under the 2nd and 4th Framework Programmes.

  6. A precise measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Brian N.

    2007-04-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. Events are selected from the single lepton plus jets final state (t$\\bar{t}$ → W+bW-$\\bar{b}$ → ℓvbq$\\bar{q}$'$\\bar{b}$). The top quark mass is extracted using a calculation of the probability density for a t$\\bar{t}$ final state to resemble a data event. This probability density is a function of both top quark mass and energy scale of calorimeter jets, constrained in situ with the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb-1 integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of top quark mass to date of 170.8 ± 2.2 (stat.) ± 1.4 (syst.) GeV/c2, where the quoted statistical uncertainty includes uncertainty from the determination of the jet energy scale.

  7. Ultra High Precision Laser Monitor for Oxygen Eddy Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Nelson, D. D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S. C.; McManus, J. B.; Jervis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric oxygen provides one of the most powerful tracers to study the carbon cycle through its close interaction with carbon dioxide. Keeling and co-workers demonstrated this at the global scale by using small variations in atmospheric oxygen content to disentangle oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks. It would be very exciting to apply similar ideas at the ecosystem level to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and our ability to predict the response of the biosphere and atmosphere to climate change. The eddy covariance technique is perhaps the most effective approach available to quantify the exchange of gases between these spheres. Therefore, eddy covariance flux measurements of oxygen would be extremely valuable. However, this requires a fast response (0.1 seconds), high relative precision (0.001% or 10 per meg) oxygen sensor. We report recent progress in developing such a sensor using a high resolution visible laser to probe the oxygen A-band electronic transition. This sensor will enable oxygen flux measurements using eddy covariance. In addition, we will incorporate a second laser in this instrument to simultaneously determine the fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor within the same sampling cell. This will provide a direct, real time measurement of the ratio of the flux of oxygen to that of carbon dioxide. This ratio is expected to vary on short time scales and small spatial scales due to the differing stoichiometry of processes producing and consuming carbon dioxide. Thus measuring the variations in the ratio of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes will provide mechanistic information to improve our understanding of the crucial exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere.

  8. Measurement of local chromatin compaction by spectral precision distance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Joachim; Hausmann, Michael; Solovei, Irina; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Christoph G.

    2000-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) offers an appropriate technique to specifically label any given chromatin region by multi spectrally labeled, specific DNA probes. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, quantitative measurements on the spatial distribution of labeling sites can be performed in 3D conserved cell nuclei. Recently, 'Spectral Precision Distance Microscopy' has been developed that allows 3D distance measurements between point-like fluorescence objects of different spectral signatures far beyond the diffraction limited resolution. In a well characterized and sequenced DNA region, the Prader- Willi/Angelman region q11-13 on chromosome 15, geometric distances between the fluorescence intensity bary centers of four different 'point-like' labeling sites were measured. More than 300 cell nuclei were evaluated with a 3D resolution equivalent better than 100 nm. The geometric bary center distances in nanometers were compared with the genomic bary center distance in kilobases (kb). A direct correlation, for instance linear correlation between geometric and genomic distances was not observed. From the measured values, a local compaction factor for the high order chromatin folding in the analyzed genome region was calculated. Along the 1000 kb chromatin segment analyzed, which spans nearly the compete Prader-Willi/Angelman region, different compaction factors were found. The compaction factor 40 typical for a straight 30 nm chromatin fiber was not observed. This shows that chromatin folding and compaction in intact nuclei may be more complex. With SPDM, however, a microscopical technique is available that can sensitively analyze chromatin organization in the 100 nm range in 3D conserved cell nuclei.

  9. Constraints on Lava Flow Emplacement Derived From Precision Topographic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Bjonnes, E. E.

    2005-12-01

    Precision topography obtained with a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) was used to derive constraints on the physical properties of two lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii. We used a Trimble 4800 DGPS to collect positional information across the lava flows with < 2 cm horizontal and < 4 cm vertical precision (but field tests show that points are usually repeatable to < 1 cm both horizontally and vertically). The DGPS data were overlaid on georeferenced aerial and satellite imaging data, allowing us to correlate the measured topographic points to field notes and photographs, as well as to the local setting evident in the vertical images. We combined field and imaging data for the eastern lobe of the 1907 basalt flow from the southwestern rift zone of Mauna Loa volcano, east of the Ocean View Estates subdivision, and for portions of a grass-covered Pleistocene benmoreite flow near Mana on the western flank of Mauna Kea volcano. Measured physical dimensions of the Hawaiian lava flows obtained from the DGPS data were then used to calculate the yield strength, average effusion rate, and effective viscosity of the lavas using published relationships derived from diverse theories of fluid flow. Yield strengths obtained from three different expressions ranged from 5800 to 56000 Pa for the Mauna Loa basalt flow and from 13000 to 28000 Pa for the Mauna Kea benmoreite flow. Total flow length could not be determined for the Mauna Kea flow, but the entire surface portion of the 1907 flow is well exposed; this allowed us to calculate an average effusion rate of 29 m/s and effective viscosities ranging from 17000 to 280000 Pa-s for this flow, broadly consistent with values published for the 1984 basalt flow from the eastern rift zone of Mauna Loa. These results improve our confidence in being able to derive similar constraints on the likely emplacement conditions of lava flows on other planets, such as the enormous lava flows commonly found on the martian, venusian

  10. A Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Relyea, D

    2004-05-13

    This thesis reports on E158, an experiment located in End Station A at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). E158 has made the first observation of the parity violating right-left asymmetry (A{sub PV}) in fixed-target low-Q{sup 2} Moeller scattering. At tree level, A{sub PV} (expected to be around -150 ppb) is directly proportional to 1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. A precision measurement of A{sub PV} at low Q{sup 2} allows the running of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} to be compared to the Standard Model prediction. Disagreements between the two might provide evidence for new physics at the TeV scale. This thesis presents the first physics data from E158, taken in the spring of 2002. The data were taken by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at 45.0 and 48.3 GeV off a liquid hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.027 GeV{sup 2}. A 60 meter long spectrometer/collimator system and a cooper-quartz calorimeter were used to detect the Moeller signal electrons. Both devices will be described in detail. The right-left parity violating asymmetry in Moeller scattering has been measured to be -152.3 {+-} 29.0(stat) {+-} 30.9(syst) ppb. The value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} derived from this measurement is 0.2370 {+-} 0.0025(stat) {+-} 0.0026(syst), in comparison with the Standard Model prediction of 0.2387 {+-} 0.0007.

  11. A precise measurement of the two-photon exchange effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam

    The two-photon exchange phenomenon is believed to be responsible for the discrepancy observed between the ratio of proton electric and magnetic form factors, measured by the Rosenbluth and polarization transfer methods. This disagreement is about a factor of three at Q 2 of 5.6 GeV2. The precise knowledge of the proton form factors is of critical importance in understanding the structure of this nucleon. The theoretical models that estimate the size of the two-photon exchange (TPE) radiative correction are poorly constrained. This factor was found to be directly measurable by taking the ratio of the electron-proton and positron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, as the TPE effect changes sign with respect to the charge of the incident particle. A test run of a modified beamline has been conducted with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This test run demonstrated the feasibility of producing a mixed electron/positron beam of good quality. Extensive simulations performed prior to the run were used to reduce the background rate that limits the production luminosity. A 3.3 GeV primary electron beam was used that resulted in an average secondary lepton beam of 1 GeV. As a result, the elastic scattering data of both lepton types were obtained at scattering angles up to 40 degrees for Q2 up to 1.5 GeV2. The cross section ratio displayed an epsilon dependence that was Q2 dependent at smaller Q2 limits. The magnitude of the average ratio as a function of epsilon was consistent with the previous measurements, and the elastic (Blunden) model to within the experimental uncertainties. Ultimately, higher luminosity is needed to extend the data range to lower epsilon where the TPE effect is predicted to be largest.

  12. Radio Telescopes' Precise Measurements Yield Rich Scientific Payoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Having the sharpest pictures always is a big advantage, and a sophisticated radio-astronomy technique using continent-wide and even intercontinental arrays of telescopes is yielding extremely valuable scientific results in a wide range of specialties. That's the message delivered to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas, by Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a leading researcher in the field of ultra-precise astronomical position measurements. Very Long Baseline Interferometry provides extremely high precision that can extend use of the parallax technique to many more celestial objects. Parallax is a direct means of measuring cosmic distances by detecting the slight shift in an object’s apparent position in the sky caused by Earth’s orbital motion. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Using radio telescopes, we are measuring distances and motions of celestial bodies with unprecedented accuracy. That's helping us better understand many processes ranging from star formation to the scale of the entire Universe," Reid said. The observing technique, called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), was pioneered in 1967, but has come into continuous use only in the past 10-15 years. The National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of 10 radio-telescope antennas ranging from Hawaii to the Caribbean, was dedicated in 1993. There are other VLBI systems in Europe and Asia, and large radio telescopes around the world cooperate regularly to increase sensitivity. VLBI observations routinely produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those made at visible-light wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope. Several groups of researchers from across the globe use the VLBA to study stellar nurseries in our own Milky Way Galaxy and measure distances to regions where new stars are forming. The key has been to improve measurement accuracy to a factor of a hundred times better than that produced by the

  13. Interferometric apparatus for ultra-high precision displacement measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A high-precision heterodyne interferometer measures relative displacement by creating a thermally-insensitive system generally not subject to polarization leakage. By using first and second light beams separated by a small frequency difference (.DELTA.f), beams of light at the first frequency (f.sub.0) are reflected by co-axial mirrors, the first mirror of which has a central aperture through which the light is transmitted to and reflected by the second mirror. Prior to detection, the light beams from the two mirrors are combined with light of the second and slightly different frequency. The combined light beams are separated according to the light from the mirrors. The change in phase (.DELTA..phi.) with respect to the two signals is proportional to the change in distance of Fiducial B by a factor of wavelength (.lambda.) divided by 4.pi. (.DELTA.L=.lambda..DELTA..phi.1/(4.pi.)). In a second embodiment, a polarizing beam splitting system can be used.

  14. A GPS measurement system for precise satellite tracking and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S.-C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is pursuing two key applications of differential positioning with the Global Positioning System (GPS): sub-decimeter tracking of earth satellites and few-centimeter determination of ground-fixed baselines. Key requirements of the two applications include the use of dual-frequency carrier phase data, multiple ground receivers to serve as reference points, simultaneous solution for use position and GPS orbits, and calibration of atmospheric delays using water vapor radiometers. Sub-decimeter tracking will be first demonstrated on the TOPEX oceanographic satellite to be launched in 1991. A GPS flight receiver together with at least six ground receivers will acquire delta range data from the GPS carriers for non-real-time analysis. Altitude accuracies of 5 to 10 cm are expected. For baseline measurements, efforts will be made to obtain precise differential pseudorange by resolving the cycle ambiguity in differential carrier phase. This could lead to accuracies of 2 or 3 cm over a few thousand kilometers. To achieve this, a high-performance receiver is being developed, along with improved calibration and data processing techniques. Demonstrations may begin in 1986.

  15. Force measurement enabling precise analysis by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) makes it possible to investigate specific interactions between two molecules such as ligand-receptor pairs at the single-molecule level. In the DFS method based on the Bell-Evans model, the unbinding force applied to a molecular bond is increased at a constant rate, and the force required to rupture the molecular bond is measured. By analyzing the relationship between the modal rupture force and the logarithm of the loading rate, microscopic potential barrier landscapes and the lifetimes of bonds can be obtained. However, the results obtained, for example, in the case of streptavidin/biotin complexes, have differed among previous studies and some results have been inconsistent with theoretical predictions. In this study, using an atomic force microscopy technique that enables the precise analysis of molecular interactions on the basis of DFS, we investigated the effect of the sampling rate on DFS analysis. The shape of rupture force histograms, for example, was significantly deformed at a sampling rate of 1 kHz in comparison with that of histograms obtained at 100 kHz, indicating the fundamental importance of ensuring suitable experimental conditions for further advances in the DFS method.

  16. Precision measurements of IVB parameters and bounds on new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltoni, M.

    2000-02-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is to discuss the impact of electroweak precision measurements on the present knowledge of particle physics, both in the framework of the Standard Model and of its most straightforward extensions. In Chapter 1 we give a general overview of the electroweak sector of the SM and of SUSY phenomenology. In Chapter 2 we deal with different definitions of the electroweak mixing angle, with particular attention to the relation between the phenomenological angle θ and the MS parameter hatθ. In Chapter 3 we use results found in the previous chapter to discuss in detail how both the decoupling and the non-decoupling approach to the running of coupling constants in the MS scheme produce the same numerical value of m_{GUT}, despite of the different initial conditions. In Chapter 4 we derive simple analytical formulas for the contribution of a chargino almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino to electroweak observables, showing that in the case of wino domination the study of oblique corrections allows a concrete improvement of experimental bounds on chargino mass. Finally, in Chapter 5 we consider the possibility of extra fermion generations, proving that they are strongly disfavoured by the present experimental data if all particles are heavier that Z-boson, while for the specific case of the extra neutrino around 50 GeV in mass (still allowed by experimental data) the quality of the fit is not worse than the SM.

  17. Precision and Accuracy of Topography Measurements on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, R.; Hurford, T. A.; Foley, M. A.; Varland, K.

    2007-03-01

    Reports of the death of the melt-through model for chaotic terrain on Europa have been greatly exaggerated, to paraphrase Mark Twain. They are based on topographic maps of insufficient quantitative accuracy and precision.

  18. An Ultra-Precise System for Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Adkins, Paula L

    2008-12-09

    The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of building and operating an ERT system that will allow measurement precision that is an order of magnitude better than existing systems on the market today and in particular if this can be done without significantly greater manufacturing or operating costs than existing commercial systems. Under this proposal, we performed an estimation of measurement errors in galvanic resistivity data that arise as a consequence of the type of electrode material used to make the measurements. In our laboratory, measurement errors for both magnitude and induced polarization (IP) were estimated using the reciprocity of data from an array of electrodes as might be used for electrical resistance tomography using 14 different metals as well as one non-metal - carbon. In a second phase of this study, using archival data from two long-term ERT surveys, we examined long-term survivability of electrodes over periods of several years. The survey sites were: the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (which was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy as part of the civilian radioactive waste management program), and a water infiltration test at a site adjacent to the New Mexico Institute of Mines and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico (sponsored by the Sandia/Tech vadose program). This enabled us to compare recent values with historical values and determine electrode performance over the long-term as well as the percentage of electrodes that have failed entirely. We have constructed a prototype receiver system, made modifications and revised the receiver design. The revised prototype uses a new 24 bit analog to digital converter from Linear Technologies with amplifier chips from Texas Instruments. The input impedance of the system will be increased from 107 Ohms to approximately 1010 Ohms. The input noise level of the system has been decreased to approximately 10 Nanovolts and system resolution to about 1 Nanovolt at

  19. Open Quantum Systems with Applications to Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieri, David

    A spectrally pure coherent light source is an important component in precision measurement applications, such as an atomic clock. The more spectrally pure the coherent light source, or the narrower the linewidth of its power spectrum, the better for atomic clock experiments. A coherent light light source, such as a laser, is intrinsically an open quantum system, meaning that it gains and loses energy from an external environment. The aim of this thesis is to study various open quantum systems in an attempt to discover a scheme in which an extremely spectrally pure coherent light source might be realized. Therefore, this thesis begins by introducing the two main approaches to treating open quantum systems, the quantum master equation approach, and the quantum Langevin equation approach. In addition to deriving these from first principles, many of the solution methods to these approaches are given and then demonstrated using computer simulations. These include the quantum jump algorithm, the quantum state diffusion algorithm, the cumulant expansion method, and the method of c-number Langevin equations. Using these methods, the theory of the crossover between lasing and steady state superradiance is presented. It is shown that lasing and steady state superradiance might be demonstrated in the same physical system, but in different parameter regimes. The parameter space between these two extreme limits is explored, and the benefits and drawbacks of operating a system at a given set of parameters, i.e. to achieve the most spectrally pure light source, are discussed. We also consider the phase stability of a laser that is locked to a cavity QED system comprised of atoms with an ultra-narrow optical transition. Although the atomic motion introduces Doppler broadening, the standing wave nature of the cavity causes saturated absorption, which can be used to achieve an extremely high degree of phase stabilization. The inhomogeneity introduced by finite atomic velocities can

  20. Application of Geo-refrenced Geophysical Measurements to Precision Agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop yield varies within a field because conventional farming manages fields uniformly with no consideration for spatial variability. Site-specific management units (SSMUs), a key component of precision agriculture, have been proposed as a means of handling the spatial variability of various factor...

  1. A 3-D Multilateration: A Precision Geodetic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Fliegel, H. F.; Jaffe, R. M.; Muller, P. M.; Ong, K. M.; Vonroos, O. H.

    1972-01-01

    A system was designed with the capability of determining 1-cm accuracy station positions in three dimensions using pulsed laser earth satellite tracking stations coupled with strictly geometric data reduction. With this high accuracy, several crucial geodetic applications become possible, including earthquake hazards assessment, precision surveying, plate tectonics, and orbital determination.

  2. Precision Teaching: Advancing Student Achievement through Daily Drill and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawers, Lois J.

    1983-01-01

    After reviewing the conceptual bases and practical application of precision teaching, this analysis traces its evolution as the Sacajawea Plan, reports on its implementation in central Oregon school districts, and details the costs and procedures of adoption. Developed by Ogden Lindsley from B. F. Skinner's work in operant conditioning and…

  3. Preparation of cold molecules for high-precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecules can be used to test fundamental physics. Such tests often require cold molecules for detailed spectroscopic analysis. Cooling internal degrees of freedom provides a high level of state-selectivity, with large populations in the molecular states of interest. Cold translational motion allows slow, bright beams to be created, allowing long interaction times. In this tutorial article we describe the common techniques for producing cold molecules for high-precision spectroscopy experiments. For each technique we give examples of its application in experiments that use molecular structure to probe fundamental physics, choosing one experiment in particular as a case study. We then discuss a number of new techniques, some currently under development, others proposed, that promise high flux sources of cold molecules applicable to precise spectroscopic tests of fundamental physics.

  4. Three-D multilateration: A precision geodetic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Ong, K. M.; Vonroos, O. H.; Shumate, M. S.; Jaffe, R. M.; Fliegel, H. F.; Muller, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    A technique of satellite geodesy for determining the relative three dimensional coordinates of ground stations within one centimeter over baselines of 20 to 10,000 kilometers is discussed. The system is referred to as 3-D Multilateration and has applications in earthquake hazard assessment, precision surveying, plate tectonics, and orbital mechanics. The accuracy is obtained by using pulsed lasers to obtain simultaneous slant ranges between several ground stations and a moving retroreflector with known trajectory for aiming the lasers.

  5. Corrections for Wavelength Variations in Precision Interferometric Displacement Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    intercomparison tech- niques by John Beers and Ted Doiron of the NIST Di- mensional Metrology Group (along with Jack Stone, one of the authors); we are indebted to...single-pass interferometer. Acknowledgments This research was funded in part by NIST’s computa- tional metrology project. Partial funding was also pro...Division of the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at NIST. Steven Phillips is the leader of the Large Scale Coordinate Metrology Group in the Precision

  6. Precise Proper-Motion Measurement of Solar Granulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    representation of the numerical method for the spatially localized cross correlation and displacement map. Two original granulation J(x) images obtained at times t...quadratic methods give displacements correct to a precision of - 10%. V. NOISE ANALYSIS We now dis,;uss a time series of solar granulation images taken with...estimate the extreme position of a function. To analyze these methods further, we digitized along the 45 diagonal the sample granulation photograph at 12

  7. Precision Measurements of Solar Energetic Particle Elemental Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spaceraft were used to determined, solar energetic particle abundances or upper limits for all elements with Z 30 from a combined set of 10 solar flares during the 1977 to 1982 time period. Statistically meaningful abundances were determined for several rare elements including P, C1, K, Ti and Mn, while the precision of the mean abundances for the more abundant elements was proved. When compared to solar photospheric spectroscopic abundances, these new SEP abundances more clearly exhibit the step-function dependence on first ionization potential previously reported.

  8. Realization of the wavepacket collapse and its relation with the measurement precision limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu-ming, Duan; Guang-can, Guo

    1996-12-01

    An interpretation of the wavepacket collapse (WPC) is given. We find a connection between the WPC and the measurement precision limitation caused by quantum fluctuation. A quantitative relation between the decay of the off-diagonal density matrix elements and the measurement precision limitation is obtained for any measurements.

  9. Measurements of atomic beam velocities with phase choppers and precision measurements of alkali atomic polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromada, Ivan, Jr.

    Atom interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and recombined to make interference fringes, now serve as precision measurement tools for several quantities in physics. Examples include measurements of Newton's constant, the fine structure constant, van der Waals potentials, and atomic polarizabilities. To make next-generation measurements of static electric dipole atomic polarizabilities with an atom beam interferometer, I worked on new methods to precisely measure the velocity distribution for atom beams. I will explain how I developed and used phase choppers to measure lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium atomic beam velocities with 0.07% accuracy. I also present new measurements of polarizability for these atoms. I classify systematic errors into two broad categories: (1) fractional errors that are similar for all different types of atoms in our experiments, and (2), errors that scale with de Broglie wavelength or inverse atomic momentum in our experiments. This distinction is important for estimating the uncertainty in our measurements of ratios of atomic polarizabilities, e.g., alpha Cs/alphaNa = 2.488(12).

  10. Do stochastic inhomogeneities affect dark-energy precision measurements?

    PubMed

    Ben-Dayan, I; Gasperini, M; Marozzi, G; Nugier, F; Veneziano, G

    2013-01-11

    The effect of a stochastic background of cosmological perturbations on the luminosity-redshift relation is computed to second order through a recently proposed covariant and gauge-invariant light-cone averaging procedure. The resulting expressions are free from both ultraviolet and infrared divergences, implying that such perturbations cannot mimic a sizable fraction of dark energy. Different averages are estimated and depend on the particular function of the luminosity distance being averaged. The energy flux being minimally affected by perturbations at large z is proposed as the best choice for precision estimates of dark-energy parameters. Nonetheless, its irreducible (stochastic) variance induces statistical errors on Ω(Λ)(z) typically lying in the few-percent range.

  11. Electronic measurement of variable torques in precision work technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maehr, M.

    1978-01-01

    Approaches for the determination of torques on the basis of length measurements are discussed. Attention is given to torque determinations in which the deformation of a shaft is measured, an electric measurement of the torsion angle, and an approach proposed by Buschmann (1970). Methods for a torque determination conducted with the aid of force measurements make use of piezoelectric approaches. The components used by these methods include a quartz crystal and a charge amplifier.

  12. Loss-induced limits to phase measurement precision with maximally entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Mark A.; Kaushik, Sumanth

    2007-05-15

    The presence of loss limits the precision of an approach to phase measurement using maximally entangled states, also referred to as NOON states. A calculation using a simple beam-splitter model of loss shows that, for all nonzero values L of the loss, phase measurement precision degrades with increasing number N of entangled photons for N sufficiently large. For L above a critical value of approximately 0.785, phase measurement precision degrades with increasing N for all values of N. For L near zero, phase measurement precision improves with increasing N down to a limiting precision of approximately 1.018L radians, attained at N approximately equal to 2.218/L, and degrades as N increases beyond this value. Phase measurement precision with multiple measurements and a fixed total number of photons N{sub T} is also examined. For L above a critical value of approximately 0.586, the ratio of phase measurement precision attainable with NOON states to that attainable by conventional methods using unentangled coherent states degrades with increasing N, the number of entangled photons employed in a single measurement, for all values of N. For L near zero this ratio is optimized by using approximately N=1.279/L entangled photons in each measurement, yielding a precision of approximately 1.340{radical}(L/N{sub T}) radians.

  13. Accuracy and precision of joint space width measurements in standard and macroradiographs of osteoarthritic knees.

    PubMed Central

    Buckland-Wright, J C; Macfarlane, D G; Williams, S A; Ward, R J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To improve the reproducibility and accuracy of joint space width (JSW) measurement as an assessment of cartilage loss in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee by determining how precision and accuracy of JSW measurement were altered by a computerised method of measurement, correction for radiographic magnification, radiography of the knee in the standing semiflexed view, and high definition macroradiography of the knee in the semiflexed view--taking JSW measurements from standard radiographs of OA knees in the extended view as the standard for comparison. METHODS--Twenty five OA and 10 nonarthritic knees were radiographed in the extended view and minimum JSW was measured manually. Conventional and x5 macroradiographs were taken in the semiflexed view. All radiographs were taken twice on the same day and repeated two weeks later. Automated computerised measurement of minimum JSW was obtained from digitally stored images of all radiographs. RESULTS--For medial compartment JSW measurements, computerised was more accurate than manual, correction for radiographic magnification improved precision and accuracy, measurements in the semiflexed view were more precise and accurate, and macroradiography increased measurement precision. For the lateral compartment JSW measurements, correction for radiographic magnification improved precision and accuracy, and the semiflexed view improved precision only. CONCLUSIONS--Protocols defining radiographic and mensural procedures are essential for quality control of knee radiography in the semiflexed view to permit accurate and reproducible measurement of JSW. Macroradiography provides greater precision of JSW measurement. Images PMID:7492235

  14. Precise Measurement of Lunar Spectral Irradiance at Visible Wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, CE; Lykke, KR; Woodward, JT; Smith, AW

    2013-01-01

    We report a measurement of lunar spectral irradiance with an uncertainty below 1 % from 420 nm to 1000 nm. This measurement uncertainty meets the stability requirement for many climate data records derived from satellite images, including those for vegetation, aerosols, and snow and ice albedo. It therefore opens the possibility of using the Moon as a calibration standard to bridge gaps in satellite coverage and validate atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Our measurement technique also yields detailed information about the atmosphere at the measurement site, suggesting that lunar observations are a possible solution for aerosol monitoring during the polar winter and can provide nighttime measurements to complement aerosol data collected with sun photometers. Our measurement, made with a novel apparatus, is an order of magnitude more accurate than the previous state-of-the-art and has continuous spectral coverage, removing the need to interpolate between filter passbands. PMID:26401440

  15. Precise Measurement of Lunar Spectral Irradiance at Visible Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Cramer, C E; Lykke, K R; Woodward, J T; Smith, A W

    2013-01-01

    We report a measurement of lunar spectral irradiance with an uncertainty below 1 % from 420 nm to 1000 nm. This measurement uncertainty meets the stability requirement for many climate data records derived from satellite images, including those for vegetation, aerosols, and snow and ice albedo. It therefore opens the possibility of using the Moon as a calibration standard to bridge gaps in satellite coverage and validate atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Our measurement technique also yields detailed information about the atmosphere at the measurement site, suggesting that lunar observations are a possible solution for aerosol monitoring during the polar winter and can provide nighttime measurements to complement aerosol data collected with sun photometers. Our measurement, made with a novel apparatus, is an order of magnitude more accurate than the previous state-of-the-art and has continuous spectral coverage, removing the need to interpolate between filter passbands.

  16. Radiographic measurement of the posterior femoral offset is not precise.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Honecker, Sophie; Chammai, Yves

    2017-08-01

    The posterior femoral offset may significantly impact the final flexion range after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of the present study was to compare a conventional, radiologic-based technique with an intra-operative, surgical navigation-based technique for the measurement of posterior femoral offset. The tested hypothesis was that the two measurement techniques produce different results both before and after TKA. One-hundred consecutive cases referred for end-stage knee osteoarthritis have been studied. Posterior femoral offsets, measured pre- and post-TKA from radiographs, as well as those measured from a navigation system intra-operatively, were analysed. The pre-TKA measured offsets, post-TKA measured offsets and the changes (pre- vs. post-TKA) in the offsets were statistically compared between the radiologic and the navigated measurement techniques at a 0.05 level of significance. The mean paired difference between pre-TKA radiologic and navigated measurement was 4 ± 4 mm (p < 0.001). There was a significant and moderate positive correlation with a good coherence between the two measurements. The mean paired difference between post-TKA radiologic and navigated measurement was 6 ± 5 mm (p < 0.001). There was a significant and moderate positive correlation but a poor coherence between the two measurements. The conventional radiologic technique for the measurement of the posterior femoral offset cannot be reliably used either for pre-TKA planning of the posterior femoral resection and antero-posterior sizing of the femoral component, or for post-TKA quality control of the reconstruction of the posterior femoral offset. Level IV.

  17. High-Precision Nucleation Rate Measurements for Higher Melting Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokeloh, Joachim; Wilde, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Nucleation of a crystal in undercooled melts of higher melting face-centered-cubic-metals has often been studied in the past. However, the data available were not of sufficient accuracy and only covered nucleation rates in too small of a range to allow precise conclusions concerning the nature of the underlying process as well as concerning important parameters such as the solid-liquid interface free energy that can in principle be deducted from such analyses. One way to circumvent ambiguities and analyze nucleation kinetics under well-defined conditions experimentally is given by performing statistically significant numbers of repeated single droplet experiments. Application of proper statistics analyses yields nucleation rates that are independent of a specific nucleation model. The first studies that were conducted in accordance with this approach on pure model materials revealed that the approach is valid. The results are comparable to those obtained by classic nucleation theory applied to experimental data, and it was shown that one might need to rethink the common assumption that heterogeneous nucleation is almost always responsible for solidification initiation. The current results also show that often-used models for the solid-liquid interface free energy might lead to overestimated values.

  18. Precise on-line position measurement for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Actis, O.; Meer, D.; König, S.

    2014-12-01

    An on-line beam position monitoring and regular beam stability tests are of utmost importance for the Quality Assurance (QA) of the patient treatment at any particle therapy facility. The Gantry 2 at the Paul Scherrer Institute uses a strip ionization chamber for the on-line beam position verification. The design of the strip chamber placed in the beam in front of the patient allows for a small beam penumbra in order to achieve a high-quality lateral beam delivery. The position error of 1 mm in a lateral plane (plane perpendicular to the beam direction) can result in a dose inhomogeneity of more than 5%. Therefore the goal of Gantry 2 commissioning was to reach a sub-millimeter level of the reconstruction accuracy in order to bring a dose uncertainty to a level of 1%. In fact, we observed that for beams offered by Gantry 2 signal profiles in a lateral plane can be reconstructed with a precision of 0.1 mm. This is a necessary criterion to perform a reliable patient treatment. The front end electronics and the whole data processing sequence have been optimized for minimizing the dead time in between two consecutive spots to about 2 ms: the charge collection is performed in about 1 ms, read-out takes place in about 100μs while data verification and logging are completed in less than 1 ms.

  19. The study of precision measurement of pelvis spatial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiang; Ouyang, Jianfei; Qu, Xinghua

    2009-12-01

    Osteometry is fundamental for anthropometry. It provides the key technology and value to the study of palaeoanthropology, medicine, and criminal investigation. The traditional osteometry that has been widely accepted and used since 18th century has no longer met the information demand for modern research and application. It is significant and necessary to create an advanced 3-dimensional osteometry technique for anthropometry. This paper presents a new quick and accurate method to measure human pelvis through mathematical modeling. The pelvis is a complex combination of bones, which consists of three connected parts: hipbones, sacrum, and coccyx. There are over 40 items to be measured for the 1-dimension characteristics. In this paper, a combined measuring technology is developed for pelvis measurement. It uses machine vision systems and a portable measuring arm to obtain key geometry parameters of the pelvis. The mathematics models of the pelvis spatial structure and its parts are created through the process of data collecting, digging, assembling, and modeling. The experiment shows that the proposed technology can meet traditional osteometry and obtain entire 1D geometric parameters of the pelvis, such as maximum breadth and height, diameter of obstetric conjugata, inclination angle, and sakralneigungswinkel, etc. at the same time after modeling. Besides making the measurements above, the proposed technology can measure the geometry characteristics of pelvis and its parts, such as volume, surface area, curvature, and spatial structure, which are almost impossible for traditional technology. The overall measuring error is less than 0.1mm.

  20. The study of precision measurement of pelvis spatial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiang; Ouyang, Jianfei; Qu, Xinghua

    2010-03-01

    Osteometry is fundamental for anthropometry. It provides the key technology and value to the study of palaeoanthropology, medicine, and criminal investigation. The traditional osteometry that has been widely accepted and used since 18th century has no longer met the information demand for modern research and application. It is significant and necessary to create an advanced 3-dimensional osteometry technique for anthropometry. This paper presents a new quick and accurate method to measure human pelvis through mathematical modeling. The pelvis is a complex combination of bones, which consists of three connected parts: hipbones, sacrum, and coccyx. There are over 40 items to be measured for the 1-dimension characteristics. In this paper, a combined measuring technology is developed for pelvis measurement. It uses machine vision systems and a portable measuring arm to obtain key geometry parameters of the pelvis. The mathematics models of the pelvis spatial structure and its parts are created through the process of data collecting, digging, assembling, and modeling. The experiment shows that the proposed technology can meet traditional osteometry and obtain entire 1D geometric parameters of the pelvis, such as maximum breadth and height, diameter of obstetric conjugata, inclination angle, and sakralneigungswinkel, etc. at the same time after modeling. Besides making the measurements above, the proposed technology can measure the geometry characteristics of pelvis and its parts, such as volume, surface area, curvature, and spatial structure, which are almost impossible for traditional technology. The overall measuring error is less than 0.1mm.

  1. Precision Measurement of the Singlet Positronium Decay Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ramadhan, Ali Hassan

    This is a new measurement of the annihilation decay rate, lambda_{S}, of parapositronium (p-Ps) as a test of quantum electrodynamics (QED). The measured value is lambda_ {S} = (7991.5 +/- 1.7) mu s^{-1}. At 210 ppm accuracy this result is 6.5 times more accurate than the previous measurement and is the first measurement sensitive enough to test the relative order alpha ^2lnalpha term in the QED calculation of lambda_{S}. This measurement, which is in agreement with theory, is particularly interesting in light of the 1500 ppm discrepancy between theory and experiment that still exists in the decay rate, lambda_{T}, of orthopositronium (o-Ps). This measurement is made using beta -decay positrons from a ^{68 }Ge-^{68}Ga source which form positronium in a variety of gas mixtures. The time interval between the emission of a positron and the detection of the annihilation gamma -ray is measured with a time-to-digital converter. The distribution of the time intervals is collected as an annihilation lifetime spectrum. lambda_{S } is measured indirectly by using magnetic mixing. In a magnetic field the m = 0 ground states mix to produce a state, o-Ps^', which has a faster decay rate, lambda_sp {T}{'}. Hence, at any gas density, rho, the histogram is fitted to two exponential components with decay rates, lambda_{T}(rho) and lambda_sp{T}{' }(rho). A quantity, Lambda( rho), linear in the gas density and equal to lambda_{S} at zero density, is calculated from the two measured decay rates and the value of the magnetic field. It is found that Lambda(rho) has a small slope due to spin exchange quenching in the gas. This slope is measured in a separate experiment and a correction is made for this. The quantity lambda_{S } is separately measured in N_2 and CO_2 (each mixed with various small percentages of isobutane) over a wide range of pressures and at two values of the magnetic field. The measured values of lambda_{S } are in agreement. The measurement in CO _2 is considered as a

  2. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: Precision and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Davis, J.L.; Svarc, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million.

  3. Precise synchronization of phasor measurements in electric power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phadke, Arun G.

    1990-01-01

    Phasors representing positive sequence voltages and currents in a power network are in the most important parameters in several monitoring, control, and protection functions in interconnected electric power networks. Recent advances in computer relaying have led to very efficient and accurate phasor measurement systems. When the phasors to be measured are separated by hundreds of miles, it becomes necessary to synchronize the measurement processes, so that a consistent description of the state of the power system can be established. Global Positioning System (GPS) transmissions offer an ideal source for synchronization of phasor measurements. The concept and implementation of this technique are described. Several uses of synchronized phasor measurements are also described. Among these are improved state estimation algorithms, state estimator enhancements, dynamic state estimates, improved control techniques, and improved protection concepts.

  4. Development of Methods Precision Length Measurement Using Transported Laser Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, E. A.; Epikhin, V. M.; Mazur, M. M.; Suddenok, Y. A.; Shorin, V. N.

    The paper shows the results of a comparison of a developed transported laser interferometer (TLI) with a measurement interferometer XL-80 Renishaw at the distance 0-60 meters. Testings of a breadboard model of the TLI showed that a difference between the travel measurements of the two interferometers does not exceed 6 μm. The mean value of the difference of indications between the TLI and a Renishaw travel measurer at the distance near 58 m approximately equals to 0,5 μm. Root-mean square deviation of the indications of the interferometers approximately equals to 3 μm. At comparison of the sections with the same name between the TLI and the Renishaw travel measurer, measured at different days, a repeatability of the results for the sections with the same name is noted.

  5. Precision frequency measurement of visible intercombination lines of strontium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Cancio, P; Drullinger, R; Giusfredi, G; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Toninelli, C; Tino, G M

    2003-12-12

    We report the direct frequency measurement of the visible 5s(2) 1S0-5s5p 3P1 intercombination line of strontium that is considered a possible candidate for a future optical-frequency standard. The frequency of a cavity-stabilized laser is locked to the saturated fluorescence in a thermal Sr atomic beam and is measured with an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through a global positioning system signal. The 88Sr transition is measured to be at 434 829 121 311 (10) kHz. We measure also the 88Sr-86Sr isotope shift to be 163 817.4 (0.2) kHz.

  6. Generating high precision ionospheric ground-truth measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila (Inventor); Sparks, Lawrence (Inventor); Mannucci, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method, apparatus and article of manufacture provide ionospheric ground-truth measurements for use in a wide-area augmentation system (WAAS). Ionospheric pseudorange/code and carrier phase data as primary observables is received by a WAAS receiver. A polynomial fit is performed on the phase data that is examined to identify any cycle slips in the phase data. The phase data is then leveled. Satellite and receiver biases are obtained and applied to the leveled phase data to obtain unbiased phase-leveled ionospheric measurements that are used in a WAAS system. In addition, one of several measurements may be selected and data is output that provides information on the quality of the measurements that are used to determine corrective messages as part of the WAAS system.

  7. High precision speed measurement by using interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ávila, M. A.; Ochoa Valiente, R.; García Trujillo, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the experimental realization of speed measurement by the use of a two wave interferometer and digital signal processing techniques. We built an automated Michelson interferometer and using an He-Ne laser and with the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and computer algorithms we derived a method for finding the speed of displacement. We report uncertainties in the order of 2-3 μm/s. with the use of this procedure. This brings the potential of another physical variable measurement like distance or pressure by this indirect measurement method. This approach is compared with an ultrasonic Logger Pro ® speed measurement system, and the results are compared between systems.

  8. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eronen, Tommi

    2011-11-01

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  9. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    SciTech Connect

    Eronen, Tommi; Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  10. Precision Measurement of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant by Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, G.; D'Amico, G.; Tino, G. M.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    We report on the latest determination of the Newtonian gravitational constant G using our atom interferometry gravity gradiometer. After a short introduction on the G measurement issue we will provide a description of the experimental method employed, followed by a discussion of the experimental results in terms of sensitivity and systematic effects. Finally, prospects for future cold atom-based experiments devoted to the measurement of this fundamental constant are reported.

  11. Intercomparison of snow density measurements: bias, precision and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Rutter, N.; Fierz, C.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-07-01

    Density is a fundamental property of porous media such as snow. A wide range of snow properties and physical processes are linked to density, but few studies have addressed the uncertainty in snow density measurements. No study has yet considered the recent advances in snow measurement methods such as micro-computed tomography (CT). During the MicroSnow Davos 2014 workshop different approaches to measure snow density were applied in a controlled laboratory environment and in the field. Overall, the agreement between CT and gravimetric methods (density cutters) was 5 to 9 %, with a bias of -5 to 2 %, expressed as percentage of the mean CT density. In the field, the density cutters tend to overestimate (1 to 6 %) densities below and underestimate (1 to 6 %) densities above 296 to 350 kg m-3, respectively, depending on the cutter type. Using the mean per layer of all measurement methods applied in the field (CT, box, wedge and cylinder cutter) and ignoring ice layers, the variation of layer density between the methods was 2 to 5 % with a bias of -1 to 1 %. In general, our result suggests that snow densities measured by different methods agree within 9 %. However, the density profiles resolved by the measurement methods differed considerably. In particular, the millimeter scale density variations revealed by the high resolution CT contrasted the thick layers with sharp boundaries introduced by the observer. In this respect, the unresolved variation, i.e. the density variation within a layer, which is lost by sampling with lower resolution or layer aggregation, is critical when snow density measurements are used as boundary or initial conditions in numerical simulations.

  12. Precision lifetime measurements by single-proton counting

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Hill, W.T. III; Leone, S.R.

    1995-08-01

    There is renewed interest in the accurate measurement of lifetimes of excited states in alkalis in order to test ab initio theories which are needed for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation measurements. While it is often assumed that the fast-beam laser method yields the most accurate lifetimes, we demonstrated that an alternative technique, time-correlated single-photon counting, is capable of achieving comparable accuracy. Using this method at JILA, we measured the lifetimes of the 6p {sup 2}p{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels in atomic Cs with accuracies {approx}0.2-0.3%. A high-repetition rate, femtosecond, self-modelocked Ti:sapphire laser is used to excite Cs produced in a well-collimated atomic beam. The time interval between the excitation pulse and the arrival of a fluorescence photon is measured repetitively until the desired statistics are obtained. The lifetime results are 34.75(7) ns and 30.41(10) ns for the 6p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels, respectively. These lifetimes are in agreement with those extracted from ab initio many-ody perturbation theory calculations at the sub 1% level. The measurement errors are dominated by systematic effects, and methods to alleviate these and approach an accuracy of 0.1% were determined.

  13. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  14. Diffraction correction for precision surface acoustic wave velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz M., Alberto; Nagy, Peter B.

    2002-09-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements can be used to nondestructively characterize shot-peened, laser shock-peened, burnished, and otherwise surface-treated specimens. In recent years, there have been numerous efforts to separate the contribution of surface roughness from those of near-surface material variations, such as residual stress, texture, and increased dislocation density. As the accuracy of the dispersion measurements was gradually increased using state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic scanning and sophisticated digital signal processing methods, it was recognized that a perceivable dispersive effect, similar to the one found on rough shot-peened specimens, is exhibited by untreated smooth surfaces as well. This dispersion effect is on the order of 0.1%, that is significantly higher than the experimental error associated with the measurements and comparable to the expected velocity change produced by near-surface compressive residual stresses in metals below their yield point. This paper demonstrates that the cause of this apparent dispersion is the diffraction of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) as it travels over the surface of the specimen. The results suggest that a diffraction correction may be introduced to increase the accuracy of surface wave dispersion measurements. A simple diffraction correction model was developed for surface waves and this correction was subsequently validated by laser-interferometric velocity measurements on aluminum specimens. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  16. Effects of partial-collapse measurement on the parameter-estimation precision of noisy quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiang-Ping; Fang, Mao-Fa; Zhou, Xin

    2017-10-01

    An efficient method is proposed to enhance the parameter-estimation precision for noisy quantum channels based on measurement reversal from partial-collapse measurement. It is shown that the quantum Fisher information can be distinctly improved for amplitude-damping channel, phase-damping channel and depolarizing channel with partial-collapse measurement. This also means that choosing the appropriate measurement strengths can lead to higher precision of estimation on noisy quantum channels.

  17. Precision Solar Neutrino Measurements with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, Noah

    2007-10-26

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is the first experiment to measure the total flux of active, high-energy neutrinos from the sun. Results from SNO have solved the long-standing 'Solar Neutrino Problem' by demonstrating that neutrinos change flavor. SNO measured the total neutrino flux with the neutral-current interaction of solar neutrinos with 1000 tonnes of D{sub 2}O. In the first two phases of the experiment we detected the neutron from that interaction by capture on deuterium and capture on chlorine, respectively. In the third phase an array of {sup 3}He proportional counters was deployed in the detector. This allows a measurement of the neutral-current neutrons that is independent of the Cherenkov light detected by the PMT array. We are currently developing a unique, detailed simulation of the current pulses from the proportional-counter array that will be used to help distinguish signal and background pulses.

  18. Precise mean sea level measurements using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelecy, Thomas M.; Born, George H.; Parke, Michael E.; Rocken, Christian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a sea level measurement test conducted off La Jolla, California, in November of 1991. The purpose of this test was to determine accurate sea level measurements using a Global Positioning System (GPS) equipped buoy. These measurements were intended to be used as the sea level component for calibration of the ERS 1 satellite altimeter. Measurements were collected on November 25 and 28 when the ERS 1 satellite overflew the calibration area. Two different types of buoys were used. A waverider design was used on November 25 and a spar design on November 28. This provided the opportunity to examine how dynamic effects of the measurement platform might affect the sea level accuracy. The two buoys were deployed at locations approximately 1.2 km apart and about 15 km west of a reference GPS receiver located on the rooftop of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. GPS solutions were computed for 45 minutes on each day and used to produce two sea level time series. An estimate of the mean sea level at both locations was computed by subtracting tide gage data collected at the Scripps Pier from the GPS-determined sea level measurements and then filtering out the high-frequency components due to waves and buoy dynamics. In both cases the GPS estimate differed from Rapp's mean altimetric surface by 0.06 m. Thus, the gradient in the GPS measurements matched the gradient in Rapp's surface. These results suggest that accurate sea level can be determined using GPS on widely differing platforms as long as care is taken to determine the height of the GPS antenna phase center above water level. Application areas include measurement of absolute sea level, of temporal variations in sea level, and of sea level gradients (dominantly the geoid). Specific applications would include ocean altimeter calibration, monitoring of sea level in remote regions, and regional experiments requiring spatial and

  19. Precise mean sea level measurements using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelecy, Thomas M.; Born, George H.; Parke, Michael E.; Rocken, Christian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a sea level measurement test conducted off La Jolla, California, in November of 1991. The purpose of this test was to determine accurate sea level measurements using a Global Positioning System (GPS) equipped buoy. These measurements were intended to be used as the sea level component for calibration of the ERS 1 satellite altimeter. Measurements were collected on November 25 and 28 when the ERS 1 satellite overflew the calibration area. Two different types of buoys were used. A waverider design was used on November 25 and a spar design on November 28. This provided the opportunity to examine how dynamic effects of the measurement platform might affect the sea level accuracy. The two buoys were deployed at locations approximately 1.2 km apart and about 15 km west of a reference GPS receiver located on the rooftop of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. GPS solutions were computed for 45 minutes on each day and used to produce two sea level time series. An estimate of the mean sea level at both locations was computed by subtracting tide gage data collected at the Scripps Pier from the GPS-determined sea level measurements and then filtering out the high-frequency components due to waves and buoy dynamics. In both cases the GPS estimate differed from Rapp's mean altimetric surface by 0.06 m. Thus, the gradient in the GPS measurements matched the gradient in Rapp's surface. These results suggest that accurate sea level can be determined using GPS on widely differing platforms as long as care is taken to determine the height of the GPS antenna phase center above water level. Application areas include measurement of absolute sea level, of temporal variations in sea level, and of sea level gradients (dominantly the geoid). Specific applications would include ocean altimeter calibration, monitoring of sea level in remote regions, and regional experiments requiring spatial and

  20. Improving Measurement Precision of Hierarchical Latent Traits Using Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Many latent traits in social sciences display a hierarchical structure, such as intelligence, cognitive ability, or personality. Usually a second-order factor is linearly related to a group of first-order factors (also called domain abilities in cognitive ability measures), and the first-order factors directly govern the actual item responses.…

  1. Improving Measurement Precision of Hierarchical Latent Traits Using Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Many latent traits in social sciences display a hierarchical structure, such as intelligence, cognitive ability, or personality. Usually a second-order factor is linearly related to a group of first-order factors (also called domain abilities in cognitive ability measures), and the first-order factors directly govern the actual item responses.…

  2. Improved measurement precision in decay time-based phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Nada, F.; Knappe, C.; Aldén, M.; Richter, M.

    2016-06-01

    This study comprises a continuation of the previous efforts of the authors to characterize different sources of errors in phosphor thermometry based on the determination of luminescence decays from thermographic phosphors. Whereas earlier investigations focused on point detectors utilizing different sensor technology, this work presents a comparison of four PMTs that are identical in terms of their product type. These detectors are supposedly identical, but the investigations revealed that their response is strictly individual. This study also shows a linear excitation energy dependence for the decay time of cadmium tungstate (CdWO4), the phosphor being used in this work. In addition, the potential influence of the intense and short fluorescence peak preceding the weaker and longer exponential decay in some phosphor materials was investigated using the electrical signal gating capability of the PMT. Finally, the evaluated decay time also appeared to be affected by the oscilloscope settings used when recording the phosphorescence signals. The presented results indicate that all operating parameters from the calibration measurement need to be rigorously reproduced in order to avoid systematic temperature errors in phosphor thermometry experiments that are based on reproducible measurements of the decay time. These results should be of more general interest also outside the phosphor community as the findings, presented herein, in principal concern all kinds of measurements that are dependent on reproducible measurements of signal shapes or time transients.

  3. A device for precision dimensional measurement of superconducting cable

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.; Bossert, R.; Fisk, E.; Mantsch, P.; Riley, R.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schmidt, E.E. Jr.

    1986-05-19

    A need for continuous sampling of the dimensions of superconducting cable has lead to the development of a machine for that purpose. This device measures average thickness, width, and keystone angle for a wide variety of cable sizes while under the mechanical loading anticipated in the final coil structure. Linear dimensions can be measured to {plus minus}0.0001 in. and angle to {plus minus}0. 01{degree}. Cable can be measured with and without insulation. Loading is variable up to 25 ksi. This device has applications in epoxy free coil winding where the cable dimensions must be well understood before coil winding in order to predict the size of the finished coil package. As a diagnostic device, it has application in the cable making process to help understand causes for subtle inconsistencies in cable dimensions. A possible quality control application exists. Current cable quality control requires destructive techniques with very small samplings, usually two samples for 5000 ft of cable. We have evaluated device performance by repeated measurements of lengths of SSC cable. 7 figs.

  4. High Precision Measurement of the Avogadro Constant Based on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes an attempt to replace the present definition of the kilogram with the mass of a certain number of carbon atoms. This requires determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, with a relative uncertainty of 1 × 10-8. Silicon crystals are used in this determination. At present, a limiting factor is the measurement of the average molar mass of natural Si. Consequently, a worldwide collaboration has been set up, to produce, approximately, 5 kg of 28Si single-crystal with an enrichment greater than 99.985% and of sufficient chemical purity to be used for the determination of NA with a target relative measurement uncertainty better than 2 × 10-8.

  5. Strain tensors in layer systems by precision ion channeling measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trinkaus, H.; Buca, D.; Hollaender, B.; Minamisawa, R. A.; Mantl, S.; Hartmann, J. M.

    2010-06-15

    A powerful method for analyzing general strain states in layer systems is the measurement of changes in the ion channeling directions. We present a systematic derivation and compilation of the required relations between the strain induced angle changes and the components of the strain tensor for general crystalline layer systems of reduced symmetry compared to the basic (cubic) crystal. It is shown that, for the evaluation of channeling measurements, virtually all layers of interest may be described as being 'pseudo-orthorhombic'. The commonly assumed boundary conditions and the effects of surface misorientations on them are discussed. Asymmetric strain relaxation in layers of reduced symmetry is attributed to a restriction in the slip system of the dislocations inducing it. The results are applied to {l_brace}110{r_brace}SiGe/Si layer systems.

  6. High precision measurement and analysis of colloidal monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Graham; Zhao, Yongxi; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an imaging algorithm for analyzing colloidal monolayers, including the measurement of particle-to-particle distances with nanometer-scale resolution, the automated detection of defects and edges, as well as determining the uniformity of the colloid size distribution. The algorithm also allows for the automatic detection and measurement of scaling introduced by non-square detector pixels - a common problem in imaging. As an application, we demonstrate the use of this method for spatially calibrating digital video microscopy systems that can be applied in situations where conventional methods may be inappropriate. Here, we provide an overview of the workings of the algorithm, which we have made freely available. PMID:20353161

  7. Precision Timing and Measurement for Inference with Laser and Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Cj ) for j = 1 . . N , where Cj = (CRj , CGj , CBj ) is an RGB colour vector and N = h × w. Suppose we have a set of laser range measurements, r, with...estimated range is written as R̂j = (Xj, Yj, r̂j, Cj ) and called 71 Figure 5.3: A rectified image with laser measurements superimposed. Note the...Range r̂j is chosen to maximize the likelihood p(Pj,Ri) ∝ e − (Xj−Xi) 2+(Yj−Yi)2 σ2 d − ‖ Cj −Ci‖ 2 σ2c (5.2) where σd is a variance for pixel distance and

  8. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  9. Precision measurement of the local bias of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Lazeyras, Titouan; Wagner, Christian; Schmidt, Fabian; Baldauf, Tobias E-mail: cwagner@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: fabians@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2016-02-01

    We present accurate measurements of the linear, quadratic, and cubic local bias of dark matter halos, using curved 'separate universe' N-body simulations which effectively incorporate an infinite-wavelength overdensity. This can be seen as an exact implementation of the peak-background split argument. We compare the results with the linear and quadratic bias measured from the halo-matter power spectrum and bispectrum, and find good agreement. On the other hand, the standard peak-background split applied to the Sheth and Tormen (1999) and Tinker et al. (2008) halo mass functions matches the measured linear bias parameter only at the level of 10%. The prediction from the excursion set-peaks approach performs much better, which can be attributed to the stochastic moving barrier employed in the excursion set-peaks prediction. We also provide convenient fitting formulas for the nonlinear bias parameters b{sub 2}(b{sub 1}) and b{sub 3}(b{sub 1}), which work well over a range of redshifts.

  10. Precise Measurement of the 21+ Level Lifetime in 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Bader, V. M.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E. M.; Morse, C.; Recchia, F.; Whitmore, K.

    2013-10-01

    For many years, it has been suggested that 12Be exhibits a breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap. This reflects the tension between the propensity for alpha-clustering in beryllium, with 12Be appearing as a 2-alpha dumb bell bound by a cloud of four poorly bound neutrons, and a more conventional Shell Model picture with the N = 8 neutrons filling the p-shell and holding the nucleus to a near spherical shape. To provide a better understanding of the extent of the breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap, the lifetime of the first 2+ state in 12Be was measured using intermediate-energy inelastic scattering of a 12Be beam combined with the Doppler Shift attenuation method. Gamma rays emitted at the target position were measured with GRETINA in coincidence with reaction residues detected in the S800 spectrometer at NSCL. Three different targets were measured, allowing for consistency checks and a better understanding of systematic effects. Preliminary results on the B(E2) transition strength from the first 2+ state will be presented. Work supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  11. An experimental assembly for precise measurement of thermal accommodation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John R.; Gallis, Michael A.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thermal accommodation coefficients for a variety of gas-surface combinations. Results are obtained primarily through measurement of the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Measured heat-flux data are used in a formula based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations to determine the coefficients. The assembly also features a complementary capability for measuring the variation in gas density between the plates using electron-beam fluorescence. Surface materials examined include 304 stainless steel, gold, aluminum, platinum, silicon, silicon nitride, and polysilicon. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness, and surface contamination have been investigated with this system; the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Without special cleaning procedures, thermal accommodation coefficients for most materials and surface finishes were determined to be near 0.95, 0.85, and 0.45 for argon, nitrogen, and helium, respectively. Surface cleaning by in situ argon-plasma treatment reduced coefficient values by up to 0.10 for helium and by ˜0.05 for nitrogen and argon. Results for both single-species and gas-mixture experiments compare favorably to DSMC simulations.

  12. A Superconducting Magnet UCN Trap for Precise Neutron Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Picker, R; Altarev, I; Bröcker, J; Gutsmiedl, E; Hartmann, J; Müller, A; Paul, S; Schott, W; Trinks, U; Zimmer, O

    2005-01-01

    Finite-element methods along with Monte Carlo simulations were used to design a magnetic storage device for ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure their lifetime. A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from β-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency. Alongside with the optimization of the magnetic and electrostatic design, the properties of the trap were investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. A preliminary, precise measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    SLD Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577 {plus_minus} 0.032(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.046(syst.) ps.

  14. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  15. Low magnetic Johnson noise electric field plates for precision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabey, I. M.; Devlin, J. A.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    We describe a parallel pair of high voltage electric field plates designed and constructed to minimise magnetic Johnson noise. They are formed by laminating glass substrates with a commercially available polyimide (Kapton) tape, covered with a thin gold film. Tested in vacuum, the outgassing rate is less than 5 × 10-5 mbar l/s. The plates have been operated at electric fields up to 8.3 kV/cm, when the leakage current is at most a few hundred pA. The design is discussed in the context of a molecular spin precession experiment to measure the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron.

  16. Research on high-precision hole measurement based on robot vision method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Li, Da-peng; Qin, Ming-cui; Li, Zong-yan; Chang, Yu-lan; Xi, Jiang-tao

    2014-09-01

    A high-precision vision detection and measurement system using mobile robot is established for the industry field detection of motorcycle frame hole and its diameter measurement. The robot path planning method is researched, and the non-contact measurement method with high precision based on visual digital image edge extraction and hole spatial circle fitting is presented. The Canny operator is used to extract the edge of captured image, the Lagrange interpolation algorithm is utilized to determine the missing image edge points and calculate the centroid, and the least squares fitting method is adopted to fit the image edge points. Experimental results show that the system can be used for the high-precision real-time measurement of hole on motorcycle frame. The absolute standard deviation of the proposed method is 0.026 7 mm. The proposed method can not only improve the measurement speed and precision, but also reduce the measurement error.

  17. EDITORIAL: Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manske, E.; Froehlich, T.

    2012-07-01

    The 56th International Scientific Colloquium was held from 12th to 16th September 2011 at the Ilmenau University of Technology in Germany. This event was organized by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering under the title: 'Innovation in Mechanical Engineering—Shaping the Future' and was intended to reflect the entire scope of modern mechanical engineering. In three main topics many research areas, all involving innovative mechanical engineering, were addressed, especially in the fields of Precision Engineering and Precision Measurement Technology, Mechatronics and Ambient-Assisted Living and Systems Technology. The participants were scientists from 21 countries, and 166 presentations were given. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions on 'Precision Engineering and Precision Measurement Technology'. Over three days the conference participants discussed novel scientific results in two sessions. The main topics of these sessions were: Measurement and Sensor Technology Process measurement Laser measurement Force measurement Weighing technology Temperature measurement Measurement dynamics and Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Technology Nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines Nanometrology Probes and tools Mechanical design Signal processing Control and visualization in NPM devices Significant research results from the Collaborative Research Centre SFB 622 'Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Machines' funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) were presented as part of this topic. As the Chairmen, our special thanks are due to the International Programme Committee, the Organization Committee and the conference speakers as well as colleagues from the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology who helped make the conference a success. We would like to thank all the authors for their contributions, the referees for their time spent reviewing the contributions and their valuable comments, and the whole

  18. Precision measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N.

    1998-02-17

    The research that is described in this paper is part of a program to study strong interaction mechanisms in proton proton collisions. The program consists of two experiments: Brookhaven E766 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 27.5 GeV/c incident protons and Fermilab E690 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 800 GeV/c incident protons. In these experiments, we employed state-of-the-art data acquisition sys- tems and acquired large samples of data: at Brookhaven we amassed 300 million high multiplicity events and at Fermilab, 5.5 billion events. Our uncertainty in the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass is more than 7 times smaller than the best previous result and was based on 16 times the statistics. Likewise, the {Sigma}{sup 0} - {Lambda}{sup 0} mass difference is more than 14 times more accurate than the previous best result. Finally, we note that this measurement is the first direct measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass.

  19. A continuous measure of fingertip friction during precision grip.

    PubMed

    André, Thibaut; Lefèvre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2009-05-15

    When humans manipulate an object, the minimal grip force (GF) required to avoid slipping depends on the frictional properties between the fingers and the object. As a consequence, fingertip skin friction plays a critical role during object manipulation. Here, the effects of the normal force and moisture content on the skin's static coefficient of friction (CF) for human fingertips were studied. Ten subjects were asked to pinch an object with a given normal force. Slippage of the object on the fingertips was generated for different ranges of normal force using a linear translation stage. The exerted forces and moisture of the fingertips were then measured, and the static coefficient of friction was calculated as the ratio between the tangential force and normal force at slippage. These results demonstrate that the effects of the normal force and moisture content on the CF exhibit a complex interaction. For a given moisture condition, the CF varies as a power function of the normal force; in contrast, for a given normal force, the CF is described by a "bell-shaped" function of moisture. A global expression of the CF as a function of the normal force and moisture content is derived, and a method is proposed for a continuous measure of the CF. This new method shall be of particular interest in investigating dexterous manipulation.

  20. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  1. Precision measurement of crack closure state with vibrothermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefelbein, Bryan E.; Holland, Stephen D.; Bastawros, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    Crack closure state is a controlling parameter in Vibrothermographpy testing as well as other Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques. The closure phenomenon reduces probability of detection (POD) by reducing the effective crack size. For this reason, understanding and quantifying closure has implications in the field of NDE. Cracks grown under fatigue have unpredictable and diffcult to quantify closure states. We propose a simple model to quantify crack closure and measure residual stress. The analysis is limited to the case of 1D residual loading of a through crack. Extensions can be made to the more applicable semi-elliptical surface crack. This model is introduced to replace the model previously suggested by Renshaw [1]. The model is applied to thermal data taken on rectangular test specimens with fatigue cracks.

  2. Control systems improvements in a precision coordinate measuring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, S. S.; Babelay, E. F., Jr.; Igou, R. E.; Woodard, L. M.; Green, W. L.

    1981-09-01

    A conventional, manually driven Moore No. 3 coordinate measuring machine at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is being upgraded to provide a continuous-path numerical control capability and simultaneously serve as a vehicle for testing new machine slide-control concepts. Besides new lead screw drive motors, an NC machine control unit, and a closed-loop servo system, the machine has also been equipped with vibration isolation, air-bearing slideways, and laser interferometric position feedback. The present conventional slide servo system will be replaced with a digital servo system wherein various feedback and compensation techniques can be realized through the use of a high speed, dedicated digital processor. The improvements to data are described with emphasis on identification and compensation of the slide control systems.

  3. High Precision SC Cavity Diagnostics with HOM Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Hendrickson, Linda; McCormick, Douglas; May, Justin; Molloy, Stephen; Ross, Marc; /SLAC

    2006-08-18

    Experiments at the FLASH linac at DESY have demonstrated that the Higher Order Modes induced in Superconducting Cavities can be used to provide a variety of beam and cavity diagnostics. The centers of the cavities can be determined from the beam orbit which produces minimum power in the dipole HOM modes. The phase and amplitude of the dipole modes can be used as a high resolution beam position monitor, and the phase of the monopole modes to measure the beam phase relative to the accelerator RF. Beam orbit feedback which minimizes the dipole HOM power in a set of structures has been demonstrated. For most SC accelerators, the existing HOM couplers provide the necessary signals, and the down mix and digitizing electronics are straightforward, similar to those for a conventional BPM.

  4. High-Precision Mass Measurements At TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Ketelaer, J.; Knuth, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-04-01

    In order to study neutron-rich nuclides far from the valley of stability as well as long-lived actinoids the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP has been recently installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz. Short-lived neutron-rich fission products are produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of an actinoid target installed close to the reactor core. A helium gas-jet system with carbon aerosol particles is used to extract the fission products to the experiment. The Penning trap system has already been commissioned. Off-line mass measurements are routinely performed using a recently developed laser ablation ion source, and the gas-jet system has been tested. An overview of the experiment and current status will be given.

  5. Quantitative estimates of precision for molecular isotopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Jasper, J P

    2001-01-01

    At least three methods of calculating the random errors or variance of molecular isotopic data are presently in use. The major components of variance are differentiated and quantified here into least three to four individual components. The measurement of error of the analyte relative to a working (whether an internal or an external) standard is quantified via the statistical pooled estimate of error. A statistical method for calculating the total variance associated with the difference of two individual isotopic compositions from two isotope laboratories is given, including the variances of the laboratory (secondary) and working standards, as well as those of the analytes. An abbreviated method for estimation of of error typical for chromatographic/isotope mass spectrometric methods is also presented. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Precise polarization measurements via detection of compton scattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Dutta, Dipangkar; Gaskell, David J.; Narayan, Amrendra

    2014-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam off a proton target. One of the dominant experimental systematic uncertainties in Qweak will result from determining the beam polarization. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in the fall of 2010 to provide a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. We have achieved the design goals of <1% statistical uncertainty per hour and expect to achieve <1% systematic uncertainty.

  7. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} (x, Q{sup 2}) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized {sup 3}He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 {le} x {le} 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2}. The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} dx g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, 5 GeV{sup 2}) = {minus}0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x {r_arrow} 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n} paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  8. Precision, accuracy, and efficiency of four tools for measuring soil bulk density or strength.

    Treesearch

    Richard E. Miller; John Hazard; Steven. Howes

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring soil compaction is time consuming. A desire for speed and lower costs, however, must be balanced with the appropriate precision and accuracy required of the monitoring task. We compared three core samplers and a cone penetrometer for measuring soil compaction after clearcut harvest on a stone-free and a stony soil. Precision (i.e., consistency) of each tool...

  9. Precision Mass Measurement with Optomechanically Induced Transparency in an Optomechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiong; Li, Wen-Juan; Ma, Peng-Cheng; He, Zhi

    2017-07-01

    We present a scheme for all-optical precision mass sensing with squeezed field in an optomechanical system in terms of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT). We demonstrate that the splitting of the two peaks of the OMIT, which is almost inverse proportion to square root of the accreted mass landing on nanomechanical resonator (NAMR). We also show that the mass measurement scheme for the squeezed fields can be robust against temperature and cavity decay in somehow. Specifically, the precision measurement is from the noise spectrum, for these reasons, our scheme may provide a new paradigm for precision measurement based on the noise in the optomechanical system.

  10. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  11. Alignment Jig for the Precise Measurement of THz Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid H.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  12. The impact of charge transfer inefficiency on Extreme Precision Doppler measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, C. H.; Halverson, S.; Roy, A.

    2017-04-01

    A new generation of ``Extreme Precision'' astronomical spectrometers is currently being designed to detect Earth-mass planets orbiting nearby stars using the Doppler method. Measuring the subtle shifts in stellar absorption features resulting from stellar radial velocity variations of tens of centimeters per second is a significant technological challenge. Currently, there are several instruments around the world capable of measuring stellar radial velocities at the 1 m s-1 level. Moving beyond this level of precision, CCD effects may become important and could limit the ultimate measurement precision in complex ways. Here, we simulate the impact of Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI) in CCDs on radial velocity measurements. We show that CTI can manifest as a significant source of systematic error in high precision Doppler measurements, though these effects can likely be mitigated using optimized observing strategies and empirical flux corrections.

  13. High-precision rotation angle measurement method based on monocular vision.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Zhao, Lingna; Xu, Shengli

    2014-07-01

    To accurately measure the attitude angles (pitch, roll, and yaw) of a rigid object that rotates in a space, we propose a high-precision rotation angle measurement method based on monocular vision. This method combines camera self-calibration, multiview geometry, and 3D measurement. This monocular vision measuring system consists of an area scan CCD, a prime lens, and a spots array target, which are fixed on the measured object. We can calculate the rotation angle according to the rebuilt rotating spots array target by using this monocular vision measuring system. The measurement precision of rotation angle can reach 1 arc sec in this paper's experiments. This method has high measurement precision and good stability. Therefore we can widely use this method in machinery manufacturing, engineering measurement, aerospace, and the military.

  14. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters m2 21, θ12 and constraints on θ13 based on a study of reactor antineutrinos at a baseline of ~ 180 km with the KamLAND detector. The data presented here was collected between April 2002 and November 2009, and amounts to a total exposure of 2.64 ± 0.07 × 1032 proton-years. For this exposure we expect 2140 ± 74(syst) antineutrino candidates from reactors, assuming standard model neutrino behavior, and 350±88(syst) candidates from background. The number observed is 1614. The ratio of background-subtracted candidates observed to expected is (NObs - NBkg)/ (NExp) = 0.59 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.045(syst) which confirms reactor neutrino disappearance at greater than 5σ significance. Interpreting this deficit as being due to neutrino oscillation, the best-fit oscillation parameters from a three-flavor analysis are m2 21= 7.60+0.20 -0.19×10-5eV2, θ12 = 32.5 ± 2.9 degrees and sin2 θ13 = 0.025+0.035 -0.035, the 95% confidence-level upper limit on sin2 θ13 is sin2 θ13 < 0.083. Assuming CPT invariance, a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino data yields best-fit values: m2 21 = 7.60+0.20 -0.20 × 10-5eV2, θ12 = 33.5+1.0 -1.1 degrees, and sin2 θ13 = 0.013 ± 0.028 or sin2 θ13 < 0.06 at the 95% confidence level.

  15. A Precision Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Kevin Matthew

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass using events recorded during a ~ 230 pb-1 exposure of the D0 detector to proton-anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that the top quark will decay into a bottom quark and a W boson close to 100% of the time. The bottom quark will hadronize (bind with another quark) and produce a jet of hadronic particles. The W bosons can decay either into a charged lepton and a neutrino or a pair of quarks. this dissertation focuses on the top quark (t$\\bar{t}$) events in which one W decays hadronically and the other decays leptonically. Two methods of identifying t$\\bar{t}$ events from the large number of events produced are used. The first is based on the unique topology of the final state particles of a heavy particle. By using the topological information of the event, the t$\\bar{t}$ events can be efficiently extracted from the background. The second method relies on the identification of the remnants of the long lived bottom quarks that are expected to be produced in the decay of almost every top quark. Because the largest background processes do not contain bottom quarks, this is an extremely efficient way to select the events retaining about 60% of the t$\\bar{t}$ events and removing almost 90% of the background. A kinematic fit to the top quark mass is performed on the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events using the final state particles that are seen in the detector. A likelihood technique is then used to extract the most likely value of the top quark mass, mt, and signal fraction. The result for the topological selection is mt = 169.9 ± 5.8(statistical)$+8.0\\atop{-7.8}$(systematic) GeV while the results on the sample selected from identification of a b quark in the event is mt = 170.6 ± 4.2(statistical)$+6.3\\atop{-6.8}$(systematic) GeV.

  16. Effect of inhomogeneities on high precision measurements of cosmological distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Austin; Troxel, M. A.; Ishak, Mustapha

    2014-12-01

    We study effects of inhomogeneities on distance measures in an exact relativistic Swiss-cheese model of the Universe, focusing on the distance modulus. The model has Λ CDM background dynamics, and the "holes" are nonsymmetric structures described by the Szekeres metric. The Szekeres exact solution of Einstein's equations, which is inhomogeneous and anisotropic, allows us to capture potentially relevant effects on light propagation due to nontrivial evolution of structures in an exact framework. Light beams traversing a single Szekeres structure in different ways can experience either magnification or demagnification, depending on the particular path. Consistent with expectations, we find a shift in the distance modulus μ to distant sources due to demagnification when the light beam travels primarily through the void regions of our model. Conversely, beams are magnified when they propagate mainly through the overdense regions of the structures, and we explore a small additional effect due to time evolution of the structures. We then study the probability distributions of Δ μ =μΛ CDM-μSC for sources at different redshifts in various Swiss-cheese constructions, where the light beams travel through a large number of randomly oriented Szekeres holes with random impact parameters. We find for Δ μ the dispersions 0.004 ≤σΔ μ≤0.008 mag for sources with redshifts 1.0 ≤z ≤1.5 , which are smaller than the intrinsic dispersion of, for example, magnitudes of type Ia supernovae. The shapes of the distributions we obtain for our Swiss-cheese constructions are peculiar in the sense that they are not consistently skewed toward the demagnification side, as they are in analyses of lensing in cosmological simulations. Depending on the source redshift, the distributions for our models can be skewed to either the demagnification or the magnification side, reflecting a limitation of these constructions. This could be the result of requiring the continuity of Einstein

  17. Precision Mass Property Measurements Using a Five-Wire Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    A method for measuring the moment of inertia of an object using a five-wire torsion pendulum design is described here. Typical moment of inertia measurement devices are capable of 1 part in 10(exp 3) accuracy and current state of the art techniques have capabilities of about one part in 10(exp 4). The five-wire apparatus design shows the prospect of improving on current state of the art. Current measurements using a laboratory prototype indicate a moment of inertia measurement precision better than a part in 10(exp 4). In addition, the apparatus is shown to be capable of measuring the mass center offset from the geometric center. Typical mass center measurement devices exhibit a measurement precision up to approximately 1 micrometer. Although the five-wire pendulum was not originally designed for mass center measurements, preliminary results indicate an apparatus with a similar design may have the potential of achieving state of the art precision.

  18. The Measurement of Little g: A Fertile Ground for Precision Measurement Science

    PubMed Central

    Faller, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The occasion of the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s “golden year” provides a wonderful opportunity to discuss some aspects of gravity—gravitation being an interest of Einstein’s that occurred a few years after 1905. I’ll do this by talking about the measurement of little g, the free-fall acceleration on the Earth’s surface that is mainly due to the Earth’s gravity but whose value is also affected by centrifugal forces that are a result of the Earth’s rotation. I will also describe two equivalence experiments and a test of the inverse-square law of gravitation. Finally, I will make some observations on the science of precision measurement—a subject that underpins much of scientific progress. PMID:27308179

  19. Spectropolarimetry with PEPSI at the LBT: accuracy vs. precision in magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, Ilya; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Hofmann, Axel

    2009-04-01

    We present the design of the new PEPSI spectropolarimeter to be installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona to measure the full set of Stokes parameters in spectral lines and outline its precision and the accuracy limiting factors.

  20. Molecular calipers for highly precise and accurate measurements of single-protein mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Hu, Xiaodong; Bu, Tianjia; Hu, Chunguang; Hu, Xiaotang; Li, Hongbin

    2014-03-18

    Single-molecule atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has evolved into a powerful technique toward elucidating conformational changes in proteins when exposed to applied force. AFM technologies that are currently available allow for precise measurements of proteins length changes during conformational transitions. However, because of systematic errors in piezo calibration as well as errors originating from fitting experimental data using a worm-like chain model of polymer elasticity, high-precision measurements of length changes do not necessarily translate into highly accurate measurements of length changes, resulting in uncertainty in obtaining structural information about protein conformational changes. Actually achieving highly precise and accurate force spectroscopy measurements remains a challenge. Here, we report a protein caliper method that eliminates systematic errors that occur during single-protein force spectroscopy measurements, and thus achieves highly precise and accurate length change measurements in protein mechanics studies. To do this, a series of loop elongation variants of the small protein GB1, which differ by 2, 5, 10, 15, and 24 amino acid residues, were engineered. Differential measurements of amino acid residue length obtained from different AFM setups result in a precise measure of the length of a single amino acid residue, which varies within different AFM setups because of systematic error between individual AFM piezoelectric calibrations. The measured length of a single amino acid residue from a given AFM setup is then used as a caliper for the given setup to eliminate systematic error, leading to highly accurate and precise measurements of the number of amino acid residues that are involved in a conformation change of a polypeptide chain. We further developed a more precise, robust, and model-free method to determine the apparent size of single amino acid residues and conformational changes of proteins. This method improves the accuracy of

  1. Pipken Award: Nuclear physics mysteries revealed by precision ion trap measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Physics is a fundamental science discipline for over 100 years, and started with precision measurements by Rutherford. Much has been learned and understood in the meantime, but some questions remain and also new nuclear phenomena have been discovered. Precision experiments open new venue to address these. Ion trap technologies, originally conceived for atomic and molecular physics have been adapted to the specific requirements stemming from nuclear physics, for example, to couple ion traps to accelerators and achieve very high speed and efficiencies. In this talk I will show some recent examples and technical developments pertaining to nuclear physics questions and phenomena and how they are addressed with precision ion trap measurements.

  2. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Philippe; Clinton, Eric; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, Dave; Miskimen, Rory; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Asaturyan, Arshak; Baker, O.; Benton, LaRay; Bernstein, Aron; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Dale, Daniel; Danagoulian, Samuel; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, Raphael; Deur, Alexandre; DOLGOLENKO, A.; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Evdokimov, Anatoly; Feng, JIng; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hardy, K.; Ito, Mark; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kingsberry, Paul; Kolarkar, Ameya; Konchatnyi, Mykhailo; Korchin, O.; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kubantsev, Mikhail; Kubarovsky, Valery; LARIN, Ilya; MATVEEV, V.; McNulty, Dustin; Milbrath, Brian; Minehart, Ralph; Mochalov, Vasiliy; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Nakagawa, Itaru; Overby, Steven; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Payen, Marvin; Pedroni, Ronald; Prok, Yelena; Ritchie, Barry; Salgado, Carlos; Sitnikov, Anatoly; Sober, Daniel; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, Aram; Underwood, Jarreas; VASILIEV, A.; VEREBRYUSOV, V.; Vishnyakov, Vladimir; Wood, Michael

    2009-12-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  3. An automated 60 GHz open resonator system for precision dielectric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, Mohammed N.; Li, Xiaohui; Chi, Hua

    1990-12-01

    An automated open resonator system was designed and constructed for precision measurement of the loss tangent and dielectric permittivity of low absorbing materials at 60 GHz. The use of a high-Q hemispherical Fabry-Perot cavity together with highly stabilized synthesized phase-locked Gunn oscillator sources and a superheterodyne receiver made it possible to measure loss tangent values as low as 10 microrad. Both cavity length variation and frequency variation techniques were utilized to provide precise data.

  4. A Time Projection Chamber for Precision {sup 239}Pu(n,f) Cross Section Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M.

    2008-04-17

    High precision measurements of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section have been identified as important for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and other programs. Currently, the uncertainty on this cross section is of the order 2-3% for neutron energies below 14 MeV and the goal is to reduce this to less than 1%. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been identified as a possible tool to make this high precision measurement.

  5. Methods for high precision 14C AMS measurement of atmospheric CO2 at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Graven, H D; Guilderson, T P; Keeling, R F

    2006-10-18

    Development of {sup 14}C analysis with precision better than 2{per_thousand} has the potential to expand the utility of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} measurements for carbon cycle investigations as atmospheric gradients currently approach traditional measurement precision of 2-5{per_thousand}. The AMS facility at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, produces high and stable beam currents that enable efficient acquisition times for large numbers of {sup 14}C counts. One million {sup 14}C atoms can be detected in approximately 25 minutes, suggesting that near 1{per_thousand} counting precision is economically feasible at LLNL. The overall uncertainty in measured values is ultimately determined by the variation between measured ratios in several sputtering periods of the same sample and by the reproducibility of replicate samples. Experiments on the collection of one million counts on replicate samples of CO{sub 2} extracted from a whole air cylinder show a standard deviation of 1.7{per_thousand} in 36 samples measured over several wheels. This precision may be limited by the reproducibility of Oxalic Acid I standard samples, which is considerably poorer. We outline the procedures for high-precision sample handling and analysis that have enabled reproducibility in the cylinder extraction samples at the <2{per_thousand} level and describe future directions to continue increasing measurement precision at LLNL.

  6. Validating precision estimates in horizontal wind measurements from a Doppler lidar

    DOE PAGES

    Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. Alan; Wilczak, James M.; ...

    2017-03-30

    Results from a recent field campaign are used to assess the accuracy of wind speed and direction precision estimates produced by a Doppler lidar wind retrieval algorithm. The algorithm, which is based on the traditional velocity-azimuth-display (VAD) technique, estimates the wind speed and direction measurement precision using standard error propagation techniques, assuming the input data (i.e., radial velocities) to be contaminated by random, zero-mean, errors. For this study, the lidar was configured to execute an 8-beam plan-position-indicator (PPI) scan once every 12 min during the 6-week deployment period. Several wind retrieval trials were conducted using different schemes for estimating themore » precision in the radial velocity measurements. Here, the resulting wind speed and direction precision estimates were compared to differences in wind speed and direction between the VAD algorithm and sonic anemometer measurements taken on a nearby 300 m tower.« less

  7. Development of Data Registration and Fusion Methods for Measurement of Ultra-Precision Freeform Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling Bao; Ren, Ming Jun; Xu, Min

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of ultra-precision freeform surfaces commonly requires several datasets from different sensors to realize holistic measurements with high efficiency. The effectiveness of the technology heavily depends on the quality of the data registration and fusion in the measurement process. This paper presents methods and algorithms to address these issues. An intrinsic feature pattern is proposed to represent the geometry of the measured datasets so that the registration of the datasets in 3D space is casted as a feature pattern registration problem in a 2D plane. The accuracy of the overlapping area is further improved by developing a Gaussian process based data fusion method with full consideration of the associated uncertainties in the measured datasets. Experimental studies are undertaken to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method. The study should contribute to the high precision and efficient measurement of ultra-precision freeform surfaces on multi-sensor systems. PMID:28498317

  8. A study of artificial eyes for the measurement of precision in eye-trackers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Mulvey, Fiona B; Pelz, Jeff B; Holmqvist, Kenneth

    2016-07-06

    The precision of an eye-tracker is critical to the correct identification of eye movements and their properties. To measure a system's precision, artificial eyes (AEs) are often used, to exclude eye movements influencing the measurements. A possible issue, however, is that it is virtually impossible to construct AEs with sufficient complexity to fully represent the human eye. To examine the consequences of this limitation, we tested currently used AEs from three manufacturers of eye-trackers and compared them to a more complex model, using 12 commercial eye-trackers. Because precision can be measured in various ways, we compared different metrics in the spatial domain and analyzed the power-spectral densities in the frequency domain. To assess how precision measurements compare in artificial and human eyes, we also measured precision using human recordings on the same eye-trackers. Our results show that the modified eye model presented can cope with all eye-trackers tested and acts as a promising candidate for further development of a set of AEs with varying pupil size and pupil-iris contrast. The spectral analysis of both the AE and human data revealed that human eye data have different frequencies that likely reflect the physiological characteristics of human eye movements. We also report the effects of sample selection methods for precision calculations. This study is part of the EMRA/COGAIN Eye Data Quality Standardization Project.

  9. Application of machine vision based measurement in precise assembly of miniature parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cui; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiwen; Wang, Lin; Luo, Yi

    2010-08-01

    In manufacturing of precise miniature devices, automatic assembly is the trend to replace manual work for better quality and higher yield. Precise measurement is a critical issue during assembly process because the parts are often complicated and quite different in size, shapes, surface condition, etc. The position and orientation error must be determined precisely before assembly. In the developed automatic assembly system, microscopic machine vision and precise linear stages were integrated in the measurement system for higher detection resolution and larger measurement range in working space. As to the extract of contour of parts with different surface condition, dynamic illumination control and different combination of feature detection algorithms were applied. The errors brought by non-perpendicularity among precision linear stages were compensated and the movement errors were reduced with effective measurement strategy. The measuring accuracy was validated with a special fabricated precise template. Assembly tests were done with the developed system and results indicate that the required position and orientation accuracy can be met successfully and consequently the assembly task can be fulfilled.

  10. Unique electron polarimeter analyzing power comparison and precision spin-based energy measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames; Charles Sinclair; Joseph Mitchell; Eugene Chudakov; Howard Fenker; Arne Freyberger; Douglas Higinbotham; B. Poelker; Michael Steigerwald; Michael Tiefenback; Christian Cavata; Stephanie Escoffier; Frederic Marie; Thierry Pussieux; Pascal Vernin; Samuel Danagoulian; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Renee Fatemi; Kyungseon Joo; Markus Zeier; Viktor Gorbenko; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Brian Raue; Riad Suleiman; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2004-03-01

    Precision measurements of the relative analyzing powers of five electron beam polarimeters, based on Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering, have been performed using the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory). A Wien filter in the 100 keV beamline of the injector was used to vary the electron spin orientation exiting the injector. High statistical precision measurements of the scattering asymmetry as a function of the spin orientation were made with each polarimeter. Since each polarimeter receives beam with the same magnitude of polarization, these asymmetry measurements permit a high statistical precision comparison of the relative analyzing powers of the five polarimeters. This is the first time a precise comparison of the analyzing powers of Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering polarimeters has been made. Statistically significant disagreements among the values of the beam polarization calculated from the asymmetry measurements made with each polarimeter reveal either errors in the values of the analyzing power, or failure to correctly include all systematic effects. The measurements reported here represent a first step toward understanding the systematic effects of these electron polarimeters. Such studies are necessary to realize high absolute accuracy (ca. 1%) electron polarization measurements, as required for some parity violation measurements planned at Jefferson Laboratory. Finally, a comparison of the value of the spin orientation exiting the injector that provides maximum longitudinal polarization in each experimental hall leads to an independent and very precise (better than 10-4) absolute measurement of the final electron beam energy.

  11. Machine vision for high-precision volume measurement applied to levitated containerless material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, R.C.; Schmidt, D.P.; Rogers, J.R.; Kelton, K.F.; Hyers, R.W.

    2005-12-15

    By combining the best practices in optical dilatometry with numerical methods, a high-speed and high-precision technique has been developed to measure the volume of levitated, containerlessly processed samples with subpixel resolution. Containerless processing provides the ability to study highly reactive materials without the possibility of contamination affecting thermophysical properties. Levitation is a common technique used to isolate a sample as it is being processed. Noncontact optical measurement of thermophysical properties is very important as traditional measuring methods cannot be used. Modern, digitally recorded images require advanced numerical routines to recover the subpixel locations of sample edges and, in turn, produce high-precision measurements.

  12. High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.-J.; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2005-07-01

    We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of {approx}50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

  13. High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Jun; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2005-07-01

    We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of approximately 50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

  14. Precise measurement of a magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, D; Sawabe, H; Matsuda, Y H; Takeyama, S

    2013-04-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure extremely high magnetic fields.

  15. How Can a Heavy Higgs Boson be Consistent with the Precision Electroweak Measurements?

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-02-01

    The fit of precision electroweak data to the Minimal Standard Model currently gives an upper limit on the Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV at 95% confidence. Nevertheless, it is often said that the Higgs boson could be much heavier in more general models. In this paper, we critically review models that have been proposed in the literature that allow a heavy Higgs boson consistent with the precision electroweak constraints. All have unusual features, and all can be distinguished from the Minimal Standard Model either by improved precision measurements or by other signatures accessible to next-generation colliders.

  16. Precision in Strontium Isotope Measurements by Laser Ablation Assisted Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sasada, S.; Tomita, H.; Watanabe, K.; Higuchi, Y.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-03-17

    We have investigated the precision of strontium isotope analysis by Laser Ablation-assisted Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry(LA-RIMS). We have confirmed that the mass discrimination effect on the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr measurement was reduced by the internal correction method. For the present system, the precision of the isotope ratio of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr has been estimated to be 0.6%(1{sigma}). The precision has been limited by the fluctuations with a time scale of less than 10 s.

  17. Research on high precision equal-angle scanning method in rotary kiln temperature measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaosheng; Guo, Zhongyuan; You, Changhui; Liu, Jinsong; Cheng, Yang; Tang, Huaming

    2016-05-01

    Aiming at traditional horizontal equal-angle scanning method's disadvantage of measurement error, a high precision equal-angle scanning method is proposed, the proposed method establishes a tilt scanning model by the following steps: introducing height variable, precisely calculating the viewing angle, building scanning model. The model is used to calculate scanning position on rotary kiln's surface, which helps to locate and track temperature variation. The experiment shows that the proposed method can effectively improve the precision of temperature spots' location on the rotary kiln surface.

  18. Flexible, non-contact and high-precision measurements of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, A.

    2016-06-01

    A high-accuracy cylindrical coordinate measuring instrument developed for the measurement of optical components is presented. It is equipped with an optical point sensor system including a high aperture probe. This setup allows measurements to be performed with high accuracy in a flexible way. Applications include the measurement of the topography of high-precision aspheric and freeform lenses and diffractive structures. High measuring speeds guarantee the implementation in a closed-loop production process.

  19. Measurement method for the transition width of precision approach path indicator based on spectral means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haiping; Zhou, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wanlu; Pan, Jiangen; Liu, Muqing

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces a new colorimetric measurement method for the transition width of the precision approach path indicator. The measurement system consists of a spectrometer, a fiber probe, a moving means and a ruler. The spectrometer is used to measure the chromaticity coordinates to distinguish the white and red light. The fiber probe is the input of the spectrometer. It is fixed to the moving means, which can move along with the upright rule. The precision approach path indicator certain distance away projects the light to the fiber probe. By moving the fiber probe crossing the transition sector up and down, the chromaticity coordinate of the light moves from the white area to the red area. The intermediate distance of the fiber probe is the width of the transition sector. Use the ruler to measure it and then calculate it to angle. With the measurement distance of 10 meter and the precision of the ruler 1 millimeter, the precision of the system can be 21 seconds of arc. Compared with the traditional measurement methods, the method introduced in this paper is more precise and it strictly accords with the ICAO standard Annex 14.

  20. A high-precision K-band LFMCW radar for range measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yingzhuo; Chen, Xiuwei; Zou, Yongliao

    2016-11-01

    K-band LFMCW radar may be applied in high-precision range measurement, if its range resolution is made be close to mm magnitude, good performance is not only needed in hardware design, algorithm selection and optimization is but also needed. In K-band LFMCW radar system, CZT algorithm is modified according to practical radar echo signal, its simulation model is built in the System Generator tool software, the corresponding algorithm is implemented in FPGA. K-band LFMCW radar may be applied in range measurement of great volume storage tank, the outfield experiment was done according to application, experiment result shows that range measurement precision may reach mm magnitude, the system can meet the requirement of remote high-precision measurement.

  1. Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements, 15th, Gaithersburg, MD, June 23-27, 1986, Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, William J. M.

    1987-06-01

    Papers are presented on quantum mechanics and precision measurements; a superconducting thin-film gyroscope readout for Gravity Probe-B; precision NMR measurement of Li-7 and limit on spatial anisotropy; the quantum Hall effect as a standard to define the laboratory unit of resistance; and the development of large Josephson series arrays for voltage standards of high precision. Topics discussed include a superconducting magnetic levitation system for an absolute determination of the magnetic flux quantum; a 25-bit reference resistive voltage divider; AC voltage measurements; the application of the thermal wattmeter principle to a broad-band device for nonsinusoidal waveforms; and a high-accuracy two phase digital generator with automatic radio and phase control. Consideration is given to the digitization error of fast digital recorders; the automatic network analyzer; a passive TV technique for time transfer via Indian satellite Insat-1B; hydrogen masers; and a highly sensitive calorimeter for microwatt-level laser power measurements.

  2. Method to precisely measure the phase of few-cycle laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qing; Lu, Peixiang; Lan, Pengfei; Yang, Zhenyu; Li, Yunhua

    2008-04-28

    A new method of accurately measuring the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of few-cycle pulses is presented. The high-energy photo-electron spectrum by a few-cycle pulse is dominated by photoelectrons bursting in very few short time intervals near the maximum of the pulse envelope. For high laser intensities, the positions of interference fringes in the high-energy cutoff region are very sensitive to the CEP, which can be used to measure and stabilize the CEP precisely. The measurement precision of the CEP strongly depends on the laser intensity for the fastest photoelectrons.

  3. Hybrid measurement to achieve satisfactory precision in perioperative cardiac output monitoring.

    PubMed

    Peyton, P

    2014-05-01

    Advanced haemodynamic monitoring employing minimally invasive cardiac output measurement may lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes in major surgery. However, the precision (scatter) of measurement of available generic technologies has been shown to be unsatisfactory with percentage error of agreement with bolus thermodilution (% error) of 40% to 50%. Simultaneous measurement and averaging by two or more technologies may reduce random measurement scatter and improve precision. This concept, called the hybrid method, was tested by comparing accuracy and precision of measurement relative to bolus thermodilution using combinations of three component methods. Thirty patients scheduled for either elective cardiac surgery or liver transplantation were studied. Agreement with simultaneous bolus thermodilution of hybrid combinations of continuous thermodilution (QtCCO) or Vigeleo™/FloTrac™ pulse contour measurement (QtFT) with pulmonary Capnotracking (QtCO2) was assessed pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass or pre- and post-reperfusion of the donor liver and compared with that of the component methods alone. Hybridisation of QtCO2 (% error 42.2) and QtCCO (% error 51.3) achieved significantly better precision (% error 31.3) than the component methods (P=0.0004) and (P=0.0195). Due to poor inherent precision of QtFT (% error 82.8), hybrid combination of QtFT with QtCO2 did not result in better precision than QtCO2 alone. Hybrid measurement can approach a 30% error, which is recommended as the upper limit for acceptability. This is a practical option where at least one component method, such as Capnotracking, is automated and does not increase the cost or complexity of the measurement process.

  4. Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Polarized Cold Neutron Capture on the Proton: the NPDGamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Lauss; J.D. Bowman; R. Carlini; T.E. Chupp; W. Chen; S. Corvig; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S.J. Freeman; T.R. Gentile; M.T. Gericke; R.C. Gillis; G.L. Greene; F.W. Hersman; T. Ino; T. Ito; G.L. Jones; M. Kandes; M. Leuschner; B. Lozowski; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; Y. Masuda; J. Mei; G.S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S.A. Page; S.I. Penttila; W.D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E.I. Sharapov; T.B. Smith; W.M. Snow; W.S. Wilburn; V. Yuan; H. Zhu

    2005-10-24

    The NPD{gamma} experiment at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is dedicated to measure with high precision the parity violating asymmetry in the {gamma} emission after capture of spin polarized cold neutrons in para-hydrogen. The measurement will determine unambiguously the weak pion-nucleon-nucleon ({pi} NN) coupling constant (line integral){sub {pi}}{sup l}.

  5. Precision measurements of charmonium states formed in {anti p}p annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bettoni, D. |; Bharadwaj, V.

    1991-08-01

    Fermilab experiment E-760 studies the resonant formation of Charmonium states in proton-antiproton interactions using a hydrogen gas-jet target in the antiproton Accumulator ring at Fermilab. Precision measurements of the mass and width of the Charmonium states, {chi}{sub 1}, {chi}{sub 2} and a new measurement of the {psi} mass are presented.

  6. A Precision Measurement Of The Neutral Pion Lifetime: The PRIMEX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, Rory

    2008-10-13

    The PRIMEX collaboration at Jefferson Lab is completing an experimental analysis to obtain a precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Results from the experiment will be presented and comparisons made with the chiral anomaly prediction and NLO calculations. An extension of the experiment to 12 GeV for measurements of the {eta} and {eta}' radiative widths is discussed.

  7. Precise laboratory measurements of methanol rotational transition frequencies in the 5 to 13 GHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, S. M.; Kukolich, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Rotational transitions for CH3OH were measured in the 5-13 GHz range with a precision and accuracy of a few kilohertz or less using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The accurate center frequencies measured should be useful in determining accurate Doppler shifts and making positive molecule identification in radio astronomy.

  8. Measuring Constructs in Family Science: How Can Item Response Theory Improve Precision and Validity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides family scientists with an understanding of contemporary measurement perspectives and the ways in which item response theory (IRT) can be used to develop measures with desired evidence of precision and validity for research uses. The article offers a nontechnical introduction to some key features of IRT, including its…

  9. Progress on Passive Sensor for Ultra-Precise Measurement of C02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Georgieva, Elena; Wilson, Emily

    2003-01-01

    We will present results from a novel instrument employing a Fabry-Perot interferometer to measure column carbon dioxide with great precision. These measurements are very important for improving our understanding of the global warming phenomenon. The instrument technique can be extended to a number of other important trace gases in the atmosphere.

  10. Effects of image and education on the precision of the measurement method for evaluating prosthesis misfit.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hang-Nga; Eun Lee, Kyeong; Ha, Jung-Hong; Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2017-08-04

    Various methods for measuring prosthesis misfit have been suggested. Although the cross-sectional images between the crown and abutment are used to evaluate the misfit, the effects of the image and the observer's knowledge on the precision of measurement are unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of the image and of education on the precision of prosthesis misfit measurement methods using inter- and intraobserver variability analyses. The cross-sectional images in the margin were obtained using the computer-aided replica technique (CART), silicone replica technique (RT), and sectioning technique (ST). Twenty-five observers measured the absolute marginal discrepancy values in the images obtained from each group 4 times at an interval of 2 weeks; the observers went through different education sessions regarding the selection of the measurement points. The precision of measurement was determined and compared using the likelihood-ratio test statistic (α=.05) and the intraclass correlation coefficient with the linear mixed-effects model. The CART group exhibited the smallest deviations in the measurement variations, followed by the ST and RT groups (P<.001). Additional education on misfit measurements generally decreased the deviation values in all the groups, but without any significant differences. The cross-sectional image obtained from the measurement methods and education on the evaluation method affected the precision of the prosthesis misfit measurement. Digital methods might be a useful tool to significantly enhance the precision of the measurements. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2010-12-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  12. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2011-05-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  13. Measurements of experimental precision for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, P E; Torres, F E; Santos, A D; Corrêa, A M; Nascimento, M; Barroso, L M A; Ceccon, G

    2016-05-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of statistics as experimental precision degree measures for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes. Cowpea genotype yields were evaluated in 29 trials conducted in Brazil between 2005 and 2012. The genotypes were evaluated with a randomized block design with four replications. Ten statistics that were estimated for each trial were compared using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and path analysis. According to the class limits established, selective accuracy and F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination adequately estimated the degree of experimental precision. Using these statistics, 86.21% of the trials had adequate experimental precision. Selective accuracy and the F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination were directly related to each other, and were more suitable than the coefficient of variation and the least significant difference (by the Tukey test) to evaluate experimental precision in trials with cowpea genotypes.

  14. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-01-01

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms. PMID:26287203

  15. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-08-14

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms.

  16. Effectiveness of Spectral Similarity Measures to Develop Precise Crop Spectra for Hyperspectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H.; Krishna Mohan, B.

    2014-11-01

    The present study was undertaken with the objective to check effectiveness of spectral similarity measures to develop precise crop spectra from the collected hyperspectral field spectra. In Multispectral and Hyperspectral remote sensing, classification of pixels is obtained by statistical comparison (by means of spectral similarity) of known field or library spectra to unknown image spectra. Though these algorithms are readily used, little emphasis has been placed on use of various spectral similarity measures to select precise crop spectra from the set of field spectra. Conventionally crop spectra are developed after rejecting outliers based only on broad-spectrum analysis. Here a successful attempt has been made to develop precise crop spectra based on spectral similarity. As unevaluated data usage leads to uncertainty in the image classification, it is very crucial to evaluate the data. Hence, notwithstanding the conventional method, the data precision has been performed effectively to serve the purpose of the present research work. The effectiveness of developed precise field spectra was evaluated by spectral discrimination measures and found higher discrimination values compared to spectra developed conventionally. Overall classification accuracy for the image classified by field spectra selected conventionally is 51.89% and 75.47% for the image classified by field spectra selected precisely based on spectral similarity. KHAT values are 0.37, 0.62 and Z values are 2.77, 9.59 for image classified using conventional and precise field spectra respectively. Reasonable higher classification accuracy, KHAT and Z values shows the possibility of a new approach for field spectra selection based on spectral similarity measure.

  17. Direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton.

    PubMed

    Mooser, A; Ulmer, S; Blaum, K; Franke, K; Kracke, H; Leiteritz, C; Quint, W; Rodegheri, C C; Smorra, C; Walz, J

    2014-05-29

    One of the fundamental properties of the proton is its magnetic moment, µp. So far µp has been measured only indirectly, by analysing the spectrum of an atomic hydrogen maser in a magnetic field. Here we report the direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of a single proton using the double Penning-trap technique. We drive proton-spin quantum jumps by a magnetic radio-frequency field in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. The induced spin transitions are detected in a second trap with a strong superimposed magnetic inhomogeneity. This enables the measurement of the spin-flip probability as a function of the drive frequency. In each measurement the proton's cyclotron frequency is used to determine the magnetic field of the trap. From the normalized resonance curve, we extract the particle's magnetic moment in terms of the nuclear magneton: μp = 2.792847350(9)μN. This measurement outperforms previous Penning-trap measurements in terms of precision by a factor of about 760. It improves the precision of the forty-year-old indirect measurement, in which significant theoretical bound state corrections were required to obtain µp, by a factor of 3. By application of this method to the antiproton magnetic moment, the fractional precision of the recently reported value can be improved by a factor of at least 1,000. Combined with the present result, this will provide a stringent test of matter/antimatter symmetry with baryons.

  18. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Melconian, D.; Anderson, R. M. A.; Anholm, M.; Ashery, D.; Behling, R. S.; Cohen, I.; Craiciu, I.; Donohue, J. M.; Farfan, C.; Friesen, D.; Gorelov, A.; McNeil, J.; Mehlman, M.; Norton, H.; Olchanski, K.; Smale, S.; Thériault, O.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Warner, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in the {β }+-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the V - A framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the Triumf neutral atom trap (Trinat), a magneto-optical trap confines and cools neutral 37K atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of \\bar{P}=0.9913+/- 0.0009, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the β-asymmetry has 0.2 % statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its overall uncertainty. This result also demonstrates the capability to measure the polarization to \\lt 0.1 % , allowing for a measurement of angular correlation parameters to this level of precision, which would be competitive in searches for new physics.

  19. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped 37 K

    DOE PAGES

    Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Melconian, D.; ...

    2016-07-13

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in themore » $${\\beta }^{+}$$-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the V ₋ A framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the Triumf neutral atom trap (Trinat), a magneto-optical trap confines and cools neutral 37K atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of $$\\bar{P}=0.9913\\pm 0.0009$$, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the β-asymmetry has $$0.2 \\% $$ statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its overall uncertainty. This result also demonstrates the capability to measure the polarization to $$\\lt 0.1 \\% $$, allowing for a measurement of angular correlation parameters to this level of precision, which would be competitive in searches for new physics.« less

  20. Segmentation quality evaluation using region-based precision and recall measures for remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Feng, Xuezhi; Xiao, Pengfeng; He, Guangjun; Zhu, Liujun

    2015-04-01

    Segmentation of remote sensing images is a critical step in geographic object-based image analysis. Evaluating the performance of segmentation algorithms is essential to identify effective segmentation methods and optimize their parameters. In this study, we propose region-based precision and recall measures and use them to compare two image partitions for the purpose of evaluating segmentation quality. The two measures are calculated based on region overlapping and presented as a point or a curve in a precision-recall space, which can indicate segmentation quality in both geometric and arithmetic respects. Furthermore, the precision and recall measures are combined by using four different methods. We examine and compare the effectiveness of the combined indicators through geometric illustration, in an effort to reveal segmentation quality clearly and capture the trade-off between the two measures. In the experiments, we adopted the multiresolution segmentation (MRS) method for evaluation. The proposed measures are compared with four existing discrepancy measures to further confirm their capabilities. Finally, we suggest using a combination of the region-based precision-recall curve and the F-measure for supervised segmentation evaluation.

  1. Direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooser, A.; Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Quint, W.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Smorra, C.; Walz, J.

    2014-05-01

    One of the fundamental properties of the proton is its magnetic moment, µp. So far µp has been measured only indirectly, by analysing the spectrum of an atomic hydrogen maser in a magnetic field. Here we report the direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of a single proton using the double Penning-trap technique. We drive proton-spin quantum jumps by a magnetic radio-frequency field in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. The induced spin transitions are detected in a second trap with a strong superimposed magnetic inhomogeneity. This enables the measurement of the spin-flip probability as a function of the drive frequency. In each measurement the proton's cyclotron frequency is used to determine the magnetic field of the trap. From the normalized resonance curve, we extract the particle's magnetic moment in terms of the nuclear magneton: μp = 2.792847350(9)μN. This measurement outperforms previous Penning-trap measurements in terms of precision by a factor of about 760. It improves the precision of the forty-year-old indirect measurement, in which significant theoretical bound state corrections were required to obtain µp, by a factor of 3. By application of this method to the antiproton magnetic moment, the fractional precision of the recently reported value can be improved by a factor of at least 1,000. Combined with the present result, this will provide a stringent test of matter/antimatter symmetry with baryons.

  2. Precision ESR measurements of transverse anisotropy in the single-molecule magnet Ni4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Charles A.; Allão Cassaro, Rafael A.; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for precisely measuring the tunnel splitting in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) using electron-spin resonance, and use these measurements to precisely and independently determine the underlying transverse anisotropy parameter, given a certain class of transitions. By diluting samples of the SMM Ni4 via cocrystallization in a diamagnetic isostructural analog we obtain markedly narrower resonance peaks than are observed in undiluted samples. Using custom loop-gap resonators we measure the transitions at several frequencies, allowing a precise determination of the tunnel splitting. Because the transition under investigation occurs at zero field, and arises due to a first-order perturbation from the transverse anisotropy, we can determine the magnitude of this anisotropy independent of any other Hamiltonian parameters. This method can be applied to other SMMs with tunnel splittings arising from first-order transverse anisotropy perturbations.

  3. Navigation Doppler lidar sensor for precision altitude and vector velocity measurements: flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockard, George; Hines, Glenn

    2011-06-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high-resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over various terrains. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  4. A precise measurement of the weak mixing angle in neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Geralyn P.

    This dissertation reports a precise determination of the weak mixing angle, sin2 thetaW, from measurement of the ratios of neutral current to charged current neutrino deep inelastic cross sections. High statistics samples of separately collected neutrino and antineutrino events, resulting from exposure to the Fermilab neutrino beam during the period from 1996 to 1997, allowed the reduction of systematic errors associated with charm production and other sources. The final value, sin 2 thetaW(on shell) = 0.2277 +/- 0.0013 (stat) +/- 0.0009 (syst), lies three standard deviations above the standard model prediction. The measurement is currently the most precise determination of sin2 theta W in neutrino-nucleon scattering, surpassing its predecessors by a factor of two in precision. A model independent analysis recasts the same data into a measurement of effective left and right handed neutral current quark couplings.

  5. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  6. A precise measurement of the [Formula: see text] meson oscillation frequency.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; C Forshaw, D; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; K Kuonen, A; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; W Ronayne, J; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-01-01

    The oscillation frequency, [Formula: see text], of [Formula: see text] mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0[Formula: see text] of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies [Formula: see text] = 7 and 8[Formula: see text]. A combination of the two decay modes gives [Formula: see text], where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  7. A novel wide measuring range FBG displacement sensor with variable measurement precision based on helical bevel gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan-chao; Wang, Jing; Sui, Qing-mei; Cao, Yu-qiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) displacement sensor is proposed, which can achieve wide measuring range displacement detection with variable measurement precision due to its mechanical transfer structure of helical bevel gear. A prototype is designed and fabricated. The maximum detection displacement of this prototype is 1.751 m, and the precision grade changes from 0.2% to 6.7%. Through analyzing the experiment data which is obtained in the calibration experiment, the measuring range of this sensor is from 0 m to 1.532 m, and the wavelength shift errors between experiment data and theory calculation are all less than 5%.

  8. Frequency scanning interferometry in ATLAS: remote, multiple, simultaneous and precise distance measurements in a hostile environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, P. A.; Howell, D. F.; Nickerson, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    ATLAS is the largest particle detector under construction at CERN Geneva. Frequency scanning interferometry (FSI), also known as absolute distance interferometry, will be used to monitor shape changes of the SCT (semiconductor tracker), a particle tracker in the inaccessible, high radiation environment at the centre of ATLAS. Geodetic grids with several hundred fibre-coupled interferometers (30 mm to 1.5 m long) will be measured simultaneously. These lengths will be measured by tuning two lasers and comparing the resulting phase shifts in grid line interferometers (GLIs) with phase shifts in a reference interferometer. The novel inexpensive GLI design uses diverging beams to reduce sensitivity to misalignment, albeit with weaker signals. One micrometre precision length measurements of grid lines will allow 10 µm precision tracker shape corrections to be fed into ATLAS particle tracking analysis. The technique was demonstrated by measuring a 400 mm interferometer to better than 400 nm and a 1195 mm interferometer to better than 250 nm. Precise measurements were possible, even with poor quality signals, using numerical analysis of thousands of intensity samples. Errors due to drifts in interferometer length were substantially reduced using two lasers tuned in opposite directions and the precision was further improved by linking measurements made at widely separated laser frequencies.

  9. Precision of measurement and body size in whole-body air-displacement plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Wells, J C; Fuller, N J

    2001-08-01

    To investigate methodological and biological precision for air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) across a wide range of body size. Repeated measurements of body volume (BV) and body weight (WT), and derived estimates of density (BD) and indices of fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM). Sixteen men, aged 22--48 y; 12 women, aged 24--42 y; 13 boys, aged 5--14 y; 17 girls, aged 5--16 y. BV and WT were measured using the Bodpod ADP system from which estimates of BD, FM and FFM were derived. FM and FFM were further adjusted for height to give fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI). ADP is very precise for measuring both BV and BD (between 0.16 and 0.44% of the mean). After removing two outliers from the database, and converting BD to body composition, precision of FMI was <6% in adults and within 8% in children, while precision of FFMI was within 1.5% for both age groups. ADP shows good precision for BV and BD across a wide range of body size, subject to biological artefacts. If aberrant values can be identified and rejected, precision of body composition is also good. Aberrant values can be identified by using pairs of ADP procedures, allowing the rejection of data where successive BD values differed by >0.007 kg/l. Precision of FMI obtained using pairs of procedures improves to <4.5% in adults and <5.5% in children.

  10. Non-contact precision profile measurement to rough-surface objects with optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Taro; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new method for the high precision and contactless profile measurement of rough-surfaced objects using optical frequency combs. The uncertainty of the frequency beats of an optical frequency comb is very small (relative uncertainty is 10-10 in our laboratory). In addition, the wavelengths corresponding to these frequency beats are long enough to measure rough-surfaced objects. We can conduct high-precision measurement because several GHz frequency beats can be used if the capability of the detector permits. Moreover, two optical frequency combs with Rb-stabilized repetition frequencies are used for the measurement instead of an RF frequency oscillator; thus, we can avoid the cyclic error caused by the RF frequency oscillator. We measured the profile of a wood cylinder with a rough surface (diameter is approximately 113.2 mm) and compared the result with that of coordinate measuring machine (CMM).

  11. Precision and accuracy of TearLab osmometer in measuring osmolarity of salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dan; Gadaria-Rathod, Neha; Oh, Cheongeun; Asbell, Penny A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inherent precision and accuracy of TearLab Osmolarity System using salt solutions, including solutions of very high osmolarity (>360 mOsm/L). Ten salt solutions with osmolarity between 286 mOsm/L and 394 mOsm/L (increments of 12 mOsm/L) plus an additional solution of 400 mOsm/L were tested twice on both the TearLab osmometer and a freezing point depression osmometer. For precision, we compared the two repeated osmolarity measurements of 11 solutions obtained from TearLab. For accuracy, we compared the averaged osmolarity measurements obtained from TearLab to those from the freezing point depression osmometer. For both precision and accuracy, Bland-Altman test of agreement was used. For precision, the upper 95% limit of agreement was 4.7 mOsm/L, and the lower 95% limit of agreement was -7.1 mOsm/L. The repeatability coefficient was 5.9 mOsm/L. For accuracy, the upper 95% limit of agreement was 4.8 mOsm/L and the lower 95% limit of agreement was -5.3 mOsm/L. The present study is the first study to demonstrate that the TearLab in situ osmometer can precisely and accurately measure osmolarity of salt solutions, including those with very high osmolarity. Future studies to evaluate the precision and the accuracy of the machine in measuring complex fluids, such as tears, need to be done, and the clinical significance of measuring tear osmolarity in patients needs to be further determined.

  12. Towards 1‰ AMS 14C measurement precision at the Rafter Radiocarbon Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Baisden, T. T.; Zondervan, A.; Kaiser, J.; Brailsford, G.; Moss, R.

    2012-12-01

    The radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 (Δ14CO2) is an increasingly important tracer used to quantify the different sources of CO2 in the atmosphere. Due to the absence of 14C in fossil fuels, 14CO2 is perhaps the best way to quantify recently added fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere. The sea-air CO2 flux also has Δ14C different from the atmosphere, so Δ14CO2 observations can be used to examine the one-way gross CO2 flux out of the oceans. Each one part per million (ppm) of fossil fuel CO2 added to the atmosphere decreases Δ14CO2 by about 2.6‰, and fossil fuel CO2 enhancements are typically in the range of a few ppm. The detection capability is therefore strongly influenced by the precision of 14C measurements. The World Meteorological Organization recommends a goal of 1‰ 14C precision, and Δ14CO2 measurements can currently be made to slightly better than 2‰ at several facilities. New Zealand has a long history of atmospheric Δ14CO2 measurements, starting in Wellington in 1955. Rafter lab recently obtained a new accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) and developed a new graphitization system. A major focus emerging from the upgrade is the opportunity to expand the high precision atmospheric Δ14CO2 capability. Results from the first year of measurements indicate 1.3‰ repeatability on modern atmospheric CO2 in samples as small as one liter of whole air, a significant improvement over previously reported AMS 14C repeatability. We use new measurements from the long-term Baring Head Δ14CO2 record demonstrate the utility of this new high precision capability in interpreting atmospheric signals. We will report on development of graphitization procedures and AMS methodology which allow us to achieve this precision. Progress towards 1‰ precision will be discussed.

  13. Direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The challenge to measure the properties of the proton with great precision inspires very different branches of physics. The magnetic moment of the proton is a fundamental property of this particle. So far it has only been measured indirectly, by analyzing the spectrum of an atomic hydrogen maser in a magnetic field. Here we report the direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of a single proton using the double Penning-trap technique. We drive proton-spin quantum jumps by a radio-frequency field in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. The induced spin transitions are detected in a second trap with a strong superimposed magnetic inhomogeneity. This enables the measurement of the spin-flip probability as a function of the drive frequency. In each measurement the proton's cyclotron frequency is used to determine the magnetic field of the trap. From the normalized resonance curve, we extract the particle's magnetic moment in terms of the nuclear magneton: μp = 2.792 847 350 (9) μN. This measurement outperforms previous Penning-trap measurements in terms of precision by a factor of about 760. It improves the precision of the forty year-old indirect measurement by D. Kleppner et al., in which significant theoretical bound-state corrections were required to obtain μp, by a factor of 3. By application of this method to the antiproton magnetic moment, the fractional precision of the recently reported value can be improved by a factor of at least 1,000. Combined with the present result, this will provide a stringent test of matter/antimatter symmetry with baryons. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, grant QU122/3.

  14. Super precise measurement system controlled by computer in a servo writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lian X.; Yu, Shengsheng; Yuan, Zhimin

    1993-09-01

    The paper gives a realization of the positioning system in a servo-writer, and discusses the Super Precise Measurement System controlled by a computer in detail. It gives a parallel 16-bit interface circuit with higher data transmission ratio, and analyses the facters which affect the measurement accuracy. The measurement accuracy of the system for the position is O.O2μm.

  15. Digital PCR modeling for maximal sensitivity, dynamic range and measurement precision.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Nivedita; Wessel, Thomas; Marks, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The great promise of digital PCR is the potential for unparalleled precision enabling accurate measurements for genetic quantification. A challenge associated with digital PCR experiments, when testing unknown samples, is to perform experiments at dilutions allowing the detection of one or more targets of interest at a desired level of precision. While theory states that optimal precision (Po) is achieved by targeting ~1.59 mean copies per partition (λ), and that dynamic range (R) includes the space spanning one positive (λL) to one negative (λU) result from the total number of partitions (n), these results are tempered for the practitioner seeking to construct digital PCR experiments in the laboratory. A mathematical framework is presented elucidating the relationships between precision, dynamic range, number of partitions, interrogated volume, and sensitivity in digital PCR. The impact that false reaction calls and volumetric variation have on sensitivity and precision is next considered. The resultant effects on sensitivity and precision are established via Monte Carlo simulations reflecting the real-world likelihood of encountering such scenarios in the laboratory. The simulations provide insight to the practitioner on how to adapt experimental loading concentrations to counteract any one of these conditions. The framework is augmented with a method of extending the dynamic range of digital PCR, with and without increasing n, via the use of dilutions. An example experiment demonstrating the capabilities of the framework is presented enabling detection across 3.33 logs of starting copy concentration.

  16. High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

    2008-08-05

    High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

  17. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed {beta}{sup +} emitter {sup 26}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Banu, A.; Chen, L.; Golovko, V. V.; Goodwin, J.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2010-09-15

    We measured the half-life of the superallowed 0{sup +{yields}}0{sup +} {beta}{sup +} emitter {sup 26}Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of {sup 26}Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, which was sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter {sup 26}Al{sup m}. The data were analyzed as a linked parent-daughter decay. To contribute meaningfully to any test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, the ft value of a superallowed transition must be determined to a precision of 0.1% or better. With a precision of 0.03%, the present result is more than sufficient to be compatible with that requirement. Only the branching ratio now remains to be measured precisely before a {+-}0.1% ft value can be obtained for the superallowed transition from {sup 26}Si.

  18. Measurement of precision oscillator phase noise using the two-oscillator coherent down-conversion technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnanelli, Christopher J.; Cashin, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of precision frequency standard phase noise and spurious outputs is addressed, using the two-oscillator coherent downconversion technique. Focus is on techniques for making accurate measurements of phase noise and spurious outputs within 100 KHz of a carrier. Significant sources of measurement error related to hardware design problems and inadequate measurement procedures are discussed: measurement errors resulting from system noise sources, phase-locked loop effects, and system bandwidth limitations. In addition, methods and design considerations for minimizing the effects of such errors are presented. Analytic discussions and results are supplemented with actual test data and measurements made using measurement hardware developed at the Ball Corporation, Efratom Division.

  19. An optical fiber multiplexing interferometric system for measuring remote and high precision step height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Xie, Fang; Ma, Sen; Chen, Liang

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an optical fiber multiplexing interferometric system including a Fizeau interferometer and a Michelson interferometer is designed for remote and high precision step height measurement. The Fizeau interferometer which is inserted in the remote sensing field is used for sensing the measurand, while the Michelson interferometer which is stabilized by a feedback loop works in both modes of low coherence interferometry and high coherence interferometry to demodulate the measurand. The range of the step height is determined by the low coherence interferometry and the value of it is measured precisely by the high coherence interferometry. High precision has been obtained by using the symmetrical peak-searching method to address the peak of the low coherence interferogram precisely and stabilizing the Michelson interferometer with a feedback loop. The maximum step height that could be measured is 6 mm while the measurement resolution is less than 1 nm. The standard deviation of 10 times measurement results of a step height of 1 mm configurated with two gauge blocks is 0.5 nm.

  20. Remote and high precision step height measurement with an optical fiber multiplexing interferometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Xie, Fang; Ma, Sen; Chen, Liang

    2015-03-01

    An optical fiber multiplexing low coherence and high coherence interferometric system, which includes a Fizeau interferometer as the sensing element and a Michelson interferometer as the demodulating element, is designed for remote and high precision step height measurement. The Fizeau interferometer is placed in the remote field for sensing the measurand, while the Michelson interferometer which works in both modes of low coherence interferometry and high coherence interferometry is employed for demodulating the measurand. The range of the step height is determined by the low coherence interferometry and the value of it is measured precisely by the high coherence interferometry. High precision has been obtained by searching precisely the peak of the low coherence interferogram symmetrically from two sides of the low coherence interferogram and stabilizing the Michelson interferometer with a feedback loop. The maximum step height that could be measured is 6 mm while the measurement resolution is less than 1 nm. The standard deviation of 10 times measurement results of a step height of 1 mm configurated with two gauge blocks is 0.5 nm.

  1. Precision of repeated, Doppler-derived indirect blood pressure measurements in conscious psittacine birds.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew S; Davidowski, Leslie A; Rao, Sangeeta; Hill, Ashley E

    2011-06-01

    Although the use of indirect methods for measuring blood pressure has become commonplace in dogs and cats, it is uncertain whether these methods can be extended to avian species with any proven accuracy or precision. To evaluate the precision of indirect blood pressure measurement in conscious psittacine birds by the Doppler flow method, 25 psittacine birds, weighing between 230 and 1263 g and representing 17 commonly kept species, were examined. Birds were manually restrained, and indirect blood pressure measurements were obtained by placing a cuff around the limb proximal to a Doppler ultrasonic flow detector held over either the basilic or cranial tibial artery. Three sets of 3 measurements were obtained from each wing and leg site, with cuff size and site based on pilot study data identifying the selection criteria of cuff placement with the least variance among repeated measurements. A mixed-effects linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the differences among mean blood pressure measurements in the individual bird, obtained from the wing versus leg site as well as from 3 different cuff placements at each site. Results showed variation attributable to the limb was not significant. However, blood pressure measurements varied significantly between cuff placements on the same limb from the same bird and among individual birds. The precision of these indirect blood pressure measurements was poor. From these results, the meaning and value of Doppler-derived indirect blood pressure measurements obtained in psittacine birds remains in question, warranting further research.

  2. A New Method to Improve the Precision of SO2Measurement in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, R. K.; Chen, L.; Nian, S. P.

    2006-10-01

    The thesis discusses the status quo and existent problems of SO2 measurement, explores sensor mechanism of measurement precision of SO2, and deduces the mathematical measurement model of SO2 according to Lambert-Beer Law. Aiming at the nonlinearity problem existing in the mathematical model, it employs Taylor's series expansion to resolve the problem. In addition, it designs the gas room of double optical paths to measure SO2 by infrared, which utilizes four detectors to eliminate the impact of CO2 and disturbed noise by receiving signals. Finally, through the analysis of the experimental data, it proves that this method has such features as easy implementation, high precision, strong anti-jamming capability, and real-time and on-line measurement of SO2required in the industry field.

  3. On precise phase difference measurement approach using border stability of detection resolution.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lina; Su, Xin; Zhou, Wei; Ou, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    For the precise phase difference measurement, this paper develops an improved dual phase coincidence detection method. The measurement resolution of the digital phase coincidence detection circuits is always limited, for example, only at the nanosecond level. This paper reveals a new way to improve the phase difference measurement precision by using the border stability of the circuit detection fuzzy areas. When a common oscillator signal is used to detect the phase coincidence with the two comparison signals, there will be two detection fuzzy areas for the reason of finite detection resolution surrounding the strict phase coincidence. Border stability of fuzzy areas and the fluctuation difference of the two fuzzy areas can be even finer than the picoseconds level. It is shown that the system resolution obtained only depends on the stability of the circuit measurement resolution which is much better than the measurement device resolution itself.

  4. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  5. High precision semi-automated vertebral height measurement using computed tomography: A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of vertebral heights is necessary for the evaluation of many disorders affecting the spine. High precision is particularly important for longitudinal studies where subtle changes are to be detected. Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice for high precision studies. Radiography and dual emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) use 2D images to assess 3D structures, which can result in poor visualization due to the superimposition of extraneous anatomical objects on the same 2D space. We present a semi-automated computer algorithm to measure vertebral heights in the 3D space of a CT scan. The algorithm segments the vertebral bodies, extracts their end plates and computes vertebral heights as the mean distance between end plates. We evaluated the precision of our algorithm using repeat scans of an anthropomorphic vertebral phantom. Our method has high precision, with a coefficient of variation of only 0.197% and Bland-Altmann 95% limits of agreement of [-0.11, 0.13] mm. For local heights (anterior, middle, posterior) the algorithm was up to 4.2 times more precise than a manual mid-sagittal plane method.

  6. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  7. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi; Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7σ smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup −4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  8. Evaluating measurements of carbon dioxide emissions using a precision source--A natural gas burner.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Rodney; Bundy, Matthew; Zong, Ruowen

    2015-07-01

    A natural gas burner has been used as a precise and accurate source for generating large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate emissions measurements at near-industrial scale. Two methods for determining carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources are considered here: predicting emissions based on fuel consumption measurements-predicted emissions measurements, and direct measurement of emissions quantities in the flue gas-direct emissions measurements. Uncertainty for the predicted emissions measurement was estimated at less than 1%. Uncertainty estimates for the direct emissions measurement of carbon dioxide were on the order of ±4%. The relative difference between the direct emissions measurements and the predicted emissions measurements was within the range of the measurement uncertainty, therefore demonstrating good agreement. The study demonstrates how independent methods are used to validate source emissions measurements, while also demonstrating how a fire research facility can be used as a precision test-bed to evaluate and improve carbon dioxide emissions measurements from stationary sources. Fossil-fuel-consuming stationary sources such as electric power plants and industrial facilities account for more than half of the CO2 emissions in the United States. Therefore, accurate emissions measurements from these sources are critical for evaluating efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This study demonstrates how a surrogate for a stationary source, a fire research facility, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of measurements of CO2 emissions.

  9. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  10. Volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography Measurement Precision for Volumes and Densities of Tarsal and Metatarsal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Commean, Paul K.; Kennedy, Jared A.; Bahow, Karen A.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Liu, Lu; Smith, Kirk E.; Hastings, Mary K.; Ju, Tao; Prior, Fred W.; Sinacore, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot diseases, such as ulcerations, infections, and neuropathic (Charcot’s) arthropathy are major complications of diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy and may cause osteolysis (bone loss) in foot bones. The purposes of our study were to make computed tomography (CT) measurements of foot-bone volumes and densities and to determine measurement precision (percent coefficients of variation for root mean square-standard deviations) and least significant changes in these percentages that could be considered biologically real with 95% confidence. Volumetric quantitative CT scans were performed and repeated on 10 young, healthy subjects and 13 subjects with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Two raters used the original- and repeat-scan data sets to make measurements of volumes and bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the tarsal and metatarsal bones of the two feet (24 bones). Precisions for the bones ranged from 0.1% to 0.9% for volume measurements and from 0.6% to 1.9% for BMD measurements. The least significant changes ranged from 0.4% to 2.5% for volume measurements and from 1.5% to 5.4% for BMD measurements. Volumetric quantitative CT provides precise measurements of volume and BMD for metatarsal bones and tarsal bones where diabetic foot diseases commonly occur. PMID:21723764

  11. Research progress on real-time measurement of soil attributes for precision agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid and accurate measurement of soil organic matter content and nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other nutrients is the basis for variable rate fertilizer application in precision agriculture, and it is also a difficult problem that scientists have been committed to resolving. On the basis of ...

  12. Manufacturing And Measuring Of Aspherics Integrated In One Ultra Precision Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knol, Pierre H.; Szepesi, Denes; Werner, P. Guenther; Knappert, Wilhelm

    1989-04-01

    Hembrug recently developed the method of tool-normality for machining aspherics on the Super-Mikroturn CNC ultra precision lathe. This method allows the single point diamond tool to be kept perpendicular to the surface and eliminates the influence of tool tip radius error. Due to the perpendicularity of the tool, this method also allows the integration of a dedicated sensor system for in-process measurement. The realisation is carried out by a hydrostatic, numerically controlled precision rotary table, together with a software package for 3-axis interpolation. To measure the surface topography and reflection value of metal optics, a non-contact sensor, consisting of a bundle of glass fibers concentrically arranged is now in development. A number of these fibers are connected to a light source and the remaining fibers are used to transmit the reflected light from the surface. The intensity of the reflected light versus the distance generates a diagram of which the shape characterizes the roughness and the reflection of the measured surface. The integration of such a dedicated sensor into an ultra precision machine tool in combination with the evaluated characteristic diagram makes it possible to obtain data of the shape of surface topography and reflection values performing the first step of an in-process adaptive control system. The paper will deal in greater detail with the development of this new concept of ultra precision machining and measuring problems connected to the process.

  13. Manganese-56 coincidence-counting facility precisely measures neutron-source strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Volpi, A.; Larsen, R. N.; Porges, K. G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Precise measurement of neutron-source strength is provided by a manganese 56 coincidence-counting facility using the manganese-bath technique. This facility combines nuclear instrumentation with coincidence-counting techniques to handle a wide variety of radioisotope-counting requirements.

  14. High-precision optical measurement of the 2S hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kolachevsky, N; Fischer, M; Karshenboim, S G; Hänsch, T W

    2004-01-23

    We have applied an optical method to the measurement of the 2S hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen. The interval has been measured by means of two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition on a hydrogen atomic beam shielded from external magnetic fields. The measured value of the 2S hyperfine interval is equal to 177 556 860(16) Hz and represents the most precise measurement of this interval to date. The theoretical evaluation of the specific combination of 1S and 2S hyperfine intervals D21 is in fair agreement (within 1.4 sigma) with the value for D21 deduced from our measurement.

  15. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  16. Development of high precision laser measurement to Space Debris and Applications in SHAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongping; Chen, Juping; Xiong, Yaoheng; Han, Xingwei

    2016-07-01

    Artificial space debris has become the focus during the space exploration because of producing the damage for the future active spacecrafts and high precision measurement for space debris are required for debris surveillance and collision avoidance. Laser ranging technology is inherently high accurate and will play an important role in precise orbit determination, accurate catalog of space debris. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) of CAS, has been developing the technology of laser measurement to space debris for several years. According to characteristics of laser echoes from space debris and the experiences of relevant activities, high repetition rate, high power laser system and low dark noise APD detector with high quantum efficiency and high transmissivity of narrow bandwidth spectral filter are applied to laser measurement to space debris in SHAO. With these configurations, great achievements of laser measurement to space debris are made with hundreds of passes of laser data from space debris in the distance between 500km and 2500km with Radar Cross Section (RCS) of more than 10 m^{2} to less than 0.5m^{2} at the measuring precision of less than 1m (RMS). For better application of laser ranging technology, Chinese Space Debris Observation network, consisting of Shanghai, Changchun and Kunming station, has been preliminary developed and the coordinated observation has been performed to increase the measuring efficiency for space debris. It is referred from data that laser ranging technology can be as the essential high accuracy measurement technology in the study of space debris.

  17. Towards high precision measurements of nuclear g-factors for the Be isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamine, A.; Wada, M.; Okada, K.; Ito, Y.; Schury, P.; Arai, F.; Katayama, I.; Imamura, K.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ueno, H.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the present status of future high-precision measurements of nuclear g-factors utilizing laser-microwave double and laser-microwave-rf triple resonance methods for online-trapped, laser-cooled radioactive beryllium isotope ions. These methods have applicability to other suitably chosen isotopes and for beryllium show promise in deducing the hyperfine anomaly of 11Be with a sufficiently high precision to study the nuclear magnetization distribution of this one-neutron halo nucleus in a nuclear-model-independent manner.

  18. Precise measurement of the W-boson mass with the CDF II detector.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shekhar, R; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Sun, S; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, D S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-04-13

    We have measured the W-boson mass M(W) using data corresponding to 2.2  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96  TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470,126 W → eν candidates and 624,708 W → μν candidates yield the measurement M(W) = 80,387 ± 12(stat.) ± 15(syst.) = 80,387 ± 19  MeV/c2. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  19. Measuring Constructs in Family Science: How Can Item Response Theory Improve Precision and Validity?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Rachel A

    2015-02-01

    This article provides family scientists with an understanding of contemporary measurement perspectives and the ways in which item response theory (IRT) can be used to develop measures with desired evidence of precision and validity for research uses. The article offers a nontechnical introduction to some key features of IRT, including its orientation toward locating items along an underlying dimension and toward estimating precision of measurement for persons with different levels of that same construct. It also offers a didactic example of how the approach can be used to refine conceptualization and operationalization of constructs in the family sciences, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (n = 2,732). Three basic models are considered: (a) the Rasch and (b) two-parameter logistic models for dichotomous items and (c) the Rating Scale Model for multicategory items. Throughout, the author highlights the potential for researchers to elevate measurement to a level on par with theorizing and testing about relationships among constructs.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISE MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; JAIN,A.; LOUIE,W.; MARONE,A.; THOMAS,R.

    2003-06-15

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require precise measurement of the time-dependent fields. In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the typical level of accuracy for accelerators, {Delta} B/B better than 0.01%. To meet this need, we have begun development of a system containing 16 stationary pickup windings that will be sampled at a high rate. It is hoped that harmonics through the decapole can be measured with this system. Precise measurement of the time-dependent harmonics requires that both the pickup windings and the voltmeters be nearly identical. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards are being used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADC's for voltmeters. In addition, new software must be developed for the analysis. The paper will present a status report on this work.

  1. Precision measurement system and analysis of low core signal loss in DCF couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, P.; Wang, X. J.; Fu, Ch; Li, D.; Sun, J. Y.; Gong, M. L.; Xiao, Q. R.

    2016-07-01

    In order to achieve higher output power of double cladding fiber lasers, low signal loss has become a focus in researches on optical technology, especially double-clad fiber (DCF) couplers. According to the analysis, DCF couplers with low core signal loss (less than 1%) are produced. To obtain higher precision, we use the first-proposed method for core signal transfer efficiency measurement based on the fiber propagation field image processing. To the best of our knowledge, we report, for the first time, the results of the core signal loss less than 1% in DCF coupler measured by our measurement with high stability and relative precision. The measurement values can assess the quality of DCF couplers and be used as a signal to suggest the improvement on the processing technology of our self-made DCF couplers.

  2. Mesoscopic atomic entanglement for precision measurements beyond the standard quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Appel, J; Windpassinger, P J; Oblak, D; Hoff, U B; Kjaergaard, N; Polzik, E S

    2009-07-07

    Squeezing of quantum fluctuations by means of entanglement is a well-recognized goal in the field of quantum information science and precision measurements. In particular, squeezing the fluctuations via entanglement between 2-level atoms can improve the precision of sensing, clocks, metrology, and spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate 3.4 dB of metrologically relevant squeezing and entanglement for greater, similar 10(5) cold caesium atoms via a quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement on the atom clock levels. We show that there is an optimal degree of decoherence induced by the quantum measurement which maximizes the generated entanglement. A 2-color QND scheme used in this paper is shown to have a number of advantages for entanglement generation as compared with a single-color QND measurement.

  3. Precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass M{sub W} using data corresponding to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470 126 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 624 708 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates yield the measurement M{sub W} = 80 387 {+-} 12{sub stat} {+-} 15{sub syst} = 80 387 {+-} 19 MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  4. Precision of the iDXA for visceral adipose tissue measurement in severely obese patients.

    PubMed

    Carver, Tamara E; Court, Olivier; Christou, Nicolas V; Reid, Ryan E R; Andersen, Ross E

    2014-07-01

    A new measurement tool, the automated software CoreScan, for the GE Lunar iDXA, has been validated for measuring visceral adipose tissue (VAT) against computed tomography in normal-weight populations. However, no study has evaluated the precision of CoreScan in measuring VAT among severely obese patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the precision of CoreScan for VAT measurements in severely obese adults (body mass index > 40 kg·m(-2)). A total of 55 obese participants with a mean age of 46 ± 11 yr, body mass index of 49 ± 6 kg·m(-2), and body mass of 137.3 ± 21.3 kg took part in this study. Two consecutive iDXA scans with repositioning of the total body were conducted for each participant. The coefficient of variation, the root-mean-square averages of SD of repeated measurements, the corresponding 95% least significant change, and intraclass correlations were calculated. Precision error was 8.77% (percent coefficient of variation), with a root-mean-square SD of 0.294 kg and an intraclass correlation of 0.96. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated a mean precision bias of -0.08 ± 0.41 kg, giving a coefficient of repeatability of 0.82 kg and a bias range of -0.890 to 0.725 kg. When interpreting VAT results with the iDXA in severely obese populations, clinicians should be aware of the precision error for this important clinical parameter.

  5. Measurement precision of body composition variables using the lunar DPX-L densitometer.

    PubMed

    Kiebzak, G M; Leamy, L J; Pierson, L M; Nord, R H; Zhang, Z Y

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the precision of total- and regional-body composition measurements from a total-body scan using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This is critical information necessary to determine the smallest change from baseline that could be detected with statistical significance when conducting longitudinal measurements of body composition variables in an individual. Twenty volunteers were scanned once each day for 4 consecutive days using a Lunar DPX-L densitometer and manufacturer-supplied software (version 1.3z). Coefficients of variation (CV, %) derived from data using the (preferred) extended research mode of analysis were 0.62, 1.89, 0.63, 2.0, 1.11, 1.10, and 1.09% for total-body bone mineral density (BMD), total percentage fat, total body tissue mass, fat mass, lean mass, bone mineral content (BMC), and total bone calcium, respectively. Regional measurements (arm, leg, trunk, pelvis, and spine) were less precise than total body measurements, with CVs in the range of 1% to 3% (but fat mass for arms was 4.26%, trunk 3.08%, BMC 3.65%). Small but statistically significant differences in mean values for most body composition variables were found when data were compared between extended and standard modes of analysis. Inconsistent use of analysis mode in a cohort or when following a patient longitudinally may negatively affect precision. We conclude that the measurement precision of total and regional body composition variables was generally comparable to the precision limits typically associated with lumbar spine and proximal femur BMD data.

  6. A precise few-nucleon size difference by isotope shift measurements of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeian, Nima Hassan

    We perform high precision measurements of an isotope shift between the two stable isotopes of helium. We use laser excitation of the 23 S1 -- 23P0 transition at 1083 .... in a metastable beam of 3He and 4He atoms. A newly developed tunable laser frequency selector along with our previous electro-optic frequency modulation technique provides extremely reliable, adaptable, and precise frequency and intensity control. The intensity control contributes negligibly to overall experimental uncertainty by selecting (t selection < 50 ) and stabilizing the intensity of the required sideband and eliminating (˜10-5) the unwanted frequencies generated during the modulation of 1083 nm laser carrier frequency. The selection technique uses a MEMS based fiber switch (tswitch ≈ 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (˜3 GHz) fiber gratings. A fiber based optical circulator and an inline fiber amplifier provide the desired isolation and the net gain for the selected frequency. Also rapid (˜2 sec.) alternating measurements of the 23 S1 -- 23P0 interval for both species of helium is achieved with a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates residual Doppler effects during the isotope shift measurement. An improved detection design and software control makes negligible subtle potential biases in the data collection. With these advances, combined with new internal and external consistency checks, we are able to obtain results consistent with the best previous measurements, but with substantially improved precision. Our measurement of the 23S 1 -- 23P0 isotope shift between 3He and 4He is 31 097 535.2 (5)kHz. The most recent theoretic calculation combined with this measuremen. yields a new determination for nuclear size differences between 3He and 4He: Deltarc = 0.292 6 (1)exp (8)th(52)expfm, with a precision of less than a part in 104 coming from the experimental uncertainty (first parenthesis), and a

  7. Error analysis of high-rate GNSS precise point positioning for seismic wave measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yuanming; Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Niu, Xiaoji; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-06-01

    High-rate GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) has been playing a more and more important role in providing precise positioning information in fast time-varying environments. Although kinematic PPP is commonly known to have a precision of a few centimeters, the precision of high-rate PPP within a short period of time has been reported recently with experiments to reach a few millimeters in the horizontal components and sub-centimeters in the vertical component to measure seismic motion, which is several times better than the conventional kinematic PPP practice. To fully understand the mechanism of mystified excellent performance of high-rate PPP within a short period of time, we have carried out a theoretical error analysis of PPP and conducted the corresponding simulations within a short period of time. The theoretical analysis has clearly indicated that the high-rate PPP errors consist of two types: the residual systematic errors at the starting epoch, which affect high-rate PPP through the change of satellite geometry, and the time-varying systematic errors between the starting epoch and the current epoch. Both the theoretical error analysis and simulated results are fully consistent with and thus have unambiguously confirmed the reported high precision of high-rate PPP, which has been further affirmed here by the real data experiments, indicating that high-rate PPP can indeed achieve the millimeter level of precision in the horizontal components and the sub-centimeter level of precision in the vertical component to measure motion within a short period of time. The simulation results have clearly shown that the random noise of carrier phases and higher order ionospheric errors are two major factors to affect the precision of high-rate PPP within a short period of time. The experiments with real data have also indicated that the precision of PPP solutions can degrade to the cm level in both the horizontal and vertical components, if the geometry of satellites is

  8. Multiple projection DEXA scanner for precision bone and muscle loss measurements and analysis during prolonged spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, H. K.; Beck, T. J.; Feldmesser, H. S.; Magee, T. C.; Spisz, T. S.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2000-01-01

    Bone structural information derived from DEXA data is shown to be relevant in explaining BMD loss versus strength-related observations in both aging populations and individuals exposed to microgravity for prolonged periods. Commercial DEXA instruments are limited (and not optimized) to make these critical structural measurements. Progress on the development of a multiple projection DEXA scanner system for making precision bone and muscle loss measurements and their resultant implications on bone strength and fracture risk is described. .

  9. New precision measurements of free neutron beta decay with cold neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Baeßler, Stefan; Bowman, James David; Penttilä, Seppo I.; ...

    2014-10-14

    Precision measurements in free neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay, and offer several stringent tests of the standard model. This study describes the free neutron beta decay program planned for the Fundamental Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and finally puts it into the context of other recent and planned measurements of neutron beta decay observables.

  10. Comparison between predicted and actual accuracies for an Ultra-Precision CNC measuring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Fix, B.L.

    1995-05-30

    At the 1989 CIRP annual meeting, we reported on the design of a specialized, ultra-precision CNC measuring machine, and on the error budget that was developed to guide the design process. In our paper we proposed a combinatorial rule for merging estimated and/or calculated values for all known sources of error, to yield a single overall predicted accuracy for the machine. In this paper we compare our original predictions with measured performance of the completed instrument.

  11. Precision Column CO2 Measurement from Space Using Broad Band LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. To uncover the missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it, calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of 0.25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong constraints on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an overview of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics. We are examining the possibility of making precise measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide using a broad band source of radiation. This means that many of the difficulties in wavelength control can be treated in the detector portion of the system rather than the laser source. It also greatly reduces the number of individual lasers required to make a measurement. Simplifications such as these are extremely desirable for systems designed to operate from space.

  12. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Manuela

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation for the prediction of precision of absorbance measurements with a miniature CCD spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousoglou, E. P.; Bolis, S. D.

    2003-01-01

    The precision characteristics of the absorbance measurements obtained with a low-cost miniature spectrometer incorporating an array detector were evaluated. Uncertainties in absorbance measurements were due to a combination of non-uniform light intensity and detector response over the wavelength range examined (350-850 nm), in conjunction with the digitization of the intensity indications and the intrinsic noise of the detecting elements. The precision characteristics are presented as contour plots displaying the expected RSD% of absorbances on the absorbance versus wavelength plane. The minimum RSD% for the spectrometer configuration tested was observed within the 0.2-1.5 absorbance units and 500-750 nm wavelength range. Without invoking signal enhancement features of the data-acquisition program (scan average, higher integration times, smoothing based on averaging the signal detected by adjacent pixels), the attainable precision within this range was 0.4-0.8%. A computer program based on Monte Carlo simulations was developed for the prediction of absorbance precision characteristics under various conditions of measurements. PMID:18924714

  14. Precision Measurement of Delbrück Scattering via Laser Compton Scattered γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, J. K.; Hayakawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    Precision measurements such as the muon anomalous magnetic moment have indicated deviations from the standard model and have in turn prompted higher precision theoretical calculations. Delbrück scattering is the scattering of photons off the Coulomb field of nuclei via virtual electron-positron pairs and has been measured using γ-rays from radioactivities and following neutron capture reactions. However, because low flux γ-rays from nuclear transitions have been used in the low photon energy regime fairly large uncertainty exists in the data. In addition, due to the complexity and time consuming nature of the theoretical calculation the scattering cross sections are obtained from tables with interpolation between the tabular values. In recent years high flux γ-ray sources via laser Compton scattering (LCS) using energy-recovery linacs have been proposed. These sources allow measuring the Delbrück scattering with high precision. We will present our own independent calculations for the scattering cross section and show what precision can be obtained using the new LCS γ-ray sources in the low photon energy regime.

  15. High precision measurement of intensity peak shifts in tunable cascaded microring intensity sensors.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Prashanth R; Selvaraja, Shankar K; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate a method to precisely track intensity peak shifts in tunable cascaded double-microring based refractive index sensors. Without modifications, width of the intensity peak of a tunable cascaded microring device limits the precision of peak-shift measurements and thereby the limit of detection of the sensor. We overcome this limitation by using dual harmonic lock-in detection for precisely determining the position of the intensity maximum. Using this modification, we have demonstrated a reduction in the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the intensity peak by a factor of over 1300. We show that such a reduction in FWHM of the peak curve can significantly improve the detection limit of a tunable cascaded microring-based sensor.

  16. The iLocater cryostat: design and thermal control strategy for precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Fantano, Louis G.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Crepp, Justin R.; Nelson, Matthew J.; Wall, Sheila M.; Cavalieri, David A.; Koca, Corina; King, David L.; Reynolds, Robert O.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2016-08-01

    The current generation of precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs are seeing-limited instruments. In order to achieve high spectral resolution on 8m class telescopes, these spectrographs require large optics and in turn, large instrument volumes. Achieving milli-Kelvin thermal stability for these systems is challenging but is vital in order to obtain a single measurement RV precision of better than 1m/s. This precision is crucial to study Earth-like exoplanets within the habitable zone. iLocater is a next generation RV instrument being developed for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Unlike seeinglimited RV instruments, iLocater uses adaptive optics (AO) to inject a diffraction-limited beam into single-mode fibers. These fibers illuminate the instrument spectrograph, facilitating a diffraction-limited design and a small instrument volume compared to present-day instruments. This enables intrinsic instrument stability and facilitates precision thermal control. We present the current design of the iLocater cryostat which houses the instrument spectrograph and the strategy for its thermal control. The spectrograph is situated within a pair of radiation shields mounted inside an MLI lined vacuum chamber. The outer radiation shield is actively controlled to maintain instrument stability at the sub-mK level and minimize effects of thermal changes from the external environment. An inner shield passively dampens any residual temperature fluctuations and is radiatively coupled to the optical board. To provide intrinsic stability, the optical board and optic mounts will be made from Invar and cooled to 58K to benefit from a zero coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value at this temperature. Combined, the small footprint of the instrument spectrograph, the use of Invar, and precision thermal control will allow long-term sub-milliKelvin stability to facilitate precision RV measurements.

  17. Measurement of the knee flexion angle with a Smartphone-application is precise and accurate.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that the measurement of the knee flexion angle measured with a specific Smartphone application was different from the reference measurement with a navigation system designed for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Ten consecutive patients operated on for navigation assisted TKA were selected. Six navigated and 6 Smartphone measurements of knee flexion angle were obtained for each patient. The paired difference between measurements and their correlation were analyzed. The mean paired difference between navigated and Smartphone measurements was -1.1° ± 6.8° (n.s.). There was a significant correlation between both measurements. The coherence between both measurements was good. The intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility were good. The Smartphone application used may be considered as precise and accurate. The accuracy may be higher than other conventional measurement techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Precise Temperature Measurement for Increasing the Survival of Newborn Babies in Incubator Environments

    PubMed Central

    Frischer, Robert; Penhaker, Marek; Krejcar, Ondrej; Kacerovsky, Marian; Selamat, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Precise temperature measurement is essential in a wide range of applications in the medical environment, however the regarding the problem of temperature measurement inside a simple incubator, neither a simple nor a low cost solution have been proposed yet. Given that standard temperature sensors don't satisfy the necessary expectations, the problem is not measuring temperature, but rather achieving the desired sensitivity. In response, this paper introduces a novel hardware design as well as the implementation that increases measurement sensitivity in defined temperature intervals at low cost. PMID:25494352

  19. SMILETRAP—A Penning trap facility for precision mass measurements using highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, I.; Carlberg, C.; Fritioff, T.; Douysset, G.; Schönfelder, J.; Schuch, R.

    2002-07-01

    The precision of mass measurements in a Penning trap increases linearly with the charge of the ion. Therefore we have attached a Penning trap, named SMILETRAP, to the electron beam ion source CRYSIS at MSL. CRYSIS is via an isotope separator connected to an ion source that can deliver singly charged ions of practically any element. In CRYSIS charge state breeding occurs by intense electron bombardment. We have shown that it is possible to produce, catch and measure the cyclotron frequencies of ions in the charge region 1+ to 52+. The relevant observable in mass measurements using a Penning trap is the ratio of the cyclotron frequencies of the ion of interest and ion used as a mass reference. High precision requires that the two frequencies are measured after one another in the shortest possible time. For reasons of convenience the precision trap operates at room temperature. So far it has been believed that warm traps working at 4 K are required for high mass precision with exactly one ion in the trap at a time. In this paper we demonstrate that mass precision of a few parts in 10 10 also can be obtained in a warm trap at a pressure of about 5×10 -12 mbar by stabilizing the pressure in the He-dewar, the trap temperature and the frequency synthesizer. In order to reduce the influence of changes of the magnetic field to a level below 10 -10, the scanning of the frequencies close to the resonances of both the ion of interest and the reference ion is done in a total time <2 min. Trapping of ions is a statistical procedure, allowing more than one ion to be trapped in each measurement cycle. However, after completing the measurements it is possible to reject all information except for events based on 1 and 2 trapped ions. The procedures of producing, transporting, catching, exciting and measuring the cyclotron resonance frequencies of highly charged ions and the mass reference ions with the time-of-flight method are described. In routine measurements with 1 s excitation

  20. Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Cross Section at High Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Longwu; E12-07-108 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of proton electromagnetic form factors (FF) is a powerful way to understand the internal structure of proton and gain insight into the nature of the strong interaction. Current data of FF at high Q2 have large statistical and systematic uncertainties, which translate into large uncertainties in the extracted cross section in this kinematic range. The GMp experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, starting from 2014, performed precision measurements of elastic ep scattering cross section in the Q2 range from 7 to 14 (GeV / c) 2. These measurements will improve the precision on the cross section in the covered Q2 range to about 2 % . They represent a great complement to the world's cross section data set and will be key inputs for future electromagnetic form factor experiments at similar kinematics. In this talk, the instrumentation and techniques used in the experiment will be described, and the current status of the analysis will be presented.

  1. Direct detection of cosmic rays: through a new era of precision measurements of particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocchiutti, E.

    2014-11-01

    In the last years the direct measurement of cosmic rays received a push forward by the possibility of conducting experiments on board long duration balloon flights, satellites and on the International Space Station. The increase in the collected statistics and the technical improvements in the construction of the detectors permit the fluxes measurement to be performed at higher energies with a reduced discrepancy among different experiments respect to the past. However, high statistical precision is not always associated to the needed precision in the estimation of systematics; features in the particle spectra can be erroneously introduced or hidden. A review and a comparison of the latest experimental results on direct cosmic rays measurements will be presented with particular emphasis on their similarities and discrepancies.

  2. Ion current as a precise measure of the loading rate of a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Bailey, K.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Purtschert, R.

    2014-01-15

    We have demonstrated that the ion current resulting from collisions between metastable krypton atoms in a magneto-optical trap can be used to precisely measure the trap loading rate. We measured both the ion current of the abundant isotope Kr-83 (isotopic abundance = 11%) and the single-atom counting rate of the rare isotope Kr-85 (isotopic abundance similar to 1 x 10(-11)), and found the two quantities to be proportional at a precision level of 0.9%. This work results in a significant improvement in using the magneto-optical trap as an analytical tool for noble-gas isotope ratio measurements, and will benefit both atomic physics studies and applications in the earth sciences. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America

  3. Precise Measurements of the Density and Critical Phenomena Near Phase Transitions in Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    1997-01-01

    The first-year progress for the project of precise measurements of the density and critical phenomena of helium near phase transitions is summarized below: (1) completion of a cryogenic sample probe for the proposed measurements, and the rehabilitation of a designated laboratory at Caltech for this project; (2) construction and testing of a superconducting niobium cavity; (3) acquisition of one phase-locked-loop system for high-resolution frequency control and read- out; (4) setting up high-resolution thermometry (HRT) for temperature readout and control; (5) developing new approaches for calibrating the coefficient between the resonant frequency shift (delta f) and the helium density (rho), as well as for measuring the effect of gravity on T(sub lambda) to a much better precision; (6) programming of the interface control of all instruments for automatic data acquisition; and (7) improving data analyses and fitting procedures.

  4. New precision lifetime measurement of the first excited state of 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, C. J.; Morse, C.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Sonzogni, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Gade, A.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2016-09-01

    12Be presents an important opportunity for nuclear structure studies. It has a canonically magic number of neutrons, N = 8, but on the other hand the beryllium isotopes are well-known for their α-clustering behavior. 12Be is at the limit of computationally feasible GFMC ab initio calculations, and is experimentally accessible for the purposes of making precision measurements. Although recent experiments indicate that 12Be favors the development of clustering over magicity, the electromagnetic decay properties of this system are poorly constrained due to the single measurement (_30% uncertainty) of the B(E2; 2+-0+) value. Here we present a new precise measurement of the 2+ state lifetime using GRETINA at NSCL. We find that the lifetime is about a factor of two shorter than previously reported, so even more collective and clustered then expected. The implications for the structure of 12Be will be discussed.

  5. Precise measurements of hyperfine components in the spectrum of molecular iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Absolute wave numbers with a typical uncertainty of 1 MHz (95% confidence) were measured for 102 hyperfine-structure components of {sup 127}I{sub 2}. The data cover the range 560-656 nm, with no gaps over 50 cm{sup -1}. The spectra were observed using Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy with tunable cw laser. The laser was locked to selected iodine components and its wave number measured with a high precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. Accuracy is confirmed by good agreement of 9 of the lines with previous results from other laboratories. These measurements provide a well-distributed set of precise reference lines for this spectral region.

  6. High-Precision Superallowed Fermi β Decay Measurements at TRIUMF-ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, C. E.

    2016-09-01

    High-precision measurements of the ft -values for superallowed Fermi β decays between nuclear isobaric analogue states provide demanding tests of the electroweak Standard Model, including confirmation of the Conserved Vector Current hypothesis at the level of 1 . 2 ×10-4 , the most stringent limits on weak scalar currents, and the most precise determination of the Vud element of the CKM quark-mixing matrix. The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF produces high-quality beams of several of the superallowed emitters with world-record intensities and hosts a suite of state-of-the-art spectrometers for the measurement of superallowed half-lives, branching ratios, QEC values, and charge-radii. Recent highlights from the superallowed program at ISAC, including high-precision half-life measurements for the light superallowed emitters 10C, 14O, 18Ne, and 26mAl and branching-ratio measurements for the heavy superallowed emitters 62Ga and 74Rb will be presented. The impact of these measurements on tests of the Standard Model, and future developments in the superallowed program at ISAC with the new high-efficiency GRIFFIN γ - ray spectrometer, will be discussed. Research supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the Canada Research Chairs Program. TRIUMF receives federal funding via the National Research Council of Canada.

  7. An Inexpensive Field-Widened Monolithic Michelson Interferometer for Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Wan, Xiaoke; DeWitt, Curtis; van Eyken, Julian C.; McDavitt, Dan

    2008-09-01

    We have constructed a thermally compensated field-widened monolithic Michelson interferometer that can be used with a medium-resolution spectrograph to measure precise Doppler radial velocities of stars. Our prototype monolithic fixed-delay interferometer is constructed with off-the-shelf components and assembled using a hydrolysis bonding technique. We installed and tested this interferometer in the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope, an instrument built to demonstrate the principles of dispersed fixed-delay interferometry. An iodine cell allows the interferometer drift to be accurately calibrated, relaxing the stability requirements on the interferometer itself. When using our monolithic interferometer, the ET instrument has no moving parts (except the iodine cell), greatly simplifying its operation. We demonstrate differential radial velocity precision of a few m s-1 on well known radial velocity standards and planet bearing stars when using this interferometer. Such monolithic interferometers will make it possible to build relatively inexpensive instruments that are easy to operate and capable of precision radial velocity measurements. A larger multiobject version of the Exoplanet Tracker will be used to conduct a large scale survey for planetary systems as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III). Variants of the techniques and principles discussed in this paper can be directly applied to build large monolithic interferometers for such applications, enabling the construction of instruments capable of efficiently observing many stars simultaneously at high velocity precision.

  8. High-precision branching ratio measurement for the superallowed {beta}{sup +} emitter {sup 62}Ga

    SciTech Connect

    Finlay, P.; Svensson, C. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Wong, J.; Ball, G. C.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Hackman, G.; Kanungo, R.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Savajols, H.; Leslie, J. R.; Towner, I. S.; Austin, R. A. E.; Chaffey, A.

    2008-08-15

    A high-precision branching ratio measurement for the superallowed {beta}{sup +} decay of {sup 62}Ga was performed at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) radioactive ion beam facility. The 8{pi} spectrometer, an array of 20 high-purity germanium detectors, was employed to detect the {gamma} rays emitted following Gamow-Teller and nonanalog Fermi {beta}{sup +} decays of {sup 62}Ga, and the SCEPTAR plastic scintillator array was used to detect the emitted {beta} particles. Thirty {gamma} rays were identified following {sup 62}Ga decay, establishing the superallowed branching ratio to be 99.858(8)%. Combined with the world-average half-life and a recent high-precision Q-value measurement for {sup 62}Ga, this branching ratio yields an ft value of 3074.3{+-}1.1 s, making {sup 62}Ga among the most precisely determined superallowed ft values. Comparison between the superallowed ft value determined in this work and the world-average corrected Ft value allows the large nuclear-structure-dependent correction for {sup 62}Ga decay to be experimentally determined from the CVC hypothesis to better than 7% of its own value, the most precise experimental determination for any superallowed emitter. These results provide a benchmark for the refinement of the theoretical description of isospin-symmetry breaking in A{>=}62 superallowed decays.

  9. The Galileo System of Measurement: Preliminary Evidence for Precision, Stability, and Equivalance to Traditional Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, James; Woelfel, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Galileo system of measurement operations including reliability and validity data. Illustrations of some of the relations between Galileo measures and traditional procedures are provided. (MH)

  10. Precision and Resolution on Tore-Supra Ece Electron Temperature Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ségui, J. L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-02-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the Xmode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 Ghz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 Ghz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600°C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Pérot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision +/-6%, relative precision between channels +/-3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (Bvacuum with ripple, Bpara, Bdia, Bpol, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction (cut-offs detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfil 32 channels (1GHz

  11. The interferometric method for measuring the generatrix straightness of high precision cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yanhui; Li, Huailu; Diao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Heng

    2015-10-01

    Cone parts are widely used in advanced manufacturing and precision mechanics, providing air proof, torque transmission and so on. The straightness of generatrix is one of the important parameters, and the required accuracy can be up to submicrometers. In order to realize the rapid and high precision generatrix measurement of smooth surface cone, a laser interferometric method is proposed based on the structure of typical Fizeau interferometer. The high precision optical flat is used for reference standard, and the surface of cone is the measured object. Two cylindrical lenses with different focal lengths realize unidirectional expansion of parallel beam, solving the problem of CCD camera fringe resolution. The interference fringes are curved because of the cone angle, and the peak is the basis for accurate determination of the generatrix. Two fringe processing techniques are described in detail, which are single-frame and phase-shifting methods. Single-frame method includes two steps, i.e. the calculation of integral part and decimal part. The advantage of this method is the simple measurement structure. Phase-shifting method needs piezoelectric transducer (PZT) to generate several steps for phase calculation, with the advantage of high accuracy. The experimental results show that the straightness measurement accuracy can be better than 0.2 μm.

  12. MULTI-CENTER PRECISION OF CORTICAL AND TRABECULAR BONE QUALITY MEASURES ASSESSED BY HR-PQCT

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Andrew J.; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Kazakia, Galateia J.; Boutroy, Stephanie; Engelke, Klaus; Patsch, Janina M.; Valentinitsch, Alexander; Liu, Danmei; Szabo, Eva; Bogado, Cesar E.; Zanchetta, Maria Belen; McKay, Heather A.; Shane, Elizabeth; Boyd, Steven K.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Chapurlat, Roland; Khosla, Sundeep; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has recently been introduced as a clinical research tool for in vivo assessment of bone quality. The utility of this technique to address important skeletal health questions requires translation to standardized multi-center data pools. Our goal was to evaluate the feasibility of pooling data in multi-center HR-pQCT imaging trials. Reproducibility imaging experiments were performed using structure and composition-realistic phantoms constructed from cadaveric radii. Single-center precision was determined by repeat scanning over short (<72hrs), intermediate (3–5mo), and long-term intervals (28mo). Multi-center precision was determined by imaging the phantoms at nine different HR-pQCT centers. Least significant change (LSC) and root mean squared coefficient of variation (RMSCV) for each interval and across centers was calculated for bone density, geometry, microstructure, and biomechanical parameters. Single-center short-term RMSCVs were <1% for all parameters except Ct.Th (1.1%), Ct.Th.SD (2.6%), Tb.Sp.SD (1.8%), and porosity measures (6–8%). Intermediate-term RMSCVs were generally not statistically different from short-term values. Long-term variability was significantly greater for all density measures (0.7–2.0%; p < 0.05 vs. short-term) and several structure measures: Ct.Th (3.4%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term), Ct.Po (15.4%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term), and Tb.Th (2.2%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term). Multi-center RMSCVs were also significantly higher than short-term values: 2–4% for density and µFE measures (p < 0.0001), 2.6–5.3% for morphometric measures (p < 0.001), while Ct.Po was 16.2% (p < 0.001). In the absence of subject motion, multi-center precision errors for HR-pQCT parameters were generally less than 5%. Phantom-based multi-center precision was comparable to previously reported in vivo single-center precision errors, although this was approximately 2–5 times worse than ex vivo short

  13. Precision measurement of the photon detection efficiency of silicon photomultipliers using two integrating spheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seul Ki; Lee, J; Kim, Sug-Whan; Lee, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jin-A; Park, I H; Yoon, Jae-Ryong; Baek, Yang-Sik

    2014-01-13

    We report a new and improved photon counting method for the precision PDE measurement of SiPM detectors, utilizing two integrating spheres connected serially and calibrated reference detectors. First, using a ray tracing simulation and irradiance measurement results with a reference photodiode, we investigated irradiance characteristics of the measurement instrument, and analyzed dominating systematic uncertainties in PDE measurement. Two SiPM detectors were then used for PDE measurements between wavelengths of 368 and 850 nm and for bias voltages varying from around 70V. The resulting PDEs of the SiPMs show good agreement with those from other studies, yet with an improved accuracy of 1.57% (1σ). This was achieved by the simultaneous measurement with the NIST calibrated reference detectors, which suppressed the time dependent variation of source light. The technical details of the instrumentation, measurement results and uncertainty analysis are reported together with their implications.

  14. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon; Alpha Gamma; BL2 Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n , t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  15. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  16. Optimized spectroscopic scheme for enhanced precision CO measurements with applications to urban source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottrott, A.; Hoffnagle, J.; Farinas, A.; Rella, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an urban pollutant generated by internal combustion engines which contributes to the formation of ground level ozone (smog). CO is also an excellent tracer for emissions from mobile combustion sources. In this work we present an optimized spectroscopic sampling scheme that enables enhanced precision CO measurements. The scheme was implemented on the Picarro G2401 Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer which measures CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O at 0.2 Hz. The optimized scheme improved the raw precision of CO measurements by 40% from 5 ppb to 3 ppb. Correlations of measured CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O from an urban tower were partitioned by wind direction and combined with a concentration footprint model for source attribution. The application of a concentration footprint for source attribution has several advantages. The upwind extent of the concentration footprint for a given sensor is much larger than the flux footprint. Measurements of mean concentration at the sensor location can be used to estimate source strength from a concentration footprint, while measurements of the vertical concentration flux are necessary to determine source strength from the flux footprint. Direct measurement of vertical concentration flux requires high frequency temporal sampling and increases the cost and complexity of the measurement system.

  17. Impairments in precision grip correlate with functional measures in adult hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Hillier, Susan L; Ridding, Michael C; Miles, Timothy S

    2006-07-01

    Analysis of a precision grip-lift task provides measures to assess functional disability of the hand, but the correlation between these measures and accepted tests of motor function in stroke patients has not been established. Seventeen subacute stroke patients were studied to compare parameters of a precision grip-lift task between the affected and unaffected side, and to correlate them with function. Functional impairment was assessed with the Action Research Arm Test and the Fugl-Meyer assessment, as well as grip strength and maximal finger-tapping speed. The grip force (GF) and load force (LF) were recorded as patients lifted a custom-built manipulandum. All measures were recorded on two separate occasions, at least 1 week apart. There was good reproducibility between testing sessions for the grip-lift and functional measures. The affected hand gripped the manipulandum for longer prior to lift-off than the unaffected hand, and the normal close temporal coupling between the rate of change of GF and LF during the lift was disrupted. These two measures correlated more highly with the ARAT than the FMA and, when combined with measures of grip strength and tapping speed, explained 71% of the variance of the ARAT. The grip-lift task is a sensitive measure of impaired dexterity following stroke and provides measures which correlate well with a commonly applied functional assessment scale. This task may be used clinically to detect changes in the hemiplegic upper limb during rehabilitation and recovery.

  18. Report of the working group on precision measurements - measurements of the W boson mass and width.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R.; Erler, J.; Kim, Y.-K.; Marciano, W.; Ashmanskas, W.; Baur, U.; Ellison, J.; Lancaster, M.; Nodulman, L.; Rha, J.; Waters, D.; Womersley, J.

    2000-11-29

    We discuss the prospects for measuring the W mass and width in Run II. The basic techniques used to measure M{sub W} are described and the statistical, theoretical and detector-related uncertainties are discussed in detail. Alternative methods of measuring the W mass at the Tevatron and the prospects for M{sub W} measurements at other colliders are also described.

  19. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in ordermore » to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.« less

  20. Precise Lifetime Measurements in Light Nuclei for Benchmarking Modern Ab-initio Nuclear Structure Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; McCutchan, E.A.

    2014-06-15

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces, is having a profound impact on our view of how nuclei work. To improve the numerical methods, and the parameterization of 3-body forces, new precise data are needed. Electromagnetic transitions are very sensitive to the dynamics which drive mixing between configurations. We have made a series of precise (< 3%) measurements of electromagnetic transitions in the A=10 nuclei {sup 10}C and {sup 10}Be by using the Doppler Shift Attenuation method carefully. Many interesting features can be reproduced including the strong α clustering. New measurements on {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}Be highlight the interplay between the alpha clusters and their valence neutrons.

  1. Time-of-flight measurement with femtosecond pulses for high precision ranging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Kim, S.-W.

    2010-10-01

    The time-of-flight of light pulses has long been used as a direct measure of distance, but the state-of-the-art measurement precision using conventional light pulses or microwaves reaches only several hundreds of micromeres. This is due to the bandwidth limit of the photodetectors available today, which is in the picosecond range at best. Here, we improve the time-of-flight precision to the nanometer regime by timing femtosecond pulses through phase-locking control of the pulse repetition rate using the optical cross-correlation technique that exploits a second-harmonic birefringence crystal and a balance photodetector. The enhanced capability is maintained at long range without periodic ambiguity, being well suited to terrestrial lidar applications such as geodetic surveying, range finders and absolute altimeters. This method could also be applied to future space missions of formation-flying satellites for synthetic aperture imaging and remote experiments related to the general relativity theory.

  2. Measure and Control Technology Based on DSP for HighPrecision Scanning Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, N.; Yang, X. Y.; Wu, B.; Ye, S. H.

    2006-10-01

    A welding seam tracking visual sensor based on laser scanning is designed to solve the problems, such as indistinct image, difficulty in processing image etc., caused by serious arc light interference during welding. This visual sensor is mainly composed of a scanning motor, a linear-array CCD, a scanning rotating mirror and a semiconductor laser. Because the sensor measurement precision relies dramatically on the rotate speed stability of the scanning motor, the crux in the sensor design is to control the rotate speed of the scanning motor. Selecting a brushless direct current motor as the scanning motor and using TMS320F2812 DSP to drive it, we adopted fuzzy algorithm to control the motor rotate speed and made the steadiness error of the rotate speed less than 0.5%, which guarantees the sensor measurement precision and is of great importance for enhancing the welding quality of the industry welding robot.

  3. A high-precision method for measurement of paleoatmospheric CO2 in small polar ice samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jinho; Brook, Edward J.; Howell, Kate

    We describe a high-precision method, now in use in our laboratory, for measuring the CO2 mixing ratio of ancient air trapped in polar ice cores. Occluded air in ice samples weighing ˜8-15 g is liberated by crushing with steel pins at -35°C and trapped at -263°C in a cryogenic cold trap. CO2 in the extracted air is analyzed using gas chromatography. Replicate measurements for several samples of high-quality ice from the Siple Dome and Taylor Dome Antarctic ice cores have pooled standard deviations of <0.9 ppm. This high-precision technique is directly applicable to high-temporal-resolution studies for detection of small CO2 variations, for example CO2 variations of a few parts per million on millennial to decadal scales.

  4. Precision measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron in the pre-LHC era.

    PubMed

    Galtieri, Angela Barbaro; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Volobouev, Igor

    2012-05-01

    The top quark is the heaviest of the six quarks of the standard model (SM). Precise knowledge of its mass is important for imposing constraints on a number of physics processes, including interactions of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is the only missing particle of the SM, central to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and generation of particle masses. In this review, experimental measurements of the top quark mass accomplished at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, are described. Topologies of top quark events and the methods used to separate signal events from background sources are discussed. Data analysis techniques used to extract information about the top mass value are reviewed. The combination of several of the most precise measurements performed with the two Tevatron particle detectors, CDF and DØ, yields a value of M(t) = 173.2 ± 0.9 GeV/c(2).

  5. Method to improve precision of rotating inertia and friction measurements in turbomachinery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povey, Thomas; Paniagua, Guillermo

    2012-07-01

    This short communication presents a method to determine the rotating inertia with superior measurement precision. The performance of free wheel devices requires an accurate evaluation of both friction and rotating inertia. The present methodology consists on spinning the rotor with a mass attached, then separating the mass from the rotor and allowing the rotor to spin down. The technique allows precise measurements without disassembling the rotor housing. The new approach models frictional torque as a linear function in speed, using optimization data reduction techniques to fit the experimental data to a multidimensional system of non-linear equations. Theoretical and experimental results are used to demonstrate the applicability of the technique with high accuracy.

  6. Performance of Planar-Waveguide External Cavity Laser for Precision Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan; Krainak, Michael A.; Stolpner, Lew

    2010-01-01

    A 1542-nm planar-waveguide external cavity laser (PW-ECL) is shown to have a sufficiently low level of frequency and intensity noise to be suitable for precision measurement applications. The frequency noise and intensity noise of the PW-ECL was comparable or better than the nonplanar ring oscillator (NPRO) and fiber laser between 0.1 mHz to 100 kHz. Controllability of the PW-ECL was demonstrated by stabilizing its frequency to acetylene (13C2H2) at 10(exp -13) level of Allan deviation. The PW-ECL also has the advantage of the compactness of a standard butterfly package, low cost, and a simple design consisting of a semiconductor gain media coupled to a planar-waveguide Bragg reflector. These features would make the PW-ECL suitable for precision measurements, including compact optical frequency standards, space lidar, and space interferometry

  7. Towards a high-precision measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Franke, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Nagahama, H.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2014-02-01

    The recent observation of single spins flips with a single proton in a Penning trap opens the way to measure the proton magnetic moment with high precision. Based on this success, which has been achieved with our apparatus at the University of Mainz, we demonstrated recently the first application of the so called double Penning-trap method with a single proton. This is a major step towards a measurement of the proton magnetic moment with ppb precision. To apply this method to a single trapped antiproton our collaboration is currently setting up a companion experiment at the antiproton decelerator of CERN. This effort is recognized as the Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE). A comparison of both magnetic moment values will provide a stringent test of CPT invariance with baryons.

  8. What can we learn from high precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, R. N.

    2004-12-01

    Many experiments are being planned to measure the neutrino mixing angles more precisely. In this note, the theoretical significance of a high precision measurement of these parameters is discussed. It is emphasized that they can provide crucial information about different ways to understand the origin of large atmospheric neutrino mixing and move us closer towards determining the neutrino mass matrix. They may also be able to throw light on the question of lepton-quark unification as well as the existence of any leptonic symmetries. For instance if exact m i symmetry in the neutrino mass matrix is assumed to be the reason for maximal nm-ni mixing, one gets q13 = 0 and theta_{13} simeq sqrt{Delta m_{dotcircle}^2/Delta_A^2} or theta_{13} simeq Delta m_{dotcircle}^2/Delta_A^2 can provide information about the way the m i symmetry breaking manifests in the case of normal hierarchy.

  9. Precision measurement of the muon momentum in pion decay at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abela, R.; Daum, M.; Eaton, G. H.; Frosch, R.; Jost, B.; Kettle, P.-R.; Steiner, E.

    1984-10-01

    A new series of precision measurements of the muon momentum pμ+ in the decay π-->μ+vμ at rest have been made using a magnetic spectrometer. The result is pμ+=(29.79139 +/- 0.00083) MeV/c. The consequences of this value for the rest masses of the muon neutrino and of the charged pion are discussed.

  10. Engineering Stark Potentials for Precision Measurements: Optical Lattice Clock and Electrodynamic Surface Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Takamoto, Masao; Hachisu, Hidekazu; Fujiki, Jun; Higashi, Ryoichi; Yasuda, Masami; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    2005-05-05

    Employing the engineered electric fields, we demonstrate novel platforms for precision measurements with neutral atoms. (1) Applying the light shift cancellation technique, atoms trapped in an optical lattice reveal 50-Hz-narrow optical spectrum, yielding nearly an order of magnitude improvement over existing neutral-atom-based clocks. (2) Surface Stark trap has been developed to manipulate scalar atoms that are intrinsically robust to decoherence.

  11. Precise measurement of volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated dynamic analysis of the physiological function of eccrine sweat glands underneath skin surface by optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this paper, we propose a method for extraction of the specific eccrine sweat gland by means of the connected component extraction process and the adaptive threshold method, where the en face OCT images are constructed by the swept-source OCT. In the experiment, we demonstrate precise measurement of the volume of the sweat gland in response to the external stimulus.

  12. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed {beta}{sup +} emitter {sup 10}C

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Golovko, V.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2008-04-15

    The half-life of {sup 10}C has been measured to be 19.310(4) s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since {sup 10}C is the lightest superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} {beta}{sup +} emitter, its ft value has the greatest weight in setting an upper limit on the possible presence of scalar currents.

  13. Quantum preservation of the measurements precision using ultra-short strong pulses in exact analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Eleuch, H.

    2017-09-01

    Various schemes have been proposed to improve the parameter-estimation precision. In the present work, we suggest an alternative method to preserve the estimation precision by considering a model that closely describes a realistic experimental scenario. We explore this active way to control and enhance the measurements precision for a two-level quantum system interacting with classical electromagnetic field using ultra-short strong pulses with an exact analytical solution, i.e. beyond the rotating wave approximation. In particular, we investigate the variation of the precision with a few cycles pulse and a smooth phase jump over a finite time interval. We show that by acting on the shape of the phase transient and other parameters of the considered system, the amount of information may be increased and has smaller decay rate in the long time. These features make two-level systems incorporated in ultra-short, of-resonant and gradually changing phase good candidates for implementation of schemes for the quantum computation and the coherent information processing.

  14. Evaluation of cost-precision rations of different strategies for ELISA measurement of serum antibody levels.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Katarzyna; Wang, Xiaohong; Jacobsson, Anders; Dillner, Joakim

    2002-12-20

    Standardization and design of optimally reproducible strategies for the measurement of serum antibody levels by ELISA can present significant problems. In this article, we present a theoretical analysis of two common calculation methods in ELISA analysis (parallel line and reference line models), together with a new model, termed wPLL (a least squares-weighted modification of the parallel line model). The subject of required precision in relation to the marginal costs of increased precision has not been well explored. We compared the three different calculation methods of expressing ELISA results based on the relationship between the dose response curves obtained from the reference serum and the test samples in two viral antibody determination systems (human papillomavirus and measles). The three methods were evaluated for inter- and intraassay precision using the coefficient of variation in experiments with different numbers of dilutions and different numbers of replicates. Strategies with optimal cost-precision ratios were designed. The novel calculation method termed wPLL was preferable.

  15. A comparison of technical replicate (cuts) effect on lamb Warner-Bratzler shear force measurement precision.

    PubMed

    Holman, B W B; Alvarenga, T I R C; van de Ven, R J; Hopkins, D L

    2015-07-01

    The Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of 335 lamb m. longissimus lumborum (LL) caudal and cranial ends was measured to examine and simulate the effect of replicate number (r: 1-8) on the precision of mean WBSF estimates and to compare LL caudal and cranial end WBSF means. All LL were sourced from two experimental flocks as part of the Information Nucleus slaughter programme (CRC for Sheep Industry Innovation) and analysed using a Lloyd Texture analyser with a Warner-Bratzler blade attachment. WBSF data were natural logarithm (ln) transformed before statistical analysis. Mean ln(WBSF) precision improved as r increased; however the practical implications support an r equal to 6, as precision improves only marginally with additional replicates. Increasing LL sample replication results in better ln(WBSF) precision compared with increasing r, provided that sample replicates are removed from the same LL end. Cranial end mean WBSF was 11.2 ± 1.3% higher than the caudal end.

  16. Evaluation of factors determining the precision of body composition measurements by air displacement plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Collins, A L; McCarthy, H D

    2003-06-01

    To investigate methodological precision of air displacement plethysmography for assessment of body composition in a heterogenous sample of adults. Accuracy of volume measurements by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) for a range of known volumes was ascertained. Repeated measurements of body volume, lung volume, and derived body composition using the BODPOD measurement system were performed. Influence of surface area estimation on ADP measurement was investigated as a possible source of variation. Clinical Nutrition Laboratory, School of Health & Sports Science, University of North London, London, UK. One hundred and two healthy subjects (57 women, 45 men) who ranged in age between 16 and 55 y and in BMI (kg/m(2)) between 17.8 and 41.9. Cross-sectional study of healthy adults for comparison with previous studies. Repeat measurements of raw body volume, lung volume and % body fat (BF) by ADP were all performed on the same day. From the range of known volumes a marked increase in the CV and a significantly greater measurement error were found at volumes below 40 l (P=0.04). Repeat measurements of raw body volume in human subjects resulted in a technical error equivalent to 0.8% BF. There was no significant difference found between measured and predicted lung volume and the 95% confidence interval for difference was only 0.3% BF. Repeat measurements of lung volume in our subset resulted in a technical error equivalent to 0.5% BF. Although body surface area estimation only accounted for variation in % BF of 0.1%, the extent of variation appeared to be governed by leanness (P<0.001). Although ADP retains excellent precision, in practice, repeat measurements of ADP should be performed whenever possible to allow for erroneous volume measurement within one procedure. Protocols for ADP measurement should be created with an awareness of those factors, which may affect measurements. This study was supported by the University of North London Diversity & Development Fund.

  17. High-precision measurement of magnetic penetration depth in superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Gozar, A.; Sundling, R.; Božović, I.

    2016-11-01

    We report that the magnetic penetration depth (λ) in thin superconducting films is usually measured by the mutual inductance technique. The accuracy of this method has been limited by uncertainties in the geometry of the solenoids and in the film position and thickness, by parasitic coupling between the coils, etc. Here, we present several improvements in the apparatus and the method. To ensure the precise thickness of the superconducting layer, we engineer the films at atomic level using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy. In this way, we also eliminate secondary-phase precipitates, grain boundaries, and pinholes that are common with other deposition methods and that artificially increase the field transmission and thus the apparent λ. For better reproducibility, the thermal stability of our closed-cycle cryocooler used to control the temperature of the mutual inductance measurement has been significantly improved by inserting a custom-built thermal conductivity damper. Next, to minimize the uncertainties in the geometry, we fused a pair of small yet precisely wound coils into a single sapphire block machined to a high precision. Lastly, the sample is spring-loaded to exactly the same position with respect to the solenoids. Altogether, we can measure the absolute value of λ with the accuracy better than ±1%.

  18. High-precision measurement of magnetic penetration depth in superconducting films

    DOE PAGES

    He, X.; Gozar, A.; Sundling, R.; ...

    2016-11-01

    We report that the magnetic penetration depth (λ) in thin superconducting films is usually measured by the mutual inductance technique. The accuracy of this method has been limited by uncertainties in the geometry of the solenoids and in the film position and thickness, by parasitic coupling between the coils, etc. Here, we present several improvements in the apparatus and the method. To ensure the precise thickness of the superconducting layer, we engineer the films at atomic level using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy. In this way, we also eliminate secondary-phase precipitates, grain boundaries, and pinholes that are common with other depositionmore » methods and that artificially increase the field transmission and thus the apparent λ. For better reproducibility, the thermal stability of our closed-cycle cryocooler used to control the temperature of the mutual inductance measurement has been significantly improved by inserting a custom-built thermal conductivity damper. Next, to minimize the uncertainties in the geometry, we fused a pair of small yet precisely wound coils into a single sapphire block machined to a high precision. Lastly, the sample is spring-loaded to exactly the same position with respect to the solenoids. Altogether, we can measure the absolute value of λ with the accuracy better than ±1%.« less

  19. High-precision measurement of magnetic penetration depth in superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Gozar, A.; Sundling, R.; Božović, I.

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic penetration depth (λ) in thin superconducting films is usually measured by the mutual inductance technique. The accuracy of this method has been limited by uncertainties in the geometry of the solenoids and in the film position and thickness, by parasitic coupling between the coils, etc. Here, we present several improvements in the apparatus and the method. To ensure the precise thickness of the superconducting layer, we engineer the films at atomic level using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy. In this way, we also eliminate secondary-phase precipitates, grain boundaries, and pinholes that are common with other deposition methods and that artificially increase the field transmission and thus the apparent λ. For better reproducibility, the thermal stability of our closed-cycle cryocooler used to control the temperature of the mutual inductance measurement has been significantly improved by inserting a custom-built thermal conductivity damper. Next, to minimize the uncertainties in the geometry, we fused a pair of small yet precisely wound coils into a single sapphire block machined to a high precision. The sample is spring-loaded to exactly the same position with respect to the solenoids. Altogether, we can measure the absolute value of λ with the accuracy better than ±1%.

  20. A method for the precision mass measurement of the stop quark at the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ayres; Milsténe, Caroline; Schmitt, Michael; Sopczak, Andre

    2008-09-01

    Many supersymmetric models predict new particles within the reach of the next generation of colliders. For an understanding of the model structure and the mechanism(s) of symmetry breaking, it is important to know the masses of the new particles precisely. In this article the measurement of the mass of the scalar partner of the top quark (stop) at an e+e- collider is studied. A relatively light stop is motivated by attempts to explain electroweak baryogenesis and can play an important role in dark matter relic density. A method is presented which makes use of cross-section measurements near the pair-production threshold as well as at higher center-of-mass energies. It is shown that this method not only increases the statistical precision, but also greatly reduces the systematic uncertainties, which can be important. Numerical results are presented, based on a realistic event simulation, for two signal selection strategies: using conventional selection cuts, and using an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). Our studies indicate that a precision of Δmtilde t1 = 0.42 GeV can be achieved, representing a major improvement over previous studies. While the analysis of stops is particularly challenging due to the possibility of stop hadronization, the general procedure could be applied to the mass measurement of other particles as well. We also comment on the potential of the IDA to discover a stop quark in this scenario, and we revisit the accuracy of the theoretical predictions for the neutralino relic density.

  1. Flying spot laser triangulation scanner using lateral synchronization for surface profile precision measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanlin; Ren, Yongjie; Liu, Changjie; Zhu, Jigui

    2014-07-10

    High-speed surface profile measurement with high precision is crucial for target inspection and quality control. In this study, a laser scanner based on a single point laser triangulation displacement sensor and a high-speed rotating polygon mirror is proposed. The autosynchronized scanning scheme is introduced to alleviate the trade-off between the field of view and the range precision, which is the inherent deficiency of the conventional triangulation. The lateral synchronized flying spot technology has excellent characteristics, such as programmable and larger field of view, high immunity to ambient light or secondary reflections, high optical signal-to-noise ratio, and minimum shadow effect. Owing to automatic point-to-point laser power control, high accuracy and superior data quality are possible when measuring objects featuring varying surface characteristics even in demanding applications. The proposed laser triangulation scanner is validated using a laboratory-built prototype and practical considerations for design and implementation of the system are described, including speckle noise reduction method and real-time signal processing. A method for rapid and accurate calibration of the laser triangulation scanner using lookup tables is also devised, and the system calibration accuracy is generally smaller than ±0.025  mm. Experimental results are presented and show a broad application prospect for fast surface profile precision measurement.

  2. Precision measurements on kaonic hydrogen and kaonic deuterium: DEAR and SIDDHARTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, M.

    2005-06-01

    The SIDDHARTA ( SIlicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) experiment [J. Zmeskal, SIDDHARTA Technical Note IR-2 (2003); C. Curceanu (Petrascu), SID-DHARTA Technical Note IR-3 (2003)] represents the scientific and technical development of DEAR ( DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) [S. Bianco et al., Rivista del Nuovo Cimento 22 (11) (1999) 1], as part of the program dedicated to exotic atoms at DAΦNE [G. Vignola, Proc. of the "5th European Particle Accelerator Conference", Sitges, Eds. S. Myres et al., Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol and Philadelphia (1996) 22]. The objective consists in an eV precision measurement of the kaonic hydrogen K line shift and width induced by the strong interaction, and the first measurement of kaonic deuterium. These values will allow a precise determination of antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths and a better understanding of the chiral symmetry breaking scenario in the strangeness sector. DEAR performed the most precise measurement up to now on kaonic hydrogen, at the end of 2002. The SIDDHARTA collaboration is developing a new set of large area, triggerable X-ray Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD), which will improve by 2 orders of magnitude the background rejection, allowing to reach the proposed objectives. The results of DEAR, as well as the state of the art of the new setup are presented.

  3. Precision Beam Parameter Monitoring in a Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moeller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, M.S.

    2005-04-11

    A precision measurement of the parity nonconserving left-right asymmetry, A{sub LR}, in Moeller scattering (e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}) is currently in progress at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This experiment, labeled SLAC-E158, scatters longitudinally polarized electrons off atomic electrons in an unpolarized hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.03 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry, which is the fractional difference in the scattering cross-sections, measures the effective pseudo-scalar weak neutral current coupling, g{sub ee}, governing Moeller scattering. This quantity is in turn proportional to (1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}), where {theta}{sub w} is the electroweak mixing angle. The goal is to measure the asymmetry to a precision of 1 x 10{sup -8} which corresponds to {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) {approx} 0.0007. Since A{sub LR} is a function of the cross-sections, and the cross-sections depend on the beam parameters, the desired precision of A{sub LR} places stringent requirements on the beam parameters. This paper investigates the requirements on the beam parameters and discusses the means by which they are monitored and accounted for.

  4. Effect of Experience and Training on the Concordance and Precision of Strain Measurements.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Tomoko; Negishi, Kazuaki; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Popescu, Bogdan A; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kurosawa, Koji; Penicka, Martin; Marwick, Thomas H

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to show the degree to which experience and training affect the precision and validity of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measurement and to evaluate the variability of strain measurement after feedback. The application of GLS for the detection of subclinical dysfunction has been recommended in an expert consensus document and is being used with increasing frequency. The role of experience in the precision and validity of GLS measurement is unknown, as is the efficacy of training. Fifty-eight readers, divided into 4 groups on the basis of their experience with GLS, calculated GLS from speckle strain analysis of 9 cases with various degrees of image quality. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), mean difference, SD, and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared against the measurements of a reference group that had experience with >1,000 cases of strain measurement. Individualized feedback was distributed, and repeat measurements were performed by 40 readers. Comparisons with the baseline variation provided information about whether feedback was effective. The ICC for GLS was significantly greater than that for ejection fraction regardless of image quality. Experience with strain measurement affected the concordance in strain values among the readers; the group with the highest level of experience showed significantly better ICC than those with no experience, although the ICC of the inexperienced readers was still very good (0.996 vs. 0.975; p = 0.0002). As experience increased, the mean difference, SD, and CV became significantly smaller. The CV of segmental strain analysis showed significant improvement after training, regardless of experience. The favorable interobserver agreement of GLS makes it more attractive than ejection fraction for follow-up of left ventricular function by multiple observers. Although experience is important, the precision of GLS was high for all groups. Training appears to be of most value for the assessment of

  5. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal‐Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital‐acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal‐noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step‐down, medical, surgical, and medical‐surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta‐binomial models, we estimated between‐unit variability (signal) and within‐unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal‐noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between‐unit variability to the total of between‐ and within‐unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal‐noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal‐noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  6. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fast and precise dense grid size measurement method based on coaxial dual optical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiping; Peng, Xiang; Yu, Jiping; Hao, Jian; Diao, Yan; Song, Tao; Li, Ameng; Lu, Xiaowei

    2015-10-01

    Test sieves with dense grid structure are widely used in many fields, accurate gird size calibration is rather critical for success of grading analysis and test sieving. But traditional calibration methods suffer from the disadvantages of low measurement efficiency and shortage of sampling number of grids which could lead to quality judgment risk. Here, a fast and precise test sieve inspection method is presented. Firstly, a coaxial imaging system with low and high optical magnification probe is designed to capture the grid images of the test sieve. Then, a scaling ratio between low and high magnification probes can be obtained by the corresponding grids in captured images. With this, all grid dimensions in low magnification image can be obtained by measuring few corresponding grids in high magnification image with high accuracy. Finally, by scanning the stage of the tri-axis platform of the measuring apparatus, whole surface of the test sieve can be quickly inspected. Experiment results show that the proposed method can measure the test sieves with higher efficiency compare to traditional methods, which can measure 0.15 million grids (gird size 0.1mm) within only 60 seconds, and it can measure grid size range from 20μm to 5mm precisely. In a word, the presented method can calibrate the grid size of test sieve automatically with high efficiency and accuracy. By which, surface evaluation based on statistical method can be effectively implemented, and the quality judgment will be more reasonable.

  8. Technical note: Aerosol light absorption measurements with a carbon analyser - Calibration and precision estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerlaan, B. A. J.; Holzinger, R.; Jedynska, A. D.; Henzing, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are different mass metrics to quantify the amount of combustion aerosol. Both metrics have their own measurement technique. In state-of-the-art carbon analysers, optical measurements are used to correct for organic carbon that is not evolving because of pyrolysis. These optical measurements are sometimes used to apply the technique of absorption photometers. Here, we use the transmission measurements of our carbon analyser for simultaneous determination of the elemental carbon concentration and the absorption coefficient. We use MAAP data from the CESAR observatory, the Netherlands, to correct for aerosol-filter interactions by linking the attenuation coefficient from the carbon analyser to the absorption coefficient measured by the MAAP. Application of the calibration to an independent data set of MAAP and OC/EC observations for the same location shows that the calibration is applicable to other observation periods. Because of simultaneous measurements of light absorption properties of the aerosol and elemental carbon, variation in the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) can be studied. We further show that the absorption coefficients and MAE in this set-up are determined within a precision of 10% and 12%, respectively. The precisions could be improved to 4% and 8% when the light transmission signal in the carbon analyser is very stable.

  9. Development of ultra-precision micro-cavity measurement technique in HIT-UOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiwen; Li, Lei; Tan, Jiubin

    2010-08-01

    Micro cavities with high aspect ratio are widely used in different fields including aerospace and defense industries with the development of manufacturing technology. So how to measure the dimension of these cavities has become one of the major research subjects in the field of measurement and instrument. This paper describes some activities of the precision micro cavity measurement technique in Center of Ultra-precision Optoelectronic Instrument (UOI), Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). The key issue of micro cavity measurement in UOI is called touch-trigger measurement method. The first scheme is double optical fiber coupling, in which light coming from the incident optical fiber is transmitted in the reversal direction via the optical fiber coupling into the effluent optical fiber, the lateral displacement of the touch-trigger sensor is transformed into the deflexion of light coming out from the effluent optical fiber, and the deflexion is transformed into an image signal by the object lens and CCD capturing system. And the second scheme is micro focal-length collimation, in which a fiber stem with a ball mounted on its end is used as a probe and a small segment of it is used as a cylindrical lens to collimate a point light source and image it to a camera, the deflection of the fiber stem can be inferred from the change in image acquired by the camera with ultrahigh displacement sensitivity. Experiments for these activities will be given with a focus on the measurement results and repeatability uncertainty.

  10. The vector modulation method to make precise measurements with directional sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. S.; Lin, Y. R.; Deng, Z. L.

    2007-01-01

    The best plan to curtail measurement errors is to modulate the input signal before it enters a sensor. As far as linear directional sensors are concerned, VMM (the vector modulation method) can make the earliest modulation and appropriate demodulation to curtail measurement errors and then improve the precision of measurement. According to the modulation-demodulation principle and the linear system theory, especially the frequency-remaining character and the superposition theorem of linear systems, a precise response to the input signal will be resolved by means of demodulation. VMM curtails the main elements of errors, including quantization error and bias of a measurement system, along with bias, drift, noise and disturbance of sensors. Experiments measuring ERR (the Earth's rate of rotation) are presented, and a design for an experiment measuring gravitational acceleration with VMM is presented. The preliminary experiments have given positive support. VMM, which can remarkably get rid of errors, is much clearer in theory and easier to implement in engineering practice.

  11. [Weighing precision of filters used in dust measurements: repeatability and reproducibility].

    PubMed

    Stroszejn-Mrowca, Grazyna; Mikołajczyk, Urszula

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of inhaled and respirable dust concentrations in the work environment are most frequently performed by employing the method of the air filtration with analytical filters placed in measuring heads, which is followed by the mass determination of the dust precipitated on the filter respective to the volume of the filtrated air. A twofold weighing of filters is thus the basic measurement technique used to determine the dust mass. It should be emphasized that the weighing precision decides about the precision of measured inhaled and respirable dust concentrations. The weighing precision of FiPro polypropylene filters, commonly used in industrial dusts measurements in Poland, was assessed. Ten filters of phi 25 mm and 37 mm were placed in open containers and desiccators with constant air humidity of 5% in weighing room. After 24 h, filters were weighed five times at one-week intervals. Weighing was performed by two persons on two balances (0.01 mg); 21 accredited laboratories participated in inter-laboratory comparisons; each of them weighed twice 5 filters of phi 25 mm and 37 mm kept in desiccators for 24 and 48 h. Standard deviation of repeatability was calculated--mass Sr of filters of phi 25 mm equal to 0.016 mg was 1.4 times lower than mass Sr of filters kept in an open container, whereas mass Sr of filters of phi 37 mm from desiccator, also equal to 0.016 mg, was 1.6 times lower than mass Sr of filters from an open container. Mean standard deviations of reproducibility, S(R), calculated on the basis of the results of inter-laboratory studies (after rejecting significantly departing values) were 0.024 mg and 0.022 mg for filters of phi 25 mm after keeping them in desiccator for 24 and 48 h, whereas these values accounted for 0.058 mg and 0.033 for filters of phi 37 mm. The results of the study in conditions of repeatability confirm high mass stability of FiPro polypropylene filters. It may be elucidated from inter-laboratory comparisons that keeping Fi

  12. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagetic Measurements, Boulder, Colorado, USA, 27 June 1 July 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1994 Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements will be held Monday 27 June to Friday 1 July 1994 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The purpose of the bienennial meetings of the CPEM is to exchange information on a wide range of topics on precise electromagnetic measurements. These topics include: Advanced instrumentation including new sensors and measurement methods Automated measurement methods Dielectric and antenna measurements Direct current and low-frequency measurements Fundamental constants and special standards Laser, optical fibre and optical electronic measurements RF, microwave and millimetre-wave measurements Superconducting and other low-temperature measurements Time and frequency measurements CPEM'94 will be extended to five days to provide for added special sessions on the fundamental physical constants. The CODATA Task Group on Fundamental Constants plans to carry out the next least-squares adjustment of the fundamental constants in 1995 with a cutoff date for input data that is shortly after CPEM'94. Thus, CPEM'94 provides a particularly timely forum for discussion of results important to the 1995 adjustment. The conference language will be English. Authors are requested to submit an abstract and summary by 18 January 1994. If the paper is accepted, the author will be notified and encouraged to prepare a full paper for IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement. Conference Chairman Donald B Sullivan, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA Technical Programme Committee Chairman Allen C Newell, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA For further information, please contact Gwen E Bennett, Conference Secretary, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA Tel: (01) 303-497-3295, Fax: (01) 303-497-6461, Telex: 910 940 5906.

  13. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagetic Measurements, Boulder, Colorado, USA, 27 June 1 July 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1994 Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements will be held Monday 27 June to Friday 1 July 1994 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The purpose of the bienennial meetings of the CPEM is to exchange information on a wide range of topics on precise electromagnetic measurements. These topics include: Advanced instrumentation including new sensors and measurement methods Automated measurement methods Dielectric and antenna measurements Direct current and low-frequency measurements Fundamental constants and special standards Laser, optical fibre and optical electronic measurements RF, microwave and millimetre-wave measurements Superconducting and other low-temperature measurements Time and frequency measurements CPEM'94 will be extended to five days to provide for added special sessions on the fundamental physical constants. The CODATA Task Group on Fundamental Constants plans to carry out the next least-squares adjustment of the fundamental constants in 1995 with a cutoff date for input data that is shortly after CPEM'94. Thus, CPEM'94 provides a particularly timely forum for discussion of results important to the 1995 adjustment. The conference language will be English. Authors are requested to submit an abstract and summary by 18 January 1994. If the paper is accepted, the author will be notified and encouraged to prepare a full paper for IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement. Conference Chairman Donald B Sullivan, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA Technical Programme Committee Chairman Allen C Newell, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA For further information, please contact Gwen E Bennett, Conference Secretary, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA Tel: (01) 303-497-3295, Fax: (01) 303-497-6461, Telex: 910 940 5906.

  14. Precise Measurements of a Magnetic Field at the Solenoids for Low Energy Coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, V.; Bubley, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Panasyuk, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    2006-03-20

    Description of equipment developed at BINP SB RAS for precision solenoid magnetic field measurement is presented in the paper. Transversal field components are measured by small compass-based sensor during its motion along the field line. The sensor sensitivity is a few tenth parts of mG and is limited in this range by external noise sources only. Scope of the device application is illustrated by results obtained at BINP during tests of cooling solenoids for electron coolers built at the Institute recently.

  15. Precise Measurements of a Magnetic Field at the Solenoids for Low Energy Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, V.; Bubley, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Panasyuk, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    2006-03-01

    Description of equipment developed at BINP SB RAS for precision solenoid magnetic field measurement is presented in the paper. Transversal field components are measured by small compass-based sensor during its motion along the field line. The sensor sensitivity is a few tenth parts of mG and is limited in this range by external noise sources only. Scope of the device application is illustrated by results obtained at BINP during tests of cooling solenoids for electron coolers built at the Institute recently.

  16. Improving the precision of Hall effect measurements using a single-crystal copper probe.

    PubMed

    Cha, Su-Young; Shin, Jong Moon; Kim, Su Jae; Park, Sang Eon; Cho, Chae Ryong; Cho, Yong Chan; Jeong, Se-Young

    2012-01-01

    The circuitry and components of a Hall measurement kit were replaced with single-crystal copper (SCC) wires and parts prepared by a novel wire fabrication process. This process preserved the grain-free structure of SCC grown by the Czochralski method. The new kit was used to determine, with greatly improved precision, the electrical coefficients such as carrier density and mobility, establish the reproducibility of the measured values, and define the semiconductor type. The observed reduction in electrical signal losses and distortion has been attributed to grain boundary elimination.

  17. Precision measurement of CP violation in D0-->pipi at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Canto, A.

    We report a preliminary measurement of the CP violating asymmetry in D0->pi+pi- using approximately 215,000 decays reconstructed in about 5.94/fb of CDF data. We use the strong D*+->D0pi+ decay ("D* tag") to identify the flavor of the charmed meson at production time and exploit CP-conserving strong c-cbar pair-production in p-pbar collisions. Higher statistic samples of Cabibbo-favored D0->K-pi+ decays with and without D* tag are used to highly suppress systematic uncertainties due to detector effects. The result is the world's most precise measurement to date.

  18. Study of Fricke-gel dosimeter calibration for attaining precise measurements of the absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Liosi, Giulia Maria; Benedini, Sara; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mario; Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A method has been studied for attaining, with good precision, absolute measurements of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose by means of the Fricke gelatin Xylenol Orange dosimetric system. With this aim, the dose response to subsequent irradiations was analyzed. In fact, the proposed modality is based on a pre-irradiation of each single dosimeter in a uniform field with a known dose, in order to extrapolate a calibration image for a subsequent non-uniform irradiation with an un-known dose to be measured. (authors)

  19. Precision measurement of the half-life and the decay branches of 62Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canchel, G.; Blank, B.; Chartier, M.; Delalee, F.; Dendooven, P.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Huikari, J.; Lalleman, A. S.; Lopez Jiménez, M. J.; Madec, V.; Pedroza, J. L.; Penttilä, H.; Thomas, J. C.

    2005-03-01

    In an experiment performed at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, the β-decay half-life of 62Ga has been studied with high precision using the IGISOL technique. A half-life of T1/2 = 116.09(17) ms was measured. Using β-γ coincidences, the γ intensity of the 954 keV transition and an upper limit of the β-decay feeding of the 0+2 state have been extracted. The present experimental results are compared to previous measurements and their impact on our understanding of the weak interaction is discussed.

  20. High-precision resistance measurements on amorphous CuTi down to 15 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, R.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Greig, D.

    1992-11-01

    We have developed a new method for making high-precision resistance measurements on amorphous-metal ribbons with very reliable thermometry down to 15 mK. In our technique the measuring current flows perpendicular to the plane of the metal ribbon and potassium metal is used to thermally anchor the ribbon to the thermometers and refrigerator. We have been able to obtain very good fits of the weak-localization and enhanced electron-electron interaction theories to the CuTi data in zero field.

  1. Testing the standard model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks.

    PubMed

    Young, R D; Carlini, R D; Thomas, A W; Roche, J

    2007-09-21

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, places tight constraints on the size of possible contributions from physics beyond the standard model. Consequently, this result improves the lower-bound on the scale of relevant new physics to approximately 1 TeV.

  2. 5 MeV Mott polarimeter for rapid precise electron beam polarization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.S.; Poelker, B.M.; Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-11-01

    Low energy (E{sub k} = 100 keV) Mott scattering polarimeters are ill-suited to support operations foreseen for the polarized electron injector at Jefferson Lab. One solution is to measure the polarization at 5 MeV where multiple and plural scattering are unimportant and precision beam monitoring is straightforward. The higher injector beam current offsets the lower cross-sections; measured rates scale to 1 kHz/{mu}A with a 1 {mu}m thick gold target foil.

  3. Testing the Standard Model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Ross Young; Roger Carlini; Anthony Thomas; Julie Roche

    2007-05-01

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low-energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, limits the magnitude of possible contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model - setting a model-independent, lower-bound on the scale of new physics at ~1 TeV.

  4. Tests of a Fast Plastic Scintillator for High-Precision Half-Life Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffoley, A. T.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, P.; Leach, K. G.; Michetti-Wilson, J.; Rand, E. T.; Svensson, C. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Thomas, J. C.; Ball, G.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Orce, J. N.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.; Andreoiu, C.; Cross, D.

    2013-03-01

    A fast plastic scintillator detector is evaluated for possible use in an ongoing program of high-precision half-life measurements of short lived β emitters. Using data taken at TRI-UMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator Facility with a radioactive 26Na beam, a detailed investigation of potential systematic effects with this new detector setup is being performed. The technique will then be applied to other β-decay half-life measurements including the superallowed Fermi β emitters 10C, 14O, and T = 1/2 decay of 15O.

  5. New Precision Measurement of the 3He(4He,γ) 7Be Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. S.; Hass, M.; Nir-El, Y.; Haquin, G.

    2004-12-01

    The 3He(4He,γ) 7Be reaction plays an important role in determining the high energy solar neutrino flux and in understanding the abundances of primordial 7Li. This Letter reports a new precision measurement of the cross sections of this direct capture reaction, determined by measuring the ensuing 7Be activity in the region of Ec.m.=420 to 950keV. Various recent theoretical fits to our data result in a consistent extrapolated value of S34(0)=0.53(2)(1) keV b.

  6. Towards a Precision Measurement of the Tritium Helium-3 Mass Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Edmund; Rana, Raman; Wesson, Bridget; Erickson, Austin

    2012-03-01

    Fitting a low-energy beta-decay spectrum near its endpoint is a direct method for determining the absolute mass scale of electron neutrinos. This is the subject of the large-scale tritium beta-decay experiment KATRIN. Besides a value (or a limit) for a sum of squares of neutrino mass eigenvalues, the fit to KATRIN data, with absolute energy calibration, will also produce a value for ``the electron endpoint for zero neutrino mass'' which is closely related to the Q-value for the beta-decay. Hence, an independent value for the tritium beta-decay Q-value, derived from the 3T - 3He mass difference, can provide a strong test of the systematics of KATRIN. The Florida State University precision Penning trap mass spectrometer has previously produced the most precise values of more than 26 atomic masses, many of which have application to neutrinoless double-beta-decay and to determining fundamental constants. The system is currently being modified for measurements of ions with small m/q ratio, and that are radioactive, to enable a precise measurement of the tritium helium-3 mass difference.

  7. Coordinates calibration in precision detection of 3D optical deformation measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Honggang; Hu, Chunsheng; Wang, Xingshu; Gao, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    In order to validate the detection precision of a three Dimensions Optical Deformation Measure System (3D-OMS), a calibration method of auxiliary coordinate and the optical coordinate base on theodolites has been proposed. The installation method by using theodolites to calibrate the auxiliary coordinate and the optical coordinate has been proposed. Specifically, after the auxiliary mirrors installed, the installation accuracy is detected, then we analyzed the influence of Axis-Error of theodolite under the practical condition of our experiment. Furthermore, the influence of validation precision for the 3D-OMS caused by the misalignment of auxiliary coordinate and optical coordinate is analyzed. According to our theoretical analysis and experiments results, the validation precision of the 3D-OMS can achieve an accuracy of 1″ at the conditions of the coordinate alignment accuracy is no more than 10' and the measuring range of 3D-OMS within +/-3'. Therefore, the proposed method can meet our high accuracy requirement while not sensitive to the installation error of auxiliary mirrors. This method is also available for other similar work.

  8. Study of magnetic hysteresis effects in a storage ring using precision tune measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2016-12-01

    With the advances in accelerator science and technology in recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which require precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied by measuring the betatron tune shifts which result from adjusting the setting of a quadrupole. A new technique has been developed to precisely recover the focusing strength of the quadrupole by returning it to a proper setting to overcome the local hysteresis effect. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  9. A precision measurement of the w boson mass at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-04-01

    I present the first measurement of the W boson mass in the electron decay channel using the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data used was collected from 2002 to 2006 and the integrated luminosity is 1 fb{sup -1}. The W boson mass was determined from the likelihood fit to the measured data distribution. The mass value is found to be 80.401 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.037(syst) GeV = 80.401 {+-} 0.044 GeV using the transverse mass spectrum, which is the most precise measurement from one single experiment to date. This result puts tighter constraints on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson. I also present three other measurements that can help to reduce the theoretical uncertainties for the future W mass measurements.

  10. A proposed experimental method for interpreting Doppler effect measurements and determining their precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal problem in the measurement of the Doppler reactivity effect is separating it from the thermal reactivity effects of the expansion of the heated sample. It is shown in this proposal that the thermal effects of sample expansion can be experimentally determined by making additional measurements with porous samples having the same mass and/or volume as the primary sample. By combining these results with independent measurements of the linear temperature coefficient and the computed temperature dependence of the Doppler coefficient the magnitude of the Doppler coefficient may be extracted from the data. These addiational measurements are also useful to experimentally determine the precision of the reactivity oscillator technique used to measure the reactivity effects of the heated sample.

  11. Practical resolution requirements of measurement instruments for precise characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Leroux, Thierry; Collomb-Patton, Véronique; Bignon, Thibault

    2014-03-01

    Different ways to evaluate the optical performances of auto-stereoscopic 3D displays are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the crosstalk measurements that can be performed by measuring, either the precise angular emission at one or few locations on the display surface, or the full display surface emission from very specific locations in front of the display. Using measurements made in the two ways with different instruments on different auto-stereoscopic displays, we show that measurement instruments need to match the resolution of the human eye to obtain reliable results in both cases. Practical requirements in terms of angular resolution for viewing angle measurement instruments and in terms of spatial resolution for imaging instruments are derived and verified on practical examples.

  12. High stability interleaved fiber Michelson interferometer for on-line precision displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fang; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Lin

    2009-11-01

    A self-reference fiber Michelson interferometer measurement system, which employs fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as in-fiber reflective mirrors and interleaves together two fiber Michelson interferometers that share the common-interferometric-optical path, is presented. One of the fiber interferometers is used to stabilise the system by the use of an electronic feedback loop to compensate the influences resulting from the environmental disturbances, while the other one is used to perform the measurement task. The influences resulting from the environmental disturbances have been eliminated by the compensating action of the electronic feedback loop, this makes the system suitable for on-line precision measurement. By means of the homodyne phase-tracking technique, the linearity of the measurement results of displacement measurements has been very high.

  13. A new approach on restoration of dynamic measurement uncertainties in optical precision coordinate metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, S.; Reetz, E.; Linß, G.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the restoration of dynamic influenced measurement uncertainties in optical precision coordinate metrology (OPCM) using image sensors to measure geometrical features. Dynamic measurements within the context of this paper are based upon relative motion between the imaging setup (CCD-camera and optical system) and the measuring object respectively the measuring scene. The dynamic image acquisition causes image motion blur effects, which downgrades the uncertainties of the measurand. The approach presented deals with a new technique to restore motion degraded images using different methods to analyze important image features by extending the famous state of the art Richardson-Lucy image restoration technique using a new convergence criteria based on the variation of the detectable sub-pixel edge position of each iteration.

  14. Formulas for precisely and efficiently estimating the bias and variance of the length measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuqiang; Yang, Yuanxi; Dang, Yamin

    2016-10-01

    Error analysis in length measurements is an important problem in geographic information system and cartographic operations. The distance between two random points—i.e., the length of a random line segment—may be viewed as a nonlinear mapping of the coordinates of the two points. In real-world applications, an unbiased length statistic may be expected in high-precision contexts, but the variance of the unbiased statistic is of concern in assessing the quality. This paper suggesting the use of a k-order bias correction formula and a nonlinear error propagation approach to the distance equation provides a useful way to describe the length of a line. The study shows that the bias is determined by the relative precision of the random line segment, and that the use of the higher-order bias correction is only needed for short-distance applications.

  15. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI{sub 100,air}); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub w}) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI{sub 100,air} values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI{sub 100,air} ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI{sub w} for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well

  16. Training to Improve Precision and Accuracy in the Measurement of Fiber Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jun; Wade, Mary Beth; Luong, Derek; Palmer, Xavier-Lewis; Bharti, Kapil; Simon, Carl G.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated $7.1 billion dollars a year is spent due to irreproducibility in pre-clinical data from errors in data analysis and reporting. Therefore, developing tools to improve measurement comparability is paramount. Recently, an open source tool, DiameterJ, has been deployed for the automated analysis of scanning electron micrographs of fibrous scaffolds designed for tissue engineering applications. DiameterJ performs hundreds to thousands of scaffold fiber diameter measurements from a single micrograph within a few seconds, along with a variety of other scaffold morphological features, which enables a more rigorous and thorough assessment of scaffold properties. Herein, an online, publicly available training module is introduced for educating DiameterJ users on how to effectively analyze scanning electron micrographs of fibers and the large volume of data that a DiameterJ analysis yields. The end goal of this training was to improve user data analysis and reporting to enhance reproducibility of analysis of nanofiber scaffolds. User performance was assessed before and after training to evaluate the effectiveness of the training modules. Users were asked to use DiameterJ to analyze reference micrographs of fibers that had known diameters. The results showed that training improved the accuracy and precision of measurements of fiber diameter in scanning electron micrographs. Training also improved the precision of measurements of pore area, porosity, intersection density, and characteristic fiber length between fiber intersections. These results demonstrate that the DiameterJ training module improves precision and accuracy in fiber morphology measurements, which will lead to enhanced data comparability. PMID:27907145

  17. High Precision Density Measurements of Single Particles: The Density of Metastable Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Cai, Yong; Chieffo, Logan; Imre, Dan G.

    2005-10-01

    We describe a system designed to measure the size, composition and density of individual particles in real-time. It uses a DMA to select a monodisperse particle population and the single particle mass spectrometer to measure individual particle mass spectrometer to measure individual particle aerodynamic diameter and composition. Mobility and aerodynamic diameters are used to extract particle density. The addition of individual particle density to the mass spectrum is intended to improve the data classification process. In the present paper we demonstrate that the system has the requisite accuracy and resolution to make this approach practicable. We also present a high precision variant that uses an internal calibrant to remove any of the systematic errors and significantly improves the measurement quality. The high precision scheme is most suitable for laboratory studies making it possible to follow slight changes in particle density. An application of the system to measure the density of hygroscopic particles of atmospheric importance in metastable phases near zero relative humidity is presented. The density data are consistent with conclusions reached in a number of other studies that some particle systems of atmospheric significance once deliquesced persist as droplets down to near zero relative humidity.

  18. A T-Type Capacitive Sensor Capable of Measuring 5-DOF Error Motions of Precision Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Qiu, Rongbo; Mei, Deqing; Chen, Zichen

    2017-01-01

    The precision spindle is a core component of high-precision machine tools, and the accurate measurement of its error motions is important for improving its rotation accuracy as well as the work performance of the machine. This paper presents a T-type capacitive sensor (T-type CS) with an integrated structure. The proposed sensor can measure the 5-degree-of-freedom (5-DOF) error motions of a spindle in-situ and simultaneously by integrating electrode groups in the cylindrical bore of the stator and the outer end face of its flange, respectively. Simulation analysis and experimental results show that the sensing electrode groups with differential measurement configuration have near-linear output for the different types of rotor displacements. What’s more, the additional capacitance generated by fringe effects has been reduced about 90% with the sensing electrode groups fabricated based on flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) and related processing technologies. The improved signal processing circuit has also been increased one times in the measuring performance and makes the measured differential output capacitance up to 93% of the theoretical values. PMID:28846631

  19. Progress on Passive Sensor for Ultra-Precise Measurement of Carbon Dioxide from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    Global measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxides (CO2) are needed to resolve significant discrepancies that exist in our understanding of the global carbon budget and, therefore, man's role in global climate change. The science measurement requirements for CO2 are extremely demanding (precision c .3%) No atmospheric chemical species has ever been measured from space with this precision. We are developing a novel application of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect spectral absorption of reflected sunlight by CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. Preliminary design studies indicate that the method will be able to achieve the sensitivity and signal-to-noise required to measure column CO2 at the target specification. We are presently engaged in the construction of a prototype instrument for deployment on an aircraft to test the instrument performance and our ability to retrieve the data in the real atmosphere. In the first 6 months we have assembled a laboratory bench system to begin testing the optical and electronic components. We are also undertaking some measurements of signal and noise levels for actual sunlight reflecting from the ground. We shall present results from some of these ground based studies and discuss their implications for a space based system.

  20. Ultrasonic scattering from a hemispherical pit theory and experimental measurement precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Thomas J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lozev, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy and precision of pulse-echo ultrasonic thickness measurement systems are influenced by systematic and environmental factors including the topographic profile of the back-wall surface. For the case of thickness measurement from the outside surface of a pipe, the back-wall surface can vary in roughness as a result of internal corrosion. A single corrosive pit can be geometrically represented by a hemisphere in a half-space to model the initiation point of rough surface corrosion, or to model isolated pitting degradation as is possible with naphthenic acid corrosion in oil refineries. The elastic wave scattering from a single hemispherical pit has been studied in the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) community, as well as scattering from a hemispherical canyon in the seismology community for various incident and reflected wave angles, modes, and frequency ranges with both analytical and discretized numerical methods. This paper looks to first review recent scattering theory (developed in the seismology community) on a full frequency range analytical solution for a normal incident longitudinal wave at a normal reflection angle from a hemispherical canyon, and then extend this theory to NDE applications with the introduction of a new far-field scattering amplitude term. Next, a selection of new theoretical scattering amplitude solutions are presented along with semi-analytical simulation and experimental measurement results. Finally, a statistical methodology to determine thickness measurement accuracy and precision taking into consideration asymmetric measurement uncertainty is referenced.

  1. Progress on Passive Sensor for Ultra-Precise Measurement of Carbon Dioxide from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    Global measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxides (CO2) are needed to resolve significant discrepancies that exist in our understanding of the global carbon budget and, therefore, man's role in global climate change. The science measurement requirements for CO2 are extremely demanding (precision c .3%) No atmospheric chemical species has ever been measured from space with this precision. We are developing a novel application of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect spectral absorption of reflected sunlight by CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. Preliminary design studies indicate that the method will be able to achieve the sensitivity and signal-to-noise required to measure column CO2 at the target specification. We are presently engaged in the construction of a prototype instrument for deployment on an aircraft to test the instrument performance and our ability to retrieve the data in the real atmosphere. In the first 6 months we have assembled a laboratory bench system to begin testing the optical and electronic components. We are also undertaking some measurements of signal and noise levels for actual sunlight reflecting from the ground. We shall present results from some of these ground based studies and discuss their implications for a space based system.

  2. Low-cost precise measurement of oscillator frequency instability based on GNSS carrier observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Yanhong; Jiao, Yue; Xu, Dongyang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ya; Li, Xiaohui

    2013-03-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers can be used in time and frequency metrology by exploiting stable GNSS time scales. This paper proposes a low-cost method for precise measurement of oscillator frequency instability using a single-frequency software GNSS receiver. The only required hardware is a common radio frequency (RF) data collection device driven by the oscillator under test (OUT). The receiver solves the oscillator frequency error in high time resolution using the carrier Doppler observation and the broadcast ephemeris from one of the available satellites employing the onboard reference atomic frequency standard that is more stable than the OUT. Considering the non-stable and non-Gaussian properties of the frequency error measurement, an unbiased finite impulse response (FIR) filter is employed to obtain robust estimation and filter out measurement noise. The effects of different filter orders and convolution lengths are further discussed. The frequency error of an oven controlled oscillator (OCXO) is measured using live Beidou-2/Compass signals. The results are compared with the synchronous measurement using a specialized phase comparator with the standard coordinated universal time (UTC) signal from the master clock H226 in the national time service center (NTSC) of China as its reference. The Allan deviation (ADEV) estimates using the two methods have a 99.9% correlation coefficient and a 0.6% mean relative difference over 1-1000 s intervals. The experiment demonstrates the effectiveness and high precision of the software receiver method.

  3. Precision measurements of the RSA method using a phantom model of hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Tatu J; Koort, Jyri K; Mattila, Kimmo T; Aro, Hannu T

    2004-04-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) has become one of the recommended techniques for pre-market evaluation of new joint implant designs. In this study we evaluated the effect of repositioning of X-ray tubes and phantom model on the precision of the RSA method. In precision measurements, we utilized mean error of rigid body fitting (ME) values as an internal control for examinations. ME value characterizes relative motion among the markers within each rigid body and is conventionally used to detect loosening of a bone marker. Three experiments, each consisting of 10 double examinations, were performed. In the first experiment, the X-ray tubes and the phantom model were not repositioned between one double examination. In experiments two and three, the X-ray tubes were repositioned between one double examination. In addition, the position of the phantom model was changed in experiment three. Results showed that significant differences could be found in 2 of 12 comparisons when evaluating the translation and rotation of the prosthetic components. Repositioning procedures increased ME values mimicking deformation of rigid body segments. Thus, ME value seemed to be a more sensitive parameter than migration values in this study design. These results confirmed the importance of standardized radiographic technique and accurate patient positioning for RSA measurements. Standardization and calibration procedures should be performed with phantom models in order to avoid unnecessary radiation dose of the patients. The present model gives the means to establish and to follow the intra-laboratory precision of the RSA method. The model is easily applicable in any research unit and allows the comparison of the precision values in different laboratories of multi-center trials.

  4. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  5. Electron reconstruction and electroweak processes as tools to achieve precision measurements at a hadron collider: From CDF to CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements are an important aspect of hadron colliders physics program. This thesis describes a method, together with a first application, of how to achieve and use precision measurements at the LHC. The idea is to use refernce processes to control the detector systematics and to constrain the theoretical predictions.

  6. Relative optical wavefront measurement in displacement measuring interferometer systems with sub-nm precision.

    PubMed

    Meskers, Arjan J H; Voigt, Dirk; Spronck, Jo W

    2013-07-29

    Many error sources can affect the accuracy of displacement measuring interferometer systems. In heterodyne interferometry two laser source frequencies constitute the finally detected wavefront. When the wavefronts of these source frequencies are non-ideal and one of them walks off the detector, the shape of the detected wavefront will vary. This leads to a change in measured phase at the detector resulting in increased measurement uncertainty. A new wavefront measurement tool described in this publication measures the relative phase difference between the two wavefronts of the two source frequencies of a coaxial heterodyne laser source as used in commercial heterodyne interferometer systems. The proposed measurement method uses standard commercial optics and operates with the same phase measurement equipment that is normally used for heterodyne displacement interferometry. In the presented method a bare tip of a multimode fiber represents the receiving detection aperture and is used for locally sampling the wavefront during a line scan. The difference in phase between the beating frequency of the scanning fiber and a reference beating frequency that results from integration over the entire beam, is used for the reconstruction of the wavefront. The method shows to have a phase resolution in the order of ~25 pm or ~λ/25000 for λ 632.8 nm, and a spatial resolution of ~60 µm at a repeatability better than 1 nm over one week.

  7. Precise SAR measurements in the near-field of RF antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, Bandar M.

    Wireless devices must meet specific safety radiation limits, and in order to assess the health affects of such devices, standard procedures are used in which standard phantoms, tissue-equivalent liquids, and miniature electric field probes are used. The accuracy of such measurements depend on the precision in measuring the dielectric properties of the tissue-equivalent liquids and the associated calibrations of the electric-field probes. This thesis describes work on the theoretical modeling and experimental measurement of the complex permittivity of tissue-equivalent liquids, and associated calibration of miniature electric-field probes. The measurement method is based on measurements of the field attenuation factor and power reflection coefficient of a tissue-equivalent sample. A novel method, to the best of the authors knowledge, for determining the dielectric properties and probe calibration factors is described and validated. The measurement system is validated using saline at different concentrations, and measurements of complex permittivity and calibration factors have been made on tissue-equivalent liquids at 900MHz and 1800MHz. Uncertainty analysis have been conducted to study the measurement system sensitivity. Using the same waveguide to measure tissue-equivalent permittivity and calibrate e-field probes eliminates a source of uncertainty associated with using two different measurement systems. The measurement system is used to test GSM cell-phones at 900MHz and 1800MHz for Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) compliance using a Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin phantom (SAM).

  8. Taking the Measure of the Universe : Precision Astrometry with SIM PlanetQuest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Shao, Michael; Tanner, Angelle M.; Allen, Ronald J.; Beichman, Charles A.; Boboltz, David; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Chaboyer, Brian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Edberg, Stephen J.; Fey, Alan L.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Gould, Andrew P.; Grillmair, Carl; Henry, Todd J.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Jones, Dayton L.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Majewski, Steven R.; Makarov, Valeri V.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Meier, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Precision astrometry at microarcsecond accuracy has application to a wide range of astrophysical problems. This paper is a study of the science questions that can be addressed using an instrument with flexible scheduling that delivers parallaxes at about 4 microarcsec (microns)as) on targets as faint as V = 20, and differential accuracy of 0.6 (microns)as on bright targets. The science topics are drawn primarily from the Team Key Projects, selected in 2000, for the Space Interferometry Mission PlanetQuest (SIM PlanetQuest). We use the capabilities of this mission to illustrate the importance of the next level of astrometric precision in modern astrophysics. SIM PlanetQuest is currently in the detailed design phase, having completed in 2005 all of the enabling technologies needed for the flight instrument. It will be the first space-based long baseline Michelson interferometer designed for precision astrometry. SIM will contribute strongly to many astronomical fields including stellar and galactic astrophysics, planetary systems around nearby stars, and the study of quasar and AGN nuclei. Using differential astrometry SIM will search for planets with masses as small as an Earth orbiting in the 'habitable zone' around the nearest stars, and could discover many dozen if Earth-like planets are common. It will characterize the multiple-planet systems that are now known to exist, and it will be able to search for terrestrial planets around all of the candidate target stars in the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin mission lists. It will be capable of detecting planets around young stars, thereby providing insights into how planetary systems are born and how they evolve with time. Precision astrometry allows the measurement of accurate dynamical masses for stars in binary systems. SIM will observe significant numbers of very high- and low-mass stars, providing stellar masses to 1%, the accuracy needed to challenge physical models. Using precision proper motion

  9. Taking the Measure of the Universe : Precision Astrometry with SIM PlanetQuest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Shao, Michael; Tanner, Angelle M.; Allen, Ronald J.; Beichman, Charles A.; Boboltz, David; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Chaboyer, Brian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Edberg, Stephen J.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Precision astrometry at microarcsecond accuracy has application to a wide range of astrophysical problems. This paper is a study of the science questions that can be addressed using an instrument with flexible scheduling that delivers parallaxes at about 4 microarcsec (microns)as) on targets as faint as V = 20, and differential accuracy of 0.6 (microns)as on bright targets. The science topics are drawn primarily from the Team Key Projects, selected in 2000, for the Space Interferometry Mission PlanetQuest (SIM PlanetQuest). We use the capabilities of this mission to illustrate the importance of the next level of astrometric precision in modern astrophysics. SIM PlanetQuest is currently in the detailed design phase, having completed in 2005 all of the enabling technologies needed for the flight instrument. It will be the first space-based long baseline Michelson interferometer designed for precision astrometry. SIM will contribute strongly to many astronomical fields including stellar and galactic astrophysics, planetary systems around nearby stars, and the study of quasar and AGN nuclei. Using differential astrometry SIM will search for planets with masses as small as an Earth orbiting in the 'habitable zone' around the nearest stars, and could discover many dozen if Earth-like planets are common. It will characterize the multiple-planet systems that are now known to exist, and it will be able to search for terrestrial planets around all of the candidate target stars in the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin mission lists. It will be capable of detecting planets around young stars, thereby providing insights into how planetary systems are born and how they evolve with time. Precision astrometry allows the measurement of accurate dynamical masses for stars in binary systems. SIM will observe significant numbers of very high- and low-mass stars, providing stellar masses to 1%, the accuracy needed to challenge physical models. Using precision proper motion

  10. Precision measurement with a DMA-train of the initial growth of biogenic nanoparticles in CLOUD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Dominik; Brilke, Sophia; Baumgartner, Bernhard; Winkler, Paul

    2017-04-01

    New particle formation is widely observed in the atmosphere (Kulmala et al., 2004) and 50 % of the global budget of cloud condensation nuclei may originate from this process (Merikanto et al., 2009). Nucleation at the critical cluster size between 1-2 nm is often followed by rapid growth to sizes larger than 50 nm. Especially fast initial growth rates between 2-10 nm are crucial for the survival of the newly formed particles, because losses to pre-existing aerosol are high. The precise quantification of the conditions which cause initial growth are key to the understanding of the influence of new particle formation on the global climate (Tröstl et al., 2016). A DMA-train (Stolzenburg et al., 2016) is used for precision quantification of biogenic new particle formation in the CLOUD experiment at CERN (Kirkby et al., 2016). The DMA-train combines the precision of electrical mobility analysis with high sensitivity, by the use of six differential mobility analysers operated in parallel at distinct sizes and state-of-the-art condensation particle counters. Under precisely controlled chamber conditions and with extremely low contaminant levels, we quantify the temperature dependence of particle growth with highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis (Tröstl et al. (2016) reported initial measurements at a single temperature of 5oC). Moreover, we report the impact of isoprene and sulfuric acid contamination on the growth rates. By combination with other state-of-the-art instruments, the size-dependence of the growth rates can be determined from cluster sizes up to 100 nm. We therefore present the most detailed growth rate measurements obtained so far by CLOUD. Kirkby, J. et al.: Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles, Nature, 533, 521-526, 2016. Kulmala, M. et al.: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine atmospheric particles: a review of observations, J. Aerosol Sci., 35, 143-176, 2004. Merikanto, J. et al.: Impact of nucleation on

  11. Precision Measurement of the Beryllium-7 Solar Neutrino Interaction Rate in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Richard Nigel

    Solar neutrinos, since their first detection nearly forty years ago, have revealed valuable information regarding the source of energy production in the Sun, and have demonstrated that neutrino oscillations are well described by the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) oscillation parameters with matter interactions due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. This thesis presents a precision measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino interaction rate within Borexino, an underground liquid scintillator detector that is designed to measure solar neutrino interactions through neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The thesis includes a detailed description of the analysis techniques developed and used for this measurement as well as an evaluation of the relevant systematic uncertainties that affect the precision of the result. The rate of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is determined to be 45.4 +/- 1.6 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) counts/day/100 ton. Due to extensive detector calibrations and improved analysis methods, the systematic uncertainty in the interaction rate has been reduced by more than a factor of two from the previous evaluation. In the no-oscillation hypothesis, the interaction rate corresponds to a 0.862 MeV 7Be electron neutrino flux of (2.75 +/- 0.13) x 10 9 cm-2 sec-1. Including the predicted neutrino flux from the Standard Solar Model yields an electron neutrino survival probability of Pee 0.51 +/- 0.07 and rules out the no-oscillation hypothesis at 5.1sigma The LMA-MSW neutrino oscillation model predicts a transition in the solar Pee value between low (< 1 MeV) and high (> 10 MeV) energies which has not yet been experimentally confirmed. This result, in conjunction with the Standard Solar Model, represents the most precise measurement of the electron neutrino survival probability for solar neutrinos at sub-MeV energies.

  12. Precision frequency measurements of He,43 2 3P→3 3D transitions at 588 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Peng, Jin-Long; Hu, Jinmeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-12-01

    We report the frequency measurements of the 2 3P→3 3D transitions in He,43 at 588 nm using an optical frequency comb stabilized laser system. The Doppler-free spectra of the 2 3P→3 3D transitions are demonstrated in an rf discharged sealed-off helium cell using intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The measured absolute frequency of the 4He2 3P0→3 3D1 transition is 510 059 755.352(28) MHz, which is more precise than the previous measurement by two orders of magnitude. The ionization energies of the 4He2 3P0 and 2 3S1 states can be derived from our result and agree very well with the previous experimental values. More importantly, the Lamb shift of the 2 3S1 state can be deduced to be 4057.086(34) MHz, which is two times more precise than the previous result. In addition, the absolute frequencies of the 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D1,3 /2 , 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D1,1 /2 , and 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D2,3 /2 transitions in 3He are measured. Our precision surpasses the theoretical calculations by more than one to two orders of magnitude. The hyperfine separations of the 3 3D states in 3He and the frequency differences between 4He and 3He transitions are also presented.

  13. 3D precision measurements of meter sized surfaces using low cost illumination and camera techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, Peter; Daemi, Bita; Mattsson, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Using dedicated stereo camera systems and structured light is a well-known method for measuring the 3D shape of large surfaces. However the problem is not trivial when high accuracy, in the range of few tens of microns, is needed. Many error sources need to be handled carefully in order to obtain high quality results. In this study, we present a measurement method based on low-cost camera and illumination solutions combined with high-precision image analysis and a new approach in camera calibration and 3D reconstruction. The setup consists of two ordinary digital cameras and a Gobo projector as a structured light source. A matrix of dots is projected onto the target area. The two cameras capture the images of the projected pattern on the object. The images are processed by advanced subpixel resolution algorithms prior to the application of the 3D reconstruction technique. The strength of the method lays in a different approach for calibration, 3D reconstruction, and high-precision image analysis algorithms. Using a 10 mm pitch pattern of the light dots, the method is capable of reconstructing the 3D shape of surfaces. The precision (1σ repeatability) in the measurements is  <10 µm over a volume of 60  ×  50  ×  10 cm3 at a hardware cost of ~2% of available advanced measurement techniques. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) is estimated to be 83 µm, with the largest uncertainty contribution coming from the absolute length of the metal ruler used as reference.

  14. Positional and orientational referencing of multiple light sectioning systems for precision profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratnig, Mark; Hlobil, Helmut; Reisinger, Johann; O'Leary, Paul L.

    2005-02-01

    Precision rolled strips are often intermediate products in the manufacturing of blades. In such cases the shape and size of these strips are essential to the functionality and quality of the blade and cutting workpiece. Although precision strips are normally produced in heavily automated rolling mills, their size and shape are still inspected manually with profile gauges and microscopes. In this paper we present a measurement setup with multiple light-sectioning systems, which is suitable for the inspection of all sides of a profiled strip. It consists of three measurement heads, which are used to inspect the upper side, the lower side and the back of the blade. The heads are calibrated individually; the focus of the work here is to determine the relative position and orientation of the heads with respect to each other. The first approach has been developed to reference two or more measurement heads. The calculation of the required transformations is based on the rotation of a suitable target. Due to the small depth of field, the location of the rotation axis must be pre-adjusted very precisely. To improve the accuracy and to simplify the process, a second referencing method was developed. The required target was manufactured by means of a 5-axis high speed milling machine and features a thickness tolerance of less than 1 micron. Both the referencing method and target are presented. Additionally, we demonstrate the all-side inspection of a blade. It will be shown that the approaches allow a robust and flexible referencing of multiple measurement heads to each other.

  15. The high precision measurement of the 144Ce activity in the SOX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Noto, L.; Agostini, M.; Althenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo—Berguño, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Cereseto, R.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cribier, M.; DAngelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquères, N.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, T.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, C.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Veyssière, C.; Vivier, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    In order to perform a resolutive measurement to clarify the neutrino anomalies and to observe possible short distance neutrino oscillations, the SOX (Short distance neutrino Oscillations with BoreXino) experiment is under construction. In the first phase, a 100 kCi 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino source will be placed under the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), in center of Italy, and the rate measurement of the antineutrino events, observed by the very low radioactive background Borexino detector, will be compared with the high precision (< 1%) activity measurement performed by two calorimeters. The source will be embedded in a 19 mm thick tungsten alloy shield and both the calorimeters have been conceived for measuring the thermal heat absorbed by a water flow. In this report the design of the calorimeters will be described in detail and very preliminary results will be also shown.

  16. Determination of Personalized IOL-Constants for the Haigis Formula under Consideration of Measurement Precision

    PubMed Central

    Leydolt, Christina; Menapace, Rupert; Eppig, Timo; Langenbucher, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of a weighted least squares approach for the optimization of the intraocular lens (IOL) constants for the Haigis formula are studied in comparison to an ordinary least squares approach. The weights are set to the inverse variances of the effective optical anterior chamber depth. The effect of random measurement noise is simulated 100000 times using data from N = 69 cataract patients and the measurement uncertainty of two different biometers. A second, independent data set (N = 33) is used to show the differences that can be expected between both methods. The weighted least squares formalism reduces the effect of measurement error on the final constants. In more than 64% it will result in a better approximation, if the measurement errors are estimated correctly. The IOL constants can be calculated with higher precision using the weighted least squares method. PMID:27391100

  17. Non-contact high precision measurement of surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ying

    2010-10-01

    The traditional contact measuring methods could not satisfy the current optical elements measuring requirements. Noncontact high precision measuring theory, principle and instrument of the surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements were studied in the paper. In comparison with other types of interferometers, such as Twyman-Green and Mach-Zehnder, a Fizeau interferometer has the advantages of having fewer optical components, greater accuracy, and is easier to use. Some relations among the 3/A(B/C), POWER/PV and N/ΔN were studied. The PV with POWER removed can be the reference number of ΔN. The chromatic longitudinal aberration of a special optical probe can be used for non-contanct central thickness measurement.

  18. Precise Measurement of the Photon Directional Asymmetry in the np → dgamma Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, David

    This work presents analysis and results for the NPDGamma experiment, measuring the spin-correlated photon directional asymmetry in the vec np → dgamma radiative capture of polarized, cold neutrons on a parahydrogen target. The parity-violating (PV) component of this asymmetry Agamma,PV is unambiguously related to the DeltaI = 1 component of the hadronic weak interaction due to pion exchange. Measurements in the second phase of NPDGamma were taken at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) from late 2012 to early 2014, and then again in the first half of 2016 for an unprecedented level of statistics in order to obtain a measurement that is precise with respect to theoretical predictions of Agamma, PV = O (10-8). Theoretical and experimental background, description of the experimental apparatus, analysis methods, and results for the high-statistics measurements are given.

  19. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-03-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser-rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser-rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam-rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  20. High precision optical fiber fluorescent temperature measurement system and data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutian; Bo, Xiaoxu; Gui, Feifei

    2010-08-01

    Generally, the theoretical analysis of the fluorescent life time temperature measurement is based on the assumption of the exponential life time characteristic, but in practice, the actual curve of the fluorescence are different from exponential. This is the key-influence on the stability of the high precision fluorescent measurement system. The differences are analyzed base on the theoretical mechanism of fluorescent, and a cutting and normalized method is given to describe the degree of the non-exponent of the actual fluorescent curve defer from the exponential curve. Several kinds of typical fluorescence materials spectrum and its cutting and normalized experiment results verify this theoretical analysis. Some effective measures to improve the non-exponent of the system are taken and are applied to a temperature measurement system based on actual fluorescent curve analysis with resolution 0.1°C, precisions +/-0.2°C, and real-time calibration is carried on. Based the theory base and the actuality of fluorescence optical fiber temperature sensor, two methods about fluorescence decay time constant are proposed. In the mean time, the mathematic model has been formed and analysis, so that the different schemes are selected in different situation.